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patterns • decorating tips • fiber art • culture

Issue No. 34

NEW!


WIN a Nobu Fujiyama Crane Dynasty Quilt Kit

valued at $250

from Kona Bay Fabrics

IT’S EASY AS 1-2-3 1

Go online at www.konabay.com/nobu.pdf to download an IY O Nobu sign. Print out a copy or pull it up on your tablet screen.

2

Take a photograph of you holding the Nobu sign at your favorite (one, two or several) quilt shop(s).

3

Email the photo to nobu@konabay.com along with your name and the name of the Quilt Shop in the photo.

THE DETAILS One lucky drawing entrant will win the stunning 86” x 111” Crane Dynasty quilt kit. Plus, the Quilt Shop with the most entries wins a kit and a twopage feature in ASIAN FABRIC magazine. You’ll be their favorite customer!

ENTRY DEADLINE: June 15, 2014


Celebrating the return of

Nobu Fujiyama with the Crane Dynasty Collection available in June

The age old tradition of textile artistry passed down through the generations continues with this limited edition group. Look inside to tour the Crane Dynasty Gallery‌

www.konabay.com


NOBU FUJIYAMA Crane Dynasty Collection

EXOT-06 Scarlet

CRAN-12 Tan CRAN-11 Tan

EXOT-06 Black

CRAN-10 Brown ACTUAL SIZE (see full design on next page)


The new Nobu Fujiyama Crane Dynasty collection introduces us to the elegantly attired women of the court. We can imagine the exquisitely embroidered silk robes and graceful accessories. We join them in the serene courtyard complete with well cared for cranes which symbolized immortality in early Asian mythology. CRAN-13 Tan

CRAN-10 Brown • 24� repeat CRAN-14 Tan

EXOT-06 Tan

EXOT-06 Green EXOT-06 Blue


NOBU FUJIYAMA Crane Dynasty Collection

EXOT-06 Gold CRAN-12 Indigo

CRAN-10 Indigo • 24” repeat

CRAN-14 Indigo

EXOT-06 White EXOT-06 Indigo EXOT-06 Scarlet


CRAN-10 Indigo ACTUAL SIZE

CRAN-11 Blue

EXOT-06 Green

CRAN-13 Indigo


available now


contents

Asian Fabric™ Vol 8 Issue 4

quilts 34 Impressive Windmills & Columns of Color Make your fabric go farther

with these two quilts

55 Chateau Charm Tablerunner & Wall Quilt Perfect for summer dining

This quilt will bring a spring garden indoors

103 Birds in the Air

features 2 Nobu Fujiyama Crane Dynasty

12 Publisher’s Note 13 How to Use the Magazine

and gift giving

63 Vin Bouteille Wall Quilt 72 Distinctive Chic

departments

A gallery of art from Kona Bay favorite Nobu Fujiyama

18 Shop Directory

Where to shop for Kona Bay

15 Introducing Fabric Vine

21 What I Did With My Kona Bay

26 LaConner Quilt & Textile Museum

Great projects from our readers

30 Texas Quilt Museum

67 Book Review

46 A Vine of Another Kind

The tale of our Publisher exploring wine country

Set the Table

88 Food

Banh Mi

93 Travel

Ho Chi Minh City

110 General Instructions Special thanks to:

Used exclusively and recommended by Asian Fabric™ Ho Chi Minh City • pg 93

2014 Asian Fabric 9


downloadable patterns from Asian Fabric —$3.99 ea w w w.konabaygifts.com


Asian Fabric back issues —$5 ea

eco friendly insulated hot/cold bags —new designs!


publisher’s note

I am truly spoiled and I will be the first to admit it! In 1991, Kona Bay Fabrics was started in beautiful, scenic Hawaii. Trade contacts from my other company, Kona Bay Coffee Estates, presented me with a fortuitous introduction to the fabric industry. I traveled from my home in Honolulu to the Kona coffee fields on the Big Island often. Enjoying these two beautiful islands was a blessing. I opened the Kona Bay distribution center in near Seattle in 1994. I just couldn’t get those UPS trucks to provide ground transportation from Honolulu to my mainland quilt shop customers! Again, I was blessed to enjoy the beauty and distinctive lifestyles of both Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest. The people and the “culture” of the Pacific Northwest have been very good to me— wow, 20 years! Now, I have set out on a new adventure to experience a unique facet of living in Washington state....the wine industry. When I visited in the late 1980’s, Washington state’s wine industry was in its infancy. Every year since, the state has seen a dramatic increase in total acres planted, wineries and tasting rooms opened, and wine focused events. The wine keeps getting better and better, too, bringing the region world recognition. In coming issues, I look forward to sharing the stories I gather as I explore the Washington wineries and vineyards. My hope is to bring to you, a fun and extraordinary life experience that happens when you combine two artistic passions—fabric and wine. As I meet more and more hardworking, passionate people involved in small family wineries, I see a strong parallel with the dedicated and devoted quilt shop owners. With the next issue, Asian Fabric will be renamed FABRIC VINE. It celebrates these two passions of mine and honors the Kona Bay journey. On page 15, you will be able to read

12 Asian Fabric 2014

much more about this new and exciting progression and adventure. Along with the usual articles and projects about quilting, sewing and crafts, we will work hard to also share with you knowledge we gain as we explore Washington’s romantic and alluring wine industry. Speaking of projects—Georgie Gerl’s talent never ceases to amaze me. She has artistically embraced our goals bringing you some very special projects in this issue. We are also joined by Sandy Turner, the author of BigPrint Patchwork—Quilt Patterns for Large Scale Prints. Join us as we travel to Ho Chi Minh, formerly known as Saigon. Plus, Andrea Nguyen, a well known author of several Asian focused cookbooks brings you a recipe for one of my favorite Vietnamese meals, the Banh Mi sandwich. I invite you to join us in our new Fabric Vine adventure. Thank you for allowing me to share with you what I find so wonderful about not just fabric and wine, but also the scenic beauty of the Pacific Northwest and its people. Mahalo from Da Textile Samurai!

Douglas (Textile Samurai) Eagleson Publisher • douglas@konabay.com http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kona-Bay-Fabrics-SeattleBay-Fabrics-and-Asian-Fabric-Magazine/106593046936?ref=ts


Make the most of Asian Fabric

Asian Fabric™ Quilting and design ideas for inspired minds Issue #34 2014 • VOL 8 ISSUE 4

Publisher douglas Eagleson Quilt designer & EDITOR Georgie Gerl ggerldesigner@

comcast.net Facebook: Georgie Gerl Designer

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORs Sandy Turner ASSISTANTS TO PUBLISHER Doris Eagleson 1923–2010 Cheryl Hamai Brittany Eagleson Simpson

Subscriptions Kona Bay Fabrics www.konabay.com 15812 NE 83rd St Redmond, WA 98052 800-531-7913

advertising and editorial inquiries

Share it with a friend 1. Click here and choose a method to share. 2. Follow prompts.

Use the easy links As you scroll over a page, active links will be highlighted in blue. This enables you to connect to additional pages and download additional patterns.

Print pages You must log in and download the publication before you are able to print. 1. Click Share and then choose the light gray Download link below. 2. Open the .pdf to view and print pages as you wish.

Eagle Publishing www.PublishingPeople.com 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207 866-638-1115 Editor and associate publisher Vicki Dar nwwoman@mac.com graphic design liminalogy.com

Kona Bay Fabrics © 2014

Subscribe for FREE— It’s easy! 1. Go to www.konabay.com 2. Click on “Subscribe” 3. Complete the information

Asian Fabric™ is produced six times a year by Eagle Publishing for Kona Bay Fabrics. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. © Kona Bay Fabrics. All rights reserved. No piece, in part or full, may be reproduced without permission.

2014 Asian Fabric 13


Mikoto II available now


We’re growing! With the next issue of Asian Fabric, we’ll be changing the name. I heard the gasps—don’t panic! The content and patterns you’ve come to love will continue. Kona Bay Fabrics has long been known for its Asian art on fabric. Over the years, though, we’ve also gained a loyal following for our non-Asian designs—the rich tone on tones and eclectic designs that effortlessly manifest a smile. May I have a drumroll, please. Introducing…

We believe the name Fabric Vine says it all. Eight years ago, when we started Asian Fabric, Kona Bay Fabrics was making a committed effort to reach out to quilters and sewing enthusiasts. A Fabric Maker adds Publisher to the mix—you could almost call it an experiment. After thirty-four issues, we’re happy to report that it has been a wildly successful experiment. Some of you joined us with the premier issue back in 2006. Thank you. Many of you discovered us more recently. With Issue #26, we switched from print to digital. For most, it was an easy transition. For some, it was more challenging. We appreciate your efforts to stick with us. After two years of dwelling in the digital world, we continue to grow. Our last issue was viewed by over 150,000 folks. To say we are thrilled about the interest in Asian Fabric would be an understatement. With Fabric Vine, our goal is to be your creative garden. The compelling quilt

patterns by Kona Bay’s celebrated quilt designer, Georgie Gerl, and our ever talented guest contributors, are the seeds. Each pattern, along with an inspirational color palette, yield inspiration for your imagination. Like an ever changing organic landscape, Fabric Vine’s mission is to encourage readers to branch out and embrace growth while you explore new artistic horizons. In addition to the patterns using Asian prints we’ve focused on in the past, we’ll include patterns which feature Kona Bay’s many non-Asian prints and tonals as well. Plus, we’ll continue to bring you opportunities for armchair travel, wine notes and pairings to expand your knowledge bank and recipes too good not to try. Storytelling is no fun without suspense, though, so watch in the coming issues as new features on the drawing board unfold. May your creative garden thrive! 2014 Asian Fabric 15


Happy Garden available soon


shop directory: where to find kona bay The premiere shops across the country for exceptional service and a superb selection of Kona Bay Fabrics.

maryland arizona 35th Ave Sew & Vac Fabric World 3500 W. Northern Ave Phoenix, AZ 85051 602.841.5427 4939 W. Ray Road, STE 27 Chandler, AZ 85225 480.961.7363 Two convenient locations with 25,000 bolts combined, including a large selection of Asian fabrics. Notions, books, threads and all quilting supplies. Kits available from this issue. Hours: M-F 9-6; Sat 9-5; Sun 10-4.  www.35thavesewandvac.com

florida Boutique 4 Quilters, Inc. 2945 W New Haven Ave West Melbourne, FL 32904 321.768.2060 A shop with a Scandinavian ambiance. Large selection of Asian, Kaffe Fasset, Batiks and Silk fabrics. Hand dyed fabrics and Fiber Art by local artists. A place where Fiber Artists and Traditional Quilters gather. Come visit Florida’s most creative quilt shop! Hours: Mon & Tue 9:30am5pm; Wed 9:30am-7pm; Thur & Fri 9:30am-5pm; Sat 9:30am-4pm.  www.boutique4quilters.com

18 Asian Fabric 2013

Patches Quilting & Sewing 308 S Main St Mount Airy, MD 21771 301.831.0366 A delight for your eyes with over 4,000 bolts of fabric. Our large selection of Asian prints, Batiks, and Black and Whites will aid you in any project. Don’t forget to check out our books, notions and classes.  www.patchesquilting.com Seminole Sampler 71 Mellor Ave Catonsville, MD 21228 866.407.2363 Dedicated quilt shop specializing in Asian, Batik and contemporary fabrics. Excellent service to meet all your quilting needs. Classes for all levels. Extensive selection of books, patterns and notions.  www.seminolesampler.com

michigan The Stitchery 1129 E Grand River Ave Howell, MI 48843 517.548.1731 The Stitchery carries many Kona Bay Fabrics. Full service quilt shop with over 5,000 bolts of fabric and supplies. Authorized Janome dealer, featuring the Memory Craft 11,000 Embroidery Machine. Conveniently located between Detroit and Lansing. Open Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat. 9-4.  www.thestitcheryonline.com


minnesota Blue Bamboo 12865 Industrial Park Blvd Plymouth, MN 55441 800.323.1105 Gorgeous array of Asian fabrics which feature the best of Kona Bay in both fabric and kits. Choose from wall hangings, quilt and runner kits. Check our website for current fabrics and sign up for our newsletter. See over 5000 bolts of fabric which include Asian, flannels, brights, holiday and batiks.  www.mybluebamboo.com

missouri The Quilted Fox 10403 Clayton Road St. Louis, M0 63131 314-993-1181 toll free 877.993.1181 Huge selection of Asian fabrics both in-store and online. We also carry internationally oriented fabrics. Many kits available. Open Mon and Wed 10 am–5 pm; Tues and Thurs 10 am–6:30 pm; Fri and Sat 10 am–4:30 pm, and Sun Noon–4:00 pm.  www.quiltedfox.com

nevada The Quilted Dragon 2890 Yucca Terrace Ave Pahrump, NV 89048 775.751.9033 Just one hour NW of Las Vegas, we specialize in Oriental, Batik, and Wide Backing fabrics, Sashiko supplies and notions all at discount prices everyday. We stock over 1,700 book titles and 600 patterns at all times. Open MTW 9–3 and second Sat 9–3.  www.quilteddragon.com

new york Discount Sewing & Jackie Lynn’s Fabric Center 475 E. Ridge Rd Rochester, NY 14621 585.544.4110 Exquisite selection of Asian quilting fabrics. Sales and Service Center for Brother, Janome, HandiQuilter, Elna and Tin Lizzie machines. Open Mon-Sat 10-5, Tues & Thurs 10-8.  www.discountsewingcenter.com

ohio Gramma Fannies Quilt Barn P. O. Box 270 Berlin, OH 44610 330.893.3243 Largest selection of Asian fabrics in Ohio’s Amish Country. You’ll enjoy our unique quilt shop located in an old barn as a part of Schrocks Amish farm. Locally made quilts plus 2500 bolts of beautiful fabrics specially designed for quilt shops. Just 1 mile east of Berlin, the heart of Amish Country, on State Route 39. Mon-Sat 10-5.  www.grammafanniesquilts.com

pennsylvania Sew Smart Fabrics 30 W Oakland Ave. Doylestown, PA 18901 215.345.7990 The best selection of Asian prints in Eastern Pennsylvania. We also carry silks, wools and other fabrics. Books, patterns, trends. Open everyday.  www.sewsmartfab.com

2013 Asian Fabric 19


online shops

wyoming E.T. Quilts 80 S. Main Buffalo, WY 82834 307.684.9006 877.ETQUILTS (877.387.8458) Quality fabrics, including Wyoming’s largest collection of Asian prints, notions, kits, patterns, books and quilts. Salt City Candles, needlecraft supplies, and Boyd’s Bears also available. Check out our website and receive a free gift with your first on-line order. Open Mon–Sat 10–5.  www.etquilts.com

contact asianfabric@ mac.com n on for informatio Asian in g in is t r e v d a Fabric

20 Asian Fabric 2013

eQuilter eQuilter.com is your online fabric store for quilting, sewing and fashion, with OVER 20,000 Fabrics IN STOCK! We specialize in Asian-Pacific and contemporary quilt fabrics.  www.equilter.com SeaWatch Fabrics Mukilteo, WA • 866.407.2363 Extensive selection of Asian fabrics, Batiks and light Batiks. Unique patterns, “Wall Hanging of the Month” club, fat quarter bundles and Superior Threads. Free shipping on all orders over $25. Most orders shipped the same day.  www.seawatchfabrics.com Debsews Fabrics Wide selection of Asian fabrics • Tone-On-Tone fabrics • Fat quarter selections • Patterns & magazines • Special sale items. Debsews as been selling fabric to thousands of satisfied customers online since 1999 and we are very proud of our customer service. See our ad on page 92.  www.debsews2.com Shibori Dragon Shibori Dragon is dedicated to bringing you the finest materials and patterns for your creation of beautiful garments and quilted items. We offer the largest supply of sashiko supplies on the internet.  www.shiboridragon.com


What I Did with my Kona Bay fabric  projects from our readers 

There are 2 ways to submit— all the e e s o t warding e r y r e v ics and r b It is a f r u ways o by you! d e creative t u c e s are ex pattern s who ha e n o y r to eve designs r u o Thanks y f s all! photo o u a s d e r e i r p a s sh in ur work o Y . s u with

1. Email: asianfabric@mac.com 2. Mail:

Asian Fabric Magazine Editor 15812 NE 83rd St. Redmond, WA 98502

www.konabayfabrics.com


ď ś

John Smith Australia

Sharing Asian prints from Kona Bay Fabric used in a unique setting. The fabric was used to compliment the entries at the Hastings Bonsai Group Annual Bonsai Exhibition held recently in Port Macquarie. Bonsai is the art of growing trees in pots. The age of trees displayed were up to 70 years old. The size of bonsai vary from those that can be held in the hand to trees so large they require a number of people to lift one. This was the Hastings Bonsai Groups first exhibition; we are only a new group that was formed this past June. We are now 90 members strong. The exhibition is still being talked about around town. We have scheduled our next show for February 27, 28 and March 1, 2015 at Port Panthers. Exhibition attendees can look forward to demonstration on how to start out in bonsai in addition to the display. of a wide range of trees from the member’s collections. Members will also be selling surplus bonsai trees from their own collections.

22 Asian Fabric 2014


Terri Burdick Canada

The Quilters: Our family has a history with quilts; our paternal grandmother was a quilter and ran a country store in her “retirement” years piecing quilt tops when things were slow. She would often have us come help her layer and tie quilts. Pat started quilting when her son requested a quilt for his high school graduation present – the night of graduation. She enlisted my help with layering and quilting and within a year I had caught the quilting bug too. Her daughter Kristina was in college at the time and soon started quilting as well. Since then we have made quilts together for fundraisers, family members and friends milestone birthdays, graduations and weddings. Pat and I live in the same town just off the Canadian border in New York and Kristina lives in Mississippi so quilting is a way to stay connected. We mail fabric and blocks back and forth. A few years ago Pat and Kristina completed a Bargello quilt for their son/ brother by each sewing half and then connecting the 2 halves– and it worked – amazing considering there were some very small seams. The Quilt Story: When our niece announced her wedding we knew the quilt would need to feature Heather’s favorites: red and black and Asian fabrics. We found the beautiful red bird print and had a start; but combining red and purple in a quilt was

24 Asian Fabric 2014


a big stretch for me. Mary Mussells, of Village Comforts quilt shop in Lake Placid, NY, introduced us to the Asian Fabric magazine, showed us some of her shop samples, and even went so far as to raid her personal stash for the light green and lavender backgrounds. Pat is a biologist, earning that degree as a non-traditional student after her children were born. Pat’s undergraduate research was with fruit bats, consequently her children and their cousins have

Kristina. Kristina embroidered the more complicated traditional designs and appliqued the simplified characters. Meanwhile Pat and I got started designing, being inspired by many of the projects featured in Asian Fabric. Pat is responsible for the ½ inch black sashing around the block – those small borders just give me the willies! Pat pieced the 2 perpetual motion blocks for Heather’s two children. For a bit of whimsy Pat designed a dragonfly (note:

memories of feeding the bats with her and having her read “Wufu: the little brown bat” to them. Wufu, is a traditional Chinese design (note: this design is in the block on the top right from the center block), with a stylized tree of life in the center surrounded by 5 bats representing happiness, health, wealth, longevity and peacefulness and we decided to incorporate these into the quilt. Pat’s friend drew both the traditional and simplified Chinese characters for each and these were emailed off to

this design is in the outside border, top left of quilt) from fabric from the birds tail. Pat and I hand quilted it this winter and it arrived just in time for their 1st wedding anniversary. Due to a passion for the outdoors including gardening, canoeing and hiking we are a bit notorious regarding “timely” arrival of these quilting gifts. Winter saves us. The label on the back of the quilt has Heather and Aubren’s wedding date and is surrounded by the ribbon from their wedding announcement. 2014 Asian Fabric 25


La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum Japanese Exhibits » Wishes Through our hands – Japanese QuilTs July 2 – October 5, 2014            Quiltmaking is converting our wishes into tangible form through the use of our hands. When we begin any sort of creation, we are filled with thoughts and ideas, and we devise a process of forming them. It must be the most inspiring and exciting moment of the process. It is utterly so when we are planning a quilt to be made. It starts with pouring our wish and mind in the quilt for someone we care, for our own dreams, or for serving our society.             Three years ago when the Tsunami attacked East Japan and washed away family members, homes and jobs, the American and Japanese people sent

00 Asian Fabric 2014

nearly 9,000 quilts to the survivors to keep them warm and comfort them. At the same time, instead of giving quilts to them, there was a “quilt making activity” started by a young volunteer group in order to encourage the mind-lost women still in temporary houses. Our quilt group gladly joined the group to support them with a belief that it will inspire those women so that they will find a joy of creation and find hope and dream for their future.            We have learned the countless patterns and techniques for quilt making from your country, and at the same time, we are thrilled to practice the “heartfelt gift in every stitch” tradition of quilt making. We are most pleased and gratified to exhibit our 9th quilt show from Japan at La Conner Quilt and Textile Museum. We sincerely hope you can read our wishes and thoughts, stitched and sewn in these quilts.  

- Miwako Kimura


Works of Junko Maeda           

Feeling deeply pitiful for the forgotten and discarded cotton fabrics in Japan, Junko has been working on preserving them. For hundreds of years, cotton fabrics had been preciously and broadly used for common people’s bedding called “Futon” and working jackets called “Hanten” until synthetic textiles were introduced. She collected the fabrics from north to south and made countless miniature Futon and Hanten in one sixth of the normal size. This space does not allow us to display all of them but I hope you will enjoy and appreciate her deep love for the textiles and insatiable passion for her creations.

           Junko Maeda has been working with Japanese natural fiber textiles such as silk, linen and cotton, for nearly forty-five years. They are used not only in quilts but in piece works, clothing, Sashiko works, etc. In the past several years, she has been inspired by handicraft called “Pojagi.” Pojagi is Korean women’s traditional patchwork handed down from mother to daughter in the family. Traditionally, a woman used scraps, worn fabrics, swatches collected from each member of the family and made Pojagi, giving her whole mind in her work for the purpose of unifying the family and wishing them everlasting wealth and happiness. 2014 Asian Fabric 27


Junko traveled to Korea several times and made a research in material fabric called ramie and traditional Pojagi. She has interpreted the construction, color and the beauty of Pojagi to her own style and created new art works which are displayed in this Museum.            It is my great pleasure to have this opportunity to exhibit the works of Junko Maeda who is well known as a quilt artist in Japan. Two of her quilts are in the collection of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. - Miwako Kimura

Artist Reception, Workshops, & Exhibit Tours Wednesday & Thursday, July 2 & 3, 2014 Join us at 4:00 on Wednesday, July 2, for an afternoon reception to meet the artists of our Japanese exhibits. Miwako Kimura, Guest Curator of both exhibits, will be leading Exhibit Tours on July 2 & 3. Three Japanese Textile Workshops are planned on July 2 & 3 by Sachiko Yoshida and Noriko Koyama.

La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum 703 South Second Street | P.O. Box 1270 La Conner, WA 98257 tel. 360.466.4288 fax 360.466.1051 www.laconnerquilts.org

00 Asian Fabric 2014

Images: Channeled Hearts by Sachiko Yoshida Crests by Sachiko Yoshida Bell Flower by Masako Masuda Pojagi by Junko Maeda Futon by Maeda


Fly Away

&

Translucent ava i l a b le n ow


30 Asian Fabric 2014


2014 Asian Fabric 31


Color Movement In stores now


Impressive Windmills & Columns of Color Quilts

Instead of wasting fabrics, two quilts are created at the same time while making the half-square triangle units. Additional blocks are made to create two unique lap/wall quilts.

Designer: Georgie Gerl

00 Asian Fabric 2014


2014 Asian Fabric 00


Impressive Windmills Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Impressive Windmills & Columns of Color Lap/Wall Quilt 69" square & 65" square Note: The technique used in this quilt will create two different looking blocks for Block 1, Block 2, Block 5 & Block 6 one set is used in this quilt while the remaining blocks will be used in the Columns of Color 65" square quilt total yardages and cuts for both quilts are listed below in cutting chart. Columns of Color layout can be found on page 43. Featuring fabrics from the Blossum Collection

material list Backing $3 yards (Windmills) & $ yards (Columns) Batting 77"x 77" (Windmills) & 72" x 72" (Columns) Pillow requirements listed on page 44. Read instructions prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A BLOS-04 Black Background

$w yards

Cut !*4”" squares twice diagonally Cut (a”" squares once diagonally Fabric B BLOS-01 Blue Block 1& 2 Large Accents

First Cuts

Next Cuts

!*4" x $@" # @ $* !) &" x $@" 1!! @2" x $@" !@ !@ @4" x $@" @

$

&" x $@"

!*4" squares (a" squares &" squares @2" x !@2"

q yard

36 Asian Fabric 2014

Next Cuts

! & !@ *

$ &" x $@" @w" x $@" !2" x $@" @$ !" x $@"

&" squares (binding)

! !@

$ &" x $@" @4" x $@"

&" squares

!" x !@2"

!^ &" squares

Fabric F BLOS-03 Blue Block 5 Light Accent Block 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, &10 Accents

!8 yards

#2" x $@" !^ ‘!^ & @w" x $@" (Binding) @) !2" x $@" @$ (

@2 yards Fabric D BLOS-02 Green Block 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 & 9 Accents

Fabric E BLOS-02 Blue Block 5 Dark Accent Block 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, &10 Accents

First Cuts

!w yards

! yard

Fabric C BLOS-02 Magenta Block 6 & 7 Border, Block 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9 & 10 Accents & Binding

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

!@ !2" x $@"

#2" x !@2" #2" x ^2" !2" x !@2"

* Fabric G @ BLOS-03 Moss Block 10, 6, & 7 Center

$" x $@" @$ $" x !@2" #2" x $@" !^ #2" squares

!3 yards

Fabric H BLOS-04 Smoke Block 6 & 7 Center

@

#2" x $@" !^

Fabric I BLOS-04 Greige

%

!" x $@"

#2" squares

a yard

Block 6 & 7 Accent Border

4 yard

!^ !^

!" x ^2" !" x %2"


!2” !2” !2”

Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram. Note: Using the technique in this pattern the half-square triangles resulted in two different looking blocks with only one being used in the Impressive Windmill Quilt so instead of having unused blocks, another quilt design was created to use these leftover blocks. Instead of creating one quilt you will be constructing two different quilts at the same time. Hopefully you will find this a win-win scenario.

Making the Strip Set Units These strip set units will be used in making Blocks 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, and 9.

1. Arrange and sew together lengthwise one @4” x $@” Fabric A strip, one !2” x $@” Fabric C strip, one !2”x $@” Fabric D strip , one !2” x $@” Fabric E strip, and one @4” x $@” Fabric F strip as shown. Press. Make twelve strip sets.

2. Cut fifty-six &”-wide segments from @4” step 1 strips assets shown above. Make sets 12 strip &"

Cut 56 segments (Units measure &” square)

Making Blocks 1, 2 & 8 1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Half-Square Triangles. Draw a diagonal line on one &” Fabric B square. Place marked square and one strip set unit right sides together, checking orientation of strip set and angle to be sewn. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make eight. Trim squares to ^2” to make sixteen half-square triangle units, eight of each variation. Label units either Quilt #1 (Windmill Block 1) or Quilt #2 (Column Block 8).

Fabric B- &””” square Unit from step 1 Make * Quilt #1

Quilt #2

$@”

@4” !2” !2” !2”

Square to ^2””” Make !^ Half-square Triangles Units (8 of each variation)

@4” Make 12 strip sets &"

Cut 56 segments (Units measure &” square) 2014 Asian Fabric 37


2. Making half-square triangle units, draw a diagonal line on one &” Fabric B square. Place marked square and one strip set unit right sides together, checking orientation of strip set and angle to be sewn. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make eight. Trim squares to ^2” to make sixteen half-square triangle units, eight of each variation. Label units either Quilt #1 (Windmill Block 2) or Quilt #2 (Column Block 8). Note: The diagonally line is in the opposite direction than step 1.

Fabric B- &””” square Unit from step 1 Make * Quilt #1

Quilt #2

4. Sew two Quilt #1 units from step 2 together as shown. Press. Make four. Sew two units from this step together. Press. Make two and label Block 2. Block measure !@2” square. Block 2

Make 4

Make 2 (for Impressive Windmill Quilt) Block measures !@2” square

5. Sew one Quilt # 2 unit from step 1 to one Quilt #2 unit from step 2 as shown. Press. Make eight. Sew two of these units together. Press. Make four and label Block 8. Block measure !@2” square. Block 8

Square to ^2””” Make !^ Half-square Triangles Units (8 of each variation)

3. Sew two Quilt #1 units from step 1 together as shown. Press. Make four. Sew two units from this step together. Press. Make two and label Block 1. Block measure !@2” square. Block 1

Make 4

Make 2 (for Impressive Windmill Quilt) Block measures !@2” square

38 Asian Fabric 2014

Make 8

Make 4 (for Columns of Color Quilt) Block measures !@2” square


Making Blocks 3, 4 & 9 1. R e f e r t o G e n e r a l Instructions (pages 110–111) for Half-Square Triangles. Draw a diagonal line on one &” Fabric A square. Place marked square and one strip set unit right sides together, checking orientation of strip set and angle to be sewn. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make twenty. Trim squares to ^2” to make forty half-square triangle units, twenty of each variation. Label units either Quilt #1 (Windmill Block 3) or Quilt #2 (Columnn Block 9).

Fabric A- &””” square Unit from step 1 Make @) Quilt #1

Quilt #2

2. M a k i n g h a l f - s q u a r e triangle units, draw a diagonal line on one &” Fabric A square. Place marked square and one strip set unit right sides together, checking orientation of strip set and angle to be sewn. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make twenty. Trim squares to ^2” to make forty half-square triangle units, twenty of each variation. Label units either Quilt #1 (Windmill Block 4) or Quilt #2 (Column Block 9). Note: The diagonally line is in the opposite direction than step 1.

Fabric A- &””” square Unit from step 1 Make @) Quilt #1

Square to ^2””” Make $) Half-square Triangles Units (20 of each variation)

Quilt #2

Square to ^2””” Make $) Half-square Triangles Units (20 of each variation)

3. Sew two Quilt #1 units from step 1 together as shown. Press. Make ten. Sew two units from this step together. Press. Make five and label Block 3. Block measure !@2” square.

Make !) Block 3

Make 5 (for Impressive Windmills Quilt) Block measures !@2” square

4. Sew two Quilt #1 units from step 2 together as shown. Press. Make ten. Sew two units from this step together. Press. Make five and label Block 4. Block measure !@2” square.

Make !) Block 4

Make 5 (Four for Impressive Windmills Quilt & one for accent pillow) Block measures !@2” square 2014 Asian Fabric 39


5. Sew one Quilt # 2 unit from step 1 to one Quilt #2 unit from step 2 as shown. Press. Make twenty. Sew two of these units together. Press. Make ten and label Block 9. Block measure !@2” square. Block 9

2. Making half-square triangle units, draw a diagonal line on one &” Fabric F square. Place marked square and one 7” Fabric A square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make four. Trim squares to ^2” to make eight half-square triangle units.

Make 20

Make 10 (Nine for Columns of Color Quilt & one for accent pillow) Block measures !@2” square

Making Block 5 1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Half-Square Triangles. Draw a diagonal line on one &” Fabric E square. Place marked square and one 7” Fabric A square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make four. Trim squares to ^2” to make eight half-square triangle units.

Fabric E- &””” square Fabric A- &””” square Make $

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Square to ^2””” Make * Half-square Triangles Units

Fabric F- &””” square Fabric A- &””” square Make $

Square to ^2””” Make * Half-square Triangles Units

3. Sew one unit from step 1 to one unit from step 2 as shown. Press. Make eight. Sew two units from this step together. Press. Make four and label Block 5. Block measure !@2” square. Block 5

Make 8

Make 4 (for Impressive Windmills Quilt) Block measures !@2” square


Making Blocks 6 & 7 1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Half-Square Triangles. Draw a diagonal line on one #2” Fabric G square. Place marked square and one #2” Fabric H square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make sixteen. Trim squares to #” to make thirty-two half-square triangle units. Fabric G- #2””” square Fabric H- #2””” square Make 1!^

4. Sew one unit from step 2 between two #2“ x ^2“ Fabric C strips. Press seams toward Fabric C. Sew this unit between two #2“ x !@2“ Fabric C strips as shown. Press. Make four, and label Block 6. Repeat this step using units from step 3 to make four blocks. Press, and label block 7. Block measure !@2” square. #2”

Block 6

#2”

#2”

Block 7

!@2”

#2”

!@2”

Square to #””” Make 32 Half-square Triangles Units

2. Sew two units from step 1 together as shown checking orientation of units prior to sewing. Press. Make eight. Sew two of these units together. Press. Make four. Sew one unit from this step between two 1” x %2“ Fabric I strip as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two 1” x ^2“ Fabric I strip as shown. Press. Make four, these will be used in Block 6. !"

!"

^2"

Make 4 (for Impressive Windmills Quilt) Block measures !@2” square

Make 4 (for Impressive Windmills Quilt) Block measures !@2” square

Making Block 10 Referring to diagram below, arrange and sew together two $“ x !@2“ Fabric G strips, two !“ x !@2“ Fabric E strips, two !2“ x !@2“ Fabric C strips and one @2“ x !@2“ A strip. Press. Make twelve and label Block 10. Block measures !@2“ square. Block 10

$”

!” !2” @2” !2” !”

$”

Make * Make $

Make $

3. Sew two units from step 1 together as shown checking orientation of units prior to sewing. Press. Make eight. Sew two of these units together. Press. Make four. Sew one unit from this step between two 1” x %2“ Fabric I strip as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two 1” x ^2“ Fabric I strip as shown. Press. Make four, these will be used in Block 7. !"

!@2”

Make 12 (for Columns of Color Quilt) Block measures !@2” square

!"

^2" Make * Make $

Make $ 2014 Asian Fabric 41


Assembling the Impressive Windmills Quilt Fabric A small triangles are used for Corner Triangles and Fabric A large triangles are used for Side Triangles and will be called this in the step instructions.

1. Sew one Fabric A corner triangle to one Block 1 as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two Fabric A side triangles. Press. Make two.

Make 2

2. Arrange and sew together two Fabric A side triangles, one Block 4, one Block 6, and one Block 3 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

3. Arrange and sew together two Fabric A side triangles, one Block 3, two of Block 7, one Block 5, and one Block 4 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

4. Arrange and sew together two Fabric A corner triangles, two of Block 2, two of Block 6, two of Block 5, and one Block 3 as shown. Press.

5. Referring to layouts on pages 35 and 36, arrange and sew rows from step 1-4 together to make quilt top. Press.

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Tyannn this 65� quilt layout needs to appear in the instructions it can be reduce right now it is at 100%. I didn’t have room on the chart to place both quilts versions. This technique I was able to make all the blocks for both quilts instructions are together please place both versions of the quilts with fabric fillss on the project cover pages.

Assembling the Columns of Color Quilt

1. Arrange and sew together two of Block 9, two of Block 10, and one Block 8 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

2. Arrange and sew together three of Block 10 and two of Block 9 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

2014 Asian Fabric 43


3. Arrange and sew together two of Block 8, two of Block 10, and one Block 9 as shown. Press.

4. Referring to layouts on pages 34 and 43, arrange and sew rows together to make quilt top. Press.

5. Sew @2” x $@” Fabric A strips end-to-end to make one continuous @2”-wide Fabric A strip. Press. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two @2”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border.

6. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two @2”-wide Fabric A strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

Finishing the Quilt

1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one &&” x *)” (Windmill quilt) or 72” x 80” (Column quilt) approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure &&” x &&” (Windmill Quilt) or 72” x 72” (Column Quilt).

2. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

Optional Project: Making a Pillow from extra Blocks

If making pillows from extra blocks, finished size measures 12” square.Additional materials needed: two 12” pillow forms (or read step 1), 2 yard backing (enough for two pillows), a yard of lining fabric (does not show), and batting.

1. Option: Making a Pillow Form: Measure pillow top prior to quilting and cut two pieces of fabric to this measurement. Using 4”-wide seam sew around all edges leaving a 4” opening for turning. Stuff pillow to desired fullness with polyester fiberfill. Hand stitch opening closed. 2. Layer batting between pillow top and a matching size lining piece (this will not show). Hand or machine quilt as desired. Trim batting and lining even with pillow top.

3. Cut two 9” x 1!@2“ pieces of backing fabric. Fold one long edge of backing piece under 4” to the wrong side and press. Turn under an additional 4” and press. Stitch along folded edge. Repeat for other backing piece.

4. Place quilted pillow top and two backing pieces right sides together matching raw edges and overlapping backing pieces (finished hem edges toward center). Using a 4” wide seam sew around all edges, clip corners and turn right side out. Press. Insert pillow form.

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available now


A Vine of Another Kind by Vicki Dar

W

ashington state is known for many things. In addition to being home to three global companies producing exquisite cotton quilting fabric, majestic mountains and its close proximity to the Pacific Ocean and the abundant gift of seafood it provides, it has also quietly become the nation’s second largest wine producer. Washington is the Evergreen state. People are often left with the impression that it rains every day. In actuality, Washington sports climate types ranging from desert to rain forest. In the middle of those extremes are over 15 million agricultural acres. Currently, there are about 43,000 acres planted to wine grapes. Over 40% of these were planted in the last ten years and that number is still growing. As the

00 Asian Fabric 2012

region gains more and more recognition, the race is on and companies are securing blocks of ground large and small. Our new magazine name, Fabric Vine, will be in place with the upcoming issue. Not only does it express our desire to be your creative garden, it speaks to our interest in Washington state’s wine history and future. In light of the of the burgeoning Washington wine industry, Douglas Eagleson, Kona Bay’s Textile


Samurai and leader, has decided to join in on the fun. WineFromWashington.com, with Eagleson at the helm, will soon launch and began selling wine online. And before you ask, NO, he will not be leaving his first love and long time baby Kona Bay Fabrics. “We know, from surveying Kona Bay fans, that many quilters enjoy wine and/or make wine purchases for friends and family. Given the superb quality and range of varietals and prices that I have discovered Washington state wines offer, I wanted to share what I’ve found with our Kona Bay friends,” shared Eagleson. “Washington wineries remind me a lot of the quilting industry,” adds Eagleson, “Like in the fabric industry, there are the national retailers carrying product with a price point and character that appeals to the masses. We want to be like the local quilt shop that carries the best of the best while sharing the knowledge we’ve acquired.” The majority of Washington’s winery’s are small, enthusiastic, family run operations. Many of the wine industry folks come from families that have farmed in Washington for several generations. Wine grapes are the state’s fourth largest fruit crop. Washington farmers are not newcomers to agriculture. The new WineFromWashington.com venture will focus on, you guessed it, wines made in Washington. Hand picked bottles of Chardonnay, Riesling,

Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah are just a few of the wide range of award winning wines that will be available along with a host of other reds and whites. The goal is to merge value and taste to create an exceptional wine experience. Within each issue of Fabric Vine, several pages will be dedicated to wine enlightenment and entertainment. We’ll continue with the popular fabric pairing and talk about current offerings of WineFromWashington.com. You can also look forward to topics like— Am I using the right wine glass? and Do I drink a Riesling before, during or after dinner? Plus, we’ll include wine and fabric lover friendly recipes along with suggestions for wines that will complement them. Washington wine tourism attracts nearly two million visitors annually. Would you like to be one of them? Where you find wineries, you’ll also find quilt shops. We’ll introduce you to different wine regions and what they’re known for. WineFromWashington .com will be launching soon. You’re invited to sign up to receive an email notification from your favorite Textile Samurai, Douglas Eagleson.

Click here to download a free guide

2012 Asian Fabric 00


Our pairing choices this issue showcase wine grapes from several different regions. We look forward to taking you on more in-depth visits to the wide range of areas in future issues. There are so many great wines coming out of Washington state, it is difficult to choose which to share. Our first choice, the 2012 Chardonnay from Pondera Winery is sourced from the Conner Lee Vineyard in the Columbia Valley in the hotter, central area of the state. The over 100-acres farm was established in the 1980’s and has provided the basis for many award winning wines and a number of Washington wineries. Aged in 80% New French Oak Pondera Winery has a tasting room in Woodinville. It is always a favorite to visit as the family also owns the well established Howard Manville Gallery just up the road in Kirkland. A sampling of striking gallery pieces can always be found in the winery. Many of their wine labels feature artist paintings. Watch for some of their exquisite reds in future issues. The 2008 Mourvedre (moor-veh-dra) from Bunnell Family Cellars is next in our mix.

48 Asian Fabric 2012

Mourvedre is a lesser recognized but highly drinkable wine grape. It has long been used as a blending grape in France and Spain. In Washington, where part of the state sports the ideal growing conditions, it has gained favor as the primary grape with it’s fruit forward style. It’s easy drinkability will leave you looking for Mourvedre on the label. Bunnell Family Cellars has a tasting room in Woodinville. They anticipate the opening of a second tasting room in Walla Walla on the eastern side of the state soon. Ron Bunnell is the winemaker but the whole family is active in the business all the way down to the little ones you can see featured on their website. Next, we meet the 2009 Fidelitas Champoux Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon. Charlie Hoppes, Fidelitas owner and winemaker, was named Winemaker of the Year in 2013 by Seattle Magazine’s Washington Wine Awards. After tasting his wines, it’s easy to see why. A visit to their site will fill you in on years of hands-on experience where he perfected his winemaking craft.


Although the featured 2009 Champoux Cab is my favorite, his mastery of winemaking is discovered in a new way with each variety, both red and white, I’ve tasted. Fidelitas can be visited at their original tasting room which overlooks Red Mountain vineyards in central Washington. This past year, they also opened a tasting room on the west side of the state in Woodinville. Our last pairing features the 2009 Mackey Vineyards Syrah. Recent tastes of Mackey Vineyard wines have secured a solid spot on my favorites list for this small but impressive winery. The owners story is as interesting as their wines. In 2007, Roger and Phillip, the two Mackey brothers and vineyard owners traded their non-wine industry California lives for a farm in one of the prime growing areas of the Walla Walla Valley. Along with fruit trees, it had uncared for vineyards which the Mackey’s have lovingly brought back. The 2009 Syrah is made from the Mackey estate vineyard. After tasting several of their recent releases, there is no doubt that the brothers are on the right track. Mackey

Vineyards brings together exceptional taste and affordability. Enjoy the wine and fabric notes and let us know if you have any pairing suggestions.

2012 Asian Fabric 49


Spring Celebration Wine Picks from Washington state

2008 Bunnell Family Cellars Mourvedre avg price $38

2012 Pondera Chardonnay avg price $28

The glistening pale straw color arrives in your glass with great promise. It’s a promise kept, as flavors of vanilla custard, lemon zest and hints of nutmeg deliciously invite you to enjoy more. This wine is well balanced with crisp acidity, low alcohol and deft use of oak.

“This soft, peppery, seductive wine is one of the most unique Rhône varieties made in Washington. The intensity of the peppery spice, along with the supple, rose-petalinflected red fruits, gives the wine unusual depth and length, despite its apparent lightness and softness. It extends gracefully and fully across the palate, leaving a peppery lift to the finish”.—by Paul Gregutt.

Recommended Buttery dishes—Roasted salmon, lobster, creamy pasta, hard shell squash and eggs

Nutty or peppery cheeses, roasted flavorful beef and dark chocolate

Recommended Kona Bay fabric and pairing notes

|

all designs

Passion PASS-05 Cream

Secret Pond POND-02 Antique Gold

The gold metallic highlights the subtle neutral tones of the shibori pattern. Like Chardonnay in a glass, the sense of reflected light relaxes your mind while at the same inspiring creative thoughts of the many possibile uses.

Eclectic and exotic design notes layered with non-seasonal rich colors means this coordinate will pair well and accent a wide range of projects. Visualize it drawing your sight into a quilt or stealing the show as a summer dress.


|

Wine tasting notes provided by the wineries

2009 Fidelitas Champoux Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon

avg price $60

Sourced from the Baby Poux Block and Block 11, this is unmistakably Champoux vineyard fruit. The vineyard was first planted in 1972 and is known for producing some of the greatest old vine cabernet sauvignon in Washington State. Nearly opaque in color, the wine offers plum, black currant, and green peppers on the nose. The layered palate adds black fruit tones, cedar and herbal accents with firm tannins and a lasting finish. Drink now to 2022.

2009 Mackey Vineyards Syrah

avg price $32

This wine exhibits beautiful structure, complexity, and length, albeit in a generally riper, rounder style. The palate’s silky texture and fine tannins envelop flavors of ripe blackberry, black cherry, grilled meats, black pepper, vanilla, mint, minerals, and earth with a silky finish. This Syrah is a testament to the unique terroirs of Walla Walla. Properly cellared, the wine should hit maturity in 8-10 years and provide excellent drinking for approximately 15-20 years.

d Food Pairings Grilled steak pot roast, pizza, sharp cheddar, roasted vegetables and walnuts

Hearty stew, spicy sausages, blue cheese, hazelnuts and black forest cake

are part of larger collections and are available at your local quilt shops

Whispering Branches BRAN-01 Burgundy

Happy Time HAPPY-01 Multi

The burgundy whispering branches are like old vine vineyards caught just before sunrise. A shadowy mist rising up from the earth looks like clouds in the distance. Available in fourteen colors to make all yours dreams come true.

Beckoning summer with it’s bright and hopeful design, the Happy Garden collection will surely make you smile. Dancing blossoms bursting with color long to be nurtured and crafted into a project that will shine for years to come.


Exotic Garden


free pattern download


Blossom available now

click quilt for pattern download


Chateau Charm Tablerunner & Wall Quilt Designer: Georgie Gerl

Sweet memories of travel to wine country display with selections of wines, cheeses, breads, grapes and other delightful appetizers sharing this enticing experience with friends.


Chateau Charm Tablerunner/Wall Cutting Chart & Material List Wall Quilt Layout

Tablerunner Layout

Chateau Charm Tablerunner/Wall 23" x 59" This quilt features the Shadowland II, Exotic Garden & Blossom Fabric Collections material list Backing !2 yards Batting @&” x ^#” Appliquẻ Assorted Scraps Lightweight Fusible Web Stablizer Read Let’s Begin (page 57) and Circle Appliqué tip (page 77) prior to cutting fabric. *Fabric B is directional fabric, first cut listed runs parallel to the selvage. Extra fabric may be needed if “Fussy Cutting” a particular motif areas.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric A SHAD-07 Gray Background & Binding !8 yards

! @ % @

&2” x $@” @ #2” x $@” @ @w” x $@” @2” x $@” $ @

Fabric B EXOT-01 Purple Center s-q yard

@*

!^2” x (2”

Fabric C SHAD-06 Purple Accent 4 yard

!

%2” x $@” @ @ @

!

!!2” x $@” @ !!2” squares @ !2" x !)2"

Fabric D SHAD-10 Illusion Appliqué Background & Accent

2 yard

56 Asian Fabric 2014

&2” x *2” #2” x #)2” @2” x !)2” !2” x %2”

%2” x &2” %2” x ^2” #2” x @2”

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric E BRAN-01 Gold Border 2 yard

&

!2” x $@” @ @ @

Fabric F BLOS-02 Green Circle Border 2 yard

@

!@” squares for ring appliqué

Fabric G SHAD-09 Ivory Appliqué Circle a yard

@

!)” squares for circle appliqué background

!2” x @)2” !2” x !@2” !2” x !!2”


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions including Appliqué General Instructions (page 110–111). Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Accurate Seam Allowance to sew a perfect 4”-wide seam. Press seams in the direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Adding the Appliqué

The instructions given are for Quick Fused Appliqué Method for other methods refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Appliqué Technique. Note: It is recommended to use removable stabilizer on the wrong side of the fabric when machine appliquéing. This will give stability to the piece, even stitching, and prevent puckering of fabric. Note: Excess web can be removed from the center of the circle if desired by cutting a”-2” to the inside of circle marked line. Be sure to test fabrics before doing this technique some fabric when fused to background will show the web ring from the front. Tip: When appliquéing several layers of fusible web I use Soft Fuse Premium™ this product reduces some of the web stiffness that other products have with multi layers. 1. Trace all grape, leaves, vine and circle templates on pages 61–62 on paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from trace line. 2. With fusible web paper-side up, fuse to wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions. Cut on traced line.

3. Refer to photo on page 55 and layout on page 56, to arrange and fuse appliqués to !!2” Fabric D squares. Tip: For easy placement of grape elements on fabric use an appliqué pressing sheet to make whole grape appliqué units prior to fusing to Fabric D squares. Finish all appliqué edges with machine satin stitch or decorative stitching as desired. Trace tendrils on block and stitch on traced lines by machine or use floss to hand stitch tendrils. Make two blocks, one of each design.

Making the Tablerunner

1. Sew one %2” x &2” Fabric C piece to one !2” x %2” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. Make two. Sew unit from this step to one &2” x *2” Fabric A piece. Press Make two. *2”

&2”

!2” &2” %2”

Make @

Make @

2. Refer to layout on pages 56 and 59 to determine which layout (tablerunner or wall) to make noting the orientation of grape blocks. Sew one !2” x !!2” Fabric E strip to one appliqué block. Press seam toward Fabric E. Sew this unit to one !2” x !@2” Fabric E strip as shown. Press. Make one.

!2”

!2”

!@2”

Tablerunner layout

!@2”

Wall layout

2014 Asian Fabric 57


3. Sew one !2” x !!2” Fabric E strip to remaining appliqué block. Press seam toward Fabric E. Sew this unit to one !2” x !@2” Fabric E strip as shown. Press. !2”

7. If Fabric B was “Fussy Cut” refer to pages 56 and 59 to determine orientation of fabric, one unit is turned 180° when assembling quilt. Sew one !^2” x (2” Fabric B piece to one unit from step 6 as shown. Press. Make two. (2”

!@2” !^2”

4. Sew one unit from step 1 to block from step 2. Press. Sew one unit from step 1 to block from step 3. Press.

Make @

8. Sew one #2” x @2” Fabric C piece to one #2” x #)2” Fabric A strip as shown. Press. Make two.

@2”

#)2”

#2” Tablerunner layout

Wall layout

Make @

9. Sew two units from step 7 together as shown. Press. Tablerunner or Wall bottom layout

5. Sew one !2” x !)2” Fabric D strip between two @2” x !)2” Fabric A strips as shown. Press. Make two. !)2”

@2” !2”

@2” Make @

6. Sew one unit from step 5 to one %2” x ^2” Fabric C piece as shown. Press. Make two. ^2”

%2” Make 2

58 Asian Fabric 2014

10. Sew unit from step 9 between two units from step 8 as shown. Press.


11. Referring to photo (pages 55 and this page) and layout (page 56) to sew unit from step 10 between blocks from Step 4, noting orientation of appliqué’s prior to stitching. Press seams towards center.

Tablerunner • @# x %(”

12. Sew !2” x @)2” Fabric E strips to top and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border.

13. Sew !2” x $@” Fabric E strips end-to-end to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric E strip. Press. Measure quilt from top to bottom. Cut two !2”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to sides of quilt. Press seams toward border.

Finishing the Quilt

1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one @&” x *)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure @&” x ^#”. 2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

2014 Asian Fabric 59


Traced Line Circle Alignment Line

ed

Fin i

sh

ed

Ci r

cle

8”

Note: Some printers may distort the pattern image. Check to make sure circle measures size indicated. If not, adjust print settings to obtain this measurement.

le rc Ci

10 ”F in i sh

Pattern is for Quick-Fused Appliqué if using hand appliqué traced line will be the stitching line and seam allowance will need to be added.

Circle Border Ring

Appliqué Background

Trace half-circle template on paper side of fusible web two times aligning red dash line to make a whole circle pattern piece. If using a hand appliquéing technique trace circle on pattern paper or template plastic.

60 Asian Fabric 2014


Chateau Charm AppliquĂŠ Template (pattern is reversed image for machine appliquĂŠ)

Trace Line Placement Line Stitching Line Circle Guide

2014 Asian Fabric 61


Chateau Charm AppliquĂŠ Template (pattern is reversed image for machine appliquĂŠ)

62 Asian Fabric 2014

Trace Line Placement Line Stitching Line Circle Guide


Vin Bouteille Wall Quilt Designer: Georgie Gerl

2014 Asian Fabric 00


Let’s Begin

Adding the Appliqué

Before you begin read all instructions including Appliqué General Instructions (pages 110–111). Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Accurate Seam Allowance to sew a perfect 4”-wide seam. Press seams in the direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

The instructions given are for Quick Fused Appliqué Method for other methods refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Appliqué Technique. Note: It is recommended to use removable stabilizer on the wrong side of the fabric when machine appliquéing. This will give stability to the piece, even stitching, and prevent puckering of fabric.

Vin Bouteille Wall Cutting Chart & Material List

Vin Bouteille Wall Quilt 16" x 24"

material list Backing q yard Batting @)” x @*” Appliquẻ Assorted Scraps Lightweight Fusible Web Stablizer Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

64 Asian Fabric 2014

First Cuts

Next Cuts

!)2” x !^2”

Fabric A SHAD 24 White Background a yard

!

Fabric B SHAD-10 Illusion Border & Binding a yard

# !

@w” x $@” @ !” x $@” @

!” x !!2” !” x %”

Fabric C SHAD-06 Purple Accent 8 yard

!

@2” x $@” @ @

@2” x &” @2” x %”

Fabric D SHAD-08 Greige Outside Border 3 yard

!

#” x $@”

(piece will be trimmed after appliquéd)

! !

@ @ @2” x $@” @ !2” x $@” @ @

#" x !#" @" x %" @2" x !%2" !2" x &" !" x @"

1. Trace all wall quilt templates on page 66 on paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from trace line.

2. With fusible web paper-side up, fuse to wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions. Cut on traced line.

3. Refer to photo on page 63 and layout to arrange, center and fuse appliqués to !)2” x !^2” Fabric A piece. Tip: For easy placement of grape elements on fabric use an appliqué pressing sheet to make whole grape appliqué units prior to fusing to Fabric A piece. Finish all appliqué edges with machine satin stitch or decorative stitching as desired. Trim piece to measure (2” x !%2”.


Making the Wall Quilt 1. Sew one @” x %” Fabric D piece to one !” x %” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. %”

@”

5. Sew one @2” x &” Fabric C strip to one !2” x &” Fabric D strips as shown. Press. Make two. Sew this unit to one unit from step 4. Press. Make two. &”

@2”

!” Make 2

!2”

2. Sew one @2” x %” Fabric C strip to one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

%”

@2”

Make 2

Make 2

3. Sew appliqué unit between two units from step 2 as shown. Press.

6. Sew unit from step 3 between units from step 5. Press. Sew this unit between two @2” x !%2” Fabric D strips as shown. Press. !%2”

@2”

4. Sew one !” x !1!2”” Fabric B strip to one !” x @” Fabric D piece. Press. Sew this unit to one #” x !#” Fabric D strip as shown. Press. Make two. !!2”

@”

!”

Make 2 !#” #” Make 2

@2”

Finishing the Quilt Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt, page 111, and bind as desired.

2014 Asian Fabric 65


Vin Bouteille Wall Quilt (pattern is reversed image for machine appliquĂŠ)

Trace Line Placement Line

66 Asian Fabric 2014


book review by Vicki Dar

Set the Table Don’t you just love table runners? They’re reminiscent of elegant days gone by and a touch of tradition that can change the look of a room in six square feet or less. The appeal may lie in their perceived simplicity or the fact that such a beautiful handcrafted piece of art can be functional as well. Plus, no one ever said table runners had to stay on the table, did they? Thumbing through Set the Table—11 Designer Patterns for Table Runners, from our friends at Martingale publishing, was 2014 Asian Fabric 67


like opening a multi-faceted gift. The saddle stitched, lays flat, book numbers only 48 pages but any doubts that you’re getting a good value are quickly dissolved as the striking photos of each new runner unfolds. Set the Table falls under the Martingale imprint, A Patchwork Place. As we’ve seen in previous titles we’ve reviewed, the talented editors at Martingale (in this case Mary Green) exhibit phenomenal skill at choosing a mix of designers to deliver projects sure to gain applause from a wide audience. The writers, whose bios you won’t want to miss at the end of the book, hail from a variety of backgrounds. Fortunately for you, their journeys have all brought them to quilting and professional pattern design. The ten designers offer us a fresh

68 Asian Fabric 2014

perspective on the look of a traditional piece. Almost all of the designers have websites to explore and blogs to follow. Surely, you’ll find new folks to follow. As so many of us try to balance so much in too few hours and too few days, table runners can provide the alternative to your existence being a creative wasteland. Bored with your tired decor? Enter a new table runner. Need a fast gift? A table runner is the answer. Feeling strapped for cash but have lots a small fabric pieces on the shelf? You guessed it—the solution is a table runner. The 11 projects featured in Set the Table leave you hard pressed to choose a favorite pattern. You don’t have to, you’ll want to make them all. By taking your fabric


choices in a few different directions, you are able to achieve completely different looks. Consider making the best use of your time by choosing one pattern and cutting enough pieces to sew up a few runners simultaneously. You can switch them out with the seasons or the next time you need a special gift for a friend. You’ll be prepared and they’ll be elated. If you’ve been waiting for the perfect project to use those larger scale Kona Bay Fabrics Asian prints or panels, don’t rule out table runner projects in Set the Table. Two projects, in particular, are well suited. Stand Out, on page 16, features a 12 1/2” x 22” center that would frame a panel beautifully. Use

coordinating tonals for the small squares and a coordinating midsize print for each end. Although Stand Out is a pattern for a table runner, it’s 48” length makes it ideal for a stunning Asian wall hanging. Turn to page 44 for another fun project to showcase your Asian fabric. This quick-to-makerunner also has multiple uses. A 3 1/4” x 8 1/2” rectangle offers the perfect frame for many lovely Asian motifs. In addition to adding a spark to a table, this simple project will transform a boring bedcover into a stunning focal point. Throughout the book, watch for tip boxes marked with a crossed spoon and fork. The helpful notes will add to your experience by eliminating unnecessary challenges and expanding the possibilities. Visit www.shopmartingale.com to view photos of the eleven projects in Set the Table, 11 Designer Patterns for Table Runners. The book sells for $16.99. Set the Table can be purchased at locals quilt shops, book stores or directly from the publisher. 2014 Asian Fabric 69


free pattern download available now


distinctive chic

Q u i lt A bed adorn with these large floral blocks set in a non-traditional style gives a modern chic appearance to a room. Designer: Georgie Gerl


Distinctive Chic Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Distinctive Chic Quilt 83” x 103” material list Backing &s yards Batting 91” x !!!” Read Let’s Begin: Cutting and Sewing and Circle Appliqué Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips

Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Featuring fabrics from the Happy Garden Collections.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric F HAPP-05 Red Large Circles, Block 2 & Quilt Accent Borders

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric A SHAD-09 Ivory Background

& !!” x $@”

Fabric B HAPP-01 Blue Block 1 Center

^ !)2” squares

@2 yards

@) !!” squares* *(cut once diagonally) @) @” squares

First Cuts

Next Cuts

!# !2"” x $@”"

$ !2” x #!2” * !2” x !@2” !^ !2” x !)2”

!8 yards

@

Large Circles

Fabric G HAPP-04 Red Block 2 Accent & Circles

$

@” x $@”

$

Small Circles

$ $

@” x !$” @” x !@2”

s yard Fabric H HAPP-02 Multi Block 2 Medium Circles

$ Medium Circles

2-1w yard Fabric I HAPP-01 Multi Border & Medium Circles

w-1! yard !) @w” x $@” Fabric C @) !2” x $@” HAPP-05 Blue Block 1 Border, Accent Border & Binding

!d yards

Fabric D HAPP-04 Blue Block 1 Accent, & Border @q yards Fabric E HAPP-05 Green Block 2 Background

w yard

74 Asian Fabric 2014

* (2” x $@” % @” x $@”

^

!)2” x $@” $ $

@

Medium Circles

$

Small Circles

$

Small Circles

@4 yards $ !@ !@ !^

!2” x @!2” !2” x @)2” !2” x !@2” !2” x !)2”

Fabric J HAPP-04 Yellow Border Circles

$ $ $ ^ ^

(2” x #!2” (2” x @)2” (2” x !)2” @” x !$” @” x !@2”

Fabric K HAPP-05 Yellow Border Circles

@ !)2” x $@” $ !)2” squares

4 yard

4 yard Fabric L DRAG-01 Green Border Circles

4 yard

$ Small Circles

!)2” x #)2” !)2” squares


Let’s Begin: Cutting

Making Block 1

Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Fabric A !!” squares are cut once diagonally as noted in cutting chart these are oversize triangles for the units, having them larger will allow for trimming and squaring of the block to achieve a @)2” measurement.

1. Sew one !)2” Fabric B square between two !2” x !)2” Fabric C strips. Press seams toward Fabric C. Sew this unit between two !2” x !@2” Fabric C strips as shown. Press. Make six.

Refer to circle template pages 81-82 to trace and cut 6”, 9”, and 11” (finished size) circles on paper, card stock or plastic template. Refer to Circle Appliqué Tips to determine which appliqué method you wish to use then trace and cut circle fabrics accordingly. Refer to Circle Appliqué Tips (page 77) and General Instructions (pages 110-111) to sew circles to block or quilt when noted in step instructions. Note: It is recommended to use removable stabilizer on the wrong side of the fabric when machine appliquéing. This will give stability to the piece, even stitching, and prevent puckering of fabric.

Let’s Beign: Sewing

Refer to General Instructions (pages 110111) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram. This quilt doesn’t use directional fabric. If “Fussy Cutting” fabrics check directions of blocks in layout to determine the best way to cut fabric. Prior to sewing check orientation of blocks in layout and step instructions to sew fabric in correct direction. Yardage needed will vary depending on motif selection and fabric repeat.

!2”

!2”

!@2”

Make 6

2. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110111) for Simple Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one @” Fabric A square. This will be your sewing line. Place marked square on one @” x !@2” Fabric D strip as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Make six. Sew one unit from this step to one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Make six. Fabric A- @” squares Fabric D- @””” x !@2””” Make ^

Make 6

2014 Asian Fabric 75


3. Using simple triangle technique sew one @” Fabric A square to one @” x !$” Fabric D strip as shown. Press. Make six. Sew one unit from step 2 to one unit from this step as shown. Press. Make six. Fabric A- @” squares Fabric D- @””” x !$””” Make ^

Making Block 2 1. Using prefer appliqué technique sew one Fabric H medium circle to one !)2” Fabric E square. Make four.

2. Sew one unit from step 1 between two !2” x !)2” Fabric F strips. Press seams toward Fabric F. Sew this unit between two !2” x !@2” Fabric F strips as shown. Press. Make four. !2”

!2”

!@2” Make 6

4. Sew four Fabric A triangle pieces to one unit from step 3 as shown. Press. Square unit to measure @)2” square. Make six and label Block 1. Block 1

Make 6 Block measures @)2” square

Make 4

3. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110111) for Simple Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one @” Fabric A square. This will be your sewing line. Place marked square on one @” x !@2” Fabric G strip as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Make four. Sew one unit from this step to one unit from step 2 as shown. Press. Make four. Fabric A- @” squares Fabric G- @””” x !@2””” Make $

Make 4

76 Asian Fabric 2014


4. Using simple triangle technique sew one @” Fabric A square to one @” x !$” Fabric G strip as shown. Press. Make four. Sew one unit from step 3 to one unit from this step as shown. Press. Make four.

5. Sew four Fabric A triangle pieces to one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. Square unit to measure @)2” square. Make four and label Block 2. Block 2

Fabric A- @” squares Fabric G- @””” x !$””” Make $

Make 4 Block measures @)2” square

Make 4

Circle Appliqué Tips Refer to step instructions and General Instructions (pages 110-111) for Machine Quick-Fused Appliqué, general instructions has some additional appliqué technique information. Here are some other helpful tips. • Test removable fabric markers using the appliqué technique chosen, some markers if heated could make it difficult to remove marks from fabric. • Stabilizers should be used when finishing appliqué edges by machine, there are many types of stabilizers on the market tear away, wash away, and iron away. Stabilizers will not be needed for hand or freezer paper method. • A variety of fusible webs are available it’s best to test out the different types to find your preference. • The appliqué pressing sheet is made from an ultra high temperature fabric and is coated with nonstick Polylon. The reverse image of the pattern is placed on iron board with the pressing sheet placed on top of the pattern it will show through the transparent sheet. Appliqué pieces are placed on the pressing sheet working from the furthest back (pieces that go under others) to the foreground. When all pieces are in place fuse following manufacturers instructions. Let the unit cool. The fusible will remain on fabric as long as the unit is cool before removing. The appliqué will be easy to peel off the sheet and then fused to background piece. • For hand appliqué method giving your fabric a memory makes turning the piece with the tip of the needle easier. Trace template on fabric this will be the stitching line trim fabric a scant 4“ from marked line. Finger press along marked stitching line simple to do with great results. • Other methods that can be used are freezer paper that’s able to be iron to fabric and depending how it is removed pattern can be reused. Another method is two layer circles; placing two fabrics right sides together, sewing on marked line, trim fabrics a scant 4“ from marked line. Make a slit in underneath fabric for turning being careful not to cut the main fabric piece. Turn, press, machine straight stitch or hand appliqué piece too block or quilt. 2014 Asian Fabric 77


Making Block 3 1. Sew one !2” x !)2” Fabric F strip to one !)2” x #)2” Fabric I piece as shown. Press. Make four. !)2”

!2”

3. Sew one unit from step 2 between one (2” x @)2” Fabric D piece and one !2” x @)2” Fabric C strip as shown. Press. Make four, two of each variation and label Block 3. Block measures @)2” x $!12” Fabric C strip. Block 3 @)2”

(2”

#)2”

Make 4

2. Sew one !2” x #!2” Fabric F strip between one (2” x #!2” Fabric D piece and one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Make four, two of each variation.

(2”

!2”

!2”

(2”

!2” Make 2 Block measures @)2 x $!2” @)2” #!2”

#!2”

(2”

Make 2

Make 2

!2” Make 2 Block measures @)2 x $!2“

78 Asian Fabric 2014


Assembling the Quilt 1. Arrange and sew together one (2” x !)2” Fabric D piece, one !2” x !)2” Fabric F strip, one !)2” Fabric I square and one !2” x !)2” Fabric C strip as shown. Press. Make four.

3. Sew one unit from step 2 between two units from 3 one of each variation. step 1 as shown. Press. New Makestep two,

!)2”

(2” !2”

!)2”

!2” Make 4

2. Sew one !2” x @)2” Fabric C strip to one Block 2. Press seam toward Fabric C. Sew this unit between two !2” x @!2” Fabric D strips as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation. New step 2 !2”

!2”

4. Arrange and sew together two !2” x @)2” Fabric C strips and two of Block 1 as shown, Press. Make two.

!2”

!2”

@)2” @!2”

Make 2 !2”

!2”

@!2”

New step 3

2014 Asian Fabric 79


5. Referring to center of diagram below sew one unit from step 3 to one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two of Block 3 one of each variation as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation.

Make 2 (one of each variation)

6. Arrange and sew together two !2” x @)2” Fabric C strips, two of Block 1, and two of Block 2 as shown. Press. !2”

!2”

@)2”

7. Referring to photo (page 73) and layout (page 74), arrange and sew together unit from step 6 between two units from step 5. Press.

8. Using prefer appliqué technique, sew one medium Fabric I circle to one large Fabric F circle. Make two. Referring to layout sew these units to center area of quilt.

9. Referring to quilt layout (page 74) sew four of each Fabric G, J, K, and L small circles to outside border area of quilt.

Finishing the Quilt

1. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one (!” x !@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure (!” x !!!”. 2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110-111) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. 3. Refer to Binding the Quilt (page 111) and bind as desired.

80 Asian Fabric 2014


Distinctive Chic Quilt 6” Circle Template Trace Line

Small 6” Circle Template

Read Let’s Begin-Cutting tip (page 75) and Circle Appliqué Tips (page 77) prior to tracing circle templates.

Note: Some printers may distort the pattern image. Check to make sure circle measures size indicated. If not, adjust print settings to obtain this measurement.

Koi Chic Quilt—version using different fabrics.

2014 Asian Fabric 81


Large 11” Circle Template

Distinctive Chic Quilt 9” & 11” Circle Templates

Trace quarter circle template four times aligning placement lines to make a whole 9” or 11” circle template. Read Let’s Begin-Cutting tip (page 75) and Circle Appliqué Tips (page 77) prior to tracing circle

Trace Line Placement Line

82 Asian Fabric 2014

Medium 9” Circle Template


Cats & Dots

available now


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Be sure to pick up the original Shadowland Collection Quilts book—remade quilts with new cutting instructions will be made available for download. Must purchase book for instructions.


click quilt for FREE pattern download


Tomorrow Morning available now


Banh Mi

A sandwich from Vietnam Rarely, when we think about favorite Asian dishes, do our thoughts turn to sandwiches. Vietnam is the exception. Banh Mi, a Vietnamese sandwich, offers a whole new sandwich experience from what most of us are used to. Rice rules in Asia, right? It is typically consumed daily by the average Asian family. So, how did a sandwich become one of those, “Oh, let me tell you about…!” kinds of food in Vietnam and the United States in recent years? We must step back in time to 1859. France had invaded Vietnam with the intent of making it a French colony. They were successful and Ho Chi Minh City (formerly known as Saigon), our featured destination in this month’s travel article, was seized. Vietnam remained under Vietnamese rule until the summer of 1954. The lingering influence of the French inhabitants can clearly be seen in Banh Mi with it’s crispy on the outside, soft and light inside, baguette. Insiders claim the secret ingredient is the light and crispy authentic Banh Mi baguette is rice flour others give credit to the process. Our guest author and Vietnamese food master, Andrea Nguyen, shares her recipe for an authentic Banh Mi here. You'll also find useful links to other recipes at her Vietworldkitchen.com site. Inside the tasty outer bread roll, fresh French and Asian ingredients meld together. First, cold cuts, grilled meats, pate and the like are layered onto a mayonnaise covered baguette. The next step is where it gets really interesting and as we depart from the standard sandwich garnish. Instead, we look to assorted pickled vegetables, fresh herbs and chilies to elevate the sandwich to a level worthy of notoriety. Banh Mi is a delectable taste explosion you’ll long to experience again and again.

88 Asian Fabric 2014

Bánh mì | © SodanieChea/F


Flickr

Click here to pre-purchase Andrea Nguyen's The Banh Mi Handbook on Amazon.


Banh Mi Sandwich Published with permission from Andrea Nguyen, Vietworldkitchen.com

for each sandwich

preparation Slit the bread lengthwise, and then use your fingers or a bread knife to hollow out the insides, making a trough in both halves. Discard the insides or save it for another use, such as breadcrumbs. If necessary, crisp up the bread in a toaster oven preheated to 325ºF, and then let it cool for a minute before proceeding. Generously spreading the inside with mayonnaise. Drizzle in some Maggi Seasoning sauce or soy sauce. Start from the bottom portion of bread to layer in the remaining ingredients. (As with all sandwiches, you’ll eventually develop an order for layering the filling so as to maximize the interaction between flavors and textures.) Close the sandwich, cut it in half crosswise for easy eating, and enjoy.

90 Asian Fabric 2014

1 petit baguette roll or a 7-inch section cut from a regular length baguette, purchased or homemade mayonnaise, real (whole egg) or homemade mayonnaise Maggi Seasoning sauce or soy sauce your choice of boldly-flavored meat or tofu, sliced and at room temperature 3 or 4 thin seeded cucumber strips, pickling or English variety preferred 2 or 3 cilantro sprigs, roughly chopped 3 or 4 thin jalapeño pepper slices Everyday Daikon and Carrot Pickle (do chua) → click here for pickle recipe


About Andrea Nguyen

Sandwich Notes from Andrea Light crispy baguette (not the chewy rustic kind) is essential for encasing without overshadowing the other ingredients. Vietnamese baguette is commonly made with rice and wheat flour, which makes for an airy crumb. You can purchase the baguette at Vietnamese or Chinese markets, Vietnamese bakeries and delis, or make your own Vietnamese baguette. A Mexican bolillo roll works well too. So does regular baguette, though avoid sourdough and the overly crusty type. The focal point may be leftover grilled or roasted meat, thin slices of Vietnamese steamed pâté (gio lua), or even seared tofu. Yes, purchased chicken liver pate, even German braunschweiger, can be smeared into a banh mi! Because the daikon and carrot pickle can keep for days in the fridge, you can make banh mi whenever the spirit moves you. Click here to view Andrea’s recipe and suggestions for making a light and airy Vietnamese baguette.

Andrea has graciously offered Asian Fabric readers a 25% discount for two of her popular Craftsy cooking classes. (Click on class to view.) Favorite Asian Dumplings from Scratch Vietnamese Classics: Pho, Noodles & Beyond

©Laurie Smith

An interest in cooking developed when Andrea was still a youngster. Since the age of 10, she spent hours with cookbooks of all kinds and watching favorite PBS cooking shows. Early on, she decided her life and future would honor her fascination with food. Andrea is an award winning author with three cookbooks to her name—Into the Vietnamese Kitchen, Asian Dumplings and Asian Tofu. A new book, The Banh Mi Handbook: Recipes for Crazy Delicious Vietnamese Sandwiches, will be released in July by Ten Speed Press. The list of books Andrea claims to her name would seem like enough of an accomplishment for many but her talents extend far beyond. The Wall Street Journal, Sunset and Bon Appetit are just a sampling of the magazines and newspapers that have featured Andreas articles. Plus, in addition to her print exposure, she has also appeared on many national television and radio programs. Andrea, without a doubt, is a media powerhouse in the realm of Asian cooking. Fortunately for us, Andrea still teaches cooking classes and we can take advantage of her knowledge first hand. Plus, as of 2013, if you can’t make it to a location where one of her classes is offered, you can take one of her classes online through Craftsy.


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Ho Chi Minh City

A Favorite Destination


recognize this destination by its better known name, Saigon. In fact, visitors will find that many sites around the city still bear its former name. The city’s long and complex history makes it a fascinating place to visit.

With a mix of French colonial and

a

T

hough it is officially known as Ho Chi Minh City today, many travelers

selection of handicrafts and thought-

traditional Vietnamese architecture,

provoking attractions mean that

the cityscapes are beautiful to behold.

this Vietnamese city is a stunning

Also owing to its past as a French

destination for travelers

outpost, Ho Chi Minh City is one of the

of all descriptions.

best places in the world to experience

Ho Chi Minh City enjoys its status

authentic French cuisine in addition

as Vietnam’s largest port. It sits on the

to native Asian offerings. A wondrous

banks of the Saigon River,

94 Asian Fabric 2014


in today’s District 1. The French would remain until 1954. Eventually, the U.S. armed forces made Saigon their base of operations in the infamous conflict that would mark the city forever. In the aftermath of the war, the people of Ho Chi Minh City suffered greatly, largely cut off from the rest of the world. A series of economic reforms broke down barriers, making foreign investment possible and allowing the country to welcome tourists as it never has before. Many of Ho Chi Minh City’s best attractions explore the darker side of its recent history. Although not located within the city proper, a visit to the Cu Chi Tunnels is definitely worth the trip. The extensive network of tunnels was built by Vietnamese guerillas who were determined to protect their homeland from invading forces. its population of some eight million

Amazing in their complexity and

plus people on the go both day and

ingenuity, the tunnels ranged for miles

night, determined to make the most

and included various meeting rooms

of the country’s reemergence as

and useful amenities like kitchens and

a viable economic power in Asia. While

medical treatment facilities. Visitors

the city moves determinedly toward

to the tunnels view a propaganda

the future, it is nonetheless highly

film from the era before touring the

aware of its past.

museum. It’s possible to traverse the

It was established in the 1700s and was already a center of commerce by the 1800s. By the 1880s, the French had

tunnels, but the experience is quite dirty and claustrophobic so beware. The Ho Chi Minh City Museum is

assumed control. It was the French

similarly fascinating thanks to its

who built grand boulevards and

1890 French colonial architecture and

architecturally magnificent buildings

the amazing depth of its collection. 2014 Asian Fabric 95


Documents and artifacts dating all the way back to the 17th century are on display, and special emphasis is placed on Vietnam’s revolutionary past. The Vietnam History Museum is also found here, notable for its superior collection of ancient ceramics and weaponry. One of its most worthwhile exhibits deals with Vietnam’s various subcultures and highlights the traditional dress of each group. Lucky visitors will get to enjoy a water puppet show in the museum’s tiny theater. One of the city’s most beautiful attractions is the Emperor Jade Pagoda. Built just before the turn of the 20th century, this house of worship is still very much in use. Its many intricately carved figurines are a cause for wonder, while visitors must pause to admire the Jade Emperor, an enormous statue perched atop the pagoda’s roof.


For buying outstanding handicrafts,

rest of the country, so this may be

there’s no better place than the Ben

the best opportunity for picking up

Thanh Market. Of course, this market

souvenirs.

boasts the usual T-shirts and other

A favorite purchase for fabric lovers

tourist paraphernalia, but sharp eyed

to pick up is a few yards of brightly

shoppers will easily find the gems.

dyed, high quality silk. Wearable

The aisles are narrow and noisy,

silk clothing is offered for sale at the

crammed with tourists, locals and the

nearby Hoang Khai shop. It’s filled to

occasional pickpocket.

the rafters with beautiful and unique

Still, a stop here is an absolute must

pieces that would make wonderful

for those interested in Vietnamese arts

souvenirs. Many of the textiles are

and crafts. Ho Chi Minh’s shopping

woven on looms in the area with

opportunities are generally considered

locally harvested raw silk making

more sophisticated than those in the

them especially memorable souvenirs. 2014 Asian Fabric 97


Lacquer items, like paintings and bowls, are found in the market and other shopping outlets throughout the city. Thoughtfully crafted, many of these depict traditional Vietnamese designs. Artisans begin with simple pieces of wood, layering on the high gloss lacquer and an inlay of mother-of-pearl. For something a little different, keep an eye out for lacquerware that features duck egg shell inlay instead. A skilled artisan

98 Asian Fabric 2014


carved statuettes of male and female figures in traditional Vietnamese garb. Of course, a favorite of many tourists are the delicate, lovely and useful sets of chopsticks. Chopsticks are the perfect gift to take home as they require little space and exemplify the local wood crafts. Exquisite silk embroidered goods stretch beyond wearables and are also widely available in Ho Chi Minh City’s shops. Artisans who have spent decades perfecting their craft may spend months completing a single work of art. The result is a creation worthy of hanging in the place of honor in any home. Silk thread used to create the design absorbs dye particularly well, making for vibrant colors. Truly high quality pieces feature finer threads and dazzlingly intricate designs. Another handicraft special to applies the bits of duck shell with meticulous care using tweezers before applying the lacquer. The Ben Thanh Market is home to a many excellent wood carving shops. Sometimes it takes a bit of work to uncover the most skilled craftsman but nonetheless, finding a treasure is worth the effort. The delicately carved

Vietnam is sand paintings. Artisans may labor for hours creating these painstaking designs. Extraordinary patience is required while the sand, which is not specially treated in any way, is carefully placed to make designs that range from Vietnamese landscapes to the Eiffel Tower or the Russian Prime Minister.

figurines showcase religious and natural subjects alike with stunning elegance. Many shoppers can’t resist 2014 Asian Fabric 99


Time passes quickly with so much

Now that you’re rested and

to see. After several busy hours of

refreshed, let’s get back to dinner.

sightseeing and shopping, even the

The French influence is still quickly

hardiest tourist will find themselves

recognizable in many dishes you’ll

in need of a good meal. Ho Chi Minh

encounter but those who love

City visitors are in luck because this

traditional Asian dishes will not be

city features a tremendous array of

disappointed either.

delicious foods. First, though, you should consider

Unlike many other destinations, it isn’t necessary to spend a fortune

treating yourself to an hour or two of

to get a fantastic meal in this city.

quality professional pampering to be

Imagine a satisfying and delicious

had at some of the best prices in Asia,

meal for less then $2. Street stalls are

if not the world. Imagine an hour long

scattered throughout the city’s many

massage for less than $15. Or how

districts, most of them in the open

about three hours complete with a

air markets. These are wonderful

massage, facial and manicure for $60.

places to enjoy a superb meal of rice,

If these are services that your budget

noodles and vegetables. Even a walk

prevents you from partaking in at

in restaurant experience will leave

home, now is the time to indulge.

you wondering how you spent so little


for a deliciously satisfying meal. For a

decor is fittingly understated and

unique sweet treat, indulge in che,

gorgeous. The food is nothing short

a dessert soup or pudding that involves

of remarkable. The fried monkfish

a fruit like mango or jackfruit along

has been declared divine while a

with beans and coconut creme.

dessert, known as Hue cake which

For a more traditional Vietnamese

is made from ground green beans, is

restaurant experience, many visitors

simply heavenly. Don’t forget to order

head to Quan An Ngon. “Chaotic” is

at least one cup of the rich, fragrant

perhaps the best way to describe the

Vietnamese coffee.

atmosphere. Waiters shout, diners

Ho Chi Minh City is a metropolis in

laugh and gossip and the supply of

flux. Even as it holds on to its socialist

good food never seems to end.

tendencies, it embraces a capitalistic

Cold noodles with beef is a local

future with trade and tourism at

specialty that is particularly well done

its center. This loosening of the old

here. The menu is also remarkable for

political bonds is necessary if Vietnam

the seemingly endless varieties

is to not just survive, but also thrive.

of noodle soup, known as pho,

I’m going to put my bet on a bright

that are available. Pho has developed

future. Tourists can reap the benefits

a fan base worldwide.

of Vietnam’s new economic diversity

A more elegant experience can be had at the Temple Club. It’s in a converted Chinese temple and the

by experiencing this grand culture in all of its complexity.


Birds in the Air surround our beautiful Geisha as she takes a leisurely stroll in an Asian garden. Designer: Sandy Turner 2014 Asian Fabric 00


Let’s Begin

Birds in the Air Cutting Chart & Material List Birds in the Air

Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram. Note: Sandy uses a shorter machine stitch length, 2.0mm when sewing bias seams.

Making the Quilt

42” square

material list Backing @q yards Batting 48” x 48” Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A Center Panel

q-! yard

First Cuts !

Next Cuts

!*2” square

Yardage needed for “Fussy Cutting” will vary depending on motif selection and fabric repeat.

Fabric B Background

! yard

@ @ #

^d” x $@” !) #2” x $@” * #” x $@” #)

^d” squares #2” x ^2” #” squares

Fabric C Center Accent

@ @

!% #” x $@” @d” x $@” !%

#” squares @d” squares

Fabric D Dark Border

@

! yard

@ @

^2” x $@” @ @ #” x $@” !% @d” x $@” !%

^2” x !%2” ^2” x (2” #” squares @d” squares

Fabric E Color Border & Binding

@

^2” x $@” @ @ @2” x $@” (binding)

^2” x !%2” ^2” x (2”

2 yard

! yard

%

1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Half-Square Triangles. Draw a diagonal line on one #” Fabric C square. Place marked square and one #” Fabric B square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make fifteen. Trim squares to @2” to make thirty half-square triangle units. Fabric C- #” square Fabric B- #””” square Make !%

2. Making half-square triangle units, draw a diagonal line on one #” Fabric B square. Place marked square and one #” Fabric D square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make fifteen. Trim squares to @2” to make thirty half-square triangle units. Fabric B- #” square Fabric D- #””” square Make !%

104 Asian Fabric 2014

Square to @2””” Make #) Half-square Triangles Units

Square to @2””” Make #) Half-square Triangles Units


3. Cut each @d” Fabric C square once diagonally to make thirty Fabric C triangles. Sew one Fabric C triangle to one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Sew another Fabric C triangle to unit from this step. Press. Make ten. Make 10

7. Arrange and sew together two #2” x ^2” Fabric B strips and two units from step 5 as shown. Press. Make four. #2”

^2”

Make 4

Make 10

4. Sew one Fabric C triangle and two units from step 1 together as shown. Press. Sew this unit to one unit from step 3. Press. Make ten.

#2”

8. Sew one !*2” Fabric A square between two units from step 7 as shown. Press. 182”

Make 10

Make 10

5. Cut each ^d” Fabric B square once diagonally to make twenty Fabric B triangles. Sew one large Fabric B triangle to one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. Make ten.

Make 10

6. Cut each @d” Fabric D square once diagonally to make thirty Fabric D triangles. Referring to steps 3-5 arrange and sew together three Fabric D triangles, three units from step 2, and one large Fabric B triangle as shown. Press. Make ten.

182”

9. Sew one unit from step 7 between one unit from step 6 and one unit from step 5 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

Make 10

2014 Asian Fabric 105


10. Sew unit from step 8 between two units from step 9 as shown. Press.

11. Sew two units from step 6 together as shown. Press. Make four.

Make 4

12. Sew one unit from step 11 between one ^2” x (12” Fabric D strip and one ^2” x (12” Fabric E strip as shown. Press. Referring to photo on page 103 and layout on page 104, sew units from this step to top and bottom of unit from step 10. Press seams away from center. (2”

(2”

^2”

Make 2

13. Sew one unit from step 11 between one ^2” x !%12” Fabric D strip and one ^2” x !%12” Fabric E strip as shown. Press. Referring to photo on page 103 and layout on page 104, sew units from this step to sides of unit from step 12. Press seams away from center. !%2”

!%2”

^2”

Make 2

Finishing the Quilt 1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one $*” x *)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure $*” x $*”.

2. Referring to General Instructions (pages 110–111) for Finishing the Quilt, layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Quilt and bind quilt as desired.

106 Asian Fabric 2014


sandy turner S a nd y T u r ner ’s lo v e of f a br ic a nd quiltmaking began in 1984. Her quilts have earned many awards at shows across the country. She has been teaching quilt making and loving every minute of it for the past 20 years. By 2005, she was selected as the National Quilting Association’s Certified Teacher of the Year. Sandy has continued to teach and create. Like the folks at Kona Bay Fabrics, she often heard the question, “I love the fabric, but what do I do with it?” in reference to the large scale prints. And, so, Sandy’s journey to becoming a known large scale fabric expert began. It started with an article entitled, “I Love the Fabric, But What Do I Do With It,” published in 2003. From there, she created a Classroom in a book bearing the same name. It can be purchased online in eBook form on her site. Sandy is also the author of Big-Print Patchwork—Quilt Patterns for Large Scale Prints which Asian Fabric reviewed in Issue #30. Click here to read the review. Look for the book at your local quilt shop or visit ShopMartingale. com. The book is available at ShopMartingale.com in two versions. The print version + eBook sells for $24.99 and the eBook only is available for $16.99 and downloadable instantly. Visit Sandy’s website at www.SandyTurner.com to learn more about our celebrated guest and the author of Big-Print Patchwork.

2014 Asian Fabric 107


click on quilt for pattern download

available now


general instructions

How-to Help You! Before You Begin We recommend washing and pressing your fabric prior to cutting it into strips and pieces. To help prevent fabric from fraying in the washer, clip corners at a 45 degree angle removing a small triangle piece.

Achieving a Perfect Block Accurate Seam Allowance Use 4”-wide seam allowance for all projects in this magazine unless otherwise stated. If seam allowances differ as little as z” assembling blocks will be difficult, especially when incorporating several block designs in a quilt. To check your seam allowances follow these steps.

Half Square Triangles

without breaking threads, continue this process to stitch additional units. Cut sections apart, press and continue with next step.

Fussy Cut This process is the selection and cutting of a particular motif pattern which is featured in a cut piece. Remember to center design and always allow for seam allowance.

Simple Triangles This is an easy way to make triangles from squares.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of fabric square that will become the triangle. This will be your stitch line.

Step 1 Cut three 12” x 6” pieces of fabric from assorted scraps. Sew pieces together to make one 32” x 6” piece. Press.

Step 2 Center strip should measure 1” x 6”. If piece measures differently check to see if seams have been pressed flat. If the piece still differs cut new strips and adjust seam allowance until you achieve the perfect stitch.

Pressing Press using steam or dry heat setting. Always use an “up and down” motion since a side-to-side motion can distort the block or unit.

Assembly Line Method Use this method when making multiple pieces or blocks.

Step 2 Place marked square on fabric piece shown in construction step matching raw edges. Sew on drawn line and trim 4” away from stitching.

Fabric A- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric B- 2 2" x 6 2"

Step 3 Press seams as indicated in construction diagram. Measure sewn piece to check accuracy.

Tip: There is a waste factor with this technique but you can stitch an additional 2” away from stitch line. Cut piece between stitching saving the smaller version for some future project. Diagram 3

Step 1

Position pieces right sides together, stitch unit.

Step 2 Align and sew the next unit

110

ASIAN FABRIC 2014

This technique differs from the Simple Triangle method; you will be making two triangles at one time.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one fabric square. Place marked square and one corresponding square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press.

Fabric F- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric D- 2 2" x 2 2"

Square to 2” Make 2

Step 2 Measure unit and trim as indicated in construction diagram.

Applique Technique Quick Fused Method This method joins fabric to each other with the use of fusible web. There are many types on the market and you will need to refer to manufacturer’s instruction for specific requirements. If quilt does not require laundering you can use heavy-weight fusible web and follow steps 1-4. If your quilt will require laundering use lightweight fusible web and follow all steps. Remember that appliqués when pressed to background fabric will be a reverse image from patterns provided.

Step 1 Trace all appliqué pieces on the paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line.

Step 2 With fusible web paper side up, fuse to the wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 3 Cut on draw line. Remove future project

paper backing, a thin film of adhesive will remain on fabric.


General Instructions

Step 4 Referring to project photo, position and fuse all pieces of one appliqué design at a time onto background.

Tip: An Appliqué Pressing Sheet is very helpful when there are many elements to a design. Place your pattern (reverse image from pattern provided) under the pressing sheet as a guide. Arrange pieces on sheet and press following manufacturer’s instructions. Allow piece to cool, remove appliqué unit and arrange on background to fuse unit in place. If the piece is not cooled, the fusible web could remain on the sheet instead of the fabric.

Step 5 If using a machine, cut a piece of stabilizer larger than appliqué area and pin to wrong side of fabric. Stabilizer is used to achieve an even stitch. Using a satin stitch, blanket stitch or other decorative stitching to secure appliqué in place. Start stitching from the background to the foreground. Option: use a hand embroidery stitch instead.

Hand Appliqué If project specifies quick-fuse you will need to reverse all patterns and add 4”- wide seam allowance. The steps that follow will add the seam allowance after pattern is traced onto fabric.

Step 1 Make a template of all pattern pieces and indicate where pieces overlap. Place template on right side of selected fabric.

Step 2 Trace around template using a removable fabric marker. This will be your turn under guide. Cut out shapes approximately 4” beyond traced line. Step 3 When layering and positioning pieces always work from the background to the foreground.

Step 4 Enter from the wrong side of applique shape bringing the needle up on the traced line. Using the tip of the

needle turn under a small portion of the fabric along trace line and secure with thumb. Using a blind stitch, stitch along folded edge to join piece to background. Stitch is hidden under fabric.

Blind Stitch

Finishing the Quilt

Option 1 Step 1 Position binding away from corner leaving 8” free of stitches and aligning raw edges with the edge of the quilt. Sew using a 4”-wide seam.

Step 2 Stop sewing 4” from quilt top edge and backstitch. Clip threads and turn quilt. Fold binding up at a 45 degree angle to create the mitered corner as shown. Diagram 1

Backing fabric and batting should be 4”-8” larger than the quilt top. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads from quilt prior to basting.

Step 1 Lay backing right side down, batting and quilt top (right side up) on top.

Step 2 Backing and batting need to

Step 3 Fold the binding back down aligning top fold with edge of quilt and matching raw edges. Start stitching 4” Diagram 2 for all corners. from quilt edge. Repeat

be taut prior to basting quilt. Start in the center and work out toward edges. You can hand stitch, pin or use a specialty tool to baste quilt together.

Step 3 Check batting instruction for quilting requirements. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Remove basting.

Binding the Quilt Two options are given for binding the quilt. For both options trim batting and backing 4” beyond raw edge of quilt, this will give fullness to the binding. Sew binding stripes end-to-end to make one continuous strip. Fold and press binding strips in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. To reduce bulk when joining strips, cut ends at 450 angle and sew together as shown.

Step 4 Determine length needed for binding strip ends, trim and sew ends together. Stitch binding to quilt. Fold binding to back of quilt, a diagonal fold will form at the corners. Hand-stitch binding to back of quilt.

Option 2 Step 1 Measure quilt through center from side to side. Cut two binding strips to this measurement. Sew to top and bottom of quilt matching raw edges with edge of quilt. Press binding away from quilt top.

Step 2 Measure quilt through center from top to bottom including the binding just added. Cut two strips to this measurement and sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Step 3 Fold top and bottom strips to the back and pin in place. Repeat for sides. Hand-stitch binding to quilt. 2014 ASIAN FABRIC 111

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Asian Fabric  

Asian Fabric magazine Issue 34 is a quilter's dream—filled with beautiful, complete quilting patterns, armchair travel, recipes and the late...

Asian Fabric  

Asian Fabric magazine Issue 34 is a quilter's dream—filled with beautiful, complete quilting patterns, armchair travel, recipes and the late...

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