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patterns • decorating tips • fiber art • culture

Issue No. 33


free pattern download available soon


contents

Asian Fabric™ Vol 8 Issue 3

quilts 23 Harvest Splendor Quilt Rich autumn tones look like

departments

sparkling jewels in the landscape

8 Publisher’s Note 9 How to Use the Magazine

29 Triple Delight Wall Art & Pillows 46 Kitchen Essentials Brighten your winter decor

15 Shop Directory

with Kona Bay's exquisite new Lotus collection

69 Splendor Bed Runner

Transform your room with this easy project

77 Holiday Ikebana Quilt 95 Mountain Flight Quilt

A work of art by quilter Helene Knott

features 12 Georgie Gerl: Featured Gellhorn Gallery Artist 57 Wine & Fabric

Have fun learning to pair wine with fabric

Where to shop for Kona Bay

19 What I Did With My Kona Bay Great projects from our readers

38 Book Review

Gifts Galore!

62 Food Mizutaki

88 Travel

Fukuoka, Japan

114 General Instructions Special thanks to:

Used exclusively and recommended by Asian Fabric™ Fukuoka, Japan • pg 88

2013 Asian Fabric 5


downloadable patterns from Asian Fabric —$3.99 ea w w w.konabaygifts.com


Asian Fabric back issues —$5 ea

eco friendly insulated hot/cold bags —new designs!


publisher’s note

Recently, the quilting industry’s wholesale show and get together—QUILT MARKET— was held in Houston. Did you know it is America’s 4th largest city? Attending are most of the quilting fabric producers, distributors from around the globe, sales reps, pattern makers, fabric designers, thread and batting companies, gadget producers and, last but not least, the owners of independent mom n’ pop quilt shops. Kona Bay Fabrics has been attending Quilt Market since 1991 (yikes, I’m old!!). Believe me, there have been many changes since then—other than a few extra pounds and more gray hair. For starters, there are way more fabric companies producing more and more gorgeous fabrics for quilters and sewing enthusiasts to drool over. Fabric designers have become like rock stars with people flocking to their booth in search of trend setting designs. Plus, the internet has prompted the launch of more companies selling not only fabric, but a zillion patterns, batting, buttons, rotary cutters, books, dvds… and the list goes on! I’m told by the old timers (I wonder when I’ll get that designation—or have I already?!) that there have been several recessions since the big renaissance in quilting (let’s call it the Bicentennial of 1976) but quilting continues to hold its own. Industry companies know that fabric is a discretionary income purchase. We also know, with certainty, that many quilters can’t go a week without stopping by their local quilt shop to oooh and aaah at the new arrivals. So where does it all come together? The heart and soul of the quilting industry is the hard working, dedicated quilt shop owners who sacrifice on a daily basis to create a quilt shop that’s the best it can be because not only for their love of fabric and quilting,

8 Asian Fabric 2013

but because they care very deeply about their customers. They ensure quilters have a place to escape the harsh reality of the “real world” where they can find comfort in fabric. Guest quilters, Helene Knott and Melanie Formway Chang have once again joined Georgie Gerl in our 33rd issue of Asian fabric magazine (I’m feeling old again!). The beautiful array of projects will keep you busy through the holiday season. Check out our fun wine and fabric pairing, food and travel features as well. You’ll find some great ideas for winter get togethers. Next time you visit your local quilt shop, please take a few minutes to seek out the owner and thank them for their efforts to maintain your fabric sanctuary. It would mean so much to them (and me!). Aloha and mahalo,

Douglas (Textile Samurai) Eagleson Publisher • douglas@konabay.com http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kona-Bay-Fabrics-SeattleBay-Fabrics-and-Asian-Fabric-Magazine/106593046936?ref=ts


Make the most of Asian Fabric

Asian Fabric™ Quilting and design ideas for inspired minds Issue #32 2013 • VOL 8 ISSUE 2

Publisher douglas Eagleson Quilt designer & EDITOR Georgie Gerl ggerldesigner@

comcast.net Facebook: Georgie Gerl Designer

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORs Melanie Formway Chang Helene Knott ASSISTANTS TO PUBLISHER Doris Eagleson 1923–2010 Cheryl Hamai Brittany Eagleson Simpson

Subscriptions Kona Bay Fabrics www.konabay.com 15812 NE 83rd St Redmond, WA 98052 800-531-7913

advertising and editorial inquiries

Share it with a friend 1. Click here and choose a method to share. 2. Follow prompts.

Use the easy links As you scroll over a page, active links will be highlighted in blue. This enables you to connect to additional pages and download additional patterns.

Print pages You must log in and download the publication before you are able to print. 1. Click Share and then choose the light gray Download link below. 2. Open the .pdf to view and print pages as you wish.

Eagle Publishing www.PublishingPeople.com 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207 866-638-1115 Editor and associate publisher Vicki Dar nwwoman@mac.com graphic design liminalogy.com

Kona Bay Fabrics © 2013

Subscribe for FREE— It’s easy! 1. Go to www.konabay.com 2. Click on “Subscribe” 3. Complete the information

Asian Fabric™ is produced six times a year by Eagle Publishing for Kona Bay Fabrics. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. © Kona Bay Fabrics. All rights reserved. No piece, in part or full, may be reproduced without permission.

2013 Asian Fabric 9


Color Movement In stores now


Georgie Gerl Featured at Gellhorn Gallery Asian Fabric Quilt Editor and Designer, Georgie Gerl, will be the featured artist at the Gellhorn Gallery in Spokane, Washington with her creations in fabric available from December 19 to January 5, 2014. Gellhorn Gallery is housed at Interplayers Theatre. Take advantage of the chance to meet Georgie at the opening Friday evening, December 20. The gallery is open from 11:00 to 5:00pm, Tuesday - Saturday and

12 ASIAN FABRIC 2013


during all theatre performances. Visit www.interplayerstheatre. com for the schedule. “Away In the Basement,� a musical comedy will open on December 19. The theatre and gallery are located at 174 S. Howard Street in Spokane. Making art has always been creation in fabric was a crossstitch pillowcase, made when she up, many hours were devoted to arts and crafts. Studying art was a natural choice in college. The journey to becoming a master quilt designer and teacher included forays into a variety of art mediums including glass. She and husband, Tim, owned Aardvark Stained Glass in Spokane for nearly thirty years. Fabric was always in the mix, though. During her thirty-three issue tenure with Asian Fabric, Georgie has established a multitude of loyal international followers anxious to get the next round of fabric patterns and the thoughtful instruction she provides. Works in the Gellhorn Gallery are for sale with a portion of Interplayers Theatre. Georgie always enjoys hearing from readers welcomes your feedback at ggerldesigner@comcast.net. Plus, she would love for you to connect with her on Facebook at Georgie Gerl Designer. 2013 ASIAN FABRIC 13


available now


shop directory: where to find kona bay The premiere shops across the country for exceptional service and a superb selection of Kona Bay Fabrics.

maryland arizona 35th Ave Sew & Vac Fabric World 3500 W. Northern Ave Phoenix, AZ 85051 602.841.5427 4939 W. Ray Road, STE 27 Chandler, AZ 85225 480.961.7363 Two convenient locations with 25,000 bolts combined, including a large selection of Asian fabrics. Notions, books, threads and all quilting supplies. Kits available from this issue. Hours: M-F 9-6; Sat 9-5; Sun 10-4.  www.35thavesewandvac.com

florida Boutique 4 Quilters, Inc. 2945 W New Haven Ave West Melbourne, FL 32904 321.768.2060 A shop with a Scandinavian ambiance. Large selection of Asian, Kaffe Fasset, Batiks and Silk fabrics. Hand dyed fabrics and Fiber Art by local artists. A place where Fiber Artists and Traditional Quilters gather. Come visit Florida’s most creative quilt shop! Hours: Mon & Tue 9:30am5pm; Wed 9:30am-7pm; Thur & Fri 9:30am-5pm; Sat 9:30am-4pm.  www.boutique4quilters.com

Patches Quilting & Sewing 308 S Main St Mount Airy, MD 21771 301.831.0366 A delight for your eyes with over 4,000 bolts of fabric. Our large selection of Asian prints, Batiks, and Black and Whites will aid you in any project. Don’t forget to check out our books, notions and classes.  www.patchesquilting.com Seminole Sampler 71 Mellor Ave Catonsville, MD 21228 866.407.2363 Dedicated quilt shop specializing in Asian, Batik and contemporary fabrics. Excellent service to meet all your quilting needs. Classes for all levels. Extensive selection of books, patterns and notions.  www.seminolesampler.com

michigan The Stitchery 1129 E Grand River Ave Howell, MI 48843 517.548.1731 The Stitchery carries many Kona Bay Fabrics. Full service quilt shop with over 5,000 bolts of fabric and supplies. Authorized Janome dealer, featuring the Memory Craft 11,000 Embroidery Machine. Conveniently located between Detroit and Lansing. Open Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat. 9-4.  www.thestitcheryonline.com 2013 Asian Fabric 15


minnesota Blue Bamboo 12865 Industrial Park Blvd Plymouth, MN 55441 800.323.1105 Gorgeous array of Asian fabrics which feature the best of Kona Bay in both fabric and kits. Choose from wall hangings, quilt and runner kits. Check our website for current fabrics and sign up for our newsletter. See over 5000 bolts of fabric which include Asian, flannels, brights, holiday and batiks.  www.mybluebamboo.com

missouri The Quilted Fox 10403 Clayton Road St. Louis, M0 63131 314-993-1181 toll free 877.993.1181 Huge selection of Asian fabrics both in-store and online. We also carry internationally oriented fabrics. Many kits available. Open Mon and Wed 10 am–5 pm; Tues and Thurs 10 am–6:30 pm; Fri and Sat 10 am–4:30 pm, and Sun Noon–4:00 pm.  www.quiltedfox.com

nevada The Quilted Dragon 2890 Yucca Terrace Ave Pahrump, NV 89048 775.751.9033 Just one hour NW of Las Vegas, we specialize in Oriental, Batik, and Wide Backing fabrics, Sashiko supplies and notions all at discount prices everyday. We stock over 1,700 book titles and 600 patterns at all times. Open MTW 9–3 and second Sat 9–3.  www.quilteddragon.com

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new york Discount Sewing & Jackie Lynn’s Fabric Center 475 E. Ridge Rd Rochester, NY 14621 585.544.4110 Exquisite selection of Asian quilting fabrics. Sales and Service Center for Brother, Janome, HandiQuilter, Elna and Tin Lizzie machines. Open Mon-Sat 10-5, Tues & Thurs 10-8.  www.discountsewingcenter.com

ohio Gramma Fannies Quilt Barn P. O. Box 270 Berlin, OH 44610 330.893.3243 Largest selection of Asian fabrics in Ohio’s Amish Country. You’ll enjoy our unique quilt shop located in an old barn as a part of Schrocks Amish farm. Locally made quilts plus 2500 bolts of beautiful fabrics specially designed for quilt shops. Just 1 mile east of Berlin, the heart of Amish Country, on State Route 39. Mon-Sat 10-5.  www.grammafanniesquilts.com

pennsylvania Sew Smart Fabrics 30 W Oakland Ave. Doylestown, PA 18901 215.345.7990 The best selection of Asian prints in Eastern Pennsylvania. We also carry silks, wools and other fabrics. Books, patterns, trends. Open everyday.  www.sewsmartfab.com


online shops

wyoming E.T. Quilts 80 S. Main Buffalo, WY 82834 307.684.9006 877.ETQUILTS (877.387.8458) Quality fabrics, including Wyoming’s largest collection of Asian prints, notions, kits, patterns, books and quilts. Salt City Candles, needlecraft supplies, and Boyd’s Bears also available. Check out our website and receive a free gift with your first on-line order. Open Mon–Sat 10–5.  www.etquilts.com

contact asianfabric@ mac.com n on for informatio Asian advertising in Fabric

eQuilter eQuilter.com is your online fabric store for quilting, sewing and fashion, with OVER 20,000 Fabrics IN STOCK! We specialize in Asian-Pacific and contemporary quilt fabrics. See our ad on the back cover.  www.equilter.com SeaWatch Fabrics Mukilteo, WA • 866.407.2363 Extensive selection of Asian fabrics, Batiks and light Batiks. Unique patterns, “Wall Hanging of the Month” club, fat quarter bundles and Superior Threads. Free shipping on all orders over $25. Most orders shipped the same day.  www.seawatchfabrics.com Debsews Fabrics Wide selection of Asian fabrics • Tone-On-Tone fabrics • Fat quarter selections • Patterns & magazines • Special sale items. Debsews as been selling fabric to thousands of satisfied customers online since 1999 and we are very proud of our customer service. See our ad on page 113.  www.debsews2.com Shibori Dragon Shibori Dragon is dedicated to bringing you the finest materials and patterns for your creation of beautiful garments and quilted items. We offer the largest supply of sashiko supplies on the internet.

2013 Asian Fabric 17


Mikoto II available September


What I Did with my Kona Bay fabric  projects from our readers 

There are 2 ways to submit— all the e e s o t warding e r y r e v ics and r b It is a f r u ways o by you! d e creative t u c e s are ex pattern s who ha e n o y r to eve designs r u o Thanks y f s all! photo o u a s d e r e i r p a s sh in ur work o Y . s u with

1. Email: asianfabric@mac.com 2. Mail:

Asian Fabric Magazine Editor 15812 NE 83rd St. Redmond, WA 98502

www.konabayfabrics.com


ď ś

Emily Breclaw thecaffeinatedquilter.com

I would like to submit a quilt made from my latest pattern. I’m attaching a cover photograph and two detail pictures of Japanese Garden, made with the Kona Bay Paradise collection. Each of the 61 blocks features the Paradise print fussycut to create a kaleidescope effect. I designed this quilt with the unusual red border to represent the red bridges found in Japanese gardens. In high school, I had the opportunity to visit Yokosuka, Japan, for two weeks, and those gardens remain one of my favorite memories from that trip. I am a pattern designer and this quilt pattern is available in quilt stores and online through my Craftsy store (http://www.craftsy.com/user/968124/pattern-

20 Asian Fabric 2013


store?ext=craftlet-pattern). It includes directions for strip cutting gorgeous fabrics to fussy-cut motifs simply. I’ve already made this quilt twice, and am looking forward to seeing the effects created using different focus fabrics and coordinating colors.  I plan to make at least two more to represent all seasons of the garden. I am really looking forward to the new Passion collection when it comes out-- so many possibilites for fussy-cutting! Thank you very much for your consideration!

2013 Asian Fabric 21


Blossom available now

click quilt for pattern download


Harvest Splendor ➺❈➺

Designer: Georgie Gerl

Wall & Bed Quilts


Harvest Splendor Wall & Bed Cutting Chart & Material List Harvest Splendor Wall and Bed Quilts Wall 35” square Bed 87” square

Featuring fabrics from the Blossom, Passion Shibori Tonal, and Shadowland II collections.

material list Wall Backing !8 yards Wall Batting $)” x $)” Bed Backing * yards Bed Batting (%” x (%” Chart shows both the requirements for the wall and bed quilts the cut sizes are the same for each just the quanity needed and yardage varies. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Wall 1st Cuts Fabric A BLOS-04 Black Background & Binding

! ) @ $ #

^2” x $@” $2” x $@” #2” x $@” @w” x $@” @” x $@”

^

!2” x $@”

Fabric B BLOS-01 Rust Block Featured Fabric

! !

Fabric C SHAD-12 Red Sashing

Wall Next Cuts

Bed 1st Bed Cuts Next Cuts

$ !& ^ ( !#

!^

$

^2” x &2”

!^

#2” squares

* @ !^ !^

@” x !@” @” x ^2” !2” x &2” !2” x $2”

!)2” x $@” %2” x $@”

$ $

!)2” x ^2” %2” squares

# #

!^ !^

$

!2” x $@”

$ ! @

!2” x @$2” !2” x (2” !2” x @”

!^

!^ $ *

Fabric D PASS-05 Teal Sashing Accent

#

!2” x $@”

*

!2” x !)2”

!!

#@

Fabric E BLOS-04 Bronze Sashing

$

!2” x $@”

*

!2” x !^2”

@$

#@

!3 yards Wall ^8 yards Bed

@!

^$ #@ * ^$ ^$

s yard Wall !2 yards Bed

3 yard Wall d yard Bed

Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat Before you begin read all instructions. Refer to General Instructions (pages 114-115) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a ¼”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

24 Asian Fabric 2013

4 yard Wall s yard Bed

3 yard Wall !3 yards Bed

Bed Eight !2” x 42“ strips are used as an accent border.


Making the Blocks

Making the Bed Quilt

1. Referring to cutting chart to cut the appropriate number of pieces for either the wall or bed quilt projects using the same size strips and pieces but the quantity needed for each will vary. Refer to Splendor Bed Runner on pages 71-73 steps 1 and 2 to make four of Unit 4 for wall quilt and sixteen of Unit 4 for bed quilt. Refer to steps 6-12 to make four of Block 3 and one of Block 4 for wall quilt or make sixteen of Block 3 and four of Block 4 for bed quilt.

1. Sew two rows with two blocks each. Press. Sew rows together. Press.

2. Referring to step 3 diagram’s center section, sew one Block 4 between two of Block 3. Press. Make one for wall quilt and four for bed quilt.

3. Sew one Block 3 between two %2” Fabric B squares as shown. Press. Make two for wall quilt and eight for bed quilt. Sew one unit from step 2 between two units from this step. Press. Make one for wall quilt and four for bed quilt. Press. Note: Go to Finishing the Quilt section, step 2, to complete the wall quilt. %2”

%2”

%2”

Make 2 for Wall Quilt Make 8 for Bed Quilt

2. Sew $2” x $@” Fabric A strips end-to-end to make one continuous $2”-wide Fabric A strip. Press. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two $2”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border. Remaining strip will be used in step 4. 3. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two $2”-wide Fabric A strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

4. Referring to steps 2 & 3 to join, measure, trim, and sew 1!2”-wide Fabric E strips and $2”-wide Fabric A strips to top, bottom, and sides of quilt. Press.

Finishing the Quilt

1. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one (^” x !@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure (^” x (^”.

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (page 115) to layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

Make 1 for Wall Quilt Make 4 for Bed Quilt 2013 ASIAN FABRIC 25


click on quilt for pattern download

available now


available now


Triple Delight Designer: Georgie Gerl

Create these wall art panels displaying then on your wall as a set or separately or make each panel into accent pillows.


Triple Delight Wall Art or Pillows Cutting Chart & Material List Triple Delight Wall Art Triple Delight Pillows Wall Art each panel 16” square Pillow either 16” square with 2” flange or 20” square Wall art can be stacked as shown to the left or displayed separately as shown on page 29. Cutting charts makes three different wall art or pillows. Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” or directional pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat.

material list

Wall Art Panels

Backing or Pillow Lining @ yards for # blocks or q for one Pillow Backing s yard per pillow For pillow backing cut for each pillow two @)2” x !#” Batting @$” square for each block Lightweight Fusible Web 1 yard 16” Pillow with Stabilize 1 yard 2” Flange 20” or 16” Pillow Forms or if making forms material needed 20” Pillows Pillow Form fabric !4 yard per pillow Polyester Fiberfill Beads, Buttons & Trims as desired Note: Cuts in chart make one of each block. 16” Stretcher Bars (Wall Art) Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage First Cuts Next Cuts Twelve (four for each panel) !)

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A BLOS-04 Black Background

!2 yards

First Cuts ! ! ! @ @ ! !

!

(2” x $@” @ &4” x $@” @ %2” x $@” @ @ $8” x $@” @ @ $” x $@” @ #2” x $@” ! @ @2” x $@” ! @ ! @ @ !2” x $@” ! @ $ @ @ @

Next Cuts (2” x !#” &4” squares %2” x *” %2” x $” $8” x @)2” $8” x !#4” $” x @)2” #2” x !#2” #2” x *” @2” x !)2” @2” x $” @2” x #2” @2” x #” @” squares !2” x ^2” !2” x $” !2” x #2” !2” squares !2” x !” !” x @”

Fabric B PASS-05 Red Border

4 yard

Fabric C PASS-02 Red Featured Motif & Appliqué Circles

!2” x $@”

*

!2” x $” !2” x #”

Appliqué border circle ! $

&2” square !2” x @2” Appliqué circle or circles

!

&2” x $@”

Fat Quarter Fabric D PASS-01 Red Featured Motif One panel or 3 yard Fabric E PASS-02 Blue Appliqué Circle

! ! ! @ @

&2” x !!2” &2” x @2” %” x @2” !2” x ^2” !2” x @2”

Appliqué circle or circles

Obese Eighth Fabric F BLOS-03 Blue Accents

8 yard

30 Asian Fabric 2013

@

@ @ @

!2” x %” !2” x @2” !2” squares Appliqué squares


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 114–115) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Making the Blocks Top Panel: Block 1

1. Sew one !2” x @2” Fabric C piece between two !2” x #” Fabric B pieces as shown. Press. Make two. Sew one &2” Fabric C square between two units from this step as shown. Press. #”

@2”

3. Cut each &4” Fabric A square one diagonally to make corner triangles. Sew four Fabric A triangles to unit from step 2 as shown. Press.

4. Sew unit from step 3 between two $8” x !#4” Fabric A strips as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two $8” x @)2” Fabric A strips. Press. Referring to Adding the Appliqué (page 34) and layouts (pages 29–30) stitch two squares and two small circles to finish the Top Panel: Block 1. $8”

$8”

#”

!2”

Make 2 &2” @)2”

&2”

2. Sew one !2” x @2” Fabric C piece between two !2” x $” Fabric B pieces as shown. Press. Make two. Sew unit from step 1 between two units from this step as shown. Press. $”

@2”

$”

!2”

Make 2

Middle Panel: Block 2 1. Sew one !2” x @2” Fabric D piece between two !2” x #” Fabric B pieces. Press. Make two. Sew one &2” x !!2” Fabric D piece between two units from this step as shown. Press. #”

@2”

#”

!2”

Make 2 !!2”

&2”

2013 Asian Fabric 31


2. Sew one !2” x ^2” Fabric D strip between two !2” x $” Fabric B pieces. Press. Make two. Sew unit from step 1 between units from this step as shown. Press. $”

^2”

$”

7. Sew one unit from step 6 to one %2” x $” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation. $”

$”

!2”

Make 2

%2”

%2”

8. Sew one %” x @2” Fabric D piece to one @2” x #” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. @2”

3. Sew one !2” x !” Fabric A piece and one !2” Fabric F square as shown. Press. Make two. Sew one of these units to one !” x @” Fabric A piece. Press. Make two, one of each variation. !2”

!”

!”

!”

@”

@”

!2” Make 2

4. Sew one unit from step 3 to one @” Fabric A square as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation. @”

#”

9. Sew one !2” x $” Fabric B piece to one !2” x $” Fabric A piece. Press. Make two. Sew one unit from this step to one @2” x $” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation. @2”

@2”

$”

$”

@”

@”

@”

5. Sew one !2” Fabric A square to one !2” x @2” Fabric F piece as shown. Sew one unit from this step to one !2” x #2” Fabric A piece. Press. Make two, one of each variation. !2”

!2”

#2”

#2”

!2” !2” 6. Sew one unit from step 4 to one unit from step 5 as shown. Press #2” Make two, #2” one of each variation.

32 Asian Fabric 2013

%”

10. Sew one unit from step 8 between two units from step 9 as shown. Press. Sew one !2” x ^2” Fabric A strip to unit as shown. Press. ^2”

!2”


11. Sew one #2” x !#2” Fabric A strip to one unit from step 2 as shown in top section of diagram. Press. Sew unit from step 10 between two units from step 7, checking orientation of units prior to sewing. Press. Sew units together. Press.

3. Sew one unit from step 2 to one (2” x !#” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation. (2”

(2”

!#2”

#2”

!#”

!#”

4. Sew one unit from step 1 between two units from step 3 as shown. Press. 12. Sew unit from step 11 between two $” x @)2” Fabric A strips. Press seams toward Fabric A. This completes the Middle Panel/Block 2. Bottom Panel: Block 3

1. Sew one &2” x @2” Fabric D strip between one @2” x #2” and one @2” x !)2” Fabric A pieces as shown. Press. #2”

&2”

!)2”

@2”

2. Sew one !2” x #2” Fabric A and one !2” x %” Fabric F strip. Press. Make two. Sew one unit from this step between one %2” x *” and one #2” x *” Fabric A pieces as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation. #2”

5. Refer to Triple Delight Quilts Appliqué patterns (page 36) and Adding the Appliqué (page 34) to stitch circle border, large circle and medium circles to unit to complete the Bottom Panel: Block 3.

%”

!2”

Make 2 %2”

#2”

#2”

*”

%2”

*”

2013 Asian Fabric 33


Adding the Appliqué The instructions given are for Quick Fused Appliqué Method for other methods refer to General Instructions (pages 114–115) for Appliqué Technique. Note: It is recommended to use removable stabilizer on the wrong side of the fabric when machine appliquéing. This will give stability to the piece, even stitching, and prevent puckering of fabric.

1. Trace circles—one large border, one large, one medium and two small circles and trace two squares on page 36 on paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from trace line. 2. With fusible web paper-side up, fuse to wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions. Cut on traced line.

3. Refer to layouts on page 29–30 to arrange and fuse appliqués to blocks. Finish all appliqué edges with machine satin stitch or decorative stitching as desired.

2. Slide 16” interlocking stretcher bars together check for square by measuring from corner to corner, adjust if necessary. Staple at corners to secure in place.

Staple stretcher bars at corners

3. Place quilt wrong side facing up and center stretcher bars on top. Pull fabric around bar, staple in the middle of each stretcher bar making sure quilt is taut. Turn unit over to check block placement. Adjust placement if needed.

Finishing the Wall Art

1. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (page 115) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Add beads, buttons and trims to embellish the art panels as desired.

34 Asian Fabric 2013

4. After checking placement continues working from center, stretching and stapling quilt, stopping at corners.


5. Pull corner tight and check front to make sure there are no ruffles. Fold excess fabric at 90° angle, crease and form corner. Staple tightly to back, repeat for all corners. Add hanger to back of bar. Note: Panels can be finished using binding strips if stretcher bars are not desired.

Making the Pillows Referring to Triple Delight Wall Art instructions on pages 30–34, sew desired block or blocks together for pillow tops. The quilt blocks can be made into either 20” pillows or a 16” pillow with 2” flange. 1. Layer batting between pillow top and lining piece. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Trim batting and lining even with pillow top.

2. On one !#” edge of backing piece fold under 4” to the wrong side and press. Turn under an additional 4” and press. Stitch along folded edge. Repeat for other backing piece.

3. Place quilted pillow top and two backing pieces right sides together matching raw edges and overlapping backing pieces (finished hem edges toward center). Using a 4”–wide seam sew around all edges, clip corners and turn right side out. Press. If making 16” finished pillow with 2” flange measure 2” from outside edge and marked pillow front. Stitch on marked line to finished. Insert pillow form. Option: Making a Pillow Form---Cut two @)2” fabric squares for 20” pillow or cut two !^2” fabric squares for 16” pillow. Using 4”wide seam sew around all edges leaving a 4” opening for turning. Stuff pillow to desired fullness with polyester fiberfill. Hand stitch opening closed.

2013 Asian Fabric 35


Triple Delight Quilts AppliquĂŠ Patterns Patterns are for quick-fuse technique these are the finished sizes

Make 1 Large Border Circle

Make 1 Large Circle

Make 2 Medium Circles

Tracing Line Placement Line

Make 2 Squares

36 Asian Fabric 2013

Make 2 Small Circles


Fly Away

&

Translucent ava i l a b le n ow


book review by Vicki Dar

Gifts Galore! W

ith the season of giving rapidly approaching, many people people fall into the trap of waiting too long to start working on their gift list. It’s far too easy to find yourself in the midst of a buying frenzy that leaves you with gifts that don’t come close to representing your true feelings for the recipient. A handmade, thoughtfully prepared, handmade gift, large or small, is always appreciated. Even with good intentions, sometimes we lack ideas for suitable gifts, though. Asian Fabric to the rescue!

38 Asian Fabric 2013


I’d like to introduce you to two lovely books from That Patchwork Place, a Martingale and Company imprint. They will provide you with both the inspiration to get busy checking gifts off your list and the patterns, templates and instructions to insure you accomplish the task with ease and success. Sew the Perfect Gift features 25 handmade gifts. Twenty-two different designers came together for this book with most developing only one gift. Because of this, the projects represent a delightfully diverse selection of gifts and styles. The Contents page separate the projects into five categories--Quilted Treasures, Around the House, Great Gifts for Special Interests, It’s Easy To Be Green and Just In Time for Christmas. You can quickly scan

the list and see the designer responsible for each project as well. I have no doubt you’ll recognize several of the names. Only three of the 25 gifts mention Christmas specifically. Two use stylized poinsettia motifs and one featured pieced tree motifs-all would be lovely in most homes. The remainder are less seasonal and will fulfill your requirements for gift giving throughout the year. Quilters will enjoy the first chapter which offers four sweet quilting projects. The third, titled “Time for Tea, Have a Cup With Me,” by Kay Mackenzie, will be a guaranteed hit with your tea loving friend. To make it extra special, gift it with a homemade gift certificate that can be redeemed for afternoon tea and sweet treats with you. 2013 Asian Fabric 39


The second chapter features five projects designed to perk up the gift recipient’s home. There are four different pillow selections. Titled, “The Wheat-Stalk Throw Pillow,” the second pillow, by Vanessa Christenson, provides a high impact design statement for a very limited cost. You’ll likely end up whipping up one or two for yourself at same time. Plus, once you’ve mastered the incredibly easy technique used, your creative flame will be lit and ideas for additional designs will flow like hot lava. Whether you’ve embroidered before or never had the good fortune of trying one of the original forms of embellishment, the “Happy Mornings Embroidered Towels,” should be on your list. I still have the name of the week

40 Asian Fabric 2013

towels with corresponding kitschy images my mother embroidered for me as a housewarming gift when I purchased my first home in my early twenties. This project, by Cynthia Tomaszewski, reminded me how quickly simple embroidery stitches can transform a blank towel into a long treasured gift. Collectively, the third chapter is my favorite. I can quickly think of several people who would relish all the gifts shown. A few interest specific gifts include, a tote for knitting friends, a gardener’s apron and an adorable pincushion for sewists. The “Knitter’s Project Tote”, by Adrienne Smitke will come together fast. The publisher, Martingale and Company, has even included bonus patterns online that compliment this gift. Combine the book and online projects for truly useful and memorable gift set that will be used for years to come.


A few years back, I made myself an apron to wear while I garden. It’s handy to have a place for all the little items you always end up needing. The “Green Thumb Gardener’s Apron” by Cassie Barden is the perfect choice for gardening friends. Depending on the fabric design, it could also be perfect for barbecue fans, busy moms and make-up brushes waiting for action. The “Posy Pincushion” by Lum DeBono would put a smile on a non-sewer’s face. The captivating little cushion featuring graceful, embellished posies will be like receiving a bright bouquet everyday. You’ll be thought of every time they use it. The pattern calls for felted wool. The instructions are provided later in the book. If you’re buying wool off the bolt, plan on making more than one. Once the pieces have been cut, multiples will go together in little more time than one. When you need another gift, in a couple months, you’ll be glad you made extras.

Cassie Barden has another project in this chapter. The “City Roses Purse” would be splendid in so many Kona Bay fabrics. This super simple pattern that can be made up quickly looks very classy and is the perfect, not too big, not too small size. The “City Roses Purse” calls for one or two covered button kits. If you’ve never made covered buttons, you’ll enjoy learning how. I have given little bags of fabric covered buttons as a meet a girlfriend for lunch gift and the recipient was delighted. Chapter Five, It’s Easy To Be Green, fulfills its promise with five delightful projects. Beth Klovich and Karen Clifton have contributed two adorable little wool bags. As a bonus and maybe one of the things I appreciated most about the book is Beth’s page of Tips for Working with Recycled Wool. I’m a newbie in this area. Her lessons will be so helpful as I scour the thrift shop racks for wool sweaters. The last project I’ll mention is by Sara Diepersloot. The “Lunch Break Reusable 2013 Asian Fabric 41


Bags” are practical and beautiful and you can choose just the right fabric for each recipient—think children, co-workers and mail carriers. The list is endless! Who doesn’t need a lunch bag at one time or another? The vinyl lining makes it easy to wipe down and they’re machine washable as well. If you couldn’t tell, I liked Sew the Perfect Gift. Just as I was ready to wrap up this review, I see an email from Martingale, the Publisher, letting me know a new gift oriented book was being released. Sew Gifts, the brand new title, I believe, attests to the success of Sew the Perfect Gift.

42 Asian Fabric 2013

Sew Gifts, too, gives you a total of 25 handmade gifts projects from a variety of top designers. I see some of the same designers we met in the first book. The majority, though, are new, insuring a fresh perspective. I’ll keep this review brief as the deadline for the wrapping up the magazine looms. This newer gift treasure trove has defined four chapters which cover ever popular areas of interest. The first, “Bags, Bags, Bags,” will not disappoint. The title may seem simple but the dynamic projects are not. Eight bags with eight different makers run the gamut from a key wallet to an ipad cover to a hobo bag. Gifts for Special Interests, Chapter Two, offers instruction for six adorable gifts. Both of these gift making books address our need for gifts that will guarantee a nod of approval from both genders, young and old.


I loved all of these and could easily ramble on about each item. A number of them are likely to make my gift list. The third chapter, Kitchen Mates, brings a new gift twist to the table from the Sew the Perfect Gift. Four lovely, practical items including a too cute Little Girl Bake Shop Set for the budding chef will be appreciated by friends and family who love to cook. The last chapter title, Pillow Perfect, speaks volumes. Although only four pillows are included, they are fresh and modern and can take on a variety of looks depending on the fabric designs you choose to work with. I have just returned from International Quilt Market in Houston. Martingale, the publisher of both titles, had a booth displaying

many of the finished items from Sew Gifts. They were even more enticing when viewed in person. Both Sew the Perfect Gift and Sew Gifts include an impressive mix of projects that will make the investment in each title well worth it. I can’t recommend one over the other. There is little overlap in the gifts the designers have created and in a perfect world, you’ll acquire both. Visit www.shopmartingale.com to view photos of all the projects in both books. Both titles are priced at $24.95 for the print and eBook version and $16.99 for the eBook version only. Even at full price, the cost per project will save you money over time. All of the projects have been created by top notch, creative and experienced designers. The books can be purchased at local quilt shops, book stores and directly from the publisher.

2013 Asian Fabric 43


Lotus Collec new pattern coming next month


ction click quilt to download a free pattern


Kitchen Essentials

This striking fabric will bring a fresh look to your kitchen while entertaining in style wearing this chic apron.

Designer: Georgie Gerl

00 Asian Fabric 2013


Table Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Lotus Table Quilt 31” octagon

Featuring fabrics from the Lotus Collection.

Let’s Begin

Before you begin read all#1 instructions. Potholder Chart Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart Lotus Potholder #1 then cut smaller pieces listed under 11” square Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to list General Instructionsmaterial (pages 114–115) Batting/Fleece for Accurate Seam Insulated Allowances and a yard (see Heat Resistant Tip Box page 51) Assembly Line Method to construct Backing 3 yard this quilt. Use a 4 ”-wide seam Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage allowance throughout this project.Cuts ! as (2” x %2” Fabric Aof arrows Press seams in direction @ ^2” x @” LOTU-01 Blue indicated in each diagram. “Fussy Cut” Elements 3-2 yard

Making the Lotus Block

Instructions given for one table quilt—two different layout options are shown.

(depending on fabric selection)

! !” x !)2” FabricFabric B 1. Sew one (2” x %2” A piece @ !” x !)” LOTU-05 Blue to one !” x %2”Accent Fabric @ as BorderB strip !” x &” ! !” x %2” yard shown. Press. Sew 8 this unit between @ !” x @” two !” x !)” Fabric B strips. Press. ! for Make one for potholder Fabric Cand four @2” x &” @ @2” x #2” LOTU-06 Green table quilt. @

material list

Background

Backing ! yard Batting #%” x #%”

%2”

*Yardage will vary depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A LOTU-01 Blue “Fussy Cut” Elements !s-@ yards*

First Cuts !* $* **

Next Cuts

!)2” square (2” x %2” ^2” x @”

3 yard

Fabric C LOTU-06 Green Background

s yard

48 Asian Fabric 2013

(2”

Potholder #2 Chart Lotus Potholder #2 Make 1 ! (potholder) Make 4 (table 11” quilt) square

(see note below)

^

!” x $@”

$ * * $ *

!” x !!2” !” x !)2”

!)”

!”

Fabric A Purchase Tip: To calculate the amount of yardage needed for your project draw on paper the following sizes then cut out paper on traced lines take these templates to fabric store to select the motif areas and determine yardage needed for table quilt. !)2” square (one)---(2” x %2” (four)---^2” x @” (eight) Fabric B LOTU-05 Blue Accent Border

!” @

4 !” yard

!” x !)2” !” x !)” !” x &” !” x %2” !” x @”

! !%2” x $@” ! ** !%2” square $ #2” squares * @2” x #2” **cut !%2” square twice diagonally for side triangles.

2. Sew one ^2” x @”material Fabric list A strip to one !” x @” Fabric BInsulated piece as shown. a yard Batting/Fleece Heat Resistantand Tip Box page 51) Press. Make two for(seepotholder Backing 3 yard eight for table quilt. Fabric Name,@” Placement & Yardage Fabric A LOTU-01 Blue ^2” “Fussy Cut” Center

3-2 yard

Cuts

!

*2” square

(depending on fabric selection)

!”

Make 2 (potholder) Fabric B MakeLOTU-05 8 (table quilt) Blue Border

4 yard

! @ @

@2” x &” @” x !!2” @” x *2”


3. Sew one !” x &” Fabric B strip to one unit from step 2 as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation for potholder and make eight, four of each variation for table quilt. !”

!”

&”

&”

Make 1 @, one of each variation (potholder) Make 8, four of each variation (table quilt)

4. Sew one unit from step 3 to one @2” x #2” Fabric C piece as shown. Press. Make two, one of each variation for potholder and make eight, four of each variation for table quilt. @2”

@2”

#2”

#2”

Making the Table Quilt 1. Refer to General Instructions (page 114) for Simple Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of four #2” Fabric C squares. This will be your sewing line. Place marked squares on one !)2” Fabric A square right sides together as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press.

Fabric C- #2””” squares Fabric A- !)2””” square

2. Note: Refer to quilt layout on pages 47–48 to view both block layout options for table quilt, steps 2 & 3 diagrams show both options. Sew one Lotus Block between two Fabric C triangles as shown. Press. Make two. Option 1

Make 1 @, one of each variation (potholder) Make 8, four of each variation (table quilt)

5. Arrange and sew together one unit from step 1 between two units from step 4, one of each variation, as shown. Press. Sew one !” x !)2” Fabric B strip to unit from this step. Press. Make one block for potholder and four blocks for table quilt.

Make 2

OR Option 2

!)2”

!”

Make 2

Make 1 ! (potholder) Make 4 (table quilt)

3. Sew one block from step 1 between two

2013 Asian Fabric 49


Lotus Blocks as shown. Press. Option 1

Table Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Lotus Table Quilt

Potholder #1 Chart Lotus Potholder #1 11” square

31” octagon

material list

OR

Insulated Batting/Fleece a yard (see Heat Resistant Tip Box page 51) Backing 3 yard

Option 2

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Featuring fabrics from the Lotus Collection.

4. Referring to layout on pages 47–48, Instructions given for arrange and sew row from step 3 between two one table quilt—two different layout rows from step 2. Press. options are shown.

5. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (page 115) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and materialbaste list backing, batting, and quilt top together. Backing Hand ! yard or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Batting #%” x #%” the Quilt and bind as desired. Binding

Fabric A LOTU-01 Blue “Fussy Cut” Elements

3-2 yard

Cuts ! @

(2” x %2” ^2” x @”

(depending on fabric selection)

Fabric B LOTU-05 Blue Accent Border

! @ @ ! @

!” x !)2” !” x !)” !” x &” !” x %2” !” x @”

Fabric C LOTU-06 Green Background

! @ @ @

@2” x &” @2” x #2” !” x !!2” !” x !)2”

8 yard

4 yard

*Yardage will vary depending on motif selection and fabric repeat.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

!* !)2” square Fabric A $* (2” x %2” LOTU-01 Blue “Fussy Cut” Elements ** ^2” x @” (see note below) !s-@ yards* 1. “Fussy Cut” a !^2” square from a motif fabric used Tip: in quilt and one !^2” backing square. Place Fabric A Purchase To calculate the amount of yardage for your project drawoutside on paper the fabric right sidesneeded together matching edges. following sizes then cut out paper on traced lines take these templates to fabric store to 2.areas Using 4”–wideyardage seam, stitch around select the motif and determine needed for table quilt. all edges leaving a $” openingx %2” on one side for Clip !)2” square (one)---(2” (four)---^2” x @”turning. (eight) corners, turn right side out and press. Hand stitch $ !” x !)2” ^ !” x $@” Fabric B opening closed. * !” x !)” LOTU-05 Blue 3. Stitch napkin 4” from outside edge.* !” x &” Accent Border $ !” x %2” 3 yard * !” x @”

Quick Napkin Tip

Fabric C LOTU-06 Green Background

s yard

50 Asian Fabric 2013

! !%2” x $@” ! ** !%2” square $ #2” squares * @2” x #2” **cut !%2” square twice diagonally for side triangles.

Potholder #2 Chart Lotus Potholder #2 11” square

material list Insulated Batting/Fleece a yard (see Heat Resistant Tip Box page 51) Backing 3 yard Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A LOTU-01 Blue “Fussy Cut” Center

3-2 yard

Fabric B LOTU-05 Blue Border

4 yard

Cuts !

*2” square

(depending on fabric selection)

! @ @

@2” x &” @” x !!2” @” x *2”


Making Potholder #1 1. Refer to Locust Table Quilt, steps 1-5 pages 48–49 to make one Lotus Block. Press. 2. Sew block between two !1 ” x !)2” Fabric C strips. Press seams toward Fabric C. Sew this unit between two !” x !!2” Fabric C strips as shown. Press. !”

!”

!!2”

3. Fold one @2” x &” Fabric C strip in half lengthwise and press. Unfold piece and fold again bringing both outside edges to center mark. Press. Fold in half lengthwise and press. Topstitch close to both edges 4. Fold tab in half crosswise as shown and place on front of block a”-2” from outside corner edge aligning raw edges. Baste tab in place and leave in this position.

5. Instruction for finishing will vary depending on which heat resistant material is used. For Quilted Iron Quick Fabric no batting or extra fabric is require so place the block on heat resistant fabric right sides together. For other products place block and backing piece right sides together and place this unit wrong side of backing on batting.

Heat Resistant Tip Box A heat resistant material needs to be used when making potholders there are several different ones on the market follow manufacturers instructions some will need to have additional fabric and batting when using their product. This product works great for potholders, table pads, oven mitts, baby warmers, water heater covers, iron cozy, iron board covers, and other type of projects needing protection from heat. Quilted Iron Quick Fabric is 42”-wide, 100% aluminum on a 100% cotton back, polyester batting and polyester/cotton backing, heat resistant up to 399 degrees, machine wash cool/ air dry flat or use a damp cloth to wipe clean. Iron Quick Fabric is 45”-wide, 100% aluminum with 100% backing, machine wash cool/air dry flat or use a damp cloth to wipe clean, heat resistant up to 399 degrees, pre-washing is recommended. This product has no insulating properties some form of fleece or batting is required when making potholder. Insul-Bright Fabric is 45”-wide, 100% polyester, insulated material, consists of hollow, polyester fibers needle punched through a nonwoven substrate and through a reflected metalized poly film. It is heat resistant not heat proof, at least one layer of cotton batting is recommended with used for potholder, or oven mitt.

6. Using 14”-wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving a 4” opening on one side for turning. Trim batting close to stitching and backing even with quilt edges. Clip corners, turn right side out, and press. Hand stitched opening closed. Press making sure hanging tab is as shown below. Topstitch close to edge and add any additional stitching as desired.

2013 Asian Fabric 51


Making Potholder #2 1. Sew *2” Fabric A square between two 1 @ ” x *2” Fabric B strips. Press seams toward Fabric B. Sew this unit between two @” x !!2” Fabric B strips as shown. Press. @”

Apron Cutting Chart & Material List

Lotus Apron

@”

!!2”

2. R e f e r r i n g t o M a k i n g Potholder #1 (page 51) steps 3-6 to make and add hanging tab and finishing the block.

Featuring fabrics from the Locust Collections *Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Cuts

Fabric A LOTU-03 Blue Apron

!

@&” square (apron)

Fabriac B LOTU-01 Blue Pocket & Accent

! #

*2” x @)2” (pocket) %2” x #2” (medium accent

Fabric C LOTU-05 Blue Trim & Neck Ties

! @ @ @ !

(2” x @)2” (pocket trim) #” x *2” (medium accent tabs) @2” x $2” (small accent tabs) @” x #^2” (neck ties) !2” x @&” (accent trim)

Fabric D LOTU-06 Blue Apron & Waist Tie

! @ ! # @

@&” x #!” (apron backing) %2” x @*2” (waist ties) #2” x @&” (bottom) #2” x %2” (accent tab backing) !2” x $2” (small accent tabs)

1! yard*

tabs)

2-w yard*

s yard

!2 yards

52 Asian Fabric 2013


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Take time to explore the areas to be “Fussy Cut” paying close attention to design elements where motifs appear when apron is worn. Use a 4”-wide seam allowances and press seams in the direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

4. Place pocket unit on top of apron #2” away from each side edge and !2” from bottom edge. Topstitch bottom and side edges leaving pocket top free of stitches. Referring to diagram below, measure and mark a line &” from each pocket’s side edge. Stitch on drawn line to create three pockets.

Making the Apron

1. Referring to curve pattern on pages 55–56, cut armhole curve from top corners of @&” Fabric A square and @&” x #!” Fabric D backing piece. 2. Sew (2” x @)2” Fabric C pocket trim to *2” x @)2” Fabric B pocket as shown. Press.

#2”

#2”

@)2”

&”

(2”

*2”

3. Fold unit from step 2 in half right sides together matching raw edges. Using 14”-wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving a 5” opening on one side for turning. Clip corners, turn, and press. Hand stitched opening closed. The backing fabric is larger than the front creating a 12”-wide trim, stitch in the ditch to hold backing in place. Fold

wrong side of fabric

&”

!2” from bottom edge

5. Layer %2” x #2” Fabric B accent tab and #2” x %2” Fabric D accent tab backing right sides together. Stitch sides and bottom edgeleaving top free of stitching. Turn right side out. Press. Make three motif tabs. Topstitch sides and bottom edges. wrong side of backing

Fold

Neck ties and Fabric C & D accent tabs

Motif tabs Make 3

6. Referring to step 5 diagram fold @” x #^2” Fabric C neck tie crosswise in half right sides together to create a @” x !*4” folded piece. Stitch both long sides leaving short edge free of stitching. Turn neck tie right side out, press and topstitch close to edges. Make two. 7. Repeat step 6 to make two small accent tabs using !2” x $2” Fabric D pieces, two medium accent tabs using #” x *2” Fabric C pieces and two small accent tabs using @2” x $2” Fabric C pieces.

2013 Asian Fabric 53


8. Fold %2” x @*2” Fabric D waist ties in half lengthwise as shown to create a @w” x @*2” folded piece. Draw a $%0 angle on one short end. Stitch angle and long side leaving other short end free of stitching. Cut 4” away from angle stitch line. Turn right side out and press. Topstitch both long sides and angle edge. Make two waist ties.

11. Arrange neck and waist ties on apron unit 2” from edges and baste in place. Bring accent tabs, waist ties, and neck ties in toward center to keep them away from seam allowance area when sewing apron back and apron together. 2” in from outside edge

Fold

Make 2 waist ties

9. Referring to diagram below to arrange tabs as desired on #2” x @&” Fabric D bottom piece as shown. Note: Fabric D small tab is center on Fabric C medium accent tab. Baste tabs in place. @&”

#2”

10. Sew !2” x @&” Fabric C strip between units from step 4 and step 9. Press. @&”

!2”

54 Asian Fabric 2013

Place ties and bottom tabs toward center of apron prior to sewing backing and apron front together.

12. Place apron and backing pieces right sides together. Using a”–wide seam, stitch around all edges leaving a &” opening on one side for turning. Clip corners, turn right side out and press. Hand-stitch opening closed.


Apron Cutting Template Section 1 Trace Apron Section 1 and 2 aligning placement lines to make a whole cutting pattern.

Section 1

Section 2

Trace Line Placement LIne

2013 Asian Fabric 55


*Using template to cut away these areas of @&" Fabric A square to make apron top section piece.

*

*

Apron Cutting Template Section 2 Trace Apron Section 1 and 2 aligning placement lines to make a whole cutting pattern.

Section 1

Section 2

Trace Line Placement LIne

56 Asian Fabric 2013


by Vicki Dar

Celebrate Fabric & Wine As winter approaches, thoughts turn to holiday gatherings and time spent sitting by the warmth of a fireplace. The perfect glass of wine and a stack of stunning fabric fit splendidly into that picture. The wines and fabric we’ve chosen to share can stand alone or, if used collectively, will make for a dynamic showing.. If serving all four wines, work from left to right to offer your guests the optimum tasting experience. We start with the Domaine Ste. Michelle Brut, from Chateau Ste Michelle. Wineries in Washington making what is referred to as Champagne

by Vicki Dar

in Europe, number less than ten but are popular none the less. Savor sparkling wines alone as a celebratory marker or complement a meal or appetizers. What a great way to welcome for your guests. Chateau Ste. Michelle recently did a bottle makeover. The new label is shown on the next page. L’Ecole No. 41, maker of the 2008 Semillion, was the 20th Washington winery. They started in 1983 and have grown to enjoy international distribution and recognition. Washington Semillion is earning a strong following and the acreage dedicated to the grape is likely to increase in years to come.

The L’Ecole Semillion’s crisp, food friendly characteristics mean it will be appreciated by most at your holiday table. Next, we bring you a 100% Syrah powerhouse by Force Majeure. Launching in 2004, Force is a relative newcomer but their wines easily live up to their name. Syrah ranks third in plantings of Washington’s reds but is rising to the top as a sought after varietal. The bulk of Force Majeure’s labels are collaborations. They have cleverly worked with some of Washington’s finest winemakers. Force’s 2010 Collaboration III is the result of winemaker Mark McNeilly’s years of experience. The beautiful color, rich aromatics and smooth finish and excellent value make this an impeccable choice for enjoying now or cellaring to enjoy for years to come. Rick and Debbie Johnson, the creators of Walla Faces, have merged winemaking, an inn and art together. The Walla Faces folks refer to this 100% reisling 2008 Ice Wine as ‘apple pie in a bottle.’ Grapes for the wine are frozen on the vine when they’re harvested and transformed into a velvety, rich work of liquid deliciousness. Our next issue will bring you Port style wines from Washington state.

Click here to download a free guide


Winter Celebration Wine Picks from Washington state

2008 L’Ecole No. 41 Columbia Valley Semillion Chateau Ste. Michelle Michelle Brut avg price $11

Both Domaine Ste Michelle Sparkling Brut Columbia Valley and Michelle Brut have delicate flavors of apples and citrus and lively acidity, They are the perfect accompaniment for a wide array of foods. Perfect for greeting guests and celebrations.

avg price $14

Remarkably brilliant with vibrant fruit and balanced acidity, this wine shows fragrant citrus blossom and honey aromas, with pretty layers of lemon bar, apricot and keylime expanding on a balanced finish.

Recommended Spicy fries, artichoke or cheese dips, calamari and salty snacks

Shellfish, crab cakes, spicy chicken, asparagus, roasted vegetables, young fresh cheese

Recommended Kona Bay fabric and pairing notes

|

all designs

Passion PASS-07 Red

Kona Bay Sateens 6362-A

Just the way sparkling wines bring together a celebration and carry it to the end, so does this Passion design. Showcasing the elements from the entire collection, it can be the starting point to effortlessly pull together a variety of projects.

The rich sheen and silky feel are an added bonus to the traditional Japanese design that would feel at home in a quilt or on kimono being worn in Kyoto a century ago. The delicate designs filling the larger motifs add balance and interest.


|

Wine tasting notes provided by the wineries

Force Majeure Collaboration Series III

avg price $58

Collaboration Series III is 100% Syrah that exhibits the abilities of the winemakers to deftly capture Washington State’s distinctive fruit intensity and richness. The goal is to create a pure expression of Red Mountain Syrah where the fruit is unleashed and the “powerful elegance” of Ciel du Cheval takes center stage.

2008 Walla Faces Reisling Ice Wine avg price $25

This beautiful ice wine features a bright dried apricot and pear nose. Silky texture with mouth filling sweetness that is not cloying but is incredibly rich ending with clean acidity and a lingering finish that keeps you wanting more. A great stand-alone dessert wine that will also pair well with stone fruit oriented desserts. Serve well chilled.

d Food Pairings Beef, lamb, roasted turkey, grilled salmon and strongly flavored cheeses

Cherry pie, peach cobbler, plum compote, apricot upside down cake

are part of larger collections and are available at your local quilt shops

Shadowland II SHAD-06 Fire

Mikoto MIKO-03 Coral

The subtle intensity of the dynamic layers will add the brillance of an autumn centerpiece to your table or next fabric creation. You can almost feel the sun breaking through the clouds as it hightlights fall flowers in the garden.

As elegant as softly colored royal icing that has been intricately piped onto a cake blanketed with a rich buttercream frosting, Mikoto will provide a sophisticated and superb accent in any environment from modern to traditional.


click quilt for FREE pattern download


Tomorrow Morning available now


Mizutaki

Chicken & Vegetable Hot Pot, A Fukuoka Speciality As winter gets closer, we begin to think about warm comfort food. In Japan, thoughts often turn to nabemono. Often simply referred to as nabe, the different dishes might most closely resemble American stews or hearty soups. Nabe (nah-bay) means cooking pot and mono means things. There are two main categories of nabe in Japan. Mizutaki falls into the first where the cooked elements are eaten with a dipping sauce to enhance the flavor. Mizutaki is a Fukuoka, our featured Asian Fabric travel destination, specialty that is said to have been created by Heisaburo Hayashida after traveling to Hong Kong and living with an English family when he was only 15. When he moved to Fukuoka in 1905, he brought his creation, a blend of English broth and the Chinese method of simmering vegetables, with him. Assorted variations of Mizutaki spread throughout Japan and are still enjoyed today. We have provided a basic recipe but, later, you may want to experiment by adding other favorite vegetables, chicken meatballs or seafood instead of chicken. In Japan, hot pot meals are typically kept warm (if not prepared all together) on a burner at the table. The recipe can be prepared on the stove and simply served at the table but a table burner will add to the fun and will surely be remembered by your guests, young and old.

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Download this fun Fukuoka restaurant guide if you plan a trip or just for fun and to learn more about Fukuoka food specialties. 2013 Asian Fabric 63


Mizutaki

(Makes approximately six servings)

ingredients

preparation Add 3-4 cups of dashi stock to the pot along with chicken. Bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer until chicken is cooked. Skim off any foam on the surface. Add other ingredients and simmer until vegetables have softened. Do not overcook. Put ponzu sauce in bowls for dipping. Provide a bowl for each person.

8 cups dashi stock (page 65) 1 tsp salt 4 boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into pieces 1 block of tofu, cut into blocks 2 leeks, white and light green parts, sliced on an angle into 2� pieces 1 napa cabbage, cut into 2� pieces 4 ounces mushrooms, sliced (shitake preferred) 1 bunch of enoki mushrooms 1 medium carrot, peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces, and thinly sliced 2 heads baby bok choy, cut into bite-size pieces Ponzu sauce for dipping (page 65)

Remove cooked ingredients from pot and enjoy with the dipping sauce. Additional warmed Dashi may be added as needed. NOTE: If you are preparing the hot pot at the table, you can add ingredients other than the chicken as you enjoy your meal to avoid overcooking vegetables. Another Japanese custom you might want to explore is adding cooked rice to the hot pot after all the ingredients have been eaten. The warmed, richly flavored rice is then served as the last course of the meal.

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Hot Pot History

Dashi ingredients 4 cups water 1 cup dried bonito flakes

preparation Boil water. Add bonito flakes and let simmer for 3 minutes. Strain and use as needed in recipe.

Ponzu Sauce ingredients 2 Tbsp rice vinegar 2 Tbsp mirin ⅓ soy sauce 2 Tbsp light brown sugar 1 Tbsp bonito flakes 1 pinch red pepper (optional) ½ cup lime juice

preparation Mix rice vinegar, mirin, soy sauce, bonito flakes and brown sugar well. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove pan and let cool. Strain, discarding bonito flakes. Add lime juice and red pepper. Refrigerate in a glass jar until needed. Will keep in refrigerator up to 3 days.

Nabemono meals have been a long time favorite in Japan. Hot pot style cooking, though, is thought to have originated with Mongol if not before. Although they established the largest land empire in world history, the Mongols were nomads. It was necessary for them to move several times a year in a constant effort to keep themselves and their animal herds fed. The Mongol warriors, too, were on the move. To travel unimpeded with cooking supplies, a pot was hung over the campfire. Various items went into the pot and dinner was served. During the Kofun period in Japan, between the third and sixth century, homes began to incorporate an irori. An irori is a traditional style Japanese hearth that served the dual purpose of heating the room and providing the heat for cooking. Like the earliest cooking pits in Japan, the irori was filled with sand to contain the fire. For cooking, a hook and pulley system was hung from the ceiling. A pot was placed on the hook and could be easily raised and lowered. As time went on, similar set ups but on a smaller scale were incorporated into a table, allowing the family to sit about the table, cook and share a meal. Today, most families use a portable butane burner like the one pictured above for hot pot style cooking.

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In stores now

nd Shadowla Col lect ion Q u i lt s

n Yenter gned by Jaso Fabric desi ie Gerl rg eo G by ired Quilts insp

Be sure to pick up the original Shadowland Collection Quilts book—remade quilts with new cutting instructions will be made available for download. Must purchase book for insurcitions.


Cats & Dots

available now


Splendor Bed Runner Designer: Georgie Gerl

Add a spark of color to any simple bed setting with this easy to make bed runner.


Splendor Bed Runner Cutting Chart & Material List Splendor Bed Runner *^” x @%”

Quilt (below) featuring fabrics from the Shadowland II collections.

This quilt version is shown on page 69, fabrics used in this quilt are from the Shadowland II, Blossom, Flyaway, and Color Movement fabric collections.

material list Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A SHAD-10 Cream Background

@ yards

First Cuts ! ! &

!) @” x $@”

#

Fabric B SHAD-06 Fire Block Featured Fabric

(2” x $@” ^2” x $@” #2” x $@”

!

!2” x $@”

Next Cuts @ $ $ %^ $ * * @ * *

!)2” x $@” $

(2” x !)2” ^2” x &2” #2” x !)2” #2” squares @” x @^” @” x !@” @” x !)2” @” x ^2” !2” x &2” !2” x $2” !)2” x ^2”

2 yard

Fabric C SHAD-07 Spring Sashing

6 yard

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Read Cutting Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips. Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric E SHAD-06 Forest Sashing & Binding

^ @w” x $@” @ !2” x $@”

$

Fabric F SHAD-08 Gold Block Featued Fabric

! !)2” x $@”

$ !)2” x ^2”

!2” x !^2”

w yard

2 yard

$ !2” x $@”

3 yard

Fabric D SHAD-07 Yellow Sashing Accent

Backing @2 yards Batting @(” x ()”

@ !2” x $@”

@ @ ! @

!2” x @^” !2” x @$2” !2” x (2” !2” x @”

Fabric G SHAD-08 Marmalode Block Featured Fabric

@ ^2” x !)2”

$

!2” x !)2”

Fabric H SHAD-07 Rust Block Featured Fabric

! !)2” x $@”

a yard

2 yard

$ !)2” x ^2”


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 114–115) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

2. Repeat step 1 to make two of Unit 2 using #2” Fabric A squares and ^2” x !)2” Fabric G pieces, make four of Unit 3 using #2” Fabric A squares and !)2” x ^2” Fabric H pieces, make four of Unit 4 using #2” Fabric A squares and !)2” x ^2” Fabric B pieces. Unit 2

Fabric A- #2” squares Fabric G- ^2””” x !)2””” Make @

Making the Quilt

1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 114–115) for Simple Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of four #2” Fabric A squares this will be your sewing line. Place two marked squares on one !)2” x ^2” Fabric F piece as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Sew remaining marked squares to piece as shown. Trim and press. Make four and label Unit 1. Unit 1

Unit 3

Fabric A- #2” squares Fabric H- !)2””” x ^2””” Make $

Unit 4

Fabric A- #2” squares Fabric B- !)2””” x ^2””” Make $

3. Arrange and sew together one #2” x !)2” Fabric A strip, one Unit 1, one @” x !)2” Fabric A piece, one Unit 2, and one (2” x !)2” Fabric A piece as shown. Press. Make two one of each variation. #2”

@”

(2”

!)2” Fabric A- #2” squares Fabric F- !)2””” x ^2””” Make $ (2”

@”

#2”

!)2”

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4. Arrange and sew together one #2” x !)2” Fabric A strip, two of Unit 3, three @” x !)2” Fabric A strips, and one Unit 1 as shown. Press. Make two one of each variation.

@”

#2”

@”

@”

!)2”

@”

@”

@”

#2”

!)2”

5. Arrange two @” x @^” Fabric A strips, one unit from step 3, one !2” x @^” Fabric C strip and one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. Make two and label Block 1 and Block 2. Block measures @^” x @$2”. Block 1 @^”

@”

6. Sew one !2” x !^2” Fabric E strip between two !2” x $2” Fabric A strips. Press. Make four. Sew one !2” x @$2” Fabric C strip between two units from this step. Press. Make two. $2”

!^2”

$2”

!2”

Make 4

@$2” !2”

!2” Make 2

@” Block measures @^” x @$2” Block 2 @^” @”

7. Sew one !2” x !)2” Fabric D strip between two !2” x &2” Fabric A strips. Press. Make four. Sew one unit from step 6 between two units from this step. Press. Make two and label Block 3. Block measures %2” x @$2”. &2”

!)2”

&2”

!2”

Make 4 Block 3 !2”

Make 2 Block measures %2” x @$2” @”

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Block measures @^” x @$2”


8. Sew one !2” x @” Fabric C piece between two @” x !@” Fabric A strips. Press. Make two. !@”

!2”

!@”

@”

11. Sew one !2” x (2” Fabric C strip between two units from step 10 as shown. Press. (2”

Make 2

9. Sew one Unit 4 between two ^2” x &2” Fabric A pieces as shown. Press. Make two. Sew one unit from step 8 to one unit from this step as shown. Press. Make two.

!2”

^2”

&2”

12. Sew one unit from step 11 between two units from step 9 as shown. Press and label Block 4. Block measures @$2” square. Block 4

&2”

Make 2

Make 2

10. Sew one @” x ^2” Fabric A piece to one Unit 4 as shown. Press. Make two. Sew this unit between two @” x !@” Fabric A pieces. Press. Make two. ^2”

@”

@”

@”

!@”

Block measures @$2” square

Finishing the Quilt Make 2

Make 2

1. Referring to layout on page 69–70, arrange and sew together Block 1, two of Block 3, one Block 4, and one Block 2 as shown. Press.

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (page 115) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

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Exotic Garden


free pattern download available soon


William available now


Holiday Ikebana Quilt Designer: Melanie Formway Chang Create a floral arrangement by “Fussy Cutting� floral motif, adding fabric paint, beading and free motion quilting to create a wall piece for the holidays.


Holiday Ikebana Cutting Chart & Material List

Holiday Ikebana Quilt

Making the Appliqué Pattern Permission is granted by Kona Bay Fabrics and Asian Fabric magazine to copy pages 82–84. Trace pattern pages aligning lines to make a whole pattern and enlarge this pattern by 200%.

Note: Template is for placement of appliqués on background fabric piece and elements from this template can be used for hand appliqué. For quick-fused method appliqué individual pieces will need to have a reversed image trace on paper side of fusible web.

Preparing the Appliqué

material list Backing w yard Batting @&” x #*” Lightweight Fusible Web & Stablizer q yards of each Threads Multi-green, metallic & matching Wooden Red Beads Fabric Paint Jacquard Red, green, yellow, metallic gold, teal & black Loew Cornell (fabric brush) series 223 shader size 4 2” Stencil Brush Water Container Aluminum Foil Paper Towels Plastic Knife or Pallete Knife Brown Fabric Marker Yardage

Cuts

Background

!

@$” x #)”

Bottom

!

%” x @$”

Appliqué Fabrics Ceramic Pot Exterior Ceramic Pot Interior Plant Stand Ornaments Pine Branches

! ! ! ! !

#” x 1!%” &” x !%” $” x @)” #” x !%” ^” x (”

2 yard 4 yard

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1. Find flowers that would make a nice focal point in the design. Melanie used two peonies measuring approximately 7” and 5” across. The cherry blossoms and leaves were attached adding some variety to the floral arrangement. The ones used in this quilt were dusty rose before paint was added. Following manufacturer’s instructions, apply fusible to back of floral fabric. Fussy cut flower design after painting. 2. Trace a reverse image of ornaments, plant stand, ceramic pot interior, ceramic pot exterior, and pine branches patterns (pages 82–84) on paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line. With fusible web paper-side up, fuse to wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions. Cut appliqué on traced lines after painting is complete.


Painting the Quilt 1. Using a small piece of aluminum foil and palette knife, darken red paint by adding small amount of green to achieve rust. Lighten red by adding yellow to make redorange.

4. Add red-orange to cherry blossoms. Using red-orange and red, add reflected colors to ornaments and leaves. Ornaments and flowers are now ready to cut and fuse to background.

2. Apply a small amount of paint to the brush and drag it lightly on a paper towel (both sides). Using red-orange cover most of each petal allowing white from original flower to remain.

Making the Quilt 1. Using 4”-wide seam, sew 24” x 30” background fabric piece to 5” x 24” bottom fabric piece. Press. 3. Add rust to shadowed areas of petals.

2. Referring to photo on page 77, place plant stand (1) in center on background with top approximately %2” from bottom of quilt. Fuse following manufacturer instructions.

3. Center top line of ceramic pot interior (2) approximately &2” from bottom of quilt. Do not fuse until remaining pieces are placed this will make it possible to re-position pieces depending on the floral fabric you chosen.

4. Referring to photo on page 77, arrange and fuse pine branches (3 & 4), partial ornament (5), and outside ceramic pot (6) on quilt top. 5. Referring to photo on page 77, arrange and fuse pine branches (7,8,9 & 10), flowers over pine branches and edge of bowl (11 & 12) on quilt top. 6. Arrange and fuse remaining four ornaments (13,14,15,16) to quilt.

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7. Add gold and rust paint to black background fabric piece.

8. Using teal and black mixed to match leaves lightly shadow white background around design and up the left side with the stencil brush. (Make sure to wipe all excess paint off onto paper towels.)

9. Use free motion embroidery as part of the quilting or place stabilizer behind area to add decorative stitching. Using multigreen thread, stitch pine needles in fan shape creating some needles long and others short.

Beads added after quilting

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Finishing the Quilt 1. Layer and center quilt top and backing right sides together on batting piece (wrong side of backing on batting). Using 14”-wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving a 5” opening on one side for turning. Trim batting close to stitching and backing even with quilt edges. Clip corners, turn, and press. Hand stitched opening closed. 2. Referring to Melanie’s Quilting Tip, hand or machine quilt as desired.

3. Refer to photo to stitch red berry beads to quilt.


Melanie’s Quilting Tips Quilt stitching around fused pieces, background area as desired, stitch gold accent quilting to bottom piece. Using gold thread, create ornament hangers.

Using brown thread, stitch bare branches, partially filling in wider areas. Complete filling with brown fabric marker.

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Holiday Ikebana Quilt

Permission is granted by Kona Bay Fabrics and Asian Fabric magazine to copy pages 82-84 and enlarge pattern pages by 200%, trace full-size pattern pages aligning lines to make a whole template

Note: Template is for placement of appliquĂŠs on background fabric piece if wishing to use an element from this drawing for quick-fused appliquĂŠ the element must be a reversed image.

#11

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Holiday Ikebana Quilt

#11

#7 #8

#9

Leaves

#13 #4 #12

#3

#2

#5 Leaves

#6 #1

#15

2012 ASIAN FABRIC 83


Holiday Ikebana Quilt

#11 Leaves

Leaves

#1

0

#14 #12

small cluster of flowers

Leaf

#6 #1

#15

#16

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contributors

melanie formway chang Melanie’s artistic side surfaced early, with fabric playing an important role. She credits her mother, and later a BA in Home Economics, with fostering an interest in fabrics. A passion for painting has also been actively developing for thirty-plus years. She has worked in watercolors, oils and acrylics. Now, she has added fabric paint. Her skillful use of paints prompted an invitation to the juried Watercolor Society of Oregon and she has won her numerous awards. In the 1990’s, Melanie started quilting and discovered a way to merge her two loves. Since, painting on fabric has become her focus. Today, she teaches classes to eager students in a variety of venues. Long a pattern designer for Story Quilts, the occasional contribution has blossomed into a busy schedule of new patterns. Each year, Melanie looks forward to joining Story Quilts at International Quilt Market in Houston. Melanie and her husband recently migrated from Oregon to Oceanside, California to welcome their first grandchild. She continues to speak to guilds, teach fabric painting and design for Story Quilts. Life is full. When we visited, Melanie shared some very important words of wisdom, “Create it, give it away and share the joy. There is no point in putting your artwork in the closet. Everyone needs beauty in their lives.” Visit www.storyquilts.com to see more of Melanie’s work.

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in stores quilt to dow


s this now ~ click the wnload a free pattern


F

ukuoka is a modern, bustling city. It’s been named to several “best places to live” lists, and its reputation among tourists is growing. Although it has been slow to gain a label as a tourist hotspot, it is not for lack of a multitude of activities guaranteed to accommodate everyone in your travel party. Fukuoka is actually a blend of two ancient communities. One was Fukuoka, the home of the feudal lord and, hence, a castle and the local samurai. The other was Hakata, one of Japan’s oldest cities with a vibrant port where industry and commerce reigned. The two communities were brought together in 1876. The partnership has been a successful one, but it’s definitely easy to see that although the samurai ensured that the new city would bear the name of their hometown, the name Hakata is still very much a part of the local vocabulary. In fact, many of the places around Fukuoka and the handicrafts produced there are still identified by the Hakata name. The Fukuoka region has long been known for excelling at several traditional crafts. Among the most famous of these is the Hakata dolls, also called Hakata ningyō. Made of earthenware clay, it is thought that the dolls were first crafted in Hakata during the 17th century, although the origins of the dolls may stretch back much further than

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that. To make the dolls, artisans first design a suitable mold which is filled with clay and then fired in a kiln. The resulting figure is then painted in brightly colored clay paints. The dolls represent the human figure, and are made using clay found in the local area. Tradition has it that the dolls became a local specialty after a tiler working on a castle for feudal lord Kuroda Nagamasa presented his employer with just such a doll. At the time, and for centuries thereafter, the figures were almost always inspired by well known characters from Noh and Kabuki theater plays. However, in recent years there has been a trend toward crafting Hakata dolls that depict modern lifestyles. Hakata dolls are still made throughout Fukuoka, with some shops allowing visitors to observe the manufacture of new dolls. Buying at least one of these dolls is considered a must do for travelers to the area, and their beauty and relatively inexpensive price make them a remarkable souvenir. Another of Fukuoka’s better known handicrafts is its Hakata-ori cloth. Traditionally used as obi sashes for beautiful kimonos, the cloth is so popular that it is now used for many other everyday items. This style of weaving first came to Fukuoka in the 13th century. Merchants visiting mainland China are


Fukuoka, Japan Exquisite handicrafts and casual dining make Fukuoka magical


said to have brought the weaving techniques home with them, and the process has been refined and improved over the intervening centuries. The cloth was so superior that it quickly became famous throughout the nation, with many of Japan’s leading citizens wishing to own the sumptuous textile. Hakata-ori cloth features a blend of plain weave called hira-ori that features highly intricate designs. Also incorporated into the fabric is a ribbed or twilled portion known as mon-ori. Although the cloth is still a popular choice for a kimono sash, it is also becoming a mainstay for neckties, handbags, stuffed toys and as furniture upholstery. Items made using Hakata-ori cloth are widely available throughout the region, and many artisans make it possible to observe the weaving process firsthand. Like many cities in Japan, Fukuoka is associated with several local specialty dishes. One of these is mentaiko, a side dish of marinated roe from cod and pollock. Usually a spicy treat, mentaiko originated in Korea before being brought to Japan in the aftermath of World War II. Chefs in Fukuoka made it a specialty, perfecting the technique

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of marinating the roe in sake, chili and various citrus juices. Mentaiko may be eaten on its own, but is often used as a filling for onigiri, a tasty rice ball that is frequently served wrapped in seaweed. In a nation known for the quality of its ramen, Hakata ramen is considered to be among the top three of this style of dish in the nation. The base is a pork bone soup that is cooked slowly to allow the richness of the flavors to permeate the liquid. The noodles themselves are straight, white and very thin. They are cooked quickly, tradition stating that the recipe was designed to accommodate the whims of impatient Hakata children. Choices for ramen topping vary widely with mushrooms, green onions and pickled red ginger being among the most popular. Though it may initially sound unappetizing, Fukuoka’s other famous dish is motsunabe. The main ingredient in this hearty stew is typically the intestines of beef cows, although pig offal is sometimes used instead. This flavorful dish includes cabbage and garlic in addition to a soy sauce soup and champon noodles. Mitzutaki, a healthy yet hearty chicken


and vegetable hot pot, originated in Fukuoka but is now popular throughout the country. Mitzutaki is the perfect table centerpiece and meal for a small gathering of family or friends. See our recipe on page 64. Perhaps the best part of enjoying traditional Fukuoka fare is doing so at one of the many streetside yatais. These casual food carts are found in the Nakasu and Tenjin districts of the city, and are widely patronized by locals and tourists. Most yatai serve sake and beer in addition to tasty dishes like ramen and mentaiko. They usually open for business in the late afternoon and remain in operation until the small hours, making them popular with young people out enjoying the Fukuoka nightlife. However, these food carts are popular with people of all ages, and visiting them is considered an indispensable part of the Fukuoka experience. If shopping for more than just food is on the intinerary, Fukuoka offers the likes of Canal City Hakata. This large shopping and entertainment complex refers to itself as a

“city within the city�. The depiction is accurate with somewhere in the neighborhood of 250 shops, restaurants and entertainment options. There are even two hotels that sit on the canal that runs through the mega-mall. The JR Hakata City complex on the other side of town offers a comparable number of merchants without the canal. If you prefer leisurely browsing and boutiques instead, seek out the side street shops in the Imaizumi neighborhood. Like the locals, you’ll discover up and coming designers and handcrafted items created continued on page 94 2013 Asian Fabric 91


The Cats of Fukuoka

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Kona Bay Fabrics is well known for it’s love of cats as is our featured travel destination—Fukuoka. It is often referred to as one of two cat heavens. Fukuoka fisherman have taken the love of cats to an extraordinary level. Japanese photographer Fubirai has encouraged us to share his warmhearted pictorial of the Fukuoka shore felines. Many of the cats roam the port region wild. Their independence, as you will see, does little to detour the care and attention they receive from local fisherman and other inhabitants, though. That, combined with the regions temperate climate makes it easy to see how Fukuoka came to be called cat heaven. Cats have long played an important role in Japanese culture and the fondness seems to build with each passing decade. Traveling throughout Japan, cat statues, images and motifs are found everywhere. Farmers for centuries have relied on their furry cat friends to control the rodent population. In Japan, this was particularly important when it came to rice and silk. In addition, Japanese legend has it that a cat saved its master by waving his paw as if motioning for him to move towards him. As the man did, lighting struck where he had been standing. Ever since, the maneki neko (cat) statue, with raised paw, is thought to bring good fortune and luck to its owner. In Fukuoka, the tides have turned. Here, the raised arms of the working fisherman seem to be the ones bringing luck and good fortune to the local cat population. To view more delightful and artistic photos by Fubirai, visit the website here: http://d.hatena.ne.jp/fubirai/. Scroll down on the right for a rough translation to English.


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with artistic flair. Even if you’re not a shopper, you’re likely to walk away inspired. Fukuoka is a rich destination for travelers with its modern transportation systems and many fascinating attractions. Chief among the city’s delights is the Hakata Machiya Folk Museum. This is the single best place to discover the regional history of Fukuoka. Exhibits include superior examples of traditional architecture and a workshop where the fashioning of traditional crafts can be observed. The museum is stretched out over three buildings. An interesting mix of displays that include dioramas depicting local festivals and ordinary household items from a bygone era make this a worthwhile stop. Another impressive attraction is the Fukuoka Asian Art Museum. This state-ofthe-art facility features an imposing edifice and one of the most spectacular collections of contemporary Asian art found anywhere. Works on display here were created in a host of different countries, resulting in a gratifying mix of mediums and themes. Fukuoka also has its share of natural beauty. Ohori Park offers plenty of scenic vistas with a central pond and an elaborate Japanese style garden. The pond is particularly interesting, as it was once part of the moat for nearby Fukuoka Castle. Only ruins of the castle remain today, but the disused towers and ramparts still make for a romantic vision that no visitor should pass up. A trip to Ohori Park also makes it easy to view the Gokoku Shrine and its enormous torii gate.

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The shrine itself is a golden structure that sparkles warmly on sunny days. Tourists flock to Fukuoka to attend the many colorful festivals that happen throughout the year. The city is mainly recognized for two memorable annual events: Dontaku and Yamakasa. Dontaku, otherwise known as Golden Week, is probably the city’s largest festival, and it’s an occasion marked by many celebrations. About two million tourists flood the city at the end of April and the beginning of May with happenings like a theater festival, special museum exhibits and parades. Visitors also attend handicraft workshops and come to see Fukuoka’s flowers in full bloom. Yamakasa happens every July, and has been celebrated since 1241. The event memorializes the occasion on which Hakata was saved from a plague by a priest who was carried around the city on a shrine. Seven teams made up of male residents from each of Fukuoka’s neighborhoods now participate in a similar feat. Each team races against the clock while carrying floats weighing thousands of pounds. The racers are garbed in traditional loin cloths and are cheered on by countless spectators who are not deterred by the middle of the night timing of the event. The festival lasts for two weeks, allowing plenty of time for various events and numerous practice runs. Whether it’s festival season or not, Fukuoka is a fascinating place as it is filled with rich culture and interesting history.


Mountain Flight Quilt

Designer: Helene Knott This elegant mountain landscape steps down out of the frame to invite you into the scene. Cranes wing across the forests toward distant mountains and the mysterious vistas that lie beyond.

2013 Asian Fabric 00


Let’s Begin

Mt. Flight Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List

Mountain Flight Quilt

material list Binding 3 yard Backing d yard Batting 28” x 20” Other Appliqué Supplies (depending on technique used lightweight fusible web, stabilizer, freezer paper an/or plastic template) Yardage Sky

Cuts !

!$2” x @!2” or @!2” x !$2”

2 yard horizontal pattern or q yard verticle pattern

Fabric B Lattice & Border

! @

@2” x @$2” @” x !$2” *may vary depending on bias method used

Appliqué Fabrics Distance Mountain Mountain Hill Background Forest Mount Fuji Mist Foreground Forest Snow Cap Cranes

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

%” x $” (#1) *” x %” (#2) !)” x %” (#3) *” x %2” (#4) @)” x !!” (#5) @%” x (” (#6) @^2” x !)” (#7) !)” x &” (#8) Scrap

3 yard*

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Symbols of luck, longevity and fidelity, cranes are considered National Treasures in Japan holding a place of honor along with that of Mt. Fuji, Japan’s beloved iconic mountain. Before you begin read all instructions and sew using a perfect 4”-wide seam. Appliqué templates include placement lines indicating where appliqué pieces will overlap and alignment lines to help join larger templates together to make one pattern piece. Refer to General Instructions on page 114–115 to select your prefer method of appliquéing. Instructions are given for fusible web machine appliqué, patterns have been reversed for this method if using hand appliqué or freezer paper method reverse the templates provided in this issue. An overlay master pattern has been provided of the quilt top before layering and quilting this will be used as a guide when laying out pieces. Note: Some appliqué pieces are added before the borders are sewn while others are added after the borders have been sewn to the unit.

Assembling the Quilt

The instructions given are for Quick Fused Appliqué Method for other methods refer to General Instructions (pages 114–115) for Appliqué Technique and Helen’s Freezer Paper method tip box (page 98). Use an appliqué pressing sheet with the overlay template under the transparent sheet to aid with appliqué placement and fusing trellis unit together. Note: Appliqué pieces 1-5 will be added to the sky fabric before borders are sewn and pieces 6, 7 and 8 will be added afterwards.

1. Mountain Flight Quilt Overlap Templates appear on two pages (100–101) join design matching alignment lines to make a whole pattern piece. Enlarge pattern by 200% to make a full-size layout guide.


2. Instructions are given for quick-fused appliqué method if using other methods deletes steps 2 and 3. Trace all landscape patterns on pages 103–110 on paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line. Note: On larger appliqué fusible web pieces the center of the web can be removed if desired just cut 4“–a“ to the inside of traced line to remove center section.

3. With fusible web paper-side up, fuse to wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions. Cut on traced line.

4. Arrange appliqué pieces 1-5 on !$2” x @!2” sky fabric piece starting with Distance Mountain #1 then add Mountain #2 making sure pieces overlap as shown on appliqué template piece. Continue adding, overlapping, and fusing Hill #3, Background Forest #4 and Mount Fuji #5.

5. Before adding the borders the lattice units need to be made and attached to sky fabric piece. Use bias tape maker to make 4“-wide tape following manufacturer’s instructions. Note: 2“-wide cut width is the measurement required by Clover brand bias tape maker, this measurement may vary with other brands. Since the lattice is straight and not curved strips pieces can be cut on the straight of grain. Add thin strips of fusible web to back of strips.

6. Cut from folded 4“-wide lattice strips the following lengths (letters indicate placement, see page 102); four @2“ lengths for A and F pieces, two $4“ lengths for B pieces, two $w“ for C pieces, two #w“ for D pieces, and two @w“ for E pieces. These lengths are generous but will allow for turning under one raw end and extending the other end in to the seam allowance.

7. Place full-size Corner Lattice Template (page 102) under appliqué pressing sheet. Turn a scant 4“ under on one end of each lattice piece and fuse to secure. Fuse strips to pressing sheet aligning the turn under end as noted on pattern and allowing the excess ends extend beyond the seam allowance, strips can be weaved or just overlap. Trim the ends to match the outside edge shown on lattice template. 8. Fuse lattice pieces together following manufacturers instructions, once the unit has cool it can be lifted off of the pressing sheet. Referring to layout, place lattice units on each top corner of sky fabric and fuse in place. Using a straight stitch, edgestitch lattice edges now or stitch in place during the quilting process.

9. Sew one @2“ x 1!$2“ Border strip to right side of panel. Press seam toward border.

10. Apply appliqué Mist #6 to base of mountain aligning the right edge with raw edge of border, fuse or stitch in place. Sew @2“ x !$2“ Border strip to left side of panel. Press seam toward border. 11. Apply appliqué Foreground Forest #7 to bottom of panel, press or stitch in place.

12. Sew @2“ x @$2“ Border to top of quilt. Press seam toward border. Apply Snow Cap #8 appliqué piece to mountain it should overlap the border about w“.

2013 Asian Fabric 97


Helene’s Freezer Paper Appliqué Tips 1. Place freezer paper matte side up over the pattern. Note: appliqué templates need to be reverse image of pattern provided. Trace each appliqué piece onto matte side of freezer paper. Trace each piece as a separate template and cut each template out exactly on the traced line – do not add any turning allowance. 2. Iron the freezer paper template to the right side of the appliqué fabric and cut the fabric out roughly about 1” larger than the perimeter of the template as shown.

4. Using a free-motion or darning foot, slightly shorter stitch length and matching thread, sew the appliqué using a straight stitch along edge of shape next to the edge of the freezer paper and not through the paper, as shown.

Stitch close to paper

Iron freezer paper appliqué template on right side of fabric.

5. After stitching carefully trim excess fabric away close to the stitching (about 8”) using a pair of fine bladed embroidery scissors as shown. Remove the freezer paper template (paper can be reused for another project if desired)

3. Pin fabric and template onto background panel in appropriate place, use a transparent overly if desired. Pin through the edge of the fabric, not through freezer paper leaving paper in place to serve as a stitching guide as shown.

Trim close to stitching

Pin fabric to quilt being careful not to pin paper.

98 Asian Fabric 2013

6. Raw edges can be left to fray if texture is desired or cover raw edges with a satin or blanket stitch. Edge stitching can be added to unfinished top if stabilizer is used, or wait until the top is layered and ready to quilt substituting the edge stitching in place of quilting in the ditch (no stabilizer necessary for this method).


Raw-Edge Machine Appliqué Cranes Finish scenic panel with a few graceful cranes fussy cut from a suitable print. Choose cranes in an appropriate size and place then in a suitable part of the landscape where they will be in correct scale with the rest of the scene. Cranes can be backed with fusible web and fused to the panel or follow Helen’s instructions for a raw-edged machine appliqué technique that is fast and easy. The exposed edges can later be covered with fine satin stitches if desired or left raw and allowed to fray. This ‘frayed’ look is particularly nice for foliage, animal fur, waterfalls or frothy waves. If decorative stitching is used, it can be stitched before layering and quilting in which case a stabilizer is recommended, a stabilizer is not needed if adding stitching during the quilting process. 1. Cut out birds leaving a very generous margin of fabric beyond the edge of the bird. This will

Helene’s Quilting Tips All appliqué pieces need to be stitched in place if fused stitch close to the raw edge if using other appliqué methods stitch in the ditch. Larger appliqués require additional quilting such as sky, foreground trees and mountain. Helene recommends streaky horizontal switchback stitching for sky area, follow mountain slope contours in a similar fashion, and puffy humped stippling for the foreground trees. Keep quilting designs simple and natural looking, especially for heavily patterned prints. The border may need additional quilting depending on the density of quilting in center panel. Lay the quilt out flat after quilting if the borders ruffle or distort excessively add additional quilting to border to conform it to the rest of the quilt. Blocking the quilt can resolved minor distortions to the quilt. To block the quilt, spray it lightly with water and on an ironing board, gently steam press from the wrong side straightening the edges as you iron until the quilt lies nice and flat. Helene recommends blocking once before applying binding and again after binding is sewn to quilt. Add a hanging sleeve if desired.

provide a good place to pin securely and also stabilize the fabric so it does not shift or scrunch while you are stitching around the motif. Place crane on quilt top and pin. 2. Choose a matching thread and stitch around the perimeter of the bird just inside the printed outline, preferably with a free motion foot and a fine straight stitch as shown in diagram below.

Stitch inside of design line of motif fabric.

3. Cut away the fabric surrounding the cranes close to the stitching, being careful not to cut the quilt top (about 8“ away from the stitching as shown). If properly stitched inside of the design lines of the print will allow the crane to be cut on the printed outline removing the excess crane fabric.

Trim close to stitching

Finishing the Quilt Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 115) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Refer to Helene’s Quilting Tip for quilting suggestions. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired. 2013 Asian Fabric 99


Mountain Flight Quilt Overlay Template

Snow Cap #8

Distance Mountain #1

Mountain #2

Mount Fuji #5 Hill #3

Background Forest #4 Mist #6

Foreground Forest #7

Trace Line Alignment Line Copy pages 100–101, align placement lines to make a whole pattern, enlarge this complete pattern by 200% to measure @$2“ x !^2“ this will be used to create a transparent overlay guide for positioning pieces.

100 Asian Fabric 2012


Mountain Flight Quilt Overlay Template

Snow Cap #8

Mount Fuji #5

Mist #6

Foreground Forest #7

Trace Line Alignment Line Copy pages 00-00, match alignment lines to make a whole pattern, enlarge this complete pattern by 200% to measure @$2“ x !^2“ this will be used to create a transparent overlay guide for positioning pieces.

2012 Asian Fabric 101


Extend these ends into panel seam allowance

Extend these ends into panel seam allowance

Mountain Flight Quilt Full-size Corner Lattice Template

Left

E F

D

D

A

A

E B

B

C

F C

Tuck these raw ends under

Quilt Layout

102 Asian Fabric 2012

Right


Note: Templates include tuck under allowance overlap of subsequent pieces is indicated by dotted placement line.

Mountain #2

Snow Cap #8

Distance Mountain #1

Trace Line Placement Line

Mountain Flight Quilt Appliqué templates are reversed for Quick-Fused method. Refer to General Instructions pages 114–115 for other appliqué methods

2012 Asian Fabric 103


Mountain Flight Quilt Trace Line Placement Line Alignment Line

Mount Fuji #5 (piece A)

104 Asian Fabric 2012


Trace Line Placement Line Alignment Line

Hills #3

Mountain Flight Quilt

Mount Fuji #5 (piece B)

2012 Asian Fabric 105


Mist

#6 (Piece A)

Mountain Flight Quilt Trace Line Placement Line Alignment Line

106 Asian Fabric 2012


Mountain Flight Quilt

#6 (Piece B)

Mist

Trace Line Placement Line Alignment Line

2012 Asian Fabric 107


Mist #6 (Piece C) Mountain Flight Quilt Trace Line Placement Line Alignment Line

Foreground Forest #7 Piece B

108 Asian Fabric 2012


Mountain Flight Quilt Trace Line Alignment Line

Foreground Forest #7 Piece A

2012 Asian Fabric 109


Foreground Forest #7 Piece C

Background Forest #4 Mountain Flight Quilt Trace Line Placement Line Alignment Line

110 Asian Fabric 2012


 www.heleneknott.com

Helene’s background is in art—primarily drawing and painting. She was born and raised in central California on the Monterey Peninsula, an area famed as an artists’ enclave. As a child, she showed an interest and a raw talent for artistic expression, an interest that was cultivated by her parents, grandparents and teachers alike.

contributors

helene knott

Upon graduating from high school, Helene apprenticed to a silversmith and explored metalworking and jewelry, later expanding her interests to include designing stained glass art for a studio owned by her husband. She continued her education, attending classes at Monterey Peninsula Community College with an emphasis in art and design. Several semesters were spent taking a series of courses that she hoped would lay the foundation for an art degree but life intervened and this goal was never realized. Helene’s family moved to Portland Oregon in 1991 and she took a hiatus from regular employment to explore fiber arts; an interest she had in embroidery in her youth had blossomed into an interest in quilting in the early 70s and she wanted to devote more time to develop and fine-tune her skills in that medium. Helene joined a local quilt guild, Northwest Quilters, and subsequently several other quilting organizations while she continued expanding on her interest in quilting. In 1999 Helene began teaching design and quilting classes. To this day, she teaches at local quilt shops and travels to teach and lecture outside of Oregon as well. “I enjoy teaching immensely and in 2006, I received a nomination for ‘Teacher of the Year’ by Professional Quilter Magazine,” shared Helene, “I have expanded my interest into designing commercial quilting patterns and currently have a number of successful series that are published by Story Quilts Inc. These include my whimsical Garden Patch Cats (cats shaped like fruits and vegetables); these patterns are distributed worldwide with an enthusiastic following.”

2013 Asian Fabric 111


Many of Helene’s quilts have won awards in local, regional, national and international shows; one quilt—‘Low Tide’ receiving a Best of Country award in the Mancuso World Quilt competition. Another—‘Evening Song’ was considered as a runner up for the 100 Best Quilts of the Century in 2000. “Though my exploration in design is widely varied,” says Helene, “Asian Art has been a major influence in my style; in particular, I love the balance and composition in Japanese art.” Helene currently lives in Oregon City, Oregon on two acres of wooded property with her husband, two cats (one a rescue kitty from Afghanistan) and a parrot. Her closing comment was, “Life is wonderful!” Helene makes and designs quilts and patterns both for personal indulgence and professionally as well. Many of her patterns are available at www.storyquilts.com. In addition, she travels to teach workshops and lecture; you can contact her through her website at www.heleneknott.com.

112 Asian Fabric 2013


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general instructions

How-to Help You! Before You Begin We recommend washing and pressing your fabric prior to cutting it into strips and pieces. To help prevent fabric from fraying in the washer, clip corners at a 45 degree angle removing a small triangle piece.

Achieving a Perfect Block Accurate Seam Allowance Use 4”-wide seam allowance for all projects in this magazine unless otherwise stated. If seam allowances differ as little as z” assembling blocks will be difficult, especially when incorporating several block designs in a quilt. To check your seam allowances follow these steps.

Half Square Triangles

without breaking threads, continue this process to stitch additional units. Cut sections apart, press and continue with next step.

Fussy Cut This process is the selection and cutting of a particular motif pattern which is featured in a cut piece. Remember to center design and always allow for seam allowance.

Simple Triangles This is an easy way to make triangles from squares.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of fabric square that will become the triangle. This will be your stitch line.

Step 1 Cut three 12” x 6” pieces of fabric from assorted scraps. Sew pieces together to make one 32” x 6” piece. Press.

Step 2 Center strip should measure 1” x 6”. If piece measures differently check to see if seams have been pressed flat. If the piece still differs cut new strips and adjust seam allowance until you achieve the perfect stitch.

Pressing Press using steam or dry heat setting. Always use an “up and down” motion since a side-to-side motion can distort the block or unit.

Assembly Line Method Use this method when making multiple pieces or blocks.

Step 2 Place marked square on fabric piece shown in construction step matching raw edges. Sew on drawn line and trim 4” away from stitching.

Fabric A- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric B- 2 2" x 6 2"

Step 3 Press seams as indicated in construction diagram. Measure sewn piece to check accuracy.

Tip: There is a waste factor with this technique but you can stitch an additional 2” away from stitch line. Cut piece between stitching saving the smaller version for some future project. Diagram 3

Step 1

Position pieces right sides together, stitch unit.

Step 2 Align and sew the next unit

114

ASIAN FABRIC 2013

This technique differs from the Simple Triangle method; you will be making two triangles at one time.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one fabric square. Place marked square and one corresponding square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press.

Fabric F- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric D- 2 2" x 2 2"

Square to 2” Make 2

Step 2 Measure unit and trim as indicated in construction diagram.

Applique Technique Quick Fused Method This method joins fabric to each other with the use of fusible web. There are many types on the market and you will need to refer to manufacturer’s instruction for specific requirements. If quilt does not require laundering you can use heavy-weight fusible web and follow steps 1-4. If your quilt will require laundering use lightweight fusible web and follow all steps. Remember that appliqués when pressed to background fabric will be a reverse image from patterns provided.

Step 1 Trace all appliqué pieces on the paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line.

Step 2 With fusible web paper side up, fuse to the wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 3 Cut on draw line. Remove future project

paper backing, a thin film of adhesive will remain on fabric.


General Instructions

Step 4 Referring to project photo, position and fuse all pieces of one appliqué design at a time onto background.

Tip: An Appliqué Pressing Sheet is very helpful when there are many elements to a design. Place your pattern (reverse image from pattern provided) under the pressing sheet as a guide. Arrange pieces on sheet and press following manufacturer’s instructions. Allow piece to cool, remove appliqué unit and arrange on background to fuse unit in place. If the piece is not cooled, the fusible web could remain on the sheet instead of the fabric.

Step 5 If using a machine, cut a piece of stabilizer larger than appliqué area and pin to wrong side of fabric. Stabilizer is used to achieve an even stitch. Using a satin stitch, blanket stitch or other decorative stitching to secure appliqué in place. Start stitching from the background to the foreground. Option: use a hand embroidery stitch instead.

Hand Appliqué If project specifies quick-fuse you will need to reverse all patterns and add 4”- wide seam allowance. The steps that follow will add the seam allowance after pattern is traced onto fabric.

Step 1 Make a template of all pattern pieces and indicate where pieces overlap. Place template on right side of selected fabric.

Step 2 Trace around template using a removable fabric marker. This will be your turn under guide. Cut out shapes approximately 4” beyond traced line. Step 3 When layering and positioning pieces always work from the background to the foreground.

Step 4 Enter from the wrong side of applique shape bringing the needle up on the traced line. Using the tip of the

needle turn under a small portion of the fabric along trace line and secure with thumb. Using a blind stitch, stitch along folded edge to join piece to background. Stitch is hidden under fabric.

Blind Stitch

Finishing the Quilt

Option 1 Step 1 Position binding away from corner leaving 8” free of stitches and aligning raw edges with the edge of the quilt. Sew using a 4”-wide seam.

Step 2 Stop sewing 4” from quilt top edge and backstitch. Clip threads and turn quilt. Fold binding up at a 45 degree angle to create the mitered corner as shown. Diagram 1

Backing fabric and batting should be 4”-8” larger than the quilt top. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads from quilt prior to basting.

Step 1 Lay backing right side down, batting and quilt top (right side up) on top.

Step 2 Backing and batting need to

Step 3 Fold the binding back down aligning top fold with edge of quilt and matching raw edges. Start stitching 4” Diagram 2 for all corners. from quilt edge. Repeat

be taut prior to basting quilt. Start in the center and work out toward edges. You can hand stitch, pin or use a specialty tool to baste quilt together.

Step 3 Check batting instruction for quilting requirements. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Remove basting.

Binding the Quilt Two options are given for binding the quilt. For both options trim batting and backing 4” beyond raw edge of quilt, this will give fullness to the binding. Sew binding stripes end-to-end to make one continuous strip. Fold and press binding strips in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. To reduce bulk when joining strips, cut ends at 450 angle and sew together as shown.

Step 4 Determine length needed for binding strip ends, trim and sew ends together. Stitch binding to quilt. Fold binding to back of quilt, a diagonal fold will form at the corners. Hand-stitch binding to back of quilt.

Option 2 Step 1 Measure quilt through center from side to side. Cut two binding strips to this measurement. Sew to top and bottom of quilt matching raw edges with edge of quilt. Press binding away from quilt top.

Step 2 Measure quilt through center from top to bottom including the binding just added. Cut two strips to this measurement and sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Step 3 Fold top and bottom strips to the back and pin in place. Repeat for sides. Hand-stitch binding to quilt. 2013 ASIAN FABRIC 115

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Asian Fabric magazine Issue 33 is a quilter's dream—filled with beautiful, complete quilting patterns, armchair travel, recipes and the late...

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