Page 1

patterns • decorating tips • fiber art • culture

Quilting and design ideas for inspired minds

Issue No. 2

urai

The Textile Sam

pg is making wine!

10


Graceful Beauty available March

click quilt for free pattern


click quilt for free pattern download


contents

Vol 1 Issue 2

quilts

Early Spring Quilt

An easy row quilt to brighten your days until spring

15

Dance of the Butterflies Quilt & Pillows

28

Radiate Wonder Tablerunner A radiant quilt to grace your table, sideboard or wall

51

Flowering Clematis Wall Quilt

Show off your gardening skills with this quilt 61

Iron Caddy An awesome tote that doubles as a pressing pad

77

The Gathering Quilt

Geisha gathering around a bubbling spring 84

features Wine from Washington The Textile Samurai diversifies

10

Leverage Your Creativity How to make extra money with your creative projects

68

Year of the Sheep 90 LaConner Museum 110 Special thanks to:

Used exclusively and recommended by Asian Fabric™

6 fabric vine 2015


departments Publisher’s Note

8

How To Use the Magazine

9

Book Review Kitchen Stitches

Travel Singapore

Food

42 94

Chocolate Flan Cake

104

General Instructions

121

Guess Who is in the Wine Business? Here’s a hint... He has been bringing you beautiful fabric for over 20 years. Turn the page to find out more.

2015 fabric vine 7


publisher’s note

I believe it was Bob Dylan who sang, “The times, they are a changing.” In 1991 I started Kona Bay Fabrics in Hawaii becoming Da Textile Samurai. Before fabric, I had grown a satisfying business in the Kona coffee industry. A series of events took me from exporting coffee to producing high quality fabrics. Since that time, Kona Bay Fabrics has established itself worldwide as consistently producing gorgeous Asian theme fabrics. We continue to evolve and have expanded our line. We have built a reputation as one of the premier suppliers of tonal prints, widely known as our TONE IT UP collections. Along the way we went into publishing and begin producing ASIAN FABRIC magazine. We recently changed the name to FABRIC VINE to better represent the range of designs that is Kona Bay today. The Vine part of the name came partly from knowing there was a new business on the horizon—a wine business. I am proud (that’s an understatement— imagine me looking REALLY excited!) to announce our first wine. It has barrel aged to yumminess since 2012. Behold, one of the newest Washington wine brands—TRELLIS GATE. I have looked forward to sharing the news and the wine with people who have long been part of our Kona Bay family. In fact, our first label features artwork from Kona Bay’s limited edition Nobu Fujiyama Crane Dynasty fabric collection. We were blessed in being able to source our grapes from the famous wine growing region of Red Mountain in Washington. In addition, good fortune smiled upon us in having award winning wine superstar, Charlie Hoppes of Fidelitas wine fame, as the winemaker. As with fabric, our goal was to produce the very best quality wine with a reasonable price point.

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Are you a wine drinker or need a gift for a friend who is, turn to page 10. Find out how you can purchase our very tasty TRELLIS GATE wine and help Da Textile Samurai aka as the Wine Eagle soar. Make no mistake, though, I am NOT leaving the quilting industry. Fabric is home for me. I have spent many years and have made so many friends, like you, that I treasure. In fact, as we speak, we are putting the finishing touches on plans for Spring Quilt Market coming up the middle of May in Minneapolis. We’ve been working on new collections we’re anxious to show. Thank you so much for joining us in our journey as new opportunities for fun and business unfold. Your support is always appreciated. I hope you’ll enjoy and learn from the exquisite projects the Fabric Vine team has again put together. Perhaps, you’d like to browse while enjoying a glass of wine from a fellow fabric lover. Please visit our wine web page at http://www. winefromwashington.com to look at the special pricing we have established for our friends and supporters. Aloha,

Da Textile Samurai and Wine Eagle Publisher • douglas@konabay.com http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kona-Bay-Fabrics-SeattleBay-Fabrics-and-Asian-Fabric-Magazine/106593046936?ref=ts


Make the most of Fabric Vine patterns • decorating tips • fiber art • culture

Issue #2 2015 • VOL 1 ISSUE 2

Quilting and design ideas for inspired minds

Issue No. 2

Publisher douglas Eagleson Quilt designer & EDITOR Georgie Gerl ggerldesigner@

comcast.net Facebook: Georgie Gerl Designer

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORs Darcy Lewis ASSISTANTS TO PUBLISHER urai

The Textile Sam

Doris Eagleson 1923–2010 Cheryl Hamai Brittany Eagleson Simpson

Subscriptions

pg 10 is making wine!

Kona Bay Fabrics www.konabay.com 15812 NE 83rd St Redmond, WA 98052 800-531-7913

advertising and editorial inquiries

Share it with a friend 1. Click here and choose a method to share. 2. Follow prompts.

Use the easy links As you scroll over a page, active links will be highlighted in blue. This enables you to connect to additional pages and download additional patterns.

Print pages You must log in and download the publication before you are able to print. 1. Click Share and then choose the light gray Download link below. 2. Open the .pdf to view and print pages as you wish.

Eagle Publishing www.PublishingPeople.com 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207 866-638-1115 Editor and associate publisher Vicki Dar nwwoman@mac.com graphic design www.tyann.portfoliobox.me

Kona Bay Fabrics © 2015

Subscribe for FREE— It’s easy! 1. Go to www.konabay.com 2. Click on “Subscribe” 3. Complete the information

Fabric Vine™ is produced six times a year by Eagle Publishing for Kona Bay Fabrics. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. © Kona Bay Fabrics. All rights reserved. No piece, in part or full, may be reproduced without permission.

2015 fabric vine 9


The Textile Samurai Diversifies

…making and selling fine Washington wine

Available Now

Trellis Gate

The first bottle being offered is a 2012 vintage Trellis Gate Cabernet Sauvignon—a collaboration between Doug and award-winning Washington winemaker, Charlie Hoppes. The grapes are sourced from the infamous Red Mountain American Viticultural Area (AVA) in the south central region of Washington state. Just like the high quality 100% cotton fabric you’ve come to expect from Kona Bay Fabrics, Trellis Gate’s debut boasts 100% Red Mountain grapes. Although the smallest AVA, Red Mountain was recently referred to as Washington’s most important wine growing region.

2012

Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

Kona Bay Fabrics is proud to announce their new sister company— WineFromWashington.com. The site will sell some of Washington’s finest wines in addition to Eagleson’s premier private label, Trellis Gate. At the helm of both Kona Bay and Trellis Gate, Eagleson hopes you’ll hop on board and join him on his adventure.

© Kona Bay Fabrics

Nearly half of Washington state wines reviewed by Wine Spectator during the last five years scored 90+ points

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2015 fabric vine 00


Although the first grapes planted here date back only forty years, more than a third of the total AVA acreage, teetering just over four thousand, is now planted to vineyards. The popularity of Red Mountain grapes is unmatched in Washington and well beyond state borders. It’s said the grapes are destined to rival the likes of long standing european and Napa vineyards. An auction this past summer drew successful bids and final prices in the range of $50,000 per undeveloped acre. The Trellis Gate 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon exhibits full-bodied, bold and savory dark fruit flavors with notes of toasty oak. The level of firm tannins were

Kona Bay Fabrics

designed to support and complement your summer burger grilled up on the barbecue or a fine gourmet meal with steak at its center. The label art will be recognizable by fans of Kona Bay Fabrics. The small run bottling of the first Trellis Gate is akin to the limited edition fabric of the Crane Dynasty collection the label pays tribute to. Visit the new WineFromWashington. com site to learn more about the Textile Samurai’s new venture and place your orders for the new 2012 Trellis Gate Cabernet Sauvignon. Make a note that you’re a Kona Bay fabric fan and you’ll get a bonus fabric charm pack with your order.

Washington is the 2nd largest premium wine producer in the U.S. with over 850 wineries and 350 vineyards

Red Mountain AVA Visit WashingtonWine.org to learn more about Washington state wine

12 fabric vine 2015


Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

© Kona Bay Fabrics

1 bottle $24.95

© Kona Bay Fabrics

© Kona Bay Fabrics

Trellis Gate

2012

2012

2012

Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

2012

Red © Kona Bay Fabrics Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

© Kona Bay Fabrics

Ordered by

Deliver to

Name

Name

Address

Address State

Zip Code

Telephone

© Kona Bay Fabrics

3 bottles $64.85 $74.85

2 bottles $44.90 $49.90

City

Print this form if you prefer to send in your payment and order via mail or fax —or— order online

Trellis Gate

Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

Trellis Gate

2012

2012

Trellis Gate

Trellis Gate

Trellis Gate

Trellis Gate Printable Order Form

Same as Ordered by

City

State

Zip Code

Telephone

Email

Shipping for 1 or 3 bottles is the same! Buy 3 and save even more!

Please add me to your email newsletter list

Wine order option

Quantity

Unit Price

1 bottle of Trellis Gate

$24.95

2 bottles of Trellis Gate

$44.90

3 bottles of Trellis Gate

$64.85

Line Total

PLEASE NOTE: By making this purchase, you are stating that you are 21 years of age or over.

Sub-total Shipping—Please refer to WineFromWashington.com or call 800.531.7913 for shipping rate Taxes—WA residents add 9.5% TOTAL Payment information

Thank you

Credit card below

Check enclosed

We accept VISA, MC, American Express, Discover and checks

Please call me at

Credit card number Exp Date

CVC Code

Signature

Mail: Wine From Washington, 15812 NE 83rd St, Redmond, WA 98052 Fax: 425.867.3054 Email: Sales@WineFromWashington.com Phone: 800.531.7913


Rain Forest


Early Spring

Q •u •i •l •t Designer: Georgie Gerl

Tired of those cold and dreary days? Then go to your favorite floral prints to create this easy row quilt to brighten your days and to remember that spring is almost here. 61” x 75”

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Early Spring Cutting Chart & Material List

Early Spring Quilt 61” x 75”

material list Backing $s yards Batting 69" x 83" Read Cutting Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips. Fabric B is set on point take this into consideration when cutting squares.

Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut" pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Featuring fabrics from the Sanctuary II (available April 2015) and Tonal Collections (currently available).

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric A TONE-07 Butter Background

@s yards

Next Cuts * * $

%2" x !#" %2" x &2" %2" x @2"

%

%2" x $@"

$ !%

#2" x $@" @2" x $@" !@) @2" squares (7 used border row)

Fabric B SANC-10 Rose Block Center

!4 yards

&

&2" squares “Fussy Cut” (yardage varies depending on moftif selection)

Fabric G TONE-06 Gold Sashing Border

^4" x $@"

Fabric H TONE-06 Blue Border Accent

!$ ^4" squares Cut once diagonally for Corner Triangles

w yard Fabric D TONE-07 Rose Border

! yard

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Fabric F TONE-05 Blue Accent, Triangles & Binding

!2" x $@"

#

!&

!2" x $@"

!$ !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

(7 used !$ border row)

#

!2" x $@" (Used for strip sets)

4 yard

$

s-! yard Fabric C SANC-13 Rose Block Triangles

Fabric E SANC-14 Rose Sashing

Next Cuts

& $ ^

@w" x $@" @2" x $@" #@ !" x $@"

@2" x $2"

(Used for strip sets)

!%

!2" x $@" (6 used for strip sets)

!$ @*

!2" x !@2" !2" x %2"

@*

@2" x $2"

d yard !#

!" x $@"

$

@2" x $@"

2 yard Fabric I SANC-15 Blue Triangles

2 yard


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram. Note: Center of block (Fabric B) is set on point take this into consideration when selecting motif placement prior to cutting fabric.

Making the Quilt 1. Sew one &2” Fabric B square between two Fabric C triangles. Press seams toward triangles. Sew this unit between two Fabric C triangles as shown. Press. Make seven. Square unit to measure !)2”.

3. Sew one unit from step 2 between two !2” x !@2” Fabric G strips as shown. Press. Make seven and label Block 1. Block 1 !@2”

!2”

!2” Make 7

4. Sew together lengthwise two !2” x $@” Fabric G strips, two !” x $@” Fabric F strips, and one !2” x $@” Fabric E strip. Press. Make three. $@”

!2” !” !2” !” !2”

Make 3

Make 7

!$”

2. Sew one unit from step 1 between two !2” x !)2” Fabric D strips as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two !2” x !@2” Fabric D strips. Press. Make seven. !)2”

5. Cut strip sets from step 4 into four !$”-wide segments, four (2”-wide segments, and two #2”wide segments as shown.

!2”

Cut four 14"-wide segments Cut four (2"-wide segments Cut two #2"-wide segments

!2”

!2”

!@2”

!2”

Make 7

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6. Sew one !2” x %2” Fabric G strip to one %2” x !#” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. Make eight. Sew one !$”-wide segment from step 5 between two units from this step. Press. Make four and label Block 2. Block 2

%2”

!2”

!#”

Make 8

Make 4

7. Sew one %2” x &2” Fabric A piece between two !1 2” x %2” Fabric G strips as shown. Press. Make four. Sew one (2”-wide segment from step 5 between two units from this step as shown. Press. Make four and label Block 3. !2”

&2”

!2”

Block 3

%2”

Make 8

Make 4

8. Sew one %2” x @2” Fabric A strip to one !2” x %2” Fabric G strip as shown. Press. Make four. Sew one #2”-wide segment from step 5 between two units from this step. Press. Make two. @2” !2”

%2”

Make 4

18 fabric vine 2015

Make 2


9. Arrange and sew together two of Block 2, two of Block 1 and one Block 3 as shown. Press. Make two and label Rows 2 and 6. Block 2

Block 1

Block 3

Block 1

Block 2

Make 2 Label Rows 2 & 6

10. Arrange and sew together two units from step 8, three of Block 1, and two of Block 3 as shown. Press and label Row 4. Block 1

Block 3

Block 1

Block 3

Block 1

Label Row 4

11. Referring to Simple Triangles technique on pages 121, draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of sixty-four @2” Fabric A squares. This will be your sewing line. Place one marked square on one @2” x $2” Fabric F piece as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Sew another marked square to piece as shown. Trim and press. Make thirty-two and label Unit 1.

12. Making simple triangles, draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of fifty-six @2” Fabric A squares. Sew one marked square to one @2” x $2” Fabric I piece as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Sew another marked square to piece as shown. Trim and press. Make twenty-eight and label Unit 2.

Unit 1

Fabric A- @2” squares Fabric F- @2” x $2””” Make #@

Unit 2

Fabric A- @2” squares Make 28 Fabric I- @2” x $2””” Make @*

13. Arrange and sew together eight of Unit 1 to seven of Unit 2 alternating units as shown. Press. Make four rows. Make 4

2015 fabric vine 19


14. Sew four !2” x $@” Fabric A strips end-to-end to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric A strip. Press. Sew seven @2” x $@” Fabric A strips end-to-end to make one continuous @2”-wide Fabric A strip. Press. Sew four #2” x $@” Fabric A strips end-to-end to make one continuous #2”-wide Fabric A strip. Press. Measure rows from steps 9,10 and 13 from side to side. Cut two !2”-wide, four @2”-wide and two #2”-wide and strips to this measurement. 15. Sew seven !2”-wide Fabric D strips end-to-end to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric D strip. Press. Sew thirteen !”-wide Fabric H strips end-to-end to make one continuous !”wide Fabric H strip. Press. Cut four !2”-wide Fabric D strips and eight !2”-wide Fabric H strips to measurement obtain in step 14. 16. Sew one !2”-wide Fabric D strip between two !”-wide Fabric H strips from step 15 as shown. Press. Make four. !”

!2” !”

Make 4

17. Arrange and sew together, one !2”-wide Fabric A strip from step 14, one row from step 13, one row from step 16, and one @2”-wide Fabric A strip from step 14 as shown. Press. Make two and label rows 1 & 7. !2”

@2” Make 2 Label Rows 1 & 7

18. Arrange and sew together, one @2”-wide Fabric A strip from step 14, one row from step 16, one row from step 13, and one #2”-wide Fabric A strip from step 14 as shown. Press. Make two and label rows 3 & 5.

@2”

#2” Make 2 Label Rows 3 & 5

19. Referring to layout on pages 15 and 16, arrange and sew rows 1-7 together. Press.

20 fabric vine 2015


Finishing the Quilt 1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one *)” x *#” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure ^(” x *#”. 2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

2015 fabric vine 21


available in April

click quilt for free pattern


downloadable patterns from Asian Fabric —$3.99 ea w w w.konabaygifts.com


Asian Fabric back issues —$5 ea

eco friendly insulated hot/cold bags —new designs!


Butterfly Fantasy


click quilt for free pattern


Dance of the Butterflies Quilt & Pillows Designer: Georgie Gerl Butterflies seem to dance amongst the flowers in this easy to make scrappy quilt with its various color accent fabrics.

00 fabric vine 2015


2015 fabric vine 00


Dance of the Butterflies Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (@" x (@" This quilt uses the Butterfly Fantasy fabric collection. Several panels are needed to make this quilt but you can purchase some FANT-02 fabric and use in some of the panel area, adjust panels yardage accordingly.

material list Backing *3 yards Batting !))" x !))" Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips

Extra fabric may be needed if “Fussy Cutting” pieces and squares.

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric G FANT-03 Blue Block Accent First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Next Cuts

@% !)2" squares Fabric A “Fussy Cut” from panels FANT-01 Magenta Feature Squares ---- % panels !* !) @! ( ^

#2" x $@" !(@ #2" squares @w" x $@" @2" x $@" !* @2" x !^2" !* @2" x !@2" (^ @2" squares @" x $@" !2" x $@" $* !2" x $2"

Fabric C FANT-03 Magenta Accent--a yard

@

$2" x $@"

Fabric D FANT-04 Magenta Block Accent

@ #

Fabric B EXOT-06 Indigo Background & Binding

%4 yards

!@

$2" squares

$2" x $@" !2" x $@"

!@ $ $

$2" squares !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

s yard

30 fabric vine 2015

^2" x $@"

^

^2" squares

@ #

^2" x $@" !2" x $@"

& $ $

^2" squares !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

@

^2" x $@"

&

^2" squares

@ #

^2" x $@" !2" x $@"

& $ $

^2" squares !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

@ @

^2" x $@" !2" x $@"

& @ @

^2" squares !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

!*

@2" x $@"

#^

@2" x !^2"

^

@2" x $@"

!@

@2" x !^2"

3 yard Fabric H FANT-04 Blue Block Accent

q yard Fabric I FANT-03 Green Block Accent

2 yard Fabric J FANT-04 Green Block Accent

Fabric K FANT-04 Purple Block Accent

s yard @ @

^2" x $@" !2" x $@"

& @ @

^2" squares !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

s yard Fabric F FANT-04 Yellow Block Accent

!

q yard

2 yard Fabric E FANT-03 Yellow Block Accent

Next Cuts

Fabric L FANT-03 Cream Block Border

!2 yards @ @

^2" x $@" !2" x $@"

& @ @

^2" squares !2" x !@2" !2" x !)2"

Fabric M FANT-04 Cream Block Border

s yard


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Making the Quilt

1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121– 122) for Simple Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of four #2” Fabric B squares. This will be your sewing line. Place two marked squares on one ^2” Fabric E, F, G, H, I, J, or K square as shown. Stitch on drawn line. Note: For this step only, sew 2” away from stitch line toward the outside edge, cut between stitches. Press. These smaller units can be used in a future project or use to make accent pillows (pages 34–39). Sew remaining marked squares to piece as shown. Trim and press. Make fortyeight large units (using different accent fabrics).

2. Making simple triangles, sew four @2” Fabric B squares to one $2” Fabric C square as shown. Press. Make twelve. Sew one unit from this step between two !2” x $2” Fabric B pieces as shown. Press. Make twelve. $2”

!2”

Fabric B- @2” squares Fabric C- $2” square Make !@

!2” Make 12

3. Making simple triangles, sew four @2” Fabric B squares to one $2” Fabric D square as shown. Press. Make twelve. Sew one unit from this step between two !2” x $2” Fabric B pieces as shown. Press. Make twelve. $2”

!2”

Fabric B- @2” squares Fabric D- $2” square Make !@

!2” Make 12

4. Referring to layouts on pages 29 and 30, arrange units from steps 1, 2 and 3 into sets as shown below prior to sewing. Sew one unit from step 2 between two units from step 1 as shown. Press. Make twelve.

Make 12 (In assorted accent fabrics) Fabric B- #2” squares Fabric E, F, G, H, I, J or K- ^2” square Make $* llarge units Save small units for future project

5. Sew one unit from step 3 between two units from step 1 as shown. Press. Make twelve.

Make 12 (In assorted accent fabrics)

2015 fabric vine 31


6. Sew one unit from step 4 or 5 between one @2” x !^2” Fabric M strip and one @2” x !^2” Fabric L strip as shown. Press. Make twelve, six with Fabric C units and six with Fabric D units. !^2”

!^2”

@2”

@2”

@2”

@2”

Make 12 (six of Fabric C & six of Fabric D)

7. Sew one unit from step 4 or 5 between two @2” x !^2” Fabric L strips as shown. Press. Make twelve, six with Fabric C units and six with Fabric D units. !^2”

!^2”

@2”

@2”

@2”

@2”

Make 12 (six of Fabric C & six of Fabric D)

8. Sew one !)2” Fabric A square between two !2” x !)2” Fabric D, E, F, H, J, or K strips as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two matching !2” x !@2” Fabric D, E, F, H, J, or K strips. Press. Make nine (in assorted accent borders). !)2”

!2”

!2”

!2”

!@2”

!2” Make 9 (using Fabric D, E, F, H, J, or K strips)

32 fabric vine 2015


9. Sew one unit from step 8 between two @2” x !@2” Fabric B strips. Press seams toward Fabric B. Sew this unit between two @2” x !^2” Fabric B strips as shown. Press. Make nine.

@2”

@2”

!^2”

Make 9

10. Referring to quilt layout on pages 29 and 30, arrange all units and blocks into rows, adjusting accent squares placement in the rows. Arrange and sew together, four !)2” Fabric A squares, and three units from step 6 as shown. Press. Make two and label Rows 1 and 7. !)2”

!)2”

!)2”

!)2”

!)2”

Make 2 Label Rows 1 & 7 Note: Row 7 uses two Fabric D units and one Fabric C unit.

11. Arrange and sew together two units from step 6, three blocks from step 9, and two units from step 7 as shown. Press. Make three and label Rows 2, 4, and 6. Note row 4 unit and block placement prior to sewing.

Make 3 Label Rows 2, 4 & 6

12. Arrange and sew together, four !)2” Fabric A squares and three units from step 7 as shown. Press. Make two and label Rows 3 and 5. !)2”

!)2”

!)2”

!)2”

!)2”

Make 2 Label Rows 3 & 5 Note: Row 5 uses two Fabric C units and one Fabric D unit.

13. Referring to layout on pages 29 and 30, arrange and sew rows together. Press. 2015 fabric vine 33


14. Sew @” x $@” Fabric B strips end-to-end to make one continuous @”-wide Fabric B strip. Press. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two @”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border. 15. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two @”-wide Fabric B strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

Finishing the Quilt

1. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one !))” x !@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure !))” x !))”. 2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

Streaks of Color Pillow Cutting Chart & Material List Streaks of Color Pillow @$" square or @)" square with @" flange Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric B FANT-04 Green Accent Border

First Cuts $

!" x $@"

Next Cuts @ @

!" x @!2" !" x @)2"

4 yard

This project uses the leftover small units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31), instructions are also Batting 26" x 26" given for making this pillow as a Lining 26" x 26" separate project. Yardage needed may 24” or 20” Pillow Form vary depending on method used.

material list

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric A EXOT-06 Indigo

!

!a yards* or ! yard

@

Background & Backing

@

@$2" x $@" @ @ @ ^ &" x $@"* ^ @2" x $@" #@

Next Cuts @$2" x !%" @$2" x @" @!2" x @" &" x !$"* #2" squares* @2" squares

*Delete cuts if using units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31).

34 fabric vine 2015

Fabric C-1 !* &" x !$"* FANT-03 Green !* #2" square* Triangles Fat Quarter* Cut for each Fabric C fabric. FANT-03 Blue Triangles *Delete cuts if using units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31). Fat Quarter* Fabric C-2 !* !)2" x &"* FANT-04 Yellow Triangles Cut for each Fabric C fabric. Fat Quarter* FANT-04 Blue *Delete cuts if using units from Dance Triangles of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31). Fat Quarter* Fabric C-3 FANT-03 Yellow Triangles Fat Quarter*

!* &" squares

Cut for each Fabric C fabric. FANT-04 Purple Triangles *Delete cuts if using units from Dance Fat Quarter* of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31).


Streaks of Color Pillow Let’s Begin This project uses some leftover small units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31, step 1) instructions are given using these units and for making this pillow as a separate project. Yardage needed may vary depending on method used.

2. Repeat step 1 to mark, sew and cut one &” x !)2” Fabric C-2 piece to one &” x !)2” Fabric A piece as shown below. Press. This makes a total twelve half-square triangle units. Repeat step for other C-2 fabric. There will be one extra unit for each combination. !)2"

Making the Pillow Top

If using units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt select six different units using different color fabric combinations. As shown in chart layout, this project needs six units each of two different fabric combinations, eleven units of two different fabric combinations, and seventeen units of two different fabric combinations for a total of sixty-eight units. These along with @2” Fabric A background squares will make the center of the pillow. This quilt can be either a 24” square pillow or a 20” pillow with a 2” flange. Note: To make pillow flange after pillow is complete measure @” from outside edge and mark with fabric removable marker. Stitch on drawn line. Insert pillow form. 1. If using small leftover units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt then delete steps 1–3. Mark the wrong side of one 7” x 14” Fabric C-1 piece with #2” grids. Then draw diagonally lines as shown. Place mark piece right side together with one &” x !$” Fabric A piece. Stitch a scant 4” on both sides of drawn diagonally lines shown in diagram below with dash lines. Cut on drawn lines to make sixteen units. Square unit to @2”. Repeat step to mark one #2” Fabric C-1 square, sew to one #2” Fabric A square. Make a total of eighteen half-square triangle units. Repeat step for other C-1 fabric. There will be one extra unit for each combination.

&"

Make 2 (one of each combination)

3. Repeat step 1 to mark, sew and cut one &” Fabric C-3 square to one &” Fabric A square as shown below. Press. This makes a total of eight half-square triangle units. Repeat step for other C-3 fabric. There will be two extra units for each combination. &"

&"

Make 2 (one of each combination)

4. Referring to diagram below arrange units and thirty-two @2” Fabric A squares into ten rows with ten units and squares in each.

!$"

#2”

&"

#2”

Make 2 (one of each combination) 2015 fabric vine 35


5. Sew units and squares into a row. Make ten. Press rows in opposite direction from row to row. Sew rows together. Press.

6. Sew pillow top between two !” x @)2” Fabric B strips. Press seams away from Fabric B. Sew this unit between two !” x @!2” Fabric B strips. Press. 7. Sew quilt top from step 6 between two @!2” x @” Fabric A strips. Press seams toward Fabric A. Sew this unit between two @$2” x @” Fabric A strips. Press.

Finishing the Pillow

1. Option: Making a Pillow Form—Measure pillow top prior to quilting and cut two pieces of fabric to this measurement. Using 4”-wide seam sew around all edges leaving a 4” opening for turning. Turn right side out, press and stuff pillow to desired fullness with polyester fiberfill. Hand stitch opening closed. 2. Layer batting between pillow top and lining piece, wrong sides on batting. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Trim batting and lining even with pillow top.

3. On one long edge of @$2” x !%” Fabric A backing piece fold under 4” to the wrong side and press. Turn under an additional 4” and press. Stitch along folded edge. Repeat for other backing piece.

4. Place quilted pillow top and two backing pieces right sides together matching raw edges and overlapping backing pieces (finished hem edges toward center). Using a 4”-wide seam sew around all edges, clip corners and turn right side out. Press. Insert pillow form.

36 fabric vine 2015


st

Pillowcase Cutting Chart & Material List Butterfly Garden Pillowcase Instructions for one Standard Bed Pillow

This project uses some leftover small units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (pages 31), instructions are also given for making this pillowcase as a separate project. Yardage needed may vary depending on method used.

Making the Pillowcase

mall rflies en for ate vary

*

are

This project uses the leftover small units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt instructions are also given for making this pillowcase as a separate project. Yardage needed may vary depending on method First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric A EXOT-06 Indigo Background

!

$%" x $@"

@

!2" x $@"

!4 yards

uts

*Delete cuts if using units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 00).

*

Fabric B FANT-04 Purple Accent Border

Next Cuts ! @ !^ @ #@ !^

$%" x !)2" $%" x @" #2" squares* @2" x $2" @2" squares !2" x $12"

#2”

!" x $@"

%

abric. using the 00).

w rder

*

Fabric D FANT-04 Yellow Accent Border

%

!" x $@"

!

@!12" x $@"

4 yard Fabric E FANT-02 Magenta Center

Makes thirty-two half-square triangle units Square to @2”

Make 16 using different fabric combinations

4 yard *

1. Delete this step if using small leftover units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 31 step 1). Mark one #2” Fabric F square once diagonally as shown. Place marked piece right side together with one #2” Fabric A square. Using scant 4”-wide seam, stitch on both sides of diagonally drawn line. Make sixteen using assorted Fabric F fabrics. Cut on drawn line and press to make thirtytwo assorted half-square triangle units. Square each unit to measure @2”. #2”

6 yard Fabric C FANT-04 Green Accent Border

are

e

Butterfly Garden Pillowcase

@

@!2" x !@2"

2. Sew one unit from step 1 or quilt left over unit to one @2” Fabric A square as shown. Press. Make two matching Fabric F/A units. Sew these units together as shown. Press. Repeat step to make a total of sixteen assorted blocks. @2”

@2”

w yard !^ Fabric F Accent Butterflies Assorted Scraps

#2" squares* (total needed from fabric scraps)

*Delete cuts if using units from Dance of the Butterflies Quilt (page 00).

Make 32

Make 16 using different fabric combinations

2015 fabric vine 37


3. Arrange and sew together eight !2” x $2” Fabric A pieces, eight assorted blocks from step 2, and one @2” x $2” Fabric A strip as shown. Press. Make two. !2”

!2”

!2”

!2”

@2”

!2”

!2”

!2”

!2”

$2”

Make 2

4. Sew two @!2” x !@2” Fabric E piece together as shown. Press. @!2”

@!2”

!@2”

5. Sew !2” x $@” Fabric B strips end-to-end to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric B strip. Press. Measure both rows length from step 3 they should measure the same at 4@2”. Cut one strip to this measurement. Note if rows measure differently than listed, repress and measure rows again then cut strips to measurement you obtained. Adjust step 4 unit if needed. 6. Sew !”-wide Fabric C strips together end-to-end, press, and cut four strips to measurement obtain in step 5. Sew !”-wide Fabric D strips together, press and cut four strips to measurement. 7. Cut two $%” x @” Fabric A strips to measurement obtained in step 5. Arrange and sew together two @”-wide Fabric A strips, four !”-wide Fabric C strips, four 1”-wide Fabric D strips, two units from step 3, and one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. @” !” !”

!” !”

!@2”

!” !”

!” !” @”

$@2”

8. Fold unit from step 7 in half, right sides together, folded piece should measure @!4” x @&2”. Sew along one short side and length of unit, leaving one short side free of stitches. Turn inside out and press. 9. Referring to measurement obtained in step 5, cut one !)2”-wide Fabric A strip to that measurement.

38 fabric vine 2015


10. Sew one !2”-wide Fabric B strip to one !)2”-wide Fabric A strip together lengthwise as shown. Press. $@2”

!2”

!)2”

11. Turn under 4” to the wrong side of unit from step 10 along Fabric A edge. Press. Turn under fabric an additional 4” and press. Stitch along folded edge.

12. Fold unit from step 11 in half right sides together, unit should measure @!4” x !!2”. Sew along short side leaving length free of stitching, this will form a tube for the pillowcase sleeve. Fold unit in half wrong sides together and press. Unfold. 13. Place unit from step 8 right sides together with unit from step 12 aligning Fabric C raw edges with step 8 edge. Sew pieces together. Press. Refold step 12 unit along press line to wrong side covering seams and hand or machine stitch in place to complete pillowcase.

2015 fabric vine 39


available now


Join us on Facebook We appreciate you spending time with us! To say thank you, we’re giving away 4 books on May 4th. How to enter: 1. Visit the Kona Bay Fabrics Facebook page 2. Comment on one post (or many) during the month of April Four winners will be randomly chosen from four different posts on May 4th. Current and new followers are eligible. You are welcome to post as often as you like to increase your odds. Winners will be notified via a Facebook message with a request for a mailing address. We encourage you to visit our friends at Martingale as well!


00 fabric vine 2015


Kitchen Stitches

Sewing projects to spice up your home by Vicki Dar Nearly a year ago I set my potholders on fire. It was not intentional, mind you. They were set too close to a hot burner. Both were damaged but, at least partially, intact after a quick dip under running water accompanied by an air sucking gasp. Though it is embarrassing to admit—I continued to use them. It’s easy to get caught up in big projects and forget the value of efforts that can give instant satisfaction and fill an everyday need (and, what can I say, they usually live tucked away in a drawer). Kitchen

Stitches

offers

seventeen projects that will inspire you to add some small but significant projects to your to-do list. Karen Burns has compiled a brilliant selection of room transforming projects that live up to the promise of ‘spicing up your home’. Karen has brought together thirteen designers who, collectively, address every facet of kitchen function and decor. Easy to

photography by Brent Kane 2015 fabric vine 43


follow instructions for everything from

loves to cook, just moved into a new house

refrigerator magnets to table dressings

or could benefit from a touch of kitchen

are found.

style. Kitchen Stitches will likely have a

If you don’t happen to possess the title of chef de

project suitable for nearly everyone on your gift list.

cuisine, you’ll still want

The projects are divided into three

to get your hands on this

categories on the contents page. The first,

book.

get cooking, focuses on practical and

Everyone

someone who

knows

functional pieces the likes of aprons, potholders

and

kitchen

towels. You’ll find a range of

potholders variety and

of

in

a

shapes

sizes—none

falling prey to a description

of

boring. There’s even a lovely baguette

tote

to take to the market. the

With

resurgence

of home cooked comfort

food,

think taking crockpot

about the

next

you gift

to a whole new level of

appreciation

by

combining it with the slowcooker cozy on page 23. The cozy

44 fabric vine 2015


makes your crockpot serve and travel ready. Instructions are included to adapt the pattern to any size crockpot. The shirt tales apron on page 43 is on my to do list. I love aprons and this one is a cinch to make. I like the fact, too, that it repurposes an old shirt. Kona Bay is bringing back the ever popular 4-up Utamaro geisha panels later this summer. I’m headed to the thrift shop to find four shirts. Together with a set of panels to embellish my repurposed shirts, I’ll have a unique new apron and three to give as gifts. The next group is called set the table. The five projects are gifts that keep on giving like the buy one get one deals many of us seek out. Each of these table adorning items include a complementary piece—either a napkin or place mat— designed to make it a set. My favorite pick in this section is the shattered strips table runner and place mats. The bright colors and the designer’s fabric choices remind me of the Radiant Wonder Tablerunner which our own Georgie Gerl created for this issue of Fabric Vine. Be sure to check it on page 51-57. The last group—add a little spice—will leave you anxious to host a party so you can show off the projects you’ve made. 2015 fabric vine 00


Better yet, gather a few friends for a

charms and fridge magnets on page 89

soiree and make one of these fun projects

would make great choices. Either could

together. The embroidery-hoop memo

easily be completed in an evening.

minders on page 79 or the wine-glass

The Chocolate Flan Cake recipe on page 104 is the perfect treat to serve your craft party guests. We’ve even provided a nice printable recipe you can share with the friends that attend. The last project in Kitchen Stitches— the magnetic message board—on page 93 is not to be missed. I’ll be making one for my office and several for gifts. The project is simple enough to change up often, easily creating a new bright spot in your environment. At the the end of book, you get to meet the thirteen designers that are responsible for the creative projects

Mary

Burns

has

compiled. You might even want to jump to the introductions before you start browsing the

46 fabric vine 2015


projects.

I

like

knowing

where

artists find their inspiration. Do you recognize any of the designers— Natalie Barnes, Lindsay Conner, Melissa Corry, Jenifer Dick, Amy Ellis, Linda Turner Griepentrog, Kim Niedzwiecki, Kari Ramsay, Missy Shepler,

Rebecca

Struckmeyer,

Silbaugh,

Heather

Amy

Valentine,

and Jackie White. Visit the designers sites.

Without

doubt

there

are

treasures to be found. Kitchen Stitches is available at your local quilt shop, bookstores or at www.shopmartingale.com. The print version sells for $26.99. The ebook, available for download from Martingale, is $18.99. You can also see photos of all the projects here. Brent Kane,

the

photographer,

deserves

a

shout out for his consistently wonderful photography.

2015 fabric vine 47


Color Movement In stores now


Designer: Georgie Gerl Radiating colors burst forth displayed on your table, sideboard or wall. Make several of these eye-catching quilts for family and friends using assorted Kona Bay Fabrics from their tonal collections.


Radiate Wonder Tablerunner Chart & Material List

Radiate Wonder Tablerunner 21” x 45” (with binding) 20” x 44” (without binding)

material list Backing !a yards Batting @%" x $(" Card Stock Option: Add-a-quarter Ruler Read Cutting Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips Extra fabric and cuts may be needed for testing Paper-pieced technique and fabric selection.

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric A TONE-06 Indigo PP#2, 3, 6 & 7 Optional Binding

Next Cuts @$ #2" x &" @$ #" x %"

% #

#2" x $@" #" x $@"

$

@w" x $@" (Optional Binding)

d-!4 yards Fabric B TONE-03 Indigo

&

@2" x $@"

q yard

4 yard

52 fabric vine 2015

!

$" x $@"

$

$" x (2"

! !

$" x $@" @" x $@"

$ !^

$" x (2" @" squares

!

@" x $@"

!^

@" squares

!

@" x $@"

!^

@" squares

!

@" x $@"

!^

@" squares

4 yard Fabric F BUBB-01 Orange PP #1 & Border Accent

%

@2" x $@"

* * !^ *

@2" x *" @2" x &2" @2" x %2" @2" x $"

Fabric G TONE-05 Red Border Accent

@$

@2" x *"

Fabric H FANT-04 Orange Border Accent

2 yard Fabric D TONE-06 Gold PP #1

Fabric E TONE-03 Gold PP #1

Next Cuts

3 yard

Border Background

Fabric C FANT-04 Yellow PP #4 & 5

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

8 yard

B8 yard !

$" x $@"

$

$" x (2"

Fabric I TONE-07 Coral Border Accent

8 yard


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

2. Flip paper to printed side, align cardstock along stitch line between sections 1 and 2, and fold paper. Align ruler 4” away from paper folded edge and trim fabric. Add quarter ruler can be used instead of rotary ruler if desired.

Making the Blocks

The center blocks use the paper-piecing technique, refer to pattern on page 57 for copy instructions. Make appropriate number of copies checking accuracy of pattern to stated size. Fabric to be used will be marked on cutting chart with PP #. Photo diagrams are shown using different fabrics than those used in quilt. 1. Place wrong side of fabric piece to wrong side of printed pattern, centering appropriate fabric over section #1. Pin using a flat-head pin, keeping pin away from stitch lines. If necessary hold pieces up to light to make sure fabric extends past section #1 shape.

3. Unfold paper, align section #2 fabric on section #1 fabric cut edge right sides together. Turn paper printed side up, being careful not to displace fabric on back, sew through all layers using a short stitch length. Begin and end stitches 4” beyond stitch line. Press.

(left) Fabric extends past Section #1 (right)

2015 fabric vine 53


4. Repeat process to fold, cut, and sew additional fabric to unit.

7. Sew two matching units together as shown. Press. Make two. Sew these two units together to make one center block. Repeat step to sew other matching units together to make two additional center blocks. Blocks each measure !@2” square.

Make 2

5. After all pieces are sewn square unit by trimming on outside pattern line.

6. Make four paper-pieced units using Fabrics A, D, and C, make four using Fabrics A, F, and C, make four using Fabrics A, E, and C as shown.

Make 4 (A/D/C)

Make 4 (A/F/C)

Make 4 (A/E/C)

Make 3 Blocks (one of each color combination)

Making the Quilt 1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121– 122) for Simple Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one @” Fabric F square. This will be your sewing line. Place marked square on one @2” x $” Fabric B piece as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Make two. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric H square to one @2” x $” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Sew two units from this step, one of each combination, together as shown. Press. Make two and label Unit 1. Fabric F- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x $””” Make @

Fabric H- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x $””” Make @

Unit 1

Make 2

54 fabric vine 2015


2. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric G square to one @2” x $” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric I square to one @2” x $” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Sew two units from this step, one of each combination, together as shown. Press. Make two and label Unit 2. Fabric G- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x $””” Make @

Fabric I- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x $””” Make @

Unit 2

4. Making simple triangle units, sew one @” Fabric G square and one 2” Fabric F square to one @2” x &2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make four. Making a simple triangle units, sew one @” Fabric I square and one 2” Fabric H square to one @2” x &2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make four. Sew two units from this step, one of each combination, together as shown. Press. Make four and label Unit 4. Fabric G- @” square Fabric F- @” square Fabric B- @2””” x &2””” Make $

Fabric I- @” square Fabric H- @” square Fabric B- @2””” x &2””” Make $ Unit 4

Make 2

3. Making simple triangle units, sew one @” Fabric G square and one 2” Fabric F square to one @2” x %2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make eight. Making a simple triangle units, sew one @” Fabric I square and one 2” Fabric H square to one @2” x %2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make eight. Sew two units from this step, one of each combination, together as shown. Press. Make eight and label Unit 3. Fabric G- @” square Fabric F- @” square Fabric B- @2””” x %2””” Make *

Make 4

Fabric I- @” square Fabric H- @” square Fabric B- @2””” x %2””” Make * Unit 3

Make 8

2015 fabric vine 55


5. Arrange and sew together one Unit 1, three of Unit 3, two of Unit 4, and one Unit 2 as shown. Press. Make two. Unit 1

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 3

Unit 2

Make 2

6. Referring to layout on page 52, sew three center blocks together. Press. 7. Referring to layout on page 52, sew center unit from step 6 between two rows from step 5, checking orientation of rows prior to sewing. Press.

8. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric F square to one @2” x *” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric H square to one @2” x *” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Sew two units from this step, one of each combination, together as shown. Press. Make two and label Unit 5. Fabric H- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x *””” Make @

Fabric F- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x *””” Make @ Unit 5

10. Sew one Unit 3 between one Unit 5, and one Unit 6 as shown. Press. Make two. Unit 5

Unit 3

Unit 6

Make 2

11. Referring to layout on page 52, sew quilt unit from step 7 between units from step 10, checking orientation of rows prior to sewing. Press.

Finishing the Quilt

Option 1 (with binding) Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired. Option 2 (without binding)

Make 2

9. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric G square to one @2” x *” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Making a simple triangle unit, sew one @” Fabric I square to one @2” x *” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make two. Sew two units from this step, one of each combination, together as shown. Press. Make two and label Unit 6. Fabric G- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x *””” Make @

Fabric I- @” squares Fabric B- @2””” x *””” Make @ Unit 6

Make 2

56 fabric vine 2015

Layer and center top and backing right sides together on batting piece (wrong side of backing on batting). Using 1 4 ”-wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving a 5” opening on one side for turning. Trim batting close to stitching and backing even with quilt edges. Clip corners, turn, and press. Hand stitched opening closed. Quilt as desired.


7

3

#””” x %”””

#2””” x &”””

5 2

@2””” x *”””

^2"

#2””” x &”””

1 $””” x (2”””

4 @2””” x *”””

6 #””” x %”””

^2" Permission to photocopy Paper-Pieced Patterns is given by Kona Bay Fabrics and Fabric Vine Magazine to successfully complete the Radiate Wonder Tablerunner. *Make one copy checking accuracy of pattern to state size noted on pattern (in red). It is important that size noted on pattern and printed pattern match in order to complete this project successfully. If size varies adjust copier to achieve the measurement listed on pattern then print the appropriate number of copies for each. Print all copies from the same copier to avoid distortions. Home printer setting should be set so paper-pieced patterns are at 100% do not fit page to printer margin. *We recommend making a few extra copies for testing fabric selection, placement and if an error occurs while sewing the units together. *Print all copies from the same printer/copier to avoid distortions. *Trim 2” away from outside trim line. Pattern will be trimmed later after all fabrics have been sewn to unit.

2015 fabric vine 57


click quilt for free pattern download


SHAD-24 forest

JETS-01 teal

SHAD-12 teal

MOVE-01 teal

EXOT-06 teal

LAIR-04 teal

BCAR-06 teal

s w

s Oranges Red Ye 2 llo 1 2

ens Gre 3

Blues Pu 4 rp 5

CONTENTS

SHAD-12 topaz les

utrals Blacks Ne 7 6

Blues MIKO-03 blue

MOVE-01 topaz

LAIR-03 blue

BUBB-01 blue

uar y 2015 Catalog • JanLAIR-05 blue 3 Easy Ways to Order bay.com 1. Online at www.kona bay.com or email konabay@kona 13 -79 2. Call 1-800-531 3. Contact your sales rep

MIDN-01 blue

Kona Bay Fabrics Tonal Collection

MUMM-01 indigo

MOVE-01 sapphire

EXOT-06 blue

check it out here 00 fabric vine 2015 EXOT-06 indigo

MOVE-01 lapis

BCAR-06 blue

RFOR-01 blue


Flowering Clematis Wall Quilt

Designer: Georgie Gerl Warmth from the sun encouraging early spring vines to break through the soil weaving in and out of the garden trellis. Show off your gardening skills by making this quilt featuring sweet clematis and butterflies.


Flowering Clematis Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List

Flowering Clematis Wall Quilt 32" x 43" This quilt features fabrics from the Tonal fabric collection and Sanctuary II fabric collection (Butterfly fabric available in April).

material list Backing !a yards Batting 38" x 49" Assorted Fabrics for Appliqué Flowers & Leaves Lightweight Fusible Web Stabilizer Perlé Cotton or Embroidery Floss (Optional) Yarn or Fiber (Optional) Beads (Optional) Vine work on the quilt can be done one of three ways, satin stitch by machine, hand embroider using embroidery floss or couching yarn or fiber to quilt by hand or machine. First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric A TONE-07 Cream Background

!

Next Cuts

!!2" x @@2"

Fabric F TONE-06 Green Block Border

a yard !2" x $@"

w yard

(

!a" x $@"

Fabric C TONE-07 Butter Border

!

$2" x $@"

! @

@2" x $@" !2" x $@"

2 yard

Fabric D TONE-05 Taupe Outside Border

a yard

62 fabric vine 2015

$ %

@w" x $@" !a" x $@"

@

@4" x $@"

@)

@4" squares

w" x $@"

$) $)

d" x #" d" x @4"

@ @ !$ $) $)

!12" x @$2" !2" x !!2" !2" x $2" !a" x $w" !a" x #"

Fabric G TONE-06 Gold Block Accent

@ $ $ @ $ $

$2" squares $2" x #2" @2" x $2" !2" x !#2" !2" x &2" !2" x $2"

^ Fabric H BRAN-01 Eggplant Block Accent

!)

#2" x $2"

@ $

#2" x $@" !2" x $@"

!)

#2" squares (Fussy Cut)

2 yard Fabric E SANC-12 Red Block Center

Next Cuts @) !a" x %4" @) !a" x #2"

q yard $

Fabric B TONE-06 Blue Sashing

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

4 yard

4 yard

Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Using an accurate 4”-wide seam allowance is very important for this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.


Making the Quilt 1. Sew one #2” Fabric E square between two !a” x #2” Fabric F pieces as shown. Press. Make ten. Sew one unit from this step between two !a” x %4” Fabric F pieces. Press. Make ten. #2”

! a”

! a”

! a”

%4”

#2” ! a” Make 10

d” @4”

d” Make @)

d”

d”

3” Make @)

3. Sew one unit from step 2 between two !a” x #” Fabric B pieces. Press seams toward Fabric B. Make twenty. Sew one unit from this step between two !a” x $w” Fabric B pieces as shown. Press. Make twenty. Cut each pieced square once diagonally to make forty corner triangle units. ! a”

! a”

$w”

Make @)

Unit 1

Unit 2

$2”

$2”

Make 10

2. Sew one @4” Fabric G square between two d” x @4” Fabric H pieces. Press. Make twenty. Sew this unit between two d” x #” Fabric H pieces. Press. Make twenty. @4”

5. Sew one !2” x $2” Fabric B piece between one #2” x $2” Fabric D and one $2” x #2” Fabric C pieces as shown. Press. Make four and label Unit 1. Sew one !2” x $2” Fabric B piece between one #2” x $2” Fabric D piece and one $2” Fabric C square. Press. Make two and label Unit 2. #2”

#2”

!2”

!2”

#2”

$2”

Make 4

Make 2

6. Arrange and sew together three blocks from step 4 and two of Unit 1 from step 5 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make @

7. Sew one !2”x $2” Fabric B piece between one !2” x $2” and one @2” x $2” Fabric C pieces as shown. Press. Make four. Sew one !2” x $2” Fabric B piece to one #2” x $2” Fabric D piece as shown. Press. Make four. $2”

Cut once diagonally Make $) triangles

4. Sew one unit from step 1 between two triangle units from step 3 as shown. Press. Sew two additional triangle units from step 3 to unit from this step. Press. Make ten. Square units to measure &2” square.

!2”

$2”

!2”

!2”

#2”

@2” Make $

Make $

8. Sew two units from step 7, one of each variation together as shown. Press. Make four, two of each variation. Make @

Make @

Make !) Square unit to measure &2” square 2015 fabric vine 63


9. Sew one block from step 4 to one !2” x &2” Fabric C strip as shown. Press. Make four. Arrange and sew together two units from step 8, one of each variation, and two units from this step, and one Unit 2 from step 5 as shown. Press. Make two.

11. Sew unit from step 10 between units from step 9 as shown. Press.

&2”

!2” Make $

12. Sew unit from step 11 between two units from step 6 as shown. Press. Make @

10. Sew one !!2” x @@2” Fabric A piece between two !2” x !!2” Fabric B strips. Press seams toward Fabric B. Sew this unit between two !2” x @$2” Fabric B strips as shown. Press. Sew unit from this step between two !2” x !#2” Fabric C strips. Press. !#2”

!2”

!2”

!2”

@$2”

!2”

64 fabric vine 2015


13. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two !2”-wide Fabric D strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border.

14. Sew !2” x $@” Fabric D strips end-to-end, including remaining strips from step 13, to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric D strip. Press. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two !2”-wide Fabric D strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

Adding the Appliqué

The vine work on this quilt can have yarn or fiber couch on drawn line, hand embroidery or machine satin stitch. The instructions given for flowers and leaves are Quick Fused Appliqué Method for other methods refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Appliqué Technique. Note: It is recommended to use removable stabilizer on the wrong side of the fabric when machine appliquéing. This will give stability to the piece, even stitching, and prevent puckering of fabric.

1. Referring to quilt layout, on pages 61–62, use a fabric removable marker to draw a curvy line for the vine work. Note to give the effect of a vine wrapping around the trellis the vine goes over some areas of the border and under other areas. If sewing the vine work by hand use embroider floss or perlé cotton and a stem stitch. If satin stitching the vine by machine stitch vines first then the appliqué edges. See steps 2 and 3 to sew fiber or yarn to piece.

Stem Stitch

2. If adding yarn or fibers to a quilt check the fibers cleaning instructions it must be the same care as quilt. Also test to see if it is colorfast. To test place fiber in hot water and clear glass or jar. Let it sit if the water turns color do not use in quilt, this is an indication that the color will bleed onto the quilt when washed. 3. Referring to layout on pages 61–62, couch fiber by machine. Set machine with a zigzag stitch a little wider than fiber. Place yarn or fiber over marked line and stitch. Note: It is recommended to use removable stabilizer on the wrong side of the fabric. This will give stability to the piece and prevent puckering of fabric. 4. Trace all Flowering Clematis Wall Patterns on pages 66–67 on paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from trace line. With fusible web paper-side up, fuse to wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions. Cut on traced line. Note: The number of flowers and leaves can vary depending on your design preference. 5. Refer to layouts on pages 61–62, to arrange and fuse appliqués to quilt as shown. Tip: For easy placement of flowers on fabric use an appliqué pressing sheet, page 122, to make appliqué units. Finish all appliqué edges with machine satin stitch or decorative stitching as desired.

6. Referring to center of flower, sew by machine or hand additional detail to flower if desired. Beads can be added to quilt if desired after quilting is completed.

Finishing the Quilt

Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

2015 fabric vine 65


Trace Line Stitching Line

Flowering Clematis Quilt

66 fabric vine 2015

Number of flower and leaves will vary depending on personal preference.


Quilt Option

Trace Line Stitching Line

Use this pattern, deleting appliquĂŠs and replacing Fabric A appliquĂŠ background fabric with a large-scale fabric print.

Flowering Clematis Quilt

2015 fabric vine 67


(and Make Extra Money) by Douglas Eagleson Life has a tendency to throw us a curve ball on occasion. On a global level, the challenging economy of the last few years has made many of us rethink what we do and how we do it. Even if all is well in your financial world—when was the last time you said no to some extra money? Maybe you have a child to put through college or maybe you’d just like to buy some extra fabric.


Even with so many creative talents, the majority of sewing and craft enthusiasts rarely believe anyone would buy their goods. And, if you are confident in your abilities, the thought of getting out there and selling your goods can still be daunting. Kona Bay Fabrics has been in business for nearly 25 years. We have been blessed with continued growth and success that has brought us to today. But, not unlike so many businesses, we are always looking at ways to leverage our creative efforts. I see the projects of so many talented people when I visit with you on Facebook every day. Many of you have also sent in your projects in to be featured in our “What I Did With My Kona Bay” feature in the magazine.

We are continuously amazed by the projects and products our customers and friends create. A few are selling their goods. Most of you are not. We’d like to share some ideas about how you might add some extra income.

What Can I Make First things first. Almost all of us has been to a local craft fair or spent time (yes, admit it—hours) on Etsy. How many times have you thought—I can make that! You can and, like the person you see, you could be supplementing your income or launching a full-fledged business. The first step in leveraging your creativity is deciding what you’re going to sell. First, think about what you love to do most. Whether you 2015 fabric vine 69


quilt, knit, do beadwork or simply like to decorate—there are opportunities. Think about the items you’ve seen at fairs and online. Which ones could you make that you would enjoy making? As you consider the possibilities, start a file box or notebook. You think you will remember the best ideas. You won’t. Even if you do, you won’t remember them all. Establish categories—fabric, knitting, jewelry, etc. When you’re at fairs, take notes (and photos if you are able). As you search online, print out examples and note where you found it. Make note of the price and how they handle shipping.

70 fabric vine 2015

If you’re like me and tend to quickly find yourself swimming in piles of paper, Pinterest is a great option for organizing the ideas you discover online. Be careful, though, it’s easy to lose track of time if you start browsing Pins in your favorite category. Keep this important point in mind, though, copyrighted patterns may only be made for for personal use only—not for financial gain—unless you obtain written permission to sell the pieces made using the pattern. Speaking of which—it’s important, too, to remember that your goal is to make money. When you’ve


established several possibilities— items you love, would enjoy making and believe others would love, too— spend some time pricing materials for each. Bounce the totals up against the price you establish based on research you’ve done. Immediately eliminate the projects that don’t offer a return. Before you choose your potential product and do the math to calculate your return, remember to factor in your time. What is it worth? Time and time again, I’ve talked to budding entrepreneurs who only factor in materials with the idea that it’s only time they have available anyway. Your time has value. You choose what it’s worth but it always has value. Another question to ask yourself, especially if you’re just getting started—What can I make using existing materials? Most of us have drawers, shelves and boxes of supplies that we’ve purchased to

make that special something or just because we couldn’t resist. Try to use what you have before you buy more. Leverage your bottom line. If you must purchase supplies, consider splitting costs with a friend. This can apply to both buying materials and sharing space and travel expenses for a craft fair or holiday show.

Where Can I Sell My Creations You might be surprised how many sales outlets exist. These are just a few: Online sales sites • etsy.com • artfire.com • kinfolkcrafts.com • handmadecatalog.com • ebay.com • bigcartel.com • yahoo.store.com • macwebsitebuilder.com 2015 fabric vine 71


In Person • Craft Fairs • Gift or Home Shows • Gallery show in your home • Galleries • Cafes and coffeeshops As you review your options for distribution, there are a number of factors to consider: Is transportation convenient? If you opt for in person over online you will need to factor in transportation costs. Do you own a vehicle that enables you to move your goods? How far are you willing to travel? How much time do you have to devote to your new business? You must allow for time to buy supplies, make the product, get it in front of people and shipping. Do you have the technical skills for an online option? If you do not and you want to be up and running quickly, start with an in person option. If you do, you must decide what level of sophistication suits you. Bigcartel.com has a simple free option if you have 5 products or less.

72 fabric vine 2015

Your only fees are those associated with your PayPal account. Macwebsitebuilder.com allows for practically unlimited products, has eNewsletter and blog options all included. How much do you want to invest? Keep in mind that having your product out there, whether it be online or on display locally, does not insure a sale. Unless you’re associated with a site like etsy.com where people are already browsing or in a gallery that is advertising your items, you will need to factor in advertising. Today, we are able to take advantage of free social media outlets like Facebook and Pinterest. As an example, search for Kona Bay Fabrics on Facebook. We have built a fan base of over 10,000 friends and sewing enthusiasts I visit with daily (if you’re not already a friend, please join us!). At the very least, you will want to put together a business card. Be creative! Make sure your calling card represents how creative you are.


How Kona Bay Leveraged Its Creativity For nearly twenty-five years, Kona Bay Fabrics has put beautiful, handpainted artwork onto fabric. Our offices have been based in the beautiful Pacific Northwest for the last several years and it has been inspirational in so many ways. During a trip to Hawaii, a few years back, a business associate introduced me to an insulated bag

they had come across. We, like many companies today, are always looking for ways to diversify. Our proven ability to choose winners and our experience working with artists is something we can leverage. In this instance, our efforts resulted in Kona Bay’s Hot Cold bags. We currently have several different eco-friendly hot/cold bags available for retail and wholesale. Each bag features original art and some even

2015 fabric vine 00


carry the artist signature. These have been very popular—being both practical and beautiful. You can purchase the bags at your local quilt shop. Another way we’ve been able to leverage our existing resources is the creation of www.konabaygifts.com. Here, consumers without easy access to a nearby quilt shop who would like one of our hot cold bags or those just looking for that special, unique little gift, have a place to go.

te

e SUrGeOn C beVeraGeS defeC tS. (2) yOUr abIlIt y aUSe health

olume

Trellis Gate

m grapes untain in winning matic, full d his team e offering. 014 limited brics.

Our most recent exercise in leveraging our creativity is the launch of a new Washington wine label—Trellis Gate. The bottling of our first release, the 2012 100% Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon is complete. The label features art from Kona Bay’s very popular limited edition Crane Dynasty collection. We are beginning to take orders now. Click here for more information.

2012

Red Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

74 fabric vine 2015

© Kona Bay Fabrics

As they say, the joy is in the journey. May yours be filled with adventure, happiness and prosperity. Join me on Facebook and let me know how you leverage your creativity.


What I Did with my Kona Bay fabric  projects from our readers 

There are 2 ways to submit— all the e e s o t warding e r y r e v ics and r b It is a f r u ways o by you! d e creative t u c e s are ex pattern s who ha e n o y r to eve designs r u o Thanks y f s all! photo o u a s d e r e i r p a s sh in ur work o Y . s u with

1. Email: asianfabric@mac.com 2. Mail:

Fabric Vine Magazine Editor 15812 NE 83rd St. Redmond, WA 98502

www.konabayfabrics.com


Mikoto II available now


Iron Caddy Designer: Darcy Lewis Have you needed an iron to press your project pieces at a class? How do you carry it home if it’s still hot? Problem solved. Darcy's iron caddy makes transporting the iron, even if it is still hot, easy and safe. In addition, the pressing pad is built in for your convenience.


Let’s Begin Darcy recommends washing fabric prior to cutting. Blue/green tote, corners are removed in step 3 after tote has been stitched together. This tote requires a bias binding. The red/black tote did not have corners cut, straight of grain binding was used instead. This tote’s points will touch each other when tote is folded.

Iron Caddy Cutting Chart & Material List Iron Caddy

Making the Iron Caddy

1. Referring to photos below, select and cut fabrics then stack fabrics in the following order; feature outside fabric place face down, both pieces of batting, insul-bright, and silver ironing board fabric.

material list Batting !(2" x @%2" (two) !" x @!" (two) Insul-bright !(2" x @%2" (one) Silver Iron Board Fabric !(2" x @%2" (one)

Elastic (or Ribbon) 4" x $" Buttons two Heat Erase Pen First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric A Feature Fabric

!

!(2" x @%2"

!

@#" square (for 4” bias binding) OR $" x $@" (for straight of grain binding) $" x @!" (handles)

s yard Fabric B Handles & Bias Binding

! yard

78 FABRIC VINE 2015

# @


2. Pin or spray-baste layers together. Using a heat erase pen, mark unit as shown below. Note: most home irons will fit this caddy. @%2”

!2”

^4”

!#” @”

&”

4. Fold one 4” x 21” handle strip in half lengthwise to measure 2” x 21”. Press. Unfold and fold raw edges to centerline and press. Unfold and lay batting to one side of centerline, refold at press lines to encase the batting and raw edges. Strap should measure 1” x 21”. Stitch close to folded edges. Make two.

!(2”

^4” ^”

3. Use a long straight stitch because of thickness of fabrics to keep layers tight and together. Using a walking foot (if on-hand), stitch on marked lines starting from the middle and stitching to outside edge. Trim unit if needed. Measure !2” from corner at 45˚, draw a line as shown in step 2 diagram, and cut on drawn line to remove corner triangles, if desired. (Blue/green unit has corners removed while red/ black unit does not.) 5. Along both long edges of unit find center and mark. Measure 3” from center on both sides, and mark this will be the handle placement (6” spread). Pin strap on Fabric A side, matching raw edges, with handle in toward center, as shown.

2015 fabric vine 79


Bias Binding Tip • Cut bias binding square in half once diagonally. Sew triangles pieces together as shown. Press.

6. Fold one 4” x $” elastic or ribbon in half. Sew elastic/ribbon to one Fabric A corner matching raw edges and loop in toward center. Tack several times to secure. Repeat step to sew elastic to opposite corner. 7. Refer to Bias Binding tip box and general instructions on page 122, to sew bias binding to blue/green tote or straight-of-grain bias to red/black tote.

• On the wrong side of unit draw parallel lines to specify size noted in instructions.

Tote ironing surface

• Fold marked piece right sides together to form a tube. Align and pin mark lines offsetting it by one so width of binding extends past the edge as shown. Using 4”-wide seam, stitch pieces together. Press seam open.

• Cut on marked line to create one continuous bias binding strip.

80 fabric vine 2015

Pressing fabric


8. Sew buttons to corners opposite the elastic. Fold tote and loop elastic over button to hold caddy in place.

Darcy Lewis Darcy Lewis has been sewing and teaching for over 20 years. Her work has won many awards and has been featured in museums and galleries around the world. She recently started blogging and is having fun pursuing the adventures surrounding her love of fabric. You can learn more about her and her philosophy of Good Enough on her blog—https:// DarcyLewisDesign.wordpress.com Darcy is in the process of moving to Detroit this month. She hopes to take her online fashion fabric business— www.BeautifulTextiles.com—live, to a brick-and-mortar shop, with an expanded stock, which of course, will include Kona Bay Fabrics. We wish her the best and hope you’ll visit and support her creative efforts.

2015 fabric vine 81


click quilt for free pattern

available in May


The Gathering Quilt Designer: Georgie Gerl A bubbling spring flows through a beautiful garden calling out to cranes and Geishas alike to enjoy its peaceful beauty.

Center cut 12 1/2� x 20 1/2�

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The Gathering Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List The Gathering Quilt *!" x !)%" This quilt features fabric from the Geisha Charm (fabric available in February) and Graceful Beauty (fabric available in March) collections. There are three panels to each set, both color waves of the Geisha Charm panel sets were used and one of the Graceful Beauty set. If making the centers out of one fabric choice than 3 panels will need to be purchase to complete this quilt.

material list Backing &2 yards Batting *(" x !!#" Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric A NOBU-87 Cream Center One Panel

#

Fabric B NOBU-90 Gray Center One Panel

#

Fabric C NOBU-87 Black Center One Panel

#

Fabric D TONE-04 Green Sashing Accent

!

Next Cuts

!@2" x @)2"

! yard

Fabric F TONE-04 Cream Sashing

#*

!d yards Fabric G TONE-03 Gray Block Border

!@2" x @)2"

Next Cuts

!2" x $@" @$ (2 used for $* (^ step 1 strip set)

!2" x #^" !2" x $2" !2" x @2"

@ #

#^" x $@" @2" x $@"

!@ $*

#^" x $2" @2" squares

@

$2" x $@"

!^

$2" squares

^

#2" x $@"

^$

#2" squares

@2 yards Fabric H TONE-04 Red Block Center

!@2" x @)2"

a yard #^" x $@"

#^

#^" x !"

Fabric I TONE-03 Indigo Accent

w yard

!8 yards Fabric E TONE-03 Red Sashing

First Cuts

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

!*

!2" x $@"

!*

!2" x #^"

!) Fabric J !* TONE-01 Green Outside Border & Binding

@3 yards

@w" x $@" @2" x $@" ^ (2 used for ^ step 1 strip set)

@2" x @)2" @2" x !@2"

2015 fabric vine 85


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

4. Sew one $2” Fabric H square between one unit from step 1 and one unit from step 3 as shown. Press. Make four. $2”

$2” Make 4

5. Sew one unit from step 3 between two #2” Fabric I squares as shown. Press. Make twenty. #2”

#2”

Making the Blocks

1. Sew one @2” x $@” Fabric J strip to one !2” x $@” Fabric F strip lengthwise to make a strip set. Press seam toward Fabric J. Make two. Cut strip set into sixteen $2”-wide segments as shown. $2”

#2” Make 20

6. Sew one unit from step 4 between one unit from step 2 and one unit from step 5 as shown. Press. Make four and label Block 1. Block measures !)2” square. Block 1

Make 2 Cut 16 segments

2. Sew one unit from step 1 between two #2” Fabric I squares as shown. Press. Make twelve. #2”

#2”

#2” Make 12

3. Sew one @2” Fabric G square between two !2” x @2” Fabric F pieces as shown. Press. Make forty-eight. Sew one !2” x $2” Fabric F piece to one unit from this step. Press. Make forty-eight. $2”

!2” @2” !2”

!2”

@2” Make 48

86 fabric vine 2015

Make 48

Make 4 Block measures !)2"

7. Sew one $2” Fabric H square between two units from step 3 as shown. Press. Make twelve. $2”

$2”

Make 12


8. Sew one unit from step 7 between one unit from step 2 and one unit from step 5 as shown. Press. Make eight and label Block 2. Block measures !)2” square. Block 2

11. Sew one #^” x $2” Fabric G strip between two !2” x #^” Fabric F strips as shown. Press. Make twelve. Cut each strip set into one @)2”-wide segment and one !@2”-wide segment as shown for a total of twelve of each size. #^”

!2”

$2” !2” Make 8 Block measures !)2"square

Make 12

9. Sew one unit from step 7 between two units from step 5 as shown. Press. Make four and label Block 3. Block measures !)2” square. Block 3

!@2”

#^”

!”

!2” !” @)2”

Cut 12 (!@2”) segments Cut 12 (@)2” ) segments

Block 4

10. Sew one !2” x #^” Fabric E strip between two #^” x !” Fabric D strip lengthwise to make a strip set. Press. Make eighteen. Cut each strip set into one @)2”-wide segment and one !@2”-wide segment as shown, for a total of eighteen for each size.

!@2”

@)2”

12. Sew one !@2”-wide segment from step 11 between one @2” x !@2” Fabric J strip, and one !@2”wide segment from step 10 as shown. Press. Make six and label Block 4. Block measures !@2” x !)2”.

Make 4 Block measures !)2" square

Make 18

!@2”

@2”

Make 6 Block measures !@2" x !)2"

13. Sew one @)2”-wide segment from step 11 between one @2”x @)2” Fabric J strip, and one @)2”wide segment from step 10 as shown. Press. Make six and label Block 5. Block measures @)2” x !)2”. Block 5

Cut 18 (!@2”) segments Cut 18 (@)2” ) segments

@)2”

@2”

Make 6 Block measures @)2" x !)2"

2015 fabric vine 87


14. Sew one !@2”-wide segment from step 11 between two !@2”-wide segments from step 10 as shown. Press. Make six and label Block 6. Block measures !@2” x !)2”.

Block 6

Make 6 Block measures !@2" x !)2"

15. Sew one @)2”-wide segment from step 11 between two @)2”-wide segments from step 10 as shown. Press. Make six and label Block 7. Block measures @)2” x !)2”.

Block 7

Make 6 Block measures @)2" x !)2"

16. Referring to diagram below, arrange and sew together two of Block 1, three of Block 4, and two of Block 2 as shown. Press. Make two and label Rows 1 and 7.

Make 2

Label Rows 1 & 7

17. Arrange and sew together, two of Block 5 three assorted !@2” x @)2” Fabric A, B or C panels, and two of Block 7 as shown. Press. Make three and label Rows 2, 4, and 6. !@2"

!@2"

!@2"

@)2"

Make 3

Label Rows 2, 4 & 6

88 fabric vine 2015


18. Arrange and sew together, two of Block 2 and three of Block 6, and two of Block 3 as shown. Press. Make two and label Rows 3 and 5.

Make 2

Label Rows 3 & 5

Assembling the Quilt 1. Referring to quilt layout on pages 84–85, arrange and sew rows together. Press.

2. Sew @2” x $@” Fabric J strips end-to-end to make one continuous @2”-wide Fabric J strip. Press. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two @2”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border.

3. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two @2”-wide Fabric J strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press. 4. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one ()” x !@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure ()” x !!#”.

5. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 121–122) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

2015 fabric vine 89


2015

Year of the Sheep February 19, 2015 to February 7, 2016 What It Will Bring Chinese New Year has been celebrated

useful animal. For centuries, people have

in Asia for over 4,000 years. In the US,

used its fleece to make everything from

the New Year is celebrated on the 1st day

warm garments to writing brushes.

of January every year. The Chinese New

People who were born in the Year of the

Year shifts each year based on the lunar

Sheep have tendencies toward being

calendar and has a twelve year cycle.

kind-hearted and artistic. Many of them

Each year is represented by an animal

have an intense interest in crafts and

from the Chinese New Year. It symbolizes

the creative arts.

letting go of the past and starting anew.

The Year of the Sheep promises to be a

The Chinese Year of the Sheep, also

time for quiet living and contemplation.

known as the Year of the Goat and Ram,

It is an opportunity to reflect on the

is a harbinger of peace and tranquility.

value of simple things like hearth and

With a docile and amiable temperament,

home. You can create greater tranquility

the sheep promises gentle days and calm

in your life by spending quiet time with

nights. The sheep is also an endlessly

those you love best. Offer friends wise

00 fabric vine 2015


counsel and listen well to their troubles. At the same time, don’t forget to rejoice with them in the happy moments. This is also an advantageous time for practicing greater economy. Frugality is a characteristic that comes naturally to those born in the Year of the Sheep, but everyone can utilize 2015 as an opportunity to live with greater simplicity while relying on innate creativity to provide ideas for better ways of doing things. Each year is a blessing, and this one promises to bring greater peace and happiness to all. Enjoy the Year of the Sheep and choose to live with compassion, tranquility and a kind-hearted outlook.

Were You Born In A Year of the Sheep? 0 2 /0 1 / 1 9 1 9 - 0 2 / 1 9/ 1 9 2 0 0 2 / 1 7/ 1 9 3 1 - 0 2 /0 5/ 1 9 3 2 02/05/ 1 9 4 3 - 01 /2 4/ 1 9 4 4

Famous Sheep People Michelangelo, Orville Wright, Thomas Edison, Jane Austen, Anne Bancroft, Barbara Walters, Nicole Kidman, Robert De Niro, Bruce Willis, Matt

01/2 4/1955- 02/11/1956 0 2 /0 9/ 1 9 6 7- 0 1 / 2 9/ 1 9 6 8 0 1 / 2 8/ 1 9 7 9 - 0 2 / 1 5/ 1 9 8 0 0 2 / 1 5/ 1 9 9 1 - 0 2 /0 3/ 1 9 9 2 02/01/2003 - 01/2 1/200 4

LeBlanc, John Denver, Mick Jagger

2015 fabric vine 00


click quilt for free pattern download


Singapore Celebrates Its Golden Jubilee in Style


50

1965 - 2015 Republic of Singapore


K

nown as the Golden Jubilee, or SG50, this year long party offers even more reasons than normal to visit. Events will explore Singapore’s rich history, cultural legacy and athleticism. The tiny Southeast Asia city-state of Singapore makes for a fascinating getaway whenever you happen to visit. However, it’s a particularly popular spot in 2015 as the year marks the 50th anniversary of its independence. Known as the Golden Jubilee, or SG50, this year long party offers even more reasons than normal to visit. Events will explore Singapore’s rich history, cultural legacy and athleticism. Tourists will have plenty of opportunities to explore a wide variety of interest. The already excellent National Museum of Singapore will complete a renovation of some of its permanent exhibitions by September. Even those who visit before then

96 fabric vine 2015

will be treated to an excellent rendition of the story of Singapore. It features several multimedia exhibits that delve into the region’s storied past and its more recent history. The Singapore Living Gallery is particularly enlightening with its focus on four elements that are of primary importance to all locals: fashion, theater and film, food and photography. Along with its rich cultural heritage, Singapore is also widely recognized for its natural beauty. The Golden Jubilee will celebrate this as well beginning in March when local gardening groups will create five different celebratory displays in HortPark. This lovely National Park shouldn’t be missed. It’s


the ideal place to have questions answered about native plants and see them thriving in their natural habitat. Take a guided tour, and be sure to bring your camera to capture the beautiful blooms. Gardening enthusiasts will also want to carve out time for the stunning Singapore Botanic Gardens. A horticulture society founded it in 1859. It has been delighting visitors ever since. Of particular note is the National Orchid Garden, which is composed of seven and a half acres of breathtaking and colorful blooms. Visitors looking for a unique souvenir might want to pick up a hydroponic orchid packaged in a test tube to take home. While the perfectly manicured gardens are beautiful, it’s worthwhile to visit the rainforest as well. This pristine preserve is within the city limits. A brief, 15 minute taxi ride is all that’s required for visitors to find themselves surrounded by a landscape that feels primordial. Singapore places a high value on respect-

ing nature. Accordingly, visitors will find diligent recycling and conservation practices in place—partly why the rainforest is so perfectly preserved. The best rainforest access is within the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve. The reserve includes numerous wellmarked trails that allow visitors to feel that they are surrounded by nature but never lost. Playful monkeys and lizards curiously peer out at people from leafy abodes, and several pavilions make for lovely spots to relax and enjoy the scenery. This is a remarkable forest that is believed to have existed for one million years. It’s also one of the only spots in Singapore that went virtually untouched during the entire British occupation. The performing arts are also a main attraction in Singapore. Plenty of special performances and festivals are planned for the Golden Jubilee. The best place to catch a theatrical performance is at Esplanade Park. A total of 50 original Singapore plays will be presented throughout the year. To add to the celebration, a full length Chinese opera will also be performed. The Esplanade Theatres on the Bay opened in 2002. The unusual architecture is reminiscent of the famed opera house in Sydney. Symphonic orchestras, jazz ensembles and dance troupes of every description perform here as well. After the sun goes down the park that surrounds the theater is nothing short of fascinating. In the band shell, listeners are treated to free performances by local music acts. It’s an experience that’s not to be missed since the beautifully lit up Singapore skyline can be enjoyed over the top of the shell. 2015 fabric vine 97


Though Singapore is known for many things, it is the shopping opportunities that draw millions of visitors here every year. This is a place that’s designed for extraordinary shopping. Visitors find everything from traditional markets to westernized malls. To make it all more interesting, Singapore boasts a fascinating mix of nationalities. Shoppers will have opportunities to explore offerings from China, the Middle East and India to name a few. The many years of colonization by the British have also left their mark. Many people come to find excellent deals on designer brands. Others come for the textiles and handicrafts. In a city-state that thrives on shopping, the best place to find authentic goods is on Arab Street. Most of the booths are selling goods crafted in Malaysia and Indonesia. Hadjee Textiles is one of the best. It features gorgeous sarongs in an unimaginable riot of color. These versatile items are an ideal souvenir, and they generally serve many purposes while visiting Singapore. They are a dressy skirt, a blanket for the beach and even a towel. These lengths of cloth are truly indispensable. Batik is the item to buy at Basharahil Brothers and Maruti Textiles. Both retailers are known for their unique designs and excellent selection. Another fantastic opportunity awaits shoppers in Little India. These crowded, meandering streets are endlessly fascinating. Serangoon Road is the place to find items and curios imported directly


from India. It’s where the local Indian population gets essential items from home. The overwhelming Mustafa’s department store is open 24 hours a day, and most visitors need that much time to take it all in. Row upon row of saris and silk fabrics make this an amazing place to browse. The gold jewelry is also a must see, and foodies won’t be able to resist the remarkable assortment of exotic spices for sale. Singapore’s Chinatown is another wonderful place to shop. Even better, it’s possible to participate in a class that teaches the traditional Chinese tea ceremony. It’s a one-of-a-kind experience that can only be found in Singapore at Tea

Chapter, which also provides a great retail experience. It’s the perfect chance to pick up a tea service and some excellent tea to enjoy at home. Food is a passion for the people of Singapore, and they’ll celebrate the Golden Jubilee in style with the Singapore Heritage Food Pavilion at the 2015 World Street Food Congress. The event runs from April to July, so there’s plenty of time for visitors to indulge their palates with a wide array of local and international delicacies. In fact, food is always an event in Singapore. Homes are nearly universally tiny, which allows for only the smallest of kitchens. As a consequence, most of the locals routinely dine out. This is a boon 2015 fabric vine 99


for visitors who will be able to sample all sorts of dishes. Head out to the East Coast Parkway, which is right by the sea, to enjoy the famous chili crab, a spicy and flavorful favorite. Eating in the numerous hawker centers is a must. These conglomerations of food stalls are a wonderful mix of sights, sounds, smells and most of all, tastes. You’ll find every kind of international cuisine like Hainanese chicken, pork ribs finished with Chinese herbs and a mix of seafood in spicy coconut broth. It’s an inexpensive but exciting feast. Singapore also has a great deal of elegant eateries for those seeking something more formal. The food is always authentic and delicious, the perfect complement to a place so exotic and international. Singapore has a great deal to celebrate in its 50th anniversary, and visitors are certain to find a remarkable experience.


Click here to a downloadable Singapore Travel Guide and to learn more about traveller essentials.


click quilt for free pattern download


available in June


Chocolate Flan

Cake


T

his cake is part delicious dessert and part science experiment. I was watching the Food Network one morning and I watched Marcela Valladolid make this cake, she called it Chocoflan, and it amazed me. You pour this cake into a pan – caramel sauce, cake batter, flan mixture. But when it bakes, the cake ends up on the bottom and the flan rises to the top. They don’t combine, they switch places. Insane. I have no idea how it works. I sort of forgot about this cake until I was flipping through this month’sCook’s Country magazine and there is was again. I put the magazine down, walked into the kitchen and made it. Magic. Pure magic. I also love this cake because it needs to be made a day before you want to serve it. I love anything that you can make ahead of time. I also love it because it makes a gorgeous presentation. I love black and white. It is so pretty on a plate. And it tastes great. Everybody wins.

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ingredients CAKE ½ cup caramel sauce ½ cup plus 2 Tablespoons Gold Medal all⅓ cup cocoa powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon salt

½ cup sugar 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla

FLAN 2 (14-ounce) cans sweetened condensed milk 2 ½ cups whole milk 6 ounces cream cheese, room temperature 6 eggs 4 egg yolks 1 teaspoon vanilla

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3. Add buttermilk, sugar, eggs, and vanilla to the chocolate. Whisk until combined.

instructions 1. Spray a 12-cup Bundt cake pan with cooking spray. In a small bowl, whisk together flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.

2. Add butter and chocolate to a microwave safe bowl. Microwave for 2 minutes at 50% power, or until melted.

4. Stir in the flour mixture until just combined. Pretend that this picture is of flour, not buttermilk.

5. Pour the caramel sauce into the bottom of the pan.

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6. Spread the batter over the caramel layer.

9. Bake for 75 to 90 minutes, a toothpick will come out clean, or you can take an internal temp, it should register 180 degrees. 7. Blend sweetened condensed milk, milk, cream cheese, eggs, yolks, and vanilla for 1 minute.

8. Pour flan over cake batter. Place the cake pan in a roasting pan. Pour boiling water halfway up the sides of the cake pan.

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10. Transfer the cake to a wire rack. Let come to room temperature, transfer to fridge and chill for at least 8 hours. To unmold, dip the bottom of the cake pan in hot water for one minute. Place cake plate over cake pan and flip over. The cake will release and the caramel will drip down the sides.


w w w.bakedbree.com

I am a Bree. I love to cook.  Even more than I love to take pictures.  I have 3 children with 3 distinctive palates.  One eats everything, one eats most things (at least one bite anyway) and one that eats nothing at all.  No joke.  We kid that she could never be on Atkins because she eats only carbs.  My husband is a pilot in the Coast Guard and we move around a lot.  We currently live in Falmouth, MA. We are heading to Cape Cod this summer and we cannot wait to eat as much lobster as we can handle. This blog began 4 years ago to keep track of my huge collection of recipes. I had a big blue binder and was overflowing. It was a huge mess.  It had torn out magazine articles, little scraps of paper with recipes with no title – no rhyme or reason to speak of.  I was cleaning it out and thought, what would I do if this binder caught on fire?  My family recipes and all of the favorite things that I feed my family and friends would be gone forever.  I could call my mom or my sister, but they are not so good at writing these things down. I got the idea to make this a place to put all of my favorite recipes and share them with my family, friends, and the Internet.  That is how bakedbree.com was born.  It is pretty much a love letter to anyone that I have ever cooked for.  I love to have people in my home eating what I have made for them.  Chances are if you have been over for dinner, the recipes will end up here and hopefully you will make them for someone that you love.

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La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum


In Wine Country by Nancy Ryan


T

he La Conner Quilt Museum, located in the charming little

town of La Conner, in the northwest region of Puget Sound in Washington state. Since 1991, the museum has been housed in the historic and lovingly restored Gaches Mansion. The Tudor style Victorian mansion, once called the Gaches Castle, was completed in 1891. The museum draws both visitors and exhibits originating from around the globe.

Revealing The Hidden With Contemporary Quiltart Association The Contemporary QuiltArt Association (CQA) is a group of more than 100 Washington State artists that work with fiber, thread and textiles. CQA artists are diverse in style, materials, and techniques, often inventing new ways to stitch or manipulate fabric. Imagery created by artists range from abstract to

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representational, expressing thoughts, feelings, or messages with fiber as their media. They use a variety of materials including silk, linen, cotton, wool, plastic, vinyl, roving, rayon, or paper; rubber, zippers, feathers, beads, metal; yarns and threads, dye, paint, pens and more. Materials may be new or recycled. A few of the techniques used include dying, fusing, bleaching, painting, and sewing by hand and machine. Completed 2 or 3-D projects may hang on a wall or from a ceiling, rest on the floor or on a pedestal.


Spring by Nancy Ryan

As part of an evolving international

United States, from Antelope Valley’s

movement in fiber art, CQA continues to

Poppy Reserve in the south to the aspen

expand the definition of an Art Quilt. CQA

forests of the Sierra Nevada and to the

is excited and proud of its contributions to

Pacific Northwest. The techniques used

the public’s awareness and understanding

in the show are perfect for depicting the

of this Fine Art form.

larger landscape, as well as the more intimate landscapes and florals.

Impressions In Fabric With Denise Miller And Nancy Ryan

The primary technique used on the fabric landscapes is reminiscent of the pointillism of the neoimpressionist painters, Georges Seurat and Paul Signac.

The inspiration for Fabric Impressions

Where they used dots of paint, the

is the beautiful landscape of the Western 2015 fabric vine 113


They Were Roses by Mary Berdan

quilting technique uses tiny pieces of

similar to a painter’s palette. The design is

fabric. The process starts with a backing

then sketched loosely on the batting. The

and batting, creating a “canvas support”

colors are then sprinkled onto the batting

for the landscape. Fabric color choices

to create the image. Some larger pieces of

are made, and then the fabric is cut into

fabric are used for different elements such

small pieces of fabric (approximately ¼”

as tree trunks and branches, architecture,

in size) using a rotary cutter. These pieces

sky, etc. Once the surface is completed,

are stacked into piles of related colors,

the entire quilt is covered with tulle (fine

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netting), pinned together, and heavily quilted. The quilting provides several functions: it

Pastels And More Selections From Our Permanent Collection

holds all the pieces together so there is no shifting of the

Every spring, the fields surrounding

fabric; it adds definition; and

La Conner are filled with bright colors.

it makes the landscape come

Beginning in March with the iridescent

to “life.” The binding on these

yellow daffodils and continuing through

pieces is sewn as a facing.

April with the varied tulips, our lives in

The second technique in

this part of the world are alive with color

the show, fusible appliqué,

and they have inspired our first floor

is used mostly on the floral

displays. Quilts made during the 1930s

quilts and in parts of some of

Depression years brightened the lives of

the landscapes. This technique

the makers and their families. A favorite

consists of creating a line

hexagon quilt on display this quarter will

drawing of the finished shapes

be a beautiful Mosaic Quilt. This quilt is

and copying this drawing onto

a recent addition to our collection and it

a 2-sided adhesive sheet. The

features hexagons formed into diamond

shapes on the adhesive sheets

blocks that are arranged into a Tumbling

are cut out and ironed onto the

Block setting. This quilt is all hand pieced

backs of the appropriate fabric. The fabric

and hand quilted, as will be many of the

shapes are then cut out and ironed onto

quilts on display. The display will also

the background fabric. Once all the pieces

include a hexagon Grandmother’s Flower

are ironed on, the piece is placed on top

Garden, a Lily Quilt, and a Circle Star

of the backing and batting, quilted, and

Quilt.

bound

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April 1 – May 3, 2015 Beadlust With Robin Atkins

Artist Reception, Workshops, & Exhibit Tours

The La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum is pleased to present the work of Robin

Opening Reception:

Akins in our Landmarks Gallery. Robin

Wednesday, April 1,

enjoys all types of beading. However, she

2015; 4-7pm. Free Event

especially loves to sew beads on cloth.

Meet the artists of our

Currently her two passions are designing

new exhibits! Denise

wall art using her eco-dyed fabrics with

Miller and Nancy Ryan

bead embroidery, and combining bead

(Impressions in Fabric)

embroidery with bookmaking to create

their fabric landscapes

bead-embellished journals. Traveling

are reminiscent of

widely to teach, lecture and research

the pointillism of

beadwork for over 25 years, Robin Atkins

the neoimpressionist

is a nationally known bead artist. She

painters; Robin Atkins (Beadlust) her two

has authored eight beading books,

passions are designing wall art using her

including her latest, The Complete Photo

eco-dyed fabrics with bead embroidery,

Guide to Beading, published by Creative

and combining bead embroidery with

Publishing International, and numerous

bookmaking to create bead-embellished

magazine articles. She is excited to see the

journals.

development of beadwork in the past two decades, as it has shifted from the world of craft toward the world of art.

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Summer – California Dreaming by Denise Miller

Landscape Impressions Workshop With Denise Miller & Nancy Ryan: Wed-Fri, April 1-3, 2015. In this 3-day

Skill level: beginner (with basic quilting skills), intermediate, and advanced levels. http://www.laconnerquilts.org/landscapeimpresssions-workshop.html

workshop, you will create an original, landscape art quilt in an impressionistic technique. Each student will bring a photo

La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum

of a landscape to make and 18” x 24” quilt.

www. laconnerquilts.org

2015 fabric vine 117


click quilt for free pattern download


Gei s ha Charm click quilt for pattern download


general instructions

How-to Help You! Before You Begin We recommend washing and pressing your fabric prior to cutting it into strips and pieces. To help prevent fabric from fraying in the washer, clip corners at a 45 degree angle removing a small triangle piece.

Achieving a Perfect Block Accurate Seam Allowance Use 4”-wide seam allowance for all projects in this magazine unless otherwise stated. If seam allowances differ as little as z” assembling blocks will be difficult, especially when incorporating several block designs in a quilt. To check your seam allowances follow these steps.

Half Square Triangles

without breaking threads, continue this process to stitch additional units. Cut sections apart, press and continue with next step.

Fussy Cut This process is the selection and cutting of a particular motif pattern which is featured in a cut piece. Remember to center design and always allow for seam allowance.

Simple Triangles This is an easy way to make triangles from squares.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of fabric square that will become the triangle. This will be your stitch line.

Step 1 Cut three 12” x 6” pieces of fabric from assorted scraps. Sew pieces together to make one 32” x 6” piece. Press.

Step 2 Center strip should measure 1” x 6”. If piece measures differently check to see if seams have been pressed flat. If the piece still differs cut new strips and adjust seam allowance until you achieve the perfect stitch.

Pressing Press using steam or dry heat setting. Always use an “up and down” motion since a side-to-side motion can distort the block or unit.

Assembly Line Method Use this method when making multiple pieces or blocks.

Step 2 Place marked square on fabric piece shown in construction step matching raw edges. Sew on drawn line and trim 4” away from stitching.

Fabric A- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric B- 2 2" x 6 2"

Step 3 Press seams as indicated in construction diagram. Measure sewn piece to check accuracy.

Tip: There is a waste factor with this technique but you can stitch an additional 2” away from stitch line. Cut piece between stitching saving the smaller version for some future project. Diagram 3

Step 1

Position pieces right sides together, stitch unit.

Step 2 Align and sew the next unit

This technique differs from the Simple Triangle method; you will be making two triangles at one time.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one fabric square. Place marked square and one corresponding square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press.

Fabric F- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric D- 2 2" x 2 2"

Square to 2” Make 2

Step 2 Measure unit and trim as indicated in construction diagram.

Applique Technique Quick Fused Method This method joins fabric to each other with the use of fusible web. There are many types on the market and you will need to refer to manufacturer’s instruction for specific requirements. If quilt does not require laundering you can use heavy-weight fusible web and follow steps 1-4. If your quilt will require laundering use lightweight fusible web and follow all steps. Remember that appliqués when pressed to background fabric will be a reverse image from patterns provided.

Step 1 Trace all appliqué pieces on the paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line.

Step 2 With fusible web paper side up, fuse to the wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 3 Cut on draw line. Remove future project

paper backing, a thin film of adhesive will remain on fabric.

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General Instructions

Step 4 Referring to project photo, position and fuse all pieces of one appliqué design at a time onto background.

Tip: An Appliqué Pressing Sheet is very helpful when there are many elements to a design. Place your pattern (reverse image from pattern provided) under the pressing sheet as a guide. Arrange pieces on sheet and press following manufacturer’s instructions. Allow piece to cool, remove appliqué unit and arrange on background to fuse unit in place. If the piece is not cooled, the fusible web could remain on the sheet instead of the fabric.

Step 5 If using a machine, cut a piece of stabilizer larger than appliqué area and pin to wrong side of fabric. Stabilizer is used to achieve an even stitch. Using a satin stitch, blanket stitch or other decorative stitching to secure appliqué in place. Start stitching from the background to the foreground. Option: use a hand embroidery stitch instead.

Hand Appliqué If project specifies quick-fuse you will need to reverse all patterns and add 4”- wide seam allowance. The steps that follow will add the seam allowance after pattern is traced onto fabric.

Step 1 Make a template of all pattern pieces and indicate where pieces overlap. Place template on right side of selected fabric.

Step 2 Trace around template using a removable fabric marker. This will be your turn under guide. Cut out shapes approximately 4” beyond traced line. Step 3 When layering and positioning pieces always work from the background to the foreground.

Step 4 Enter from the wrong side of applique shape bringing the needle up on the traced line. Using the tip of the

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FABRIC VINE 2015

needle turn under a small portion of the fabric along trace line and secure with thumb. Using a blind stitch, stitch along folded edge to join piece to background. Stitch is hidden under fabric.

Option 1 Step 1 Position binding away from corner leaving 8” free of stitches and aligning raw edges with the edge of the quilt. Sew using a 4”-wide seam.

Step 2 Stop sewing 4” from quilt top

Blind Stitch

Finishing the Quilt

edge and backstitch. Clip threads and turn quilt. Fold binding up at a 45 degree angle to create the mitered corner as shown.

Diagram 1

Backing fabric and batting should be 4”-8” larger than the quilt top. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads from quilt prior to basting.

Step 1 Lay backing right side down, batting and quilt top (right side up) on top.

Step 2 Backing and batting need to

Step 3 Fold the binding back down aligning top fold with edge of quilt and matching raw edges. Start stitching 4” Diagram 2 for all corners. from quilt edge. Repeat

be taut prior to basting quilt. Start in the center and work out toward edges. You can hand stitch, pin or use a specialty tool to baste quilt together.

Step 3 Check batting instruction for quilting requirements. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Remove basting.

Binding the Quilt Two options are given for binding the quilt. For both options trim batting and backing 4” beyond raw edge of quilt, this will give fullness to the binding. Sew binding stripes end-to-end to make one continuous strip. Fold and press binding strips in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. To reduce bulk when joining strips, cut ends at 450 angle and sew together as shown.

Step 4 Determine length needed for binding strip ends, trim and sew ends together. Stitch binding to quilt. Fold binding to back of quilt, a diagonal fold will form at the corners. Hand-stitch binding to back of quilt.

Option 2 Step 1 Measure quilt through center from side to side. Cut two binding strips to this measurement. Sew to top and bottom of quilt matching raw edges with edge of quilt. Press binding away from quilt top.

Step 2 Measure quilt through center from top to bottom including the binding just added. Cut two strips to this measurement and sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Step 3 Fold top and bottom strips to the back and pin in place. Repeat for sides. Hand-stitch binding to quilt.

Fabric Vine  

Fabric Vine, previously known as Asian Fabric, inspires creativity. Fabric and wine are at the core. An abundant range of patterns, projects...

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