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V OLUME 6

F EBRUARY 2019

U TA H C AT T L E M A N

S EEDSTOCK

EDITIO N

A special edition of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association official publication. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 6

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L Y M A N L I V E S T O C K C AT T L E M E N T O C AT T L E M E N B U LL S A LE • S AT U R DAY • F E B RUA RY 2 3 • 1 P M • • P RO D U C E R ’ S L I V E S TO C K M A R K E T • S A L I NA , U T • • W ATCH AND B ID L IVE AT WWW .CATTLEUSA. COM •

75 Y E A R L I N G B U L L S

How do you want your bulls? PAP Tested? We test all our bulls at 7,200 feet!

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Guaranteed? We 100% guarantee all our bulls!

B A R S TOW B A N K RO L L B 7 3 T RU E C U RV E B E N D E R SI R E - S O N S SE L L !

Fed for Free? We offer free wintering until April 15! Put through the ringer?

We performance test, ultrasound, and semen test!

Most of all, we offer our best! Call 801-310-1570

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H OOKS

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B A L D R I D G E B RO N C C A LV I N G E ASE SI R E W I T H A D D E D V I G O R !

C A LV I N G E ASE

S IMA NGUS

L R S T OP T EN 1 0 4 A SI R E W I T H A D D E D P U N C H !

O THER S IRES Q UA K E R H I L L M A N N I N G • L D E M B L A Z O N • S I T Z R E S O U RC E 6 8 7 C C O N N E A LY C A P I TA L I S T • C C R B O U L D E R • T F S B L AC K I C E B E AC O N • W / C L O C K D OW N • C C R W I D E R A N G E • W OW F AC TO R

ANGUS • SIMANGUS • SIMMENTAL • BALANCER

L YMAN L IVESTO C K

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

S A L EM , U T E RIC L YMAN • 8 0 1 . 3 10.1570 K EV IN L YMAN • 8 0 1 . 3 76.5774 M IKE L YMAN • 8 0 1 . 4 04.0587 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 3


UTAH CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Serving Ranchers Since 1890 UCA PRESIDENT Mark Wintch, Milford 1 VICE PRESIDENT Tracy Hatch, Randolph ST

2ND VICE PRESIDENTS Daniel Crozier, Roosevelt Joseph Weston, Randolph Jeff Young, Henefer IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Joe Fuhriman, Nibley EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Brent Tanner UTAH BEEF COUNCIL Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN The Utah Cattlemen’s Association works to represent cattlemen in the legislative arena, provide educational information and assist with networking opportunities. If you own cattle and are not a current member, checkout our member benefits by visiting www.utahcattlemen.org The Utah Cattleman newsletter is published monthly with this one-time annual publication published in February. This publication is sent to all UCA members and its affliates as part of their annual dues as well as prospective members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. For advertising inquiries in future issues of this publication or in upcoming newsletters, contact Brent Tanner at (801) 355-5748 or utahbeef@aol.com

Table of Contents Working For You UCA charting the path forward........................................... 8 Utilizing your resources..................................................... 12 Beef Council plays to the public....................................... 16. The Checkoff working for you........................................... 26. NCBA fighting in D.C........................................................ 40. PLC plans priorities for 2019............................................. 54. Congressman Bishop on fire front.................................... 72

Interest & Education The value of visual appraisal..............................................22 High altitude and your herd...............................................32 Pap Testing.........................................................................36 Hereford resources.............................................................46 Simmental provides building blocks..................................60 Evaluating cow herd managment......................................66 Utah fire facts in 2018.........................................................76 Ranchers fight fire in Washington, D.C..............................78 Added nutrition for your cowherd........................................86 Tighten up your calving window........................................92 Ag taxes in a new tax code................................................98 Index of Advertisers..........................................................102

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Utah Cattlemen’s Association 150 S 600 E, #10-B Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 (ISSN #3933) mailed from USPS facility in Jefferson City, Mo.

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www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Celebrating 40 Years! of performance breeding Bulls d r e H

HH Advance 0002X

HH Advance 3297A

CL 1 Domino 660D

HH Advance 5011C

JH Advance 5114C

ells! S e H

HH Advance 2158Z

JH Advance 6101D

Find us on Facebook and Instagram! Watch for giveaways to help us celebrate 40 years of Hereford genetics, including a $500 sale credit!

Call today for more information. Visitors always welcome! Check us out at johansenherefords.com

PO Box 199 • Castle Dale, UT Jonathan • (435) 650-8466 Craig • (435) 820-8490 johansenherefords@gmail.com www.johansenherefords.com

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2019


s ale Bull S e r u t a Fe

1979-2019

Over 30 yearlings and coming 2 year olds available by PRIVATE TREATY!

Our herd consists of 130 registered Hereford females. Since the beginning, the base herd has been Line-One bred. It has been proven over time that these genetics are superior for our environment. Using our Line-One genetics will add an extra punch of heterosis to commercial breeders. Hereford genetics bring hybrid vigor, improved fertility, feed efficiency and easy handling docility to your program. Find out more at Hereford.org/genetics

Our Cow Selection Criteria Fertility • Reproduction • Udder Quality • Pigment • Longevity And Conversion So They Can Produce Bulls That Are Powerful • Rugged • Eye Appealing • Sound • Guaranteed PO Box 199 • Castle Dale, UT Jonathan • (435) 650-8466 Craig • (435) 820-8490 johansenherefords@gmail.com www.johansenherefords.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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LOOKING FORWARD UCA ROLLS WITH THE PUNCHES By Utah Cattlemen’s Association President Mark Wintch I am looking forward to attending some of the livestock sales advertised in this magazine. We have some very amazing cattle producers in our state. This magazine represents a collection of the best programs that can be found in the west and I am proud to call them members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. Throughout the past year I have had several opportunities to travel around our state and visit many of you in area or county meetings. It is amazing to me that so many of you work so hard to provide the best protein product available to the world with little thanks or recognition from the consumer, but you continually keep them in mind as you make cattle and ranching decisions. The beef industry has experienced some real struggles this past year with a sluggish market and extreme drought in our state and across much of the west. Nationally, we have been fortunate to keep most of our trade markets open to the world. Other industries have not been so lucky with the current trade wars going on. Currently, foreign trade makes up about $300 dollars per head. Many of the products that are exported are low valued cuts domestically but in other parts of the world are high valued cuts. Trade is a large issue that we need to see expanded. Brand inspection has been an issue in our state over the past year. The Utah Cattlemen are in support of a brand inspection program when crossing state lines and at the point of sale. We expect this to be done in the most economical way possible. We are not the only brand state that is seeing problems with the current enforcement of fees and laws. The brand board has made some good decisions and looked at this issue from many different directions. While we all raise beef, each of our operations is unique and has its own way of operating. The members of the brand board have worked hard to look at each angle to provide us with the best possible solutions to the brand inspection process. There will likely be changes to the current law as well as changes on the fee structure. This is something that will affect everyone in this

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industry in our state. The issue of increased wildlife numbers and introduction of certain wildlife species throughout the state has been something we have worked on over the past year. UCA has raised concerns to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and we are now in ongoing discussions of how landowners, livestock producers and wildlife enthusiasts can have our needs met. This, of course, is a large challenge. I am hopeful that as producers we see some benefit of wildlife and that the sportsman will begin to see the benefit of livestock and the efforts our producers make that benefit wildlife. A larger, but related issue that faces our industry is not just hunters and wildlife. I believe that the recreation industry could be a real danger. I see this in the form of people wanting to restrict access to federal land for certain types of permitted multiple uses like grazing of livestock. Presidents Clinton and Obama blocked out millions of acres, destroying several ranching operations, so that that land could be used for other uses. This is celebrated by many people in our own state who seem to only want the land for their personal use instead of the permitted multiple uses. It was great to see President Trump reduce the size of Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase Monuments. As the population of our state grows, public land access becomes a bigger threat to our industry. We must make the case that we are helping enhance and improve both our private and public lands through our grazing operations. We are the ones that have kept roads open. We are the ones that provide water for livestock as well as wildlife. We have kept fire fuels down with grazing. We have loved and cared for our land and our cattle operations and we are a vital part of the culture that makes up the great state of Utah that we live in. I hope that each of you have a better year than last year and that you find as much joy and happiness in the cattle industry as I have.

VOLUME 6

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FEBRUARY 2019


K E L L E R C AT T L E C O R P O R A T I O N

th

7 1 ANNUAL BULL SALE FRIDAY • MARCH 15, 2019

P R O M O N T O R Y, U T • A N G U S •

BOX ELDER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS TREMONTON, UT LUNCH 11 AM • SALE AT NOON Bulls available to view at the sale site March 14 Visitors welcome to view at the ranch anytime

Featuring Utah’s largest selection of low birthweight, scale-pounding herd bulls in volume!

We welcome you to a new chapter here at Keller Cattle Corp! With my brother Paul and his family moving on to other fields, Stacy and I are excited to continue forward with our great Keller family tradition in the Angus business. As always, I am grateful to my parents, Glenn and Linda, for their continued support. With over 70 years of experience in livestock, we offer you our best set of bulls to date. They exhibit length of spine, width of base, along with excellent feet and legs. 2019's offering is headlined by the breed sensation, HA Cowboy Up 5405. All sire groups have been heavily sifted for quality, type and kind. We love and appreciate our great association with all of you and look forward to seeing you on sale day,

HA Cowboy Up 5405

Prairie Pride Next Step 2036

Buford Pathfinder C304

Connealy Commonwealth

S Foundation 514

Connealy Armory

Da v e Ke l l e r 4 3 5. 757. 9875

J a c o b K e lle r 4 3 5 .8 9 0 .3 3 1 6

S tacy K e lle r 4 3 5 .512. 8194

djk.genetics@g mail.com

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

jacob.d.keller68@gmail.com

stacykeller.kcc@gmail.com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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WHY WORK WITH US? 7.12 MILLION

reasons

By reasons, we mean dollars. Western AgCredit returned $7.12 million of 2018 profits to customers, including a special one-time patronage of $1.19 million. Payments of patronage to our customer-owners is just another benefit of doing business with Western AgCredit.

Does your bank do that? 10

westernagcredit.com Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 6

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FEBRUARY 2019


SHAW CATTLE CO.

Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, February 20, 2019

450 Angus, Hereford & Red Angus Bulls • 12 noon

MST,

at the ranch, Caldwell, ID

H E L P I N G C U S TO M E R S BU I L D C OW H E R D S F O R OV E R 7 0 Y E A R S !

Hereford AI sires include: BoomTown, Dynasty, Integrity, Peerless 55000, Trust 167 & Revolution 66128.

Angus AI sires include: Payweight, Resource, Powerball, Response, Command, Aviator & Rampage.

Red Angus AI sires include: Merlin, Fusion, Oscar & Nightcalver.

 Our cow herd is built on cow families. Many half, three quarter and full siblings are included.  All bulls sell with genomic-enhanced EPDs.  Data driven performance—accuracy your cow herd can depend on.  Cattle that calve easy with gain and performance through finish.  Actual Birth, Weaning and Yearling Weight data, EPDs and genomic testing, but most importantly…Cow Sense! REQUEST YOUR CATALOG NOW. VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

SHAW CATTLE CO. Since 1946

22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 greg@shawcattle.com www.shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

 First Breeding Season Guarantee  Sight-unseen Purchases Fully Guaranteed  Family Owned & Operated for over 70 Years Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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TAP INTO YOUR TOOLBOX The myriad of resources ranchers have available By Utah Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President Brent Tanner Tools! Every rancher has them. Every day we use them. For each individual rancher, the definition of what comprises a good set of tools is different. For some, their tools are immaculately lined up in order like the local high school marching band. Each tool in its designated place wiped clean and shining waiting for the moment to jump to work. For others the tool box may be filled with a jumbled accumulation of grandpa’s hand-me-down tools, a few discount tools that the kids gifted you for Father’s Day and whatever you found on the county road that fell off the neighbor’s pickup as he rounded the corner. Whatever your tool box looks like, one thing for certain, you are sure glad to have the necessary tool when you need it. I recall vividly the day I learned about a certain tool and how happy I was to see it. I spent my teenage summers on a little red International Harvester tractor that was woefully undersized for the job of pulling around a loaded bale wagon. I hauled thousands of hay bales with that little unit and thought I was king of the hay field. One day while hauling bales in a field quite some distance away from the home place, a chain on the bale wagon jumped the sprocket and sheared off some sprocket teeth. I knew the closest possible tool might be in an old orange and black GMC pickup that we affectionately called the Halloween truck that we had used as a makeshift gas truck. The bed of that old pickup was a collector of miscellaneous tools, broken equipment and sprinkler parts. After a scavenger hunt for a few tools, I was successful in getting the bolts out, but that sprocket wouldn’t budge off the shaft. I pounded and cussed for quite some time when Jim, the local hometown mechanic pulled into the field looking for my dad. He quickly saw my dilemma and my inadequate set of tools. Two minutes with his handy wheel puller and the broken sprocket was easily removed. As a young man, I learned right then and there that a job is better done with the right set of tools. In this magazine, you are going to find some tools. They might be genetic tools, animal health tools, or other management tools. Are you using the right set of tools for the job you are doing? Don’t be afraid to investigate a few new ideas or tools. You might find your job is done better and much easier than when you were banging along with some old worn out ideas. Another set of tools that you may not be aware of are

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

the tools of an industry trade association and what that has to offer. Trade groups, or associations, like the Utah Cattlemen’s Association are organizations founded and funded by the businesses that operate in that specific industry. Like finding that “right” tool, you might not think you needed it. But after you have used it, you wonder why you didn’t have it, or join it, earlier. Business professionals agree that there are many good reasons to join your trade association. The two that I hear the most are the opportunity to join collectively in efforts to protect, defend or improve our businesses and the opportunity for networking and education. In addition, as an association member you might find you have access to innovations and new developments. Occasionally there are cost savings provided by our vendors for association members. You might learn a new technique or skill that would benefit your operation. Networking in an association environment gives you the opportunity to be mentored by others or maybe mentor that young cattleman that is looking to you for advice. Until that fateful day in the hay field when Jim the mechanic showed me a tool that easily got the job done, I didn’t know I needed it. Maybe you don’t know why you need to be a member of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. Let one of the members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association show you how they have used their membership as a tool to make their cattle business better.

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


UBIA

Performance Bull Test

e l a S

Since 1972

Utah Beef Improvement Association

March 16, 2019 - 1:00 p.m. Producers Livestock Market - Salina, UT Sale Preview at 10:00 a.m.

En jo y

lu n a f re e

ch pro

v ide d

Performance bulls for today’s cattleman.

Charolais Black Angus Hereford Simmental Red Angus Gelbvieh Balancer Sim-Angus Maine-Anjou

See Bull Videos at :

ubiabulls.com For more information Call Chris Beins @ (435) 257-0654

Bid online at DV Auctions

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Free Delivery up to 300 miles

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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by


GELBVIEH & BALANCER

®

Smart. Reliable. Profitable.

Gelbvieh and Balancer® genetics offer more pounds of calf weaned, added fertility, and greater cow herd longevity.

gelbvieh.org Trust in a program that stands behind their product!

True Quality from Robins Nest Angus ranch

mcconnell ALTITUDE 311 4 8.15.13 • 17877778 • 3114 (ced) +5 (bw) -1.2 (ww) +55 (yw) +100 (m) +20 (mb) +.64 (re) +.08 ($b) +94.64

connealy BLACK GR ANITE 1.13.11 • 17028963 • 133

mgr TREASURE 1.17.15 • +18156972 • 5017

(ced) +13 (bw) +.3 (ww) +58 (yw) +98 (m) +21 (mb) +.37 (re) +.72 ($b) +131.40

(ced) +14 (bw) -1.4 (ww) +69 (yw) +134 (m) +14 (mb) +1.09 (re) +.55 ($b) +153.49

OUR PROGRAM AI P ROGRAM S INCE 1990 • PAP T ESTING 100% OF O UR C ATTLE S INCE 2005 • S TRICT C ULLING C ATTLE ARE F ULLY G UARANTEED • F OCUS ON S TRUCTURE, P OWER, AND L ONGEVITY SELLING CATTLE AT Utah Angus Association Sale Ogden, UT • April 6 Rocky Mtn Angus Association Sale Ogden, UT • Nov 9

Private Treaty at the Ranch 14

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Call us Today! Brent 435-529-0103 Hank 435-201-9679 Emmett 435-979-4154 Visitors Always Welcome!

ANGUS RANCH Brent and Lisa Robins Salina, UT h (435) 529-0103 f (435) 287-0483

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


Genetic Edge Bull Sale Please Join us at the ranch near Idaho Falls, Idaho

Saturday •

March 9, 2019

• 11 a.m.

OFFERING OVER 500 HEAD

250 FALL YEARLING BULLS • 250 SPRING YEARLING BULLS

*19113383

+*19113573

RIVERBEND FORTRESS F024

RIVERBEND 1682 F650

Sire: KCF Bennett Fortress • Dam: Riverbend Lady Ida D009 MGS: Riverbend SF Montana 104 CED +11; BW +.3; WW +84; YW +151; Milk +28 CW +50; MARB +.72; RE +.69; FAT -.002 $W +88.73; $F +119.64; $G +43.90; $B +154.78

Sire: Basin Payweight 1682 • Dam: Riverbend Lucy B1649 MGS: Sitz Top Game 561X CED +0; BW +3.3; WW +78; YW +142; Milk +32 CW +65; MARB +.63; RE +.74; FAT -.004 $W +77.33; $F +121.65; $G +39.10; $B +182.99

+*19094684

+*19071346

RIVERBEND RAMPAGE E1614

RIVERBEND 4P26 E1714

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Dam: Riverbend Lucy Y104 MGS: Connealy Consensus 7229 CED +3; BW +4.0; WW +93; YW +154; Milk +27 CW +67; MARB +.56; RE +1.20; FAT -.058 $W +86.52; $F +124.96; $G +44.13; $B +183.92

Sire: Woodside Rito 4P26 of 0242 • Dam: Riverbend Rita B1251 MGS: Connealy in Focus 4925 CED +7; BW +1.3; WW +76; YW +135; Milk +29 CW +67; MARB +1.20; RE +.88; FAT +.018 $W +76.98; $F +112.55; $G +53.21; $B +200.24

2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821

SALE MANAGEMENT 517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

CALL 208-528-6635 OR E-MAIL BULLS@RIVERBENDRANCH.US TO BE PLACED ON OUR MAILING LIST

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

www.riverbendranch.us

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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CAPITALIZING ON CURRENT TRENDS

The Checkoff’s mobile marketing By Utah Beef Council Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN

These days we don’t have to look very far to see someone staring intently at their mobile phone. In fact, 95 percent of Americans own some kind of cell phone and 77 percent of Americans own a smartphone. People use them while waiting in line, at the dinner table, walking down the street, or even when stopped at a traffic light. It seems that we just can’t put them down. In fact, one survey reported that 61 percent of respondents checked their phone within five minutes of waking up. Our phones have almost become an extension of our body. Some are so dependent on their mobile device that they suffer from anxiety when they are without it. It is called Nomophobia. It’s not an actual fear but an anxiety disorder

that stems from not having access to your mobile device. Many of these “Nomophobes” never turn their device off. It should be no surprise that the time people spend online has doubled over the past several years, and 2/3 of that time is spent on mobile devices (smartphone + tablet). Social media and video viewing are the two most popular online activities. Social media alone accounts for 26 percent of the total online time. The average amount of time spent on those mobile devices is now three hours per day. These mobile device trends help shape and influence how beef marketing is taking place here in Utah. Mobile device usage applies similarly to traffic accessing the Utah Beef Council website. More

than 75 percent of our website visitors in 2018 were using a tablet or cell phone. The Utah Beef Council’s current advertising includes digital displays, social media and paid search tailored to show ads on digital and mobile devices where they are more likely to be seen. For example, display banners are placed on the mobile website for Fox 13 and include scrolling mobile ads that direct consumers to www. utahbeef.org. These ads feature delicious close-up views of beef and include the tagline, “Nicely done, beef.” Display ads are served on numerous cooking and health websites and many phone applications. These ads are ...Continued on page 18

Nicely done, beef. Dinner without you is just an appetizer.

No offense to appetizers, but we’re here for the main course. Browse recipes, cuts and cooking tips for this protein like no other at BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


12TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE

PERFORMANCE TESTED ANGUS BULLS AND FEMALES Saturday FEBRUARY 23, 2019 1:00 PM (MST) At the Ranch, 7673 Hwy. 40, Jensen, Utah

70 ANGUS BULLS 6 SIM/ANGUS BULLS

25 OPEN YEARLING REGISTERED AND COMMERCIAL HEIFERS 5 BRED FEMALES THIS OFFERING SUMMERS AT 7,000 – 8,500 FEET IN ELEVATION EVERY BULL SELLING WAS RAISED AT RV BAR. MANY CALVING EASE BULLS WILL SELL

SELLING 100 HEAD

This sale will feature large numbers of half-brothers of: RB Tour of Duty 177 I Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 SAV Ten Speed 3022 I KCF Bennett Absolute AAR Ten X 7008 SA I SAV Sensation 5615 I Connealy Black Granite All bulls will be fertility tested and PAP scored Complimentary feed on all bulls until June 1, 2019 Free delivery on five or more bulls within 150 mile radius

THE RV BAR HERD IS NOW IN ITS FOURTH GENERATION AND CONTINUES TO GROW AND EXPAND WITH SUPERIOR ANGUS SEEDSTOCK.

Randy Vincent (435) 828-1111 I Randan Vincent (435) 8281116 Jake Wilkins (435) 828-8391 rvranch@easilink.com I www.rvbarangus.com For your free reference sale booklet, contact anyone in the office of the Sale Managers, Tom Burke, Kurt Schaff, Jeremy Haag, AMERICAN ANGUS HALL OF FAME at the WORLD ANGUS HEADQUARTERS, Box 660, Smithville, MO 64089. Phone (816) 532Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org 0811. Email: angushall@angushall.com. www.angushall.com.

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...Continued from page 16

delivered to our specifically chosen target audience and can even be customized to show when consumers are within a certain radius of grocery stores, restaurants and shopping centers. Top grocery stores include stores such as Smith’s Marketplace, Costco, Walmart, Harmons and WinCo. Top restaurants include Chili’s, Costa Vida, Café Rio and Olive Garden. Over the past year our ads have been shown on over 13,000 websites and phone applications. Some of the most popular websites showing our ads have been allrecipes.com and myrecipes.com. Two of the most popular applications include MyFitnessPal and Calorie Counters. The intent is to show ads to consumers who are more likely to be making a purchasing decision and remind them to choose beef. When selected, our ads direct people to the Utah Beef Council website. Google analytics provides information about what people are looking at on our site. Paid search advertising also makes available additional demographic details about those who visit our site. This information allows us to tailor website content to offer maximum impact. The most visited pages on the site this last year were the recipe pages and rancher page. These pages will receive improvements and updates to keep them relevant and interesting throughout the year. We can also find out where Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 18

our website traffic comes from. The top sources referring consumers to our website are paid ads such as those on Fox13now.com, Facebook and the Cooking with Chef Bryan Show website. We will continue to utilize these avenues to drive consumers to our website for great beef recipes and information. Please feel free to contact the Utah Beef Council if you have questions about any of the promotion and marketing programs at (801) 355-0063.

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


O ur AI Her d S ir e s

KCF B ENNETT A BSOLUTE

E LLINGSON C HAPS 4095

C ONNEALY C OURAGE 25L

KCF B ENNETT S OUTHSIDE

Q UAKER H ILL R AMPAGE 0A36

Selling 70 premier Angus bulls this spring! Cal l for m ore i nf o rma ti o n ( 801) 3 62-7150

Se m e n is a va il a bl e o n o ur h e rd si re ! $10/ s t r a w PM R a m pa g e 449 Y 18 D 10 5 ce d +10, bw +2.6, ww +100, y w + 1 5 9 sc +1.84, m +24, cw +71, m b +.43 , re + 1 . 1 3 $w +91.90, $f, +141.74, $g +38.35, $ b + 1 9 5 . 2 1

The

2

• Our Program •

nd Largest Angus Seedstock Herd in Utah

By using the top AI sires, we actively breed the best Angus cattle we can. We take a balanced approach with EPDs coupled with a strong phenotype. We strictly cull, always trying to improve our herd. We run our cattle at high elevations and PAP a majority of the cattle. By doing all this, we know we can back our cattle with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. - Paul McPherson www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

P AUL M C P HER S ON F AM ILY 885 W 200 S • Ne ph i, U T 84648 (801) 362- 7150 M c Ph e rs o n Fa rm s @m s n . c o m Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Delta, UT 435-864-2110

Ephraim, UT 435-283-4529

Logan, UT 435-753-0181

Price, UT 435-637-0652

Richfield, UT* 435-896-6461

Roosevelt, UT 435-722-2542

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Hyde Park, UT 435-563-1604

Ogden, UT* 801-394-8831

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St. George, UT 435-673-3631

VOLUME 6 • FEBRUARY 2019 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition Store Hours: Mon. – Sat. 8am – 7pm (*Open 8am – 8pm) Closed Sundays.


BEST HEALTH OF YOUR HERD Featuring the HC2500

Hydraulic Chutes Bigger • Faster • Stronger Available Options:

Hydraulic Head Restraint • Built-In Preg Gate Over 12’ Long • Live Floor

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THE EYES HAVE IT Is Visual Appraisal Still a Viable Tool in the Selection Process? By Matthew Garcia, Ph.D., beef extension specialist, Utah State University The practice of proper visual appraisal has been instrumental to many of the improvements achieved by the beef industry over the last six decades. However, with all the tools currently available to beef producers to make selection decisions is visual appraisal still as vital in the selection process? Many would argue that with the use of centralized testing methods, EPDs, genomically enhanced EPDs, and commercial genomic testing that visual appraisal has become less important because we are actually able to better select for genomic value. However, I would argue that visual appraisal is just as important of a tool as these previously described selection methods. Genomic predisposition and breeding value are of great importance but a herd sire has to be able to transfer that breeding value and the producer has to have the resources to realize that breeding value into performance of his/her animals.

Visual Appraisal in a Herd Sire

With all the previously described selection tools available visual appraisal in herd sires is still vitally important prior to purchase and after incorporating the bull into your operation. Prior to purchase obviously a bull that is physically appealing (muscling, body depth, structure etc.) is very important as calves are bought based off of appearance and weight for the most part. However, structure and physical ability are the major components that should be evaluated from a visual appraisal standpoint. The first part of visual appraisal prior to purchase or breeding season is to evaluate if he is sound on his feet and legs, does he travel smoothly without wasted movement, are his eyes clear, and do his sexual organs look free from scarring or damage? Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 22

The second part of visual appraisal prior to purchase or breeding season is to evaluate if his appearance is compatible with his paperwork/ predictions. Essentially, does he look like he is going to give you the type of calf that his paperwork says he is capable of, and is he going to give you the type of calf that fits your marketing and managing program? The last part of visual appraisal typically happens once the bull has been breeding in your operation. In this situation the major factor to consider is how compatible is he to your operation and the resources you have for him to do his job? Specifically, is holding enough body condition to complete a breeding season or are you having to pull him early because he has gotten too thin. What is the time frame for him to recuperate after breeding season and do you have to allocate extra resources to keep him in your system? While these might not be traditional visual appraisal questions, they are questions that need to be answered if a bull is going to become a sire in your herd and if he is going to remain a sire in your herd.

Visual Appraisal of Replacement Females

Visual appraisal and selection in replacement females has been somewhat of a heartbreaking process for beef producers. Typically, producers will say “I want a deep bodied female, with a specific frame size, a large pelvic area, feminine head and a tight well shaped udder.� These are all important characteristics as they are directly related to her ability to do her job as a mother in your herd. However, visual appraisal in females has not been as accurate due to the job that we are asking females to do in our herds and the fact that fertility and reproductive efficiency are lowly heritable and highly environmentally influenced. VOLUME 6

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A heifer/cows job is to breed early in life (1 year) calve, calve early (2 years), rebreed and do it every year with our resources so she pays her bills and ours. However, even if she has all the physical characteristics that you are looking for there are times that your most desirable heifer/cow falls out because she fails to adhere to her job description. While it is important to select for the visual characteristics that we have come to know make a good cow, it is probably more useful to incorporate visual appraisal as one of many tools to identify females in your operation. For example, how well does she do her “cow job description� on your resources and how well does she fit your specific system. Specifically, does she maintain body condition score (BCS) well throughout the production process and does she not have large fluctuations in BCS that cause you to allocate extra resources to her because you are concerned that she will not be able to do her job. In this case visual appraisal of our desired traits, accompanied with visual appraisal of her BCS and her ability to fulfill her cow

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

job duties might be selection tools of how successful and compatible this cow is to your production system.

Summary Visual appraisal is still an important component to the success of our beef production systems. While visual appraisal is important in selection, it should also be utilized with other selection tools and benchmarks to evaluate animal performance after they have been selected as well. Visual appraisal, like any other selection tools, should not be the lone deciding factor that we are using to make selection decisions. Visual appraisal should be used in combination with all the tools that are currently available to producers to make more accurate decisions. In order to remain productive, profitable and sustainable, multiple selection tools should be utilized to select and produce animals that are more compatible with our resources, production goals, management capabilities, herd improvement goals and marketing strategies.

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USU EXTENSION SPECIALIST RECEIVES GRANT FOR AGRICULTURAL WATER CONSERVATION RESEARCH Matt Yost, a Utah State University Extension specialist, recently received a New Innovator Award from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture. This award is designed to give early-career faculty members the investment needed to establish scientific research projects. The grant will fund the establishment of three long-term research and demonstration sites where agriculture water optimization can be studied. At these sites, over 150 different combinations of pivot irrigation technology, irrigation rates, crop genetics, tillage and crop management practices will be evaluated to identify winning combinations that will help optimize water use in agriculture. The three research sites will be located in Cedar City, Logan and Vernal. According to Yost, several technologies and practices have shown potential in conserving water, but there are few studies that examine the results when multiple technologies and practices are combined or “stacked.” “In most cases, it is impractical for all of these practices to be implemented simultaneously,” he said. “This project is important because identifying individual practices or combinations of practices that produce the greatest water

savings is of high importance for irrigators in Utah.” According to Yost, if certain combinations of these technologies and practices prove economical, effective and feasible, applied water in agriculture could be reduced by nearly 20 percent, resulting in annual savings of nearly 20 billion gallons of water. According to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture, this project was selected for funding because it is a holistic approach to studying agriculture water optimization, and the knowledge and insights that could be gained will likely have a significant impact on water use efficiency for agricultural systems across the western United States. The Foundation for Food and Agriculture awarded $300,000, matching the $300,000 that Yost and USU Extension were able to raise in collaboration with several organizations, including two conservancy districts, two soil and water conservation districts, Senninger Irrigation and the Utah Division of Water Rights. For more information about USU Extension projects, visit http://extension.usu.edu/.

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P HIL ALLEN POLLED

AND

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HEREFORDS

P O B o x 1 2 0 0 7 4 | A n t i m o n y, U T 8 4 7 1 2 Shannon Allen 435-624-3285 s j a l l e n @ c o l o r - c o u n t r y. n e t

VOLUME 6

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7%

Highter pregnancy rates

$20

Advantage in feed efficiency

$51

More per cow, per year

$30

Advantage in feedlot profitability

The Bald-Faced Truth About Hereford genetics It’s obvious – Hereford-sired calves deliver a $51 increase in net profit per cow, per year.* Hereford genetics bring legendary hybrid vigor, improved fertility, feed efficiency and easy-handling docility to your program. Read the research, and see why Hereford heterosis pays off, at HerefordTruth.com.

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Jared Patterson

Ariz., Calif., Idaho, Nev., Ore., Utah and Wash. 208-312-2386 •jpatterson@hereford.org *Compared to Angus-sired calves. Source: Daley, David A. and Earley, Sean P. Impacts of Crossbreeding on Profitability in Vertically Coordinated Beef Industry Marketing Systems. American Hereford Association. Retrieved from https://hereford.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/HarrisHeterosisReport.pdf. 57100-A02 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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States Remain Key to Beef Checkoff Program By Laurie Munns, vice chair, Federation of State Beef Councils When we think of the USA, the middle letter is very important, because it stands for States. The 50 states that make up our country are independent in many ways but come together to form what most of us consider to be the best country in the world. The Federation of State Beef Councils operates in a very similar way. The 44 Qualified State Beef Councils are independent, with their own structures, boards, staffs, strategic plans and operations. But we come together to support a Beef Checkoff Program that delivers on the promise of strong beef demand and greater consumer acceptance of our great product – Beef – across the country and throughout the world. In a partnership with a national Beef Checkoff Program that focuses on the same core principal – build beef demand – we strive to emphasize teamwork that delivers results to those who pay in to the Beef Checkoff Program. Since 1986 we have operated under a national $1-per-head checkoff system that has made an enormous impact on how consumers view our products, and their willingness to purchase it.

as a virtual assistant for smart speakers. In this country there are almost 50 million smart speaker users, and about 40 percent of those people use smart speakers in their kitchens. Chuck is an expert on recipes, cuts, nutrition, cooking tips… and all things beef. He’s easily accessible, with access not only through Amazon Alexa and Google Home Assistant but on the web at www.ChuckKnowsBeef.com and on any mobile device, allowing a consumer to have Chuck anywhere you go, from the kitchen to the grocery store. This represents a huge opportunity for the beef community. With the help of Chuck, we can reach today’s consumers and teach them more about beef while getting them to cook more confidently with it. Reaching Out As a producer who has been very active in industry organizations, I think it’s crucial that we work together at the local, state and national levels to make programs like this possible – and make sure they do so with beef producer direction and involvement. At every level, we already have producers who volunteer their time to help direct beef demand-building efforts. The Beef Act Still What’s For Dinner and Order established by Congress in For the past quarter century our 1985 makes it clear that although the reminder to consumers has been checkoff has oversight at the USDA, that beef is what’s for dinner. The there is significant input and direction Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand given by producers both at the state was refreshed, strengthened and level, through state beef councils, and modernized. The website was redone, at the national level, through voluntary and more than 11 million visitors, service on the Cattlemen’s Beef representing a 96 percent increase Promotion and Research Board. year—over-year, visited the site. Most Federation of State Beef Council of those visitors came looking for leaders have made it a priority to recipe, cut and cooking information, reach out to producers throughout and were richly rewarded. the country and let them know about Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. Federation efforts and strengthen the advertising became digital to be used relationships that make the entire Beef in formats that will reach today’s Checkoff Program more successful. millennial consumers. Ads that ran Regional vice presidents are traveling online sent consumers to the website to cattlemen’s groups and update for more information. This year we’re introducing “Chuck” them on not only the reasons for our Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 26

existence, but the successes we have been able to generate through checkoff investments. Can more be done? Of course it can. We are always looking for ways that we can improve our strategies and programs, looking at both efficiencies and effectiveness as we spend checkoff dollars. Every beef producer is involved when they sell their animals and a dollar per head is collected for beef demand-building efforts through the checkoff. But you can do more, too. Attend cattle organization meetings at which the checkoff is discussed and speak up. Find out how you can volunteer to serve on checkoff committees through your local, state and national organizations. And when not speaking out, keep your eyes and ears open. As an industry we’re only as good as the dedicated producers delivering great beef that consumers enjoy every day. The more we know, the better we are. The Federation of State Beef Councils is

a division of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), which is a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program. The program is administered by the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, with oversight provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Beef Checkoff Program was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. The checkoff assesses $1 per head on the sale of live domestic and imported cattle, in addition to a comparable assessment on imported beef and beef products. States retain up to 50 cents on the dollar and forward the other 50 cents per head to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board.

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www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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DID YOU KNOW DOLLAR INVESTED $11.20?

EVERY

RETURNS

$

Advertising Creates all domestic consumer advertising –radio, print, outdoor and digital – to reinforce how beef is part of their everyday life

Beef Safety Research Identifies potential risks to beef safety and develops solutions to maintain a safe beef supply for consumers

Foreign Marketing Provides beef market development, promotion, research, consumer and industry information in more than 100 countries worldwide

Public Relations Proactively shares positive beef messages with consumers, health professionals and other food influencers

Channel Marketing Develops all promotions, training and other programs to help promote beef in restaurants and grocery stores

Product Enhancement Research Discovers new ways to improve beef quality, consistency and value, including research focused on new cuts, taste, tenderness and carcass value

Nutrition Research Focuses on beef’s role in human nutrition as it relates to overall health and well-being

New Product Development Works with industry leaders to develop new beef products, plus shares beef recipes and cooking tips

Industry Information Safeguards the image of the beef industry by responding to, and correcting, misinformation about beef and sharing the beef production story

In a comprehensive economic study about the return on investments of checkoff programs funded by the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, Dr. Harry Kaiser of Cornell University concluded that the return on investments is vastly greater than the cost of the program.

6.4

11.3

15.7

PERCENT LOWER

PERCENT LESS

BILLION POUNDS MORE

BOTTOM LINE

The reduction in foreign demand for U.S. beef between 2006 and 2013, if not for the checkoff

The reduction in domestic beef sales between 2006 and 2013, if not for checkoff programs

The amount of additional beef sold domestically between 2006 and 2013 because of checkoff programs

Your investment in the checkoff results in higher prices, which means higher net revenue for your operation

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

#beef11:1 Funded by the Beef Checkoff.

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


40th Annual

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Bulls and Heifers for sale private treaty For 30 years we have concentrated our program towards moderate frame, moderate birth weight, and easy fleshing, Angus cattle. As a result, we are very happy with our cow herd and the genetics behind them. We feel we have a nice group of bulls and heifers that could enhance your replacement programs and calf performance. You are welcome to Come and have a look.

Sires Include: 7AN395 KCF BENNETT FORTRESS 7AN384 CONNEALY COURAGE 25L 7AN440 DEER VALLEY OLD HICKORY 7AN419 CTS REMEDY 1T01 7AN443 BALDRIDGE BRONC 1ANG1299 FORTITUDE 1ANG426 COLEMAN CHARLO 0256

Thanks,

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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U N M ATC H E D P E R F O R M A N C E

Shandar Angus Ranch

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at High Altitude A COMPREHENSIVE LOOK AT HIGH ALTITUDE DISEASE, PAP, FEEDLOT HYPERTENSION AND RESPIRATORY ISSUES by J.M. Neary, Department of Animal and Food Sciences, Texas Tech; F.B. Garry, T.N. Holt, and G.M. Krafsur, Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State; P.S. Morley, R.D. Brown, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, University of Colorado; K.R. Stenmark, R.M. Enns, and M.G. Thomas, Department of Animal Sciences, Colorado State University.

Right-heart failure (RHF) due to pulmonary hypertension, more commonly known as brisket disease or high altitude disease, is a complex disease that is becoming increasingly problematic for the cattle industry–regardless of altitude. The disease became known as high altitude disease because until the mid1960s RHF was only reported at altitudes over 7,000 ft. Today, RHF is still problematic in high altitude cow-calf operations and is occurring with increasing incidence in feedlot cattle. The clinical signs are commonly mistaken for chronic pneumonia, which complicates disease diagnosis and reporting. Moreover, cattle treated for pneumonia have 2 to 3 times greater risk of developing RHF than cattle not treated. An ongoing investigation of beef cattle mortality on a feedlot at 3,000 ft. in the Texas Panhandle indicates that respiratory disease and RHF are intimately linked. Cattle with evidence of pneumonia may have actually died from RHF; however, close examination of the heart is required for an accurate diagnosis. INTRODUCTION One hundred years ago, two researchers from the Colorado Agricultural College, now Colorado State University, set out to investigate a strange new disease that was killing cattle in South Park, Colo. These researchers, George Glover and Isaac Newsom, gave this new disease the name brisket disease because one of the clinical signs included swelling of the brisket (Glover and Newsom 1915). They concluded that the disease was caused by exhaustion of the heart due to the low oxygen levels associated with high altitude exposure. The progeny of bulls originating from low-altitude were reported to be particularly susceptible, providing the first Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 32

evidence for a genetic basis to the disease (Glover and Newsom 1915). The disease also became known as ‘high altitude disease’ because, up until the 1960’s, the disease was only seen at altitudes over 7,000 ft. (Hecht et al. 1962). Studies of the bovine lungs and pulmonary arteries, conducted in the early 1960s, revealed that a key process in the development of pulmonary hypertension was the remodeling of the pulmonary arteries (Alexander and Jensen 1963a; b). In the same year, however, it was also reported that cattle with RHF have increased resistance to blood flow downstream of the pulmonary capillaries (Kuida et al. 1963). The increased resistance suggests that narrowing and remodeling of the pulmonary veins, which return the oxygenated blood to the left side of the heart, may also contribute to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This latter finding remains to be investigated.

Differences between right heart failure (brisket disease) and other causes of heart failure Brisket disease or RHF should not be confused with other causes of heart failure. These other causes affect specific areas of the heart: 1. Pericarditis: inflammation of the pericardium, the outside of the heart. Hardware disease (traumatic pericarditis) is a common example 2. Myocarditis: inflammation of the myocardium, the wall of the heart. Haemophilus somni infection of the left ventricle is one example 3. Endocarditis: inflammation of the endocardium, the inside lining of the heart. Bacterial colonization of the major heart valves is one example. Brisket disease differs from the above heart diseases VOLUME 6

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because, unlike the above, the disease does not involve a specific area of the heart. Rather, the entire right-heart is involved due to narrowing of downstream vessels, in the pulmonary arteries–this is technically called cor pulmonale. Importantly, on necropsy examination, the above diseases can produce similar lesions to RHF; consequently, the heart must be closely examined for other possible causes of heart failure. Low oxygen levels in the lung cause right-heart failure (brisket disease) So why do the pulmonary arteries begin to narrow and restrict flow? For 3 possible reasons: 1) High altitude exposure, 2) Diseases of the lung such as pneumonia, and 3) Slow or shallow breathing. All 3 factors can trigger the disease through one common mechanism: they reduce the amount of oxygen entering into the lung. The low levels of oxygen cause the pulmonary arteries to contract and narrow; this increases the resistance to blood flow–just like a blocked irrigation pipe–and causes the blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries to rise. This is why cattle that have a high pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP)–greater than 49 mm Hg–are thought to be at greatest risk of brisket disease (Holt and Callan 2007). Incidence of right-heart failure Unfortunately, we do not have a reliable estimate of the RHF incidence in the cow-calf industry. One study, from 50 years ago, estimated the annual incidence of RHF to be ~1% of all cattle at altitudes over 7,000 ft. (Hecht et al. 1962). The true incidence, however, is likely to be even greater given that the clinical signs of RHF are often mistaken for respiratory disease (Glover and Newsom 1915; Malherbe et al. 2012; Neary et al. 2013). Furthermore, despite current mitigation practices, RHF is still problematic for high altitude cow-calf producers (Neary et al. 2013). On one cow-calf operation at an altitude of > 8,000 ft., RHF was responsible for half of all calf death loss between branding in the spring and

weaning in the fall (Neary et al. 2013). We have more reliable estimates of RHF incidence in the feedlot industry. In a recent epidemiological study, which involved 1.6 million cattle fed in 15 feedlots across North America, we found that the incidence of RHF doubled from the years 2000 to 2008 (Neary et al. 2015a). In 2012, 15 out of every 10,000 cattle entering US feedlots died of RHF (Neary et al. 2015a). A study, conducted in the mid-1970s, of 4 U.S. feedlots located at an altitude of 5,000 ft. reported the risk of CHF to be 3 cases per 10,000 cattle entering the feedlot ( Jensen et al. 1976). Although direct comparisons between these two studies cannot be made, the findings do, however, suggest that the incidence of RHF has increased in the feedlot industry. Furthermore, RHF was observed in feedlots at all altitudes (Figure 1); consequently, ‘high altitude disease’ may not be an appropriate name for RHF, at least in feedlot cattle–high altitude merely increases the baseline risk. In another study, involving 152 Angus steers, we found that mean PAP increased with age from calfhood to the late feedlot finishing phase (Neary et al. 2015b). Mean PAP increased from 4-months (39 ± 3 mm Hg; mean ± SE) to 6-months of age (42 ± 3 mm Hg) at an altitude of 7,200 ft., and from 13-months (43 ± 1 mm Hg) to 18-months of age (50 ± 1 mm Hg) at an altitude of 4,000 ft. These findings indicate that PAP may actually be greater in the feeding period at low altitude than in suckling calves located at higher altitudes. Furthermore, the increase in mean PAP through the feeding period may explain why RHF typically occurs around 4-months on feed (Neary et al. 2015a). Clinical signs In many cases, brisket disease occurs undetected because the clinical signs of congestive heart failure are variable and may be confused with respiratory disease (Glover and Newsom 1915; Malherbe et al. 2012; Neary et al. 2013). These include labored, or open-mouth, breathing, rough hair coat, glazed eyes, and reluctance to move. More specific signs of heart failure include swellings of various body regions including the brisket region (hence, brisket disease), belly, and under the jaw. The jugular vein will also become engorged with blood and, later in the disease, may show pulsations, which indicates that the major valve in the heart (tricuspid valve) is leaking.

Figure 1. The risk of right-sided congestive heart failure (RHF) or brisket disease in Canadian and U.S. feedlots in 2012 according to feedlot altitude. The risk of RHF appears to be greater in feedlots located at higher altitudes. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Necropsy findings On necropsy examination, cattle that died of RHF will have an enlarged, flabby right ventricle (the chamber of the heart closest to the head) (Figure 2). ...Continued on page 34 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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...Continued from page 33 Other findings typically include, 1. Enlargement of the liver and a mottled or ‘nutmeg’ appearance when sliced, 2. Fluid accumulation in the chest and abdomen, 3. Edema (fluid accumulation) of the intestines and mesentery (membranous tissue in the abdomen), 4. Enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes (due to edema) 5. Fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac (membrane surrounding the heart). Other potential causes of heart failure–previously described–must also be ruled out. Unfortunately, there is no treatment for this disease and many of the risk factors remain unknown. This is concerning for the cattle industry, particularly if the incidence of the disease continues to climb. PULMONARY ARTERIAL PRESSURE (PAP) MEASUREMENT Unfortunately, we cannot directly determine an animal’s risk of RHF. Instead, we have to rely on pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) measurement (Holt and Callan 2007); the greater the mean PAP, the greater the supposed risk of RHF. Cattle with a mean PAP greater than 49 mmHg are considered to be at particularly high risk and should be moved to a lower

Figure 2. Narrowing of the pulmonary arteries in response to low levels of oxygen in the lung increases resistance to blood flow pumped through the lung by the right ventricle or chamber of the heart (top left arrows). The increased workload causes the muscular wall of the right ventricle to thicken in order to match the increased vascular resistance. Chronic pressure overload eventually causes the pumping capacity of the myocardium to decline, and the right ventricle to enlarge owing to incomplete filling and emptying during the cardiac cycle. Eventually, the heart can no longer function to pump blood through the pulmonary circulation – the valves begin to leak and contractions are further impaired as cardiac muscle cells die and are replaced with fibrotic lesions – leading to heart failure and death. The left ventricle (bottom right arrows) always forms the apex of the heart, the lowest part of the heart as it sits in the chest, and is closer to the diaphragm than the right ventricle.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

elevation to avoid the onset of RHF. Since mean PAP is moderately to highly heritable (Shirley et al. 2008), it is reasonable to assume that we might be able to reduce the incidence of RHF among a calf crop by only breeding cattle with ‘low’ PAP measurements. To be accurate, PAP measures must be obtained at the altitude (or higher) at which the cattle are to be pastured. PAP measurements performed at a lower elevation than the altitude at which the cattle are to inhabit provide little information: a low PAP measurement does not mean that it will also be low at a higher elevation; however, an individual with a high PAP measurement at low altitude should not be taken to higher altitude because it is already a high-risk candidate for RHF. PAP measurement has been largely successful at reducing the incidence of RHF among cattle located in the high country; however, because the technique requires specialist equipment and veterinary expertise, its application has been largely limited to the paternal line. It should also be noted that most PAP measures are collected from yearling bulls and replacement heifers. Therefore, additional research is needed to understand what these yearling measures infer to pre-weaning calves, and conversely, finishing steers. Recently a variant of the gene encoding HypoxiaInducible Factor-2 (EPAS1) was discovered that predicts, in part, the tendency of beef cattle to develop elevated PAP when exposed to high altitude, raising the possibility that genetic testing may provide solutions for improving cattle breeding practices and reducing the risk of pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure (Newman et al. 2015). RESPIRATORY ISSUES Unfortunately, the clinical signs of RHF are similar to those of respiratory disease (Glover and Newsom 1915; Malherbe et al. 2012; Neary et al. 2013); consequently, many cases of RHF are likely misdiagnosed and mistreated. Further, calves with RHF may also have concurrent, or residual scarring from, respiratory disease (Neary et al. 2013). We have previously found that feedlot cattle treated for respiratory disease are 2 to 3 times more likely to develop RHF than cattle not treated for respiratory disease (Neary et al. 2015a). In an ongoing investigation into cattle mortality at one feedlot located at 3,000 ft. in the Texas Panhandle, we have identified that lesions of the pulmonary arteries and right ventricle are commonly associated with pneumonia. Furthermore, in many cases it appears that pneumonia was responsible for the development of RHF but it was RHF that was the cause of death. This raises many questions: Are necropsies commonly misdiagnosed as respiratory disease when in fact the animal died of RHF? Does pulmonary hypertension predispose cattle to respiratory disease, as well as RHF? Could pulmonary hypertension reduce the effectiveness of antimicrobials for treatment of respiratory disease? VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


HIGH ALTITUDE BULL SALE The Temple family at T-Heart Ranch has been committed to reducing the serious effects of Brisket Disease for more than 18 years. With the lowest elevation on the ranch at 7,800 feet they have experienced the same challenges as their customers and understand that at high altitude, just like everywhere else, live calves are the only ones that count. At elevation, that means the ones that PAP well. Working closely with the world’s #1 and most practical authority, Dr. Tim Holt at Colorado State University, T-Heart Ranch has methodically collected more than 16,000 PAP scores. Early on, Shane and Beth realized their customer’s need for environmental adaptation of bulls with low PAP scores just to survive and breed cows. As more facts surfaced about the genetic impact and potential to select for reduced losses to Brisket Disease, T-Heart Ranch began testing and selecting all replacement females using PAP scores as well. Selection pressure applied over years, and using all of the tools available to them, has created a vastly improved herd and now their customers are benefiting from these efforts. Be watching for a new genetic evaluation for high altitude success coming soon from T-Heart Ranch. These evaluations will be the only one of its kind based on real, high altitude measures, that are not compromised with lower altitude values.

PAP 39 8529F

PAP 43 8312F

NLC COW BOSS 160C x HOOKS SHEAR FORCE 38K

NLC COW BOSS 160C x THR NEW STANDARD 874

PAP 40 8492F

GW MOUNTAIN DUE 373C x HOOK`S YELLOWSTONE 97Y

PAP 40 8538F

NLC COW BOSS 160C x A A R TEN X 7008 S A

PAP 40 8365F

CLRS DAKOTA 427D x NLC PAYDAY 16P

PAP 39 8102F

NLC COW BOSS 160C x SHIPWHEEL CHINOOK

250 Simmental and SimAngus™ Bulls, Including a large group of NLC COW BOSS 160C Sons. Other sires include: GW MOUNTAIN DUE 373C, TNT THR UNITY D420, HOOK’S BLACK HAWK 50B, LRS TEN X EXCELLANCE, HOOKS BEACON 56B, CLRS DAKOTA 427D, HOOKS CONFIDENCE 26C.

True High Altitude Cattle Shane & Beth Temple

T-HEART RANCH and L-CROSS RANCH Marty Ropp 406-581-7835 Corey Wilkins 256-590-2487 Clint Berry 417-844-1009 www.alliedgeneticresources.com

719-850-3082 • 719-850-3083 shane@t-heartranch.com

Josh Staudt 970-227-0729

www.t-heartranch.com Follow us on FaceBook

35


PAP TESTING AND THE TROUBLE IT CAN SAVE YOU by Nicole King, as originally printed by the Angus Journal The heart is a muscle and when it has to work harder, the organ will eventually remodel itself. This is the case in cattle suffering from high altitude disease (HAD), sometimes known as brisket disease or bovine highmountain disease (BHMD). Hannah Garrett, Neogen territory manager based out of Wyoming, explains the finer details of HAD and how it is possibly trickling down to lower elevation feedlots. “From a physiological standpoint, this disease is a result of a progressive increase in arterial vasoconstriction due to vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy and a somewhat fixed obstruction of the pulmonary arteries,” Garrett added. The heart works harder and builds muscle obstructing blood flow, making the vein smaller to push the blood through. No one breed is more susceptible than any other. Risk factors include age, environment the animal was raised in and previous health issues. Animals with a high incidence of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) historically showed increased risk for the disease when tested in a high-altitude environment. “[Pulmonary Arterial Pressure] PAP testing is an indicator of resistance to blood flow through the lungs and when measured at a high altitude is a reliable predictor of susceptibility of an animal for brisket disease,” Garrett said. Making strides for helping for high-altitude producers is Colorado State University’s (CSU) Tim Holt, associate professor of clinical sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. His research revealed the heritability of a PAP score is 0.34. “The best way to manage risk is to use proven bloodlines, purchase PAP-tested bulls, PAP-tested females and immediately haul at-risk animals to lower elevations,” Garrett said. “Producers send animals up to Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 36

the mountains to graze and some of them never come back. They figure this into their death loss every year.” The procedure for obtaining a PAP score seemed simple during the live demonstration by Dillon, Mont., veterinarian Ben Abbey. The small number of veterinarians performing PAP tests around the country either have ties to or were trained by Holt, including Abbey. “I always tell the cowboys they need to have the chute as tight as your cinch, with enough room to slide your hand in by their neck and on their side,” Abbey said as he tied the heifers head around to the left side of the chute. It’s important for PAP testing to occur at the elevation closest to the altitude where the animals will be expected to survive and thrive. Since a needle is inserted directly into the heart, sanitation during this process is of the utmost importance. “We use a 3-inch, 12-gauge needle so our catheter can flow into it,” Abbey explained of the process he took less than five minutes to perform. “This is about the same as a cardiac catherization in people.” Abbey inserts the needle into the jugular vein, feeding the catheter back through the right atrium and right ventricle to get into the pulmonary artery. The catheter is connected to a pressure transducer to measure PAP. The PAP score is derived from the mean of the systolic and diastolic pressure. “The test has about a 75 to 95 percent repeatability when done at the proper elevation,” Abbey said. “Though you do have to take the age of the animal into consideration. I usually tell producers to test at or after sexual maturity.” The average cost of a PAP test is under $30 per animal, plus the farm call charge. With cooperative cattle and an expert hand like Abbey’s, a PAP test is a quick way to save cattlemen a lot of trouble. VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


17 Annual Spring Bull Sale th

Wednesday March 13, 2019 | Dillon, MT | 12:30 PM (MDT)

Selling 300+ Yearling Bulls

Next Generation Outcross Genetics Selling sons of: SITZ Stellar 726D, SITZ Asset 402C, SITZ Invasion 574D, SITZ Profile 1160, Koupals B&B Atlas 4061, Raven Powerball 53, BSF Hot Lotto 1401, HA Cowboy Up 5405, Poss Achievement, S Whitlock 179, 4M Element 405, Spring Cove Paygrade 5064 The

SITZ Stellar 632F DOB 2/01/18 Reg.#19078148 Sire: Sitz Stellar 726D MGS: Sitz Superior 10971

SITZ Achievement 720F DOB 1/24/18 Reg.#19078208 Sire: Poss Achievement MGS: S A V Resource 1441

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

HP

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

HP

5

3.3

75

137

0.38

18.5

10

-0.2

72

123

1.7

14.9

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$W

$B

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$W

$B

23

61

0.6

0.46

67.78

169.91

22

54

0.96

0.44

72.78

167.84

LIV

Best o

EST O

f Northern Ca ttle!

TIO CK VIDEO AUC

N

Watch and bid by phone DISH Channel 998 Bid online at CattleUSA.com

Maternal Strength Sale Average

HP 12.5, top 25% of the breed

$W 64.16, top 10% of the breed SC 1.04, top 30% of the breed

SITZ Added Value SITZ JLS Element 618F DOB 2/03/18 Reg.#19082592 Sire: 4M Element 405 MGS: Sitz Up Trend 2049

SITZ Stellar 459F DOB 02/26/18 Reg.# 19078062 Sire: Sitz Stellar 726D MGS: S A V Resource 1441

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

HP

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

HP

8

1.8

77

137

1.09

18.9

3

2.2

73

134

1.47

14.7

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$W

$B

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$W

$B

34

65

0.44

0.68

85.61

167.06

30

52

0.51

0.6

77.29

140.46

• 100% Sight-Unseen Guarantee • Free Bull Delivery or Sale Day Pickup Discount • 100% First-Year Breeding Guarantee • Repeat Buyer and Volume Discounts • SITZ-Influenced Calf Marketing Options Dillon Ranch

Jim Sitz (406) 683-5277 SitzAngus@gmail.com Harrison Ranch

Designed by AgTown.com

Bob Sitz (406) 685-3360 SitzAngus@3Rivers.net

SITZ Profile 334F DOB 03/09/18 Reg.# 19118318 Sire: Sitz Profile 1160 MGS: Sitz Upward 307R CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

HP

Sitz Stellar 456F DOB 02/27/18 Reg.# 19117272

Marketing

Sire: Sitz Stellar 726D MGS: Sitz Vance 6372 CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

HP

6

1.3

81

136

1.09

12.9

8

1

67

116

0.91

17

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$W

$B

Milk

CW

Marb

RE

$W

$B

24

60

0.33

0.64

78.68

158.51

30

54

0.54

0.81

78.16

149.92

Joe Jones (208) 670-2364

JoeJones@SitzAngus.com

SITZAngus.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

37


UTAH RANCHERS RECOGNIZED FOR PRESERVATION EFFORTS issues to legislators and agricultural organizations. In late 2018, Ercanbrack Livestock of Coalville was selected as the recipient of the 2018 Utah Leopold “Give to the land, it will give back” is more than Conservation Award®. just a motto for those who live and work at Ercanbrack Sand County Foundation, the nation’s leading voice Livestock. for private conservation, created the Leopold Conservation “Western AgCredit congratulates Ed Ercanbrack Award to inspire American landowners by recognizing for winning this prestigious award in recognition exceptional farmers, ranchers and foresters. The prestigious of his impressive conservation efforts on his ranch. award, named in honor of renowned conservationist Aldo Conservationist Aldo Leopold challenges stewards of the Leopold, is given in 14 states. land: ‘Examine each question in terms of what is ethically In Utah the $10,000 award is presented annually by and aesthetically right, as well as what is economically Sand County Foundation, Western AgCredit, Utah Farm expedient.’ Ed has achieved this critical balance,” said Bureau Federation and Utah Cattlemen’s Association. David Brown, Western AgCredit President. Ercanbrack Livestock is operated by Ed and Dixie “We are extremely proud of the Ercanbrack family Ercanbrack, and their adult children, Dane and Dusty. and the pride they take in the land and natural resources The family works together at making their land productive in their care,” said Ron Gibson, Utah Farm Bureau by targeting areas in need of water, regeneration and soil Federation President. “They represent the conservation support. They were revealed as the award recipient at ethic found in Utah’s farmers and ranchers, and we salute the Utah Farm Bureau Federation’s Annual Meeting in them for their efforts.” Layton. They were presented with a $10,000 award and a “It is exciting to see the passion, along with the amount crystal depicting Aldo Leopold. of effort and investment that landowners put towards good Ercanbrack Livestock’s story began amid the Great land stewardship. Ed and his family have a rich history of Depression with a hearty handshake and $12 an acre on caring for the land and water resources, and of encouraging the front steps of the Summit County Courthouse. Since others” said Brent Tanner, Utah Cattlemen’s Association then, four generations of ranchers have ridden the same Executive Vice President. trails and shared a passion for the land. Among the many outstanding Utah landowners A variety of range management projects have improved nominated for the award were finalists: Basque Cross the quality of wildlife habitat, pastures for beef cattle, and Ranch of Park Valley, and JY Ferry & Son, Inc. of Corinne. the ranch’s many springs and ponds. By restoring native The Leopold Conservation Award in Utah is made grasses and the health of the soil, they are reversing damage possible thanks to the generous contributions from from decades of sheep grazing and coal mining. Prescribed Western AgCredit, Utah Farm Bureau Federation, Utah rotational grazing lowers the threat of wildfire, as native Cattlemen’s Association, Utah Association of Conservation grasses and vegetation are allowed to reseed, producing Districts, The Nature Conservancy, Utah Wool Growers healthier forests. Association, Producers Livestock Marketing Association, Cattle watering facilities have been retrofitted so birds and the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food. and bats can safely drink. Supplying a clean water supply For more information on the award, visit www. benefits the performance of livestock and wildlife. leopoldconservationaward.org. The vegetation, warm coal soils, and cliffs found at a reclaimed coal mine provides unique habitat for wildlife. With an influx of elk, deer, ruffed grouse, mountain lions, bobcats and bear, the 2,400-acre ranch offers limited big game hunting to others. A Forest Stewardship Plan was developed with the Utah Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands. It encourages regeneration of aspen tree groves, and eradicates musk and Canadian thistles, and other invasive species. Conservation of grazing land works hand-in-hand with success in the cattle business. Two generations of Ercanbracks are achieving more profit with fewer cattle, by adopting innovative practices (like a fence-line weaning system) while seeking niche markets for their Angus and Simmental cattle. The Ercanbracks host youth groups on their ranch, have participated in pro-conservation videos for fellow (Pictured L to R) Curt Morgan, Gus Morgan, Oly Morgan,, Dusty Morgan, Ed Ercanbrack, Dixie Ercanbrack and Dane Ercanbrack. ranchers and consumers, and advocated for conservation VOLUME 6 • FEBRUARY 2019 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 38


A r e your bul l s used t o 10,000 fe e t ?

O u r s wer e r ai s e d t h e r e. We raise our cattle like commercial cattle! We expect them to survive the rigid conditions year-round with minimal inputs. As soon as our permit is ready, the pairs are taken to 10,000 feet to summer! If they can’t survive there, we don’t expect them to survive anywhere! Call today for more information or a sale catalog. Jeff 801-623-8308 Tamara 801-623-8309

Our exciting new herd sire!!

JRI Priority 254D28

EGL Lifeline B101

PAP Score: 36 at 7,000 ft! CTR Elevation

Plus KCF Bennett Y6, CTR Impressive 5767, BGGR BLK Gold Payload, EGL Barrett B050, DLW Sand Trap.

Offering bulls in the

Jeff and Tamara Loveless Spanish Fork, UT 801-623-830 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org 8 • 801-623-8309

Selling 50 Loveless Bulls along with bulls from Sorensen Angus and Circle 4 Simmentals! March 8, 2019 • 6:00 pm Spanish Fork Fairgrounds Spanish Fork, UT

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

39


NCBA President Outlines Year Ahead By National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Jennifer Houston With the Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in the rearview mirror, cattle producers across the country have a clear sense of the national public policy issues to watch in 2019. NCBA’s annual list of policy priorities – which are shaped by state affiliates and producer-members – guides advocacy efforts in Washington, D.C. In my new role as NCBA President, I will be focused on fighting for these priorities day-in, and day-out. My passion for serving the cattle and beef industry took shape early on. I grew up on a Hereford operation in West Tennessee and watched my father actively engage in the political issues impacting the livestock industry. Today my husband Mark and I own and operate a livestock market in Sweetwater, a small town about an hour away from Knoxville, Tennessee. Over the last 30 years, I have held a variety of industry leadership positions at the state and national level and seen the results of dedicated beef advocacy first-hand. In 2019, I hope to build on NCBA’s recent policy victories and improve the overall business climate for farmers and ranchers. But there is no doubt that the shifting political landscape presents new challenges. With Republicans in control of the Senate and Democrats in charge of the House of Representatives, it will take creativity and persistence to get things done. At the top of the policy priority list is fake meat. Producers of plant-based protein products are continuing their marketing push, but the bigger debate on the policy

40

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

front concerns lab-grown protein. Late in 2018, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced their plan for regulating lab-grown fake meat. Under the announced framework, the USDA would have the primary role in ensuring that lab-grown fake meat is held to the same food safety and labeling standards as real beef. Still, many more details need to be hashed out before any lab-grown products enter the market. NCBA will be focused on preventing fake meat manufacturers from using deceptive marketing claims that disparage beef. We also must ensure lab-grown products are held to the same food safety standards as everyone else. As long as we compete on an even playing field, real beef will continue to be the leading protein choice for families in the United States and around the world. International trade is another critical area of concern for producers. U.S. beef exports are increasingly important to the bottom line of every segment of the cattle and beef industry. In fact, the U.S. Meat Export Federation estimates that beef exports account for around $300 per head of fed cattle. President Trump was able to conclude negotiations with Mexico and Canada on an agreement to replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. The agreement ...Continued on page 42

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


Elevate Your Genetics with Miles High Angus!! Selling our best bulls at the

Intermountain Genetic Alliance March 2 • Nephi, UT • 1 pm Selling 12 bulls, including a flush of 5 bulls that are out of the same Erianna cow family as the females pictured below!

Musgrave Stunner (Capitalist 316 x Pure Product)

Bruns Blaster (Mogck Bullseye x Right Answer)

HA Cowboy Up 5405 (HA Outside x Upward 307R)

SAV Resource 1441 (Ideal 7075 x Traveler 004)

Eathington Sub-Zero (Final Answer x Matrix)

Rampage 0A36 (Daybreak x Ideal 2440)

One of the most exciting bulls this year - a low bw bull with width, mass, and dimension!

These two females pictured were highlights in the 2018 National Western Stock Show Foundation Angus Sale. Pictured left, sired by Black Granite, was the $37,500 selection of Pollard Farms, OK and pictured right was the $35,000 selection of Powell Farm, TN. This same cow family also produced the high selling bull in the National Western Angus bull sale for $37,500. We have several close siblings to these heifers and bull selling this spring! Call today for more information!

Quaker Hill Erianna 8T2 and Welytok Total 10 Erianna 3B2 are cornerstones of the Erianna cow family that is becoming so popular today. We have several sons and daughters out of 8T2, with several sons selling this spring. They have impeccable data, but built on a solid foundation of foot, bone, and muscle. Call today!

Private Treaty at the Ranch Available after March 2 We have a strong selection of yearling and ageadvantage bulls for sale. Our customers know they can rely on us to stand behind our product each and every year. Visitors are always welcomed to the ranch at any time. Call today to schedule a time to come see the bulls and their mothers!

Call Layne Miles at 435-823-3277

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Used to add power and calf performance! This bull is an easy sell - his calves are so uniform!

A total calving ease sire with a ton of style!

A stylish made bull with length, dimension, and overall performance!

As consistent as they get - power and maternal! We also love the feet and legs this bull gives us!

Data! Widely known for carcass merit and growth!

Our home ranch is at 6,200 ft elevation and summer range surpasses 8000 ft elevation. Our cattle are trained early how to travel and survive in rigid condition year-round. We have always focused on a females that will maintain flesh in our high, dry climate while being easy to be around. They must wean a good, heavy calf each year and on time or they are culled - without question. We select for a solid foundation on good feet and legs simply because they have to be able to travel. From a data perspective, the $Weaning is a priority, as it includes many important traits. DNA samples are sent in on all replacement females retained to assist with earlier predictions of genetic strengths and weaknesses. Call anytime and visitors always welcomed!

M

Miles High Angus Layne Miles Family Altamont, UT 84001 435-823-3277 / 435-454-3278 mileshighangus@yahoo.com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

41


...Continued from page 40 keeps duty-free, unrestricted, and science-based trade in place. But the new deal, called the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, faces an uncertain fate in Congress. NCBA will be working to ensure it is passed quickly. We also hope to see swift action on a bilateral trade deal with Japan, a market that accounts for nearly $2 billion in annual sales. Finally, reducing the regulatory burden on the beef industry is a constant challenge. The Trump Administration has demonstrated a commitment to repealing some of the most egregious examples of federal overreach, including the 2015 Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule. The Administration even proposed a new water rule that would give the federal government more reasonable jurisdiction and restore state authority. NCBA also continues to work to find a long-term solution to the implementation of electronic logging devices (ELDs) and overly-restrictive Hours of Service (HOS) rules for livestock haulers. Livestock haulers were

granted a temporary exemption from electronic logging devices (ELDs), but the industry needs more time to find a permanent solution. The Department of Transportation is currently considering an NCBA petition that would fix overly-restrictive Hours of Service rules for five years, but it is unclear what action will be taken at this time. The key to achieving this ambitious policy agenda is to work together. All of us in the cattle and beef industry must remember that there is more that unites us than divides us. And with less than two percent of the U.S. population involved in production agriculture, we cannot afford to splinter in the face of our opponents. The policy debates in Washington, D.C., may seem like a world away. Daily farm and ranch duties – not to mention our family and friends – demand our immediate attention. But I encourage you to make time to engage in the political process this year. It can be difficult to see how showing up to a local meeting, donating to the NCBA Political Action Committee, or contacting your Member of Congress will make a difference. Yet these actions will ultimately determine whether NCBA’s work on behalf of cattlemen and cattlewomen succeeds or fails.

Anderson Angus

801-368-4131

Absolute

S A V TEN SPEED 3022

435-660-9013

Banks Simmental

Miles High Angus

Blackett Angus

Daniels Livestock

801-592-0851

Mr. nlc upgrade

Lynn Angus

435-823-3277 435-660-9234

Saturday

1p.m.

Juab County Fairgrounds, Nephi UT

42

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


www.ipsencattle.com Where busy cattlemen 6thAnnual go to buy bulls! Internet BULL

SALE

march 5, 2019 • Angu s • OUT Hereford • 7 PM CLOSE

Contact us for a sale catalog! 208-681-4794

Lot 4

Lot 17

Lot 14

Lot 3

Lot 9

Lot 28

26 A NGUS

S ELLING B ULLS • 12 H EREFORD B ULLS 9 B RED H EIFERS

S IRED B Y A NGUS : A VIATOR • F ULL P OWER • C OMRADE • C OURAGE H EREFORD : L EADER • P OWERBALL

Lot 46

A U C T I O N D E TA I L S • Pictures and Videos will be available for viewing after Feb 15 • • Bulls are available to view at the ranch anytime • • Auction Format - open bidding from 7 am to 7 pm; followed by a horse-race style finish • • Bulls will be semen/trich tested, and evaluated for soundness • • All bulls selling have been PAP tested • 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED • go to www.IPSENC ATTLE.com for more details! angus • hereford

ICC

Ipsen Cattle Co.

Mark and Becky Ipsen | 4368 Dingle Rd | Dingle, ID | 83233 (208) 681-4794 | (208) 681-4793 | IPSENCAT TLECOMPANY @ YAHOO . COM | WWW . IPSENCAT TLE . COM Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

43


Offering an Exceptional Combination of

Cow Sense & Science 1AN01416 Musgrave 316 STUNNER

STUNNER

Reg#: 18467508

LD Capitalist 316 x Mcatl Pure Product 903-55 Producing calves with muscle shape, depth of body and great growth all in a calving-ease package.

1AN01389 G A R ASHLAND

ASHLAND

Reg#: 18217198

G A R Early Bird x B/R Ambush 28 A unique combination of performance data, genomics and phenotype, offering the performance data you demand and the visual qualities you expect from a powerful herd sire.

1AR00972 WFL MERLIN 018A

MERLIN 018A

Reg#: 1628086

LJC Merlin T179 x Brown Commitment S7206 With big-time EPDs and indexes and a pedigree that mates easily on so many popular lines, he’s an obvious next generation breed-leading sire.

1HP00855 TH FRONTIER 174E

FRONTIER

Reg#: 43818822

TH 403A 475Z Pioneer 358C x NJW 73S M326 Trust 100W He’s got it all: unmatched genetic merit with curve-bending GE EPDs, a power-packed pedigree and outstanding phenotype.

Download the GENEX Beef app today!

For more information, contact: Matt Storlie // 208.215.0337 // mstorlie@genex.coop

44

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition © 2019 Genex Cooperative. All rights reserved.

A-20290-19

VOLUME 6

App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google LLC. App available for download on Windows 10 devices.

FEBRUARY 2019


Annual

gene t ic Pa r t n e r s

Production Sale

SALE 1P M

TRI TIP @ 12PM

MARCH

7

DINNER @6PM

Pilot ROCK, ORegon

Mar 8

sAle broadcast live online at:

• VOLUME CALVING EASY AND GROWTH BULLS • FORAGE BASED GENETICS • COMPLETE EPD AND PERFORMANCE DATA • GROWTH AND FEEDLOT PROVEN GENETICS

SITZ DEMAND 730D CED +12 | BW -1.6 | WW +62 | YW +107 MILK +26 | $W +66.94 | $B +118.33

HA COWBOY UP 5405

CED +5 | BW +2.6 | WW +77 | YW +140 MILK +7 | $W +44.86 | $B +168.23

• BRED FOR HIGH WEAN AND RESPONSIBLE FRAME SIZE • GNOMICALLY ENHANCED EPD’S • CALF MARKETING OPTIONS • UDDER, FEET AND STRUCTURAL SOUNDNESS • DEVELOPED WITH LONGEVITY AND SEMEN QUALITY IN MIND

CROUTHAMEL PROTOCOL 3022

CED +7 | BW +1.1 | WW +61 | YW +121 MILK +27 | $W +56.20 | $B +161.64

SITZ DIVIDEND 649C

CED +15 | BW -3.6 | WW +54 | YW +105 MILK +23 | $W +55.49 | $B +133.34

The Program with a Purpose continues... rollinrockangus.com

Cattle raised in the mountains of Eastern Oregon

Raymond & Son •Breeding season guarantee RYAN & AMY RAYMOND P. 541.457.2366 C. 541.969.9409 raymondandsonranch@gmail.com

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BEAU & KRISTIN BOTTS P. 541.426.4849 C. 541.263.0988 beaubotts1@gmail.com

•1000 mile free delivery •Volume discounts

•Docility and fertility guarantee Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 45


MAXIMIZE THE VALUE OF YOUR CATTLE by Trey Befort, director of commercial programs, American Hereford Association As we begin a new year, I hope everyone had holidays blessed with plenty of time spent with family and friends. This is my favorite time of the year, and I think that it is a great time to sit back and to take a look at not only what we have experienced and accomplished over the past year but also what we can do to improve ourselves and our operations in the year to come.

CERTIFIED HEREFORD BEEF® SPECIFICATIONS

An important part of being a progressive producer is having the willingness to adapt to changes and the openmindedness to adopt new practices and technologies to set yourself apart and to improve the quality, efficiency and profitability of your cattle and your operation. One exciting change to mention is the quality grade improvement modification made to the Certified Hereford Beef brand. Effective Jan. 1, 2019, Certified Hereford Beef carcasses will be required to have a Small00 or higher marbling score, making all Certified Hereford Beef product grade United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Choice or higher. A comparison of the carcass specifications for the two Certified Hereford Beef programs can be found in Table 1. The Certified Hereford Beef marbling score modification has several benefits to the brand and will create new opportunities for growth with a higher quality

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product. Approximately 80 percent of product going into the previous Certified Hereford Beef Classic program was USDA Choice or higher. Eliminating the approximately 20 percent of USDA Select product previously included in the Certified Hereford Beef Classic program will provide a more consistent and higher-quality product for end users. Increasing the quality standard of the Certified Hereford Beef product will also allow the brand to be more competitive in a marketplace that continues to demand a superior product. Another benefit of this change is the elimination of brand confusion of being a “non-graded” product. This misconception resulted from the absence of a specific USDA quality grade on product sold through the previous Select/Choice blended Classic program. Most importantly, this modification will drive the demand for higher-quality Hereford and Herefordinfluenced cattle. With the continued growth in demand for a high-quality Certified Hereford Beef product, additional opportunities will arise for premiums paid to cattlemen, rewarding those who produce top-quality cattle to supply the brand.

BALANCED APPROACH

Setting a higher standard for marbling in the Certified Hereford Beef brand will be an added attribute

...Continued on page 48

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P OWER F U L B U LL S WI TH E LE G A NT F E M AL E S A L L C R EAT IN G A S O LI D F O UNDATI O N T HE 2 0 1 9 R EE S C A LE NDA R S P RI N G A N G U S B UL L S A L E A P R I L 20 • AT T H E R A NC H S E LLI N G 3 0 Y E A R L ING A N G U S BUL L S

Semen, Trich, Performance Tested • Ready to turn out!

A NNUA L F A L L P RODUC TION S A L E N OV 8 • AT TH E R A NC H S ELLI N G 7 0 L O N G Y E A R L ING B U L L S A N G U S • H E RE F O R D 50 F E MA L E S ANGU S • HE R E F ORD • F 1 B A L DIE S

Cattle that work in all environments!

Bulls with these genetics sell! C NJW 7 8 P 8 8 X S T E A K H O U S E 1 8 7 Z

C O NNE A LY F I NA L P RODU C T

NJW 6 7 U 2 8 M B I G M A X 2 2 Z

C O NNE A LY C ONFI DENC E 0 1 0 0

PER K S 00 0 3 R O ME O 4 0 1 1

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OUR BULLS CARRY A F UL L GUAR ANT EE T H ROUGH T H E FI RST YEAR AND STA ND B EH I ND OUR PRODUCT 100% .

Here at Rees Bros we operate a no nonsense performance oriented program. Our cows must calve every year in a 60 day breeding exposure and bring home a big calf. There is no forgiveness for low milk, poor udders, bad feet, cancer eye or poor temperament. They summer at 5000 to 8000 ft elevation on some 7000 acres of mountain forage. There is no creep feeding or hot rations. Our goal is to provide you with some of the freshest and most proven genetics that the industry has to offer; with bred in performance and an unconditional soundness guarantee. Come see for yourselves how Rees Bros can help your program. You'll be happy you did.

www.REESCATTLE.com Scott Rees (801) 949-8960 Jake Rees (801) 668-8613 Roger Rees, DVM (801) 913-5747 reescattle@gmail.com Take Exit 106 of I-84 Morgan, UT

OFFER ING ANG U S , HOR N E D A N D POL L E D HE R E F OR D S!! OFFE RING

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...Continued from page 46 to complement the existing efficiency and maternal advantages of the Hereford breed. I recommend producers avoid “tunnel vision” and strictly selecting for marbling but, instead, take a balanced approach to improve the genetic merit of their herds. The commercial programs offered by the American Hereford Association (AHA) are great tools to do so and have been discussed in previous issues of the Hereford World. Many Hereford breeders have started to include the commercial program logos on bulls that meet program requirements. Table 2 briefly reviews and outlines the different programs and the associated profit index requirements for each. By participating in these programs, producers receive a sire summary generated specifically for their bull battery. With this sire summary, producers are able to quickly see the strengths and weaknesses of their bull battery, allowing them to make educated selection and culling decisions before the next breeding season. Refer to the image below for an example of the sire summary generated through all of the AHA commercial programs. As we come into the early spring when many bulls will

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be available for purchase, this is a great time for producers to evaluate their bull battery information to see what area(s) they may need to focus on when purchasing bulls. Though many producers market their calf crop as weaned calves or yearlings — and do not retain ownership of those animals through the finishing phase — I believe it is still a responsibility of all cattlemen to produce the highest quality product possible to pass along to the next segment of the industry. By putting added focus on carcass traits, such as marbling, producers may gain additional buyer interest and repeat buyers who have added confidence in genetics that have proven to perform in the feedyard and at the packer level. I strongly encourage producers utilizing Hereford bulls in their operation to take advantage of the commercial programs discussed as we near bull sale season. For those interested in participating in and taking advantage of the commercial programs listed above, visit the “Commercial” page at Hereford.org for more information or contact Trey Befort.director of commercial programs for the American Hereford Association. He can be reached at tbefort@herefordbeef.org.

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RED ANGUS BOOSTS RELIABILITY OF EPDS WITH BOLT Cattle producers can expect more accurate predictions with the release of the fall 2018 Red Angus EPD suite, calculated using the much-anticipated new genetic evaluation software Biometric Open Language Tools, or BOLT by Theta Solutions LLC. The new BOLTgenerated Red Angus EPDs will enable producers to make more informed, lower risk selection decisions. Ryan Boldt, RAAA director of breed improvement, stated that BOLT-generated EPDs are very beneficial for Red Angus producers moving forward. “The BOLT analysis is able to use pedigree, performance and genomic information simultaneously to calculate EPDs. Through this method, we are able to improve reliability and squeeze more valuable information out of the data.” One factor lending itself to the increased accuracy of the EPDs is the sheer size of the database, which is composed of nearly 17 million animals from 13 different breed associations. Generally speaking, the accuracy of prediction increases proportionally with the size of the data pool. Additionally, BOLT uses a subset of DNA markers that influence economically relevant traits. This method of analysis reduces the statistical noise of unimportant markers, which boosts the accuracy of its EPD predictions. Another advantage of the BOLT software is the frequency of data analysis, which can be done weekly.

“We’ve reached a real milestone in the history of Red Angus with the release of BOLT-generated EPDs,” says Tom Brink, CEO of the Red Angus Association of America. “One of our long-standing core policies is to utilize the best science available once it’s ready, and that is certainly true with BOLT. Breeders and commercial customers will now have access to the better genetic prediction tools, which will enable them to make multitrait improvement like never before.” Red Angus was the first breed to implement Total Herd Reporting and has been doing so for two decades. The utilization of THR has created an accurate database of Red Angus genetics and EPDs, which are trusted by farmers and ranchers. Furthermore, Red Angus EPDs are displayed with their in-breed percentile ranking to assist with selection decisions in the context of how individual animal traits rank within the Red Angus population. BOLT plus Red Angus’ strong base of THR data, combined with a large volume of genomic data from tests provides EPDs with unsurpassed reliability. The information from genomic data can be as informative as a bull’s first calf crop or a cow’s lifetime production record. For more information on BOLT and Red Angus EPDs, visit the “Genetics” page on RedAngus. org or contact Ryan Boldt, RAAA director of breed improvement at ryan@redangus.org or (940) 387-3502 ext. 12.

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haystackmtn.com VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


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March 16, 2019 – 1 p.m. Anderson Livestock Auction Willard, UT

Baldridge Jennings

Connealy Black Granite 2-Year-Old Bulls – Yearling Bulls – Open Heifers – Bred Cows & Heifers

Sires Represented: ▪ S Summit 956 ▪ Baldridge Bronc ▪ 6 Mile Prophet ▪ JMacholan Ingenuity 52

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Ward Angus Ranch Chris Ward (435)757-5140 www.wardangusranch.com

Catalogs mailed by request VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


ANGUS

SIMANGUS

TM

FLECKVIEH

FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 2019 • 1:00 P.M. at the ranch in Bancroft, Idaho

Offering over

120 HEAD Angus, SimAngusTM, & Fleckvieh

HAR PINEBANK 443 202

Angus reg. 17505028 Pinebank Waigroup 41/97 x DDA Ally 69C Angus Sons Sell

50

CROSSROAD RADIUM 789U

REGISTERED BULLS

Fleckvieh reg. 2705810 MF MR Evan x BHR Doorn Full Fleckvieh Sons Sell

Yearling & Coming Two’s Negative BVD-PI Tested, Performance Tested, Fertility Tested and

O C C ZAMIR 412Z

Angus reg. 17771569 O C C Jet Stream x D D A Fahren 21X Angus & SimAngus Sons Sell • PAP 39

PAP TESTED

ACW IRONHIDE 395Y

SimAngusTM reg. 2624126 Lock N Load x BOYD New Day SimAngus Sons Sell

60

COMMERCIAL HEIFERS Angus & SimAngusTM

10

REGISTERED HEIFERS VE NE RONNY 862C

Angus reg. 18730239 DUFF New Edition x OCC Just Right Angus & SimAngus Sons Sell

5 SimAngusTMand 5 Angus

DRAFT HORSE TEAM

GOLDEN DAWN DECKER

SimAngusTM reg. 3042281 MFI Center Cut x HEMR Samurai SimAngus Sons Sell • PAP 38

Also selling sons of Trifecta, Fahren 21X, VE Euro Jiggs, Emblazon 27C, SDS Wide Range, S/M Diesel, Paxton 1172

DIRK & MARNIE JOHNSON 2055 Ivins Road • Bancroft, ID 83217 Cell: (208)390-6619 • Home: (208)425-9169 simroot57@yahoo.com • www.verticaledgegenetics.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Call or email to join our mailing list. Utah Cto attleman Seedstock Edition 53 Stay tuned website for pictures & videos.


Policies & Priorities

PLC Sketches 2019 Agenda By Public Lands Council Executive Director Ethan Lane The Public Lands Council (PLC) logged a year of progress in 2018. We focused on modernizing the Endangered Species Act (ESA), enacting critical reforms to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and working to correct chronic problems that have plagued federal grazing regulations since the bad old days of Bruce Babbitt and “Range Reform ’94. Our needs were anything but modest, and we walked away with many accomplishments the western livestock industry should be proud of. These accomplishments included progress on ESA. Going into the 115th Congress, PLC knew we need to bring common sense back into the implementation of ESA. We launched a campaign that emphasized the benefits of ranching to the environment, habitats of many endangered species, and the work of ranchers to recover and save many species in the United States. Our voice helped. The Administration proposed three comprehensive rules this summer targeting Sections 4 and 7 of the act to reform how species are listed, critical habitat designations, and interagency consultations. Final rules are just around the corner. From a statutory perspective, we were encouraged by draft legislation that incorporated the recommendations of the Western Governors’ Association’s ESA Initiative. This was led by Senate Environment and Public Works Chairman John Barrasso (R-Wyo). Barrasso’s legislation did not advance, and progress on the “Barrasso bill” specifically is unlikely in the new Congress. That being

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said, the finished product was a huge step forward and initiated a productive dialog with conservation groups, states, and others that could lead to statutory relief down the road. For federal lands ranchers, grazing regulations can be burdensome and threatening, particularly management directives brought from initiatives like Range Reform ’94 during Bruce Babbitt’s tenure at the Department of the Interior. Our leadership organized a working group to examine ways to repair the tremendous damage done to the federal grazing system over the years. We collected voices from every state in the west, the heart of a grassroots organization like PLC. The recommendations stemming from that working group will help us push for key reforms with the Department of the Interior, and we hope to make strides on this in the coming year. A special PLC working group also provided direction for modernizing NEPA. We worked with the Administration to ensure key decisionmakers understood how NEPA is abused, and how this impacts federal lands ranchers. In response to our concerns and those of other regulated industries, the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) this summer initiated a rulemaking to update and streamline NEPA implementation across the entire federal government. This rulemaking brings hope for progress on categorical exclusions, recognition of socioeconomic impact in decisions, and other changes benefiting the industry. Of ...Continued on page 56

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FEBRUARY 2019


28th Annual • 100 Bulls Sell Feb 22, 2019 • Montrose, CO • 12 noon Gelbvieh and Balancer Bulls Featuring Yearlings and Long Yearlings Lunch will be provided

Bulls can be seen on video after February 14 with online bidding through DVAuction.com Online bidding the day of the sale with sight unseen purchase is guaranteed. Delivery can be arranged!

Tested for Fertility, PAP, Trich, and PI-BVD

Producing great dispositioned bulls that work at high elevation, rough conditions, calve easy, produce heavy weaning weights, and produce females that are efficient, breed back, and wean a high percentage of their body weight. Call us so we can help pick the bulls that will work best for you! This sale will be broadcast live on the internet.

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

For the latest updates, find us on Facebook at PotOfGoldBulls

Selected for Calving-Ease, Growth, Carcass, Disposition, and Soundness Most bulls are AI sired by top Angus and Gelbvieh bulls

For more information or a catalog, call or visit: Mark 970-209-1956 or Dave 970-209-6833

www.GelbviehBulls.net

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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...Continued from page 54 course, a final rulemaking is required to move forward, a move I expect to occur very soon. I am also pleased to report some progress on the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) 2015 Greater Sage Grouse plans. The new amended plans were released this December, with a focus on working lands conservation and state and local management of the species. The plans move away from draconian grass height requirements and grazing reductions and toward wildfire fuels management. This is positive for ranchers, providing a better environment to operate in the sage grouse country. I anticipate Forest Service to be closely behind, carrying through similar action to benefit the industry. Speaking of wildfire, 2018 was a devastating year for fires across the west. With blazes consuming forests, grazing land, livestock, and human lives, our producers were hit hard last season. We pushed this issue hard on the hill and finally saw some progress with the elimination of “fire borrowing”, the practice of diverting in heavy fire years to make up for budgeting shortfalls. Absent from this fix, unfortunately, was critical language needed to increase the use of categorical exclusions in the forest. We pushed again to address this issue in the farm bill, only to see the finished product stripped of almost all critical forest management tools at the demand of Senate Democrats. PLC spoke out about this failure,

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and our disappointment that the 2018 Farm Bill ended up being a bad bill for the west. That hasn’t made us very popular with some corners of the agricultural community, but we thought it important to have at least one voice speaking for the needs of western ranchers that have been pummeled by wildfire. To ease the sting of Congress’ failure in the Farm Bill, the Administration came through at the end of the year with an executive order promoting active management of forests, rangelands and federal lands. This was a great way to end the year and a positive step toward better forest management. This move from the Administration adds pressure to government to truly reform wildfire management, drawing attention back to needed categorical exclusions. Lastly, we beat the drum on feral horse and burro issues across agencies and coalitions. We were also instrumental in advising the Interior Department on strategies to curb the unsustainable growth, brining solutions that worked for the conservation community, sportsmen groups, and other industries. These efforts led to the gather of more than 11,000 horses and burros last year – the most in recent memory. While there is still much to do, progress always puts our minds at ease. Thanks to all who helped PLC achieve success in 2018. I look forward to the upcoming year, and hope to see you all in Washington, DC this April for the Public Lands Council and NCBA Spring Legislative Conference.

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


- 285 LOTS SELL -

Females sell Sunday evening, February 24th

Bulls sell Monday, February 25th

25 Open Hereford Heifers | 19 Open Angus Heifers 5 Sexed Female Pregnancies

150 Hereford Bulls | 87 Angus Bulls

AHA 43889924

LOT 23 - C 4038 Bell Air 8057 ET

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

AHA 43889973

0.8 53 89 39 0.6 0.17

Powerful big topped son of Belle Air out of the $97,000 donor dam 4038 owned with Bowling Ranch in Oklahoma. Low birth genetics with great markings and big carcass traits. Three full brothers also sell.

LOT 47 - C 4038 Bell Air 8108 ET

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

If you remember back to what “Double Your Miles” looked like when he was named National Champion in Denver 2017 this one is like looking in a mirror. Big bodied and huge hipped with that same dark color pattern and scanned with a huge ribeye. His brothers have proven to be big time herd sires and this one will do the same.

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

3.6 62 87 31 0.69 -0.01

LOT 65 - C CJC 4264 Bell Air 8153 ET

LOT 122 - C Special Edition 7348

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

3.6 64 88 33 0.73 0.2

LOT 191 - CCC The Natural 8060

High performing bull and backed by a top cow family. Dam has an AWWW of 106 and AYWR of 103 with both daughters retained in the herd.

www.hereford.com

2.2 52 85 28 0.6 0.21

AHA P43871950

LOT 123 - C 4038 Mr Canada 7355 ET

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

1.7 63 102 35 0.65 0.04

Unique outcross genetic combination which blends Mr. Canada with one of our very best donors 4038. His individual scan data sets him apart from the rest and with his extra look and structure he will be one of the popular choices sale day.

AAA 19195035 BW WW YW MM REA MARB

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

This herd sire will see heavy use in our program in the years to come. He is the polled full brother to the Belle Heir bull that Knox Brothers recently purchased a half-interest in. Great look and incredible pedigree and performance.

This son of Special Edition has been a standout all along. He has always been a visitor favorite with his extra look and bold top and hip. He is a natural calf out of a Stockman daughter and should be one of the popular sires on the market.

AHA P43871947 BW WW YW MM REA MARB

AHA P43890016

AHA 43871943

2.4 67 95 35 0.65 0.11

This is an exciting young prospect who is made perfect in terms of structure, body depth and muscle shape. He is out of a first calf heifer who was a no doubt donor when she calved. Great udders all the way through both sides of his pedigree with his grandmother being 4208 who sets the bar for udder quality.

LOT 124 - C 5280 1311 Lad 7352 ET

0.8 53 89 39 0.6 0.17

Big time heifer bull candidate and one that could be used on lots of commercial heifer breeding projects. He has as much red as you could put on one and is out of one of the best donors we have in 4038. He will add maternal traits with carcass and superior markings.

AHA P43890045

LOT 78 - C Double Your Miles 8185

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

3.4 74 134 30 0.76 0.31

AAA 19195212

LOT 198 - CCC Playbook 8072

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

This bull is out of one of our all time top producing females. At 11 years old she weaned this calf with a WWR of 110. Her AWWR is 105 and AYWR is 106 on eight head.

Guy, Sherry and Katie Colyer, 208.845.2313 Kyle and Bobby Jean, 208.845.2098 GUY cell: 208.599.0340 • email: guy@hereford.com FAX: 208.845.2314 KYLE cell: 208.250.3924U•tah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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3.1 60 103 33 0.30 0.58


GILLESPIE ANGUS S E L L I N G 7 0 B U L L S A N N U A L LY P E R F OR MAN C E | Q U AL ITY | CA RCA SS | HIGH M ATE RNA L S T R U C TU R AL C O R R EC TNE SS | V IGOROUS | E FFICIE NT T E S TED FO R PER FO R M A NCE , SE M E N, TRICH, A ND PA P

B u l ls A v a i l a b le from th ese S i res

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BUFORD BLUE STEM 9974

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Celebrating 50 Years! BY P RI VAT E T REAT Y Conservatively Priced Slowly Developed for Structural Integrity Fully Guaranteed

We invite you to come take a look! Visitors ALWAYS welcome!

GILLESPIE ANGUS P O Bo x 6 | F ai rvi e w, U T 8 4 6 2 9 | 4 3 5 . 4 6 9 . 1025 Dave Hanse n M i ke C o x Ji m G i l l espie He rdsm an R anc h M anage r Ow ner 435.469.1024 435.469.1025 2 0 8 . 3 7 5 . 6229 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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by Lane Geiss, Director of Commercial and Nontraditional Data Programs, American Simmental Association

The commercial programs offered by the American Simmental Association (ASA) are an by Lane Geiss, Director of Commercial effort to provide genetic tools to the largest sector and Nontraditional Data Programs of the beef industry— the cattle operations. These efforts supported through multiple ASA by The are commercial programs offered programs and the world’s most comprehensive the American Simmental Association (ASA) beef genetic database. The three pillars to ASA are an effort to provide genetic tools to the Commercial Programs are the: Total Herd largest sector—ofCommercial the beef industry— the cattle Enrollment option (THE-CM), Cow operations. These efforts supported through Herd DNA Roundup (CHR),are and the IGS Feeder multiple ASA programs andThese the world’s most Profit CalculatorTM (FPC). programs allow comprehensive beef genetic database. The commercial producers to maximize the genetic three pillarssurrounding to ASA Commercial Programs awareness their program and toare make the: Total Herd Enrollment —decisions. Commercial better management and selection Cow Herd DNA Roundup option (THE-CM), Each of these programs are designed to offer (CHR), and the IGS Feeder Profit Calculaassistance at three key management moments in TM (FPC). operations; These programs allow commercial tor commercial Breeding, Heifer Selection, and Weaning. This articlethe willgenetic briefly dive into how producers to maximize awareness each program functions. surrounding their program and to make better management and selection decisions. Total Herd Enrollment — Commercial Each of these programs are designed to offer The THE-CM themanagement foundation to moments these assistance at three iskey programs and allows participants to fully capitalize in commercial operations; Breeding, Heifer on the true genetic awareness of their cow herd. Selection, and Weaning. This article will This isdive a whole-herd program that helps into howreporting each program functions. briefly isolate the known genetic potential of every female owned. The industry’s best metric for understanding 62 TALK on individual animals is through an SIMmerit genetic Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 60

expected progeny difference (EPD). Simply put, an EPD describes the difference in production value Total Herd Enrollment — for a given trait compared to other cattle. These are allCommercial calculated through pedigree relationships and performance records — and genomics if desired. The THE-CM is the foundation to these proSelection indexes take that one step further by grams and allows participants to fully capitalize combining multiple EPDs on the true geneticeconomically awareness ofrelevant their cow herd. along with industry costs and thresholds into This is a whole-herd reporting program thata helps prediction model. Seedstock breeders of undoubtedly isolate the known genetic potential every female use EPDs and selection indexes to make mating owned. The industry’s best metric for understanddecisions. Why shouldn’t commercial producers is through ing genetic merit on individual animals have the same technology? an expected progeny difference (EPD). Simply Follow thisdescribes link to learn more aboutinTHE-CM: put, an EPD the difference production www.simmental.org/commercial value for a given trait compared to other cattle. These are all calculated through pedigree relation-

Cow Herd DNA Roundup records — and genomics ships and performance The CHR is an opportunity to push if desired. Selection indexes take that the one step furaccelerator on female genetic awareness. Every ther by combining multiple economically relevant cattleman knows cowcosts is hisand bestthresholds producer, but EPDs along withwhich industry dointo theya know right model. away which replacement heifer prediction Seedstock breeders will fill that role? The field of genomics allows undoubtedly use EPDs and selection indexesusto tomake gain amating better decisions. understanding a young commercial heifer’s Whyof shouldn’t genetic potential beforetechnology? she starts producing. producers haveeven the same This technology on the bovine Follow thisuses link known to learnregions more about THE-CM: genome that impact specific economically relevant www.simmental.org/commercial traits. For example, longevity in cattle is known once ...Continued on page 62

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...Continued from page 60

potential on a calf crop through the understanding of genetics, health and management. Buyers want

they’ve been in production for almost a generation, but producers would hope to know that information before they invested time and money in replacements. Through genomics, we can use known genetic markers to give an indication of whether a female may last in the herd longer (or shorter) than others. The CHR will provide years of information before you have

low-risk, high-potential calves with earning potential. Producers want to highlight that their calves fit potential buyer’s needs. As opposed to traditional marketing slogans and empty statements let’s provide true awareness. We can Know or Guess. Choose Know. Follow this link to learn more about the FPC: www.

internationalgeneticsolutions.com

to invest years of time. Follow this link to learn more about CHR: www.

simmental.org/chr

IGS Feeder Profit CalculatorTM While the other two programs are focused around the cow herd, the FPC is centered around where commercial producers make ends meet. They’ve invested a lot of time and money into not only their cow herd, but also their bull battery because they know the role genetics play in the end product. They’ve also invested in their management protocols to ensure the feeder calves they raise will stay healthy and perform in the feedlot. These investments help producers stay profitable and build a more valuable feeder calf, but are their buyers aware of their commitment? The FPC is a third-party view of the profit Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 62

VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


Sons of These Bulls Sell!

9 T H A N N UA L

BULL AND HEIFER SALE Connealy Black Granite

S AT U R DAY , M A RC H 2 3 , 2 019 B OX E L D E R C O U N T Y F A I RG RO U N D S T REMONTON, U T • 1 PM 6 0 B ULLS • 2 0 H EIFERS S I M M E N TA L • A N G U S • S I M A N G U S ®

Bid Live Online at

SAV Universal 4038

SEMEN AND TRICH TESTED F U L LY G UA R A N T E E D

FOR A CATALOG OF MORE INFORMATION, CALL OR EMAIL KASEY ROWSER 435-757-4093 • KASEYROWSER@YAHOO.COM

Come be a part of our family and enjoy a free lunch on us! Our sale is a highlight of our year and we’re excited to share it with you! HA Cowboy Up 5405

W/C Bullseye 3046A

R&R Genetics consists of three families running cattle operations in Northern Utah. Our cattle run on US Forest permits where they range at elevations reaching 9,500+ feet. Water is scarce and trips of 2-3 miles are common from one watering hole to the next. This is why we have chosen to run Angus and Simmental cattle. Both breeds offer a strong maternal instinct, solid milk flow and reproductive efficiency. This is coupled with great dispositions, strong carcass traits and good feet and legs. Our high elevation cattle bred in the west offer top end genetics at affordable prices. We implement a strong ET program and vast AI protocol. If you are looking for strong Angus, Simmental, and SimAngus® genetics, be sure to look us up March 24, 2018!

R & R

ROWSER & RINDERKNECHT

GENETICS WLE Uno Mas X549 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Double JR Simmentals Rowser Angus & Simmental Rinderknecht Angus (435) 512-8455 (435) 757-4093 (435) 279-7372 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

63


e v i l s u n Joir online! o WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AT THESE UPCOMING EVENTS... SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE FEBRUARY 21

WYNDHAM HOTEL, VISALIA, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE MARCH 25

watch, listen and bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy.


BARKER CATTLE COMPANY

BULL AND FEMALE PRODUCTION SALE

Tuesday, February 26, 2019 Burley Livestock Auction, Burley, Idaho • 1:00  () Lot 12 - He Sells.

Lot 4 - He Sells.

FC654

SimAngus™ • TJ Main Event 503B son

Lot 105 - She Sells.

FC933

FA65

FA603

SimAngus™ • CCR Cowboy Cut 5048Z son

Lot 73 - He Sells.

SimAngus™ • JC Mr BSR Kahuna N163C daughter

Lot 13 - He Sells.

SimAngus™ • TJ Main Event 503B son

Lot 133 - She Sells.

FD702

F22G

Angus • EXAR Epic 6549B son

Angus • Boss Prowler 203 daughter

We focus on the TRAITS that PROFIT Western Cattlemen: Calving Ease • BW • WW • YW • API

Ruel & Tyler Barker 801-792-1036 801-372-0996

SALE MANAGED BY:

Tom & Sally Ottley 208-312-3085

Marty Ropp 406-581-7835 Corey Wilkins 256-590-2487 www.alliedgeneticresources.com

Braden Ottley 208-650-6295

www.barkercattle.com

Bowdrie Ottley 208-340-4464 tosalott@atcnet.net

Selling 100 Simmental, Angus and SimAngus™ Bulls 50 Simmental, Angus and SimAngus™ Yearling Heifers

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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CAUSE & EFFECT exploring factors in cow herd management by Certified Angus Beef Supply Development Director Justin Sexten We sometimes associate cause and effect without knowing the real link, or as an academic buzz phrase has it, “correlation does not equal causation.” A quick search provides a humorous example. Did you know ice cream sales and shark attacks are highly correlated? While true in a broad sense, the actual reason for similar seasonal trends is that hot weather brings greater ice cream consumption as well as more swimming along beaches where sharks lurk. Examples in the beef production model are many: vaccines’ ability to prevent pinkeye, growth attributed to a change in feed ingredients, treatment success with the most recent antibiotic. Then there’s the supposed link between weaning success and the moon’s position relative to constellations of stars. While I have never seen any data on the relationship between lunar or zodiac signs and calf weaning success, I wonder if another factor comes into play. Those who follow the signs must plan ahead, so this advance planning could be the actual basis for weaning success rather than relative positions in the heavens. Planning ahead can still get us in trouble, however, if we ignore data and hold on to assumptions of cause and effect. As many cows across the county enter their third trimester and weather turns colder calving season comes to mind along with birth weights and, especially with heifers, concerns about calving difficulty. Two correlations are often referenced for calf birth weight: weather and nutrition. Data from Nebraska and Oklahoma suggest birth weight increases in cold weather and decreases in hot. That’s likely caused by changing blood flow to conserve heat in the winter and dissipate it in the summer, but it’s a factor we can’t control. That said, those who manage fall-calving herds and should keep in mind the seasonal data suggest their calves are 4 to 5 pounds lighter at birth than spring-born from similar genetics. Calving ease is less important in sire selection for the fall herds. You can control late-gestation nutrition, and some say putting limits on that can moderate birth weight. While true, there are many potentially negative effects, such as increased calving difficulty due to weak cows, poor colostrum quality, later puberty in replacements, lower quality grade in finished cattle and increased Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 66

post-partum interval. It may lower rebreeding rates in cows when the attempt to solve a problem not only fails in the near term but keeps on failing because cows lack adequate body condition scores at calving. Clearly the associated effects suggest correct sire selection as the more appropriate method to address dystocia. Another relationship commonly discussed comes up in a recent article from the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center. Warren Snelling and coworkers looked at the correlations or relationships of cow weight and productivity. Their paper examined the productivity of cows over time and how the industry trend for increased yearling growth affects reproductive success and retention in the herd. It agreed with past studies, showing a negative relationship between increased cow weight and weaning production traits. The new wrinkle was Snelling’s suggestion that culling unproductive 2and 3-year-old females could overcome this negative relationship. Here’s where discussion among ranchers can lead to different outcomes, depending on their ranch environments. One decides to stop selecting for more growth, citing genetic progress as the cause for larger mature cow size, which in turn has caused declines in weaning performance and longevity in the herd. Another decides to keep selecting for increased growth and finds minimal reduction in weaning performance. Unknown is how the rest of the environment—to include management—affects these relationships. Perhaps on one ranch, the 2- and 3-year-olds are given another chance after failing to rebreed while the other indirectly selects for fertility (and females that fit the program) by culling based on reproductive success regardless of age. When you stop to think about cause and effect in any aspect of herd management, keep in mind many variables influence cow herd productivity. When evaluating alternative practices, remember to consider all aspects of your environment; your management decisions are part of the environment. When comparing notes with neighbors, veterinarians, nutritionists and seedstock suppliers, ask questions specific to your management in combination with the environment to ensure you are not causing undesired effects or blocking the way for desired effects. VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


Director of Breed Improvement. With more Angus influenced cattle qualifying for the Certified Angus Beef ® brand than ever before, it’s clear that the Angus bull has become America’s bull. He sires calving ease, growth and superior marbling. He works well in any environment, and on any cow, regardless of breed. Make sure that America’s bull serves as your director of herd improvement. Angus. America’s breed. Go to www.Angus.org/businessbreed or call 816.383.5100 to learn more.

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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NEW LOOK, SAME MISSION FOR CAB DIVISION To make it easier for cattlemen to identify and access online resources, the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand revitalized its virtual presence on producer-focused communications channels. It’s all to better serve the cattlemen who own and supply the brand, says Nicole Erceg, CAB producer communications specialist. ““I loved the logo,” she says. “It helps separate the main CAB website from this one.” Erceg says the new name helps cattlemen recognize resources tailored specifically for them. “I recommend cattlemen consider bookmarking this website,” she says. “It’s consistently updated with tools designed to help add value to your bottom line.” Resources include news articles, market insights, success stories, research summaries and new management techniques. It’s an all-encompassing tool for cattlemen targeting quality beef production. For seedstock breeders, the new site includes detailed information on how to leverage the Targeting the Brand program to market Angus bulls. Value calculators and tips for marketing feeder cattle are available for the commercial producer. Packers pay producers more than $75 million annually in premiums for cattle that meet the brand’s ten quality specifications.

“That’s not just pocket change,” she says. “We strive to help cattlemen capture their piece of those premium dollars.” The brand’s first producer-facing website, CABpartners.com, was named for its prominent feedyard partner program that operated for 15 years. As producer outreach efforts grew, technology and branding required an evolution with the change in programs. The addition of a blog and social media channels for the production audience began as “Black Ink from the Certified Angus Beef brand.” The most recent update brings all channels under one umbrella with a new name and look. “As a premium beef brand, we work to ensure each interaction anyone has with the brand is a reflection of the quality beef we market,” Erceg says. “This new website and updated branding brings a new, premium experience to our cattleman resources by making them easier to find, read and use on any device.” Sankey says ease of use is a necessity, because she checks the website for quick updates while on the go. “It makes you want to come back and look at the news or information that’s going to challenge you,” she says. “With technology, you can do more, but we’re all busier, too.” Cattlemen can connect with the brand online through the new website, CABcattle.com and on social media.

Bred to Perform! LOOK FOR US AT THESE SALES Fallon All Breeds Bull Sale

Fallon Livestock Exchange • Fallon, NV February 16

Snyder Livestock Bulls for the 21st Century Synder Livestock Facilities • Yerington, NV March 10

WBCIA Bull Test Sale

Pingetzer’s Bull and Hfr Center • Shoshoni, WY March 14

Utah Beef Improvement Association (UBIA) Producer’s Livestock Auction • Salina, UT March 16

Midland Bull Test

Midland Bull Test Center • Columbus, MT April 5

Private Treaty at the Ranch

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INNOVATION

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800.989.8247

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Join Us the First Thursday in March in Preston, Idaho

cache Valley Bull sale selling a stout set of late fall anD early sPring yearling angus Bulls Outstanding Phenotype, Genetically Elite, Sound, Deep & Functional

thursDay, march 7

Lunch Served at 11 a.m. Sale at 12 p.m.

Watch and Bid Live Online

John cannon 818-400-4513 2214 e. 800 s., Preston, iD 83263 http://cannonangus.com As 4th generation Preston, Idaho, cattle ranchers, we are building our family legacy as we take a systematic approach with sound judgement, balanced eye-appeal and functional cattle that will thrive in our rigid conditions.

SIRE: ICC PAY RAISE 4886

CAnnon PAYRAISE 405 CED +1 MARB I+.23

BW +3.0 RE I+.70

WW +65 $W +47.32

AAA 19322654 12-10-2017

YW +123 $F +89.23

SC I+.95 $G +25.26

MILK +22 $B +130.66

SIRE: EF CoMMAnDo 1366

CAnnon CoMMAnDo 406 CED +9 MARB I+.68

BW +.4 RE I+.67

WW +62 $W +62.53

AAA 19322655 12-10-2017

YW +105 $F +53.59

SC I+.53 $G +41.76

MILK +27 $B +122.39

Our cowherd is backed with performance, carcass and maternal traits so we can sell bulls that thrive in the commercial industry from conception to consumption. We take cattle ranching back to the basics of good-footed, hearty cows producing soggy calves every year! Follow us on Facebook or visit http://cannonangus.com for details on the 2019 sale offering.

CAnnon ConFIDEnCE PLuS 408 CED +14 MARB I+.63

BW -1.3 RE I+.77

WW +49 $W +52.84

YW +92 $F +46.93

sale manager

matt macfarlane: 916-803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com m3cattlemarketing.com auctioneer trent stewart: 541- 325-3662 THD ©

SIRE: BALDRIDGE TITAn A139

SIRE: ConnEALY ConFIDEnCE PLuS

CAnnon TITAn 412 AAA 19325618

AAA 19313143 12-17-2017

SC I+.56 $G +42.41

MILK +29 $B +120.30

CED +3 MARB I+.77

BW +2.2 RE I+.47

WW +60 $W +45.40

YW +111 $F +72.36

CED +12 MARB I+.64

BW -.9 RE I+.71

WW +59 $W +55.03

YW +111 $F +75.35

SC I-.09 $G +41.27

12-28-2017

MILK +25 $B +147.67

MILK +20 $B +130.64

SIRE: CASIno ALL In M46

SIRE: ConnEALY ConFIDEnCE PLuS

CAnnon ConFIDEnCE PLuS 419 AAA 19322662

12-19-2017

SC I+1.12 $G +43.24

CAnnon CASIno ALL In 425 AAA 19322668 1-1-2018 CED +4 MARB I+.47

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MILK +22 $B +166.07


Proactive Approach

Working Together to Manage Public Lands By Utah Congressman and House Natural Resources Committee Chair Rob Bishop For western states, “fire season” has become “fire year.” Just last year, wildfires destroyed over 8.5 million acres of land and wreaked lethal havoc on a growing number of western communities. In Utah alone, wildfires burned over 485,000 acres. This was more than double the acreage that burned during 2017. Sadly, these 2018 wildfire numbers were not an outlier, as we have continuously seen this type of destruction increasing year after year. In the last 10 years, wildfires have burned over 74 million acres. The impact on our nation’s cattlemen and the rural communities of which they are apart has been especially severe, causing tragic losses of homes, cattle, and equipment. This situation is growing more dire with each passing year, and cannot continue to be ignored. First, it is important to dispel the myth that simply nothing can be done; that we, as Americans are powerless against Mother Nature to play any active role in fire prevention. This backwards thinking is where the problem begins but we need not allow this unchecked devastation to continue. It is a fact that many of our forests are overloaded with dangerous dry fuels that have been allowed to accumulate in the absence of proper management. Yet, year after year, we spend billions of dollars fighting wildfires as they occur without seriously addressing this undeniable root cause. What we really need is a more proactive forest management approach that addresses the dangerous overgrowth and dead trees that buildup in our nation’s forests and rangelands. Minimizing the impact of wildfires before they begin is an achievable goal if we use sound science to address the significant overgrowth that has turned many of our lands into ticking time-bombs of kindling leading to the uncontainable wildfires we’ve tragically grown accustomed to. During the 115th Congress, the House led a bipartisan effort to empower our land management agencies with the tools they have requested to better manage our nation’s forests. Following an in-depth series of Congressional hearings examining a myriad of wildfire related issues and challenges, the House passed H.R. 2936, the “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” to restore resiliency and promote health in our fire-prone, overgrown forests. 72

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Regrettably, we were not able to get these important reforms through the Senate. This was sadly a recurring theme with the Senate last Congress. Over 400 House passed bills died in the Senate waiting for a vote because of its often arcane and irrational procedural rules. The 116th Congress presents a fresh opportunity for Congress to work with the Trump Administration to finally enact meaningful reforms to bring critical relief to western forest communities that have been continuously ravaged by catastrophic wildfires. We need to work together to enact the type of proactive forest management that is so desperately needed, including allowing for controlled burns, timber harvesting, and strategic thinning of the overgrowth and dead trees which create these deadly conditions. A handful of fringe environmental groups have worked hard to make the American people believe that active forest management is incompatible with science, and would lead to indiscriminate clear cutting of our nation’s public forests. This willful misinformation campaign must not go unchecked. Active forest management is not a radical idea, and it is indisputably supported by sound science. Similarly, we must address the debilitating harm caused by unnecessary litigation, which is the direct result of many of these same groups weaponizing and abusing the legal system to delay and prevent vital forest management projects. For too long, this costly and frivolous litigation has created a culture of paralysis across public land management agencies that prevents responsible, active land management at a pace and scale needed to restore health, resilient forests. The time to act has long passed and, sadly, we cannot go back and undo the personal and environmental damage from recent fires. However, we can use the tools available to us in partnership with public land managers to mitigate future damage through sound wildfire prevention techniques. We must not continue to treat the symptoms of this crisis while ignoring the root causes. Healthy, fireresilient public forests and rangelands are an achievable goal, and one that we owe to the American people to pursue wholeheartedly. VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


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VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


EAGLE PASS RANCH

THE SOURCE FOR HYBRID VIGOR

RE DUC ING INPUTS • MA XIMIZI N G O UTPUT • I M PROVI N G YO U R BOT TO M L I N E

NEW SALE DATE: PRESIDENT’S DAY - 485 HE AD SELL!

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2019 AT THE R ANCH NE AR HIGHMORE, SD. SALE WILL BE BROADCAST ON DV AUCTION.

EGL FIRESTEEL 103F

EGL FUTURITY 49F

SIMANGUS™

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API 149.0 TI 93.4

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SELLING 225 FEED INTAKE TESTED, ULTRASOUND MEASURED, 50K TESTED BULLS

BAL ANCER ®, SIMANGUS ™, RED ANGUS + ANGUS MATERNAL EDGE™ FEMALE SALE 35 REGISTERED BRED HEIFERS 200 COMMERCIAL BRED HEIFERS 25 COMMERCIAL OPEN HEIFERS

MORE INFORMATION : AJ MUNGER 605/521-4468 ANDY LEDOUX 785/527-3188

EAGLE PASS RANCH

HIGHMORE, SOUTH DAKOTA • PHONE: 1-855-303-BULL

W W W . E A G L E P A S S R A N C H . C O M www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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400 structures 87 homes 485,989 acres - more than double 2017 Over $110 million in costs - not including local firefighting costs 1,314 total wildfires - 462 more than in 2017 680 of the 2018 wildfires were human caused 0 deaths and 0 major injuries 1. Pole Creek Fire • 102,190 acres. • Started on U.S. Forest Service land in Juab County but spread to Sanpete and Utah counties. •Cost is estimated at $20 million for the Pole Creek Fire and $10 million for the smaller adjacent Bald Mountain Fire which burned simultaneously.

2. Dollar Ridge Fire • 68,869 acres • Destroyed over 170 structures Duchesne and Wasatch Counties.

• Cost is estimated at $22 million with the state covering more than half the cost.

3. Goose Creek Fire • 132,220 acres

• 68,431 of the acres burned were in in Utah and another 63,789 across the border in Nevada, where it began due to lighting but spread across the Utah border, burning near Grouse Creek in Box Elder County. • The fire destroyed three structures before being contained in mid-August. • The cost for the Goose Creek Fire is expected to be $8 million, with Utah covering about $2.1 million

4. Coal Hollow Fire • 31,661 acres

• Started with a lightning strike Aug. 4 about 15 miles southeast of Spanish Fork. It burned about 31,661 acres in Utah and Sanpete counties. •That fire will cost about $13.5 million, and Utah will cover $1.6 million of that.

5. Trail Mountain Fire •18,000 acres

• Started June 6 about15 miles northwest of Orangeville in Emery County. • It burned just over 18,000 acres. Utah won’t cover any of that fire’s $15 million cost.

Facts compiled from Utah Division of Forestry, Fires and State Lands 2018 data 76

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A ranching family’s commitment to fire crisis pays off through executive order

F

by Stevie Ipsen for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

or most ranchers, the idea of taking time to rub elbows with politicians in Washington, D.C., doesn’t rank at the top of their bucket list. In fact, there probably aren’t many things that would push them further outside their comfort zones. Fred and Kris Stewart of Nevada’s Ninety-Six Ranch, in Paradise Valley, Nev., likely considered themselves among such ranchers, until a wildfire started on their grazing ground late in the evening of July 4, 2018 forced them to take action. The 18-day Martin Fire destroyed 6,300 acres of the Stewart Family’s private ground in addition to their entire Bureau of Land Management permit of 81,000 acres. In all, nine operations were wiped out during the Martin Fire alone. Their friends and neighbors were again hit as the Sugarloaf Complex Fire consumed nearly 500,000 additional acres for a total of one million acres in Humboldt, Lander and Elko counties in the summer of 2018. For Utah ranchers – on both private and public lands – this tale may sound hauntingly familiar as cattlemen and women in all corners of the Beehive State watched their grazing ground literally go up in flames last summer. Perhaps another similarity between Utah public lands ranchers and their neighbors to the west is that many of them felt this freight train coming as access to public lands has been cut back in recent decades. “Our permits today run 1,800 pair of cattle, when historically they ran 5,000 to 5,500 in the 1930s and ‘40s,” explained Kris Stewart, whose family has been ranching in Nevada for more than 150 years. “Today we turn out May 1 and have to be off by end of September. We used to go out in late March and come home ahead Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 78

of snows in late October to mid November.” Stewart attributes these kinds of permit changes to being a primary cause of the catastrophic outcomes of many of today’s wildfires. “We’ve been through fire before, but this time enough was enough,” Kris said. “My husband and I agreed that we weren’t going to let this happen to another ranching family.” From that point forward, Fred and Kris drafted talking points, gathered facts about the history of the AUMs on their allotments, compiled binders of information, made appointments and booked flights and hotel rooms in Washington, D.C. In mid-September, the Stewart Family made a whirlwind trip around the nation’s capital city. They met with the acting director of the BLM, the chief of the U.S. Forest Service, members of Congress from Utah, Wyoming, California, Idaho, Alaska and of course, they met with senators and a U.S. representative from Nevada. “We felt like each meeting went exceptionally well and like our concerns were really being understood,” Kris said. “Our final meeting was with the assistant director of external affairs for the White House, a meeting that we felt was crucial to the outcome of our trip. In that meeting, we did almost all the talking. Very few questions were asked of us and we left feeling a bit deflated, especially considering how well the other meetings had gone.” After returning home and getting back to life on the ranch, the afternoon of Sept. 26 brought an interesting turn of events for the Stewart Family. “The phone rang and on the other end was the secretary to the President of the United States asking if VOLUME 6

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we could soon be available to speak with the president. Well, yeah, we can be available!” Kris laughed as she shared her thoughts about that evening. Not only was the president interested in the reason for her visit to the White House, he and his staff had studied the materials she had left with him. “He asked what an AUM was. So, I gave him the definition. An animal unit month,” Kris said. “He said, ‘No, not what does it stand for, I want you to explain what it means.’ So I explained it and he then clarified, ‘So, basically how much grass is available to feed a cow and calf for a month?’ and I said, ‘Yes! Exactly!’” “Throughout our conversation, I was so relieved to realize that he got it – he understood,” Kris said. “And best of all – he said he was going to do something about it.” In that conversation, not only did Kris say she felt reassured by the president’s commonsense concerns about wildfire in the west, she believed he was going to help fix it. She said the two talked about what could be done and he shared his plans to issue an executive order on wildfire. She didn’t hide her skepticism and asked him why he couldn’t work towards a law over an executive order. “He was very candid in saying a law was unlikely to pass in the remainder of 2018 given that there was a real chance Republicans would lose the House in the midterm elections. But he promised to release his executive order by the end of the year and that with our (ranchers’) help, it would address the problems we are facing. I asked him if a future president couldn’t just undo an executive order and he said, ‘Trust me, after the work we put into this, no one will have the energy to undo it.’” According to Kris’ account of the remainder of the conversation, Donald J. Trump came across almost exactly how one would expect him to. He wanted to discuss her

“We weren’t going to let this happen to another ranching family.”

-Kris Stewart

trip to Washington – which particular hotel they stayed at and if the Stewarts had visited his steakhouse, which fortunately they had. But the crux of their conversation assured her that President Trump truly did have the best interest of the country in mind and that he was working to see that ranchers’ problems regarding wildfire on public lands would be addressed. On Nov. 10, in the midst of the worst fire in California history, President Trump made a statement from Paris regarding the poor management of forests how the magnitude of such fire catastrophes is avoidable with better management of natural resources. Kris said her mother called during broadcast of the president’s statement and exclaimed, “He’s reading from your paper!” ...Continued on page 80 The Martin Fire burns North of Winnemucca Nev. in July 2018

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...Continued from page 79 And it was true, Kris said. The President of the United States was speaking directly from the notes that he and the Stewarts had discussed. Following the midterm elections, the Stewarts returned to Washington, where they met with Undersecretary of the Department of the Interior, White House Director of External Affairs, Special Assistant to the President and the Director of Policy for the National Security Council. “Once we got assurances that plan was on track for a Christmas-time executive order, I hit three key legislative offices to update them and ask that they keep hard pressure on the White House and Interior Department,” Stewart said. Those key officers were those of Rep. Liz Cheney (WY), Rep. Mark Amodei (NV) and Rep. Kevin McCarthy (CA). To ensure persistence pays off, she talked again one on one with incoming House Minority Leader McCarthy on Dec. 11 when he wanted to hear more about her talk with President Trump to make sure he was doing all he could. In addition to these various meetings with politicians and policy makers, Kris spent her fall and early winter speaking to cattlemen’s groups and the National Grazing Forum. At these events she stressed the importance of real world ranchers getting involved in outreach and education effort of those who can help reverse the mismangement of natural resource management that has been created in recent decades. While trade organizations are also working on this and the myriad of issues impacting ranchers, Kris said the involvement of those who live, work and understand the environment in their own unique areas is vital to spurring true progress and change. To his credit, President Trump followed through on his promise to the Stewart Family of the NinetySix Ranch in Northern Nevada. On Dec. 21, with the Christmas holiday looming and the real possibility of a partial government shutdown filling his plate, Donald J. Trump issued an executive order that expands logging on public lands to curb the devastation caused by wildfires. The executive order instructs the USDA Secretary and Interior Secretary to consider harvesting a total of 4.4 billion board feet of timber from forest land managed by their agencies on millions of acres, and put it up for sale. The order would translate into a 31 percent increase in forest service logging since 2017. According to the Washington Post, an insider told them the president wanted to sign an executive order on the issue during his trip to California in mid-November, but it wasn’t ready for his signature. 80

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In addition to removing trees, Trump asked his secretaries to remove forest brush and debris that help fuel fires from more than 4 million acres and treat another 1.5 million acres to control tree-destroying pests. “President Trump has kept his focus and his word,” Kris said. “The executive order is perfect. It sets the table for next step – secretarial action to rework policy and regulations to effectively manage our forests and rangeland. Remember that rangeland is not a use-based designation, it is a type of ground that requires grazing to maintain optimum health and reduce wildfire danger.” Though nay-sayers who disagree with the executive order maintain that wildfires are worse in recent decades due to climate change and that most fires are human caused, folks like the Stewarts recognize that regardless of the original cause of fires, the devastation is caused from the overgrowth and underuse of natural resources. Another problem ranchers across the west experience is that after a fire impacts public land, the use requirements become more strict – if the land is even allowed to be used at all. The Stewarts experienced that problem first hand this fall as they waited for a post-fire grazing plan for their BLM permit. And as they feared, the news wasn’t good. The plan said no outcome-oriented grazing – no grazing, seeding or weed abatement after March 1 – and no grazing till fencing was restored (with low BLM funds for fencing) and no grazing till base plants (sagebrush and perenniels) were restored. “After dragging their feet for months, we finally got the BLM’s plan and was the same lack of commonsense we’ve been seeing for decades,” Kris said. Only this time, she had in her arsenal the personal phone numbers of people in Washington who could help – and they did. Meetings have now been set up with local BLM staff to discuss the Stewart’s post-fire plan and it is their hope that the long-time post-fire protocols can evolve into more commonsense solutions with more input at the rancher level. But as Kris says, other ranchers don’t have top officials at the Department of the Interior or the BLM in their phone list. Her advice? “Ranchers should be learning from these fires not just cranking out the same old responses that guarantee more cheat grass, more fire, less range health and less sustainability for all the species who share the range of the rural West.” “The swamp is alive and well, and it exists at each of these agencies at many levels. We must stay focused, engaged and steadfast in making our points to all who will listen,” she urges. “As for me, I’m going to keep speaking and pushing my way into meeting rooms in D.C., and anywhere else this discussion needs the gut check from real working ranchers who know what really works out on the range.” VOLUME 6

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S AW C AT T L E C O .

Q UA L I T Y H AY

AND

A N G U S C AT T L E

A LWA Y S F O R S A L E !

LOOK FOR SAW ANGUS BULLS AT Utah Beef Improvement Association March 16 • Salina, UT Selling our best Angus bulls!

KCF BENNETT SOUTHSIDE, THE SIRE OF OUR CONSIGNMENT AT UBIA, LOT 118!

PRIVATE TREATY AT THE RANCH CALL 435-660-1347

At SAW Cattle, we strive to provide the most well rounded cattle possible. We not only focus on growth to bring you more pounds at sale time. But we put just as much emphasis on material traits, docileity, and heifer pregnancy as we do on carcas data. We want your replacement heifers to preform. We winter in Nephi Utah and summer in Montpelier Idaho. Both places are about 6000 ft. Feel free to call anytime at 435-660-1347.

Quality Hay & Angus Bulls Shane and Kristie Walker Mona, UT 435-660-1347 2017 SEEDSTOCK PRODUCER OF THE YEAR 82

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Adams Acres Chilkoot 376 01-07-2018 Sire: A&B Spotlite 3065, BW 90 , WW 850 , Ratio 114

Adams Acres Spotlite 907 01/18/2018 Sire: A&B SpotLite 3065, BW 77, WW 759 , Ratio 102

#19182601 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B +2.9 +77 +139 +1.03 +5 +29 +80 +.67 +71.17 +115.54 +185.45

Rimrock Text Book 1809 01/25/2018 Sire: Tex Playbook 5437, BW 83 , WW 706

#19181921 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B -.4 +75 +123 +2.25 -3 +33 +.66 +.41 +83.43 +87.57 +136.92

WBVB BL Eclipse 776E

08-21-2017 Sire: MAGS Cable, BW 64, WW 608, PAP: 39

#19217594 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B +1.0 +54 +94 +1.13 +26 +34 I+.46 I+.40 +58.94 +149.90 +129.13

#LFM2140456 CED BW WW YW MK CEM SC DOC +16 -1.2 +69 +108 +24 +10 +1.60 +14

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USU ANIMAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR RETIRING AFTER 41 YEARS Well-known Utah State University professor in the department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Science Lyle McNeal, Ph.D., will be retiring from the university July 1, 2019 having educated students at the land grant university since 1979. Raised on a ranch in Montana, he began his career upon graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Animal Husbandry from California Polytechnic State College in San Luis Obispo, Calif., in 1964. He went on to receive a Master of Science in Animal Breeding and Range Management, with a focus on improvement of sheep genetics and carcass trait, from the University of Nevada, Reno in 1966. In recognition of his commitment to agricultural sciences and education, McNeal has received numerous awards throughout the course of his career. Most recently, he was honored as the Undergraduate Faculty Mentor of the Year at the 2018 Robins Awards at USU. He was the recipient of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service Award to conduct work with the sheep and wool sector in Armenia in 2011, and then another Foreign Agricultural Service Award to work with the Iraqi shepherds and veterinarians in 2013. In 2007 in Washington, D.C. he received

the Carnegie Professor of the Year Award, representing the State of Utah, and to this day, the only professor in the agricultural sciences to receive this nationally recognized award for an outstanding career as a professor in higher education. In 2003, he was selected as recipient of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Association of State and Land Grant Colleges, National Excellence in Teaching Award, the highest in the USDA. His personal achievements include helping to rescue from extinction the first domestic sheep brought to North America by the Spanish conquistadores. McNeal has been featured in a wide range of honors publications, including Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World. He maintains involvement with numerous academic and agricultural organizations, including the National Livestock Conservancy, Utah Wool Growers Association, the American Sheep Industry Association, American Society of Animal Science, National Bison Association, and the National Academic Advising Association, where he was named a National Faculty Advisor of the Year in 2005. Additionally, McNeal is an honorary lifetime member of the Navajo-Churro Sheep

Association, Dine’ be’ Iina (The Navajo Lifeway) organization of Navajo shepherds and notable artisan weavers, and the American Polypay Sheep Association, which sheep breed he helped in its development while at the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station, Dubois, Idaho. As one of the first teachers an agriculture student has at Utah State, McNeal is remembered fondly by thousands of the college’s graduates for helping many get started on the the right track in their college careers and for being instrumental in many of their life career choices.

Breeding Cattle That Work!!

March 9 2019

• M AT E R NA L T R A I T S • D OA B I L IT Y • • POW E R • S T RU C T U R E • • PE R FOR M A N C E •

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Tuesday

March 5, 2019

11 a.m. • Baker City, Oregon 200 BULLS & 75 FEMALES Also Note:

March 4, 2019 • Baker City, Oregon

Harrell Hereford Ranch Bull Sale at the Western Genetic Event

Thomas Rampage 7876 19126639

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Dam’s Sire: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

Thomas Weigh Up 8051 19157467

Sire: Plattemere Weigh Up K360 • Dam’s Sire: GAR Prophet

CED +7 BW +2.2 WW +67 YW +119 Milk +26 MRB +.63 RE +1.03 $B +171.59

CED +8 BW +2.1 WW +81 YW +135 Milk +37 MRB +.93 RE +.73 $B

Thomas Fortress 7666 19008380

Sire: KCF Bennett Fortress • Dam’s Sire: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

Thomas Carol 7785 19126522

Sire: KCF Bennett Absolute • Dam’s Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 Due 8/25/19 to Sydgen Enhance 5209-B15.

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Bryce Schumann, Manager of Cooperative Solutions • Cell (785) 424-0360 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

CED +8 BW +2.3 WW +76 YW +135 Milk +32 MRB +.67 RE +.48 $B +163.26

CED +8 BW +.4 WW +65 YW +113 Milk +20 MRB +.64 RE +.56 $B +143.04

Sale Managers: www.cotton-associates.com 517-546-6374

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HOW TO GIVE

multi-tasking mamas

A NUTRITIONAL BOOST

from BioZyme, Inc. Ask any new mother how she’s feeling, and variations of “exhausted” will likely be uttered from her mouth. If a new mama cow could talk, her answer might be the exact same, especially if she is a 2-or 3-year-old that’s just delivered her first or second calf into the herd, while she’s still growing and developing herself. That’s not all this multi-tasking mama is doing; she’s also lactating, caring for a calf, and trying to prepare herself for the upcoming breeding season. Producers put a lot of pressure on their cows. While they continue to grow and mature themselves, they

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are also growing a calf in their womb and hopefully generating an ample supply of high-quality colostrum. On calving day, you expect them to deliver a healthy, vigorous calf unassisted, and get that calf up and nursing. Then, during peak lactation when nutrient needs are the highest, you also expect them to maintain their body condition, all while continuing to grow and being ready to rebreed 4560 days after their calf is born. “These are some unrealistic expectations we put on a cow in a very short amount of time, about 120 to 150 days of her life,” said Lindsey Grimes-Hall, Nutrition and Field Sales Manager for BioZyme® Inc. “Our cattle are genetically superior to what they were 20, 40, even 50 years ago so our nutrient requirements are also increased because they are genetically capable of more. Between genetics being better and our exceedingly high-performance expectations of that cow to stay in business, we have got to take care of her at a nutrient level that will allow her to reach optimal performance. If she’s not getting the groceries and goodies she needs, she is going to fall short. We’re going to want to blame it on the cow, but it’s not really her fault. We weren’t paying attention to what she needed.” The hierarchy of nutrient partitioning applies to all vitamins, minerals, protein and energy according to Grimes-Hall, and a large portion of nutrients that an animal consumes each day goes toward maintenance. Next, the remaining nutrients are used for the growth of the actual animal if they have not yet met maturity. If there are still a surplus of nutrients, these can be allotted for fetal growth and development. Finally, any remaining nutrients are then used for milk production, reproduction and weight gain – all critical to that younger cow that has just given birth. “If you are lacking nutrition, milk production, reproduction and BCS are what are going to suffer first,” Grimes-Hall said. “And that’s not even taking into consideration the weather.” Weather has a huge impact on basic maintenance requirements. When it is really cold, an animal is going to have to expend more energy to keep herself warm. Nutrient requirements tend to increase 10 to 25 percent in extremely cold weather, when many producers do calve. ...Continued on page 88

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...Continued from page 86 To prepare your cows for this nutritionally challenging time of their production cycle, Grimes-Hall suggests making sure the younger females are on a more positive plane of nutrition and exceeding some of their nutrient requirements. As they enter the last 30 to 45 days of gestation, an extra boost of protein and energy will help them with colostrum production, as well as their own maintenance. She warns not to push the cows too hard to get them overly fleshy because that could lead to bigger calves and calving difficulties. Additional nutrition for your cows will depend on the region you live in and the resources available to you. If you were able to make plentiful high-quality hay, you might be able to supplement with additional forage. For others, adding grain to the diet might be necessary. “That’s the beauty of the beef industry. We can do so many different things to achieve the same result all across the country,” she said. One sure way to get added nutrients into your herd’s diet while maximizing the nutritional value of their feed, is to feed with VitaFerm® Concept•Aid®. Concept•Aid is a line of vitamin and mineral supplements for beef cattle formulated to promote effective, easy breeding when fed 60 days pre-calving through 60 days post-breeding. High concentrations of vitamin E and organic trace minerals, coupled with the Amaferm® advantage, supports quick repair of the reproductive tract and more energy for reproductive success. Additionally, increased nutrient absorption and digestion leads to healthier and heavier calves giving you performance that pays. A variety of Concept•Aid formulas are available for producers to use and there is one to complement every quality of forage. All formulations are formulated with high concentrations of the most stable, highest bioavailable trace minerals on the market to ensure quicker impact and high levels of vitamin E to aid in reproductive tract repair. BioZyme, the maker of Concept•Aid, has created a handy, easy-to-use calculator to determine which Concept•Aid fits best into your scenario. “The NRC requirements are based on an average cow, with average performance in an average environment. I always like to challenge customers, and say we all have better than average cows,” Grimes-Hall said. “With improved advancements in genetic selection and better management practices, our cows need more than average nutrient requirements to meet our expectations.” The mama cow is a busy lady with raising a calf, maintaining her own body condition, and getting reproductively in-shape for re-breeding. As producers, it’s your priority to make sure she has the nutrients she needs to handle the balancing act required to continue to be a highperforming, profitable part of your herd. Provide the nutrition she needs with VitaFerm and the Amaferm advantage. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 88

UTAH’S SCHULTHESS APPOINTED TO BEEF BOARD At the first of the year, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue today announced the appointment of 35 members to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board. Utah beef producer Wallace Schulthess, Woodruff, was appointed to serve a 3-year term. The board is authorized by the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985 and has 99 members, all of whom are beef producers or importers of cattle, beef or beef products. Since 1966, Congress has authorized the establishment of 22 industry-funded research and promotion boards. They empower farmers and ranchers to leverage their own resources to develop new markets, strengthen existing markets, and conduct important research and promotion activities. USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Services provides oversight, paid for by industry assessments, which ensures fiscal accountability and program integrity. More information about the board and list of board members is available on the Agricultural Marketing Service Cattlemen’s Beef Board web page. More information can also be found on the board’s website, www.beefboard.org.

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www.CallicrateBanders.com VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


QUALIT Y & BALANCE

Bigger isn’t always better and more isn’t always best

Breeding better cattle isn’t as simple as picking the biggest or the most extreme data package. It’s about producing well balanced, sustainable genetics that continue to enhance output and profit while protecting the basics of calving ease and maternal productivity. Look to ABS for the best in multi-trait performers with quality and balance. HICKOK and BROKEN BOW are our top sellers in 2018 because of the total data and phenotype packages they offer. Use them and next generation ABS leaders to not only produce top selling bulls, but also females that will keep you and your customers in business for the long run.

LAND GRANT

29AN2053

CHERRY CREEK LAND GRANT AAA 18863391 K C F BENNETT HOMESTEAD x KG SOLUTION 0018

WELL GROUNDED MATERNAL GENETICS ■ High performance son of the maternal standout HOMESTEAD ■ Ranks #1 among all HOMESTEAD sons for yearling growth and $Beef index ■ Well balanced phenotype and well balanced data ranking in the top third of the breed in 19 categories ■ Should offer all of the maternal design quality of HOMESTEAD with more performance and a highly competitive overall data package

TRAIT EPD ACC

CED +9 .36

BW

+0.1 .55

WW +66 .48

Y W RADG DMI

+127 .44

+.35 .25

+.17 .25

YH

+0.4 .50

SC

+0.70 .49

DOC +25 .36

HP

+16.1 .24

CEM MILK Hd/Dts MW +7 .31

+30 .32

0 0

+49 .33

MH

+0.6 .38

CW MARB REA +62 .42

+.76 .37

+.67 .37

FAT C/U Pg $EN

-.013 .33

0 0

$W

$G

$B

-24.29 +67.77 +44.15 +185.53 EPDs as of 01/04/2019 TOP 35%

PATRIARCH

29AN2093

TEHAMA PATRIARCH F028 AAA 18981191 S S NIAGARA Z29 x CONNEALY THUNDER

FAMILY MATTERS ■ Record setting bull from the Tehama program and highlight of the fall 2018 sales season ■ Admired for his sound structure, foot quality and massive appearance ■ Power phenotype bull with top 5% growth that also happens to have a +14 Calving Ease EPD ■ Maternal pedigree backed by a program that has relentlessly pursued and been focused on maternal output coupled with end product merit ■ His grandsires, HOOVER DAM and Connealy Thunder are both recognized as superior female sires that consistently transmit sound foot structure and excellent teat and udder quality

TRAIT EPD ACC

CED +14 .37

BW -1.6 .52

WW +71 .46

Y W RADG DMI

+131 .41

+.19 .24

+1.05 .24

YH

+0.3 .48

SC

+0.78 .46

DOC +20 .34

HP

+16.8 .24

CEM MILK Hd/Dts MW +15 .29

+29 .29

0 0

+35 .32

MH

+0.2 .37

CW MARB REA +50 .41

+.73 .37

FAT C/U Pg $EN

+.90 +.028 .37 .35

0 0

$W

$G

$B

-21.61 +78.29 +43.68 +150.67 EPDs as of 01/04/2019 TOP 35%

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

1.800.ABS.STUD | ABSBEEF.COM

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PLEASE CONTACT US FOR ALL YOUR PASTURE, RANGELAND, AND FORAGE INSURANCE NEEDS! THANK YOU FOR YOUR BUSINESS. Payden Stewart | (940) 203-0095 8525 Business US Hwy 277 N | Haskell, TX 79521 90

www.rangelandinsurance.com • www.silveuscropins.com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FILLING THE GAPS IN DISEASE PREVENTION

When commercial vaccines may not be the answer, Newport Laboratories can create a custom one. We pinpoint the problem and produce a customized vaccine specific to the herd in need. And now that Newport Laboratories is part of Boehringer Ingelheim, you have the combined resources of two industry leaders ensuring your veterinary toolbox is never left incomplete. For more information, contact Newport Laboratories, Inc. at 800-220-2522.

The Newport Laboratories Logo is a registered trademark of Newport Laboratories, Inc. Š2018 Newport Laboratories, Inc., Worthington, MN. All rights reserved. BOV-1255-NPL0518 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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GETTING YOUR HERD IN SYNC

Strategies for calving 85% of the cow herd in 30 days by Adrienne Lulay and Clint Sexson, All West/Select Sires

M

any producers have different management scenarios to juggle as spring rapidly approaches. We are all calving cows, planning brandings, preparing to move pairs from winter pastures to Bureau of Land Managment, Forest permits and mountain pasture and going to bull sales. There are so many decisions to be made. We need those bigger calves that walk the distance or weather the long haul to greener pastures and return as big strapping feeders to push down the scales in the fall. How great would it be to have all those calves on the ground early, branded and ready for spring turnout? Here are a few thoughts to consider going forward. If you could have 425 out of 500 calves on the ground in a month’s time, they would sure have a jump start on their journey to greener pastures. You may want to consider the benefits of synchronization and artificial insemination (A.I.). How is this achievable you ask? Synchronization allows every cow an opportunity to conceive on the first day of the breeding season, and the cows that miss will have the chance to settle in 21 or 42 days following synchronization. Wow, three chances to get bred in 42 days?! Yes! And better yet, with a 55 percent conception rate on first and second service, you only have 75 cows left to get pregnant in the second month of the breeding season. You ask what about the financial risk? Does it pay? Let’s discuss the logistics of implementing this aggressive program. If you are starting into an A.I. program for the first time with your cows, you need to be ready to commit for the long run. The results will become very evident by year four or five, when your young cows are comprised of the early born heifers resulting from synchronization. And if your goal is to cut your calving season down to 45 days you will have to make tough culling and marketing decisions. There will be many good cows that simply will not make the cut because they calved too late in the previous calving seasons. However, there will be a chance to give some of those cows an opportunity to catch up with the main herd. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 92

A few years down the road when you calve out heifers that were themselves from an A.I. sire, you will see huge differences in your calf crop. Cows chosen for the first synchronization should be at least 45 days post calving when you start them on a controlled internal drug release (CIDR) synchronization program. This should have given them enough time for their uterus to return to normal size and for them to start cycling. Some very healthy cows will cycle as early as 21 days post-partum while others will still be anestrus (not cycling) at 45 days. The benefit of still synchronizing those anestrus cows is that you will create an artificial “cycle” for them using the synchronization hormones. By using CIDRs, you expose the cow’s body to progesterone that she has not experienced since calving and you essentially jump start her, allowing for a more robust follicle to be formed on the subsequent cycle. Normal A.I. conception rates on a program of sevenday co-synch plus CIDR synchronization with fixed time AI range from 48 to 65 percent. In order to gain even higher conception rates with the seven-day co-synch plus CIDR synchronization program for cows you should consider applying the split time AI technique to your program. This involves identifying cows that are in estrus on schedule and giving cows not in estrous additional time to go into heat and be bred accordingly. With the help of heat detection aids like Estrotect heat detection patches, you can identify standing heat with minimal effort. Estrotect patches are similar to a lottery ticket with a grey coating that is scratched off when other cows mount the cow in heat. The mounting cow’s brisket rubs off the grey revealing a bright, easily distinguished color beneath. A cow is considered in estrus when at least 50 percent of the sticker is rubbed off. Estrotect stickers are applied when CIDRs are pulled and the prostaglandin shot is given on day seven. When using the ...Continued on page 94

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...Continued on page 92 stickers in a split time A.I. synch, you will separate off all the cows that have an activated sticker at 66 hours post CIDR pull and A.I. cows that do not have an activated sticker at 66 hours are separated till 20 to 24 hours later when they will be brought in and artificially inseminated. Cows that have not shown estrus at 90 hours also receive gonadatrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) shot (Cystorelin or Fertagyl). Using the split time A.I. protocol provides a happy medium between entirely fixed timed A.I. and longer term heat checking. By only giving GnRH to cows that have not shown heat you should have a significant savings on your drug costs. Additionally, you will capture more pregnancies by listening to the cows and breeding off of heats. The figure to the right also helps illustrate this concept. In the study by Patterson’s group evaluating split time A.I. at the University of Missouri, they found that on average, 63 percent of cows showed a heat by 90 hours post PGF shot. Pregnancy rates were increased 7 percent from 49 percent pregnancy rate with fixed time A.I. versus 56 percent pregnancy rate with split time A.I. While this system requires some extra labor and the cost of the Estrotect patches, the extra cost can be entirely offset by reduced GnRH costs. If you get an increase of 7 percent in A.I. pregnancy rates the extra labor is entirely worth it. In the 500 cow example, using the split time A.I. you could get an additional 35 calves from A.I. that will be born in the first two weeks the calving season. Those 275 calves born to A.I. will have an additional 21 days of gain on their natural service herd mates as well as genetic gain. Some of the cows will not be able to “accept the challenge” of getting pregnant on the synchronization with A.I., but you will have set them up to be successful on their second cycle 21 days later. This will front load the first 30 days of the calving season with the first 275 calves and a second “wave” of 150 calves. Once you have implemented a synchronization program you will need to be aggressive with monitoring pregnancies, culling of open cows or marketing cows with short term pregnancies. Clean-up bulls should be pulled 45 days after artificial insemination. If ultrasounding you will want to diagnose pregnancy at 45 days after the clean-up bulls are pulled out. You can also use the Bio-Pryn blood test for pregnancy diagnosis in which case you can test as early as 30 days after you pull the bulls. There may be a significant number of open cows at this time, but they do not fit your calving window so they should be culled or marketed as bred cows. They may be perfectly good cows that will do well in a later calving herd for someone else. If it is the first year you are using A.I. and you are unwilling to cull a lot of cows, you may want to synchronize a second set of your later calving cows. Set your second group of cows up for breeding 21 days after the first group so they get two chances to be bred. This way, you can accumulate another decent sized group of cows that have passed 45 days post-partum and will have a good chance of becoming pregnant to the AI. This will allow you to ease your herd into a shorter calving season. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 94

FIGURE 1. Seven-day co-synch plus CIDR with split time A.I.

And now for the dollars and pounds of the matter! Compared to a traditional natural service what is the return on investment? It comes down to at least 30 pounds and $75.42 return on investment per head on steers and 30 pounds and $67.89 return on heifers produced in the synchronized mating system. “Tell me more,” you say? OK, let’s break it down. Given a 95 percent pregnancy rate on 500 cows, you will have over 400 calves synchronized to be born in the first 21 days compared to approximately 275 calves in a bull breeding system. Those 400 should push the scale down with more than 30 pounds per head of extra sellable weight considering both steer and heifer mates alike. Or approach it from this view, how many more actual pounds of calf are generated? If 275 head of natural sired calves are born in the first 21 days of the calving season and weigh 537 pounds at weaning, you have almost three 50,000 pound loads of calves to market without keeping replacements. If compared to the synchronized and A.I. program with a 55 percent first service conception, you should receive at least 30 more pounds of weaning weight per head on 275 A.I. sired calves born in the first two weeks of the calving season (275 calves x 30 pounds = 8250 more pounds) and 125 more calves born in the first 21 days of the calving season (125 calves x 568 pounds =71,000 pounds). If you are marketing 50,000 pound loads of calves in the fall, you can now market four loads of early born calves, as well, you can keep more than 50 replacements heifers. If the calculated return on investment is correct, the 200 steers should return over $15,050 and 200 heifers should return over $13,575 above and beyond traditional natural service. These numbers are generated above and beyond input costs of the A.I. program. The bonus is the genetic value of the female offspring retained for replacements. So if those potential herd building genetics are added to the operation, your returns are greater looking forward. The benefits seem to outweigh the extra labor and costs of doing business. If you are looking to get the most pounds out of the early spring grass, those early born calves are your best bet. Ask your local A.I. representative how to get started down the road to greener pastures and with more pounds of high quality genetics. To put wheels under those extra pounds of marketable calf start with synchronization and A.I. VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


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MARCH 29, 2019 - 1:00 PM - PRODUCER’S LIVESTOCK AUCTION - SALINA, UTAH

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We select cattle for doability, longevity, and production. We are trying to raise true quality Red Angus cattle that will thrive in the West’s harsh conditions. VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


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DATA ON FILE, STUDY REPORTS NO. 2239A-60-00-029, 2239A-60-00-030, 2239A-60-00-033, 2239A-60-94-003, 2239A-60-94-007, 2239A-60-94-067, 2239A-60-94-068, 2239A-60-94-070, 2239A-60-95-156 AND 2839A-60-97-123, ZOETIS INC. ALL TRADEMARKS ARE THE PROPERTY OF ZOETIS SERVICES LLC OR A RELATED COMPANY OR A LICENSOR UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. © 2018 ZOETIS SERVICES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DMX-00090

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TAX CODE UPDATES IMPACTING YOU by Robin Pickard, LTP, Athena Income Tax

While rules change within the tax code from year to year, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is being considered as the largest overhaul in the American Tax code since 1986. While change is not always a bad thing, change does leave a lot of questions and uncertainties. The TCJA biggest appeal is that it is suppose to simplify your tax return. While I agree that for some it may, I feel that for others it will create more of an investment in getting the return filed correctly. That being said I hope that if you’re one that falls in the category of non-simplistic you have already had multiple conversations with your Tax Professional. One of the biggest areas of uncertainty under the TCJA has been the 20 percent deduction under Section 199A, which took the IRS till August of 2018 to issue proposed regulations to help explain the deduction. The basis of this deduction is, that those eligible to take a Section 199A deduction include pass-through entities (such as S corporations, LLCs, LPs, GPs, Ect.), sole proprietors, and certain trusts and estates. A basic example would be for someone who owns their own business and made $100,000 in 2018, could potentially get a $20,000 cash-free deduction and only pay tax on the remaining $80,000 of taxable income. As with all tax codes there are exceptions to this rule, so please discuss with a professional. Farmers, Ranchers, and Small Business owners have hopefully had multiple conversations with their tax professional throughout 2018, as tax planning is, or should be a vital part of your management of the business. I don’t say this to create more work for myself, but from my professional standpoint I would rather assist you all year long than have you deliver your stuff in February and say here is what I did, then I have to give you the bad news that you could have done something differently to reduce your tax liability. Going with the theory that you all did a diligent job of having multiple conversations with your tax professional in 2018 you already know that for most business owners there were two avenues you could take your business, first being more income may have been the best advantage to reach the taxable income target for the most advantageous deductions, and the second may be that your business had a better than average year so you might need the advantage of reducing taxable income. Now let’s say that you fall in the category of an after

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the year is over now, I need to do some tax planning, don’t fret you still have a few options that may be beneficial to you. One option may be looking long range to your retirement, I know what you’re thinking Farmers and Ranchers don’t retire, I grew up on a cattle ranch I know that you work them forever. However, in this case it may be beneficial to tuck some money away to reduce your tax liability. There are multiple different retirement options available for you to contribute to for the 2018 tax year even though we have moved into 2019. Some will reduce your current year income taxes, there are also nondeductible plans. It is best you consult your tax preparer and a financial advisor for the option that will best fit your needs. A second option is the increase amount of IRC Section 179 expensing to $1 million with an investment limit of $2.5 million. A third option may be the bonus depreciation of 100 percent for new and used depreciable assets purchased in 2018. While there are more options out there it is best to consult with your tax professional what is going to be the best option for you. All of this talk of the TCJA and how to plan for it accordingly to optimize your business on a Federal level is great, but I think that people are missing the fact that in a state that collects Income Taxes for the most part we aren’t going to see the same changes. I hope that your pre-year-end tax planning took that into consideration as well. I also would say that from a professional standpoint some tax returns will take longer to prepare because of this. Again, every change has good qualities and bad qualities and the best we can do is roll with them, making the best, most informed decisions we can for our businesses. I highly recommend multiple conversations a year with your team of professionals; tax preparer, financial advisor, and lawyers, in order to keep your business growing and striving year to year. If you don’t have these people in your hip pocket it would be my recommendation that you find people who specialize in ag business, that you feel comfortable with and can openly talk with. I tell most of my clients I have to ask the nosy, personal questions in order to best serve you, so find someone you feel comfortable telling everything to. Disclaimer: Every tax situation is different and the above article is just a general statement not advice for specific situations. VOLUME 6

FEBRUARY 2019


T HE H EREFORD

U TAH A SSOCIATION

4 8 TH A N N UA L BULL SALE 3 0 B ULLS • 15 F EMALES M ARCH 2 • 1

PM

• P RODUCER’ S L IVESTOCK • S ALINA, U T

Selling 45 Head from these Progressive Hereford Breeders P HIL A LLEN AND S ON, A NTIMONY • D ICK J ONES, O RANGEVILLE • D AN T AYLOR, G ENOLA O L I V E R B R O T H E R S , L E VA N • R O N R E E D , L A S V E G A S • E K K E R H E R E F O R D S , V E R N O N SIRED BY THESE BREED-LEADING BULLS!

W hite h a wk WA R R I O R 8 4 5 C

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Come enjoy a great afternoon hosted by the Utah Hereford Association! C a l l S h a n n o n A l l e n a t 4 3 5 - 6 24 - 3 2 8 5

F OR M ORE I NFORMATION , C ONTACT :

U TAH H EREFORD A SSOCIATION

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

P RESIDENT • S HANNON A LLEN - 435-624-3285 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

99


ABS........................................................... 89 Adams Angus Connection.................... 83 AllFlex, USA............................................ 70 American Angus Association............... 67 American Gelbvieh Association........... 14 American Hereford Association........... 25 American Simmental Association........ 61 Anderson Angus..................................... 42 Banks Simmentals.................................. 42 Barker Cattle Company......................... 65 Basin Livestock Bull Sale....................... 84 Beckman Livestock ................................ 83 Beef Council............................................ 28 BioZyme, Inc, VitaFerm........................ 87 Blackett Angus........................................ 42 Botts Angus............................................. 45 Callicrate Banders.................................. 88 Cannon Angus Ranch............................ 71 Circle Four Simmentals....................... 101 Colyer Herefords and Angus................ 57 Daniels Livestock.................................... 42 Daniels Polled Herefords..................... 102 DBC Angus............................................. 84 Diamond Peak Cattle Co....................... 49 Double JR Simmentals........................... 63 Eagle Pass Ranch.................................... 75 Ekker Herefords.................................... 104 Fullmer Crescent Moon Angus............ 30 Genex, Cri............................................... 44

Gillespie Angus Ranch........................... 59 Hoffman AI Breeders............................. 62 Hot Shoe Red Angus.............................. 96 Intermountain Embryonics................... 77 Intermountain Farmers , IFA........... 20,21 Intermountain Genetic Alliance........... 42 Ipsen Cattle Co....................................... 43 Johansen Herefords............................... 6,7 Keller Cattle Corp..................................... 9 Key-Lix..................................................... 56 Lazy JB Angus......................................... 18 Loveless Gelbvieh........................... 39, 101 Lund Ranch............................................. 27 Lyman Livestock....................................... 3 Lynn Angus............................................. 42 Maple Leaf Seed Co................................ 50 McPherson Farms.................................. 19 Memory Ranches.................................... 81 Miles High Angus............................. 41, 42 MultiMin USA........................................ 51 Newport Laboratories............................ 91 Phil Allen and Son.................................. 24 Pot of Gold Bull Sale.............................. 55 Quest of the West Sale......................... 101 R&R Genetics Sale.................................. 63 Raymond and Son Angus...................... 45 Redd Ranches............................................ 2 Rees Bros................................................. 47 Rimrock Angus....................................... 83

Riverbend Ranch.................................... 15 Robins Nest Angus Ranch..................... 14 Rollin’ Rock Genetic Partners............... 45 Rowser Angus and Simmentals............ 63 RV Bar Angus Ranch............................. 17 SAW Cattle Co........................................ 82 Scales Northwest................................... 103 Select Sires............................................... 93 Shandar Angus Ranch........................... 31 Shaw Cattle Co........................................ 11 Silveus Insurance Group........................ 90 Sitz Angus Ranch.................................... 37 Sorensen Angus Ranch.................... 5, 101 ST Genetics............................................. 73 Steve Smith Angus and Gelbvieh......... 68 T-Heart Ranch........................................ 35 Thomas Angus Ranch............................ 85 UBIA........................................................ 13 Udy Cattle Co.......................................... 29 Utah Angus Association........................ 69 Utah Hereford Association................... 99 Vertical Edge Genetics........................... 53 Ward Angus Ranch................................ 52 Western Ag Credit.................................. 10 Western Livestock Journal.................... 95 Western Video Market........................... 64 Winnemucca Ranch Rodeo.................. 58 Zions Bank.............................................. 74 Zoetis........................................................ 97

Thank you to all of these advertisers for their support of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association!

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FEBRUARY 2019


D ANIELS P OLLED H EREFORDS BUILT AROUND A SIMPLE CONCEPT : Our Cowherd MATERNAL Our cows are built around fertility, high quality udders, and longevity.

EFFICIENT

We expect our cows to run in mountain country while raising a big calf and breeding.

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Cows play 50% of the genetics on our bulls, so we select powerful, heavy cows.

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We have to enjoy looking at the cattle we raise - it’s the only way you can too.

40 Bulls Available by Private Treaty! D A N I E L S

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Champion Bull at the 2016 Western Idaho State Fair, Boise, Eastern Idaho State Fair, Blackfoot, NILE National Show, Billings, Division Champion at Reno Nugget National Show. Semen available.

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Commitment to Quality since 1915 1350 N 2100 W | Malad, ID 83252 Dan 208-339-2341 | Teresa 208-339-2340 danielsherefordranch@yahoo.com Follow us on Facebook at Daniels Hereford Ranch!


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Herd Bulls!

Churchill Outcross 1217Y ET • 43237197 (bw)+4.8 (ww)+58 (yw)+97 (m)+28 (mg)+57 (sc)+1.4 (re)+.55 1217Y is our cornerstone herd sire with an abundance of eye appeal and performance all while starting with a 78 lb bw.! He was a class winner at the ‘13 NWSS! Sons available now!

These bulls sell!

March 2, 2019 • Producer’s Livestock Market • Salina, UT • 1 PM

H5 161 Advance 586 • 43589508 (bw)+3.8 (ww)+63 (yw)+105 (m)+25 (mg)+57 (sc)+1.6 (re)+.59 586 was our selection out of Harrell Herefords’ sale in Baker City, OR. He is a classy made, fully pigmented, very correct bull backed by one of Harrell’s best cow families. We are anxious for his first calf crop!

At Ekker Herefords, we st rive t o breed t h e be st Horned Hereford genet ics a va ila ble. We se le c t only t op herd sires a nd breed t hem t o prove n cows wit h t he int ent t o a lwa ys move our ge ne t ic ba se for wa rd. We know t ha t a ma jorit y o f o ur cust omers ma int a in a nd Angus- ba sed cow h e rd , so select ion of opt ima l ma t erna l t ra it s is vit al. We keep good uddered, ea sy doing, fer t ile , and good disposit ions. Our cust omers a re why we cont inue t o enjoy wha t we do. Visit ors are welcome a nyt ime! Ca ll 435- 839- 3454.

Every good black baldy starts

with a good Hereford cow!

EKKER H E RE F O RD S J I M A N D L I N DA E K K E R PO BOX 37 • VERNON, UT 84080 (435) 840-2699 • (435) 839-3454

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FEBRUARY 2019

Profile for Logan Ipsen

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 2019  

Volume 6 of the Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition, Feb 2019

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 2019  

Volume 6 of the Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition, Feb 2019

Profile for lipsen
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