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The Australian

JERSEY JOURNAL November-December 2019 Print Post Approved 325550-009


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FROM THE FRONT DESK Developing and Promoting the Jersey Breed

Jersey AUSTRALIA Jersey Australia Inc C/- AGRIBIO 5 Ring Road Bundoora, VIC. 3083 PH: (03) 9370 9105 Fax: (03) 9018 4391 Email: Jersey@Jersey.com.au www.Jersey.com.au President Chris McKenzie - 0447 736 179 859 Cooriemungle Rd, Timboon VIC 3268 jirehJerseys859@gmail.com Senior Vice President & Chair - Genetics Sub Committee Lisa Broad - 0427 862 624 388 Johnson Rd, Lockington VIC 3563 lisa.broad@bigpond.com.au Junior Vice President Brian Wilson - 0407 176 425 204 Wallamore Rd, Tamworth NSW,2340 brianwilson.shirlinn@gmail.com Treasurer Paul Lenehan - (03) 5568 7330 201 Sheehans Rd, Crossley VIC 3283 lynette.lenehan@gmail.com Chair Promotions Sub Committee Jane Sykes - 0422 640 533 839 West Maurice Road, Ringarooma TAS 7263 jane.sykes@utas.edu.au BOARD MEMBERS

Trevor Saunders - 0427 266 374 saunders-day@dcsi.net.au Alan Carson - (03) 5235 3201 janine.carson@activ8.net.au cairnbraeJerseys.com Hayley Menzies - 0428 765 767 signaturegraphics@bigpond.com Wayne Kuhne - 0438 088 660 bushleafarms@bigpond.com Jamie Drury - 0427 008 088 jamie@emmie-rfarms.com

I

write this article with bittersweet reflection, having attended two significant sales of the Jugiong milking herd dispersal and the Kings Vale dispersal. The Jugiong sale on the 30th September 2019 was a massive event, demonstrating the significant value of registered cattle. 88 years of stud breeding history was packed into 260 sale lots and the Jersey Family was out in force from across the country to not only to take home a special cow or two, but to also support the Nicholson Family who has made an enormous contribution to the Jersey breed. Strong sales resonated from the first to the last lots and quality cattle found quality new homes across the country. Although brought on by water accessibility issues, this sale will be remembered for many years to come by the Jersey family and we look forward to the next generations of Jugiong cows bred by Pat, Brendan and their families. The Kings Vale stud history runs the deepest of all in the Jersey family with a monumental 133 years of breeding on offer. It has stood the test of time, from the early days of the Victorian colony and before Australia’s federation to today, and we congratulate David and Sharon Anderson for their many years at the helm of the Kings Vale herd. To put this herd’s longevity in perspective, consider that the average life span of a company in Australia is 35 years. To have survived droughts, fires, floods, the Great Depression, two World Wars and the many ups and downs of the dairy industry and urban sprawl is a credit to the many generations of Andersons who have farmed the Kings Vale stud. People often ask, “why should I register a cow?” and both these sales are testament to the many reasons why. The Jugiong and Kings Vale cows bred with painstaking passion, providing high levels of production performance, achieving classification results some only dream about, gaining success at minor and major shows, globally recognised and respected, are most certainly some of the reasons the Jersey family members took the opportunity to attend the sales and value-add to their herds from the Jugiong and Kings Vale studs. Between now and our next edition will be the Festive Season, so from my family to yours I wish you all a very merry Christmas and a wonderful New Year and I look forward to seeing many of you at International Dairy Week at Tatura early in the New Year. Glen Barrett GENERAL MANAGER Jersey Australia

General Manager / Secretary Glen Barrett - 0418 466 371 Glen.Barrett@Jersey.com.au

STATE SECRETARIES NEW SOUTH WALES Milton Johnston - (02) 6552 5915 johnston_Jersey@yahoo.com.au QUEENSLAND Diane Reeves - (07) 5485 4585 W: (07) 3221 3182 ajbsqld@bigpond.com SOUTH AUSTRALIA Amy McDonald - (08) 8562 8113 PO Box 13, Greenock SA 5360 sa.branch.Jersey.australia@outlook.com

TASMANIA Max McCormack - 0409 252 232 8 George St, Devonport TAS 7310 pegandmax@bigpond.com VICTORIA Andrew Younger - 0409 572 484 162 Zeerust Church Rd, Zeerust Vic 3634 motor5@bigpond.com

GENETIC RECOVERY OFFICERS Chris McKenzie (Western Districts) Ph: (03) 5598 7222

Barry Monson M: 0429 343 903 Ph: (03) 5625 3176

Margaret Cockerell (Northern Vic) M: 0407 641 132 Ph: (03) 5864 1133

Susan Lutey (Western Australia) Feast Rd, Serpentine WA 6125 Ph: 08 9525 2407 hope1@iinet.net.au

4 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


12 CONTENTS Great Southern Challenge Reaches Milestone… … … … … … … … … … … … … A Look Back In Time… … … … … … … … … … … … … Judges Have It Down Pat Pat’s Double Honours… … … … … … … … … … … … Facing Touch Decisions … … … … … … … … … … Sales: Jerseys Top $15,000 at Jugiong; 133 Years Of Breeding Goes Under The Hammer … … … … Taking On The World’s Best … … … … … … … … … Around The Grounds… … … … … … … … … … … … … “A Reflection – Part 2” … … … … … … … … … … … … Shows: Melbourne Royal, Perth Royal … … … … … … …

6 12 16 18

21 24 26 28

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FRONT COVER Kings Ville Bella 48, Ex91

Vanahlem X Ex90 Larfalot X Ex90 Belmont X Ex90 Montana. Current lactation 7213 L 5.5% 397kg Fat 3.91% 282 kg protein in 279 days cont. Currently rank in the top 25 BPIg females. Her Oliver P son- Kings Ville Bashful-P is now at Total Livestock Genetics. TLGBashful has a BPIg +215, Overall Type +109 and Mammary +110.

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Kings Ville Jerseys Rob & Kerrie Anderson Email – kingsville@dcsi.net.au Rob – 0400 987 702

THE AUSTRALIAN JERSEY JOURNAL – NEXT ISSUE

JANUARY 2020 Advertising & Editorial Deadline Monday, December 9th, 2019 To book your advertising contact Sharon Clark - email jerseyjournal@iinet.net.au DISCLAIMER: Opinions expressed in The Australian Jersey Journal are not necessarily those of Jersey Australia Inc or its Board of Management or Compiling Editor, and no responsibility whatsoever is taken for their authenticity. While every effort will be made to publish advertisements as ordered, no responsibility is taken for the failure of an advertisement to appear as ordered.

The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December // 5


WORDS // RICK BAYNE

R

GREAT SOUTHERN CHALLENGE REACHES MILESTONE

on Baker and Peter Farrell knew they were onto a good idea when they learnt of an on-farm challenge starting in a Jersey cattle club in Gippsland. The farming mates from northern Victoria were part of the Goulburn Murray Jersey Breeders Club and started discussing the potential for all local cattle clubs to hold on-farm challenges, leading to an inter-club final. With a love of breeding stud cattle, showing and promoting their hard work and successful cow families; Ron and Peter proposed to the Jersey Breed Society to find over-judges to score the best of each club’s most successful entrants in each age group from twoyear-olds through to mature classes. With support from the committee, the Great Southern Challenge was born to include clubs from Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and the Riverina area of NSW. The first awards were presented in 1999 and today the Jersey world continues to enjoy the fruits of their initiative as the Challenge celebrates two decades of success. “It was very small at the start but it’s grown from there,” Ron and Peter said. “The challenges are held at a busy time of year after spring calving, when labour is often stretched by irrigating and silage/hay making, but holding judging on-farms allowed many studs to display their quality cattle, who may not have been able to compete in the traditional show-ring. The opportunity to judge cattle not previously seen was a phenomenal outcome,” they said.

“It’s the biggest Jersey competition in the country and it’s always good to win something as large as that.”

– Geoff Akers

The first Great Southern Challenge Supreme Champion Cow, Bushlea Brook Fernleaf - KP & W Kuhne.

The first Supreme Champion cow was BUSHLEA BROOK FERNLEAF from K.P. and W. Kuhne, which also won the mature cow category. CRELLYNVALE ALF’S PRISCILLA, from M and L Boyd, was the 2-Year-Old Champion. There were no other categories at that stage but more age groups were added over the years. The inaugural judges were Alan Carson and Dick Maloney. The judging panel and/or classifiers were nominated by the breed society and varied each year and were initially chauffeured by manager of the Victorian branch, Scott Joynson. Prizes were sought and provided by World Wide Sires, Jim Conroy of Semex and others, including Yamaha, which provided a two-wheel ag bike one year. Semen vouchers and other prizes have varied over the years. Announcing the Great Southern Challenge winners each year has included a great meal and celebration, with venues including a North Melbourne hotel for a few years and a nice winery in Melton. The inaugural

winner and long-time members were the Kuhne family. Last years’ winner, the Barry family, are only new to the Jersey breed, showing the reach of the competition. Peter now lives closer to Melbourne and Ron has retired into Numurkah but they still closely follow the challenge. “We are proud and thrilled that in early December this year, the Great Southern Challenge, Baker-Farrell trophy will be awarded for the 21st year to the club that earns to the overall maximum points,” they said. “We notice a lot of young people are winning the awards; you don’t have to be in it for 50 years to win which is nice,” Ron added. Four-time Supreme Champion winner Geoff Akers said the competition was up there with the best in Australia. Geoff, from northern Victoria, won in 2000 with LOXLEIGH BLANE LILY II, 2006 with LOXLEIGH ASTOUND IRIS 4, 2014 with LOXLEIGH FUTURITY IRIS and 2015 with LOXLEIGH BADGER IRIS 4.

6 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


AGRCHICAGO // AHLEM BANCROFT CHICAGO 23929 BANCROFT X VIPER X LEGAL

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2015 Champion: Loxleigh Badger Iris 4

GSC Results-1999 to current Year Judge 2018 LYNTON BROAD 2017 LUKE WALLACE 2016 PAT BUCKLEY 2015 BRYAN RUSTON 2014 MILTON JOHNSTON 2013 TREVOR SAUDERS 2012 PETER NESS 2011 LINDSAY MARSHALL 2010 GREG FLEMING 2009 LES BENNETT 2008 LISA BROAD 2007 JIM PARKER 2006 ROGER HEATH 2005 MAX HYLAND 2004 KEIH KUHNE & LINTON BROAD 2003 JEFF PARKER & TANYA ALLEN 2002 GORDON LAWSON & ALAN CLYNE 2001 BILL COCHRANE & TED CODLING 2000 JIM PARKER & RON HANN 1999 ALAN CARSON & DICK MALONEY

2-Year-Old Champion DARRYN VALE TEQUILA SATIN DARRYN HOURIGAN KINGS VILLE COWSLIP 115 R & K ANDERSON CALTHORPE VANAHLEM CREAM M & J PERKINS DORNOCH ASTOUND 4640 D & L PARISH CAIRNBRAE ENSIGNS ILLUMINATION A & J CARSON LOXLEIGH ELTON BUTTERCUP G W & N AKERS CAIRNBRAE TBONE DAISY A & J CARSON JUBILEE PARK IDA GR2 K, F & G ARMISTEAD INGOLMOR COMERICA BEAUTY T & K GILMORE MERSEYBANK ELTONS CLAIRE G & A HEAZLEWOOD ISYCOED FAIRY CR & ME BRERETON WALLACEDALE LESTER LYN CJ & MB & LJ & ML WALLACE KOOROO POWER PRINCESS 3 RG & GA LAWSON JUGIONG VIOLENT 4800 NICHOLSON FAMILY FLEURIEU ASTOUND SELL GC & SJ THORN ROLMA FERNS GEM 18 R & T REID LERIDA PARK AMERICAN ROSEBUD BR, JL, RP & LJ SMETHURST KADDY TRADER GIRL 16 A. YOUNGER BRUNCHILLI B JUSTINE ET M & L BOYD CRELLYNVALE ALF?ÇÖS PRISCILLA M & L BOYD

“It’s a competition that allows people so enter their best cows on their home farm, without the expense of taking cows to a show or the need to break them into lead.” – David Mayo, Semex

2014 Champion: Loxleigh Futurity Iris

“It’s the biggest Jersey competition in the country and it’s always good to win something as large as that,” Geoff said. “It’s way up there. It’s a different show to Dairy Week but basically every cow in the country can be entered into the on-farm challenge and they’re judged in their natural environment. “You get a good look at the cow as she is.” After starting in the local on-farm competition in the late 1990s, Geoff continues to compete and sees the value of the challenge. “It’s a fantastic competition and a great promotion for the cow and studs that are successful. We’re looking forward to this year‘s event.” Former Great Southern judge Pat Buckley said the Challenge was one of the best in Australia. “The great thing about the on-farm challenge is you don’t have to go to all

the trouble of preparing cows like you do for a show or Dairy Week,” he said. “It opens up the door for everyone to compete and everyone takes it just as seriously as Dairy Week. People see it as a higher achievement to win Great Southern or Great Northern level than it is to win at some of the big shows.” Pat said the competition opened many doors for breeders. “Even getting

3-Year-Old Champion ARALUEN PARK VANAHLEM BEAUTY 2 T SAUNDERS & A DAY KRISHLAYE TOPEKA BELLE 2 COHEN HARRISON DARRYNVALE VANAHLEM JOAN 2 D HOURIGAN MIKANDAN VANAHLEMS ILAGA 2184 T & B EDWARDS MURRAYBROOK BOWTIE 3660 LENEHAN FAMILY JUGIONG LEONIE 6223 NICHOLSON FAMILY CAIRNBRAE TBONE BENITA A & J CARSON BROADLIN CONSTANCE 2565 L & L BROAD MERSEYBANK ELTONS CLAIRE G & A HEAZLEWOOD RIVERSIDE SULTAN ANTHEM C & K COUCH LERIDA PARK ASTOUNDS LUCY 25 BR, JL, RP & LJ SMETHURST KAARMONA PARADE BABE 2 GC & RG SPRUNT WARRAIN PARADE ROMA J & M COCKERELL

8 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019

4-Year-Old Champion JACKIAH VALENTINO MIMOSA 2797 S G REID BROOKBORA TBONE BONITA 2 R & S BACON ARALUEN PARK SEGA EBONY T SAUNDERS & A DAY MIKANDAN TBONES MARIE 2175 T & B EDWARDS PANNOO LARFALOT VANESSA L & L BROAD CAIRNBRAE TBONE BENITA A & J CARSON BROADLIN CONSTANCE 2565 L & L BROAD MELDAN COUNTRY PHAROS B & M SCOTT LOXLEIGH ASTOUND IRIS 8 R & H & G AKERS KINGS VILLE BP BELLE 11 R & K ANDERSON WALLACEDALE JACE MELAINE 4 CM & LM WALLACE JUGIONG VIOLENT 4800 NICHOLSON FAMILY DARRYN VALE BHAMAS FAVOUR 6 D & E HOURIGAN FLEURIEU ASTOUND SELLY 2 ET GC & SJ THORN


in the Great Southern or the Great Northern is a massive achievement; it certainly puts some cows and breeders on the map,” he said. Semex Australia has been the event’s major sponsor for more than 10 years and General Manager David Mayo said the connection remained strong. “It’s a competition that allows people so enter their best cows on their home farm, without the expense of taking cows to a show or the need to break them into lead,” Mr Mayo said. “It’s a high-quality competition that allows everybody the opportunity to enter and we’re proud to be part of it. Semex has always been renowned for high-quality cattle so it fits hand-inhand with the genetics we sell.” Jersey Australia president Chris MacKenzie said the Challenge was a great way to draw together a broad spectrum of members. GSC Results-1999 to current 5-Year-Old Champion MIKANDAN VANAHLEMS BELLE 2259 GC & RG SPRUNT ARALUEN PARK SEGA EBONY T SAUNDERS & A DAY WALLACEDALE ALMER RUNUNCULUS L & M WALLACE LOXLEIGHT RESURRECTION PEACH AKERS FAMILY JUGIONG DAYDREAM 6054 NICHOLSON FAMILY

“It’s the one project that involves the biggest number of our membership, moving from the local scene to the finals,” Chris said. “We have the greatest participation in the Challenges and because the competition comes to the farm, it involves breeders who’ve never had any previous interest in showing cows. “For some clubs it’s the only function for the year and it’s a reason for them to get together. It’s a great way to compare their cows with their fellow breeders and it’s an honour for winners to represent their area. “Everyone’s a winner that gets to the final.” Chris said the competition also encourages new breeders. “There are always new names coming up; it’s not the same people winning the award ever year. It’s good to see young people being successful.”

Mature Cow Champion WOOLVIE 2276 O BARRY LOXLEIGH FUTURITY IRIS G & N AKERS LOXLEIGH BADGER IRIS 4 AKERS FAMILY LOXLEIGH BADGER IRIS 4 AKERS FAMILY LOXLEIGH FUTURITY IRIS GW & N AKERS JUGIONG DAYDREAM 5744 GLEN GORDON MERSEYBANK ELTONS CLAIRE G & A HEAZLEWOOD WILLOW DELL FANCY 512 ELOORA PASTORAL CO KAARMONA PARADE BABE 2 GC & RG SPRUNT NOEDA MAYFAIR 143 P & A LENEHAM INVERGELLY STEALTH RADIANTMAID 368 G & J FLEMING DARRYN VALE BHAMAS FAVOUR 6 D & E HOURIGAN LOXLEIGH ASTOUND IRIS 4 R & H & G AKERS COWILLA PRIZE SAPPHIRE MANUAL FAMILY ROLMA FERNS GEM 18 R & T REID JUGIONG ILAGAY 142 NICHOLSON FAMILY LERIDA PARK LESTERS LUCY BR, JL, RP & LJ SMETHURST JIMANN TRADER MISTY MORN T & J CAMPBELL LOXLEIGH BLANE LILY II R & H & G AKERS BUSHLEA BROOK FERNLEAF K.P. & W. KUHNE

2016 & 2017 Champion: Araluen Park Sega Ebony

2018 Champion: Araluen Park Vanahlem Beauty 2

Supreme Champion ARALUEN PARK VANAHLEM BEAUTY 2 T SAUNDERS & A DAY ARALUEN PARK SEGA EBONY T SAUNDERS & A DAY ARALUEN PARK SEGA EBONY T SAUNDERS & A DAY LOXLEIGH BADGER IRIS 4 AKERS FAMILY LOXLEIGH FUTURITY IRIS GW & N AKERS JUGIONG DAYDREAM 5744 GLEN GORDON / JUGIONG MERSEYBANK ELTONS CLAIRE G & A HEAZLEWOOD BROADLIN CONSTANCE 2565 L & L BROAD KAARMONA PARADE BABE 2 GC & RG SPRUNT NOEDA MAYFAIR 143 P & A LENEHAM WALLACEDALE JACE MELANIE 4 CM & LM WALLACE KAARMONA PARADE BABE 2 GC & RG SPRUNT LOXLEIGH ASTOUND IRIS 4 R & H & G AKERS FLEURIEU ASTOUND SELLY 2 ET GC & SJ THORN ROLMA FERNS GEM 18 R & T REID JUGIONG ILAGAY 142 NICHOLSON FAMILY LERIDA PARK LESTERS LUCY BR, JL, RP & LJ SMETHURST JIMANN TRADER MISTY MORN T & J CAMPBELL LOXLEIGH BLANE LILY II R & H & G AKERS BUSHLEA BROOK FERNLEAF K.P. & W. KUHNE

The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019 // 9

Baker Farrell Trophy CENTRAL GIPPSLAND CENTRAL GIPPSLAND TASMANIA COLAC & DISTRICTS COLAC & DISTRICTS GOULBURN MURRAY COLAC & DISTRICTS NORTHERN DISTRICTS NORTHERN DISTRICTS WESTERN DISTRICTS CENTRAL GIPPSLAND NORTHERN DISTRICTS GOULBURN MURRAY SOUTH AUSTRALIA GOULBURN MURRAY GOULBURN MURRAY WESTERM DISTRICTS NORTHERN DISTRICTS GOULBURN MURRAY COLAC & DISTRICT


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South Gippsland Jersey Breeders Club Inc

PRESIDENT: BRIAN LAUNDER | SECRETARY: TANYA PRIVITERA | TREASURER: ALEX MATHEWS

MEMBER PROFILE:

Patrick Anderson ‘Kings Veldt’ Jerseys FA R M LIFE: While completing year 12 VCE at Marist-Sion college Patrick spends most of his time working on his family farm in Athlone. On the Farm they milk up to 350 registered Jerseys through three Insetec Astrea 20.20 Robotic milkers.

Patrick established Kings Veldt Jerseys in 2016 and owns over 60 cows now that run alongside his parents Lindsay and Jacinta Anderson ‘Kings Vista’ Stud. JUDG IN G: Patrick has judged Jerseys and the Interbreed sections at Sale Show and the Jerseys, Interbreed and Youth Handlers at Heytesbury Show. This spring Patrick will be judging the Maffra show and Jersey Section at Noorat as well as the Bega Jersey on Farm challenge.

Winsome Anderson, Kasey Shields and Patrick Anderson with Riverside Grand Belle, Supreme Junior Champion at the Royal Melbourne Show

S H O W ING: Over the past three years since establishing Kings Veldt Jerseys, Patrick has won 4 Junior Champions at local shows with 4 different heifers. At this year’s Royal Melbourne Show Patrick took home ‘Most Successful Jersey Exhibitor, Junior Champion Jersey, Reserve Junior Champion Jersey and Supreme Junior Exhibit’. Patrick fitted his uncle Ian’s Cow who won ‘Supreme Intermediate’ exhibit. 2018 A C HIEVEMENTS • • • •

Victorian Agricultural Shows Junior Dairy Cattle Judging State Champion National Young Dairy Judges Championship - 3rd place West Gippsland Trade Training Alliance Young Persons Excellence award Victorian Agricultural Shows Junior Dairy Cattle Parade’s Reserve State Champion

2019 A C HIEVEMENTS • • • • • •

Victorian Agricultural Shows Junior Dairy Cattle Judging State Champion National Young Dairy Judges Championship - 4th place IDW Jersey Australia, JEFO Encouragement award Jersey Australia Gold Membership Award All Breed Dairy Youth Camp - Team player award RASV Youth Travel Scholarship (Patrick plans on attending the WJCB Conference in Canada)

Zoetis Dinner and Presentation 'Zoetis' Kindly sponsored South and Central Gippsland Jersey Breeders club members to a dinner and presentation at the Leongatha RSL on September 11th. We learnt about 'Search Point' their Genomic testing performance program and how to break down their genomic test information report 'Search Point' which has been developed alongside DATAGENE and DAIRY AUSTRALIA. Glenn Barrett from Jersey Australia also gave a short presentation about the eligibility for your cows to be rewarded with the new '5 Star Jersey' Cow status. A great night had by all.

Club Life members: H Colin Dowel - Inverell H Keith Kuhne - Bushlea H Gordon Lawson - Kooroo H Don and Evelyn Patterson - Sanray New members are always welcome please contact Tanya Privitera on 0408 649 259 if interested.

The South Gippsland Jersey Breeders Club would like to thank Vic Feeds for their ongoing support with sponsorship of our club page.


I

A LOOK BACK IN TIME

Has• artificial insemination ru1ned the bull business? By DR. H. A. HERMAN

(Reprinted by perm1sswn from September JO, 1969, issue of Hoard's Dairyman, Copyright, 1969, by W. D. Hollrd & Sons Company, Fort Atkinson:, Wisconsin.)

We continue our retrospective look over 50 Years of the Jersey Journal History has a great habit of repeating itself and as we take a look you’re the 1970’s edition of the Jersey Journal, we see a number of issues effecting the dairy industry that resonate with the modern day. Floods, droughts, milk pricing and the ongoing challenge to have member nominate for board positions are just some of the matters that the Jersey Journal reported on.

Some breeders will answer the question in our heading with n resounding, "Yes". Others, who have sold· good bulls to A.I. ol'gnnizntions or to other breeders, will declare it hus helped purebreds make progress, In the lust 30 years, breeders of l'cgistcrcd dairy c-JUlc have had much "unlearning" to do, and have had to nc<Juirc "new learning" about bull miles.

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Artificial insemination was still very much in its infancy in 1970 and while Jersey Australia acknowledge in the Dairy Queen the impact on the breed for not embracing AI in the early days, we were already questioning the merits and impact of AI’s introduction in the 1970’s and its impact on a key revenue driver for breeders in the bull markets.

During this period, particularly the past 20 years, there has been an economic upheaval in dairying in the U.S.A. which resulted in our milk cow population declining from over 27 million head in 1945 to some 14 million in 1968. The number of dairy herds has been reduced about 50 per cent with the remaining herds having many more cows. Irrespective of the A.I. program, the liquidation of so many herds reduced by thousands the number of bulls being used in natural service. Registered breeders, who once found a market for nearly every respectable looking bull, no longer have the buyer who wants a bull "just to get cows in calf." Many of the dairy farms that remain arc specialized businesses. Dairymen carefully screen bulls used. Our observations lead us to believe that the reduction in herds during the past 20 years caused a good share of the bull-selli g business to be lost. In the A.I. program, the semen from the average bull in service is used to inseminate about 3,300 cows a year. If we estimate 30 to 50 cows bred yearly to the bull in natural service, it means the average bull in A.I. use is replacing at least 75 natural-service bulls. The reduction in total' bulls registered is reflected in all breed association reports and shows only about one-half to one-third as many males registered as 20 years ago. In some breeds the number of bulls maintained by A.I. organizations also dwindled. Bulls in A.I. by breeds, 1958 and 1967 Brown Year Ayrshire Swiss Guernsey Holstein Jersey 1958 953 83 516 157 348 42 1967 220 90 278 1,352 The number of cows bred per A.I. sire has increased from 2,500 in 1958 to 3,300 in 1967, calling for fewer bulls. However, the decrease in cow numbers is a major factor, also, In addition, lhere has been a reduction in the number of cows in· the higher butterfat breeds, and the demand for bulls has been reduced. We point these facts out because only about 50 per cent of the milk cow population is bred artificially, so A.I. cannot be charged with all bull sale losses. The breeder of registered cattle has a bull market if he is willing to gear his program to meet today's requirements. Increased milk production per cow and improved methods of sire evaluation place rigid requirements on those sires used for sampling in the A.I. program.

Dr. /-/. A. Herman With the emphasis on high milk production, lhe herd owner who uses natural service also has raised his standards. Except for the man who wants a "cow freshener," the market for mediocre bulls is the butcher. For that market, dairy bulls have been replaced by beef bulls as dairymen switch to beef pro uction. The regislercd dairy callle breeder, who has a constructive program, will sell fewer bulls but for better prices than in the past. Herc arc some of the factors he must consider and steps to take: Emphasize cows and ramilies. The purebred breeedcr can get the sire's side of a calf's pedigree made to order by breeding to one of the well-proved bulls available through A.r. Both bull studs and private herd owners will be interested in resulting bull calves if they are: 1. Out of dams with several good production records. Three or four consistently high records are worth more than one high record with mediocre records before and after. 2. Not only should the dam be a consistent prnducer but she must have desirable conformation, including a well-carried udder and good wearing qualities. 3. If the dam has several maternal half sisters that are above average in production and conformation, and she is the daughter of a good-producing, long-wearing cow, she has the "cow family" breeders arc looking for. The man who wants to produce bulls for the future should attempt to develop good brnod cows and strong families. Have a plan. In selecting sires to be mated lo cows, the breeder should not try to use every sire in the book. The breeder who succeeds has definite goals in breeding. He will follow a ptogram of breeding and selection that results in strong, upstanding, milky cows. He usually will stay within certain family bloodlines and choose sires that are recognized (Continued overleaf) throughout the breed.

7

FEBRUARY 28, 1970

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He will advertise in his breed journal; test for production; classify for type; perhaps show a few animals; and be active in his local, state, and national breed association programs. He will become acquainted with the management of A.I. organizations and familiarize sire selection personnel with his herd, Often such contacts result in a cow being selected for a special mating to an A.I. bull. Bull calves from such special matings are purchased and sampled for young sire proving programs. The single herd problem. Today's method of evaluating sires on the basis of P:redicted Difference and Repeatability of the proof, places a sire proved in a single herd at a disadvantage. The Repeatability of a sire's proof with five tested daughters in one herd may run only 14 to 16 per cent. A sire with 100 or more tested daughters in many herds may run as high as 99 per cent. To broaden the base for proving sires, several herds must be involved. Today, there arc young bulls, known as "syndicate bulls," owned by a half-dozen or more breeders, being sampled in all of their herds. Some of these bulls will prove out at high levels and will be desired by A.I. organizations or other breeders. In some cases, A.I. organizations own shares in "syndicate bulls" and sample them over a wide area.

EDI JERSEYS

There is a market for the outstanding sires proved in only One or two herds. But daughters of such bulls must be well above average in production and conformation, In order to enter a bull stud, bulls must not be over seven or eight years of age and must be we1l-respected and known. A.I. organizations must have bulls their customers like and have confidence in. They will use some bulls even if the Repeatability is at a minimum. Purebred breeders have a great stake in producing bulls that will continue to boost milk production and wearing ability of cows for the future. Just to meet the average, bulls in A.I. use today must sire daughters yielding 1,500 to 2,000 pounds more milk per lactation than sires selected 15 years ago. The bulls in greatest demand sire daughters which produce above the breed average by 500 to 1,000 pounds or more of milk. The registered breeder who expecls to sell bulls must recognize that he has a demanding market if he will meet its requirements. He will forget the idea that "every bull dropped is a potential herd sire" and concentrate his efforts only on males from his best cows. The future of dairy cattle improvement rests with the co-operative effort between breeders and • A.I. organizations.

h a v e b e e n bred to produce e c o n o m i c a l l y

We have always believed that the final proof of good breeding and sound bloodlines i s 12 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019 "How animals that you have bred perform in other herds." EDI congratulates the following breeders on their selection, management and success with ED I Jerseys.


'

Clubs' Association Su--pports Jersey Unity -

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Victorian Jersey The recent meeting of the Combined approval to sup,, their Cattle Clubs' Association voiced tho Herd Society Jersey port all moves toward unity of in Australia. n that the dairying Mnny delegates expressed the opiniobeen ·and was still had industry throughout Australia the was to remain Jersey if and ks set-bac suffering many Jersey Herd Societies the premier breed then unity of the ty. was a necessi that all States should They further expressed the sentiment of the breed which was forget past differences for the good of paramount importance to all. to the Victorian The Clubs' Association recommended all moves towards unity Branch Committee that "it supported made by the Victorian between State Jersey Herd Societies Branch." Victorian Cattle Clubs Twenty-two delegates from the eight House, in Melbourne, attended the conference staged at Jersey . : _ 1 2 y on Wednesday, Januar Mr. Alan McKean, Association President and Chairman,e this gathering which said that it was a pleasure to welcom Clubs' As6ociation. the of history the was the largest ever in s from the Livestock Mr. McKean also welcomed Mr. Phillip Jersey Journal, lian Austra the from er Bulletin, Mr. Warren the Secretary and' Field Officer. ced and introdu were Following this the club delegates . they included:A. J. Smethurst, R. CENTRAL GIPPSLAND-Messrs. ssrs. R. Melross, L CarrolJ, W. J. Clark; COLA C-Me -MURRAY-Messrs. Featherston, A. McKenzie; GOULBURN ff; MURRAY VALL EYW. Miles, A. Loundes, E. CosgriV. Smith; NORT HERN Messrs. A. Broad, J, White, G, ; NORTH EAST ERNMessrs. S. L. Mock, A. W. HodgeH GIPPSLAND-Messrs. Messrs. K. Turner, R. Reid; SOUT DISI'RICT-Messrs. Hine, R. Wintle, H. Cousins; WESTERN A. McKean, W. Fisher, D. Cox, . L. Williams and G. Apologies were received from Messrs McDonald. were discussed with Remits submitted by the various clubs the following result s:provision be made for GOULBURN-MURRAY-That held immediately following Special General Meetings to benecessa ry. the Victorian Branch meeting if Special Meeting had been The secretary explained that a the g Annual Meeting Comin called and would be held prior to rules as was stated at in order to change the Branch Shepparton in 1969. and referred to the After some discussion it was carried Victorian Branch for consideration. be submitted to the NOR1HERN DISTR ICT-A remit that when a vacancy Annual General Meeting of Membersl Meetings this vacancy n Annua occurs on Committee betwee 0 be filled by holding a by eiection.

Unifying Jersey Australia was a hot topic in 1970 and while history tells us this took until 2008 to achieve, the foundations for this achievement started with earnest conversations long ago.

7

A u st ra li a n inve stigations into the basis o f payment fo r m

JANUARY 31, 1970

Milk payment systems were on the table as the value for protein was being recognised and the discussions were started on how farmers can be remunerated for protein alongside butterfat.

Club delegates at the Conference agreed that the Northern This was approved 1 and it wassubmit ting the remit at the District Club be responsible for ul. Warrag Annual Meeting at ce in the Rules and WESTERN DISTRICT-That all referen Patrons 1 be deleted. Constitution of the Jersey Society, to g of Committee meetin last the at The secretary reported that Meeting of Members it had been decided to convene a Special word "Patrons" the g deletin for g prior to the Annual Meetin n was approved. from the rules. This recommendatio progeny of unclassified GOULBURN-MURRAY-That male le for registration. cows and unapproved heifers be ineligib Jerseys with obvious Mr. Miles stated that of late manyused for breeding and being faults such as short jaws were do image any good. Jersey the not did this being sq.Id and that eradicating this problem . This remit was designed as a start to worthwhile1 to very was this h Delegates agreed that althoug cation would have to be be of any use compulsory· classifi heifers and at ing approv of system introduced as well as a not have the facilities to the pr sent time the Society didmomen this reason the For t. the at implement these processes remit .was not approved. form be' present its COLAC-That bull classification in aboli$hed. cation of bulls was Mr, Mellross remarked that the classifi purpose because nothing of no use as it did not serve any to pass the classification happened to the bulls that failed inspectio,n. classification at present The field officer explained that bull and more inexperienced was designed mainly to assist the newion as to whether they indicat an them breeders, to give bull, Delegates supported were using the right type of Jersey bulls should be classified. all this, and many indicated that not approved. For this reason this remit was Jersey Herd Society CENTRAL GIPPSLAND-That the tion for calves with be asked to review the costs of registra Service Certificates. charge put on these The secretary explained that the the cost involved in processing Service Certificates was to offsetgot A.I. The remit was by s the registrations of animal ended that Committee review approved, and it was recomm these costs. this Club's wish that the NORTHERN DISTRICT-It is discuss ed. future of the Stud Book again be Continued Overleaf

A progress report payment for milk foron investigations into the basis for manufacture has bee able to dai r y indu n mndc availstry recently by Mr. H. organisations. This was announced A. Stone, O.D.E., Preside Australian Dairy Far nt of the the Australian Dairy mers' Federation and Chairman of Industry Council. Following represe cil the Committee ntations by the Federation and the Cou Committee on Agr was appointed in 1968 by the Stan nicul ding reached the conclus ture. Mr. Stone said "The Commit tee ion that the only payment worthy of con alte sideration was a fat rnative system of plus protein basis." The main factors whi ch influenced this con clusion w e r e : • The increasing and its high value nutimportance of protein on world mar kets ritionally. • From an econom ant non-fat constituent ic viewpoint protein is the most imp ortof milk. • The protein test is faster, more sim on both milk and manufactured produc ple and mo-re precise ts solids determinations than S.N.F, or tota . l Protein movement ,r in the same man through the factory can be account ed ner as fat movements. Such cannot be achieved for accounting S.N.F. • It is possible to whereas this is diff determine a meaningful price for pro and mineral salts icult for S.N.F. because the protein lacttein are all independent ose variables. Before making any to undertake an ana recommendation, the Committee dec ided lysi s of fat and protein leve dual milk supplies ls in ind the 1970/71 producto at least one factory in each State iviover payment which maytion season, to determine disparities in arise under the pre sent system of pay -

0•

Who says Jerseys can't produce

ilk

ment, and to asssess the extent to which plus protein basis payment on a fat would reduce such disp tion o f such data nec arit essa ry for the analysis ies, The coJlecin the hands of the was, at present, various State Departm ents of Agriculture. The Committee esti to collect the necessamated that it would take up to 12 mon the proposed analysi ry fat/protein test data and carry ths out mittee would submit s. When this work is completed the Com its final report. Mr. Stone said that the question of the for milk was of par bas is of paymen facturers, as it cou ticular interest to all producers and man t uhold very importa future of the induld stry. In order to ensnt implications for the hensive views of all ure that the compre mittee had distributedinterested parties are obtained, the Com the Progress Report organisations and widely to farmer cop dairy factory and Bre ies had also been forwarded to each ed Society in Austral ia. (The Committee was· established in 1968 Committee on Agr by the Standing icul ture of the Australian Agr Council and consist icultural s Department of Prim of a represelltative of the Commonwea lth ary Ind ustr y (Mr. L. E. Nic hol man), the Australian s-C hai Thorne), the Victori Dairy Industry Council (Mr. K. ran W. Dep artment of Agriculture Howey), the New (Mr. R. I. Sou (Dr. G. J. Smith), Mr. th Wales Department of Agriculture J. H. Jenkins of the sion of the Departm Marketing Div ient of Prim ary Industry is Secretary the Committee, and cultural Economics, Mr. N. Honan of the Bureau o f Agrof are co-opted memberand Mr. L. J. Erwin, a Dairy Technologi is.) st,

OBITU

ARY On Jersey Island receJournal ntly a two–-yea Themen Australian Jersey November-December 2019 // 13 r-old heifer, Mel e's Ceres, bred Mr . N. C. De La Ru Farm. completed a and owned by P. A.· Perriee of Boupoe Mr; Norris Clifton lbs, fat at a 3.97% J2 record of 19,100 lbs. milk and ley De La Rue of the test in 361 days. 755 Tomahawk Creek, Glenwyn Stud, via Colac, Victo This makes


TIONS I ced DRY CONDI redu s to be having much

seem The whole of Australitiais widely reported that many areas rainfaU this year and harvest. hay or will not have a grain suppose that under such circumstances, It is reasonable to will rise sharply and already hay coarse grain prices lity, is expensive. Many dairyfarmers even of doubtful qua for self sufficiency and rely on the do not normally farm or grain for supplementary feeding. purchase of hay and red that costs of purchased feed will umn comes around It already seems assu

at least until Aut increase substantially long once more. ual pasture this is a ned e who depend on ann maintai

0

and immediately particularly prior to The level of feeding, strongly influences production for very ing calv g followin t to lift the the entire season. a major requiremen Improved feeding ismilk and fat. breed average for both ze could help you to do just this in The growing of mai the hay situation in this dry year. addition to helping outwhat it is worth the long range general (Ed. No te: - For s moderate to good weather forcast sayfor December and January d cate indi are rains efit). a maize crop could ben

WS R OF MERIT COfoll owing N.S.W. REGISTEived advise that the

Dry conditions across Australia are currently impacting us like rarely seen before and Jersey Journal was across this in 1972. Introducing maize for cow feed was seen as a way to combat the dry conditions and provide and alternative and better feed source and what about some of those cows/breeders on the NSW register of merit. INGALA, PARRABEL and MIAMI are studs that still resonate across the breed to this day and you can imagine the feedback at the Warrnambool show with sharing the major prize between a Holstein and Jersey Cow. I wouldn’t want to be the judge who came up with that decision!!

rece Jersey House hasqualified for entry in the register of Jersey Cows have to be For thos ds nee tion duc pro milk 1100 lbs buttermerit. time to wait and if will be heavy. ds are a minimum of so The qualifying yielns. have some moist the cost of doing ever how atio do lact e ing, 6580-4,7%fat for thre a creek or gully, Many on dry land farm y, W, J , D a l e y - 2 st land adjacent toleast some summer Gannon Vale Light Rub or at least semi moi at ly ear ced B.F, men 0-4 .8% -12 95 1262 we can antiand if planting is com H, J, Fle min g-2 715 expected, and perhaps Miami Eileen 2nd, crop growth could be world will send us some out of 0-4 ,7% -14 24 B.F, cipate this funny old , H, J, Fle min g-3 033 Miami Larkspur 2nd gamble in areas a season rain! ays alw is s -26 370 -5.2 %B.F, Planting summer cropis minimal - if hay is in short ene, C. C. Co chr ane fall Parrabel Jester's Eth where summer rain could well be worth taking. , 832 0-4 .2% 1363 B.F supply the gamble the possibility en, Kameruka Est .-2 one crop that offers be heavy and Sanvale Beauty Que can Maize is perhaps the ds yiel , Co lL- 215 401184 B,F ply shortage, ry 3rd, Wagga Ag, of relief in food supability to survive dry conditions until Wagga Winsome Glo B,F, it has considerable on-231005,5 %-1 194 s, H. J. Salway & S rain falls. cob and green Wilgo Sultan's Countes widely for both the direct to cattle n grow is B.F, crop 210 The 5,2 %-1 -23910-4,8%e into silage or fed nt years much 28th, G, L, W a t e r s food, is frequently mad Willow Dell Girlie electric fence. Over rece ss the asse of to s aid rsea the , with 23250-5,2%1159 B.F e both here and ove 6th, G, L. W a t e r s stages of growth. research has been don Willow Dell Noella maize at its variousprotein availability of e valu ing feed the seven lacta1203 B,F, ons exist, plainly 0 B.F., not more than When drought conditi on what is provided other thin in Lifetime Section (224 rely enti ent end is dep 842 0-6 ,1 % tions). n or fodder purchased. ry, G, H, Ger mo n-4 tein pasture - by the grai Cayuga King's Rosema maize is not a high pro that wn kno tein l i. pro wel varying idmann-40680 B.F, 6 Lac Whilst it is other plants have a Dainty 4th, P. R. We Hunterford Jester's feed, it does like all its degree of maturity. Work in New i, Lac to ies 5 , g 3 var 4 ann -46 980 -5,5%-22 content accordin illustrates that protein content nty 2nd, P, R, We idm Hunterford Rush Dai Zealand recently young stage to .035% per plant at the t c a L ge 6 the , sila sfactory 626 0-5 .1 % 5,0 %-2 360 from .045% at gested that whilst sati ie, Johnston Bro s.-4 Ingalala Earl's Jess mature stage. It is sugthe young maize, animals generally the i, from as ne-52275--.e - just 2340, 6 Lac can be made Clarice, C. C. Cochra the hard "dent" stag Kameruka Roseboy'si, prefer that made in harden. At this point protein content the Lac to 6 to , ng ns-52140le, close 5,5 %-2 861 cob is beginni W, J, Murray & S o .040% and the who The Farrells begun preparing this news item for the per plant is around yield. Lightview Cherub 4th, i, ter Lac 7 , mat 980crop some months ago, but in the pressure of work o n s - 6 4J"oumal 4,9 %-2 540 maximum dry e maize silage, the con, W, J, Murray & S mak 2nd to d ody nde Mel w inte tvie ight be following Ligh er airt Should it their return to "Tlte Willows," overlooked pped and stored und .0% 4,6 %-2 957 , 7 L a c t e, H. J; Fle min g-4 561 5-5sending needs to be finely cho it to us. We publish it now in our belief in the give Miami Hope's Surpris not ld ditions. wou y old man maxim, "Better late tlmn never." -46 830 of course, 2297, 6 Lact, On irrigation areas growing, if however, we have an ance 2nd, N. J. Gr een ze Taree Vale Golden Adv l deserve wel may consideration to mai ter t evacuated just in time to escape the largest c The mat a were L cattle feeding the l-56 820 -6.2 % 4,9 %-2 308 , 6 eye to· next winter's in silage form could well prove Lotus, Yanco Ag. Col and most disastrous flood ever experienced in the Mersey Wagga Ringmark's consideration. Maize after opening rains have germinated ) tations We made the decision at 9 a.m. on Monday, August Valley, 10 Lac 3503, 7 Laci, the valuable for feedingon dry land - it would help out dry B.F, Not more than ,1 % George telephoned the Hydro-Electric Commission Elite Section, (3600is Alice, Avondale Col L-7 258 24,5-5after for the the annual pasture Dracon a maintenance rationbecome well ord vide terf pro Hun and ition s to and that incredible conditions were prevailing at Paranhay pos ture found pas ts, land Lac dry 9 , 8 the 0 g -37 cows, thus allowingraz Dam, some forty miles upstream. There were 20,000 ing. C.) gana (VI L established before iliser applied OO fert MB and NA le cubic of water per second spilling over the dam, where feet RR ilab the ava WA er is show that Where _adequate watper acre have been achieved. Such keen at the above was highest flood reading had been only half of this $100previous Competition was so Championship prize of the up to' 30,0oo· plants d soil preparation well before plantCow ons. ry mpi Cha amount. inter-breed Dai nd 90 days only to ey and the Friesian density requires goo arou Jers s the uire 4th, req een nty Dai betw crop l s ded the divi ing and as the tota is possible to plan to ensure that t on, Bemersyde Farm rd The was already rising around us and we organised awawater The Jersey Championald of Grassmere shared the reach maturity, it r to the commencement of the fros ourselves to save what we could. Except for the three herd owned by Mr. A. McDmarty Triste. silage is made prio Cro ter l but the loca sires and ten yearling bulls which were shut in on the highest with the Friesian, danger period. from overseas ey was provided by r Party came backAustralian dairy The $100 prize mon and safest place on the farm, every beast was evacuated. The Members of the Tou factory. countries y ese man che with and ed par milking 11cows and calves were accommodated at tho nearby saying that com fed. herds are not well Calthorpe Stud of Mr. K. L. Perkins. 1 1972 Delightfully indi g n ant at having been so ruthlessly transNOVEMBER

The Mersey Bank Flood

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C

Classi

O

We all recall the story of the floods in recent years in Tasmania and Geoff and Annie Heazelwood finding their calves on the top story of the house. Mersey Bank has been no stranger to severe flood impacts. 1970 saw a major flood in Tasmania with the Mersey Bank severely damaged and the cows evacuated from the farm. Severe damage to the farm and house occurred but it was great to see that the strong community spirit came to there’s and I’m sure all other affected farmers aid to get them back on track

planted, the 68 Mersey Bank ladies rebelled at the unfamiliar conditions of a totally different shed, so were later trucked six miles away to the now dispersed "Corinna" stud of Mr. R. Bennett of East Devenport. Here they found the herringbone dairy much more to their liking and stayed for a week until the ground at "The Willows'' had dried out a little and temporary fences had been erected. Because of our timely decision to evacuate, we were more fortunate than. most, as we lost no stock at all. The bulls did spend a very uncomfortable period standing in water, because the WHOLE farm was completely inundated. The fences were a tangled mass of broken, twisted wire under driftwood debris. The house too, suffered considerable damage with all the floor coverings, some built in cupboards and bedding being ruined by the mud. The stench was unbelievable, On the return of the milking herd, several cows became ill with colic and other upsets through eating vegetables and rubbish strewn among the wreckage. 1\Yo thousand bales of hay had been damaged by the water, but in the continuing rain 20 cheerful locals turned up and salvaged one thousand bales, We served a meal of sorts to these good folk-soup fol/ Q o w e d by stew and mashed potatoes in the same bowl and · eaten with the same spoon, Further working bees of farmers helped untangle and re-erect fences, and their help so cheerfully given is something that we will never forget.

14 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019

T O MEMBERS OF THE VICTORIAN I,!

NO AU

In Jerse Com


· .. .,._

Editorial

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liJ

'DAIRYING IN CRISIS'

The 1970’s were a tumultuous time for the dairy industry with poor farm gate returns and low stock values cutting a swathe through the dairy farming communities across the country. Farmers took to the streets with rallies in major cities bringing the plight of the industry to the attention of all.

Such have been the headlines of recent weeks in the press from Queensland to Tasmania and who can deny .that the words do not accurately sum up the situation on many farms and in many country towns. If this is not the position on your farm then be thankful. Victoria and Tasmania have witnessed many demonstrations designed to bring the economic plight of the dairy farmer to the notice of the gen.era! public. Never before has the industry been able to get so much media coverage for its problems. Never before has the consuming public been faced with the stark picture of seeing 700 head of cattle slaughtered because of low returns from dairy factories and stock sales yards, and the ruinous effects of drought. It can no longer be said that the general public is unaware of the plight of the dairy farmer, will there be a responsive answer from them that will generate some form of action from politicians and authorities? The following are some of the utterances gathered from various sources, over the past month on the dairy industry and its problems. MR SINCLAIR- 'Australia looks like being forced to,tu_rn down the level of dairy production so that we can better relate returns to those who spend so many hours and so many days of the week in producing such a basic food.' MURRAY GOULBURN - 'The way the season is in Victoria and the way next years prices look at the moment it seems virtually certain that production will be severely cut back without any government action. However, we state firmly that we have every confidence in the longer term future of the industry'. PETER NIXON - (Federal Minister for Transport, Member for Gippsland). 'There will be financial assistance to the dairy industry'. MR J. HALFPENNY - (Secretary Amalgamated Metal Workers Union). 'I propose a meeting with farmers representatives to discuss the rural crisis'. PRESIDENT - U.K. FARMERS UNION - 'Dairy product mountains in Europe have a habit of vanishing quickly. I would not doubt that the same will happen on this occasion'. BILL PYLE - United Dairy Farmers (Vic). 'We must not make long run decisions on the evidence of short term factors'.

DAIRY FARMERS MASS RALLY

A long line of Victoria's dairy farmers, led by half a dozen dairy cows stopped the traffic in the city block on Monday, June 21st 1976 to bring to the notice of the consuming public the desperate plight of the industry as a result of the effects of low world prices, high costs generated by inflation and wage and price increases over recent years.

Mr Sinclair seems to be saying that our industry has to shrink; Australia's largest dairy Co-operative seems to be saying it has to survive in the interests of the future; Mr Nixon seems to be saying that the industry will be helped to survive, whilst Bill Pyle and the U.K. Farmers Union are saying, seemingly, that the present problems are not long term. Significantly for the first time a major Union has concerned itself with the rural sector. Where does that leave the man whose interest bill is due, whose milk cheque has ceased because of drought conditions, whose overdraft has reached the limit and whose familY are endeavouring to struggle on whilst the husband is searching for a job to help keep the household going? For what it is worth I suggest that:Mr Sinclair will e right but that it will happen without his help; that M.G. will be right and will be chasing milk before the end of the 1976-77 season; that Mr Nixon will be right but it may not be at a level that will prevent the industry shrinking, however his financial assistance will assist those who choose to leave the industry; Mr Halfpenny will have his meeting and we may find that meat processing, livestock exports and shipping delays may receive more realistic consideration as to bans etc; The E.E.C. skim milk powder mountain will disappear and this will improve world prices until the next one (which may be another product) is built - and I hope that what Bill Pyle says about taking hasty decisions will be heeded. Further, I would suggest that the future will see returns from the liquid milk market in all states becoming part of the returns for all dairy farmers in all states that are prepared to produce good quality milk. The decision of the oil producing countries last month not to increase the world price of oil will greatly assist the strengthening of world economies, in consequence world food demand will increase. How satisfying it would be if those with the power to take decisions would insist that in the future all milk (for whatever purpose) be paid for at the farm level on the food value it contains and that the marketing of it and indeed all dairy products, should be as modern and as aggressive as that currently directed towards the sales of 'Coke', cigarettes and washing powder. There will be more than enough wastage in the next twelve months within the ranks of producers and whilst to survive as a unit will be perhaps painful and difficult for many, it can be reasonably expected that to do so will bring rewards. Ed. Ireland. Whilst the mood of the rally during the march was good humour, when the crowd of 4 to 5,000 assembled beside parliament house to hear Deputy Prime Minister Doug Anthony and state premier Dick Hamer, heckling and abuse of the speakers took over. Radio, Television and the press media coverage of the event ensured that the public were well aquainted with the dire situation of the states dairy farmers - never before has the industry received such publicity. Did the politicians commit themselves to anything substansive? No - Dick Hamer promised his governments co-operation with the Commonwealth Government, to introduce a free school milk scheme, to continue rural reconstruction and the 'carry·on loan scheme'. Doug Anthony reasserted his governments $2 for $1 with the state government to support skim milk caisien export prices and called for a NATIONAL dairy industry free of state policies that he claimed worked against the national good. What did the masses want to hear? The answer to that question was summed up in the words of one lifetime dairy farmer when he made these points to the media 1) Equal opportunity to all efficient producers to share the home market irrespective of the form in which the milk is sold. 2) Modern marketing methods to increase home market consumption of milk and dairy products and aggressive overseas marketing. 3) Government support to enable our exports to compete on world markets against our subsidised competitors, particularly during poor export price periods. 4) A decrease in the cost inputs of production throughout

JULY, 1976

5

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The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019 // 15

Wayne & Lisa Kuhne 0438 088 660 bushleafarms@bigpond.com


PAT’S DOUBLE HONOURS

WORDS // RICK BAYNE

JUDGES HAVE IT DOWN PAT The Great Southern and Great Northern judging jobs are among the most prestigious positions available to Jersey Australia members. Jersey Australia president Chris MacKenzie says this year’s choices, Pat Buckley and Pat Nicholson, have all the experience needed for the job. “We look for someone with experience, a good knowledge of cows and who knows how to mark the scoresheet,” Chris said. “Pat Nicholson was a classifier in the past and Pat Buckley is a classifier now. The traits they are looking at when completing the scoresheet are based around the traits that are assessed when classifying.” The judges will score the entries over 22 categories. Now meet the judges…

At 33, Pat Buckley is believed to be the youngest person to judge both the Great Southern and Great Northern challenges. However, Pat has plenty of experience to match his youthful enthusiasm. He has been a Jersey classifier for seven years and has judged many competitions, including onfarm challenges in Victoria and NSW and the Great Southern Challenge in 2016. “I believe I’m the youngest to do both; I’m pretty proud of that,” he said. “It doesn’t matter the size of the competition; I always try and do it. I’ve judged a lot of shows, but the Great Southern was a massive highlight and having the opportunity to judge the Northern is just as prestigious.” His judging follows a history of showing cows “from pretty much the time I could walk”. Pat runs Killarney Grove Jerseys, the name referencing his Irish heritage, while his parents David and Linda Buckley have their stud Nimerald at The Oaks, near Camden in NSW. They lease the farm and milk about 200 cows, down about 50 as a result of the drought. Judging and running a farm in tough times have trumped showing for Pat. “I don’t show as much today because full time farming takes precedence over showing, especially with the drought,” he said. He will compete in the local on-farm challenge but won’t pursue any further honours. “If we do any good, I’ll have to pull them out,” he said. “I don’t mind too much – it’s a pretty big honour to do the Great Northern; you don’t get asked every day to judge big competitions like this.” Pat says he’s looking forward to travelling from Far North Queensland to Bega and other NSW locations to see cows in their natural settings. “That’s what I loved about the Great Southern. I travelled across four states in five days seeing awesome cows. NSW and

Queensland seem to have a slightly different style of cow to the southern states, but at the same time the quality is just as high. From what I’ve seen with the Great Southern and the local on-farm challenge, it’s super competitive.” Pat won the 3-Year-Old Championship in the Great Northern Challenge in 2011 with Transit Park Hattie 5746. “It was a pretty big achievement because she’d just come off winning Reserve Senior Champion cow at the NSW state show. She was a cow I’d purchased with a friend, Shane Oslear from a sale in Victoria, so it was good to see how far she’d developed in the couple of years we’d had her.” A few months later she won the Jersey futurity at International Dairy Week in 2012. Being a judge is a serious task for Pat. “You’ve got to have a good eye for cows,” he said. “You’ve got to know what you’re looking for and be able to clearly explain the reasons why you’ve placed them the way you have”. “You’ve got to be confident in your placings and be able to justify your decisions.” Pat will look for the type of cows he’d like to be milking and breeding on his farm. “Like all dairymen, I look for cows with high, wide rear udders and cows that are balanced right throughout and have that dairy strength we all look for,” he said. “She doesn’t have to be the biggest cow but a cow that is balanced overall and functionally correct, able to walk 1-2kms a day or stand for hours on feed pads if needed.” He expects a tough judging assignment. “It’s like the grand final so often there’s not much between the top five. No cow is perfect, but you tend to find something that can help with the decision, it might be slightly better teat placement or she was a little deeper or open in the rib. “Ultimately you look for the cow that’s most correct, with the least faults.”

16 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


WESTERN DISTRICT

JERSEY BREEDERS CLUB 1944 - 2019

______________________

CLUB MEMBERS

Club News

MT PLEASANT JERSEYS Tim, Daryl & Sue Bryce 03 5565 1474 0428 615 350

We would like to thank all those Jersey enthusiasts for making our 75th Anniversary in conjunction with Jersey Australia Annual meeting such an enjoyable and wonderful celebration.

JIREH JERSEYS Chris & Pam McKenzie 0455 987 222 MARITANA Stephen Gleeson 03 5567 1090 SOMERSET Francis Greed & Judy Russell 0421 012 026 GREEN PINES Greg & Leesa Bryce 0437 662 523

Our members showed their farms and cows to their credit, we enjoyed great weather and fantastic social activity, all due to our amazing Jersey cow. Our club would like to congratulate the Great Australian Challenge winners, especially ‘Woolvie Jerseys’ – Carla & Owen Barry on taking out the 2019 Jersey Australia/Semex Great Australian challenge champion with Woolvie 2276.

BAROMI Jason Smith 0438 307 342 CHISLEW JERSEYS David Leonard 0438 662 313 WOOLVIE JERSEYS Owen & Carla Barry 0409 339 532

MURRAY BROOK Adam & Paul Lenehan 0428 687330 / 0428 687 331

JAKE HARKNESS 0448 634 533 Alta Genetics Australia

WANSTEAD JERSEYS Roger & Amanda Heath 0447 939 321

LERIDA PARK JERSEYS Rhys & Lauren Smethurst 0428 564 389

BUBBLE FROST JERSEYS Ashlea & Geoff Church 0448 910 565

CAIRNBRAE JERSEYS Alan & Janine Carson 03 5235 3201

ELMS PARK JERSEYS Shahna & Andrew Chant 0400 128 960

WHITE STAR JERSEYS Con & Michelle Glennen 0408 527 898

SEAVIEW Jason & Fiona Newcombe 0427 988 232

ALAMBIE Mary & Russell Hussy 03 5569 2228

ROLBS GOLD JERSEYS Josh McKenna & Renee Barling 0439 462 172

CLUB MEMBERS

______________________

A good day was held on Thursday 12th September, when our club visited ‘Maritana’ Jerseys – Stephen Gleeson at Purnim. In October the club visited ‘White Star’ Jerseys – Con & Michelle Glennen, the No. 1 ASI herd in Australia. In the next Journal we will have results of our On Farm Challenge.

For further information please contact: WESTERN DISTRICT JERSEY BREEDERS CLUB

PANMURE JERSEY Chris & Karen Parker 03 5567 1355 AMY WRIGHT 0408 417 871 World Wide Sires Australia _______________________

LIFE MEMBERS

Don Clarke - 0429 661 156 Bruce & Lorraine Smethurst

PRESIDENT: Daryl Bryce (p) 0428 615 350 SECRETARY: Lynette Lenehan (p) 03 5568 7330


As part of the judging, Pat will spend 7-8 days on the road in late November. Not only is this enjoyable, it’s educational. “You have the opportunity to look at other cows and other farming systems, see what bulls are working,” he said. “Classifying and judging has made me use bulls that weren’t on my radar. After seeing their daughters, I went out and bought the semen and now I’m milking their daughters so it’s helped to improve my breeding program. We’ve got two-year-olds coming through where you can see our breeding program start to take shape

with the quality of udders and the milk production we’re getting.” On-farm performance is part of his judging criteria. “They have to be functionally correct but milk as well. Production efficiency is key; we need cows that are going to work in the real world for us. They have to display a lot of dairyness which you get through the bone quality and the quality of the udder system.” “You tend to find with the on-farm challenges they’re the best cows type wise and production wise.” n

FACING TOUGH DECISIONS Pat Nicholson will have plenty of tough decisions to make as judge for the 2019 Great Southern Challenge. But before he gets that far, he’s facing a personal teaser – how can you separate the honour of judging the Challenge or International Dairy Week. The Jersey Australia challenges have grown in prestige to rival IDW and being asked to judge either is a feather in anyone’s cap. Now Pat can claim both titles. “I judged the Jerseys at Dairy Week in 2018. That was a great honour but judging the Great Southern is right up there with judging the Jerseys at Dairy Week,” he said. While the final call won’t be made until the last cow has been seen for the Great Southern Challenge, Pat is relishing the opportunity and realises there will be plenty of tough decisions along the way. “This is the first time I’ve judged the Great Southern but I’ve been involved in challenges with our own cows over the years,” he said. Pat’s Jugiong stud has had a lot of success over the years, including JUGIONG DAYDREAM 5744 which won Supreme Champion in the Great Southern Challenge for Glen Gordon in 2013 before backing-up with the 5-Year-Old Championship in 2014, and JUGIONG ILAGAY 142 which was Supreme Champion in 2003. “It was an honour to win, especially when you’re competing against so many other top cows from all over southern Australia,” Pat said.

The stud’s success also includes JUGIONG VIOLENT 4800 winning the 2-Year-Old Champion in 2005 and 4-Year-Old in 2007, and JUGIONG LEONIE 6223 taking the 3-Year-Old Champion title in 2014. JUGIONG is named after a small town in NSW that was home to Pat’s great grandmother. Pat and his brother Brendon are the fourth generation to run the family farm operation and stud at Girgarre in northern Victoria. While winning is an honour, being invited to judge is just as prestigious for Pat. “I’ve judged a lot of on-farm challenges over the years from all breeds and it’s an honour to be able to judge a competition like the Great Southern,” he said.

“You see the winners from each region; you’re judging the best of the best and that’s a great honour to select the overall champions.” Pat said he would be looking for “a good dairy cow with good, high wide rear udders and strong ligaments. Judging is not a new experience for Pat. “I started judging competitions in shows and youth camps from when I was very young and from there, I progressed to judging panels for Jerseys and Holsteins,” he said. “I’ve judged a lot of shows throughout Australia.” That experience has shown Pat how far the breed has progressed. “There’s no doubt competitions like this are getting stronger and stronger,” he said. “As you get more people entering at the grass roots level and more herds are getting involved, you’re identifying a lot of top cows that go through to the final. “I’m looking forward to going to different farms and seeing the winners from each region. Having been involved in the challenges and knowing what goes on at a club level for those cows to win, which is an honour in itself, for cows to go to the next level is something special. “To be able to judge those cows of the highest calibre is a real honour.” While Pat does some Holstein judging as well, his farm is strictly Jersey. “For the size of the cow and what they’re able to produce and their conversion of feed into milk and fat and protein, they’re a very efficient animal,” he said. “They are easy to manage and easy to handle.” n

18 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


NortherN District Jersey BreeDers cluB

Presdient: Daniel Bacon 0407 753 324

The Northern District Jersey Breeders Club recently held their AGM, and this years office bearers will be –

Secretary: Pat Nicholson

Congratulations to the Nicholson Family on a hugely successful milking herd dispersal!

President: Daniel Bacon Vice President: Geoff Brown Secretary: Pat Nicholson Treasurer: Kaye Cochrane A huge thank you must go to Lisa Broad on 15 years of service as Secretary!

WINDY WAYS JERSEYS Frank Walsh 41 A Finlay Road, Tongala VIC 3621 Ph: 03 5859 0532 Mobile: 0418 576 856

Jimann Jerseys

Trevor & Julie Campbell 286 Lowe Rd Rochester 3561 PH: (03) 5484 1624 jimann1@bigpond.com

Email: frankwalsh3@bigpond.com

LINCOLNDELL JERSEYS Ron and Val Read & Family 167 Panoo Road, Lockington 3563 03 5488 2266 | 0428 332 793

SUNSHINE FARM JERSEYS N R & J M McDonald 715 Andrews Rd Kyabram 3620 Ph: 03 5855 2516 - 0428 992 450 janelleabbey@hotmail.com

Jugiong Jerseys Nicholson family 771 Curr Road Girgarre 3624 Pat & Carmen 0438 347 737 Brendon & Tenealle 0413 022 398

Craigielea Jerseys Bill, Kaye and Andrew Cochrane 836 Hansen Rd, Bamawm, 3561 Ph: 03 5486 5474 craigielea3@bigpond.com

SHENSTONE JERSEY STUD Gordon, Lyn & Craig Emmett 12 Curr Road, Stanhope Ph: 03 5857 2629 lynemmett@bigpond.com.au .....100 Years of Farming - since 1930

BROADLIN JERSEYS Lynton and Lisa, Toni, Gavin and Cassie Broad 388 Johnson Road, LOCKINGTON 3563 Lisa: 0427 862 624 • Lynton: 0429 380 093 Gavin: 0448 456 848 lisa.broad@bigpond.com

Sybilgrove & Summer Spirit Jerseys Collins Family 202 McColl Road, Ballendella 3561 Ph/Fax: 03 5486 5393 | Ph: 03 5486 5422

Brookbora Jerseys

Robert and Sandra Bacon Tennyson Vic 3572 03 5488 2323 - 0429 333 119 bacons@brookbora.com.au www.brookbora.com.au

Bercar Jersey Stud Bernie and Carol McManus 252 Bamawm Rd Bamawm. 3561 Ph: 03 5483 2245 e-mail bercar3561@bigpond.com

EURARIE JERSEYS Charles & Carolyn Smith 80 Rathbone Road, St Germains 3620 Ph: 03 5826 0325 andesholsteins@bigpond.com.au

Benlock Jersey Stud Bryan & Lee Rushton 79 Brooks Rd Rochester 3861 Ph: 03 5484 1551 | benlockj@gmail.com

GAILEE JERSEYS Norm & Dawn Stone 489 Hill Rd Stanhope Ph: 03 58572399 gaileeadsl@bigpond.com

Geoff and Yvette Brown - Lockington

Call Reid Stockfeeds 1300 REID FEED to speak with one of our qualified team today... that’s 1300 7343 3333


COLAC JERSEY BREEDERS CLUB President: Des Parker – Secretary: Kerry McGarvie Life members: Bob Mellross, Anne Mercer, Ted Codling, Jim Parker and Jim & Glenda Carson

Colac Jersey Club On Farm Challenge Results 2019 THANKYOU to everyone who entered cows in this years On Farm Challenge, and a warm welcome to the new farms entered. It was great to see Jerseys entering mixed and Holstein herds to bolster components. As always we would like to thank our wonderful sponsors – RIDLEY AGRIPRODUCTS, TOTAL LIVESTOCK GENETICS, ALTA GENETIC, GENETICS AUSTRALIA, HICO COLAC, CENTRAL SIRES, ABS, COBDEN AB, and AAIR COUNTRY ROAD FARM SUPPLIES. Thankyou to our judge Mr PAT BUCKLEY (right) for a first class presentation, and for being professional and a pleasure to work with. The growing trend to have a written comment on the score sheet is receiving very good feed back. To GLENDA CARSON (camera /chief steward), DONALD MURRAY (stand in driver, very appreciated!), AMY WRIGHT and TERRY KAVANAGH (data collation), all of which we could not do with out. Many thanks to all of you. RESULTS Jnr 2 Year Old (born 1Jul to 31st Dec 2017) 1. Balpat Vanahlem Kathy (sire Vanahlem), M Paterson & L Balcombe. 2. Dornoch Apollo 5293 (Apollo) P, D & L Parish. 3. Elm Park Spyro Mel 320 (Spyro), A & S Chant. 4. Boggabilla Valtino Bell (Valentino), W & B Rundle. 5. Merseybank Velocity Sunrise(Velocity), Linsand & Merseybank. Snr 2 Year Old (born 1st Jan to 30th June 2017) 1. Rockvale Oliver Buttercup 5341 (Oliver-P), D & W Parker. 2. Dornoch Oliver 5235 (Oliver-P) P,D & L Parish. 3. Rockvale LHead Gem 5339 (Lemonhead), D & W Parker. 4. Camo Lassie 258 (Vanahlem), D & R Hallyburton. 5. Warrion Oliver Misty Morn 28, (Oliver-P), Sarah Chant. 3 Year Old 1. Warrion Valentino Canary 278 (Valentino), Sarah Chant. 2. Elm Park Tbone Neal 229 (TBone), A & S Chant. 3. Dornoch Maui 5126 (Mauiman) P, D &L Parish. 4. Rockvale David Jill 5393 (David), D & W Parker. 5. Camo lassie 256 (Barcardi), D & R Hallyburton. 4 Year Old 1. Rockvale Tbone Buttercup 5168 (Tbone) D & W Parker. 2. Camo Lyn 8 (Vanahlem), D & R Hallyburton. 3. Riverside Tequila Princess (Tequila), Linsand and Merseybank. 4. Dornoch Valent 5044 (Valentino) P,D &L Parish. 5. Warrion Galaxies Canary 270 (Galaxies), Sarah Chant.

5 Year Old 1. Dornoch Valson 4808 (Valson) P,D & L Parish. 2. Camo Lassie 230 (Hatman), D & R Hallyburton. 3. Dornoch Tbone Sweetie (Tbone) P, D & L Parish. 4. Warrion Tbone Pretty 50 (Tbone), Sarah Chant. 5. Elm Park Tbone Nancy 156 (Tbone), A & S Chant. 6 Years Old and over 1. Taughboyne Aus Gold Ella 13078(P) (AussieGold P), L Finney & K McGarvie. 2. Camo Ballerina 35 (Vanahlem), D & R Hallyburton. 3. Dornoch Valentino 4656 (Valentino) P, D &L Parish. 4. Warion JaceRomulus Redeye 14 (JaceRomulous), Sarah Chant. 5. Vanahlem Purple 34 (Vanahlem), G Mason & K Moore Two new awards were introduced this year in recognition of many years service to the club. The Basil Boardman Memorial is now the Boardman Parker Memorial for Champion Cow in recognition of (Life Member) Mr Jim Parkers' 40+ years of involvement with the club. Also a perpetual trophy (to be displayed at Hico Colac), the Stuart Jackson Memorial for Champion Two-Year-Old, as recognition for involvement (cameraman) in the On Farm Challenge since it's inception in the 1980's. • Boardman Parker Memorial for Champion Cow and Ridleys AgriProducts Overall Champion – TAUGHBOYNE AUS GOLD ELLA 13078(P), Lawrence Finney & Kerry McGarvie • Stuart Jackson Memorial for Champion 2 Year Old and Total Livestock Genetics Champion 2 Year Old – BALPAT VANAHLEM KATHY, Maryanne Paterson and Lynton Balcombe

To keep up to date with club days and other news – find us on FACEBOOK or contact us via EMAIL colacjerseyclub@gmail.com WARRION JERSEYS Sarah Chant PH: 0400 092 337 CAMO JERSEYS David & Raelene Hallyburton PH: 03 5595 1566 BOGGABILLA JERSEYS RJ, WJ & RM Rundle PH: 03 5566 2313 Alan & Margaret Halliday PH: 03 5231 4421 Regan and Morgan Nelson PH: 0488 360 442

Castle Family, (Peter and Carol) PH: 0439 204 032 GLENBRAE JERSEYS Jim & Glenda Carson PH: 0409 188 161 jgcarson2@gmail.com Jake Harkness C/- Alta Genetics PH: 0448 634 533 jake.harkness@altagenetics.com CAIRNBRAE JERSEYS Alan & Janine Carson PH: 03 5235 3201

JIREH JERSEYS Chris & Pam McKenzie Cooriemungle PH: 03 5598 7222 VENOMA JERSEYS Norma, Jeff & Kylie Parker PH: 03 5235 3209

Emma & Adam Pouw PH: 0481 265 350 AMY WRIGHT C/o WWS Aust. PH: 0408 417 871 ROCKVALE JERSEYS Des & Wendy Parker PH: 03 5234 6284

BUBBLEFROST JERSEYS Geoff & Ashlea Church PH: 0448 910 565

TAUGHBOYNE JERSEYS Kerry McGarvie & Laurie Finney PH: 03 5593 9347

DORNOCH JERSEYS David & Lyn, Paul Parish PH: 0427 887 229

LINSAND Lisa and Willy McKay PH: 0439 911 428

PROUD SPONSORS OF THE COLAC & DISTRICT JERSEY BREEDERS CLUB

For specialist nutritional advice call Ridley Terang on 1800 100 151

HOMEBUSH PARK & LORAMANIA JERSEYS Beth,Alana & Lora Schulz Ph. 0458 200 645 BALPAT Maryanne Paterson & Lynton Balcombe PH: 0407 882 354

New members always welcome


SALES 133 Years Of Breeding Goes Under The Hammer

Sale Reports by Brian Leslie, Dairy Livestock Services P/L

Jerseys top $15,000 at Jugiong

A wonderful crowd was at Ripplebrook in West Gippsland for the Complete Dispersal Sale of the Kings Vale Jersey Milking Herd of David and Sharron Anderson. Established in 1886 Kings Vale was famous for their renowned Rosella, Brunette and Linda Cow Families. Sale top of $13,000 was paid for lot 1, Kings Vale Rosella 438, EX 92 the current Melbourne Royal Supreme Champion. This Vanahlem 6 year old has produced over 8,200 litres and is on target to produce 9,000 litres this season, she was purchased by the well known Kings Ville herd of R & K Anderson of Drouin West. The 3 year old Valentino daughter of this cow recently classified EX sold at $6,000 to Saunders and Day of Shady Creek while the 2 year old daughter by Chrome who showed great potential sold at $4,000 to M & C Wilson of Drouin West. Second high seller at $10,000 was the outstanding 3 year old Kings Vale Valentino Madge 3, VG 89 backed generations of high rated sires and much respected Denison Park genetics, she sold to Saunders and Day. Her maternal sister Kings Vale Ken Madge, EX 91 sold at $8,250 to D & A Mathews of Langdale Jerseys at Dumbalk. Next high of $8,000 was paid for Kings Vale Rosella 443, EX 92, this tremendous 4 year old Valentino daughter sold to Creed and Russell of Garvoc, the same buyer also selected her 2 year old Premier daughter, Kings Vale Rosella 453 at $5,500 along with Kings Vale Brunette 343, EX a deep pedigree Celebrity daughter at $6,000. The very stylish current Reserve Champion of the Melbourne Royal, Kings Vale Icey Silvermine, EX 93 sold at $6,000 to Saunders and Day. Local Breeders R & T Attenborough purchased Kings Vale Linda 441, EX a Celebrity 4 year old backed by many generations of EX dams at $5,500 and the exceptional 2 year old Kings Vale Brunette 354 by Marcin at $5,000. Launder Farms of Tarwin selected Kings Vale Rosella 451 also by Marcin at $5,500 while R & K Anderson paid $4,000 for Kings Vale Irwin Melaine, VG 88. Selling agents Dairy Livestock Services report buyers were from all parts of Gippsland along with Western Victoria, Northern Victoria and Southern NSW. 93 Jersey cows av $2,927 3 Heifers due Autumn 2020 av $ 2,180 96 Jerseys gross $278,650 – Av $2,903

One of the largest crowds seen at a Dairy Sale for many years was at Girgarre for the Milking Herd Dispersal Sale of the Jugiong Jerseys established in 1932 by the Nicholson Family. The 5 and half hour long auction saw cows sell to Tasmania, NSW, Qld and all parts of Victoria to a top of $15,000 for the reigning intermediate Best Udder winner of IDW Jugiong Belle 7279, EX 91, this 9,000 litre cow was purchased by the Craigielea herd of the Cochrane Family at Rochester. The same buyers also selected Jugiong Daydream 7578 a VG 87 2 year old by Valentino at $6,500. Second high seller at $14,000 was the EX 92 point cow Jugiong Eran 7172, this 5 year old from the same maternal line as well known AI sire Larfalot was purchased by the well known Kings Ville herd of R & K Anderson of Drouin West. These buyers also selected Jugiong Doris 7571 a VG 87 2 year old by Valentino at $7,000 and Daydream 7613 another VG 87 heifer by Valentino at $6,000. Third high lot at $9,500 was the magnificent 2 year old Honeycomb Damsel backed by many generations of EX cows, she sold to Sage Deenen of Leongatha. Many Breeders admired the wonderful rear udder of Wallacedale Navarian Melys, EX 90, she sold to R & C Hartin of Millaa Millaa, North Qld at $8,200. Gippsland buyers, Launder Farms of Tarwin made several purchases including Jugiong Ilagay 7402, EX 91 at $6,500. Competition stayed throughout the day with Jugiong Ronita 7297, EX 91, a beautiful uddered 4 year old, almost the last lot of the day selling to the Officer family of Princetown at $6,200. Other noted sales included the fancy 2 year old Jugiong Pride 7672 at $6,100 selling to D & M Stewart of Pyramid Hill. Jugiong Sandra 7575 at $5,700 to Hallyburton Farms of Cobden. Jugiong Daydream 7383, VG 88 at $5,500 to D, J & T Bryce of Allansford. Jugiong Illusion 7593 at $5,300 and Jugiong Rhonda 7401 at $5,000 both to Blue Sky Syndicate. The exceptional uddered 2 year old Jugiong Spray 7611, VG 88 by Valentino sold at $5,000 to Marks Bros of Dorrigo, NSW and Jugiong Daisymae 7582 another VG 88 heifer by Valentino selling to Wanstead Jerseys of Boorcan also at $5,000. Selling agents Dairy Livestock Services report the following details – 253 Cows gross $703,850 to average $2,782 for a total clearance.

We Can’t Decide... Your pick from the

BUSHLEA SHOW TEAM Keith & Pat Kuhne (03) 5664 2235 bushlea@active8.net.au

Follow BUSHLEA FARMS on facebook

The Australian Jersey Journal – September-October 2019 // 21

Wayne & Lisa Kuhne 0438 088 660 bushleafarms@bigpond.com


CENTRAL GIPPSLAND JERSEY BREEDERS CLUB INC President Reece Attenborough 0400 597 341 • Secretary Tahnee Wilson 0408 220 249

AITKEN FARM B, H, O & G Aitken ALLANDALE P & E Allan ATTAVIEW JERSEYS R & T Attenborough BENELLI JERSEYS B Elliott BLUEGUM PARK J Mathews BUSHLEA JERSEYS K, P, W & L Kuhne COLONSAY D & P McPhie FARNBOROUGH R Kingham GIPPSLAND DAIRY YOUTH INVERLAIR HEIGHTS B, S & T Allan JACKIAH & RIPPONLEA JERSEYS S Reid and B Egan JINALDI L & L & S Ronalds KAY VEE W Anderson KINGS VALE D & S Anderson KINGS VIEW I Anderson KINGS VILLE R & K Anderson KINGS VISTA L & J Anderson MAJESTIC T & A Bradley MONTA VALE T & J & W Monson MUNDEN FARMS K Munden Noble Park B Noble PROGRESS R Cayzer & J Pilgrim-Cayzer PROM VIEW A & M Richards RIVIERA JERSEYS S & T Wilson SILONDA B Ziero SPEEDWELL C Swindlehurst WALLACEDALE & BEMERSYDE C, M, L & M Wallace WILWARD M & C Wilson WINSDALE C & T Bawden YOUNGSTAR D & R Ross HHHH

Life Members T SAUNDERS & A DAY B & M MONSON J & D SMETHURST E & S JOHNSON K & R COLLINS G PECK • G HARDIE DAVID ANDERSON

MEMBER PROFILES

WILWARD JERSEYS

RIVIERA FARM Scott and Tahnee Wilson

• Were do you farm: Nyora, 380 acres • How many cows do you milk: 225 cows + 170 young stock • Why do you milk Jerseys: Temperament, Components, Efficiency, Family tradition • Future farming goals and ambitions: Increase equity and continually improve herd conformation • Favourite cows: Riviera Vanahlem Alice 5616 Ex92 and Jugiong Leonie 6789 EX91 • Favourite cow families: Daydream’s & Bud’s • Sires in use this season: Casino, Valentino, Chrome, David • What interests do you have outside of farming: Sport, Travelling and cooking • People who have had the biggest influence in your life to date: Close family • What is your Favourite food: Chocolate and Seafood • If you could choose anywhere in the world to travel where would it be: Alaska, Antarctica, anywhere warm (Tahnee) • If you had the opportunity to meet three people you’ve never met before who would they be: Roger Federer, Sir David Attenborough, Rick Stein

Mathew and Caroline Wilson and young sons Rohan (8yrs) and George (6yrs.) • Were do you farm: Drouin West • How many cows do you milk: 170 • Why do you milk Jerseys: They are quiet and easy and have great components • Future farming goals and ambitions: To have a full purebred Jersey Herd. To get better each day • Favourite cow: Haven’t got one yet. • Favourite cow families: Melanie’s Belles and Maries • Sires in use this season: Matt, Cohort, Valentino, Marvarie • What interests do you have outside of farming: Snow skiing, fishing and Camping, Golf • People who have had the biggest influence in your life to date: As far as dairying goes Luke Wallace, for helping me to realize my dream. Outside in a previous life Gordon Ramsey, Marco Pierre White amongst other great chefs. • What is your Favourite food: French food, it’s just wonderful • If you could choose anywhere in the world to travel where would it be: Japan skiing. • If you had the opportunity to meet three people you’ve never met before who would they be: Marco Pierre White, Glenn Plake and Seth Morrison.

Congratulations…

The CENTRAL GIPPSLAND JERSEY BREEDERS CLUB would like to congratulate David and Sharon Anderson and family on a great sale and wish them all the best for the next chapter in their lives. Your contribution to our club and the Jersey breed has been enormous and greatly appreciated over many, many years and we hope you will continue to be involved in some form in the future. Burra Foods proudly supports the Central Gippsland Jersey Club. For Milk Supply enquiries please contact either Peter Fort 0417 332 141, Jamie Serong 0477 992 274 or Tom Wyatt 0429 138 235.


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TAKING ON THE WORLD’S BEST

I

n early September an Australian team returned from a successful first foray to the European Young Breeders School. We caught up with team leader, Justin Johnston, team members Julia Paulger and Zoe Hayes and Jersey Australia’s Glen Barrett to find out the inspiration behind the trip and what it was like for our young dairy men and women to compete on the world stage. “It was an idea years in the making,” says Justin Johnston. “I’d always wanted to get a team together to compete at the European Young Breeders School. I see it as the international reference point for training and show preparation, and I’d always thought our young dairy men and women could acquit themselves well, plus it would provide a great learning opportunity.” Run by the Association Wallonne de l’Elevage in Battice, Belgium, the European Young Breeders School, run over five days, involves hands on workshops including bedding, showmanship and clipping, culminating in a weekend event of stock judging, showmanship and calf classes. “To come away with the result we did, with all team members placing in the top third of the 163 strong field from 15 countries, and three in the top 15, was incredible but really only half the story,” says Justin. “The way the team embraced every opportunity, what they learnt from the experience, and the contacts and friends they’ve made will I think play an important part in their future careers. “The other real highlight for me is how the industry really got behind us. I took the idea to Jersey Australia, Holstein Australia and Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria first, and all three saw the opportunity.

[Team Photo – Left to Right] Ricky Nelson, Brady Hore, Sam Hall, Zoe Hayes and Julia Paulger.

With their initial backing, and a lot of phone calls and late night work at the computer, thirteen more organisations came on board. It was then down to us to make it all happen and do the best job we could.” Getting to Belgium On a cold August night four nervous dairy men and women – Zoe Hayes, Julia Paulger, Brady Hore and Ricky Nelson – flew out of Melbourne not quite sure what to expect when they arrived in Belgium. Fifth team member, Sam Hall from Western Australia, flew from Perth, meeting his team mates in Dubai. Zoe Hayes from Girgarre, Victoria, explains: “For most of us it was our first big trip overseas, first time in Europe. And although we’ve all come up through our breed society youth programs, this just really felt like taking things to the next level. Add in the pressure of being the first Australian team, representing your country, and there were a lot of nerves. I think we all put a lot of pressure on ourselves.” Zoe and her team mates, along with team reserve Alexz Crawford, were selected from twenty-five applicants for a position on the team. The calibre of applicants was high and the interview panel had a tough job says Jersey Australia’s General Manager, Glen Barrett.

“I think the quality of the applicants is a real testament to the youth programs we run in Australia. It was an easy decision for Jersey Australia to get involved. “The whole ethos of the European Young Breeders School fits with our internal youth objectives. It gives our younger members something really meaningful to aim for, being exposed to international opportunities and representing your country on the world stage.” Team reception After almost thirty hours in the air the team arrived in Belgium. What would their reception be like? How would they stack up against the other teams? Adadale Jerseys & Holsteins Julia Paulger takes up the story. “It was our first time, and we were conscious that other teams would have an advantage in that they had been here before, knew what needed to be done, so it took us a while to settle in. But the nerves quickly settled and we were made to feel incredibly welcome, other teams helped us out with equipment, and our common interest really helped break through any barriers,” says Julia. Zoe Hayes agrees: “I was surprised. As the whole event is team based I thought it would be really competitive from the outset, but from day one everyone was really friendly, willing to

24 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


help out and share their knowledge and experience.” After three days of training, the Australian team’s result speaks for itself says Glen Barrett. “I don’t think it’s a surprise that the team achieved the results they did. Our industry and people are world class, and our young breeders really embraced this opportunity to compete on the international stage.” Enduring friendships There were many highlights for the team members, not the least of which were the networking benefits and educational tour arranged by Justin Johnston. “Interacting with the other teams was a real highpoint for me,” says Julia Paulger. “A great example is after the judging session we had, the opportunity to talk about the reasoning behind some of the decisions with other competitors was invaluable, we really learnt a lot. “The whole experience really demonstrated to me the global and interconnected nature of our industry, and the common interest that drives it forward. Not only have I been able

to broaden my knowledge base, but I’ve made some really good friends in Canada, Switzerland and the Netherlands, and even been offered the opportunity to go across to Swiss Expo 2020 and the World Dairy Expo.” Zoe’s experience was similar, and she is already thinking about her next international trip, plus the possibility of hosting a couple of Canadian team members at next year’s IDW. “I think we all made what will be enduring friendships and contacts. We’re in touch most days,” says Zoe. “The other great thing were the farm visits we made, particularly to K.I SAMEN, the Netherlands largest private AI station. They use a combination of very traditional methods in combination with genomics and more modern techniques in their bull selection. While their focus is very much towards commercial users, there were many aspects of what they do that I think would be of benefit to stud breeders out here.” The future This wasn’t a one off. Planning has already commenced for an Australian team to compete at the European Young

Breeders School next year. Watch this space! Applications will be opening before Christmas. Perhaps the final word should go to Julia Paulger, on behalf of the entire team. “Standing alongside four friends as part of the first Australian team was an unbelievable experience and one I won’t forget. Thank you to everyone for your support and encouraging words. We hope we have done you all proud and that this incredible event gains momentum to further develop and broaden the horizons for Australian youth. The memories and friendships we have made and the experience we have gained will last us a lifetime, and for that we are all extremely grateful.” The 2019 Australian European Young Breeders School team was supported by supported by Holstein Australia, the Royal Agricultural Society of Victoria, Jersey Australia, Genetics Australia, Dairy Australia, GippsDairy, Gippsland Dairy Youth, Gardiner Dairy Foundation, Fonterra, STgenetics Australia, Ridley AgriProducts, WFI Insurance, Dick Smith, Smyth Seeds, B. Braun Australia and New Zealand and the Australian Football League.


AROUND THE GROUNDS Drought Support Program

Great Southern Challenge Lunch

JA is ever conscious on the continue impact of long-term drought is causing across the country. To support our members during these tough times to maintain their herd book registry, JA is pleased to offer a Drought Relief Registration Catch Up Program. The program provides discounted registrations on older animals yet to be registered and payment terms over a 6-month period

The Jersey Australia – Semex Great Southern Challenge Presentation Luncheon 2018 will be held on Friday December 6th at the Witchmount Estate Winery. The two-course luncheon will cost $60 per head (drinks at bar prices). Booking will close at 12noon on Friday 29th November. Bookings can be made online at – https://www.trybooking.com/569320

Registrations Costs are as follows Year of Birth

Cost per Registration – Inc GST

2019

$9.90

2018

$5.50

2017 or before

$2.20

Conditions do apply. • Member must be in a drought declared area • Must include 2019 born calves. • Animal data must be provided in electronic formats • Discounted animals will not be provided a printed registration certificate • Payments over 3-6 months via provided credit card with monthly cap of $500.00 • Offer is available up to the 28th of February 2020 For more information contact Glen on 0418 466 371 or email Glen.Barrett@jersey.com.au

Spring Classification Tour Spring class tour has started, and it is great to see support from over 130 members in booking class visits. Classifiers will be out in the field over November and into December.

Welcome New Members JA welcomes the following new members • PROMENADE JERSEYS Owen Dailey & Brieanna Bratfield. Stroud RD, NSW • CARLVILLE JERSEYS. Rikki Planke. Wooroloo, WA • LUXURY JERSEYS. Sarah Lloyd., Kyabram VIC • OLIVIA JERSEYS. Derek Louw. Kirep WA • WIVANHOE JERSEYS Errol & Julie Gerbe. Clarendon QLD • JETZ JERSEYS Donald & Margaret Stewart. Pyramid Hill VIC Please make these new members welcome in your regions and into club/local activities

Classification Survey Don’t forget to complete the members classification survey. Your feedback is important and a critical component of the review process. Copy and post the following link into a web browser. If you have limited access to the internet, please contact Glen on 0418 466 371 at the JA office and we can forward you a paper survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/8RHY7S5

Changes to Microsats As previously advised, NEOGEN have indicated that they will be phasing out their Microsats services for parentage. When this occurs, existing Microsats results will no longer be useable to members. Members will need to migrate to SNP based parentage assessment in the very near future. This can also be achieved via a standard genomic test To facilitate a transition away from Microsats JA have negotiated a deal with NEOGEN to upgrade where possible existing microsat profiles to SNP if sufficient DNA is still available from the original samples to a 9k SNP genotype Cost to upgrade to the 9k SNP is $30.00 + GST and this special deal is only available for animals with existing Microsat profiles from NEOGEN. The 9k SNP’s are also suitable for genomics if members wanted to also consider this as an option. Additional costs would apply. Please contact Glen or Lucy at the JA office on 03 9370 9105 or email jersey@jersey.com.au for more information or to lodge your request to upgrade your existing profiles.

Ginfo Project Its great to see a number of members joining the Ginfo Project. This is a world leading R&D project that drives significant data and animals into Australia’s reference populations to add ongoing improvements to ABV’s and ABV(g) and also provides critical data for research purposes Jerseys herds are in high demand to add to the project particularly from outside of Victoria. If you are interested in joining please contact Glen on 0418 466 371. Herds are selected on the quantity and quality of herd testing and herd management data recorded and provided through to your herd test centre. For more information on Ginfo visit – www.datagenne.com.au/node/1183

WJCB 2020 Tour and Conference Canada is the destination or the 2020 Would tour and Jersey Australia invites interested members to register with the JA office More information on the Tour itinerary can be found at https://jerseycanada.com/wcjb-2020-tour/ Jersey Australia office is coordinating travel and tour booking son your behalf. Register your interest now via email jersey@jersey.com.au or contact the office on 03 9370 9105

26 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


Goulburn Murray Jersey Breeders Club President: Rohan Sprunt (03) 5826 9506 Secretary: Geoff Akers (03) 5829 8478

FROGLANDS JERSEYS Owner: Ben Pedretti Established: 10 years (approx) Farm size: 400 acres Milking herd: 240 40% Jerseys – 60% Holsteins Grazing system: 70% annual and 30% summer crops (sorgum) Best bulls: Vanahlem, Galaxies 2 yr olds sired by: Valentino, Vanahlem, Tequila and Galaxies Heifers sired by: Citation, Topsy, Viral, Vanahlem, Chrome and Casino Achievements: • Premier Exhibitor IDW 2019 Goals: Breed good cows in a profitable farming system. Bluechip Galaxies Rory – Best Udder IDW 2019 – sold at the Cherrylock Fastrack to Success Sale.

Feel free to contact any GMJBC member on this page to learn more about their herd. BRUNETTA D & A Van Popering Invergordon 0488 655 315 CHERRYLOCK Brad and Jess Gavenlock Tallygaroopna 0437 299 205 DELRAE AND READVALE H & S Read – P & F De Lia Katandra (03) 5831 3775 FROGLANDS JERSEYS Ben Pedretti Tallygaroopna 3634 0447 429 828 GARCOLA JERSEYS Gary & Christine Maddern 305 Kenny Rd, Koonoomoo 3644 (03) 5873 2330 | 0419 217 142 maddern@adam.com.au

GLENARRON JERSEYS Ron, Glenyss & Grant Baker 52 Hutchins Lane, Katunga (03) 58646246 info@glenarron.com

LOXLEIGH JERSEYS Geoff and Natalie Akers Victoria Rd, Tallygaroopna 3634 (03) 5829 8478 geoffakers1@bigpond.com

GLENFERN JERSEYS Peter & Bev Farrell 579 Healesville-Kooweerup Rd, Healesville 3777 0409 503 352 peter.farrell7@bigpond.com

WAIANIWA JERSEYS Lindsay Hamilton 1045 Hawkers Rd, Nathalia 3636 (03) 5864 1380

HAZELVALE Jason Hayes Invergordon 0410 135 420 KAARMONA JERSEYS Graeme & Robyn, Rohan & Claire Sprunt 228 & 235 Kaarimba Hall Rd, Kaarimba 3635. (03) 5826 9506 kaarmona@bigpond.com KADDY JERSEYS Andrew Younger 1025 Mulcahy Road, Gillieston 0409 572 484 motor5@bigpond.com jersey.com.au/jweb/uploads/kaddy/kaddy_intro.html

WARRAIN JERSEYS John & Margaret Cockerell 1219 Rendells Rd, Numurkah 3636 (03) 5864 1133 warrainjerseys.m@gmail.com YALCARA JERSEYS Peter & Lyn Sprunt 926 Sandmount Road, Katunga 3640 (03) 5873 2583 yalcara57@gmail.com YENOLAM JERSEYS Neil, Wendy & Dick Maloney 1119 Boals Rd, Numurkah 3636 (03) 5864 1064 WendyLeeMal@hotmail.com

NEW MEMBERS ALWAYS WELCOME


WORDS // CAROLYN SMITH, 2019

“EURARIE” JERSEY STUD – 90th Anniversary (1929-2019)

“A Reflection – Part 2” My parents conducted stud sales on the Shepparton East property, where they still live today. “Eurarie” featured prominently in local shows in the Goulburn Valley – the heart of Australia’s dairy industry. The consistent daughters of Carrondale Royal Pride won championships and pen of three classes. They also set the foundation for “Eurarie” being named a “Gold Certificate” Production Herd on twelve occasions, the highest accolade for Jersey herds at the “Soft as a kitten” was how Grandma described time. the feel of a young bull that was to change My parents imported Awatui Grand Ace from Eurarie and the breed forever. “In 1973, New Zealand and also semen from Ivanhoe an Australasian record $8000 price for a Ideal Lin (NZ). These bulls consolidated yearling bull (all breeds) was paid. the excellent genetic base of the herd Cleavedale Othello was bought (by my and undoubtedly paved the way for the grandparents) in New Zealand and Cleo, dramatic and successful introduction of as he became known, proved to be one of outcross genetics from North America. the Jersey breed’s great sires of all time, When the World Jersey Conference their domination of show rings and huge inspected “Eurarie” in 1999, daughters of production elevated him to be the best Highland Duncan Lester and many “old” sire used at Eurarie”.* Cleo’s semen later bulls were in their prime, stunning the became commercially available through VAB international visitors with their eye-catching and had a positive impact on many herds. dairy frames and very snug udders. The top herd average under my parents’ Jim & Betty Jeffery “Soft as a kitten” management was: 5897 litres, 228kg protein Soon after, “Eurarie” acquired another bull from New and 318kg fat in 305 days in 2004. The quality of the herd Zealand, also rich in Big Hollow blood, in Carrondale was not surprising. Mum, a perfectionist, left no breeding Royal Pride, a son of the 1000 gallon cow and prolific show decision to chance and had years earlier been the first woman champion, Carrondale Apex’s Petrina, VHC. At about this appointed to the Victorian Jersey Judges’ Panel, leading to her time, my grandparents retired and my parents moved to appointment to judge the Queensland State Feature Show in a smaller farm at Shepparton East, Victoria. Grandad was 1997. Meanwhile, Dad was an office bearer in the Goulburn awarded a Life Membership of the Australian Jersey Breeders’ Murray Jersey Breeders’ Club for a number of years and a Society in 1983. Shepparton National Dairy Show Committee member. My From humble beginnings milking 13 grade cows off six acres, to becoming the highest (all breeds) production herd in the southern hemisphere, my grandparents (Jim & Gwen Till), really showcased the Jersey breed (as outlined in Part 1 in the 50th Anniversary Edition of “The Australian Jersey Journal” Sept/Oct 2019). Part 2 highlights the achievements of my parents (Jim & Betty Jeffery) in the “Eurarie” story and looks to the future…

Betty Jeffery judging the Best Vessel class at the Queensland State Show

28 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


elder sister, Joanne was Executive Officer of the Australian Jersey Breeders’ Society.

“Breeders from throughout Australia converged on their picture perfect property…..” Ill health led to the difficult decision to auction the herd in 2005/06. A sale report by CrazyCow reflected how devoted my parents were to their cattle and stud farm: “Breeders from throughout Australia converged on their picture perfect property on a stunning Autumn day. Some of the biggest names in the Jersey industry filled Eurarie’s sale shed to capacity and many had to be content with leaning on gates and peering into the ring to get a look at their preferred choices.”* “Eurarie” cows went on to establish valued families in high profile herds, produce well, classify particularly well and win at shows. The third generation Today a small nucleus of “Eurarie” cows are milked at St. Germains, Victoria where I farm with husband, Charles Smith and sons Alex (16) and Hamish (14). Until recently, we milked a 500 cow mixed herd of predominantly registered Holsteins from the “Andes” stud which was developed by Charles’ grandparents Howard and Sidna Smith since the 1950s. We have also milked some “Rockwood Park” Holsteins descended from bloodlines developed by the stepfather and mother of Charles (Frank and Andis Sorraghan.) For over 20 years, our focus was converting a cropping farm to dairy, which is now 920 acres. Two years ago we auctioned our Spring-calved herd in line with our plan to diversify into mixed farming. Top priced Jersey at this sale for $7000 was Eurarie Tbone Princess 2nd who went on to classify EX-92 and win 2nd 5 years in milk at International Dairy Week. I was privileged to be part of a dairy youth movement involving Calf Days, Youth Camps, appointment to the judging panel and the opportunity to travel to the US and Canada as the inaugural winner of the QANTAS/Australian Jersey Breeders’ Scholarship in 1992. A highlight for me was being on the halter of Eurarie Lin’s Serene, VHC when she was Honourable Mention at the Jersey Showcase, Tatura in 1995.

Alex, Charles, Carolyn and Hamish Smith.

I am honoured to continue the “Eurarie” prefix. In an individualistic era when people change jobs and allegiances regularly, it is mind-blowing that my family, for 90 years, has continuously registered Jersey cattle. Sometimes we were leaders of change (e.g., dehorning) and sometimes we were more cautious (e.g., introducing US genetics). But despite which property we are on, or which generation milks the cows or what technology is available, one thing remains at “Eurarie”: if we are milking cows, we may as well be milking cows of the highest quality. Reference: * “Eurarie Sale Report” by Dianna Malcolm, crazycow.com.au, April 14, 2005.

Lester daughters (bred by J & B Jeffery)

Eurarie Graceful Design 80th VHC 90 (bred by J & B Jeffery) Sire: Span 6662L 405kg 6.1% 272kg 4.1% 305d

Eurarie Graceful Design 103rd Sup 93 (bred by C & C Smith) Sire: Lester 6460L 359kg 5.6% 262kg 4.1% 305d

The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019 // 29


Jersey AUSTRALIA FEES

SHOWS

MELBOURNE ROYAL SHOW 2019 Heifer, Under 6 Months 1. Deniliquin High School - A & F Michael: MAYBERRY GRACE 6, Heifer, 6 To 12 Months 1. Patrick Anderson: KINGS VELDT GRANT DELICATE 1 2. Deniliquin High School - A & F Michael: MAYBERRY SOX 5 3. Ben Pedretti: FROGLANDS CITATION PAT Heifer, 18 To 24 Months 1. Patrick Anderson: RIVERSIDE GRAND BELLE, 2. Deniliquin High School - A & F Michael: WILLOW DELL CRYSTAL 612 3. Patrick Anderson: RIVERSIDE HG COLTON IVY Junior Champion Heifer – RIVERSIDE GRAND BELLE Reserve – KINGS VELDT GRANT DELICATE 1 Senior 2 Year Old, Heifer, In Milk 1. Patrick Anderson: KINGS VIEW AILEEN 181 Junior 3 Year Old, Heifer/Cow, In Milk 1. G & DL Robertson, Ivanhoe: IVANHOE ILLUSION 68 2. Brookbora Jerseys: BROOKBORA LOVER LIES 735 Senior 3 Year Old, Heifer/Cow, In Milk 1. Deniliquin High School - A & F Michael: WILLOW DELL CRYSTAL 612 2. Patrick Anderson: KINGS VIEW AILEEN 181, Intermediate Champion – KINGS VIEW AILEEN 181 Reserve – MAYBERRY CRYSTAL 3 Senior 4 Year Old, Cow, In Milk 1. Brookbora Jerseys: CEDAR VALE IRWIN HATTIE Senior 5 Year Old, Cow, In Milk 1. Kingsvale Jerseys: KINGSVALE ICEY SILVERMINE, 2. Ben Pedretti: BLUECHIP GALAXIES RORY Senior 6 Year Old, Cow, In Milk 1. Kingsvale Jerseys: KINGSVALE ROSELLA 438 2. G & DL Robertson, Ivanhoe: IVANHOE ILLUSION 67

EFFECTIVE JULY 1 2018. All prices GST inclusive unless otherwise noted

Membership Full Family Syndicate Associate Junior Registrations Electronic Registration • 0-6 Months of • 7-12 Months of Age • 12+ Months Manual Registration • 0-6 Months of Age • 7-12 Months of Age • 12+ Months Associate Member Registrations – Any Age Telephone emergency registration surcharge • Associate members may only register 5 animals/year • Bulls born after July 1 2007 – Dam must be classified • Bulls born to a GR cow cannot be registered

$9.90 $14.30 $24.20 $12.10 $18.70 $33.00 $18.70 $66.00

Classifications Herd Visit Fee 2 Year Old’s (all) 2 Year Old’s (Selected) Adult Cows Cows - Resubmitted

$44.00 $7.70 $12.10 $12.10 $12.10

Transfers Whole Herd – Walk in Walk out Up to $1500 $1500.00 + Within Family Within Syndicate Bulls to AI companies Lease transfer fee

$7.70 $16.50 1% of sale price No Charge No Charge $55.00 $27.50

Genetic Recovery Deceased Animal Live Animal (1st year) Replacement Pedigree Certificates Incorrect information reprint Whole Herd (Per Animal) Individual Animal AI Company

No Charge $6.60 No charge $1.10 $2.75 $5.50

JOURNAL ADVERTISING RATES (Including -GST)

Best Senior Vessel – KINGSVALE ROSELLA 438 Senior Champion Cow – KINGSVALE ROSELLA 438 Reserve – KINGSVALE ICEY SILVERMINE Premier Exhibitor – Patrick Anderson

PERTH ROYAL SHOW 2019

$240.00 +GST $260.00 +GST $240.00 +GST $120.00 +GST $80.00 +GST

Ad Sizes and Rates Fees are subject to GST and is included in the price Price does not include cost to develop artwork Full Colour

Black and White

Single Issues

6 Edition Multi Pack – per Edition payable in advance

Single Issue

6 Edition Multi Pack – per Edition payable in advance

Heifer, over 2 & not over 10mths. Owston, Wayne and Belinda, Broselinda Park Vidia JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Broselinda Park Vidia

Front Cover

$510.00

N/A

N/A

N/A

Back Cover

$480.00

N/A

N/A

N/A

Inside Covers

$470.00

$420.00

N/A

N/A

Full Page

$425.00

$380.00

$300.00

$260.00

Cow, over 2 & not over 2 1/2yrs - In Milk Owston, Wayne and Belinda, Broselinda Park Jellybaby INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION FEMALE Broselinda Park Jellybaby

½ Page

$320.00

$280.00

$215.00

$180.00

¼ page

N/A

N/A

$145.00

$120.00

$95.00

$80.00

GRAND CHAMPION – Broselinda Park Jellybaby SERVE – Broselinda Park Vidia

Business Card Size A4 Insert

$215.00

Advertorial - Full Page / Full Colour

$470.00

Sale Catalogue Insert

$520.00

30 // The Australian Jersey Journal – November-December 2019


Farm Gate Signs A great sign is a perfect addition to every farm entrance and at JA we are excited to release our new FARM GATE sign collection based on our Dairy’s Finest marketing campaign.

“YOUR STUD PREFIX” Your Family / Business Name

“YOUR STUD PREFIX” PROUDLY BREEDING

DAIRY’S FINEST COWS

MADE HERE BY

“YOUR STUD PREFIX”

“Your Family / Business Name”

FARM GATE signs are 900mm x 600mm and made from aluminium composite panel. To order your FARM GATE sign (or signs) visit the Jersey Shop on our website

www.jersey.com.au/shop Orders and payment can be made through our secure online portal. Check out our range of Jersey apparel while you’re there. For more information contact the Jersey Australia Office on +61 3 9370 9105


Profile for Jersey Australia Inc

Australian Jersey Journal Nov/Dec 2019  

Australian Jersey Journal Nov/Dec 2019  

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