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Marlborough - New York

Keith Mayerson My American Dream: Heroes and Villain


Keith Mayerson My American Dream: Heroes and Villain

Jan 08 - Feb 02 2019

Marlborough Contemporary @ Marlborough Gallery 40 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 212-541-4900 marlboroughcontemporary.com marlboroughgallery.com


My Heroes and Villain

“My American Dream: Heroes and Villain” takes it cues from the majestic Brian Wilson/Beach Boys and Van Dyke Parks SMiLE song cycle, an opera of images of triumphant American leaders, creators, and places that have made our country a nation for others to follow--with the exception of just one villain who wants to destroy the party, a malcontent demigod whose misery will hopefully be superseded by the others inspiration to continue the ascension of our United States. Historic civil rights leaders and saviors such as Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, and the LGBTQ rioters of the Stonewall rebellion consort with current igures who are speaking truth to power—Emma González, Robert Mueller, and CNN’s George Acosta. Cultural icons and their makers such as Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy (bringing up Jim Henson and Grant Wood), David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane, and Jane Fonda as cowgirl bandit Cat Ballou (in an homage to Warhol) hang out with meta human superstars Batman, Wonder Woman, and Titian’s Saint Christopher (this time crossing between Washington D.C. and Yosemite, with the baby Jesus on his shoulder, to bring their blessing for safe passage to the country). The personal is political, and my personal hero, husband Andrew Madrid, lovingly embraces our goose Goldie, and wishes upon the Empire State Building for a better America. The city of New York makes another appearance as the sun gleams upon its majestic buildings towards a new future--across from a picture of Obama looking back at us with grave concern from my painting of 9-11 (from a photo by presidential photographer Pete Souza from the presidents’ visit to the Whitney’s inaugural show downtown America is Hard to See when the painting was installed at the beginning of the last “chapter” Course of Empire). We love the Grand Canyon, and in the painting created in plein air there of our beloved sublime park, the lag was at half-mast from the then recent school shootings in Santa Fe Texas. One of the student survivors, the prophetically named Rome, looks on from a painting installed nearby. Yosemite’s Tunnel View brings the show home in a wintery ecstatic reverie to our beautiful lands. The one villain lurks from behind a corner, but is overwhelmed by the preponderance of hope and aspiration, great land and people that have made America truly great and will continue to inluence and give agency and hope to our current troubled times. My American Dream is the continued non-linear narrative cycle of paintings I began in the George W. Bush era, where installations of various “chapters” are installed deliberately so that the images “talk with one another”, like comic book panels on a wall. Like the American Transcendentalist Walt Whitman’s poetry collection Leaves of Grass, each painting is like a poem, in a still building series that aspires to encapsulate the igures and landscapes that have helped to forge an ideological country that allows my family, along with the rest of the nation, to pursue “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness,” despite the odds and terriic challenges of these last years. Each image is a Proustian madeleine, a talisman for thoughts and feelings that I hope to unconsciously bring to the image along with the conscious control of my brush, breaking images into painterly subconscious iconic abstractions in micro-managed moments. My installations, in the juxtapositions of images, aspire to perform almost like dreams, with scenes and portraits that bring to mind dream space and time in the theater of the gallery. I’m particularly proud that this is my irst show uptown, and I hope that it seems as if the historic gallery has been transformed into the Gotham headquarters for a superhero teamof legendary Americans, with a supervillain appareling in their midst in an epic battle where the mythic good triumphs over the banality of evil.


As I am so inspired by comics, it’s ideology and machinations, I am especially honored to be showing alongside my friend Art Spiegelman, considered to be one of the most important and prominent cartoonists and artists in the world, in Spiegelman’s irst exhibition of his prints at Marlborough Gallery. Keith Mayerson

Keith Mayerson is known for his work encompassing portraits, historical scenes, landscapes, and more. Through his paintings, Mayerson creates broader narratives, citing comic books as an inspiration and inluence. Keith Mayerson was a Semiotics and Studio Art Major at Brown University where he received his BA in 1988. In 1993, he earned his MFA from the University of California Irvine, and is now Professor of Art at the University of Southern California. Mayerson has exhibited his art in galleries and museums since 1993. His work is featured in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Columbus Museum of Art and the Davis Museum of Wellesley College, MA. His graphic novel Horror Hospital Unplugged, a collaboration with the writer Dennis Cooper, is well known among graphic artists. A graphic novel biography of James Dean is forthcoming, to be published by Fantagraphics. Mayerson’s work was prominently featured in the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art with a solo show My American Dream, the Whitney Biennial, and the Whitney Museum’s inaugural show, America is Hard to See.

Obama and the 9-11 painting at the inaugural downtown exhibition America is Hard to See, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, July 17, 2015. Photograph by Pete Souza, former Chief Oficial White House Photographer for U.S. Presidents Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama and the former director of the White House Photography Ofice.


Paintings

1 End of Days: Obama and the 9-11 painting at the Whitney, July 17, 2015, from a photo by Pete Sousa, 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 60 inches

10 Batman (after Bob Kane and Bill Finger), 2018 Oil on Linen 48 x 56 inches

2 View from the Rock, 2018 Oil on linen 52 x 70 inches

11 Wonder Woman (after William Moulton Marston & Harry G. Peter), 2017 Oil on Linen 60 x 42 inches

3 Liberty, 2018 Oil on linen 82 x 80 inches

12 Jane Fonda as Cat Ballou, 2018 Oil on linen 68 x 43 inches

4 American Gothique, 2018 OIl on linen 30 3/4 x 30 inches

13 Trump & Stormy, 2018 Oil on linen 54 x 40 inches

5 Aladdin Sane, 2016 Oil on linen 30 x 30 inches

14 Pleine Air Grand Canyon (Flag at Half Mast in honor of the recent Santa Fe High School shootings), 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 60 inches

6 My Husband Andrew and Goldie our Goose, 2017 Oil on linen 30 x 20 inches

7 Moses (Harriet Tubman), 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 30 inches

8 Stonewall (after Fred W. McDarrah), 2018 Oil on Linen 60 x 40 inches

9 Saint Christopher (after Titian, with Washington D.C. and Yosemite in the background), 2017 Oil on Linen 60 x 38 inches

15 Rome (Santa Fe High School Victim Survivor Recounts Being Shot in Head, Escaping Gunman), 2018 Oil on linen 30 x 21 inches

16 Emma Gonzรกlez, March For Our Lives, 2018 Oil on linen 20 x 36 inches

17 Robert Mueller, 2018 Oil on linen 24 x 26 inches


18 Malcolm X (after Eve Arnold), 2018 Oil on panel 20 x 17 3/4 inches

19 LeBron Dunk over Garnet, 2017 Oil on linen 36 x 40 inches

20 CNN vs. Trump (Jim Acosta at a rally at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium, May 29, 2018, from a photo by Drew Angerer), 2019 Oil on linen 36 x 55 inches

21 Andrew and Empire, 2018 Oil on linen 78 x 52 inches

22 Tunnel View, Dec. 25 2016, 2017 Oil on Linen 40 x 60 inches


1 End of Days: Obama and the 9-11 painting at the Whitney, July 17, 2015, from a photo by Pete Sousa, 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 60 inches


2 View from the Rock, 2018 Oil on linen 52 x 70 inches


3 Liberty, 2018 Oil on linen 82 x 80 inches


4 American Gothique, 2018 OIl on linen 30 3/4 x 30 inches


5 Aladdin Sane, 2016 Oil on linen 30 x 30 inches


6 My Husband Andrew and Goldie our Goose, 2017 Oil on linen 30 x 20 inches


7 Moses (Harriet Tubman), 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 30 inches


8 Stonewall (after Fred W. McDarrah), 2018 Oil on Linen 60 x 40 inches


9 Saint Christopher (after Titian, with Washington D.C. and Yosemite in the background), 2017 Oil on Linen 60 x 38 inches


10 Batman (after Bob Kane and Bill Finger), 2018 Oil on Linen 48 x 56 inches


11 Wonder Woman (after William Moulton Marston & Harry G. Peter), 2017 Oil on Linen 60 x 42 inches


12 Jane Fonda as Cat Ballou, 2018 Oil on linen 68 x 43 inches


13 Trump & Stormy, 2018 Oil on linen 54 x 40 inches


14 Pleine Air Grand Canyon (Flag at Half Mast in honor of the recent Santa Fe High School shootings), 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 60 inches


15 Rome (Santa Fe High School Victim Survivor Recounts Being Shot in Head, Escaping Gunman), 2018 Oil on linen 30 x 21 inches


16 Emma Gonzรกlez, March For Our Lives, 2018 Oil on linen 20 x 36 inches


17 Robert Mueller, 2018 Oil on linen 24 x 26 inches


18 Malcolm X (after Eve Arnold), 2018 Oil on panel 20 x 17 3/4 inches


19 LeBron Dunk over Garnet, 2017 Oil on linen 36 x 40 inches


20 CNN vs. Trump (Jim Acosta at a rally at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium, May 29, 2018, from a photo by Drew Angerer), 2019 Oil on linen 36 x 55 inches


21 Andrew and Empire, 2018 Oil on linen 78 x 52 inches


22 Tunnel View, Dec. 25 2016, 2017 Oil on Linen 40 x 60 inches


Notes from the Artist

1 End of Days: Obama and the 9-11 painting at the Whitney, July 17, 2015, from a photo by Pete Sousa, 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 60 inches

After pouring over Pete Souza’s terriic new book of his photos with the Obama administration, I saw the great image of them at the Whitney. Remembering Whitney director Adam Weinberg’s moving story he told me of their visit to the museum to see the inaugural downtown exhibition America is Hard to See, and that they had a moment in front of the 9-11 painting, I emailed Souza, who referred me to the National Archives at the Obama Library, who found and sent me the image I brought up into this painting. It was an amazing opportunity of exhibiting this work for the inaugural show, it will forever mean so much to me. Knowing too that the Obamas saw it (whom we miss so much) and could have an experience regarding the work and all that it symbolizes (along everyone else!) means the world to us. I thought it was a picture I had to do, as it was such a momentous moment for me in every way, and hoping it also works as an allegory for our current tumultuous times...

2 View from the Rock, 2018 Oil on linen 52 x 70 inches

In painting this work I was thinking of the hopes and aspirations of myself, New York City, and America. My husband and I, for a short while, lived on 46th street, between 5th and 6th, in a “haunted’ apartment, where we unwittingly were above a mob-owned bordello. I would escape to the roof, and in my despair, would paint the view Rockefeller Center in plein air, looking towards NYC, like so many others, to achieve our dream. When I irst took this picture, just a few years ago, we were in a much better place, and it was exciting to be on top of the Rock, looking at the incredible view, but also how, in the sunset, it seemed like the entire city was looking towards a brighter future. Now, as I live in southern California, teaching as a full tenured professor at USC, I feel that my goals back in those time have largely been reached, but personally, could climb even higher. More importantly, as a nation suffering under such strife in our current times, I painted this image with the news in the background, alternating with my favorite music of the Rolling Stone magazine top 500 album canon. The news for me speaks truth to power, and especially for the last two years, it has been THE check and balance for our government, and now with a new House with many woman, POC, LGBTQ and sensitive white men, there is a more hopeful future for us. The sunset also though could signify the waning power of our great city and nation, but also how it can still stand strong against all odds. Every window for me symbolizes a person or people, and how together, in this fantastic city of luminaries and bright lights, we can put our heads, talents, and energy together to continue to achieve what it is that this America has been built by the founding fathers for life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness. As the micromanaged world of the painting becomes almost abstract, I also think of Broadway Boogie Woogie, the Mondrian that rocks my world, for me the dynamism that encapsulates the pulse and energy that makes New York great. Rockefeller Center is one of my most favorite buildings, and the Top of the Rock--which also broadcasts some of my current favorite


television and historically has brought amazing content to the world, it seems like one is standing on the antenna of American culture, beaming out culture to the world to make it a better place.

3 Liberty, 2018 Oil on linen 82 x 80 inches

This painting is based on a photo I took while on a short cruse that my husband and I took just to get this image. Years ago, when I was teaching at NYU, I would take my students on a sketching journey on the Staten Island Ferry, and of course, seeing Liberty from there was such a highlight, although the boat would move to quickly to really render all that you would absorb in what would become a sublime experience. Here, with high deinition from a digital image, one can capture so much more information that in maritime paintings of the past, Turner being my favorite. At this moment in our America, when the whole notion of liberty is something we are learning not to take for granted, and as our notion of immigration has so devolved, the statue has taken on even more gravitas in our time where we narrowly escaped fascism, and how our current president exploits immigration for his own evil demigod agenda. From afar, Liberty is something to be reached, and like how the immigrants that helped to build our nation would look upon her as a beacon of hope, I too look upon her as a symbol of freedom. I like to paint pixels as if they are “real”, being a son of a psychoanalyst, and I hope something that makes an image like this contemporary, but also a painterly expression of the past. Like Cézanne ruminating on his thoughts and memories, and using landscape as a map to project his thoughts and feelings but also his unconscious which breaks his landscapes into subliminal abstractions, that I might try to do the same with my images. Here, the trees, the undulating water, but most especially the statue (and the face of the statue, for which I spent a week painting!) becomes otherworldy in the micromanagement of the noise from my high res photo albeit taken at a distance. As our America, especially before the recent edifying midterm election, seemed to be ripping apart, and as the Kavanaugh hearings for the Supreme Court were happening in the background of my studio as I painted, the notion of liberty, what America stands for, and the political demonization of immigration was roaring. In my photo and painting, Liberty just seemed more than sad, almost transformed, as the pixels become fractals like looking at the cosmos through the wrong end of the telescope or a microscopic world, like bacteria that threatens to tear the palpability of the impression of the statue as she ights to stay on-- as we ight to retain the beauty and majesty of all our great country stands for now, and forever.

4 American Gothique, 2018 OIl on linen 30 3/4 x 30 inches

Inspired by the Whitney’s amazing Grant Wood show, this is an image I have been long wanting to paint, appropriated from the book Miss Piggy’s Treasury of Art Masterpieces


from the Kermitage Collection, that was published in 1984. I grew up loving the Muppets, and as a child of that generation (Sesame Street premiered in 1969 when I was four, and the Muppet Show came into being—with Miss Piggy in 1976, when I was ten) I was the perfect age and was fully immersed in that world. I lived through these characters, at least when I was religiously watching the programs, and had all of them as puppets (along with many more) that I would play with often, trying to bring the same life into them as did their famous creators, and performing skits and puppet shows both for myself and with others that would inform how I would draw comics then and paint and create my ine art cosmologies now. In 2007 I created a painting of Kermit the Frog, from an image of him magically (as you could see his full body, without any strings or hands) riding a bike—a ilm still from the irst Muppet Movie. The Kermit painting wasn’t exhibited until the Whitney Biennial in the spring of 2014, in my installation entitled “My American Dream,” where it symbolized for me the very idea of what had occurred in the movie—where Kermit was bicycling to Hollywood from his swamp to “make it big,” and for me vicariously as he was an avatar I identiied with and I have kept pressing on trying to be the best person and artist I could be in my work and my life. The image was picked up by the New York Times in their preview piece that they ran the week before the Biennial opened, and people seemed to really enjoy it, including an artist friend of mine, who commissioned me to create another for his partner for his partner’s birthday, as he is a huge fan of both Kermit and the painting. I had so much fun recreating the image, with even more detail and nuance than before (hopefully we grow as artists and painters, although hopefully each stage is good), that I felt compelled to inally create the companion piece, Mona Moi, a Miss Piggy Mona Lisa for the full cosmology version of My American Dream, that was at Marlborough Chelsea in Manhattan in the fall of 2015, also from the Kermitage! Miss Piggy in particular holds great signiicance to me growing up and now. Frank Oz, the famous Muppeteer who was Jim Henson’s “right hand man” made her famous (in 1996 TV Guide ranked her number 23 on its 50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time list), and for him, the conceptual hook for her personality was a “Truck driver wanting to be a woman.” She is like a drag queen in some respects, who is convinced she is destined for stardom (although she doesn’t have any real signiicant talent besides her charisma), and nothing will stand in her way—she is very feminine but can also deliver a mean Karate Chop when feeling threatened, insulted, or thwarted, and is forever in love with Kermit, who is the object of both her affection and her intensity. She also is one of the most well-rounded, three dimensional, and “deep” characters of the Muppets, and although I didn’t realize it growing up as a gay kid in Colorado, a likely avatar for me to breath empathy through and as an icon in which I could identify with unconsciously as to what I would ight to become—a hopefully generally happy and successful artist and man who happens to be gay (and married to my husband, etc.). Although I don’t completely identify with the character today (I hope that I have true talent, and also am not quite as feminine or violent as she), I do identify with her tenacity and willingness to work hard to achieve dreams. The wonderful thing about the Kermit on the bike image was that he really seemed, in this moment, to have a life of his own, beyond his creator. Kermit and Miss Piggy continue to enthrall children of all ages despite the fact that Henson has died, Frank Oz no longer continues to perform her, and the Muppets are owned by Disney, and so on. I do think that characters (and hopefully paintings!) can have a life of their own that evolve—like Frankenstein monsters, great characters live on the imagination of their fans, and as different people work with them, they also develop the characters who can morph and change as the eons progress (just think of ancient mythical characters, Punch and Judy, or characters from operas and Shakespearian plays, and Superman and other cartoon characters that grow with the ages). I grew up with this image of Kermit and Miss Piggy as the characters in the Grant Wood masterpiece, and always loved it and it stuck with me. In the context of the book, which was a collaboration between the editor Harry Beard, the photographer John Barrett, their art directors and designers, that were building on the legacy of Jim Henson and Frank Oz, the Muppet designer Kermit Love, and so on, the image already was a collective group appropriating of course also the original da Vinci painting in the context of a book of Piggy as an avid collector in a dream like fantasy of famous masterpieces with she and the Muppets all in starring roles. In contemporary times, I feel that what artists who paint in oil paint with brushes can bring to the table is this “essence,” as ineffable (and perhaps subjective!) as this notion might be. Post Warhol, post Richter, I think when painting from photos the job of the artist is to penetrate the photo, to bring out what they might feel about the work, in the same manner as the irst painters to use photos as source materials might have done. I always think that if you could have the emotions and ineffability of Rembrandt in a painting, but also have a work relate to the culture that surrounds it like Warhol, perhaps you can have something that is “new.”


I was blown away by the Grant Wood show at the Whitney. I knew he was, although not out, “gay” in his desire and inner life, and felt an afinity for this, but also his work as an illustrator and “populist” (if this is not a bad term these days) artist that transcends the pejorative “regionalism” so appeals to me. But also, I was shocked that he should lose his best friend in an auto accident around the same age as did I—just months before I saw the show with his moving painting of this event. I felt that I wanted to really channel his spirit and pay homage to Wood, alongside the Muppets, and it was inally the time to paint this picture. I love that, in their appropriation, they switched up the gender roles appropriately—it is now the male Kermit who is demur to the powerful female Piggy, who has been given her symbolic pitchfork to hold. In the Mona Moi painting, I decided to pay tribute to the original Da Vinci by trying to replicate his own background, but in this, as the palate and Muppet aesthetic so appealed to me and was already perfect for the characters, thought I should keep it the same. With Mona Moi, like a method actor, or indeed like Frank Oz who originally performed the character, I tried to “get inside” the spirits of the two characters, to drive the form and the content to have a life of its own by relating them and the image to my own life, and my own cultural references. I ruminated on everything that had been going on in my life and in the political strife of the world, where we need a powerful matriarchy to help rescue us out of putrid Patriarchy, that related to painting, to use it as a meditation to express myself, but by way of the remove of iconic allegory. I’m hoping the result might be something that doesn’t read as ironic as Duchamp or Warhol, but a sincere attempt to bring emotions and feelings to a character as I “performed” painting them. I also think the trick for making an image like this is to ultimately make it a “Great Painting,” so the formal nuances and the ineffability succeed in resonating long after the initial “ joke” is perceived—more of a “hah hah OH” than a gag cartoon, and I hope I brought in my many hours and weeks of creating the work something substantial. And of course, I hope to make something that stands apart and is “better” than the initial image. Ultimately I wanted to create a work that was also iconic for what it is a feel I do in many of my paintings, make a work that, despite being derived from a photo, in this case an appropriation (or here, an appropriation of an appropriation of an original), that feels alive, ineffable, mysterious, and beyond hopefully the cultural and political references, turning a “joke picture” back into a painting that will hopefully transcend my hand, mind, and time and speak in their own mysterious ways to all. And hopefully, too, this work relects a more current America than the one that helped to subjugate Wood, and that the Muppets, in their powerful allegorical whimsy, helped us to transcend..

5 Aladdin Sane, 2016 Oil on linen 30 x 30 inches

I’m a huge Bowie fan, and when he died I was devastated, and mourned his loss by making a series of my favorite album covers from some of his best records and moments. Aladdin Sane is one his best “characters”, and for the show Heroes & Villain, I feel he created his own superhero with Aladdin Sane (and he was also for much of his adult life a great American and New Yorker!). The 1973 cover was from a famous photoshoot by Brian Duffy, who came up with the idea of the lightning bolt from a rice cooker logo that was in the studio kitchen, and it was makeup artist Pierre Laroche who made it manifest. My job in an era post-Warhol, and maybe even post-Richter, is to paint through the photo and make it come alive, and hope that I was able to do this with this image, painted to be the scale of a record cover. As I painted, I listened to the entire Bowie oeuvre in the hopes to really embellish his character and bring him to life, like a Frankenstein monster—it was amazing to me that you can see his pupils through the glare of the lights and his makeup, almost like a spirit channeled through the vehicle of his lesh. As a gay man, I really admire and want to bring to homage his opening up, via this and his other characters, music, and person gender and identity politics, for all “queer” people, despite one’s orientation, and the cover of Aladdin Sane does this for me as an image perhaps the most, as he truly is beyond (especially for that time) conventions of patriarchal order. The weird allure of the drip on his collarbone, wonderfully airbrushed and hopefully translated well here, seems like simultaneously a teardrop, “cumdrop”, or a strange amalgamation of both forming a would be gun/


phallus like form, which further gives the character symbolic power, the yellow on his armpits also giving a musky stench to the proceedings. Like Bowie, I too am inluenced by Burroughs, who wrote The Wild Boys and Naked Lunch and more, where his queer characters have super powerful agency that transcends the worlds that try to subjugate them, and Bowie, in his music and persona had the grace but also power and gravitas that has superseded the ages—his spirit and music will live on through eternity and continue to productively inluence the world.

6 My Husband Andrew and Goldie our Goose, 2017 Oil on linen 30 x 20 inches

The personal is political, and I love my husband Andrew Madrid, my personal hero--who I’ve been together with for almost 30 years, since we met when I was a grad student at UC Irvine, where he was also a student. We love our animals, and now that we are in Southern California again, have dogs, parrots, chickens, turkeys, and geese that are all truly our pets. The fowl have names, and this goose is Goldie, who has been with us for a couple of years now, and, like the others, is fully domesticated and loving. This is from a photo from our porch in front of our beloved cabin in Riverside, which originally belonged to Andrew’s grandfather, and that we lived in irst as a vacation home, and then as a primary residence until recently when we had to move to larger quarters. On the right is the back of our German Shepard Leonardo, and to his left is the ear of our Anatolian Shepard Georgia. Andrew inds true solace in these animals, and it’s not infrequent that he gives them hugs and kisses which they wonderfully reciprocate in their way. But Andrew is the man I’ve also chosen to live my life with, and who is the one I love and care for, who gives my life meaning and wonder, hope and ambition. We got married the irst Sunday it was legal on this very porch, and although I’ve done many paintings of him, this is one of my favorites, as it really hopefully captures his spirit, and the place and animals that are the heart of our home, wherever that may manifest. I’m a great admirer of Manet, one of my favorite artists, and I believe the irst to be “post post-modern” as he realized he could paint the aspects of his personal world and have it resonate to a larger context of politics, history, and the culture beyond the picture frame to help to progress ideology (the power of women and more!) of his time, but also do so in a warm, painterly manner that was beautiful and transcendent. By either painting from appropriation or my own life, I hope to do the same, and although this work is deeply personal to me, I hope it is about the agency of POC, LGBTQ people, and the harmony we all must embrace between humans, animals, and nature for us to all progress into a higher plane of existence and progressive world.

7 Moses (Harriet Tubman), 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 30 inches

Harriet Tubman is one of my all-time heroes, from the time I was little and even more so now. She was called “Moses” in her time, as of course she lead her people to freedom, escaping from the slavery she was born into, and subsequently making at least 13 missions back to the perilous South to rescue approximately 70 enslaved people, family and friends through the Underground Railroad. She later was a cook and nurse, and then an armed scout and spy for the United States Army during the Civil War, and helped John Brown to recruit men for the raid on Harper’s Ferry, among many other acts of courage and daring to help others and to ight for freedom of all peoples. She was intensely spiritual, a devout Christian and, like Joan of Arc, had visions and vivid


prophetic dreams and heard voices from God that helped to guide her and her actions in amazing and productive ways her whole life. She was able to survive beatings and severe injuries and violent subjugation with power, and gave to others incessantly at the cost of her own health and wealth. She was always poor, as she gave her money away to people who needed it most, and helped to free her parents and purchasing a home for them and care for them. She had to be admitted to a home for elderly African Americans in Auburn that she helped to establish in her name as she had been overcome with illness, where this picture was taken in 1911, before her death in 1913. As I painted this, to get closer to my subject while trying to bring this famous black and white photo to life, I listened to African-American spirituals that she might have enjoyed, her contemporaneous biography by her friend and supporter Scenes of the Life of Harriet Tubman, and more, alternating this with the current news of racial strife and prejudice. It’s sadly amazing to me that we are still dealing with many of the same issues that Tubman fought and lived against her whole life--I guess so long ago--and the way Trump and his admiration gin up their base to bring out their racism and misogyny for their own political agenda is tragic. But for generations, Tubman has served as a model and an icon to speaking and acting in truth to power. How she lead her people out of slavery is just what we need to strive to do as a country to not only help our own, but also the demonized immigrants that Trump and his cronies so devilishly have used as scapegoats to drive the engine of their draconian political machine. I felt as if, at times, I was channeling her, in the very least how this maverick marvel and all she stood for still speaks for our times. In painting, I realized that behind her maybe cotton, but also, being a son of a psychoanalyst with a belief in how the subconscious can manifest itself in painting, that in the micromanaging of the exquisite abstraction of the background in this daguerreotype, that in thinking of all the souls she saved, perhaps the idea of their spirit is subconsciously embedded here, too. And the shawl and blanket, majestically making a humble throne out of her wheelchair, were probably also lovingly wove out of cotton, the material of which was cultivated by generations of her peoples. I hope this is a loving tribute to this Saint.

8 Stonewall (after Fred W. McDarrah), 2018 Oil on Linen 60 x 40 inches

As a married gay man, Stonewall means everything to me and my husband and our lives. We lived during a prophetic time on Christopher Street, albeit in the 90’s, but still when you could capture the essence of the energy of the Stonewall riots in June 1968 just steps away from the Stonewall Inn (now, thanks to Obama, a National Monument!). Especially this image really helped me get through the r`edrfgtfecent Gay Pride Month in June, 2018 in Trump’s America, but also hopefully resonates to everyone about how a relatively small group of people (and their cohorts in the nation and the generations before them) spoke truth to power and helped to change the world! Fred McDarrah was a great beatnik NYC photographer who worked at the Village Voice, which was at that time just down the Christopher Street block from the Stonewall Inn, and had witness the irst night of the uprising, and went out into the street to take a canonical series of photos of the notorious rebels, many of whom were unknown then and now—the artist Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt is the young man on the right with the striped shirt, and I believe that one of the African American people in the back may be Marsha P. Johnson, who was instrumental in both the uprising and the trans and LGBTQ community. It was fun and inspiring to listen to all the Motown music this group loved, in addition to early “real” disco from the era just after this, when people of all color and backgrounds would dance and commune together. It was my job to try to make the photo come alive again, to turn what was irst a news photo into a historical painting that tells the story, but hopefully too transcends into synaesthetic feeling both the rage, but also the joy that brought this loving community to the fray, tired of the subjugation of generations, inspired by the civil rights movements (and the death of Judy Garland the night before!), and unwilling to stand yet another violent and marginalizing moment of police and the mob-owned bar putting them into a paddy wagon for their courage to live as gay (and trans!) people out and not in the shadows. Their active resistance was one of the primary catalysts for the rebellion that had been building for decades that helped to bring about a culture in which my husband and I can be married and accepted,


but for all LGBTQ people and “queerness” in general to be powerful, active agents of freedom.

9 Saint Christopher (after Titian, with Washington D.C. and Yosemite in the background), 2017 Oil on Linen 60 x 38 inches

I love the Old Masters, and although much of their work was by commission, how their paintings transcend the commission is what is “them” about it, and Titian was one of the best. This fresco is from 1524, and was commissioned by Doge Andrea Gritti, and is in the Palazzo Ducale in Venice. He had him paint it over a staircase leading to the doge’s apartment, as a symbolic icon protect him from assassination. He is a Christian martyr, who may or may not have really existed, indeed his story might have come from ancient Greek mythology. To serve God, he carried travelers across a tumultuous river, and at one point, a small child was on his shoulder who was incredibly heavy as the river grew raging around them. When crossed, Christopher exclaims to the infant, “You have put me in the greatest danger. I do not think the whole world could have been as heavy on my shoulders as you were.” The child replied: “You had on your shoulders not only the whole world but Him who made it. I am Christ your king, whom you are serving by this work.” The child then vanished. Thus he is the patron saint of travelers, and icons of him prevail not just in paintings, but in carried in some form by believers to give them safe passage. In the original, the huge saint insures the Child’s protection for Venice which appears in the background. In my version, I’ve replaced this with Washington D.C. on the left, and Yosemite Valley on the right. In our current times of great strife, I hope to bring new life to these characters, ancient “superheroes” of their kind (resplendent with their capes!) to hope to help give protection to America, and everything politically, socially, and in our beautiful nature to keep it at peace.

10 Batman (after Bob Kane and Bill Finger), 2018 Oil on Linen 48 x 56 inches

This is an appropriation from the irst panel of the “full reveal” of Batman, from Detective Comics #27, May 1939, the original creation of Bob Kane and Bill Finger. I love Batman, and have long yearned to create this image, which I think creates such an impact—the silhouette of Batman and his demeanor hasn’t changed much in the many decades of this character’s life throughout many different artists, era’s, and ilms and shows, and I like that this image displays the roots of this great living icon. I love comics, and have drawn cartoons since I could hold a pencil—in addition to my near three decades exhibiting as a professional ine artist, I have also taught comics (in addition to ine art) at the historic comics program at the School of Visual Arts (where I was the “Comics Coordinator” and lead teacher for over twenty years), and currently as a full, tenured professor at the University of Southern California (I’m proud also to be in contract for a new graphic novel about James Dean for Fantagraphics). When creating my own work (and also in my teaching), I “suture into” the characters I am painting. Much like a method actor such as Dean, I try to relate the image to my own life, and to create environments that help to bring about life to the work, playing music that is meaningful to me or ilms, tv, or audiobooks in the background and thinking about the meditation of my thoughts. The wonderful thing about painting and drawing is that while you are consciously trying to bring about an image, your unconscious also spills out into the brush, and subconsciously realized imagery may appear within the framework of the forms—much like the mountain Mont Sainte-Victoire becomes abstracted into


liminal surrealities by the brush of Cezanne. Especially in comics, where you know you are drawing well if you ind yourself smiling while drawing a character who is smiling, we are able to “mask” into the characters we are portraying, like Bruce Wayne in his famous costume. While painting this I listened to a lot of CNN, MSNBC, and the other “real news” of our turbulent times, but also a lot of glam rock, speciically David Bowie, who had such power (and amazing music) at the same time being a subversive reaction to patriarchal norms. It occurred to me that Batman also spoke “truth to power”, while also in an amazing, somehow graceful but still masculine leather outit and tights! The wings of the Batman, irst fashioned after Da Vinci’s drawings, look much like a bird or bats, but here almost seem skeletal ingers, and the relections in his cape almost seem like the shape or forms of beings being saved and/or the fearful victims of Batman. I like to paint the reproductions of comic pages as I see them—the Ben day dots become things, the cross hatching becomes a sort of rain, the roof he originally stands on almost seems like gold. This is a cropped image from the original panel when Batman irst reveals himself to horrible mobsters, and I’m hoping, in a good way, we can all appreciate his power—I inished this painting listening to Bowie’s song Heroes, something we need so much more of these days….

11 Wonder Woman (after William Moulton Marston & Harry G. Peter), 2017 Oil on Linen 60 x 42 inches

I’ve always loved Wonder Woman, and this is her irst cover, along with her irst feature story, from Sensation Comics #1, from January 1942. She was created by the infamous William Moulton Marston, a.k.a. Charles Moulton, and was inspired by the strength and fortitude of both his wife, Elizabeth Holloway Marston and their lifetime 3rd partner/lover Olive Byrne. Moulton was the creator of the lie detector test, and was a professor at American University and Tufts, and was a champion for woman’s rights. He was also a writer of essays of popular psychology, and was hired by Max Gaines to be educational consultant for National Periodicals and All American Publications, when he decided he would like to create a superhero--in an era when they all were muscle-bound he-men-to conquer not with violence, but with love. His wife suggested “ine, but make her a woman”, and Mouton, basing her on an amalgamation of his two life partners, to make a character “with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman”, and Wonder Woman was born. I’ve taught comics all my career, for over twenty years I was the lead comics teacher at the School of Visual Arts, the worlds best school for comics, and now am a full tenured professor at the University of Southern California, teaching both comics and ine art (which I’ve also taught my whole career). The machinations of how I understand all art comes from comics, and I feel that I’m a narrative installation artist who happens to work with paintings and drawings that “talk with one another” like comic panels on a wall. The theme of the show Heroes & Villain obviously allude to this, but also these comic paintings. I love the patina of old comics, and like to paint the off-register marks, the bleed of the ads through the cover and other “noise” as if it were “real” using them as painterly moments were my subconscious and synesthetic aspects of paint, touch and color can make these images come alive. Unlike Warhol, Lichtenstein, and other pop artists, who in a Duchampian way, would bring the “low” art as a readymade into “high” art culture, for me the characters, like a classical cartoonist, are the vehicle in which I could suture into as an avatar. When I’m rendering, I think symbolically what they represent, and like a Proustian madeleine--a meditative talisman--in the hope that the emotions and beauty, in addition to subconscious thoughts come out from my brush along with the image that I’m consciously forming. In our current moment, I feel that really women are a big part of the solution. When painting this, the Trump world seemed manifest, and I love the image of Wonder Woman, in Washington D.C., battling the mobsters—much like Hillary tried with Trump, but also how now the House is being led by Nancy Pelosi and the other woman, people of color, LGBTQ and sensitive white male representatives, to help to rid our government of corruption, and keep our country safe for democracy. Wonder Woman, both the comics, 70’s tv show, and current incarnations (I’m proud that I’m friends and


colleagues with Phil Jimenez, the current Wonder Woman cartoonist who I consulted when choosing this image), as she still provides a wonderful model for all genders about what it is not only to be a strong female protagonist, but also what it is to be a good human being, speaking truth to power!

12 Jane Fonda as Cat Ballou, 2018 Oil on linen 68 x 43 inches

Jane Fonda is an amazing actress, activist, feminist and person. I’ve been wanting to paint this image for a long time, and so glad to be able to do so at this moment, when women are taking over the House, and when the Warhol show is up at the Whitney, as this image also is an homage to Warhol, and his “silver Elvis” paintings (which were based on a publicity stills like this one). Cat Ballou is also an incredible 1965 ilm and character, where she goes rogue after her father is murdered by a land developer, and leads a gang of misit male characters (who are also strong gay and Native American) to notorious glory. Jane Fonda of course was herself notorious at the time as “Hanoi Jane”, when she made the mistake of resting for a moment on a visit to Vietnam (she was against the war but also wanted to ind out more) on an anti-aircraft gun, after a long day when she was exhausted and not paying attention, and was lead there by someone after a group celebration, when the cameras lashed and a two-minute mistake became a lifetime regret. At that time, conservatives villainized her, and a very different image from Cat Ballou went viral—that of her contemplating being hung by a noose! I’m happy to reclaim another image from the ilm, as I love her and all the amazing things she represents to both myself and feminist and progressive movements my whole life, as well as being entertained by her incredible acting and roles of hers (and her families). I admire how she still is very much in the spotlight as a strong female protagonist of our world—both in her ongoing, fruitful acting career, and how in front and behind the scenes of many movements, including for the rights of women and people of color. As a celebrity, she emulates what currently is happening in our political and social life, that woman of all stripes and colors are the matriarchs that are leading the progress of our society and world. In this painting, it was fun to fervently paint, after Warhol, I feel my job is to honor the people behind the icons, to make them “come alive” in my painterly practice, and to bring out and illuminate what they mean to me and to hopefully our culture. Unlike the Elvis Flaming Star image that Warhol silkscreened, here she seemed both coy and full on energy, almost as she is drawing her guns in a duel. I wanted it to feel of the moment, like she is wittingly challenging her viewer, thinking of course of Manet’s woman, looking at the viewer looking at them, but also the strong women lovingly rendered by Sargent and Whistler. The grid shows in the back a bit, but also wanted to keep this as it seems she is in front of line-up, but superseding her territory coming out of subjugation and commanding her agency, jumping out of her supposed context and charging into the world to make it a better place.

13 Trump & Stormy, 2018 Oil on linen 54 x 40 inches

This is an image now made famous over its ubiquitous repetition when the news (or at least my “real” news of MSNBC, CNN, and more) brings up the notorious Stormy Daniels case. It’s proof in the pudding that Trump had his adulterous affair with this porn star, whose real name is Stephanie Gregory. In 2018 she became involved in legal


dispute with Donald Trump and his attorney Michael Cohen for the $130,000 in hush money to silence Daniels over the affair she says they had in 2006. Trump and his team say she is lying, although there is much proof to the contrary, including this notorious image, and the case may be a major component in inally taking this demigod down. The photo is from when she and Trump met each other after a golf tournament in Lake Tahoe, Nevada a year after Trump’s marriage to his third wife, Melania, who was four months pregnant with their son Baron. At the ill-fated day, after a lousy performance at the celebrity golf, Trump met Stormy at a gifting suite that was promoting Wicked, a porn production company that had made Stormy a star. Trump invited her for dinner, which turned out to be in his hotel room, where no food, at least, was to be served. When painting this picture, I wanted to paint it as “straight” as possible, following my gridded image, without making exaggeration or caricature, as it was as if Trump was a living cartoon evil clown without having to make any changes. I love Goya, who painted Charles IV and his family as a royal painter, making images of his king that they would admire and approve, but in our time, look like as if he is mocking them, as they too were ill-fated leaders who were incompetent and corrupt. As Goya’s genius is in part to reveal the inner soul of the people he paints in addition to trying to respect who they are in his commissions, I wanted to try to make a work, that in a different world, perhaps even Trump might approve. The My Space.com/Stormy Daniels watermark of the original image I wanted to keep intact, as to give Stormy the power of her agency, and indeed, subconsciously I painted her hair to resemble snakes, a modern Medusa, in a good way, turning her men erect—but to stone. He seems to be like the cat that ate the canary—I felt he was thinking about what he would have “for dinner” that night, his belly contorts out barely able to keep his pants—and belt on. I watched interviews with Stormy while painting this, and she mentions on one talk show that Trump’s penis was small, but with a big mushroom head, and I also realized that subconsciously, his pants button might be like Trump’s other head sticking out in anticipation of his prize. His shirt really was this yellow, but now reminds me of the urine in his alleged glee for watersports, the logo on his shirt resembling to me a fractured heart. Stormy on the other hand has power in the red of her eyes from the camera lash, and it’s amazing, as the image is always shown, but so pixelated and quickly, that when you really look she is doing something alluring with her tongue, and of course the Wicked motif behind them symbolizes more than merely a movie studio, the blissed out nature of the plants and more also resembling, in my mind, the horror of the hell in early renaissance and medieval paintings, where Trump probably will reside, if it really exists, for the rest of eternity.

14 Pleine Air Grand Canyon (Flag at Half Mast in honor of the recent Santa Fe High School shootings), 2018 Oil on linen 40 x 60 inches

I love America, and one of the most magniicent sites of all of the United States is the Grand Canyon, a place we cherish that reminds us not only of our place within the world and of the Earth’s history, but the fantastic possibilities of our great country in both times of strife and grandeur. The history of the Grand Canyon is vast, and our interactions as humans within it seem short compared to the largeness of its history, but after indigenous peoples populated the region, Western Europeans came to inhabit the place, both as explorers and discovers, but also as businessmen. I have a penchant for not only Cézanne, but the Hudson River School, and despite the egregious politics of Manifest Destiny, really enjoy how those painters depicted the landscapes of the United States, and also the Germans who came upon our shores, and more speciically related their foreign points of view to the Rockies and the West, romanticizing reality in their own way in paintings I grew up seeing at the Denver Art Museum. This was from our recent trip for Andrew’s birthday to the El Tovar at the Grand Canyon, where we were upgraded to the Presidential Suite and I painted this in “plein air”. I have painted the Grand Canyon many times before, it is one of our most favorite places on earth. I had planned to create this in advance, however we couldn’t expect that the school shootings in the El Paso TX, which happened right before we got there, the lag at half-mast in memorial to the young students who were killed. A bittersweet subliminity was in the air as I painted for a marathon of three days on this work, hopefully capturing the beauty of America, but also an encapsulation of our recent times. I also was thinking of course of the environment, and how we must do all we can to preserve and nourish our planet for survival, especially in this time of uncertain futures. As I paint,


I allow my unconscious to spill out along with my conscious brush, and like Cézanne, have moments that project into subconscious dream worlds mapped along with representational realities of what I see, inspired by the meditation of painting. Hopefully this picture has much to offer in representing the landscapes, the sunset of the Grand Canyon, but also a melancholic, surreal edge of how close we are to the precipice of losing our national treasures of rich, nourished land and landscape.

15 Rome (Santa Fe High School Victim Survivor Recounts Being Shot in Head, Escaping Gunman), 2018 Oil on linen 30 x 21 inches

This is from my own photo from our television of Rome Shubert, an El Paso TX high school student and star pitcher who narrowly escaped death. In his interview on MSNBC, he has just explained how the shooters bullet went through the back of his head and through his neck--that if it was a millimeter in any direction he could have died or been paralyzed. This image is from just after he speaks, where he is taking in the magnitude of all of what happened and what it represents. As a son of a psychoanalyst, I have a penchant for the unconscious, and the surreal worlds created in the throes of Modernism, as surrealism breaks into abstraction in automatic drawing and painting. The pixels and noise from the news camera, translated to my high deinition TV, camera, and then printer creates distortions that I like to paint as if they are “real”, mapping my subconscious what my conscious can’t ascertain in the already abstracted image. Here, I like think his hair breaks into igurative abstract elements that become a mindscape of what this young man might have just gone through and experienced, a personal nightmare that has become one for all Americans.

16 Emma González, March For Our Lives, 2018 Oil on linen 20 x 36 inches

Emma González young queer Latinix activist and is a survivor of the February 2018 Stoneman Douglas High School shootings, one of the co-founders for the Never Again MSD gun control advocacy group. She and her cohort survivors created the group out of the pathos those horrible shootings, which have become rampant in our NRA inluenced terror of the widespread killings that have become manifest in today’s America. Speaking truth to power, she and her friends have been courageous models for the youth and all Americans to not accept subjugation and the proit over people ideology inherent in today’s administration, and now have devoted much for striving to achieve sane gun laws to “never again” have the tragedy of the murder of their fallen friends and evil of a capitalism and ideology that is seemingly out of control. Before, in another famous speech and actions, she coined the phrase “We Call B.S.!” and intensely confronted the leaders of the NRA. This image is from her now famous speech she gave at the March for Our Lives demonstration on March 24 2018 in Washington that they helped to organize that was attended my thousands. In her speech, she lovingly declared the names of her fallen 17 friends, how they “never again” can enjoy the aspects of life she wittingly gives to these individuals. She then mysteriously falls silent, holding back tears as she deinitely looks at the audience, who wonder what may be going on, but also giving all the loaded quiet moments to relect upon the murdered young people she mentions, and all that she and the others are there to protest. Her cell phone alarm then goes off, and she mentions that since she has come onto the stage, in that 6 minutes and 20 seconds, that it was all it took for the killer to enter into the school and forever tragically end the lives of these teens, and forever change those


who survived. It is up to all of us to help bring sanity to our nation, but it is especially heartening to see these incredible young people, many from diverse POC, LGBTQ backgrounds, all of them invigorated and smart, that represent what can come for now and our future, making change happen when many adults may feel disillusioned and hopeless. As a professor, my students give me hope, and these folks I feel conident will be the leaders, and inspire more future leaders, as the pendulum may swing from the far right to the far left, to make America a better place for all. I painted this on treated raw linen as I felt the rawness seemed right for the moment, her youth almost becoming like a more animated avatar in her likeness, as subconsciously I felt perhaps both her innocence and her experience coming together in her deiant optimism to bring the power of change to our world. In her close-up, she looks almost like Joan of Arc in the sublime Passion of Joan of Arc movie by Carl Dreyer, but I hope to bring a sense of realness and to document in a painting what already is, for her, one of the most moving and public political performances of our time.

17 Robert Mueller, 2018 Oil on linen 24 x 26 inches

This is from an image that ubiquitously is shown by the news, especially the “real news” I like to watch of CNN and MSNBC, usually when they bring up the ongoing Mueller investigation, hoping that he will be the hero that will save us from this devious administration before it brings America to ruin. I feel that the image almost takes on a religious tone, in that many would be almost praying for this man to deliver us from evil, like a Byzantine Icon painting, or—when as it is often juxtaposed to an image of Trump, resembles one my favorite Duccio paintings, which resides at the Met, The Temptation of Christ on the Mountain, where Jesus is casting out Satan. It was an edifying antidote to the news to paint this picture, I too am believing in this man and all he has to stand for. But in listening to news and my favorite rock music in the background, there is a certain pathos in his pained expression—albeit as the photo was most likely from before the Trump era--if my job is to make my paintings transcend the photos they are based upon, the wrinkles of his brow became further unconsciously wrinkled, and his ambivalent expression, both of power but also extreme worry and human frailty, also hopefully come through. He is just a man in the system, and although he is currently in charge of bringing his report to congress, he still could be ired, the report repressed, or some other ill fate could be brought to him and his purpose. Still, as he deeply investigates, I hope the world of his eyes bring about the deepness of his intellectual and emotional soul as he strives to bring about real truths and unpack the insidiousness of our current administration to save democracy and the America that we all love, despite our afiliations, religion, politics, beliefs, and individual differences. Freedom shall hopefully reign!

18 Malcolm X (after Eve Arnold), 2018 Oil on panel 20 x 17 3/4 inches

I have painted several pictures of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and other civil rights leaders, and have always wanted to paint Malcolm X, and was so glad for the opportunity to inally create this. I’m proud that my cousin Wendy Wolf edited the Pulitzer Prize winning book Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable, and this is her favorite image of him, and I’ve been yearning to paint it, and now seemed the time with the divisive politics of our current politics, which at bottom, seem to be


driven by race. The photo this image was based upon was by the great Eve Arnold, and I felt my job was to bring it further to life, if possible, and to make it in color in a painterly manner inspired by my subject. I like to get into the world of those that I paint by listening to audio that pertains most to my subjects and my state of mind, and it was a perfect blend to not only listen to his biography, but actual speeches he gave, which were incredibly compelling, of course, in addition to alternating this with the current news, listening to MSNBC, CNN, NPR and more Real News. It was incredibly bittersweet how still persistent and contemporary his speeches and conversations are to our present day, so many decades after, when I had hoped that we had progressed so much when in the Obama era. Coming from being a semiotics major at Brown, I was so intrigued by Malcolm X’s redeining of culture via language, bringing about the agency of those he spoke to by deconstructing the subjugating language that created ideology that suppressed African Americans, much of the same language and thought that creeped back out of the shadows in the racist Trump era. Malcolm X, despite his extremely complicated politics, in the end, I think he came to a peace that approached Dr. King, but it was also his intense earlier politics that helped to mobilize those who felt that King’s inspiration from Gandhi and his own religion was too passive. Although I don’t agree with all of this, the intellectual vigor that Malcolm X, obviously a genius, brought to his own ideas, always challenging himself and his views, is inspirational. As a gay man, I also appreciate the news that Malcolm X had his own homoerotic history, but moreover, the train of his thought, how he spoke, and the power in what he proclaimed in his self-invention and it helped to motivate a world is sublime. This is the energy that for me at this moment is the antidote to the rampant normalization that this new regime is trying to manifest—making America “great” again by attempting the white supremacist notion of bringing back the 50’s and all the social horror of what that can mean and their evil idiotic attempt to keep America white, straight, and male-dominated. Listening and thinking about Malcolm X seems like a super smart, almost for me punk rock cry of resistance, to create a new world that more relects the agency of a new great America where the “minority” is the “majority”. Like the watch on his wrist, it’s about time, and the ideas and being and pertinence of Malcolm X is immortal.

19 LeBron Dunk over Garnet, 2017 Oil on linen 36 x 40 inches

LeBron James, represents the very epitome of what My American Dream stands for, indeed for most people’s interpretation of the American Dream. He is also still a historic hometown hero for Ohio and now LA as he is with the Lakers, giving me inspiration to paint this great man who achieved all and broke the curse for a community with his incredible heart, mind, skill, and talents. Despite all odds, LeBron was able to have the vision and fortitude to achieve all, and with the support of his friends, family, coaches, school and community, to bring him and his world to new, visionary heights.I love images that capture historic moments, and have painted his famous “The Block,” where LeBron breaks the “Cleveland Curse” by his amazing play. In this image LeBron James “throws down a thunderous dunk” in Game 4 of the May 12, 2008 Game 4 NBA Playoff over the Celtics’ Kevin Garnett, considered one of his greatest plays ever. When painting this, I was again inspired by this man who is so generous and incredible, who plays and lives despite all odds to be one of the greatest athletes of all time, to bring victory not just to his teammates and state, but also to all Americans and people who struggle everywhere. He is also one of the most outspoken athletes and leaders of our day, opening a school in his hometown for the disadvantaged, and courageously speaking out against the Trump administration. I also am thinking of the great Goya paintings of matadors, where you see the crowd celebrating on the matador (and sometimes the bull) where his total concentration needs to be at the very public task at hand while sometimes you have a crowd jeering as much as cheering you on. In this image, you also have the lag, symbolizing America, LeBron’s tattoos, symbolizing his past, struggles, and ambitions, and a very quick moment in time that hopefully is captured forever.


20 CNN vs. Trump (Jim Acosta at a rally at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium, May 29, 2018, from a photo by Drew Angerer), 2019 Oil on linen 36 x 55 inches

Jim Acosta is currently the chief Whitehouse correspondent for CNN, which I watch and listen to, along with MSNBC, CNN, along with reading the New York Times and other sources of Real News. At this Trump rally, our president was ginning up his base by calling out the “fake news” media, egging them on to further demonize the individuals in their “press cages”, while ironically proceeding to descminate his own, very real, fake news. Acosta, especially after this rally, mentioned in interviews that while the base was invigorated in their heckling (FAKE NEWS! CNN SUCKS! SCUMBAGS! etc.) by Trump (who forges their response by energizing their anger at the media), that after, when they calm down, are also realizing that some of this is about the act of the moment, and actually want to take selies with him, discuss what is happening in the news, and so on. Acosta, whose father is Cuban, grew up in a working class environment—his father worked as a clerk and cashier at Safeway stores and his mother as a bartender and waitress in the Washington area. But he has been made into a villain by Trump and his administration—more recently, he was called out by Trump at a White House press conference, after asking a pertinent question as a “rude, terrible person” and that he “shouldn’t be working for CNN”. They had an intern attempt to grab Acosta’s mike away, and banned him from the White House. CNN sued, and his press credentials were restored. Obviously one of the irst paths to fascism is to control the press, one of the reasons it is part of our First Amendment. Although the play-acting part of the rallies is theater, the dark reality of how the Trumpian propaganda has attempted to wipe away notions of what is true and what is not is an Orwellian strategy to manipulate and brainwash the masses—and for a third of the nation, who doesn’t change the channel from Fox, Breitbart, and the rest, it’s working. I love the Bruegels, Bosch, Hogarth, and others who create these group scenes of their world’s groundlings of humanity, and recently again was enamored with Bruegel the Elders’ famous Netherlandish Proverbs painting in Berlin, which outlines in performative acts fables of the lows of the human comedy that still instructively resonate today, in addition to the great Goya bullighting paintings and more, and was very much thinking of these when painting this. I also love the ighting scene paintings of Bellows, and the synesthetic abstraction of his igures. Some of these I left in a rawer cartoon form that brings about their sensation of anger, and feel that the gentleman in Acosta is a direct binary to this circus. Also the format of the painting is like a lag, with Acosta in the blue quadrant where the stars would be, the blissed out nature of the chiaroscuro in the arena hopefully ascending to other worlds, transcending in a way that Acosta must when he holds his breath, speaking truth to power, his actions achieving the higher purpose of really telling the truth to make the world of America a better place, along with his amazing colleagues in our cherished news media, who have been the check and balance that has gotten us through these last years in the hope to save democracy.

21 Andrew and Empire, 2018 Oil on linen 78 x 52 inches

This is painting from a photo I took on my cell phone from recently when we still lived in Manhattan. This is from near the corner on 34th and 9th, and it’s the back of my husband Andrew Madrid’s head on the left, and to the right is where we would park our car in the lot to the right—we also used to go to the movie theater all the time on 34th St., and it could be from following him back one of those evenings. For the last few years of living here, I would obsessively post an image of the Empire State Building on social media, in a way giving a prayer of peace to my friends via this symbol, which for me


represents all that is good in America, NYC, and the good-energy power of the grand optimism of the Empire State Building, one of the great masterpieces of architecture in our world, built with extreme stealth in a time of the great depression. But in some cases, when distorted, the symbolism, in its abstraction, of what a falling Empire threatens to be, like the perilous Carl Andre bricks in his sculpture Manifest Destiny in the Judd home in Soho. I’m also channeling a bit of the Americana impressionism of Childe Hassam here, but also the Kirschner street scenes of peoples that are the source of his expressionistic anxieties (and Munch and more!), with the silhouette of my husband as an avatar to place them into the scene. When we lived here on the constant hustle, we really worked hard to achieve our dreams of success, both personally, politically, and in terms of career, and largely achieved a certain plateau, as now I’m proud to be a full tenured professor at USC with also an art career, good health, and good family. But we are in troubled times as a nation, and alternatively optimistically listening to the best music that inspires my soul, I listened to much of the “real” news of MSNBC, CNN, NPR and more, hoping for a better tomorrow with America’s democracy seeming to threaten to unravel under our current would-be fascist rule. Holding on and ighting has been a theme in our lives, and in the life of the nation, and I hope that some of this is impacted, even beyond the symbolism in this work. I like to bring modernism and the painterly to my postmodern subjects, and hope that projecting my thoughts and subconscious through my brush, painting the pixels of a motion and noise-illed phone camera pic of Empire like Cézanne would project onto his Mont Sainte-Victoire, could amount to something more transcendent than the actual object itself. Bringing about what I could perceive in the foliage of trees and distortion, painting micromanaged distortion as if it were real, is able to gleam the unconscious symbolist imagery that could encapsulate the spiritual hope, but also anxiety, of our tremulous age.

22 Tunnel View, Dec. 25 2016, 2017 Oil on Linen 40 x 60 inches

This painting is from my Yosemite in Winter series, which concentrates on iconic aspects of this great park (from my own photographs from a recent Christmas trip to Yosemite with my family) and, by extension, nature in general, speaking through the narrative allegory presented by the seasons to bring symbolic meaning to the works in our perilous times. Like Thomas Cole’s famous narrative The Voyage of Life, the panorama of same-size horizontal landscapes that comprise Yosemite in Winter is a story of nature at its end, perhaps, if we continue the environmental, spiritual, cultural and political path of our present Nation. Symbolically, Winter in Japanese screens and more represent death, or an end of a cycle, and here bespeak for the life of the parks and their heritage, but along with this, a better regard for environmental concerns to protect our future of our Earth and its people, environment, lora and fauna, air and water. This particular image was the climax of the series, and on our trip, where we were astounded by the true sublime view that made us feel so wonderfully and ineffably small in the context of the beauty of our world and history. I love James Ensor, the Brueghel’s and Bosch, but I also love Gorky and Dekooning and Pollock too. How to realize the aspects of your unconscious, and bring them to life without illustrating them like Dali is a slippery slope, and I think regarding nature, where forms are much more complex than anything we can imagine, and projecting your unconscious onto those forms, like Cézanne did when painting his Mont Sainte-Victoire can be an answer. I had fun with this painting, and ending this to Dylan’s Gates of Eden, thinking of the complicated times we live in, wanted it to be relective of the surreal, seemingly apocalyptic sometimes days we live in as Americans. I would thing that even the most conservative people would want Yosemite and the other National parks around for their children and their children’s grandchildren, and to do this, we need to care for not only the parks, but the environment that helps to support the National Parks, to be for clean energy, water, and the environment. If we can agree on this, perhaps we can agree on other things, the protection of people, their civil rights, empathy and compassion for all people, animals, and our Earth, so we can continue to prosper as a nation, culture, and world.


Keith Mayerson www.KeithMayerson.com Born May 18, 1966

Solo Exhibitions 2018 “Love/Liebe: Keith Mayerson & German Expressionist Masters-Otto Dix, George Grosz, Josef Scharl and more,” Weiss Berlin, Berlin, Germany “My American Dream, Mystery Train (in loving memory of Daniel Tinker Knapp),” Marlborough Contemporary, New York, NY, October 12-November 11, 2017. 2017 “My American Dream,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, Ohio. June 2-September 17, 2017. 2016 “My American Dream: Berlin Edition,” Weiss Berlin, Germany (Featuring a conversation on American painting with Ortrud Westheider (Director, Museum Barberini, Germany), Adam Weinberg (Director, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York), and Keith Mayerson, moderated by Kimberly Marteau Emerson (Embassy of the United States of America). Talk and opening September 21, 2016. 2015 “My American Dream,” Marlborough Chelsea, New York, NY “Iconscapes,” Freddy Gallery, Baltimore, MD 2014 “My American Dream: Frontiersman,“ David Shelton Gallery, Houston, TX “My American Dream (Prologue),” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2013 “My American Dream,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2012 “My American Dream,” Solo Booth for Derek Eller Gallery, NADA NYC Art Fair, New York 2011 “Life, Art & Fashion,” Shaheen Modern & Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH “Iconscapes: 1995-1999,” Knoedler Gallery, New York, NY 2010 “My Modern Life,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY “Good Leaders, Endangered Species,” Broadway Windows, 10th and Broadway (NYU), New York, NY 2009 “Souvenirs,” The Bakery - Annet Gelink Gallery, Amsterdam, The Netherlands “Both Sides Now: A Selection of Drawings 1992-2009,” Paul Kasmin Gallery (project room), New York, NY 2008 “Good Leaders, Endangered Species, Ships At Sea, Part II,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY “Good Leaders, Endangered Species, Ships At Sea,” Kim Light / Lightbox, Los Angeles, CA 2007 “Friends & Family,” Shaheen Modern & Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH 2006 “Kings & Queens,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY “Heroes,” Gallery Alain Noirhomme, Brussels, Belgium


2005 “Rebel Angels at the End of the World,” QED Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 2004 “Hamlet 1999,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2003 “Hamlet 1999, Pt. 3,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2000 “Illuminations,” The Fifth International, New York, NY 1997 “Paintings and Drawings,” Jay Gorney Modern Art, New York, NY 1995 “Monty’s Dream: The Sleeper in the Valley,” Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA 1994 “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell!” Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA 1993 “Pinocchio the Big Fag,” Kiki Gallery, San Francisco, CA

Group Exhibitions 2019 “Portraits,” Foxy Production, New York, NY 2018 “Mixed Bag: Drawings” curated by Joe Bradley and Jeremy Willis, Real Estate Fine Art, Brooklyn, NY “My Kid Could Do That,” Project Art LA/The Underground Museum, Los Angeles, CA “ROCK,” curated by Tony Payne, PHIL, Los Angeles, CA 2017 “Keith Mayerson, Julius von Bismarck, Werner Büttner ” Marlborough Contemporary, The Armory Show, New York, NY, March 1-5. “Drawing Island,” The Journal Gallery, New York, NY “Heartbreak Hotel,” Invisible-Exports, New York, NY 2016 “Landscapes,” Marlborough Chelsea, New York, NY “2 Years of Looking,” curated by Erik Hanson, New Art Projects, London “Logic Frog,” Allen & Eldride (James Fuentes project space), New York, NY “Foundation Barbin Presents: Redeux (Sort of),” curated by Lucky DeBellevue, Kai Matsumiya Gallery, NY “Intensive Nesting,” curated by Brad Phillips, Galerie Division, Montreal, Canada 2015 “America is Hard to See,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY “EAGLES II,” Galeria Marlborough Madrid, Madrid, Spain 2014 “The Great Figure,” The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn, NY “Keith Mayerson and Peter Saul,” Robert Blumenthal Gallery, New York, NY “Don’t Look Now”, Zach Feuer Gallery, New York, NY, curated by Jesse Greenberg and MacGregor Harp/247365 Gallery “Inaugural Exhibition,” Sarah Gavlak Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “Parallel Myths,” David Shelton Gallery, Houston, TX “This One’s Optimistic,: New Britain Museum of Art, New Britain, CT, curated by Cary Smith “2014 Whitney Biennial,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY


2013 “A Point of View: Selected Gifts from the Laurence A. Rickels Collection,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, March 20-June 9. “Jew York,” Zach Feuer Gallery, New York, NY “All F@*#ing Summer,” Gavlak Gallery, Palm Beach, FL 2012 “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” curated by Ilan Cohen with Quan Bao, SecondGuest, New York, NY and Ana Cristea Gallery, New York “All I Want is a Picture of You,” Angles Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “Group Shoe,” curated by Joe Bradley, Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York, NY “Its Always Summer on the Inside,” curated by Dan McCarthy, Anton Kern Gallery, New York, NY “B-OUT,” curated by Scott Hug, Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York, NY “The End,” curated by Michael Buhler-Rose and John Connelly, Vogt Gallery, New York, NY 2011 “Keith Mayerson: Horror Hospital Unplugged, Dominic McGill: Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY “8 Americans” (Organizer. Hilary Berseth, Joe Bradley, Jacob Cassay, Ann Craven, Francesca DiMattio, Wade Guyton, Keith Mayerson, Dana Schutz), September 2011, Maruani & Noirhomme Gallery, Brussels, Belgium “Joni,” Kathleen Cullen Fine Arts, New York, NY “Put Up or Shut Up,” New York Academy of Art, New York, NY 2010 “Ink Plots: The Tradition of the Graphic Novel at SVA,” Visual Arts Gallery, New York, NY “The Pencil Show,” Foxy Production, New York, NY “Keith Mayerson, Kent Henricksen,” Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn, NY “Wall to Wall,” Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, CA “The Boneyard,” Kim Light/Lightbox, Los Angeles, CA 2009 “The Never-Ending Story: Fairy Tales, Fantasy, Obsession,” curated by Laura Hoptman, Royal/T, Culver City, CA “Out of Order,” curated by Scott Hug, Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York, NY “Naked,” Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, NY “The Tree,” James Cohan Gallery, Shanghai, China “New Acquisitions,” Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH “Figuratively Seeing,” Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston, MA 2008 “Peanut Gallery,” curated by Joe Bradley, The Journal Gallery, Brooklyn, NY “THINGS BEHIND THE SUN,” PHIL, Los Angeles, CA “Summer Group Exhibition, “ Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY “Friends and Family,” Anton Kern Gallery, New York, NY “Kiki: The Proof Is In the Pudding,” Ratio 3, San Francisco, CA “The Guys We Would Fuck,” curated by Nayland Blake, Monya Rowe Gallery, New York, NY “History Keeps Me Awake at Night: A Geneaology of Wojnarowicz,” PPOW Gallery, New York, NY “Artist as Publisher,” The Center For Book Arts, New York “ambivalent iguration; people,” Samson Projects, Boston, MA “a new high in getting low II,” John Connelly Presents, New York, NY 2007 “Genesis I’m Sorry, ”Greene Naftali Gallery, New York, NY “Joe Bradley, Ann Craven, Dana Frankfort, Keith Mayerson,” Zach Feuer Gallery, New York, NY 2006 “Likeness (Portraits from All Angles),” Geoffrey Young Gallery, Great Barrington, MA “Summer Group Exhibition,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY “How I Finally Accepted Fate,” curated by Jason Murison, EFA Gallery, New York, NY “This Name of This Show is Not GAY ART NOW,” curated by Jack Pierson, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, NY “Salon,” Greene Naftali, New York, NY


“Inaugural Group Exhibition,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2005 “The Most Splendid Apocalypse,” curated by Jason Murison, PPOW Gallery, New York, NY “This Hard, Gem-Like Flame,” curated by Joseph R. Wolin, Angstrom Gallery, Dallas, TX “On Paper: Drawings from the 1960’s to the Present,” Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 2004 “Under the Sun,” Greener Pastures Contemporary Art, Toronto, Ontario “Rimbaud,” curated by Max Henry, I-20, New York, NY “The Sublime is (Still) Now,” curated by Joseph R. Wolin, Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York, NY “Let the Bullshit Run a Marathon,” curated by Nate Lowman, Nicole Klagsbrun, New York, NY 2003 “K48,” Dietch Projects Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY “Hothouse; Contemporary Floras,” curated by Mary Jo Vath, Gallery of Art & Science, New York, NY “You,” curated by Lisa Kirk, Royal Modern, New York, NY “A New New York Scene--K48 Teenage Rebel: The Bedroom Show,” Gallerie du Jour at Agnes B., Paris, France FIAC art fair, curated by Scott Hug, Paris, France “Magazin (K48: Do Not Provoke Us),” Marres, Maastricht, Holland “Now Playing,” D’Amelio Terras Gallery, New York. NY “Drawings,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2002 “Kool Kult,” k48, Scope Art Fair, New York “25th Anniversary Selections Exhibition,” The Drawing Center, New York, NY “Landscape,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY 2001 “Reiguring Painting,” Los Angeles County Museum “Group Exhibition,” American Fine Art at P.H.A.G., New York, NY 2000 “Recent Acquisitions,” Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles, CA “Fore and Aft,” Acme., Los Angeles, CA 1999 “The Stroke,” curated by Ross Bleckner, Exit Art, New York, NY “Young New York Painters,” curated by Ross Bleckner, Baldwin Gallery, Aspen, CO 1998 “Inaugural Show,” curated by Jennifer Bornstein and Chevy’s Clem, The Fifth International, New York, NY “he swam down, away,” curated by Tony Payne, Audiello Fine Art, Inc., New York, NY “Painting: Now and Forever,” Pat Hearn and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, NY “Codex USA: Works on Paper by American Artists,” Entwistle Gallery, London, UK “I Love New York,” Edinburgh International Art Festival, Edinburgh College, Edinburgh, Scotland “Bathroom,” curated by Wayne Koestenbaum, Thomas Healy Gallery, New York, NY “View 3,” curated by Klaus Kertess, Mary Boone Gallery, New York, NY “Francis Alys, Keith Mayerson, Franklin Preston, Hiroshi Sugito,” Audiello Fine Art Inc., New York, NY “More,” curated by Tony Payne, XL Gallery, New York, NY 1997 “Paintings and Sculpture,” Luhring Augustine, New York, NY “Three Painters,” curated by Jack Pierson, Musee d’art Contemporain de Bordeaux, France 1996 “The Name of the Place,” curated by Laurie Simmons, Casey Kaplin Gallery, New York, NY


“Young, Dumb, and Fun,“ curated by David Pagel, University of Las Vegas, Nevada “The Incredible Power of Cheap Sentiment,” curated by Bill Arning, White Columns, New York, NY “Annual Summer Watercolor Exhibition,” curated by Tom Woodruff, P.P.O.W., New York, NY 1995 “Degenerative Art Show,” The Lab, San Francisco, CA “The Moderns,” curated by Tony Payne, Feature Gallery, New York, NY “Faggots,” curated by Bill Arning, Rojes Foundation, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina “Stretch Out & Wait,” Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA 1994 “Stonewall 25,” curated by Bill Arning, White Columns, New York, NY “Dave’s Not Here Show,” Three Day Weekend, Los Angeles, CA “Red Rover,” Three Day Weekend, Los Angeles, CA “Tiny Shoes,” New Langton Arts, San Francisco, CA “Selections Spring ‘94,” The Drawing Center, New York, NY (brochure) “Playield,” curated by Randy Summers, Rio Hondo College, Wittier, CA 1993 “Sick Joke,” Kiki Gallery, San Francisco, CA “Steve Crique, Keith Mayerson, Tyler Stallings,” Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA

Bibliography 2018 Starnes, Sadie Rebecca, “Ruins in Reverse,” Brooklyn Rail, Nov. 1 Pepper, Jeremy, “Comic-Con, not just about comics anymore, is changing the entertainment industry,” USC News, July 19 Rosenfeld, Jason, “Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings,” Brooklyn Rail, March 5 “What We Sold at the Dallas Art Fair,” Artsy, April 15 2017 Phipps, Laura. “Paciic Coast Issue,” New American Paintings, January Colucci, Emily, “Questions In A World of Blue: “Heartbreak Hotel” at INVISIBLEEXPORTS, Filthy Dreams (online), Feb. 28 Donoghue, Katy. “15 Finds at the Armory Show,” Whitewall.com (online), March 3 Luxe Interiors + Design (Colorado Edition) March Bohle, Ruppert, “Art Fair: Our Best Pics form the Armory Show 2017,” Berlin Art Link, March 6 2016 Fitzgerald, Ali, “Keith Mayerson and the American Dream” Place Part Here 2, Art21, Nov/Dec Issue, Dec. 22, 2015 Rosenfeld Ph.D., Jason, “Landscape”, essay for Marlborough Chelsea, Summer. “Keith Mayerson at Weiss Berlin,” Artviewer, October 27 (online) Owens, Alexandra, “Keith Mayerson Paints Lebron James for MOCA Cleveland,” Sotheby’s (online magazine), August 29. USC Roski Makes Transformative Faculty Hires,” USC News, August. Vankin, Deborah, “USC Roski School of Art and Design rebuilds with “transformative new hires,” Los Angeles Times, August 4th. Keith Mayerson, “Drum Majors,” Whitney Museum of American Art Facebook and Instagram posts, January 18. 2015 Wolin, Joe, “Keith Mayerson,” TimeOut New York, December 2-8, pg. 55 (critic’s pick) Pollack, Maika, “Keith Mayerson,” Interview, November 2015, pgs. 32-33. Russeth, Andrew, “The Whitney Opens With a Winner,” ARTnews, April 23. Indrisek, Scott, “The Whitney, Chapter by Chapter: How to See 100-Plus Years of Art in One Day,” Blouin Artinfo.com, April 23. Mogilevskaya, Regina, “Preview: America Is Hard to See at the Whitney”, Blouin ArtInfo. com, April 23. Bilsborough, Michael. “Course of Empire,” SVA Continuing Education Blog, April 23. Paddy Johnson, “At the Whitney: Industry, Advertising, and Death Makes America Hard


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O’Connor, Colleen M., “The 2014 Whitney Biennial Struggles for Breath,” ictive sister, March 9 (content) Gisla, “Whitney Museum Biennial 2014,” Taxi Amarelo, Nova York, March 8 (image) * McGarry, Kevin, “Art Matters: The Whitney Biennial’s Last Upper East Side Hurrah,” The New York Times TMagazine blog, March 7 (image) * DeFore, John, “Whitney 2014 Biennial: Five Hot Artists to Watch,” The Hollywood Reporter, March 7 (image and interview) * McGarry, Kevin, “Whitney Biennial 2014,” Art Agenda, March 7 (image and content) * Matorin, David, “Spring/Break Art Show Brings A Focus on the Personal,” Art F City, March 7 (image and content) “The 2014 Whitney Biennial Starts Today,” INHALE, March 7 (image) Yung, Susan, “The Biennial’s Uptown Salvo,” Ephemeralist, March 7 (content) Creahan, D., “New York-the Whitney Biennial Through May 25th, 2014,” March 7 (content) Sarang Lee, Joo, “Festival of Art in New York is now, ‘plop’” Korea Daily, March 7 (image and content) Kalm, James, “2014 Whitney Biennial, Part II,” March 7 (video) * Halle, Howard, “Review: 2014 Whitney Biennial,” TimeOut New York, Thursday, March 6 (lead image) * Russeth, Andrew, “The 2014 Whitney Biennial Disappoints, with Misires, Omissions, Only Glimmers of Greatness,” NY Observer’s Gallerist, March 6 (content) * “Your Guide to the Artists of the 2014 Whitney Biennial,” Hufington Post, March 6 (image and interview) Chang, Soojin, “Preview: 2014 Whitney Biennial at the Whitney Museum of American Art,” Hi Fructose, March 6 Diamond Hamer, Katy, “First Impressions: the 2014 Whitney Biennial, NY,” Eyes Towards the Dove, March 6 * Vartanian, Hrag, “Whitney Biennial 2014: Stuart Comer on the Third Floor,” Hyperallergic, March 5 (image and content) Ozeri, Bianca “The 2014 Whitney Biennial,” The Wild Magazine, March 5, (image and content) * Indrisek, Scott, “103 Reasons to Visit the 2014 Whitney Biennial,” Blackbook, March 4 (image and content) * Zevitas, Steven, “Must See Painting Shows: March 2014,” Hufington Post, March 4 (image and content) Jeppesen, Travis, “Rethinking the Language of Art: The Whitney Biennial 2014 Beyond Discourse,” ArtMag by Deutsche Bank, March 4 (content) Komarek, Eva, “A Farewell to Upper East Trio,” Die Press.com, March 2 (Germany, content) “Whitney Biennial 2014,” Fluoro, March 1 (image) Michael Wilson, “Spotlight: Keith Mayerson,” New American Painting #111, April 2014, pgs. 8-12 (lengthy article and images) * Vogel, Carol, “State of Our Art, According to the Whitney: A Guide to the 2014 Whitney Museum Biennial,” New York Times, Feb. 28, 2014, pg. C21 (image and lengthier content) 2013 Zevitas, Steven, “14 Painters (+2) to Watch in 2014, Hufington Post (online), Dec. 20 Zevitas, Steven, “14 Painters (+2) to Watch in 2014, New American Paintings (online), Dec. 19 Russeth, Andrew. “The Year in, and Beyond, the Galleries,” The New York Observer, “Gallerist,” (online blog), Dec. 19 Kirsch, Corinna and Whitney Kimball, “The Deinitive NADA Slideshow and Commentary, “ Art F City, (art blog), Dec. 6 Smith, Roberta, “Last Chance: Keith Mayerson, My American Dream,” New York Times, Friday, May 24, pg. C18 Hamer, Katy, “My American Dream,” Keith Mayerson @ Derek Eller, NY, Eyes Towards the Dove (online), Monday, May 20 Bilsborough, Michael, “Northern Lights,” (My American Dream exhibition review), SVA Continuing Education Blog, May 8 McGarry, Kevin, “Sketch Troup,” V Magazine, vol. 83, Summer, 2013, pg. 38 Chang, Stella, “My American Dream Exhibition,” Rambling Masterpiece (online), May. 2012 Penn, Asher, “Keith Mayerson” (Interview), SEX Magazine #2 Kazakina, Katya, “Martha Graham Sets, Older Artists in Westbeth Flooding,”


Bloomberg.com, Nov. 3 Russeth, Andrew, “Chelsea Galleries Begin Recovery Work,” Gallerist, NY Observer.com Nov. 1 ”We Went to NADA,” Art Fag City, May 8 Belasco, Daniel, “Suturing In: Anne Frank as Conceptual Model for Visual Art,” Anne Frank Unbound: Media/Imagination/Memory, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Jeffrey Shandler, eds. Indiana University Press ”Slideshow, Art from NADA 2012,” Blouin Artinfo, May 8 Herman, Sasha, “NADA New York 2012 Preview,” NY Observer.com, April 30 Miller, Michael H., Rozalia Jovanowitz, Andrew Rosseth “Gallerist’s Frieze Week in Pictures,” NY Observer.com, May 7 D’Agostino, Paul, “Big Art Fairs Swarm NYC This Weekend,” The L Magazine “Something for NADA,” Art + Auction, May 2011 Bilsborough, Michael, “Unplugged, Rebooted,” School of Visual Arts Continuing Education Blog Kimball, Whitney, “Horror Hospital Unplugged at Derek Eller Gallery”, Art Fag City.com, October 24 Price, Ada, “Pioneering Graphic Novel, “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Back in Print, Publishers Weekly, October 11 Fitzpatrick, Colin “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” (book review), Lambda Literary.org, August 22 Butler, Blake, “Dennis Cooper & Keith Mayerson’s Horror Hospital Unplugged,” HTML Giant.com, July 28 Litt, Steven, “Keith Mayerson paintings in wonderful exhibit at Cleveland’s Shaheen gallery,” Cleveland Plain Dealer, July 20 Frank, Alex, “Studio Visit: Keith Mayerson,” The FADER.COM, July 7 Frank, Alex, “Dead Again,”, The FADER, June/July, pg. 74 “Keith Mayerson Discusses ‘Iconscapes 1995-1999,” School of Visual Arts Briefs, Summer Hart, Tom, “Why We Love Keith Mayerson,” Seriously Comics, Summer Hartinger, Bruce “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” (book review), AfterElton.com, June 27 “Short List,” The New Yorker, May 16 Wei, Tingting, “Interview with Keith Mayerson,” WhiteHot Magazine, May Wollen, Joseph, “Joni Mitchell,” TimeOut NY, January 28 2010 Smith, Roberta, “Keith Mayerson: My Modern Life,” The New York Times, November 12 Russeth, Andrew “Keith Mayerson, My Modern Life,” ArtInfo.com/Modern Painters, Nov. 4 “The View Master,” The New York Observer.com, Oct. 26 Finch, Charlie, “Eleventh Avenue Ramble,” Artnet.com Magazine, October 25 Saltz, Jerry, “Ask an Art Critic,” Artnet.com, and NYMagazine, “Vulture,” Oct. 18 Wollen, Joe. “Neo-Integrity: Comics Edition,” Time Out New York, August 10 Le Hay, Benjamin-Emile, “Artists Nate Lowman and Keith Mayerson Take a Long, Hard Look at Humanity,” Black Book Art Review, August 17 Phillips, Brad, “Keith Mayerson,” (interview), Hunter and Cook 06, Summer Saltz, Jerry, “Remembrances of Louise Bourgois’s Salons,” New York Magazine.com, June 3 “Neo-Integrity at MoCCA,” Publisher’s Weekly The Beat, March 31 2009 Sokol, Brett, “36 Hours in Cleveland,” The New York Times, September 20 “Bang for your Buck,” Art + Auction, July-August Heller, Fran, “Art Museum’s New East Wing is a Celebration of Firsts,” Cleveland Jewish News, Friday, July 3 Litt, Steven, “Cleveland Museum of Art Displays New Acquisitions in East Wing,” The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, OH Time Out Amsterdam (image and listing), June Cotter, Holland. “Peanut Gallery,” The New York Times, Art Review, Jan 29 2008 “Keith Mayerson,” The New Yorker, Galleries - Chelsea, November 10 “History Keeps Me Awake At Night,” The New Yorker, Galleries - Chelsea, August 4 Cotter, Holland. “History Keeps Me Awake At Night,” The New York Times, July 25


Vogel, Traci. “Time in a Bottle,” San Francisco Weekly, July 9-15, Vol. 27, No. 24 Greenield, Beth. “Body of Inluence.” Time Out New York, Issue 667, Jul 10-16 Rosenberg, Karen. “A New High in Getting Low,” The New York Times, Mar 7 Bradley, Joe, “Salon XXIV,” The Journal: Contemporary Culture, Spring NY 2007 “Joe Bradley / Ann Craven / Dana Frankfort / Keith Mayerson,” The New Yorker, Galleries - Chelsea, August 20 Saltz, Jerry, “Has Money Ruined Art?,” New York Magazine, October 15. Keith Mayerson, New American Paintings, no. 68, pgs. 90-93 (and cover) Katz, Miriam, “NeoIntegrity,” Artforum.com, August. Cotter, Holland, “NeoIntegrity” (starred capsule review), Friday August 17 and 24. “NeoIntegrity,” (capsule review), Paper Magazine, August, pg. 120. “Neo-Integrity,” capsule review, The New Yorker, August 27 “Perfect 10: This Week’s News & to-Do’s,” New York Daily News, Monday, August 13. Cotter, Holland. “When the Curator Is Also an Artist, Go Ahead, Expect Surprises,” The New York Times, August 9 Glaser, Cris, “Family Guy,” Cleveland Scene.com, April 17. 2006 White, Roger, “Keith Mayerson Kings and Queens,” The Brooklyn Rail, Dec 05/Jan 07, Artseen p. 44 Gelber, Eric. “James Reilly and Keith Mayerson,” artcritical.com, December Wolin, Joseph R., “Keith Mayerson,” Time Out New York, Nov 23-29, p. 99 Gelber, Eric. “Of Groups - and Individuals,” The New York Sun, Nov 16 2005 Knight, Christopher. “Fresh, original voices in L.A.: A deceptive look at a mythic igures,” Los Angeles Times, October 28 Ammirati, Dominic. “Keith Mayerson,” Artforum, February. p. 175 2004 Smith, Roberta. “Keith Mayerson,” The New York Times, December 24 Speers Mears, Emily. “Keith Mayerson,” Artforum.com, December 13 Smith, Roberta. “Rimbaud,” The New York Times, July 30, p. E35 Levin, Kim. “Rimbuad,” The Village Voice, July 28 Johnson, Ken. “The Sublime is (Still) Now,” The New York Times, June 11 Walker, Kelley. “Top Ten,” Artforum, April Cohen, Michael. “Keith Mayerson,” artUS, April – May Keith Mayerson, “Work in Progress,” V Magazine Schmidt, Jason, “Artists” 2003 Cotter, Holland. “Keith Mayerson,” The New York Times, December 12 Mmirati, Domenick. “Critic’s Pick: You,” Arforum.com, October 2002 Kannenberg Jr., Gene. “Read All (or Some) About It,” X-Tra, Vol. 3, No. 3, Spring The Comics Journal, Issue No.242, April, p. 68-69 “Landscape,” Time Out New York, Reviews, February 21, Issue No. 334 1998 Herbert, Martin. “Codex USA,” (Review), Time Out, London, page 51 Rimanelli, David. “Painting Now and Forever,” Listings, The New Yorker, June-July Duncan, Michael. “Keith Mayerson at Jay Gorney,” Art in America, Reviews, June, p. 107 Johnson, Ken. “View Three,” The New York Times, Reviews, May 1, p. E43 Drenner, Craig. “View Three,“ NY Arts Magazine, May, p. 29 Mayerson, Keith. “Guest Room With a View,” Paper, May, p. 49 (illus.) James, Merlin. “New York: Recent Painting,” Burlington Magazine, London, February, p. 65-67 Still, Torri. “Filling the Canvas,” Brown Alumni Monthly, January/February, p. 38-43 1997 Schwendener, Martha. “Keith Mayerson,” Time Out New York, Nov. 20-27, p. 47 Arning, Bill. “Keith Mayerson,” Bomb, November ”Keith Mayerson,” (Interview), Dangerous Drawings, Juno Books, New York


Featured Artist, Honcho, November, p.66-67 Carter, Holland. ““The Name of the Place,” The New York Times, Reviews, February 24 Tom, Karen. “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Cover, Volume 11, Number 5, p. 59 Hainley, Bruce. “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Index, May, pg. 79 Marston, Jayson. ““Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Drummer, August, vol. 208, p. 49-50 “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Library Journal, April 1 “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Attitude, London, March, p. 22 “Cult Fiction,” Gay Times, London, February, p. 69 “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Bay Area Guardian, Literature Section, February 1996 Knight, Christopher. ”Review,” Los Angeles Times, April 10, Section F, p. 6 Pagel, David. “Keith Mayerson,” Art Issues, September/October, p. 40 “PW’s Best Books,” Publisher’s Weekly, November 4, P. 57 “Horror Hospital Unplugged,” Publisher’s Weekly, September 23, p. 71 Rimanelli, David. ‘The Young and the Feckless: Keith Mayerson’s comic rock novel,” OUT, October, p. 66 “A Brilliant Chick Parody,” OUT, August 1995 Greene, David A. “Review,” ART & TEXT, January, p. 71 FRAMEWORK, Volume 7, issue 3, p. 23-26 (illus.) Red Hot + Bothered: The Indie Rock Guide to Dating, Volumes 1 (pp. 11, 21) & Volume 2 (Back Cover) (illustrations), magazine produced by the Red Hot Organization, included with album compilations Michel, Deborah. “The Himbos are Coming! The Himbos are Coming!” BUZZ, April, p. 59 1994 Relyea, Lane. “Openings: Keith Mayerson,” Artforum, April 1994, p. 92 Helland, Glen. “Sympathy For the Devil,” San Francisco Weekly, April 6, 1994, Vol. XII, no. 6, p. 19. Duncan, Michael. “LA Rising,” Art in America, December, p. 72 Myers, Terry R. “On View: Los Angeles,” New Art Examiner, December, p. 36 Pagel, David. “Art Review: Convention Unites with Gay Fantasy,” Los Angeles Times, October 6, p. F4 Saltz, Jerry, “L.A. Rising,” Art & Auction, April, page 88 Atkins, Robert. “Queer For You,” Village Voice, June 28 Bonnetti, David. “Gallery Watch: Give ‘em that ‘ol tired religion,” San Francisco Examiner, April 15, p. D10 Cotter, Holland. “The Joys of Childhood Reexamined,” The New York Times, March 25, p. C30 1993 Bonnetti, David. “A Queer Way To Look At Pinocchio,” San Francisco Examiner, Friday, November, p. E10 Helland, Glen. “Art,” San Francisco Weekly, November 17, p. 15 Provenzano, Jim. “Pinocchio Queeriied,” Bay Area Reporter, vol. XXIII, November 18, section II 1990 Snook, Raven. “Cameo’s: K. Mayerson’s “A Child Is Being Beaten,” The Village Voice, August 7, p. 100

Education 1988 1993

B.A., Semiotics and Studio Art, Brown University M.F.A., University of California, Irvine

Teaching Experience 2016-present Professor of Art (with tenure), Roski School of Art and Design, University of Southern California (Graduate Studies, Advanced Painting, Comics Projects, Painting II)


2005-2016 Cartooning Coordinator, School of Visual Arts (Administrative Position, acting as a conduit between Cartooning Faculty and Students and Chair, organizer of Precollege Cartooning Program, Organizer and host of: Illustration and Cartooning Continuing Education Open House, Illustration and Cartooning Professional Portfolio Day, Cartooning Accepted Students Day, “Fresh Meat: SVA’s Comic Convention”, the SVA booth at comic conventions. Faculty advisor for cartooning club “Cartoon Allies” and “INK!” the cartooning magazine). 1995-99, 2000-2016 Faculty, School of Visual Arts Classes taught: Senior Portfolio, Junior Thesis, Sophomore Principals, Advanced (Model) Drawing, Senior Series: Anime Wonderland, Drawing, Precollege Cartooning, Continuing Education Advanced Cartooning, Graduate Advisor/Mentor 2014 Adjunct Lecturer/Visiting Artist, Brown University Classes taught: Critique Intensive class for seniors 2012-13 Assistant Professor of Professional Practice in Visual Arts in the Faculty of the Arts, Columbia University Classes taught: MFA Graduate Student Critique, Senior Studio, Foundation Painting (also served on 5 MFA thesis committees, also 5 additional thesis committees in 2014) Spring 2012 Adjunct Assistant Professor, Columbia University Classes taught: MFA Graduate Student Critique (also served on 5 MFA thesis committees) Spring 2011 Core Critic, Graduate Painting Program, Yale University School of Art Classes taught: intensive MFA studio visits 2008-2011 Adjunct Lecturer, Brooklyn College (MFA, MA, and Undergraduate) Classes taught: Master Painting (MFA, MA), Graduate Critique Seminar, Painting 3 (Advanced, undergraduate) 1998-99, 2000-2012 Adjunct Instructor, New York University (BFA, MA) Classes taught: Senior Honors Studio, Senior Integrated Liberal Arts Seminar, Drawing (and Painting) Foundation, Galleries and Museums of New York (for MA and BFA), Graduate Critique, Advanced Painting, Visual Arts Praxis, Semiotics and Art, individual mentorships and independent studies 1999-2000 Adjunct Professor, University of California, Irvine Classes taught: Contemporary Art History, Advanced Painting, Art and theory seminar 1999 Instructor, “Four Painters Program”, Museum School, Boston Classes taught: intensive MFA studio visits 1995 Adjunct Professor, University of California, Irvine Classes taught: Advanced Painting

Public Collections Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY Los Angeles Country Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA


The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA The Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, OH The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH American University Museum, Washington, D.C.

Visiting Artist Lectures and Guest Teaching Visiting artist: Brown University’s wintersession course From Beginning to End: Process and Creation, 2019 New York Academy of Art, NYC, 2015 “Teacher Exchange Workshop” Whitney Museum, NY, 2014 Columbus Museum of Art, OH, 2013 Columbia University, NY; 2009, 2011, 2013 (three times) Yale University, NY: 2013, 2012 (twice) Bennington College (2014) American University (2008) University of Tennessee (2008) Tyler School of Art, Temple University, PA (1997) Museum School in Boston, “Four Painters Program” (1999) School of Visual Arts MFA (2013, 2011, 2007, 2005, 2001—at least 5 times) Boston University (2014, 2012, 2011—three times) Brown University (1998, 2015—twice)

Panels and Artist Talks 2017 Conversation regarding R.B. Kitaj, moderated by curator Barry Schwabsky, with artists Natalie Frank. Samua Lamtarpvslu and R. B. Kitaj Studio Project Director Tracey Bartley, Marlborough Contemporary, New York. 2016 Conversation on American painting with Ortrud Westheider (Director, Museum Barberini, Germany), Adam Weinberg (Director, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York), and Keith Mayerson, moderated by Kimberly Marteau Emerson (Embassy of the United States of America), Weiss Berlin, Germany. 2014 “Breakfast With the Director (Adam Weinberg),” Whitney Museum of American Art. May 14. “Making the Invisible, Visible: Willem van Genk’s Mapping of Modern Life,” moderated by Dan Mazur, also featuring Ans van Berkum, Dr. Valerie Rousseau, Patrick Allegaert, Ben Katchor. American Folk Art Museum, New York City, October 8. “Strong Female Protagonists,” Shelly Bond, Alitha Martinez, Diane Noomin, Raina Telegemeir, moderated and organized by Keith Mayerson, part of the Society of Illustrators/MoCCA Comics Week, School of Visual Arts, April 1. 2013 “Painting Expanded Symposium,” California College of the Arts, April 13 (Participating artists include Mary Heilmann, Keith Mayerson, Keltie Ferris, Meleko Mogkosi, Dushko Petrovich, Lecia Dole Recio, Amy Bessone, Tom LaDuke. Mary Weatherford, Vincent Fecteau). 2011 “8 Americans” (Hilary Berseth, Joe Bradley, Jacob Cassay, Ann Craven, Francesca DiMattio, Wade Guyton, Keith Mayerson, Dana Schutz), September 2011, Alain Noirhomme Gallery, Brussels 2011 (video series). 2010 “A Conversation with Gary Panter and Peter Saul, moderated by Keith Mayerson,” Thursday, August 19, Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art, New York. “Dash Shaw and Keith Mayerson in Conversation,” Tuesday, May 25, Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art, New York.


Boards 2007-2011 Board of Trustees, Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art, NY

Curated Exhibitions 2011 “8 Americans” (Hilary Berseth, Joe Bradley, Jacob Cassay, Ann Craven, Francesca DiMattio, Wade Guyton, Keith Mayerson, Dana Schutz), September 2011, Alain Noirhomme Gallery, Brussels 2010 “NeoIntegrity: Comics Edition,” Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art, New York, NY 2007 “NeoIntegrity,” Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY

Published Essays, Articles, and Commissioned Printed Artistic Projects 2019 James Dean: My Life in Pictures, forthcoming graphic novel to be published by Fantagraphics 2017 My American Dream, forthcoming catalog for MOCA Cleveland exhibition My American Dream, Turps Banana, London. January. R.B. Kitaj at the Forefront, catalog essay, Kitaj: The Exile at Home, Marlborough Chelsea, March. 2016 Keith Mayerson, Adam Weinberg, Ortrud Westheider, My American Dream: Berlin Edition 2014 “Spruh!”, Andy Warhol’s Interview (commissioned assignment, German Edition), November, pp. 242-43. “Ode to Andy” (commissioned assignment), Interview, October, pp. 118-19. “Dreamtime,” Artforum.com, July 2 (artist article and image) “The NeoIntegrity Manifesto—My American Dream,” Whitney Biennial Catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art 2013 “Letter written on a plane to and fro Columbus,” (My American Dream catalog essay), Derek Eller Gallery, New York 2012 “Interview with Dan McCarthy,” Dan McCarthy (catalog interview), Suzanne Tarasieve Gallery, Paris 2011 “NeoIntegrity: Comics Edition,” (interview with Keith Mayerson, curator, conducted by Peter Halley) “Kevin Kelly,” (commissioned assignment), The Journal “Dana Schutz: 8 Americans”, Artforum online (video interview) “Joe Bradley: 8 Americans”, Artforum online (video interview) 2009 “The Artist’s Artists: Keith Mayerson, Stevie Wonder, Gershin Prize for Popular Song (the White House, Washington DC)” Artforum, December 2009 (best of the year capsule review) 2008


“Jane Freillicher: Recent Paintings,”, Tibor De Nagy Gallery, NY (catalogue essay) “Kathe Burkhart: The Liz Taylor Series: The First 25 Years, 1982-2007”, Modern Painters, March 2008, (book review) “How Haute It Is,” Interview, April, p. 130-133 (commissioned assignment) 2007 “Annie Lennox,” Interview, Oct. 2007, pg. 155 (commissioned assignment) 2006 “Moomin: the Complete Tove Jansson Comic Strip,” Modern Painters, September, pg. 114. “Keith Mayerson on Randy Wray,” BOMB, Spring 2006, Number 95, pgs. 46-47. 2005 “Wake the Sleepers,” ArtUS, May-June, pgs. 16-18 2002 Sehorn, Jason, and Keith Mayerson. “Why I Didn’t Rush the End Zone,” (commissioned assignment), Interview, February, p. 40 2000 “Icons & Iconography in Technocratic Culture: The Sleeping Painting,” Xtra, Spring, Vol. 3, Issue 3, pgs. 23-28. 1997 “Self Portrait,” The New Yorker, Nov. 10, p. 28 (illus.) 1994 “Family Value Cartoons,” Faultline, May, p. 39-43

Artist’s Books 2018 Love/Liebe: Keith Mayerson & German Expressionist Masters (catalog essays) James Dean: My Life in Pictures (graphic novel, in progress, to be published by Fantagraphics Books 2017 My American Dream (exhibition catalog for the forthcoming solo MOCA Cleveland show) My American Dream: Berlin Edition (book and exhibition catalog), Weiss Berlin, Germany 2016 My American Dream (book and exhibition catalog), Marlborough Chelsea, NYC 2013 My American Dream (book and exhibition catalog), Derek Eller Gallery, NYC NeoIntegrity Omnibus (book and exhibition catalog, interview with Keith Mayerson and Peter Halley), Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art, NYC 2011/1996 Horror Hospital Unplugged, (with Dennis Cooper) JunoBooks/RESearch Publications, New York, N.Y. (republished 2011 by Harper Perennial) 2007 NeoIntegrity (book and exhibition catalog), Derek Eller Gallery, NYC 2006 Heroes (book and exhibition catalog, interview with Keith Mayerson and Ross Bleckner), Alain Noirhomme Gallery, Brussels 2005 Rebel Angels at the End of the World (book and exhibition catalog, essay by Klaus Kertess), QED Gallery, Los Angeles


1995 A Patriarchy’s Nightmare, White Columns, New York, NY Artist’s Videos 2012 “8 Americans” (interview series with Hilary Berseth, Joe Bradley, Jacob Cassay, Ann Craven, Francesca DiMattio, Wade Guyton, Keith Mayerson, Dana Schutz), part of the 8 Americans curated exhibition Maruani & Noirhomme Gallery, Brussels, Belgium, September 2011 2011 Portrait of Anne Frank, part of “Life, Art & Fashion,” Shaheen Modern & Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH

Plays/Screenplays 2000 Hamlet 1999 (ilmscript) 1999 A Child is Being Beaten (ilmscript) 1995 Nowhere Fast 1993 Pinocchio the Big Fag 1991 Fags 1988-89 A Child is Being Beaten, BACA DOWNTOWN, New York, NY directed by David Savran and Ron Clark, July-August 1989: THE BOX, Trinity Repertory Company, Providence, RI, March 1989, as a part of “Graduate Play Festival,” Directed by David Savran and Ron Clark, Leeds Theater and Brown’s Production Workshop. Spring 1988. Directed by Keith Mayerson as part of Richard Foreman’s “Blackboard” series, St. Marks Theater, New York City, Summer, 2004. TYGER, (Set design only), Leeds Theater, Brown University, Fall 1987 Melonboy (also director and set designer) Production Workshop, Brown University, March, 1988


Marlborough

NEW YORK MARLBOROUGH GALLERY, INC. 40 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 Telephone 212.541.4900 Fax 212.541.4948 www.marlboroughgallery.com mny@marlboroughgallery.com

MADRID GALERĂ?A MARLBOROUGH, S.A. Orila, 5 28010 Madrid Telephone 34.91.319.1414 Fax 34.91.308.4345 www.galeriamarlborough.com info@galeriamarlborough.com

MARLBOROUGH GRAPHICS 40 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019 Telephone 212.541.4900 Fax 212.541.4948 graphics@marlboroughgallery.com

BARCELONA MARLBOROUGH BARCELONA Enric Granados, 68 08008 Barcelona Telephone 34.93.467.44.54 Fax 34.93.467.44.51

MARLBOROUGH CONTEMPORARY 545 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001 Telephone 212.463.8634 Fax 212.463.9658 www.marlboroughcontemporary.com info@marlboroughcontemporary.com

LONDON MARLBOROUGH FINE ART LTD. 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY Telephone 44.20.7629.5161 Fax 44.20.7629.6338 www.marlboroughineart.com mfa@marlboroughineart.com

MARLBOROUGH GRAPHICS 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY Telephone 44.20.7629.5161 Fax 44.20.7459.0641 graphics@marlboroughineart.com

MARLBOROUGH CONTEMPORARY 6 Albemarle Street London W1S 4BY Telephone 44.20.7629.5161 www.marlboroughcontemporary.com info@marlboroughcontemporary.com


DESIGN by Grace Pak and Keith Mayerson PHOTOGRAPHY by Marlborough Contemporary and Tom Powel Imaging (Liberty, Stonewall, Rome, My Husband Andrew and Goldie our Goose, and Tunnel View) Photo of the artist by Andrew Madrid

Front Cover: Stonewall (after Fred W. McDarrah), 2018 Oil on Linen 60 x 40 inches Back Cover: Trump & Stormy, 2018 Oil on linen 54 x 40 inches


Marlborough Contemporary ฀ Marlborough Gallery 40 West 57th Street New York, NY 10019

Keith Mayerson My American Dream: Heroes and Villain

Profile for Keith  Mayerson

My American Dream: Heroes and Villain Exhibition Catalog  

Exhibition catalog for Keith Mayerson's "My American Dream: Heroes and Villain" Marlborough/Marlborough Contemporary, New York Jan 08 — Fe...

My American Dream: Heroes and Villain Exhibition Catalog  

Exhibition catalog for Keith Mayerson's "My American Dream: Heroes and Villain" Marlborough/Marlborough Contemporary, New York Jan 08 — Fe...

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