Real Men Magazine October Issue

Page 1

Real Men Magazine Mentoring the 100 Way Across A Lifetime October 2022 MENTORINGISSUE

The Foundation of a Legacy

The overall concept of “The 100” began in 1963 in New York City when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways of improving conditions in their community. These visionaries included businessmen and industry leaders such as David Dinkins, Robert Mangum, Dr. William Hayling, Nathaniel Goldston III, Livingston Wingate, Andrew Hatcher, and Jackie Robinson. On October 2, 1986, representatives from 100 Black Men Chapters converged in Washington, DC, for a final meeting to establish a national organization. During previous meetings, they determined the structure, governance and model that would provide the most effective physical and financial resources to support the communities and Chapters. At the final gathering, the organization’s name – 100 Black Men of America, Inc. – was unveiled and attendees elected four accomplished, professional men from within their ranks to serve as its first and founding officers.

Each of the four were selected based on their demonstrated commitment to give back in a holistic way that addressed the educational, social, emotional, and cultural needs of youth in their own communities. They put their hands to the plow and did the hard work necessary to establish a foundation for a network of Chapters in their infancy, which today is an international nonprofit organization that positively impacts more than 125,000 youth across the United States and abroad. Throughout our history, the leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc. has been impeccable. The men chosen as national leaders all have contributed to the growth and strength of the organization. Their unique contributions have helped The 100 to become one of the premiere mentoring organizations anywhere. Consider the impact each leader has made. On May 27, 1987, in Atlanta, Georgia, this newly formed mentoring organization held its first national conference and introduced itself to the nation. Noted speakers included the late Alex P. Haley and the late Honorable Maynard H. Jackson.

On May 27, 1987, in Atlanta, Georgia, this newly formed mentoring organization known as 100 Black Men of America, Inc., held its first national conference and introduced itself to the nation. Noted speakers included the late Alex P. Haley and the late Honorable Maynard H. Jackson.

2 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. Leadership

BOARD

Lee V. Fields Jr. Chairman

Gregory Lockhart

Vice Chairman

Brett Horton Esq Secretary

Director of Finance Lucien Blackwell

Anthony Peebles

Director of Development

Robert Ivory Director of Programs

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Rodney L. Brown

Grady Burrows

Brandon Curry

Edwin Hubbard Jr. Darian Johnson

Tyson Mitchell, Esq Dr. Ernest Smoot James W. Wade III

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Director of Communications & Public Relations, James W. Wade III

Economic Empowerment Vacant Education, Chair Grady Burrows

Health & Wellness Marvin Ferguson, Chair

Mentoring

Darian Johnson, Chair

Dr. Ernest Smoot, Co Chair

Membership Chair Bilal S. Akram, Chair

100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Inc. 13815 Kinsman Road Cleveland, OH. 44120 (216) 354 - 0896

www.100blackmencle.org

National Chairman

Thomas W. Dortch, Jr.

Midwest District Representative James Duke

3 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

ABOUT US

The 100 Black Men of America, Inc. is recognized as the nation’s top African American led mentoring organization. Every African-American person should have the ability to create the life they’ve always wanted and that’s what The 100 Black Men of America, Inc. provides.

Committing ourselves to personify the type of people our children will look up to and emulate, we embrace the immense responsibility we have to our mentees and our communities. Providing these children another choice in life by being around likeminded individuals who have similar aspirations and goals.

As we have grown The Network of 100 Black Men of America, Inc. more companies and programs have been formed to assist in delivering the education and empowerment needed to change the course of these children’s lives. This is done through the 100’s Four For The Future focus areas; Mentoring, Education, Health & Wellness, and Economic Empowerment.

Through the expansion, we’ve created 100 Black Men Chapters that delivers unique programs that address specific needs in local communities. Through 57 years of testing, we’ve created the 100’s successful model. A proven blueprint for mentoring and developing young people into future leaders by surrounding themselves with a positive network and giving them the opportunity that they may not have thought was possible.

Our ongoing commitment to continuously improve and implement our programmatic initiatives is what drives us. Helping shape our mentees realize their potential by showing them how to be successful and significant, stressing the importance of obtaining and applying education, and providing them the tools that empower them for selfsufficiency, cultivated civic, and business leadership

4 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

GIVING

5 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
REAL TIME REAL MEN

James W. Wade III

MAGAZINE COMMITTEE

Rodney L. Brown

Brandon Curry

Christopher Howse

Franklin Martin

Retanio Rucker

LAYOUT & DESIGN

ENTERTAINMENT

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Rodney L. Brown

Darien Johnson

Gregory Lockhart

James W. Wade III

Earl Williams

CONTRIBUTERS

Christopher Howse

Erwin Hines

The Real Men Magazine is the official publication of The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Inc. Chapter. For any questions or feedback about the publication contact us at info@100blackmencle.org www.100blackmencle.org

JW MEDIA
VOLUME 1, ISSUE 6 To get the online issues of Real Men Magazine send email to info@100blackmencle.org FREE REAL MEN MAGAZINE

The Voice of The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Inc.

8 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
9 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Letter from the Chairman

We have been working very hard getting our 100 Black Men in Ties Scholarship & Awards Gala coming December 10, 2022. This year is notable for the Cleveland Chapter as we are celebrating our twenty-fifth year, and one of the gala’s highlights is honoring one of our founders, Judge Michael Nelson, who will receive the Larry A. Hines Award; this is a first.

I hope you enjoy our October Issue of Real Men Magazine, where we have featured one of the Four For The Future programs, the 100 Black Men cornerstone Mentoring. Special Thank you to Darian Johnson and Dr. Ernest Smoot, who serve as the Chair and Co-Chair of the Mentoring Committee and all past Mentoring Chairs for twenty-five years.

The 100 is committed to mentoring and supporting individuals as they pursue goals throughout their lifetime. Members are actively mentoring elementary, middle school, and high school youth. Through the Collegiate 100, students are mentored and serve as mentors during their post-secondary education. Members of their businesses and employers provide internship opportunities to collegiate students. Upon entering the workforce, mentees receive ongoing guidance and support from 100 members.

100 Black Men, through the signature program Mentoring the 100 Way®, has ex- expanded services and programmatic initiatives to support, educate and empower individuals throughout their lifetime. The global 100 networks, which grew from a group of concerned African American men who in 1963 dedicated themselves to making a difference in the lives of youth and the communities in which they live, was a natural progression to provide Mentoring to The 100 Way Across A Lifetime.

For nine months, we have been making a presence in the Cleveland community; so thankful for all the men who are giving 110% to make sure our organization achieves the goal of educating and empowering African-American children and teens. Through its intentional focus on mentorship across a lifetime, 100 Black Men of America’s local chapters prepare young men and women to realize their highest potential by creating viable solutions to address local and national issues affecting African American communities.

Sincerest regards,

10 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
11 Real Men Magazine | October Issue ESPORTS EVENT Save the date Denzel Ward CLEVELAND BROWNS CB SATURDAY OCTOBER 15 CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY MAIN CAMPUS, 325 SUPERIOR AVENUE, CLEVELAND, OH 44114 Follow @MTKYN_ WWW.MTKYN.ORG ALL DAY EVENT 10 am-5pm FREE PLAY 10-12:30pm SPEAKER SESSIONS 12:30-2pm TOURNAMENT 2-5pm FOOD, PRIZES, AND MORE! POWERED BY
12 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

From the Editor

The Cleveland Chapter is pleased to bring you this special edition of our Mentoring Issue. We have positively impacted the Lives of Tomorrow’s Leaders for twenty-five years. Mentoring begins with the trust and ability to see everyone’s potential. Not every person starts at the same stage, but they all could create a positive impact on society, which begins with the guidance of mentors.

Sometimes you don’t realize someone can be your mentor and not know it, and I have had so many, including my father. While growing up, he taught me many lessons about life that have helped me become the man I am today. One of my biggest mentors was Donald Graham, an Executive Vice President at Fifth Third Bank who helped many who walked through the bank’s doors. At that time, I didn’t realize that he was mentoring all of us. Mentoring is work never forgotten, but it lasts a lifetime. I understand the complexities of African American men being raised. I enjoy working with the youth in our mentoring program because I believe we all need or have a mentor in our life.

The 100 Black Men programs deliver unique mentoring initiatives that help tap into the deserving youth annually and change their lives. Mentoring provides support and positively impacts the lives of tomorrow’s leaders today. Mentoring begins with the trust and ability to see the potential. Not every person starts at the same stage, but they all could positively impact society, beginning with mentors’ guidance. The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland men generously give their time, inspiring and motivating young men by example.

Our mentoring program addresses these complexities by pairing seasoned black leaders with emerging ones and cultivating an environment where transformation happens. Through our partnership with Cleveland Metropolitan Schools, we have reached hundreds of youth, shaping them into strong, healthy, culturally aware young men. Mentoring is the cornerstone of 100 Black Men. The social, cultural, emotional, and unique needs of youth, primarily African American males, are addressed through one-to-one and group mentoring relationships.

Mentoring is the signature program and cornerstone of 100 Black Men; committed to our cause, our members serve as positive role models, advocates, and trusted advisors to children and young adults.

The 100 delivers mentoring training at our annual conferences and regional workshops, which are open to the public. Collegiate 100 chapters and 100 Black Men chapters provide unique mentoring initiatives that impact deserving youth annually. Please support the work of the 100 and explore ways to support it.

13 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
14 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
15 Real Men Magazine | October Issue Do what builds a better future. Dollar.Bank We are proud to support 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC. Copyright © 2022, Dollar Bank, Federal Savings Bank. CMD251_22

HELP OUR STUDENTS WHO PARTICIPATE IN

MENTORING PROGRAM

Make a Charitable Donation Today!

We appreciate any gifts that will help us continue to fulfill our purpose and mission

The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. relies on the support of members, individuals, volunteers, private foundations, and corporations to carry out its mission. Your contribution will make a difference in helping the 100 empower students while building stronger communities.

The programmatic pillars

of the 100 are Mentoring, Education, Economic Empowerment, Health and Wellness, and Leadership Development.

The organization has created programs that provide an environment where young people are encouraged and motivated to achieve.

Our young people receive information that aids in their maturing into practical, self-

sufficient, and responsible shareholders in the Economic and Social dynamics of their communities.

There are over 10,000 members who include educators, corporate executives, physicians, attorneys, entrepreneurs, and men from numerous other professions.

Our organization is a 501(C)(3) and is recognized as the nation’s top African American led mentoring organization.

16 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
Donate through Cash App at: $100BMOGC
OUR
George M. Johnson Angeline Boulley Jarrett Krosoczka Malinda LoAyana Gray
17 Real Men Magazine | October Issue YOUNG ADULT BOOK FESTIVAL Main Campus | 525 Superior Ave. Saturday, October 22 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Join exclusive discussions with best-selling authors of your favorite books!
Register and see full list of authors at cpl.org/clereads

FROM THE 100 BLACK MEN NATIONAL OFFICE

CHAPTER & MEMBER SERVICES

100 Black Men at the Congressional Black Caucus

C-100 National Conference Upcoming October 6th - 9th, Atlanta, Ga

Leadership Summit, December 8th - 10th, Atlanta, Ga

37th Annual Conference, June 14th - 18th, Las Vegas, NV

18 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
19 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

LARRY A. HINES

Photo by: Rodney L. Brown

100 BLACK MEN OF GREATER CLEVELAND CELEBRATES 25 YEARS AND SALUTES OUTSTANDING CLEVELAND LEADERS

The Cleveland Chapter of The 100 Black Men has started preparing for the 100 Black Men in Black Ties Scholarship and Awards Gala “Building Dreams with YOUth in Mind,” on Saturday, December 10, 2022, at InterContinental Hotel Cleveland, 9801 Carnegie Avenue. The proceeds from the gala will support the 100’s Mentoring, Education, Health & Finance programming that will be featured during the evening. “We must encourage and empower our youth by providing programming that will give them the confidence and support to lead positive lives and become our leaders of tomorrow,” stated Chairman Lee V. Fields. “We have committed 25 years to building a better community and are excited to share with you how we intend to continue our outstanding legacy.”

One new award was added to celebrate our 25th Anniversary, the Larry A. Hines Founder’s Award, which will be presented to The Honorable Michael L. Nelson, Sr., Judge - Cleveland Municipal Court.

Hines, one of the founders of the Cleveland Chapter, was very instrumental in keeping the 100 running smoothly. “Larry did a lot for the 100 behind the scenes, and I was pleased to have someone like him with me,” said Judge Nelson. For those of you who never met Larry, he had the swag and knew how to make things happen.

Mr. Hines was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and attended Shaker Heights High School, where

he lettered basketball/football and baseball. He received both Academic and Football Scholarships from Wisconsin and Baldwin Wallace. He chose to take the Academic Scholarship offer to play for Legendary Lee Tressel at Baldwin Wallace before transferring to Kent State University. While at Kent, he was selected for the KSU Black Student Union Leadership position. He was involved in the Civil Rights / Anti-War Movement at KSU during the shootings of 1970.

He decided to transfer to Cleveland State University and Graduated with a degree in Education and attained an MBA from Baldwin Wallace in Organizational Development. Additional training at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government / Columbia Teachers. Hines served as the first Executive Director of the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. Hines was well known throughout the city of Cleveland and surrounding areas. He has served as the Commissioner of the Public Service Department for both Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. A great man, a member of Kappa Alpha Psi and Prince Hall Masons.

He was the beloved husband of Alliece; son of Edward Sr. and Ann (deceased) Hines; cherished brother to Edward II, Leon (Deborah), Jarmellia (Levin), Erwin (Lolita), Wynn and Dawn; loving father of Deon, Christopher, Ayanna and Jasaan; proud grandfather of Ashley, Legend, Annaya;

The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. was chartered in 1997 as a chapter of the 100 Black Men of America, Inc. Our mission is to serve as mentors, deliver and support educational and economic opportunity, advocate for institutional change, and improve the health and wellness of African-American Men and Youth in particular and the African-American community in general.

21 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Did you know that nearly half of all Americans don’t have any life insurance protection?1 If you have family or loved ones who would have a tough time financially if something were to happen to you, it might be worth considering. After all, 42% of Americans would have trouble paying their bills within 6 months if the primary breadwinner in their family were to die unexpectedly.2

Term life is the simplest and most cost effective type of life insurance available. And now it’s available in a new way. Equitable Term in 10℠ is simple, flexible life insurance that features an all digital experience in just 10 minutes or less. That means no exams, waiting or hassles. To learn more or get a Term in 10℠ quote, call or scan the QR code below.

1650,

o. 216.615.7459

Network,

(Equitable Network Insurance Agency of California in CA; Equitable Network Insurance Agency of Utah in UT; Equitable Network of Puerto Rico, Inc. in PR), and Equitable Distributors, LLC. Securities offered through Equitable Advisors, LLC (NY, NY 212 314 4600), member FINRA, SIPC (Equitable Financial Advisors in MI & TN). Annuity and insurance products offered through Equitable Network, LLC.

Equitable is the brand name of the retirement and protection subsidiaries of Equitable Holdings, Inc., including Equitable Financial Life Insurance Company (NY, NY); Equitable Financial Life Insurance Company of America, an AZ stock company with main administrative headquarters in Jersey City, NJ; and Equitable Distributors, LLC. Equitable Advisors is the brand name of Equitable Advisors, LLC (member FINRA, SIPC) (Equitable Financial Advisors in MI & TN). The obligations of Equitable Financial and Equitable America are backed solely by their claims paying abilities. AGE 4749581.1(5/22)(Exp.5/24)

22 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
Cosmo Danielly, Financial Advisor 1001 Lakeside Ave E. Suite
Cleveland, OH 44114 m. 330.802.4083 |
Cosmo.Danielly@equitable.com | www.equitable.com Get the coverage you need in 10 minutes or less with our seamless, all-digital experience. Equitable Term-in-10 SM 1 Source: https://www.iii.org/fact statistic/facts statistics life insurance#Life%20insurance%20ownership 2 Source: https://www.limra.com/en/newsroom/news releases/2021/study finds covid 19 spurs greater interest in life insurance/ Term in 10SM may not be available in all jurisdictions. Some states may vary the terms and conditions. A life insurance policy is backed solely by the claims paying ability of the issuing life insurance company. It is not backed by the broker/dealer or insurance agency through which the life insurance policy is purchased or by any affiliates of those entities, and none makes any representations or guarantees regarding the claims paying ability of the issuing life insurance company. Term in 10℠ is issued by Equitable Financial Life Insurance Company (New York, NY) and is co distributed by Equitable
LLC

INN SETTLEMENT,

S

P

d 5 S t a r H e a d S t

t

e p d S t a e a d a r t r

g

a

t e p F o r w a r d 5 S t a r H e a d S t a r t P r o g r a m F o o d P a n t r Fy o o d P a n t r Fy o d P n t y Y o u t h P r o g r a m Ys o u t h P r o g r a m Ys o u h r o g r a m s M o m s F i r s Mt o m F i Mt o m s F i r s t P a r e n t s a s T e a c h e r Ps a r e n s a s T e a c h e r Ps r e n t s a s T e a c h e r s H e l p M e G r o Hw e l M e G r o Hw e l p M e r o w M o m s Q u i t f o r T w Mo o m Q u i t f o r T w Mo o m s Q u i t f o r T w o

23 Real Men Magazine | October Issue FRIENDLY
INC.
r o g r a m Ps r o g r a m Ps r o g r a m s
t e p F o r w a r
a r
P r o
r a Sm
o g
Sm
G e r a l d i n e B u r n s B e h a v i o r a l H e a l t h S e r v i c e Gs e r a l d i n e B u r n s B e h a v i o r a l H e a l t h S e r v i c e Gs e r a l d i n e B u r n s B e h a v i o r a l H e a l t h S e r v i c e s C o m m u n i t y B a s e d S e r v i c e Cs o m m u n i t y B a s e d S e r v i c e Cs o m u n i t y B a s e d r v i e s R o s i e ' s G i r l Rs o i e ' s G i r l Rs o s i e ' s G i r l s M Y C O MM Y C O MM Y C O M 2386 Unwin Road Cleveland, OH| 216 431 7656 | www.thefriendlyinn.org CULTIVATING, PLANTING, NUTURING
24 Real Men Magazine | October Issue EDUCATION HEALTH & WELLNESS FOUR FOR THE FUTURE
25 Real Men Magazine | October Issue MENTORING ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT FUTURE SECTION

Principal at Kenneth Clement Boys Leadership Academy making a difference in student’s lives

The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. has adopted Kenneth Clement Boys Leadership Academy, where Derrick Holifield is the Head of School, aka Principal. The definition of a Principal is a person who has controlling authority or is in a leading position: “I believe teaching chose me. While developing a program, I realized that I could offer valuable insight and learn a great deal from a profession lacking in acquiring the unique perspective of black males,” said Holifield.

Mr. Holifield began his teaching journey at the Cleveland School of the Arts, teaching English Language Arts and Reading Intervention. Mr. Holifield worked through the Office of the CEO as a Barrier Breaker, where he supported 12 CMSD Principals with their school’s operations. Mr. Holifield completed the Aspiring Principal Program, a CMSD-NYC Leadership Academy Partnership. Derrick is a proud member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity INC. and is active in the Glenville neighborhood as an advocate for economic,

educational, and health opportunities for Cleveland residents. Real Men Magazine was inspired to know more about this outstanding young man.

RM: What made you want to be an educator?

Growing up, I never wanted to be an educator. I always wanted to help people, but being an educator never crossed my mind. It was not until I went to

I want the Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy scholars to feel empowered to do whatever they put their minds to. “
26 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

college that I began to ponder the idea of working with kids from Cleveland. I believe great schools can and will provide unlimited opportunities for families in the city. My devotion to the town of Cleveland inspired me to be an educator. I can not imagine leading this kind of work in another town. I have an unwavering belief that this city is in a great position to break barriers of inequity, and I plan to be a part of the city’s renaissance. I see an abundance of space for growth and progression within the Black community in Cleveland. I want to do my part to elevate the educational, economic, social, and health outcomes of people who look like me. Teaching kids and adults to think critically without limits is an excellent investment of my time.

RM: Where did you grow up and get your formal education, including college?

I grew up and currently live in the Glenville neighborhood. I attended two excellent Cleveland Public Schools: Joseph F. Landis and The Cleveland School of the Arts. After high school, I briefly attended Howard University and transferred to Ohio University, receiving a bachelor’s degree in English with a minor in African American Studies. I earned

a master’s degree in Public Administration with a focus on Economic Development from Cleveland State University.

RM: What do you most want to see from your students?

I want the Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy scholars to feel empowered to do whatever they put their minds to. I like these scholars to be socially and emotionally prepared to navigate life’s obstacles with resiliency. I want these scholars to be lifelong learners who set and work toward ambitious and courageous goals. It is essential that these young men become equipped for college and beyond, even if they later choose a different route.

RM: How long have you been at Kenneth Clement? and tell us the journey you had to endure to get here.

In college, I worked with Teach for America’s Leadership initiative to create a program that

27 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
Read more on next page

brought students from CMSD to Ohio University for an overnight college trip that gave many of them their first exposure to college. At least seven students enrolled and graduated from Ohio University! This experience is what attracted me to teaching. I taught 6th, 7th, and 8th grade English Language Arts and Reading Intervention at my former high school. I started classes at CSU during my second year of teaching. I wanted to learn more about the administrative work of the city’s departments and the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. I left the classroom to take on a new role as a Barrier Breaker. I supported 11 principals and the superintendent of CMSD’s Achievement Network with school operations. After learning about the different departments within CMSD, I accepted a position with CMSD’s Aspiring Principal Program. I completed a residency as an Aspiring Principal at two CMSD schools (Case Elementary and Scranton Elementary) and accepted a position at the Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy. This is my fifth year as the Head of School (Principal) at the Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy. I became the youngest Principal in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District at 25. This was a great honor that required me to continue to learn as I led.

RM: Share your hobbies with us.

I enjoy reading, writing and performing poetry, traveling, camping, cooking, and spending time with family and friends.

RM: What would the students be surprised to find out about you?

The students would be surprised to learn that I was voted “teacher’s nightmare” in my high school yearbook.

RM: How do you spend your summer breaks?

I spend my summer breaks traveling, reading, grilling, and planning for the upcoming school year.

RM: What makes a ‘good day at school?

A good day at school is when scholars are excited about learning and teachers are enthusiastic about teaching. Inquiry and discovery are important symbols of a good day at school.

RM: What inspires you?

I am inspired by the people in Cleveland who remain committed to working toward racial, educational, economic, and health equity.

RM: What’s the best/worst thing about being a teacher?

The best thing about being a Principal is creating a wraparound model that supports families through any obstacle they encounter. The worst thing about being a Principal is knowing I can not help everyone who needs help.

28 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
29 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

EDUCATION

The report card shows signs of recovery.

9/15/2022

CMSD’s new state report card shows what the District and families anticipated: Students struggled mightily during the pandemic. But the data also indicates that scores are improving.

The promising news is that some categories returned to pre-pandemic levels. And overall, CMSD was the highest performing of Ohio’s eight urban systems.

“This report card tells us what we already knew,” CEO Eric Gordon said. “The pandemic hit us hard, but we can recover. Our surveys indicate that the community expected this. Families also said they were confident we could get their children back on an upward trend.”

Report cards have switched from letter grades to a scale of stars, with five being the highest. Districts did not receive an overall rating -- those will return in 2023. Report cards were issued last year; however, much of the data was incomplete because of the pandemic.

Results were mixed. K-3 literacy received just one star, as did the graduation rate, which fell after climbing annually for 11 years, setting a new high each time. The four-year graduation rate dropped 6.6 points, from 80.9 percent to 74.3 percent.

Reflecting on the literacy score, CEO Gordon noted that students in classrooms where everyone was wearing masks could not see readers’ mouths as they formed words, a critical aid in developing the skill. The graduation rate, a lagging indicator, is for the Class of 2021 when students were mostly remote and could not get in-person experiences like careertech labs required to receive credit. Some students are thought to have opted to work and help their families during a challenging period.

On the positive side, success in closing achievement gaps and value-added, a gauge of progress, each received four stars, meaning the marks exceeded student growth and gap closing expectations. And while the District’s performance index, a measure of test scores, earned a rating of two stars, the numbers returned to pre-pandemic levels.

30 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

The District, which has the highest rate of child poverty in the nation, was the only member of the Ohio 8 urban systems to score four stars in gap closing, and CMSD and Toledo were the only districts to receive four stars in value-added.

None of the districts did better than two stars on the performance index, and the only system to get more than one star on graduation was Youngstown, which received two.

Gordon said CMSD would use extra tutoring and other support to help students continue catching up. The District will soon roll out online tutoring that students can access 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The schools will also continue pursuing its new Vision for Learning, which calls for learning that students will find more relevant, engaging, and personal.

The CEO credits students, teachers, and families for the encouraging signs on the report card. He said he

had asked teachers to stop “teaching to the test” and instead challenge students with complex tasks they see as worthwhile.

“When we do great teaching, the test results will take care of themselves,” he said.

In the years just before COVID-19, CMSD gained national attention for achieving growth that outpaced that of school districts across Ohio and the nation.

A study that the Council of the Great City Schools released last year said urban districts exceeded expectations when their challenges were considered and that CMSD stood out as a “window of opportunity” for students. Also, an Education Week piece featured CMSD among a select group of U.S. districts beating the odds last year.

31 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

100 BLACK MEN READING TO MENTEES

32 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
33 Real Men Magazine | October Issue CONGRATULATIONS
100 Black Greater Cleveland, Participated in The Schools
Black Men of Cleveland, Inc. Schools Open House

The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. has adopted the Kenneth W. Clement Boys Leadership Academy, and the 100 recently showed up with them clapping the young men into school. On Thursday, September 15, 2022, the chapter participated in the school’s Open House. So many parents stopped by the table to sign their children up after we shared with took the time explaining about our organization and mentoring program.

Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy is one of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District’s few schools offering single-gender education. They are located at 14311 Woodworth Road, 44112;

they foster a learning environment that inspires, motivates, and encourages young males from Pre-K through 8th grade to achieve academic excellence while providing social & emotional support daily. They begin each day by reciting our creed and ritual, preparing our scholars to be successful in a culture that stresses respect, compassion for others, and displays of good character.

The school aims to prepare scholars for active leadership roles in high schools, universities, families, and communities. We expect that our scholars will become key contributors in this global society where we are building men of tomorrow, starting today.

36 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

The 100 loved their mission: Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy develops leaders and promotes brotherhood and academic excellence while advocating for and servicing our community.

The Objective of Kenneth W. Clement Boys’ Leadership Academy is to stimulate the ambition of its scholars, prepare and educate young men to be successful at high-performing 21stcentury high schools, and encourage leaders of high moral character and academic distinction.

37 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

HEALTH & WELLNESS DIABETES, THE SILENT KILLER

At the national and local level, our organization and Chapter affiliates partner with corporations, foundations, and other nonprofit organizations to promote preventative health strategies and provide education on prevalent diseases that negatively impact African Americans. The 100, through its Health and Wellness Committee, works with other synergistic organizations to develop strategic partnerships to raise a collective voice to help increase awareness and provide health education to mitigate chronic conditions and diseases that plague the African American community.

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes. Over time, it severely damages many of the body’s systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels.

In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2019, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths, and 48% of all deaths due to diabetes occurred before the age of 70. Between 2000 and 2016, there was a 5% increase in premature mortality rates (i.e., before the age of 70) from diabetes. In high-income countries, the premature mortality rate due to diabetes decreased from 2000 to 2010 but increased from 2010 to 2016. In lowermiddle-income countries, the early mortality rate due to diabetes increased across both periods. By contrast, the probability of dying from any one of the four primary noncommunicable diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, or diabetes) between the ages of 30 and 70 decreased by 18% globally between 2000 and 2016.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes (formerly called non-insulindependent or adult-onset) results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin. More than 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. This type of diabetes is primarily the result of excess body weight

38 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

and physical inactivity. Symptoms may be similar to type 1 diabetes but are often less marked. As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, after complications have already arisen. Until recently, this type of diabetes was seen only in adults, but it is now also occurring increasingly frequently in children.

Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulindependent, juvenile, or childhood-onset) is characterized by low insulin production and requires daily insulin administration. In 2017 there were 9 million people with type 1 diabetes; most of them live in high-income countries. Neither its cause nor the means to prevent it are known. Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine (polyuria), thirst (polydipsia), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes, and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly.

Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes is hyperglycemia with blood glucose values above normal but below diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy.

Women with gestational diabetes are at an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and delivery. These women and possibly their children are also at increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the future. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed through prenatal screening rather than through reported symptoms. Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glycemia

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycemia (IFG) are intermediate conditions in the transition between normality and diabetes. Although this is not inevitable, people with IGT or IFG are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Health impact

Over time, diabetes can damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Adults with diabetes have a two- to three-fold increased risk of heart attacks and strokes(1). Combined with reduced blood flow, neuropathy (nerve damage) in the feet increases the chance of foot ulcers, infection, and the eventual need for limb amputation.

Diabetic retinopathy is a significant cause of blindness due to long-term accumulated damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. Close to 1 million people are blind due to diabetes. Diabetes is among the leading causes of kidney failure.

Prevention

Simple lifestyle measures are effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes. To help prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications, people should:

Achieve and maintain healthy body weight; Be physically active – doing at least 30 minutes of regular, moderate-intensity activity on most days.

More action is required for weight control;

Eat a healthy diet, avoid sugar and saturated fats; and Avoid tobacco use – smoking increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Read more on next page

39 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Diagnosis and treatment

Early diagnosis can be accomplished through relatively inexpensive testing of blood sugar. Treatment of diabetes involves diet and physical activity along with lowering blood glucose and the levels of other known risk factors that damage blood vessels. Tobacco use cessation is also important to avoid complications.

Interventions that are both cost-saving and feasible in low- and middle-income countries include: Blood glucose control, particularly in type 1 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin; people with type 2 diabetes can be treated with oral medication but may also require insulin; blood pressure control; and Foot care (patient self-care by maintaining foot hygiene, wearing appropriate footwear, seeking professional care for ulcer management, and regular examination of feet by health professionals).

Other cost-saving interventions include: screening and treatment for retinopathy (which causes blindness); blood lipid control (to regulate cholesterol levels); screening for early signs of diabetes-related kidney disease and treatment.

If you don’t take care of your diabetes, you will learn that diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. People with kidney failure need either dialysis or a kidney transplant. Over many years, the condition slowly damages your kidneys’ delicate filtering system. Early treatment

may prevent or slow the disease’s progress and reduce the chance of complications. You can slow down kidney damage or keep it from getting worse.

Diabetic kidney disease refers to a decrease in kidney function that occurs in some people who have diabetes. Diabetes is a risk factor for kidney disease. Over time, high sugar levels in the blood can cause tiny blood vessels in the kidney to become narrow and clogged. Without enough blood, the kidneys become damaged.

Diabetes can also cause damage to the nerves in your body. If the nerves of the bladder are damaged, you may not be able to feel when your bladder is full. The pressure from a full bladder can damage your kidneys. If urine stays in your bladder for a long time, you may get a urinary tract infection. This is caused by bacteria, which grows rapidly in urine with a high sugar level. These infections can sometimes spread to the kidneys.

People with diabetes may also develop high blood pressure. This is another leading cause of CKD. If you are diagnosed with kidney disease, it’s essential to know that you can take steps to manage CKD and thrive. More than 80% of people with diabetes and CKD have hypertension (high blood pressure). Talk to your doctor about creating a treatment plan to help you take control of your blood pressure. Steps you can take include eating a healthy, low-sodium diet, exercising regularly, managing stress, and quitting smoking.

40 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
41 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Howse Bytes

Tech Nuggets from The Black MacGyver

Adolescent Elephants Running Amok: A True Story

Many years ago, I read about an event that started in Kruger National Park in South Africa. It was so unbelievable I had to verify its validity. Unfortunately, it’s a true event and as I researched further, more specific details became apparent.

Kruger National Park suffered from an overpopulation of elephants starting in the late 1960s. To solve this problem, it was decided that they would cull (put to death) many of the adult elephants, and transport the young ones (since they were smaller and easier to transport) to Pilanesberg Park some 352 miles away. This culling left the young, orphaned elephants in a herd with other young, orphaned elephants. Families were destroyed and the knowledge transfer train was derailed.

What happened next was disappointing, but should have been expected. The young elephants formed small social crews and began attacking villages, tour vehicles, and killing an endangered species, the white rhino. Chaos ensued as the elephants were powered by

large amounts of testosterone some ten years before they should have. Many of the young elephants were, in some cases, attempting to have sexual relations with mature females who refused them, and with rhinos. The early increase in testosterone resulted in more aggressive behavior, and many of the juvenile elephants were killed due to their aggressive nature. This went on for years until it was recommended that a group of adult male elephants be introduced into the herd. The adult elephants came in and reestablished a familial hierarchy. In short, the young elephants needed the older adult elephants to mentor them and to teach them how to behave.

You’ve heard the expression: “It takes a village!”

The village saved some of these young elephants, the village saved many of my friends, and the village saved me!

“Each one, Teach one.”

“What they see, is what they will be.”

These are some of the mantras of 100 Black Men, and one of the reasons why I joined the Cleveland chapter. Why we do what we do is so very important and vital to our mentoring efforts. People ask me why I spend so much time mentoring and helping others. I do it because it was done for me. Oftentimes, I jokingly declare that I’m a country boy raised in the city! I say that because my parents were both Southerners who moved to Cleveland during the second wave of the Great Migration. They were two out of thousands of folks who left the South for better opportunities, new jobs and to experience the “American dream”: 2.5 kids and a house with a white picket fence. They found their “village” at church. I remember our church vividly. It was Prayer Temple Church of God in Christ, located on Giddings Road off Superior in Cleveland, Ohio. (The name has since changed to New Direction Church of God In Christ.)

As a youngster, I remember struggling with some math problems. My parents worked two jobs and did their best to

42 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
43 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
44 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Cleveland Museum of Natural History presents Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Community Days

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History illuminates the natural world and inspires visitors to engage with the scientific forces that shape their lives. Since its founding in 1920, the Museum has pioneered scientific research to advance knowledge across diverse fields of study and used its outstanding collections, which have grown to encompass more than five million artifacts and specimens, to engage the public with the dynamic connections between humans and the world around us. Through its Natural Areas Program, the Museum stewards more than 12,000 acres of protected ecosystems across northern Ohio. A community gathering place, educational center, and research institution, CMNH is a vital resource that serves the Cleveland community and the nation.

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History is now offering free admission every Sunday to Cleveland and East Cleveland residents through the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Community Days. This program is funded by a $3 million grant from the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Foundation, which is also supporting the creation of a new community space in the Museum’s education wing.

45 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

ENTORING

Photo by: Gregory Lockhart
M

THE 100 WAY

ENTORING

COVER STORY

100 Black Men of America, Inc. Developed the Programmatic Platform, Mentoring the 100 Way Across A Lifetime

When you hear the tagline “Real Men Giving Real Time,” you must think of the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Chapter Inc. The One-on-one mentoring program is the last program of the year.

The Black Men of Greater Cleveland (100 BMOGC) mentoring program is for our mentors to share their knowledge, experience, and wisdom in regards to the various aspects of life to support our mentees necessary to develop and further enhance the core skills (interpersonal and intrapersonal) required to become future leaders and productive citizens of their community.

Here in Cleveland, we want to develop and maintain a comprehensive and effective mentoring program that integrates education, economic empowerment, health & wellness, and leadership into the 100’s

mentoring strategy. This will be done by using a variety of tactics to engage mentees, such as one-on-one, group, peer, and virtual mentoring. Significantly increase our reach with more efficiently trained mentors.

Members will learn the policies and procedures of Mentoring the 100 Way and how to implement them to preserve the reputation of the 100 and the integrity of the mentor and mentee. The main focus of 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. is to provide mentoring to at-risk African American youth from the greater Cleveland area. The 100 Black Men Inc. has successfully changed many youths’ lives through the 100 Black Men Mentorship Program. We focus on modeling and developing academic and critical thinking skills, tutoring, self-esteem, citizenship, and appropriate behavior.

Mentoring is the cornerstone of what the organization brings to the community–guiding youth in life experiences, fostering a positive selfperception and self-respect, encouraging excellence in education, and pursuing positive life-long goals. The purpose of mentoring is to grow by tapping into

48 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

the knowledge and experience of someone further along than yourself. It’s the best way to accelerate your development. Mentoring sessions are the meetings between mentor and mentee, where advice, knowledge sharing, and problem-solving occur. These sessions may only happen monthly or so, and there’s much to discuss. It’s, therefore, essential for mentoring sessions to follow a structure to ensure they stay productive and valuable for both parties.

“What They See Is What They’ll Be®” is more than a motto. It is a source of motivation for all members of our 100 Black Men chapter network. Additionally, our motto reminds us that we must consistently commit to personifying the type of people our children will look up to and emulate. We fully embrace our immense responsibility for our mentees and communities.

In the early years, the Cleveland chapter would continue to grow its brand in Cleveland. The group coordinated mentoring programs in numerous schools, including Daniel E. Morgan Elementary

School, Cleveland East Senior High School, John F. Kennedy Senior High School, East Cleveland Shaw Senior High School, and Warrensville Heights Senior High School. The 100 also held a Saturday morning mentoring program at its offices in Cleveland’s Shaker Square complex. The numerous programs included a reading program at Daniel E Morgan and a stock market competition at East High School. One of the highlights of our plan was the success of our East High Stock Market Challenge team, which traveled to Atlanta and took on some of the nation’s most prominent schools finishing a highly respectable 3rd out of the scores of schools that competed.

The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. provides long-term mentor relationships for multiple stages of life that expand the possibilities of what can be achieved. We provide augmented educational experiences and advocacy in the areas that significantly affect the community and systemic

on next

49 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
Read more
page

issues and bridge opportunity gaps for African American youth. We create environments where children and their families are inspired to dream, challenged to achieve, and empowered to be economic stakeholders.

Mentoring begins with the trust and ability to see everyone’s potential. Not every person starts at the same stage, but they all could create a positive impact on society, beginning with mentors’ guidance Across the United States and Internationally, 100 Black Men of America, Inc. is changing the lives of tomorrow’s leaders through the 100’s signature programs: Mentoring 100 Way, Collegiate 100®, and 100 Black Men Chapters.

Each of our programs delivers unique mentoring initiatives that help tap into the deserving youth annually and change their lives. Mentoring provides

support and positively impacts the lives of tomorrow’s leaders today. The 100 delivers mentoring training at our annual conferences and regional training workshops, which are open to the public. Both Collegiate 100 chapters and 100 Black Men chapters provide unique mentoring initiatives that positively impact deserving youth annually. Please support the work of the 100 and explore ways to help it.

Mentoring is to connect an individual who has a lot of knowledge and experience with someone who hasn’t gained the same knowledge or experience. By having someone who knows more than yourself share advice, offer guidance, and be a sounding board for your thoughts, you stand to benefit from experiences beyond your own. Whether in your career or life, having a mentor is crucial to our continued growth and development.

50 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

100 Black Men of America, Inc. developed the programmatic platform, Mentoring the 100 Way Across A Lifetime℠ , which seeks to address systemic issues and bridge opportunity gaps for marginalized African American youth. This platform provides a comprehensive structure through which the organization’s volunteer network offers:

Community-wide youth programming and services.

Face-to-face mentoring, online mentor training.

A facilitated virtual mentee curriculum that includes a Health & Wellness module.

Post-secondary scholarships.

In addition to youth, the schools and communities served by 100 Black Men of America, Inc. reap tangible benefits. Black male mentors give the black child a renewed sense of value that positively impacts their personality and actions. Additionally, research shows that positive racial identity is strongly associated with more academic motivation for African American middle and high school students.

“Show me a successful individual, and I’ll show you someone who had real positive influences in their life. I don’t care what you do for a living—if you do it well, I’m sure someone was cheering you on or showing the way. A mentor.” – Denzel Washington

Read more on next page

51 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Not all youth are born with privilege, opportunities, or a positive network. Some are raised throughout their lives thinking they’ll never be able to live the life they want. This is because of the environment and the people they surround themselves with daily. Every African-American person should be able to create the life they’ve always wanted, and that’s what The 100 Black Men of America, Inc. provide.

Committing to personifying the type of people our children will look up to and emulate, we embrace our immense responsibility to our mentees and communities. We are providing these children another choice in life by being around like-minded individuals who have similar aspirations and goals.

As we have grown The Network of 100 Black Men of America, Inc., more companies and programs have been formed to assist in delivering the education and empowerment needed to change the course of these children’s lives. This is done through the 100’s Four For The Future focus areas; Mentoring, Education, Health & Wellness, and Economic Empowerment. Mentoring is work never forgotten, but it lasts a lifetime. We understand the world’s complexities that African American men are being raised in. We have been there. Our mentoring program addresses these complexities by pairing seasoned black leaders with emerging ones and

cultivating an environment where transformation happens.

Through the expansion, we’ve created 100 Black Men Chapters that deliver unique programs that address specific needs in local communities. Through 57 years of testing, we’ve created the 100’s, successful model. A proven blueprint for mentoring and developing young people into future leaders by surrounding themselves with a positive network and giving them the opportunity they may not have thought possible.

Our ongoing commitment to continuously improve and implement our programmatic initiatives is what drives us. Helping shape our mentees realize their potential by showing them how to be successful and significant, stressing the importance of obtaining and applying education, providing them the tools that empower them for self-sufficiency, and cultivating civic and business leadership.

In the last two years, we have grown and had to be creative due to the pandemic. With so many things being shut down with COVID - 19 causing so many deaths, a new mentoring program was birthed. One key component of our mentoring program is Walk A Mile With A Child, which Gregory Clifford

52 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

conceived. During almost 18 months of dealing with COVID-19, which caused the closing of the schools, the 100 conducted their mentoring programs. “I wanted to design a new outdoors mentoring program that would be safe and healthy while maintaining mentoring opportunities. I created a vision of an alternative mentoring concept that I labeled “Walk a Mile with a Child,” said Clifford.

The Cleveland Chapter of 100 Black Men has combined the Mentoring, Education, and Health and Wellness Committees to form this program and connect a nature walk in some of our local public parks with a health and wellness, science, and environmental education component to the mentoring experience.

With Clifford’s idea, 100 Black Men chairs Darian Johnson and Dr. Ernest Smoot led the summer program. Each walk is unique. “All mentees are encouraged to know and live by the 100 BMOGC Mentoring Program Affirmation principles - being ethical, excellent, proud, and united,” said Smoot.

During the walks, the 100 Mentors and Mentees discuss essential life skills such as self-care and

53 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

hygiene, educational success, finance and economics, and peer relations. Youth have time to discuss as a group and in 1-on-1 mentor/mentee pairings during the walks.

This program comprises two components, the walk and the talk/mentoring. Walking, like hiking, running/jogging, etc., is a weight-bearing exercise. And like all weight-barring exercises, there are numerous physical health benefits. These results include body fat reduction, increased strength and endurance, and improved cardiovascular and pulmonary fitness, significantly reducing health issues such as heart disease and diabetes.

“They represent the values of our group of successful black men. We recognize that life and relationships involve ‘Joy and Pain’ (Frankie Beverly and Maze). Failure is not the end. Quitting is,” said Smoot. These walks also allow mentees, parents, and mentors to share new experiences. “That is a big plus. I enjoy watching youth (and myself) explore, learn and understand more about this fascinating world in which we live,” said Smoot.

In addition, during walks, the youth explored nature. Curiosity was piqued by the variety of plants, animals, insects, and bodies of water - ponds, lakes, and creeks. They were particularly excited to see, on

different walks, deer, ducks, and Lake Erie up close. They were informed about the 5 Great Lakes (mnemonic HOMES) and bodies of freshwater versus saltwater. They learned about symbioses such

54 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

as milkweed, monarch butterflies, and yellow goldenrod.

Soon, the Mentoring Committee has shared they will start a chess club, golfing, and even a baseball team. So make sure you keep up with the various events and think about volunteering to be a mentor to a mentee who would appreciate your time, talent, and resources.

The Mound Talented Tenth Program is a mentoring program held in the Mound STEM school designed to work with 8th-grade students of Mound elementary. This program is conducted using forum style mentoring format where mentors and mentees talk about various topics ranging from current events and school-related issues to specified topics that focus on leadership, responsibility, the importance of education, etc. Sessions were held biweekly throughout the school year.

The Virtual Mentoring Program was a unique way that our organization reached out to the youth of Northeast Ohio during the Covid-19 pandemic. This program was designed to mentor youths virtually (via Zoom) to help teach and develop their interpersonal skills (self-awareness, self-identity,

conflict management, resolution skills, respect, etc.); raise their awareness as well as inform them on ways to improve their mental and physical health and wellness; help them identify, establish and maintain positive peer relationships.

55 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
56 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
57 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

FROM OUR MENTEE’S

Hello my name is Zacariah Davi Custodio, I had to start from the bottom and work my way to the top, and helping me along the way was the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Mentoring Program. The affirmation reminded me that I must be ethical, excellent, proud, and united. The parts that helped me were the perfect part. Ethicalness helped remind me that you should always tell the truth; even if you get in trouble, you will get in less trouble if you are ethical. Plus, let’s say you always lied when you’re telling the truth; how will they (the person you speak to) believe you? The excellent part helps me realize that even when challenging, you must try your best and “strive for excellence in all you do.” And sometimes that might be hard, but it doesn’t mean you stop trying.

Ethicalness is also essential because it’s all about trust. Trust is important because people can rely on you or count on you. Excellence is vital because it helps you achieve goals; I know it helps me achieve my goals, like getting better at sports/school. Proudness is critical because it helps motivate you to keep moving/ helps me succeed in life and achieve your goals. Being united is vital because it helps me achieve goals faster, creates trust bonds, and puts us at peace. This affirmation guides me to achieve my dream of being an ethical, excellent, and proud man.

The 100 BMOGC taught me different ways to conduct myself as a young man. To do the right thing no matter the situation. It’s helped me recognize when I was not in control and keep myself level-headed.

In 100 BMOGC, we do things together. We have fun, like going to sporting events. We also “walk a mile,” where we walk with each other and talk about anything and everything. I feel I can speak to them when I am excited about something or need advice.

100 BMOGC reminds me to work towards excellence and to be the best me. I always give my best and be proud of my accomplishments and failures.

58 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

FROM OUR MENTEE’S

Ethical, Excellent, Proud, United

These four principles make up the Affirmation of the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland (100 BMOGC) Mentoring Program. All mentees must know the affirmation and are encouraged to live by these principles. As one of the mentees, these four principles have a special meaning to me.

To be ethical means to know the difference between right and wrong and good and evil. However, it’s not essential to know right and wrong but to do what’s right and not wrong. Being ethical makes a better and safer, and more fair society. An example is our school student council which deals with disagreements amongst students and issues with right and wrong.

Excellence is a result of being consistent and persistent in all I do. Those things I practice well, I perform well as in video games, running, and surprisingly Math. Being proud is knowing who you are and your self-identity—being proud means knowing your value. People sometimes struggle with life because they don’t know their self-worth. The 100 BMOGC teaches us value in being readers, and thinkers, having good health and sharing our wealth. To be united is to be as sticks but not to be as one stick. One bar is easily broken. However, a group of posts is not so easily broken. Mentors and mentees working together are more vital together, not easily separated. Together we will not fall. We strive to live by the affirmation of a better society.

Amyis Glover
59 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Barbara A. Palmer is a board-certified Family Nurse Practitioner in Tampa, Florida. Originally from Cleveland, Ohio, she is an outstanding volunteer for the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Inc. Mentoring Committee. Since 2000, along with her close friend Dr. Ernest Smoot and Mr. Curtis {Griggs) who was an active member at the time and connected her with the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland. During that time, Mr. (Griggs) was the chairperson of the mentoring committee, and Michael Nelson was the president.

“I enjoy volunteering for this organization for several reasons: I enjoy assisting and coordinating with the members and the mentor-mentee programs, making telephone calls, sending text messages and emails, i.e., (Walk-a-mile with a child, Virtual educational programs, Educational and family outings) What I enjoyed the most was having one of the first Mentee-Mentor car wash fundraisings at one of the member’s church. We organized that car wash to expose the mentees to the National Convention to tell them what other mentees are doing at their age,” said Palmer.

As a volunteer, Palmer ensured all mentees were prepared and dressed appropriately for all events, i.e., the annual Gala. At the same time, teaching appropriate etiquette and the importance of generational wealth, respect, self-confidence, and the importance of accountability. Their affirmation is a testament that embodies those mentioned above.

“I appreciate the 100 for their never-ending commitment to persistently and consistently seek out young at-risk African American males to mentor. I respect and admire them for making the time to mentor these youth,” said Palmer.

Some of her fond memories with the mentees are they had an opportunity to meet and speak with the African American Billionaire Philanthropist, Mr. Robert Smith. They also had opportunities to meet Magic Johnson, Local Judges, job opportunities, attend Cleveland Cavaliers and Cleveland Browns games, and participate in volunteer programs throughout the community.

The 100 are not just role models in name but a profound group of distinguished men who are always willing to give back and commit to our community. Giving back with my little time is the least that I enjoy doing.

I appreciate the 100 for their never-ending commitment to persistently and consistently seek out young at-risk African American males to mentor. I respect and admire them for making the time to mentor these youth.
Barbara A. Palmer
60 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

FROM OUR MENTEE’S

What does it mean to be ethical? Ethics is to be morally good or correct. It is to be good even if no one is watching. For example, people donate to charity even if they don’t benefit from it.

The 100 Black Man Organization has also taught me to be excellent and skillful and to accomplish everything I set out to do. For example, I got A’s and B’s in the classroom from working hard. This is a great model right here that I’m continuously striving towards.

Another thing I learned from the 100 Black Men organization is to be proud. For example, my brother taught me always to look someone in the eyes when talking, to have a firm handshake, and to keep my head up. This helps me to be more confident and proud of who I am as a black man.

Finally, the last thing the 100 Black Men taught me is how to be united. I learned that two could do more than one. For instance, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. didn’t do everything as one but did it as a unit.

This is what I learned from The 100 Black Men Organization.

Arinn Hall
What the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Inc. Affirmation Means To Me
61 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Dr. Linwood Whitten

Inaugural Assistant Vice President, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Cleveland State University

Dr. Linwood B. Whitten (he/him/his) serves as the inaugural Assistant Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership, management and coordination of centralized operations to strengthen and sustain comprehensive institutional diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives for students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Prior to joining Cleveland State University, Dr. Whitten served as Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management while simultaneously serving as Director of Diversity and International Affairs, as well as Title IX Coordinator at Alabama State University

Robert L. Solomon, Esq.

Vice President - Office for Inclusion, Diversity and Equal Opportunity

Case Western Reserve University

Solomon served at Ohio State on the office’s executive leadership team and helped execute policies and practices aimed at enhancing the institution’s culture, climate and curriculum with regard to inclusive excellence. He also worked with multiple university offices—among them enrollment services, undergraduate education, human resources and student life—in developing and reaching diversity goals. Solomon succeeds Marilyn Mobley, PhD, a professor of English who served more than a decade as Case Western Reserve’s inaugural vice president for inclusion, diversity and equal opportunity.

Joy Bostic, PhD, an associate professor of religious studies and founding director of the minor in African and African American Studies, has served as interim vice president since July.

62 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
63 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. in the community at the

100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Being Mentors During The Father’s Walk

The 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. understands the work of mentoring and being significant father figures to many young men. Through its focus on mentorship across a lifetime, 100 Black Men of America’s local chapters prepare young men and women to realize their highest potential by creating viable solutions to address local and national issues affecting African American communities. One significant cause is The Fatherhood Initiative which began in Cleveland in 2004 under the leadership of Al Grimes.

It became the premier organization of its type in the United States. It seeks to strengthen families in our community by encouraging fathers to play an active role in nurturing and raising their children. The Fatherhood Initiative continues to fund programs to assist fathers in promoting children’s financial and emotional needs. It provides options through programs presented by partners in community-based organizations.

For many children, the father’s absence is a sad reality. The number of children born to unmarried parents in Ohio and across the country has steadily increased. In Ohio, 28% of children live in households with no father present, compared to 23% nationally. These numbers It was one of

66 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

the main reasons the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. were at local schools escorting children to school for the Father Walk on September 22, 2022.

The Father’s Walk is a day for men to walk their children to school. Close to 200 schools in Cuyahoga County are taking part. This is open to fathers, stepfathers, grandfathers like me, grandfathers, and any father figure in Cuyahoga County. We want you to be involved in this process. If you don’t have a biological father, the male father figure in your life, invite them to walk you to school that day, Children make up 22% of Ohio’s population and all of its future.

For some of these fathers to be great parents, it has to start at an early age, and that’s a dream of the 100 Cleveland Chapter to mentor them while they are younger so they can grow into excellent fathers to shower their children with love.

The Ohio Commission on Fatherhood (OCF) seeks to improve the well-being of Ohio’s children by helping fathers become better parents, partners, and providers. Commissioners include the directors of state agencies, bipartisan members of the Ohio House and Senate, representatives from the Ohio Supreme Court, and citizens chose because of their knowledge of fatherhood issues.

As part of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, the commission strengthens vulnerable families by funding programs that serve lowincome fathers.

In addition to other initiatives, the Fatherhood Initiative wanted to ensure fathers are treated fairly when they come to the county for services and included in the process when there are issues involving children. To that end, a county-wide audit and enhancements were made. It serves as a resource for county services.

In June of 2005, the Cuyahoga County Fatherhood Initiative hosted the first ever publicly sponsored forum explicitly created for the following purposes.

To promote healthy father-child relationships. To address the social problems that result from “father absence.”

To strategize what we must do, as a community, ensure every child has a dad in their life.

Over 2,400 dads and their children attended the two-day event. The Annual Fatherhood Conference has grown each year, with over 3,000 attendees.

67 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

The Cuyahoga County Fatherhood Initiative

(CCFI) seeks to strengthen families in our community by encouraging fathers to play a more active role in nurturing and raising their children. Cuyahoga County is the only one of 88 counties in Ohio to have a program of this magnitude addressing the issue of fatherhood.

The Fatherhood Initiative responds to escalating social concerns regarding “father absence” by providing fathers with access to services and programs designed to prepare them to meet better the emotional, psychological, and financial needs of their children. The CCFI also seeks to increase public awareness of the importance of father involvement.

Goals

The goals of the Fatherhood Initiative are:

•To promote public awareness of the role of fathers

•To provide linkages to other public systems and improve our current service delivery to fathers

•To fund fatherhood-related programs on the county level

68 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
69 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
70 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
71 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

MetroHealth Announces Opening of Minority Men’s Health Institute

The MetroHealth System is proud to announce the opening of the MetroHealth Minority Men’s Health Institute under the leadership of Charles Modlin, MD, M.B.A., Director of Health Equity & Medical Director of the Office of Equity, Inclusion & Diversity.

The Minority Men’s Health Institute welcomes all men, regardless of race, ethnicity, or demographics. However, the mission of the Minority Men’s Health Institute is to address the numerous health disparities that disproportionately afflict and burden men of color and contribute to the higher incidence of chronic disease rates and lower life expectancies in men of color compared to other populations.

The Minority Men’s Health Institute will be housed within the MetroHealth Division of Urology and function in partnership with the MetroHealth Division of Medicine and additional subspecialty areas, as well as with the MetroHealth Institute for H.O.P.E., the Office of Patient Experience, Office of Equity, Inclusion & Diversity, the Department of Population Health and others.

“We know men of color have higher incidences and death rates from prostate, colon and lung cancer, prostate disease, heart and kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes, H.I.V., stroke, and mental health conditions, among others,” Dr. Modlin said. “Many of these conditions can be prevented, treated, controlled, and cured if diagnosed in early stages.”

Biological and hereditary factors, along with many social determinants of health, including poverty, lack of access to quality care, education levels, cultural and health behaviors, lack of preventative health screenings, and other factors, contribute to many of the health disparities observed in men of color and that primarily afflict AfricanAmerican males.

American Cancer Society data demonstrates that up to 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime, compared to a 1 in 8 chance for White men, and the death rate for prostate cancer in Black men is twice that in White men. The American Urological Association recommends Black men start screening for prostate cancer at 40. If diagnosed in the early stages, cure rates of

72 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

prostate cancer in Black men are equivalent to that seen in White men.

To schedule an appointment to be seen in the Minority Men’s Health Institute, please call 216-778-4391. MetroHealth is committed to treating everyone, regardless of their insurance status or ability to pay.

MetroHealth also encourages everyone to save the date for the 2nd Annual MetroHealth Minority Men’s Health Fair, Thursday, April 27th, 2023, from 5-8:30 pm, for several free preventive health screenings, health examinations, and health education. Stay tuned for details.

Dr. Modlin is also leading efforts to implement the MetroHealth Multicultural Health Centers of Excellence, which will encompass some health equity specialty centers within MetroHealth to address the various health disparities that disproportionately and negatively impact health outcomes in the minority and multicultural populations of men, women, and children.

Dr. Modlin is a proud member of the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. chapter.

73 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
74 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
75 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

THE GRAND RE-OPENING OF THE CLEVELAND CLINIC LANGSTON HUGHES HEALTH & EDUCATION CENTER

100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. out in the community spreading the word about our organization, events and programs coming

On Saturday, September 17, the 100 Men of Greater Cleveland, Inc. (BMOGC, Inc.) participated in the grand reopening of the Cleveland Clinic Langston Hughes Health & Education Center, located at 2390 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio. The center has had some renovation work to create office and break areas on the lower and second floors, including reconfiguring the waiting area. They created a new Exam Room and MA space, converted an office into an exam room, and made general renovations throughout the building. Health & Wellness is part of our Four For The Future Programming, so the 100 had to be present and visible in the community. Being at the re-opening allowed us to recruit mentees and mentors and spread the word about our upcoming gala on December 10, 2022, and the InterContinental Hotel. The 100’s health and wellness goals are to raise awareness, provide access to health care and give health information that will ultimately promote behavior change resulting in a healthier lifestyle.

The 100 goal is to raise awareness and provide information to promote healthier behavior and lifestyle in our community. As the saying goes, “health is wealth!” The 100 understands that a person’s zip code influences their health more than their genetic makeup. In Austin, we want to continue to create an environment of health and Wellness that will benefit our community. The 100 encourages you to Take Action For Health to promote health screenings, address barriers, empower African Americans to track their screenings, and make it easy to share health information with their health care teams, family, and friends. The African American community is experiencing an alarming increase in the rate of cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, HIV/AIDS, renal disease, respiratory conditions, arthritis, and depression. Therefore, the 100 BMOGC, Inc. emphasizes improving the health awareness of youth in our community. In addition, the 100 works to shield African American children from violence and harmful behaviors while instilling in them the principles of community building.

76 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

In 2006, Cleveland Clinic partnered with Fairfax Renaissance Development Center to offer health screenings to residents, and in 2009 the CCCHEC was launched in the Langston Hughes Center at East 79th and Quincy Avenue. The center is staffed by a nurse practitioner, social worker, registered dietician, and medical students and has three medical examination rooms, an exercise room, and classrooms. CCCHEC offers area residents physicals, health screenings, education, and prevention services. In addition, the center offers exercise classes, cooking demonstrations, smoking sensations, self-defense, and more.

Cleveland Clinic has expanded to bring adult primary care services to the communities surrounding its main campus at the Langston Hughes Health and Education Center. In case you don’t know about the man this center is named after, The great Lanston Hughes was an American literary great - and one-time Cleveland resident born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri.

Hughes, a leader of the Harlem Renaissance, moved to East 86th Street in Cleveland with his mother and stepfather after his early years in Missouri, Kansas, and Illinois. He began to write in earnest in the third-floor attic of the colonial home. He continued living there after his mother and stepfather left Cleveland and attended the famed Central High School in 1916 and ‘17.

Mark Ribbins served as MC, Robert Johnson, aka The Line Dance King, was on the wheels of steel and the featured band was Hubbs Groove, featuring Sarah’s Girl.

Pictured to right: Events Songstress Stacey Richardson aka Sarah’s Girl and MC Mark Ribbins

77 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
78 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
79 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

Do you remember the first time you voted? Even as the rising American electorate gains momentum, new regressive laws, rulings, and maneuvers threaten voting rights without facing the strict scrutiny that would come with an affirmative constitutional right to vote. In 2013, the Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA), stripping the Justice Department of its powers for five decades to curb racial discrimination in voting. The Election Assistance Commission was left without commissioners for years and frequently faced bills in Congress that would end its existence entirely. Many schools skip civics education, contributing to declining voter turnout in local and primary elections.

Have You Registered to Vote for this Upcoming Election on November 8, 2022?

Like the Fifteenth Amendment, the Twenty-fourth Amendment and the Voting Rights Act emerged from their historical contexts, such as the civil rights movement and voting rights initiatives of the 1960s. The push for voting rights was led by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and by activists Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., John Lewis, Diane Nash, Ella Baker, Bob Moses, Stokely Carmichael, and others. In 1963, SNCC organized Freedom Vote, a mock election among southern Black people designed to encourage these citizens to register to vote.

Growing up in the 60s and 70s, you could hear grandparents and parents share how vital voting is

80 Real Men Magazine | October Issue

because so many people fight for you to have the right to vote. In 1964, the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), a coalition of the Mississippi chapters of the four organizations mentioned above, coordinated the Freedom Summer Project, which worked to register Black people in Mississippi to vote. Local activists powered this project, and over one thousand college student volunteers (most of whom were white) from the northern and western regions of the U.S. Voting rights activists faced violent opposition in the South, both from law enforcement and white residents.

Local police officers arrested many Freedom Summer activists, some were beaten, and three young men (James Chaney of Mississippi and Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman of New York City) were killed in June 1964 by the Ku Klux Klan. In addition, dozens of homes, businesses, and churches were destroyed. Another violent incident occurred on March 7, 1965, when hundreds of protestors, led by John Lewis of SNCC and Rev. Hosea Williams of SCLC, marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge leading out of Selma, Alabama, while marching to Montgomery to demand voting rights and civil rights for African Americans. The marchers were blocked by state troopers and deputized white men, who then

attacked the marchers with clubs and tear gas.

The Civil Rights Movement showed that People of Color were together in their beliefs and that their minds were set on one (1) thing--equal participation in the American Dream. This show of solidarity had to be respected; thus, the changes were achieved as part of the Civil Rights Movement.

By not registering to vote and refusing to participate in the voting process, People of Color are abdicating their responsibility. They are also weakening the solidarity that People of Color once showed gained from the Civil Rights Movement. If People of Color do not register to vote and then vote, individuals who harbor beliefs contra People of Color will continue to be elected to political office, including judicial positions.

It is time for People of Color to unite concerning their beliefs and goals. It is time to not only be angry, make speeches, and protest, but to register to vote and vote. It is time to elect individuals to political offices and judicial positions who understand that People of Color are Human beings deserving of the ability to participate in the American Dream as envisioned by the words “We The People.”

81 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
82 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
83 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Inc. met with representatives of the Cleveland Cavaliers talking about specialized programs for our mentees and becoming a partner.

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS IN THE COMMUNITY TO BE MORE VISABLE IS OUR GOAL

Community service and involvement are often an afterthought to busy people, but establishing yourself as a partner with a powerhouse company such as the Cavaliers has business-related benefits that are tough to achieve through conventional marketing methods. So a few of the 100 Black Men of Greater Cleveland Board Members met with Cleveland Cavalier’s representatives to discuss how we could partner.

Members of your community will surely notice and view the company as reputable and trustworthy, and you’ll likely see a morale boost in your employees. As a bonus, your company can potentially be mentioned as a sponsor or supporter of organizations on their Web site or in the media, thereby enhancing your marketing efforts. So thanks to the Cavs for taking the time to meet.

85 Real Men Magazine | October Issue TROY LOWE MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST OFFICE: (216) 420 - 2419 TLOWE@CAVS.COM ROCKET MORTAGE FIELDHOUSE 1 CENTER COURT CLEVELAND, OHIO 44115
86 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
87 Real Men Magazine | October Issue bringing you technology for the future IT Consulting | Staff Augmentation | Training | Project Management Cybersecurity | Low Voltage Installations | Supply Chain 5247 Wilson Mills Road #233 | Cleveland, Ohio 44143 | 216 352 4282 | chowse@howsesolutions.com we have an in-depth understanding of emerging technologies HOWSE SOLUTIONS technology solutions that work businessand their commercial applications for your Certified Minority Business Enterprise (MBE/DBE)

100 Black Men Mentees Spend an Evening at Adrenaline Monkey Adventure Center

This center is known for many courses, including the Mobile Monkey Obstacle Course!

On Tuesday, September 27, 2022, our Mentees enjoyed an evening at Adrenaline Monkey Adventure Center in Warrensville Heights, Ohio. This indoor adventure center has many fun things to do while visiting; some features are ninja warrior obstacle courses, an aerial ropes course, climbing walls, an arcade, and an event space that is a 24,000-square-foot facility. A 4,000+ square foot mezzanine and Monkey Bar provide the perfect setting for a private event featuring nourishing or indulgent small plates and mock or cocktails.

This center is known for many courses, including the Mobile Monkey Obstacle Course! Great indoor and outdoor experiences with customized experiences for different ages and levels. Even better, we’ll come to you! Use Our Mobile Monkey Obstacle Course. This is a safe, educational, and fun environment for kids and some adults to enjoy themselves.

Each event is planned thoughtfully and carried out with impeccable customer service. We pay attention to a million little things that add up to something special!

88 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
89 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
90 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
91 Real Men Magazine | October Issue
Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.