Inside Columbia Magazine May/June 2022

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 177


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features

Inside Columbia

features

C O N T E N T S

129 ADORNMENTS TO ADORE TWO LOCAL JEWELERS SHARE SOME SPARKLE.

134 WEEKEND WONDERS FIVE DRIVES WORTH YOUR WHILE.

140

SOW IT GROWS A PRODUCE PICKING PRIMER

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 17


When you give joy to other people, you get more joy in return.

- Eleanor Roosevelt

CONTACT US TODAY 573.514.0097 LegacyMo.com

It is my personal mission to get to know each individual entrusted to us and see that they receive the highest quality of care.

Candace Palmer, RN Owner/CEO

Creating a LEGACY one life at a time.


May/June C O

N

T

E

N

T S

In every issue

20 24

FROM THE EDITOR ONLINE

Life 29

45

30

5 THINGS Nom De Plume (Or, Fur)

32

HEALTH & WELLNESS Caloric Combo: Weight Loss Takes Both Diet & Exercise

34

ENCOUNTERS Columbia’s Own Dog Whisperer

37

ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS The Best Cook In Saint Cook

Flavor

40

151

39 FOUGERE'S FAVORITES Lemony Lusciousness: Beyond Basic Bread Pudding

42

DINING OUT Syrian Stars at New Restaurant

45

COOKING WITH BROOK Miso Glaze Makes Succulent Salmon

49

COCKTAIL This Bevvy Is A BFD

SPRING 2022 BOOM! 102-127

Insider

147 148 BOOKSHELF A Song For The Road Will Resonate With Those Grieving 151 WEDDINGS A Big Fat Greek Wedding 153 CALENDAR 155 SPOTLIGHT Folk-al Point: Arrow Rock Hosts Antiques Symposium

Views

Photo by The Marions

157 159 DUELING DJS 161 ON THE TOWN 169 A NEW VIEW

171 DARKOW DRAWS 173 THE FINAL WORD

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 19


from the editor

MADELEINE LEROUX

Splurge-Worthy Adventure

FINDING TIME FOR SELF-CARE.

I

Madeleine Leroux

Editor | mleroux@insidecolumbia.net Inside Columbia magazine

s anyone else exhausted? I don’t mean “had a bad night’s sleep” tired, but existentially exhausted — two-years-of-a-global-pandemic, rising-inflation, distant-war, endless-day-to-day-responsibilities kind of exhausted. When I start to feel like I’m getting burned out by life, I look for ways to incorporate a little self-care. Sometimes, all it takes is a small amount of retail therapy in one of Columbia’s many local shops. Or maybe just withdrawing for some quality alone time with a cup of tea and a good book. Other times, it takes a little more. Maybe it’s splurging on an expensive piece of jewelry you’ve always wanted — something that makes you feel glamorous and special. I know I couldn’t resist trying on the peridot necklace and earring set loaned to us from Betz Jewelers for our fashion feature. As you can see from the photo on this page, the set dazzles. But it’s also a special one to me, as peridot is my birthstone. And the earrings include opal, which is actually my mother’s birthstone, and I really love the idea of having both of us represented in one stunning piece of jewelry. Check out plenty of splurge-worthy pieces from Betz and Buchroeders Jewelers on pages 129-133. Maybe retail therapy isn’t your style. If you need to get away from midMissouri for a weekend to recharge your batteries in a new environment, you’re going to want to turn to pages 134-139. We’ve outlined five different weekend getaway spots perfect for whatever you’re looking for, whether it’s an adventure-packed journey with family or friends, or a more intimate, relaxed respite just for you and maybe one other special person. (I’m already looking for a window to visit the ballooning festivities in Indianola, Iowa!) Ultimately, whatever you need to do to recharge when you start feeling strained is worth doing. And when you’ve started to feel once again ready to take on the world, you can look for new ways to incorporate healthy changes into your life. If you’re like me and trying to ditch the junk food in favor of fresher, healthier options, make sure you take a look at our handy guide to some freshly picked produce on pages 140-145. Several area experts have shared tips on how to pick out the very best at the peak of freshness, as well as advice for those interested in trying their hand at a home garden. So take some time to care for yourself before taking on that next big project. A little splurge can make all the difference.

Madeleine 20 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


CIVIL ENGINEERING TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING FORENSIC AND INVESTIGATIVE ENGINEERING STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

bd

Employee Spotlight Jenna Roe Jenna, an engineering intern, graduated from Drury University with a degree in Environmental Biology and from the University of Missouri with a degree in Biological Engineering. Since the start of her career at Allstate, Jenna has gained experience in a wide range of projects including mitigation design alternatives, intellectual property development, technical support for drinking water reservoirs and funding pathways and commercialization for renewable energy businesses.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 21


Inside Columbia Staff CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Carla Leible cleible@zrgmail.com FOUNDER & PUBLISHER EMERITUS Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net PUBLISHER Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net EDITOR Madeleine Leroux mleroux@insidecolumbia.net ASSOCIATE EDITOR Peg Gill peg@insidecolumbia.net CONTRIBUTING WRITERS John Robinson, John Darkow, Sara Fougere, Brook Harlan, Mason Stevens, Kalvin Bartholomew, Sofia Perez ART DIRECTOR Tim Flanner tflanner@zrgmail.com PHOTO EDITOR L.G. Patterson lg@insidecolumbia.net GRAPHIC DESIGNER Madelyn Jones mjones@insidecolumbia.net

On the cover

An example of the fresh produce grown in mid-Missouri. Photo by L.G. Patterson 22 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022



what’s online...

Enjoy additional digital content on our website and social media.

Inside Columbia Staff ADVERTISING COORDINATORS Jeff Ausmus jausmus@zrgmail.com Kalie Kramel kkramel@zrgmail.com Stefanie Joseph sjoseph@zrgmail.com

A PORTRAIT CHALLENGE

We asked Producer Hannah from 93.9 The Eagle and Tim Taylor from 96.7 KCMQ to face off in a blind portrait challenge. Check out the results on page 159, then visit insidecolumbia.net or check out our YouTube channel to see a video of the full challenge.

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Cathy Atkins catkins@insidecolumbia.net Josh Arnold jarnold@insidecolumbia.net Laura Wagner lfuchs@insidecolumbia.net Hayden Haumann hhaumann@insidecolumbia.net Michael Herschel mherschel@insidecolumbia.net OFFICE MANAGER Becky James rjames@zrgmail.com

GLITZ FROM BEHIND THE SCENES

Get a behind-the-scenes look at our jewelry-themed fashion photo shoot by checking out Inside Columbia on Facebook and Instagram.

DISTRIBUTION ASSOCIATE Steve Leible

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAGAZINE Zimmer Strategic Communications 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 www.InsideColumbia.net Office: 573-875-1099

#INSIDECOLUMBIA

Inside Columbia is published by Zimmer

Take a look at the spring bloom in Columbia, photographed by Chrissy Daingerfield, who won our Instagram contest with her spring photo! Get your photo published by posting your best (high resolution) photo showing what summer in Columbia means to you on Instagram by June 1. Make sure you follow and tag @insidecolumbiamagazine and include #insidecolumbia on your story or post to be considered. The winner will be featured in the July/August issue and will receive a FREE one-year subscription to Inside Columbia. Show us your CoMo!

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InsideColumbiaMagazine

Strategic Communications, 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201, 573-875-1099. Copyright Zimmer Communications, 2022. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo. Not responsible for omissions or information, which has been misrepresented to the magazine.


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Details SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscription rate is $15 for 1 year. Call 573-875-1099 to place an order or to inform us of a change of address, or subscribe at www.InsideColumbia.net. For bulk subscription rates, contact Becky James at 573-875-1099.

ADVERTISING Inside Columbia is the best way to reach Columbia’s upscale consumers. Information about advertising is available online at www.InsideColumbia.net or by calling 573-875-1099.

NEWS RELEASES & EVENT NOTICES Contact editor at 573-875-1099, or email to editor@insidecolumbia.net.

ON THE TOWN Send your photos with the event description and subject names for captions to tflanner@zrgmail.com, or mail to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201. Not all photos received will be published.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send letters to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 or email to editor@ insidecolumbia.net. Inside Columbia reserves the right to publish any letter to the editor.

CUSTOM PUBLISHING Let us publish a specialty magazine exclusively for your company or organization. Call Melody Parry at 573-875-1099 or email melody@insidecolumbia.net

REPRINTS Want to reproduce an article you’ve seen in Inside Columbia? We can provide reprints and customize them on glossy stock for your promotional needs. Minimum quantity is 500 copies. Call Cathy Atkins at 573-875-1099 or email catkins@insidecolumbia.net.

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see the

Book Your Tour MissouriPenTours.com

History Home to the “Bloodiest 47 acres in America” Jefferson City’s dark side focuses on the old Missouri State Penitentiary – nicknamed “The Walls” because of the limestone walls surrounding it – which operated 1836 until 2004.

Plan Your Trip VisitJeffersonCity.com

feel the

History Located at Ike Skelton Training Site, the Museum of Missouri Military History houses many artifacts and weapons of war from the Revolutionary War to the present era. INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 27


QUALITY CANNABIS. LOW PRICES. SUPERIOR SERVICE. Thank you for nominating us. Vote 3Fifteen Primo Cannabis in the 2022 Best Of Columbia Contest!

SCAN HERE TO VOTE MEDICAL DECISIONS SHOULD NOT BE MADE BASED ON ADVERTISING. CONSULT A PHYSICIAN ON THE BENEFITS AND RISKS OF PARTICULAR MEDICAL MARIJUANA PRODUCTS.


Inside Columbia

life C O N T E N T S

30

Pet Names (As in, for pets!) ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

32

Two Must-Dos For Weight Loss ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

34

How One Local Man Found A Canine Career ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

37

Home Cooking Away From Home

PROPER PET-IQUETTE

If you have a canine companion and plan a dog park visit, be sure both you and your charge are on your best behavior. Big size disparities between dogs can sometimes lead to accidental injury or emotional trauma.


life

5 THINGS

Pick of the Litter 5 TIPS FOR NAMING A PET.

BY PEG GILL

A

lot of people acquired pandemic pets, many of whom were rescues. Although nowhere near as serious as picking out a name for a baby, picking out a name for a pet is still significant. Plenty of new pet parents

opt to keep the name their rescue came with. Others choose a moniker makeover. If you're getting a pet, there are a number of ways to choose a name. Here are five:

1

Horticultural help. Many people name their pets

2

Location, location, location. Another option

3

Good sports. I have known dogs christened with

4

5

after their favorite flower. I have known a: Daffodil, Lily, Marigold, Tulip, Daisy and Posie.

is to pick a name based on where the pet came from. If it's a purebred, you can name it something related to its country of origin. Examples I've known? A Weimaraner named Fritz Von Katzenbach, a West Highland terrier named Aberdeen ("Birdie" for short), and an Arabian horse named Saudi.

sports-related names. A few of those? A Chicago couple with two labs named Wrigley and Addison (named for the intersection where Wrigley Field sits), another Chicago owner whose rover goes by Cubbie (go Cubs!) and a cat named White Sox. Yes, she's named for the team, but in all fairness, she actually has white socks.

Side-splitters. People often opt for humorous names. Oxymorons are fun, for instance a toy poodle named Brutus or a Great Dane called Tiny. Then there's the standard poodle I know named Taxi. His owners live on a horse farm and think it's hysterical to stand in their pasture and call, "Taxi! Taxi!" I had a co-worker who called her dog Hoover, after the vacuum, and another with a cat named Mugglywumps. "Person"-able pets To a large extent, pet names and human names have become interchangeable. I've known two dogs named Riley, one a pit mix and the other a Border Doodle (a Border collie poodle mix), as well as two human girls named Riley. Also, Rosie the Bernese mountain Dog, Rosie a co-worker and Rosie my great niece. Of course, people in romantic relationships often give each other what are called "pet names," but that's a whole different animal!

30

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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life HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Understanding Weight Loss FIND BALANCE WITH DIET AND EXERCISE.

BY MASON STEVENS · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

H

ave you ever heard the saying, “You can’t outrun a bad diet?” What about the idea that if you want to lose a pound of fat each week you simply need to eat 500 fewer calories each day? Here’s one of my favorites: if you want to lose weight, don’t do any resistance training. Lifting weights will make you gain weight and bulk up, right? The problem with so much of the weight loss advice that we hear is that it is full of misinformation and half-truths. It can be overwhelming to sift through pages and pages of Google results. Two different fitness magazines might give completely different opinions on the newest weight loss trend. Thankfully, there are a number of researchers and health/fitness professionals who are trying to find the answers to the most confusing weight loss questions. One of the biggest questions being asked is how much diet and exercise each contribute to weight loss. We’ve all heard the ads for the “miracle workout” that will melt fat without you ever having to diet again. And what about that friend who took up running to lose weight but never saw the scale move? The truth is, neither dieting nor exercise are as effective on their own. Research has shown that exercise alone isn’t very good at helping us lose weight. Dieting alone, while initially great for losing weight, can result in a plateau in the first few months. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the best approach for losing weight, and keeping it off, is one that combines diet and exercise. A common suggestion is that about 75-80% of weight loss comes from the changes we make to our diet. So clearly, there must be one diet that’s better than the rest, right? WRONG! One of the most pervasive diet myths is that there is one way to eat for weight loss. The key is to find a way of eating that helps to decrease your portion sizes, eat fewer calories and ultimately works in the long term.

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


life HEALTH AND WELLNESS

While decreasing calories is important, it is recommended that you also try to maintain variety in your diet. Eating a variety of foods will help to ensure that you’re not creating a harmful nutrient deficiency. With summer upon us, it’s a great time to be eating seasonal fruits and vegetables. These are rich in nutrients, but low in calories. Fresh produce also can be more satisfying because it’s more flavorful and the high fiber is filling. At the end of the day, however, the right diet for you is the one that helps you to consistently consume fewer calories than what your body needs. For a long time, conventional wisdom was that you could lose a pound of fat each week by consuming 3,500 fewer calories each week. That would be the equivalent of eating 500 fewer calories each day. Recent research has demonstrated that this equation is an

oversimplification of energy balance. It is likely that this approach will create an initial weight loss, but over time that weight loss will slow and eventually stall. Part of the slowdown is due to metabolism slowing as weight comes off. While it is true that exercise isn’t a great weight loss tool by itself, it can be a big help in maintaining or even raising your metabolism while dieting. Interestingly, the type of exercise that is best for supporting your metabolism is the exact thing that so many worry will cause weight gain. Strength training has received an unfair reputation for causing people to bulk up. The reality is the average exerciser will never look like a body builder. It takes far more time in the gym than many of us are willing, or able, to spend. So while it may be tempting to spend hours on the treadmill, you’re actually better off strengthening muscles, bones and

metabolism through resistance training. Cardio is helpful too, but more for health and stamina than as a weight loss tool. Think of it this way: that doughnut that’s been tempting you will take about 2 miles to run off. Instead of using exercise as punishment for how you’ve eaten, get outside and enjoy the sunshine. Take a bike ride because you enjoy it, not because you’re feeling guilty. And remember, weight loss is all about moderation and balance. Be kind to yourself and know that the most successful weight loss journeys take time and consistent effort. Mason Stevens is owner and exercise physiologist at MET-Fitness in Columbia. He has his bachelor’s in nutrition and fitness, and has more than 10 years of experience in sports conditioning, coaching and fitness.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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life ENCOUNTERS

Dedicated to Dogs

THE PATH FROM INCARCERATION TO SMALL BUSINESS OWNER. BY MADELEINE LEROUX · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

T

rey Dawson never planned

for the Puppies for Parole program,

Corrections. He returned to Columbia,

on working with dogs.

which gives offenders the opportunity

where he applied at In2Action, a local

The owner and lead

to become trainers to rescue dogs. And

organization that provides transitional

trainer for Backyard K9

though he didn’t expect it, he found a

and recovery support for those released

had grown up with dogs and certainly

real purpose, ultimately becoming the

from prison or at risk of incarceration.

been around them, but he never really

lead dog trainer for the Algoa program.

“I didn't know what I was going to do,”

trained them or sought them out. In

“A lot of these dogs, this is their second,

he recalls. “For the first time in my life, I

fact, the path to founding Backyard K9

third, fourth chance, and that’s what’s

wasn't weighed down by addiction.” He

had quite a few bumps.

so special about Puppies for Parole.

went to his new bed and sat down with

It’s not only a dog that’s working with

his Bible, but he was quickly and quietly

Dawson is a Columbia native

A lot of these dogs, this is their second, third, fourth chance, and that’s what’s so special about Puppies for Parole. It’s not only a dog that’s working with an inmate, but it’s the inmate that’s working with a dog. A lot of these guys have never had that unconditional love that a dog supplies. but he left the area years ago and

an inmate, but it’s the inmate that’s

joined by the house dog, Jobe, who

substance abuse issues led to his being

working with a dog. A lot of these guys

stayed with Dawson through the night.

incarcerated. He ultimately spent time

have never had that unconditional love

“I knew the next day that I was right

in 27 different jails across 12 states,

that a dog supplies. It just gives people

where I was supposed to be.”

returning to Columbia in 2013. But

a purpose,” Dawson says. “These dogs

his substance abuse continued, and

are basically unadoptable … and our

dog park, where he would talk to other

he was incarcerated with the Missouri

job was just to kind of make these dogs

people and give tips on how to train

Department of Corrections, where he

adoptable, and just produce a really

their dogs. Soon enough, people were

began his work with dogs.

socialized, good dog.”

encouraging him to start a formal dog

While at Algoa Correctional Center in Jefferson City, Dawson decided to apply

34

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

On Christmas Day 2019, Dawson was released from the Department of

Dawson began to take Jobe to a local

training business, and Backyard K9 was born. Dawson says the key to training


life ENCOUNTERS

is really training owners in how to properly communicate with their dogs. Dogs need exercise, discipline and attention in order to thrive, he says, and he helps guide dog owners in giving their animals confidence. “Backyard K9 is here for the dogs,” Dawson says. “It’s not just a training session. It’s a lifetime commitment.” The business itself has now grown to include two other trainers, Mike Montagna, who assists in Columbia, and Danny Ramsey, who has taken Backyard K9 to the Lake of the Ozarks. Both Montagna and Ramsey are former lead trainers with the Puppies for Parole program, just like Dawson, who emphasizes how important they are to the business and its continued success. Dawson doesn’t have a physical business location, instead training in a variety of places, from area dog parks to businesses that have agreed to allow him to train on site, such as Bass Pro Shops and Home Depot. In addition to Backyard K9, Dawson works as activities coordinator for In2Action and as a peer specialist at Burrell Behavioral Health. He relishes any opportunity to give back and to help others, crediting his success to his relationship with Christ, his church and In2Action, among other local organizations that provided support.

FACT Since Puppies for Parole started in 2010, more than 6,000 dogs have graduated from training in Missouri and have been adopted.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

35


PROMOTION

36

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


life ROBINSON'S RAMBLINGS

Saint Cook A TABLE WORTHY OF GRANDMA.

BY JOHN DRAKE ROBINSON

I

left Weston’s Saint George

the energy and the enthusiasm of a kid

Hotel — built in 1845, a

despite his 80-some years. He owes

grabbed the squeeze bottle and

throwback to European

his stamina to early rising and hard

decapitated it, held it in one hand

elegance with its mansard roof

work and clean living, but mostly to his

with a gallon milk jug in the other. He

companion for 60-plus years.

poured milk into the syrup bottle.

— and headed across the state to do a story about Hannibal’s second-favorite son, the voice of Jiminy Cricket. More than halfway across the state

Dorothy Shoemyer's kitchen table

“Give it here,” Robert said. He

“Chocolate milk,” he explained,

looks like a Grandma Moses painting.

“and I don’t even have to dirty a glass.”

Everything is on it. Everything. Her

Shoemyer chuckled as she flitted like

on Highway 36, hunger overwhelmed

face would be on the label of the

a hummingbird from stove to table to

me. Taking the state Route 15 exit ramp

grocery-store package that says,

sink.

off the Avenue of the Greats, I knew I

“Grandma's home cooking,” if there

could get to anywhere in tiny Shelbina

was such a package.

in five minutes, as long as a freight

Robert and I dug into a home-grown,

“More ice cream?” she asked. “No, thanks,” I demurred, as I watched Robert shake his squirt

train isn't crawling through the middle

sit-down, all-you-can-eat, family-style,

bottle to make his chocolate milk. I

of town.

“don't stop now because there’s only

was stuffed. It’s rare that a weary road

It wasn’t, and that was a good thing

a spoonful of cottage cheese left and

traveler gets a home-cooked meal,

because the chime on my radio signaled

finish up those peaches cause I can't

especially for lunch.

it was straight-up noon, and I knew

keep up with ’em fallin’ off the trees

lunch was already on the table.

and here, have some more fried chicken

Robert’s work ethic is impressive, and he’s married to Saint Cook.

From different directions, Robert

cause there’s not enough room to put

But that’s not why he’s my hero.

Shoemyer and I arrived at the table at

all this stuff back in the fridge” dinner.

Robert finds a use for everything. Or a

the same time. We exchanged greetings

Shoemyer’s kitchen table featured

shortcut. And I knew that as soon as he

as we sat down to the glorious task of

beef and gravy and new potatoes with

finished his chocolate milk, the squeeze

absorbing a 15-course meal.

green beans from the garden and sliced

bottle would find the recycling bin.

Robert is a family friend and my

home-grown tomatoes and cucumbers

This lunch was a refreshing oasis

hero. He farms for a living. And like

from her garden, too, and corn and

in my sojourn through this big,

most folks who toil the whole time the

relish and pickled beets and bread and

throwaway world.

sun is watching, he stays young behind

butter.

his weather-beaten face that looks all

Robert watched me coax the last

John Drake Robinson is a former director

the more leathery as he sits hatless

drops of chocolate syrup out of a

of the Missouri Division of Tourism and

across the table from me, his balding

Hershey’s squirt bottle onto a dish of

has driven every mile of highway in the

pate a pasty white above a tan line as

vanilla ice cream. I worked the squeeze

state. His book, Souls Along the Road, tells

stark as the rust line in a porcelain tub.

bottle like a bellows, violently expelling

more stories about Weston and Hannibal’s

That tan line is testament to five dozen

a few drops of syrup in a flatulent

most famous Hollywood voice.

seasons on the seat of a tractor, sowing

whoosh, then waited as the air wheezed

soybeans and feeding cattle. Robert has

back into the plastic bottle. INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

37


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She’s got it all. From wealth management and financial planning to accounting, lending and insurance, the professionals at Convergence bring together the financial services you need in one place. If a team of industry leaders focused on your entire financial picture is just what you’re looking for, give us a call, visit us online or simply stop by for a visit today.

Fully invested in you.

Convergence Financial Convergence Accounting Convergence Insurance Convergence Lending

(573) 818-2264 • Convergence-Accounting.com 200 E. Southampton Drive, Suite 102 • Columbia, MO 65203

3919 S. Providence Rd. | 573-818-2264 | convergence-co.com Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through Convergence Financial,LLC, a registered investment advisor. Convergence Financial and LPL Financial are separate unaffiliated legal entities. 38

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

Convergence Lending, LLC NMLS# 2064040


Inside Columbia

flavor SQUEEZY PEASY

Need to squeeze fresh lemon juice by hand? Try these tricks: Roll the lemon back and forth on a flat surface a few times. Next, nuke the lemon in your microwave for 10-20 seconds. Finally, slice it lengthwise and then squeeze.

C O N T E N T S

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Puddin' It Nicely: Lemon Brightens Bread-based Dessert ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

42

New Syrian Eatery Eyes Success ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

45

Salmon Goes Swimmingly With Miso Glaze ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

49

This Bevvy Is A Very Veggie One


flavor FOUGERE'S FAVORITES

A Luscious Twist

LEMON CHESS BREAD PUDDING SIGNALS CHANGE. BY SARA FOUGERE · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

I

'm going to admit something to you. I'm not a huge fan of change. I buy the same kind of shoes all the time, and I'm known to be very brand loyal in a grocery

store. My ice cream order is pretty much set in stone. An oaky chardonnay and I'm always happy. I find comfort in my routine. And yet, this fall, our baby will go off to college and we will be empty nesters — a huge change. Like many of you, caring for my growing older mother has begun to take significant time and our relationship also is evolving. Such a poignant change. So earlier this year, when I found myself contemplating a work kitchen move, I just wasn't sure I could do it. After 17 years, it might be too much change. But I'm a little surprised to say I'm embracing this change — a new kitchen, in the vibrant North Village Arts District; a new outlook on how to provide the fresh, flavorful food I love to bring to parties; and an opportunity to share some recipes I've always loved, but for some reason didn't put in our offerings. This lemon chess bread pudding is going to join our signature dessert list and I just know you're going to love it. It is bright, luscious and comfortable. You can add fruit if you'd like and, although it really is best with freshly squeezed lemon juice, use bottled if that's what you have. It's definitely a change from what you expect from a bread pudding. But it turns out sometimes change is good. I'm going to buy some new shoes, too.

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


flavor FOUGERE'S FAVORITES

Lemon Chess Bread Pudding LEMON CHESS SYRUP 1 ½ cups sugar

6 tbsp heavy whipping cream

1 tbsp cornstarch

6 tbsp lemon juice

1 ½ sticks of butter

Zest from the additional lemon

DIRECTIONS Whisk the lemon juice, zest and cornstarch in a large bowl. Mix in the melted butter, salt and sugar. Whisk the eggs into the mixture. Add the bread cubes and mix to allow the bread to soak up the mixture. INGREDIENTS

Place in a greased 9x9-inch baking dish and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes, until center is set and firm.

4 cups cubed breadcrumbs (TIP: I freeze leftover bread and rolls for this purpose. A hearty artisan roll makes a courser pudding. A less dense roll or bread makes a more tender pudding.)

Zest from the lemons (TIP: Zest them before you cut and squeeze)

1 ²⁄₃ cups sugar

Add remaining ingredients and stir constantly over medium high heat until mixture melts and boils. Keep stirring while the mixture boils and sauce thickens.

¾ cup lemon juice, about 3 large lemons

5 eggs, lightly beaten with a fork or whisk

Let sauce cool (it will continue to thicken while cooling) then drizzle over finished bread pudding.

6 tbsp melted butter ½ tsp salt

While the bread pudding bakes, make the syrup: Mix sugar and cornstarch in a medium saucepan.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

41


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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

The lamb kebab plate at The Syrian Kitchen.


flavor DINING OUT

Seriously Syrian NEW ETHNIC EATERY DEBUTS.

BY PEG GILL · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

W

hen Ahmad Alkadah

to the decor.

I like to eat, I like to serve," he says. Of

came to Columbia in

Alkadah takes immense pride

2016, he came with a

in the freshness and quality of his

nobody serves this kind of food here.

dream: A better life for

dishes. Nothing is frozen, pre-made or

It's hard to make. I do all the prepping,

his family certainly, including his wife,

prepackaged. The meat he uses is trucked

cutting, spicing." Lamb kebabs are his

children and mother. But he also dreamt

in twice a week from Kansas City.

favorite dish to make, he says, especially

of opening an authentic Syrian restaurant,

"I do everything from scratch. No

his new eatery, he says, "We are different,

with hummus. He's noticed that with

serving the kind of food he grew up with

shortcuts,” he says. “I buy the garbanzo

customers, the chicken shawarma is very

and missed. That part of his dream finally

beans, put them in water, wait till the

popular. His bestseller, however, is the

came to fruition in March, with the

next day, then cook them."

mixed Syrian kitchen — one skewer of

opening of The Syrian Kitchen.

chicken, one skewer of lamb kebab and

Alkadah worked at the Coffee Zone

one skewer of beef served with a side of

downtown and began looking for a

salad or rice.

restaurant space in earnest in February

Alkadah says his food is fairly healthy,

2021. Everything finally aligned when he

with its emphasis on fresh vegetables and

signed a lease at 600 Business Loop 70

ingredients and because it's "barbecued.''

W., which some may remember as the

He adds that the meat isn't fatty because

original location of JJ's Cafe. While the

he trims it well.

kitchen was fairly well outfitted, Alkadah

In addition to traditional Syrian meat

wanted to bring in certain specialty

dishes such as kebabs and shawarma, the

equipment in order to provide a truly

menu includes many vegetarian items,

authentic experience for diners.

as well as vegan dishes. One vegan dish

He uses a charcoal grill, as well as

is called Foul Moudames — but it isn't

a griddle surface and industrial stove.

foul at all. The dish contains fava beans,

His house-made pita bread is baked on

onions and diced tomatoes, topped with

a rotating turntable-type device. The

parsley and olive oil, and served with

hummus machine was imported from Turkey. He brought in ornately carved tri-panel wooden screens, inset with

Kibbeh, falafel, hummus and pickled veggies are part of the menu at The Syrian Kitchen.

He says he keeps his spices simple

pita bread. Alkadah plans to add more vegetarian and vegan options in the future. He also plans to add a lunch shift.

small brass bells, from Syria, Jordan and

— mainly salt and pepper but also

At time of press, The Syrian Kitchen's

Turkey to lend a distinctive foreign flavor

cardamom, cumin and coriander. "What

hours are 3-8 p.m. daily.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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44 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

A Taste of the Coast

MISO GLAZED SALMON PROVIDES PERFECT SEGUE INTO SEAFOOD. BY FOOD EDITOR BROOK HARLAN • PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

G

etting people to eat salmon in the Midwest can be hard. I know, I grew up in the Midwest. As a kid, my diet mostly consisted of Midwestern food, until I was about 5 or 6 and we went to California to visit a relative. My parents told us that they didn't have hamburgers or hot dogs on the coast, so we had to eat shrimp, fish and other sea-dwelling things. Little did they know, this would back-

fire. Once we got back, we still wanted seafood, which of course was much more expensive in the Midwest. Sometimes, people are turned off by seafood because of a one-time overly fishy-smelling experience. A strong fishy smell typically means seafood that is ending or past its prime. I vividly remember taking a tour of a culinary school in New England when I was 17 and was asked by a chef what the inside of a day-old whole

salmon smelled like. “Fish!” I replied. The chef then told me it smelled like a fresh cut melon. I can imagine that I had a face of disbelief because the chef then picked up a whole 20-pound salmon and asked me to come up to smell it. I stuck my nose so far into the salmon, as I was sure that the farther I stuck my nose, the more of a chance I would have to catch a fishy smell. Alas, the only smell that I could INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 45


and carefully cut just above where the skin attaches to the meat of the salmon. Use the knife to scrape off the skin at a slight angle (as you might brush the dirt off your desk but add a little forward and backward wiggle to it). This method also can be applied to a whole fillet or side of the salmon.

GLAZE

The glaze is pretty easy: add all of the ingredients and simmer until it thickens. You may have to play with the heat a bit. Depending on your range and size of the pan, you may need to have a little higher or lower heat. You need to have the heat high enough to reduce the sauce (evaporate moisture to thicken and intensify flavor), but not high enough to burn or crust on the side of the pan. If you see the sauce starting to burn, turn down the heat, but DO NOT scrape the sides back into the sauce, it will just end up tasting burnt. If you want, the glaze can be made beforehand, even in larger batches, and frozen until needed.

COOKING PORTIONS

Cooking one or two portions at a time is easy. It can be done in one pan and can quickly go from the fridge to the plate with minimal effort. You can start the salmon in the pan with a little oil, add the ingredients for the glaze, baste the salmon, then take the salmon out, put it onto the plates and finish the glaze by itself in the pan. detect was fresh melon. This recipe is a great segue into seafood, as it has saltiness and sweetness, while letting the great flavor of salmon come through. It works well for cooking one or two individual portions, or a larger fillet of salmon to serve family meal style. The ingredients are the same, but the technique is slightly different, both with the same delicious result.

SALMON

Depending on where you are, the wild salmon season is typically late April or early May through October. You can find a much larger variety of salmon available then. Farm-raised salmon will be more available throughout the rest of the year. My preference is portions that are about

46 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

2-inch to 2 ½-inch thick, and fillets (whole sides) that are on the thinner side, closer to 1 ½ inches. I find cooking the individual portions goes faster than you might think but glazing it while cooking a whole fillet (or side) of salmon goes a little slower.

SKIN

Skin or no skin is more of a preference, it does take a little more technique for making it crispy, but I love the crisp result. Removing the skin takes a little practice but is easier than you would think. If you don’t want to bother with it, it will come off very easily once it is cooked. Just be careful, the salmon will have become extremely delicate during the cooking process as well. Remove the skin from a tranche or portion of salmon — from the side, use a knife

COOKING FILLET

Your pan and your oven or broiler are what limit how large of a piece of salmon you can cook. I find it sometimes easier to make the glaze a day or two beforehand. It may be a little thick when it is cool but will thin once the glaze starts hitting the warm salmon. The salmon cooks best going into a preheated oven for four to five minutes, then removing to preheat the broiler, then back in to broil. Once you have baked and broiled, you can brush the glaze on the salmon just as it is finishing under the broiler. Remember, all of the glaze does not need to go on now. Use just enough to start sticking to the salmon to help flavor it. The rest of the glaze can be put on once you have the salmon on the platter to serve.


MISO GLAZED SALMON

2 to 3 portions

2 or 3 salmon tranches (4 to 5 ounces), skin removed 2 tablespoons miso 1 to 2 tablespoons rice vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar 2 to 3 tablespoons soy sauce 2 cloves of garlic, minced 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced Water to thin, as needed Season salmon pieces lightly with salt and pepper. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and oil a small oven-safe saute pan on the stove over medium heat. Place the salmon skin side down into the pan and place in the oven for two to three minutes until the salmon just starts to cook on the base. Move the pan under the broiler on high for three to five minutes until some brown starts to form on the top. Using a towel or oven mitt to hold the pan, return the pan to the burner over medium heat and add miso, rice vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, garlic and ginger. Bring to a simmer and baste the salmon. Cook the salmon until the ends are slightly firm to the touch, and the center has a slight give. Remove the salmon and place it onto your plate. Keep reducing the sauce until it is slightly thicker than maple syrup. Taste and season with more soy (needs salt), sugar (too acidic or salty), and water (too thick or sweet), as needed. Spoon some sauce over each piece of salmon and serve.

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flavor COCKTAIL

Fighting Flavors

THE SURPRISING TASTE OF THE B.F.G. BY KALVIN BARTHOLOMEW · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

W

hile riding in an Uber on my way to work, I began to think about how cumin and bell pepper marry together in food so well, and

how that may work in a cocktail. My first attempt didn’t really pan out — the use of mezcal mixed with cumin seed resulted in a horrific experience. But then, after seeing a photo of someone drinking a caipirinha, I had a moment of inspiration. Caipirinhas are typically made by muddling limes with sugar and adding cachaça, which is the national spirit of Brazil. Stir a little and, voila, a caipirinha! I found it fun to find a way to blend bell pepper, cumin seed and mint, all of which can be overpowering, into one delicious drink. The name itself refers to these three ingredients, which can be bully ingredients that take over other flavors. The finished product should be heavily spiced and savory with moments of sweetness provided by the pepper and cachaça, which is distilled from molasses extract.

Kalvin Bartholomew is a bartender at Flyover.

The Bully Fruit Gang

(The B.F.G.)

INGREDIENTS • 2 lime wedges

4-6 mint leaves plus a sprig

• 4-5 pieces red bell pepper,

Decent pinch of sugar

1.5 ounces cachaça

Splash of ginger beer

julienned • 10-15 cumin seeds TO MAKE THE DRINK:

Muddle together the lime, bell pepper, cumin, mint leaves and sugar. Add the cachaça and the splash of ginger beer. Serve on the rocks, then roll shake (quickly pour into different glass or cocktail tin and then back into original glass) and garnish with a mint sprig.

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49


Columbia is home to many businesses, representing a wide variety of fields and industries. But when we connect with a business, we often connect with a person — or sometimes several people — who serves as the “Face” of that local company, providing that personal connection between the business and the community it serves. In the following special section, you’ll learn about 41 local businesses and the face, or faces, behind them. We hope you’ll gain a more intimate look at the people behind these successful businesses and what they most enjoy about their work in mid-Missouri.

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

VEIN CARE

MISSOURI VEIN CARE In 2005, while working as a heart surgeon, Dr. Michael Ryan learned about new patient-friendly treatments for vein conditions, sparking a new focus in his medical career. “Most people we see don’t understand that their leg symptoms and fatigue get better with treatment,” Ryan says. “It is very satisfying to let them know this is something we can treat. It gives them hope.” At Missouri Vein Care, Ryan takes a patient-first approach. It’s something he learned while working

with Dr. Denton Cooley at the Texas Heart Institute. “I learned that talking to patients and understanding them as human beings is as important to the process of healing as the treatment,” he says. Ryan says the revolution in vein care is centered around patient-friendly treatments, which he expects will only get easier as health care progresses. He and his office staff all recognize these new patient expectations and work hard to deliver.

MISSOURI VEIN CARE | 4004 PEACH COURT, SUITE E, COLUMBIA MO | 573-449-2273 | MISSOURIVEINCARE.COM

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

FINE DINING CHRIS McD'S Chef Tyler Spurgeon, new owner of Chris McD's, fell in love with cooking when he was 14 years old and working at Tonazios, a restaurant in the New Bloomfield area. The restaurant was hosting a wedding for around 350 people on his first day. He was immediately thrown into the frying pan, and obliged by putting his head down and getting to work. As he'd refill the buffet, he'd hear praise from guests about how perfect everything was — from the food to the centerpieces on the table — and everything in between. "A sense of pride swelled in me," Spurgeon says. "I knew I was making a difference doing something I loved — cooking great food!" Of his recent acquisition of one of Columbia's most well-regarded, long-standing restaurants after working there for more than three years, he says, "Life has given me the incredible opportunity of bringing me full circle back into cooking, something I've never stopped loving after all these years. As the first sauté pan touched the stove again I felt at home and in my element." Spurgeon's favorite part of working in the restaurant business may not sound enviable to most. He says joining the Marines right out of high school is a testament to the type of person he is. "Anyone in the industry will tell you that working in the kitchen is one of the loudest, hottest, grueling jobs one can have — similar to the Marines — and I love it for that!" He says the magic moment for him is walking out in

the dining room (usually just once a night — his job is in the kitchen, he says) and seeing everyone smiling, laughing and immersed in the incredible food he has put out, creating a memory for people, not just a dinner. "The dinner table has been a gathering place for friends and family since the dawn of time and to be able to create something more than just food, a memory, an experience, something that brings everyone together regardless of differences, is what I take from the long, hot hours needed in this profession." Spurgeon acknowledges that the bar was set high coming in, as he's "stepping into the shoes of a man who has cooked his way into a Columbia legacy. How do you build on something that, in most of Columbia's eyes, is the best restaurant in the city?" His plans include maintaining the quality of food and service, adding exciting, fresh specials every week, a new bar in the back room with a huge patio, opening for brunch and updating the decor. He says the future of Chris McD's in the next five years is what it has been for the past 30 — the highest quality ingredients, food and service to provide patrons with the ultimate dining experience. To unwind, Spurgeon likes playing with his dogs, working on his garden and taking an afternoon nap in the hammock. "Pina coladas also aren't bad after a long night at work!" he says.

CHRIS McD'S | 1400 FORUM BLVD., COLUMBIA MO | 573-446-6237 | CHRISMCDS.COM

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

MENTAL HEALTH

BURRELL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Ashley Angerer-Blunt, director of outpatient services; Mat Gass, regional president; Vinita Khanna, assessment center supervisor; and Christopher Smith, licensed psychologist, are some of the many faces that make receiving care from Burrell Behavioral Health possible for so many. The diverse array of credentialed experts lead the community mental health center in delivering best practices and individualized care. An 8 a.m.–5 p.m. walk-in Connection Center, pharmacy, psychiatry and outpatient therapy services are among the many services available at their Berrywood Clinic just off

of Keene Street. Burrell is continually working on meeting the demand for mental health services in mid-Missouri. One example is the construction underway on a temporary Behavioral Crisis Center that will open this summer in the lower level of Burrell’s Stephens Lake Clinic, 1805 E. Walnut St. Burrell provides immediate, 24/7 response to anyone who is experiencing a mental health crisis or is having thoughts of suicide. To get in touch with a crisis care specialist, anyone in central Missouri can call 1-800-395-2132.

BURRELL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH | 3401 BERRYWOOD DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO | 573-777-8300 | BURRELLCENTER.COM

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

TOURISM

CITY OF COLUMBIA - CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU Amy Schneider, director of the City of Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau, is no stranger to the hospitality business, having always worked in hotels or restaurants. She says that made it easy for her to transition to promoting the whole city, instead of a single property. In her position for 10 years, Schneider loves talking to others throughout the state, region and nation about Columbia and why it's so special, as well as partnering with our hotels, events and attractions to bring

visitors to our community. "When we bring visitors to Columbia, we know the spending they do while they are here helps our local businesses and our community thrive," she says. Although many moments in her career stand out, two in particular are the 2017 solar eclipse and Columbia's bicentennial. “I am so very proud of our team and what they have accomplished throughout the years,” Schneider says.

CITY OF COLUMBIA | 300 S. PROVIDENCE ROAD, COLUMBIA MO | 573-875-1231 | VISITCOLUMBIAMO.COM

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

ADVANCED WEALTH PLANNING WR WEALTH PLANNERS For the team at WR Wealth Planners, creating deep, personalized partnerships with clients is what makes the work worthwhile. They get to help clients navigate both life’s happiest and most challenging moments, assisting them in finding peace of mind when it comes to their finances. There’s nothing better than “seeing the relief on their faces when I’m able to show them they are going to be OK financially,” says Carroll Wilkerson, co-founder and senior wealth advisor. “There is nothing more gratifying than making a real difference in people’s lives through planning and helping people reach their personal and financial goals,” says Dan Kellar, wealth advisor. Jared Reynolds, co-founder and senior wealth advisor, recalls a particularly special moment after 56 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

assisting a couple with retirement and plans for their dream vacation. Her husband passed away shortly after the vacation, and Reynolds will always remember the widowed client “tearfully hugging and thanking me for helping her husband.” Wilkerson and Reynolds founded what was originally known as Wilkerson & Reynolds Wealth Management in January 2009. The company rebranded as WR Wealth Planners in 2020 and continues to instill a high standard of conduct in all of its team members, always putting the client’s best interests first. Taylor Knipp, servicing wealth advisor who joined the team in 2016, says she has found “a fulfilling profession where I get to help people with more than just their investment allocations.”


Helping better people’s lives through smarter investment moves is what attracted Justin Hamilton, data/trading analyst, to the field. For wealth advisor Ben Dierkes, working at WR Wealth Planners has brought him full circle, as his initial interest in the field was sparked in the seventh grade, when Wilkerson himself spoke to his class, teaching students about money, investing and compound interest. And Sheryl Hopkins, client service administrator, simply loves coming to the office and working with the “wonderful team in place.” As the financial planning industry moves forward, the truly independent firms like WR Wealth Planners will continue to grow as more and more clients realize that their financial advisors should be sitting on the same side of the table. A lot of clients come to the office after working with other advisors, and they soon realize how different the experience

is. Instead of seeing the same old sales proposals, clients see the advanced wealth, estate and tax planning service the team at WR Wealth Planning provides. Business owners and real estate investors who use the firm’s advanced tax planning realize the most value in the mitigation of income and capital gains taxes at the time of a sale. The speed of the transactions and trades also will improve as the industry begins to use the innovations of blockchain technology, says Teresa Tice, servicing wealth advisor. Outside of financial planning, the entire team enjoys all kinds of outdoor activities, from Dierkes’ passion for golf to Knipp’s love of being outside with her dog, Merle Haggard. “Our strong culture likely has something to do with the fact that we all find enjoyment in hunting, fishing, hiking and just being outdoors!”

WR WEALTH PLANNERS | 200 E. SOUTHAMPTON DRIVE, SUITE 101, COLUMBIA MO 573-875-3939 | WRWEALTH.COM INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 57


2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

CUSTOM HOME BUILDING

ALPINE BUILDERS For Scott Powell, becoming a builder began with a strong foundation. “My dad always had a passion for building, engineering and woodworking,” Powell says. He taught Powell these disciplines from a young age, instilling a sense of purpose and pride in designing and creating woodwork and houses with structural and aesthetic integrity. Powell remains guided by those tenants and a continued effort to do what’s right for his clients' interests and the interests of sustainable building. He

feels extremely fortunate to work with a team at Alpine that embodies these same values. On designing and building custom homes, Powell says, “For most families their home is their most sacred space. I love being able to help design and create a home where families can be inspired, comfortable and make lasting memories through the years.” His favorite way to unwind is being outdoors: “I always feel most balanced and at peace when I’m in nature.”

ALPINE BUILDERS | 11 S. GLENWOOD AVE., COLUMBIA MO | 573-424-3022 | ALPINEBUILDERS.ORG

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

SPRAY TANNING

BRONZE BY DESIGN Jennifer Heidrich has known since high school that she wanted to own a tanning salon. “After being introduced to handheld spray tanning after college and learning more about the harmful effects of UV, I knew sunless tanning was the path for me,” Heidrich says. She loves being able to help clients look and feel their best, living up to the industry motto that says “a spray tan is confidence applied directly to the skin.” Heidrich’s services have been used on multiple touring

productions, including ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” and for Kaitlyn Bristowe from “The Bachelor.” As we learn more about the harmful effects of sun and UV damage on skin, Heidrich says she sees the sunless tanning industry continuing to grow rapidly. “Tanning beds and UV rays can cause wrinkles, sun spots and even lead to skin cancer,” Heidrich says. “Sunless tanning is a much safer option and gives you the ability to create a glowing tan instantly.”

BRONZE BY DESIGN | 111 E. WALNUT ST., SUITE B , COLUMBIA MO | 573-864-9627 | BRONZEBYDESIGN .COM

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2022

FACES

OF COLUMBIA

THE FACE OF

EVENTS VOCO THE TIGER HOTEL Even though she's only been with voco The Tiger Hotel a few months, Events Manager Mackenzie Townsend hardly feels like a guest. She feels right at home. "voco The Tiger Hotel is a beautiful place full of wonderful people and history to be told," she says. "It has something for everyone to enjoy and is a fantastic experience for anyone visiting Columbia." Townsend's teammate, Catering Sales Manager Abigail Maynard, shares a similar sentiment: "Being a part of the team at voco The Tiger Hotel is memorable and very special to me. This hotel is so unique to Columbia and I love working at a place with such history," she says. "Being a part of the hotel's transition to an IHG voco property has been extremely rewarding and I couldn’t imagine a better team to work with." Both women were drawn to the hospitality/events industry because of its variety and unpredictability, as well as the rewards of seeing a happy clientele. "My favorite part of working in this profession is assisting clients and bringing their vision for their events to life," Maynard says. "I love seeing all the details come together like a puzzle and create a beautiful event. And the food. I love creating, customizing — and of course tasting — menus!" Both believe the events industry is changing more and

more every day, whether it be trends, venues or the type of events themselves. "Everyone is being so creative with different event formats and layouts," Maynard says. "Now that we have proper protocols and vaccines in place the next few years will be a wild ride of postponed weddings, family gatherings and corporate travel." If Townsend wasn't in events management, she says she'd probably be exploring new restaurants and bars, trying to expand her knowledge about bartending and new food trends. "I have an interest in molecular gastronomy," she says, "as well as different food preparation techniques and ingredients from other parts of the world." Maynard feels content in her current calling: "Over the years I considered being a tornado chaser, flight attendant, concierge and even a marine biologist. However, now I can’t see myself working in any other field," she says. One of the great things about the hospitality industry is all the different fields. Besides, how exciting can fish and tornados really be?" To unwind, Townsend likes to see her friends, put on her chef's hat and cook dinner for everyone. Maynard enjoys visiting her favorite restaurants here and watching live music, as well as spending time with her Boston Terrier, Frankie.

VOCO THE TIGER HOTEL | 23 S. EIGHTH ST., COLUMBIA MO | 573-875-8888 | THETIGERHOTEL.COM

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EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION

COLUMBIA ACADEMY FOR LEARNING AND ENRICHMENT Dr. Susan Deakins and Dr. Jill Dunlap Brown opened the Columbia Academy for Learning and Enrichment (CALE) to ensure families have access to a nurturing, academically engaging and safe environment for their children. Both Deakins and Dunlap Brown are lifelong professional educators who incorporate a “whole child approach to learning” that focuses on meeting the social and emotional needs of each student while realizing academic goals through rigorous, engaging

and meaningful instruction. Deakins and Dunlap Brown find it truly fulfilling to cultivate strong relationships with students, families and teachers, while creating an authentic family environment where students can thrive. “The opportunity to rethink what it means to create the very best educational experience for all students has been life changing,” Deakins says.

COLUMBIA ACADEMY FOR LEARNING AND ENRICHMENT | 2201 W. NIFONG BLVD., COLUMBIA MO 573-777-1300 | COMOCALE.COM 62 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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FAMILY DENTISTRY

COLUMBIA HEALTHY SMILES Dr. Philip Batson and Dr. Elizabeth Abe began their careers in separate offices. But in 2019, the husbandand-wife dental team had the opportunity to merge two dental practices, allowing them to fulfill their dream and begin working together. “It’s hard to remember what it was like to practice without each other now,” Batson says. “It has been amazing to work with each other and share in our development and growth together. … We push each other to be better dentists and continue to grow in our

clinical and leadership skills.” Batson and Abe work to make coming to the office a pleasurable experience for everyone. They enjoy how the work is always changing, as each person and their oral health is unique. They also incorporate new technology whenever possible. “Dentistry is a mixture of science, artistry and engineering, and getting to apply that in different ways is rewarding,” Abe says. Ultimately, “It’s special to restore someone’s smile and confidence.”

COLUMBIA HEALTHY SMILES | 2516 FORUM BLVD., SUITE 200, COLUMBIA MO 573-875-7071 | COLUMBIAHEALTHYSMILES.COM INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 63


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ENTREPRENEURSHIP NIC PARKS Over the last eight years, Nic Parks has been working to turn mid-Missouri into an entertainment destination. Parks is the founder and chairman of The Pinball Company and CEO of Parks Amusements. His business endeavors include Level Up Entertainment, Silverball Arcade Bar, Cantina Margarita & Tequila Bar, Shiloh Bar & Grill and, his most recent development, Lakeside Ashland, a 37-acre entertainment park near U.S. 63 in Ashland. For Parks, each venture is another way to provide the community new entertainment options without having to travel outside of mid-Missouri. “If I have it my way, Columbia will become an entertainment destination similar to Branson,” Parks says. “People will come from all over the state to eat, play and stay in our great city.” His latest project reflects the realities of pandemic era entertainment. Looking for a way to fulfill a need for family-friendly outdoor entertainment, Parks came up with Lakeside Ashland. The project includes an amphitheater, outdoor movie screen, restaurant, playground, and 700-foot zip line. Parks is looking

at other possible activities to include, such as a ropes course or an inflatable aqua park. Down the line, the development may also include more restaurants, a hotel and athletic courts, he says. Parks says he appreciates all the support the community has given, and he promises to continue to reinvest, adding more entertainment options for local families and giving back to local nonprofits. That spirit is evident in the completion of the expansion at Level Up, which had already offered a ropes course, arcade, bowling and laser tag. Early this year, Parks completed the ‘80s-themed expansion that added a new mini golf course and rollerskating area, as well as additional arcade games. Parks says the feeling of providing people with a space and atmosphere to enjoy themselves and have fun is the best part of his business. “One of the first few weekends at Level Up, I stood at the upstairs balcony looking out over the entire space. The place was buzzing with a lot of visitors having fun. Moments like that make all the hard work worth it,” Parks says. “I look forward to experiencing many more similar moments at Lakeside and beyond.”

NIC PARKS | 2300 BERNADETTE DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO | 573-615-0443 | LEVELUPTHEFUN.COM

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LUXURY HOME BUILDING

LOMBARDO HOMES OF COLUMBIA For Jeremy Spillman, there was never a question of what he would grow up to do. His love of building and remodeling started at a young age, thanks to his mother and grandmother. “It was living with them that I learned to make new things out of existing items around the home. I already had an imagination and loved being creative, so learning to use my hands and be resourceful was actually a gift,” Spillman says. Now, as division president of Lombardo Homes of

Columbia, Spillman carries that passion into every project, always remembering that the end result is so much more than a building. “A home is a place that memories will be made over and over again,” Spillman says. “It is the place we seek comfort, and it becomes a part of us.” Going from a small startup to partnering with Lombardo has allowed Spillman to access the resources of a larger builder while remaining focused on the community he serves.

LOMBARDO HOMES OF COLUMBIA | 2817 CLAPTON COURT, COLUMBIA MO | 573-542-0605 | LOMBARDOHOMES.COM 66 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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INCLUSION

AVANT SUPPORTED LIVING Brittani Gardner-Evans loves helping people achieve their goals. Empowering others to be successful in their own lives is why she founded Avant Supported Living. “We are driven by goals,” Gardner-Evans says. “Day to day, our team has to think outside the box and create measurable goals that are person-centered, but it’s incredibly rewarding to see the progress.” A particularly special moment for Gardner-Evans came when Avant Supported Living was recognized by the Missouri Department of Mental Health for taking

on some of the most complex individuals in the state. “It was validation that our push to provide excellent service wasn't in vain. Our efforts are actually impacting lives in a great way,” she says. The company’s day programs and employment services are expanding and Gardner-Evans says they “are looking to grow our team with people who fit our core values. Our passion is people, our employees and the individuals we support."

AVANT SUPPORTED LIVING | 3806 BUTTONWOOD DRIVE, SUITE 103, COLUMBIA MO 573-567-0230 | AVANTSUPPORTEDLIVING.COM

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HOSPITALITY

CHESTERFIELD HOTELS INC These hospitality pros recognize the value of a good first impression. At The Broadway, A DoubleTree by Hilton hotel, Jeff Guinn, Vice President of F&B Operations, and Aric Jarvis, GM, take pride in welcoming guests from around the world and introducing them to the unique shopping, dining and vibrant nightlife Columbia offers. GM Nadia Ryakhmyatullov with the Hampton Inn & Suites at the University, agrees saying, "In the hospitality industry we serve as ambassadors to the city. We strive to anticipate guest’s needs, make their stay as

comfortable as possible and leave them with a positive impression that’ll encourage them to visit again.” Jared Klarfeld, Regional Sales Director for both properties, says the job isn’t a typical 9-5 one. “In our industry we need to be responsive to guests’ needs around the clock. Although the trend toward more technology-based solutions in the hotel industry will definitely continue, we know nothing can take the place of our personalized service.”

CHESTERFIELD HOTELS | 5 MCBRIDE AND SON CENTER DRIVE, CHESTERFIELD MO | CHESTERFIELDHOTELS.NET

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THE LAWN CARE INDUSTRY

McVEY MOWING & LANDSCAPING LLC After starting his own company in 2003, and after 13 long years of running it out of a self-storage center, Ben McVey's goal was to have his own shop. Now, thanks to Jay Gebhardt at The Civil Group, McVey recently began to occupy his own facility. McVey, along with General Manager Jacob Richards and secretary Janey Trull, are moving toward a common goal of being a “One Stop Shop” for all your lawn and landscape needs. Richards graduated from high school

early, ready to build a foundation and was given an opportunity at McVey Mowing & Landscaping. He excelled in his role and became McVey’s “right-hand man.” Trull has been “behind the scenes” as their bookkeeper, and after moving into their new facility they’re happy she’s now in a full-time secretarial role. “We are excited for what the future brings!” the trio say.

McVEY MOWING & LANDSCAPING | 612 JACKSON ST., STE. 100, COLUMBIA MO 573-489-3489 | MCVEYMOWING.COM INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 69


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K-8 EDUCATION OUR LADY OF LOURDES INTERPARISH SCHOOL Our Lady of Lourdes Interparish School has a rich history in Columbia going back to 1960. And while the school is used to change and growth, one thing that has remained since day one is the community atmosphere. That familylike feeling is what attracted Elaine Hassemer, who has been principal of Our Lady of Lourdes Interparish School for nine years. “The best part of this job is working with the students, families and staff,” she says. Hassemer’s love of teaching makes her the perfect fit at OLLIS. She loves to watch the students shine as they reach their full potential, like when she saw a young student with special needs do his first reading at Mass. Then there’s those full circle moments, she says, like greeting a new parent at the school only to realize they’re also a former student. “We get to see the fruits of our efforts,” Hassemer says. “Working in education is very rewarding and fulfilling. Each day brings something new and exciting.” That passion for education is why Hassemer says she would be working in a classroom if she weren't in administration. During the last two years, she has spent much of her time dedicated to COVID-19 management. Now that guidelines and precautions are being scaled back, she is looking forward to getting back in the classroom once again to interact with teachers and students. “It’s what I love doing and I’m happy to see school slowly return to normal,” Hassemer says. But there are obstacles to overcome, as Hassemer knows. The pandemic put a strain on educators, with

many teachers choosing to leave the field as stress grew amid constant change and tension. “The next five years will be crucial in the education industry,” she says. “Nationally, we are facing a teacher shortage like we have never seen. We need everyone to see the value educators bring to our community.” It’s a lot to deal with as an administrator, and Hassemer says she unwinds at the end of a long day by changing into her tennis shoes and taking a long walk through the neighborhood. “Not only does it help reduce stress, but it reminds me to focus on all the good things happening at OLLIS,” she says. There’s plenty in that arena. In 2018, another addition to the building was completed, which eliminated the need for eight trailers and added nine new classrooms. To assist with development, Hassemer says they’ve completed a rebranding through the help of Hoot Design Company. “While it’s important to appreciate our past and remember where we began, it’s vital that we continue to move forward,” she says. “There are many exciting changes at OLLIS and we have so much to be thankful for.” Our doors are open to anyone seeking a high quality Catholic education with a curriculum that incorporates the social, emotional and spiritual well-being of each child. Our faith guides our daily lessons, interactions and expectations. We are OLLIS.

OUR LADY OF LOURDES INTERPARISH SCHOOL | 817 BERNADETTE DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO 573-445-6516 | OLLISK8.ORG

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INFERTILITY SOLUTIONS

MISSOURI FERTILITY Dr. Gil Wilshire, President of Missouri Fertility, was drawn to his profession because family means everything to him. He's always been captivated by helping others create the family of their dreams. "Reproductive medicine is so much more than a job," he says. "My team and I love what we do. It's a life calling." He loves being able to rejoice with patients when they hear the baby's heartbeat for the first time, and holding the babies when they come back to visit.

"I'm honored to be able to walk side-by-side with my patients through their fertility journey." One moment that stands out in Wilshire’s career occurred on Doctor's Day "when the stream of pictures of children from grateful parents just kept coming!" he says. "It was so deeply gratifying I got all choked up. The fact that that still happens after almost 30 years of doing this, speaks to the fulfillment I receive from it."

MISSOURI FERTILITY | 1506 E. BROADWAY, STE. 220, COLUMBIA MO | 573-443-4511 | MISSOURIFERTILITY.COM

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

AUTOMATED SYSTEMS CONSULTING As an MU freshman, Shawn Sutterer had no idea what he wanted to do. He took a basic programming class and was hooked. "I found it came easily to me," he says, "and I discovered my passion for working with technology." President of his company since founding it in 1993, Sutterer still partners with his first client from that time, and truly enjoys collaborating with clients to discover their needs and ways technology can improve their business.

For him, the most gratifying moment of his career was working with Rainbow House. The nonprofit was having a hard time retrieving information due to an entirely manual system. It took them weeks to compile information for yearly grant reports. Sutterer's company was able to write a custom program to automate the whole process. As for the future? He says, "Many people outside the IT industry think the computer age is advanced, when in reality, it's just getting started."

AUTOMATED SYSTEMS CONSULTING | 2201 CHAPEL PLAZA COURT, SUITE 103, COLUMBIA MO 573-815-0200 | GOAUTOMATEDSYSTEMS.COM

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CATARACT CARE

MISSOURI EYE CONSULTANTS For both Dr. Nathan Hesemann and Dr. Anitra Turner, improving — or even restoring — patients' eyesight is incredibly rewarding. "Often our technicians and staff see patients before and after surgery," Hesemann says. The doctors agree that one of their favorite aspects of their work is when staff and patients celebrate the outcome together. "Almost every day there are one or two patients who have had a truly life changing result," Turner says. ""The joy is infectious."

Both can easily recall moments that stand out. For Hesemann, it was helping newly arrived refugees who had never had eye care. For Turner, it was helping someone totally blind from cataracts see again. The duo believes the patient experience will continue to improve. "Many years ago, patients who had eye surgery had to stay in the hospital overnight. They were restricted in their activities and choices in visual outcomes," Hesemann says. "Now surgery is a same-day procedure."

MISSOURI EYE CONSULTANTS | 500 N . KEENE ST., SUITE 103 & 900 W NIFONG BLVD., SUITE 125, COLUMBIA MO 573-874-2030 | MOEYES.COM 74 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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BRIDAL JEWELRY

MOLLY'S JEWELRY DESIGN It's no wonder Molly Smith, owner of Molly's Jewelry Design, took a shine to being a jeweler — she grew up in the business. Sales Manager Ami Hunter was working multiple jobs at age 19 when she was approached about trying jewelry sales. She's still doing it 17 years later! Smith's fellow bench jeweler, Sarah Darnell, always had a passion for jewelry, wanting to be a designer since age 12.

Of ending up in the same 'setting' (to use a jewelry term), Smith says: "It was fate that we came together." The trio agree their customers are their favorite part of their profession, saying, "They give us free rein over their designs and allow us the freedom to design and create." Smith feels people are more in tune with their individuality and sees her team creating more custom pieces in the future.

MOLLY'S JEWELRY DESIGN | 422 B . MAIN ST., BOONVILLE MO 660-672-5074 | MOLLYSJEWELRYDESIGN@GMAIL.COM INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 75


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ADULT EDUCATION

MOBERLY AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE-COLUMBIA Aleesha Coke, Director of Site Operations & Student Affairs at Moberly Area Community College-Columbia, and Tony Killian, Director of Instructional Services, are both passionate about higher education. The two agree that seeing students learn, grow and succeed in their academic careers is the most fulfilling part of what they do. They acknowledge that higher education, like most industries, has been forever changed by the global pandemic. “As time goes on, the resources and tools we

have for interacting with a broader range of students will become even more robust and user-friendly,” Coke says. “The landscape of college recruiting, enrollment and teaching is in revolutionary time of change.” Killian concurs, adding that MACC has done an excellent job meeting challenges with an increase in distance education offerings and alternative instructional delivery methods. “I believe these will continue to be a significant part of our curriculum as we grow and develop new programs,” Killian says.

MOBERLY AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE-COLUMBIA | 1601 BUSINESS LOOP 70 W., STE. 216, COLUMBIA MO 660-263-4100 | MACC .EDU 76 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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IN-HOME SENIOR CARE

HOUSE OF CAREGIVERS For Sonya Johnson, being in the profession of caring for others came naturally. “I remember as a young girl being on the floor after school at Keller Memorial Hospital asking to help pass water to patients or visit with the physicians in the unit they worked,” she says. Now, as home care director for the House of Caregivers, Johnson gets to take that drive to help others and use it every day caring for clients. “Many of the seniors we serve are very active in the

community, but they just need help with activities of daily living,” she says, noting that caregivers accompany them to tailgates, weddings and meetings. “We help them age safely in the comforts of where they call home.” Johnson says seniors have an appreciation for their caregivers and express their gratitude, which makes the job incredibly special. Plus, there’s always so much to learn. “The elderly have a wealth of knowledge that they love to share,” she says.

HOUSE OF CAREGIVERS | 303 N . STADIUM BLVD. SUITE 200, COLUMBIA MO 573-818-3470 | HOUSEOFCAREGIVERS.COM INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 77


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FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC CARE RESTORATION CHIROPRACTIC Having grown up with a grandfather and both parents who were chiropractors, Dr. Taylor Sirois, owner of Restoration Chiropractic and a chiropractor himself, saw firsthand the impact chiropractic care had on his family and their health. He also saw how much their family chiropractic practice helped others feel better and enjoy an improved quality of life, often with reduced pain and increased ability to more comfortably and easily perform routine activities. His vision is to create one of the healthiest cities in the world, right here in Columbia, by allowing individuals to achieve optimal health naturally, and chiropractic care can play a large part. It's completely natural health care that's been proven — without drugs or surgery — to create optimum function of the central nervous system. It's been shown to correct ailments that are far removed from their proximity to the spine, resulting in a true experience of health and vitality. Sirois says his favorite part of working at his practice over the past six years is working with families. “I’m passionate about seeing kids grow up healthy and parents able to care for and play with their kiddos without pain,” Sirois says.

With his wife, Leah, serving in the role of office manager, Sirois says, “This is truly a family business and a family practice, and we wouldn't have it any other way.” He says he’s enjoyed many special moments throughout his career, but that the best days are when his children, Jayna and Alden, are in the office and asking to help him adjust patients. “It would be pretty cool for one of them to continue the family legacy and be the fourth generation,” he says. In the next five years, he sees the chiropractic industry evolving and moving toward more proactive efforts from patients. "I think people are becoming more and more aware of their health and finding natural solutions to manage their pain and symptoms," he says. "I also see so many more families becoming aware of how important it is to keep kids healthy from an early age to prevent issues in the future." His favorite way to unwind is getting to spend time with his family and enjoying outdoor activities with them. Sirois says if he wasn't a chiropractor, he'd be a professional fisherman. "I grew up fishing with my grandpa on the Current River and have recently discovered I really enjoy fly fishing."

RESTORATION CHIROPRACTIC | 1413 GRINDSTONE PLAZA DRIVE, SUITE 109, COLUMBIA MO 573-247-6798 | CHIRORESTORATION.COM

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MEDICARE INSURANCE

WENDY L. SPROUSE AGENCY Initially, Wendy Sprouse only handled personal insurance lines for her clients. But she noticed many were overwhelmed and confused by Medicare. She soon realized she really loved helping with Medicare, finding it very rewarding: “Just knowing I’ve helped clients feel confident that they understand their plan and how it works is great!” One moment that stands out in her career was when she helped a client on a fixed income save half on her premium. “She had the same plan since 1992 and didn't

understand Missouri’s anniversary rule,” Sprouse says, “and had overpaid for many years!” Sprouse sees her industry only getting busier, due to the influx of baby boomers turning 65. Nonetheless it’s hard for her to imagine another career. “I feel like helping the elderly in some form is what I'm best at,” she says. Her favorite way to unwind is hanging out with her new granddaughter, dogs or in her garden when weather permits.

WENDY L. SPROUSE AGENCY | 204 PEACH WAY, STE. B , COLUMBIA MO 573-292-6373 | WENDYSPROUSEAGENCY.COM 80 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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RESIDENTIAL PAINTING

AI PAINTING PLUS The team at Ai Painting Plus knows how important a paint job can be to a home. When done well, it can help provide joy through the visual transformation of a cherished space. “Our mission is to ‘paint joy into people’s homes’ and that’s our favorite part about doing what we do,” says Lacie Ilsley, who owns the business with her husband, Austin. “We are artists by nature, creating joy in the form of a newly painted home exterior, a beautiful

fresh coat of paint on your walls inside or a complete transformation of your cabinets.” Ilsley says the team is dedicated to providing five-star service, from the initial point of contact to the project’s completion. The team at Ai Painting Plus is proud to be at the forefront of initiatives meant to improve the experiences of clients and provide a path to personal growth for team members.

AI PAINTING PLUS | 6991 S. SINCLAIR ROAD, COLUMBIA MO 65203 | 573-529-2128 | AIPAINTINGPLUS.COM

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RETIREMENT LIVING

THE TERRACE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY Linette Beaman and Dawn Vaughn feel they’ve been fortunate to work with a great group of staff and residents, making the environment at The Terrace feel more like family. “We’ve been told many, many times from visitors what a friendly and warm feeling they get when visiting," says Vaughn, manager at The Terrace. Beaman, director of sales and marketing, could not agree more. “When you walk through the front doors, you will feel a special atmosphere and find a one-of-a-

kind community,” she says. Vaughn and Beaman both love being able to interact with residents at The Terrace, listening to their stories and hearing about their different lives and experiences. “I learn something new every day,” Beaman says. Vaughn says the residents always show true compassion and gratitude for all that is done for them. “I enjoy helping them with whatever I can,” Vaughn says. The Terrace lifestyle is retirement living at its best.

THE TERRACE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY | 1408 BUSINESS LOOP W., COLUMBIA MO 573-875-2538 | TERRACERETIREMENT.COM 82 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


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CATCHING STUDENTS UP

SYLVAN LEARNING Children and education were always at the forefront for Melanie Bowers. She’s worked as an elementary teacher, a high school teacher for at-risk children, a school counselor and a psychological examiner. “I enjoy every aspect of education and discovering all of the unique ways that children learn best,” she says. “There is nothing more rewarding than teaching a child the skills they need in order to succeed.” And that’s what led her to open Sylvan Learning in June 2021. In the midst of the global pandemic, Bowers

saw the community need for a place to help students fill in the academic gaps during an extended period of remote learning. While schools have returned to in-person classes, Bowers says the ramifications of the pandemic will be seen in education for years. “Parents are going to have to utilize outside sources to supplement their child’s schooling to shorten academic delays and get students back on track,” she says.

SYLVAN LEARNING | 3301 W. BROADWAY BUSINESS PARK COURT SUITE B, COLUMBIA MO 573-446-0310 | SYLVANLEARNING.COM INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 83


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CABINET REFINISHING

GARRETT PAINTING The finishing aspects of home building have always interested Shane Garrett. The transformation of a space and seeing the excitement from clients is one of the best parts of the job. “It really gives the feeling of making a difference in people’s lives — knowing we are helping to create spaces they love to come home to,” says the owner of Garrett Painting. Knowing that the aesthetics of a home are what truly set it apart and seeing the demand for experienced work and integrity in home remodeling, Garrett has launched a sister company with Garrett Remodeling. “We are

excited for this expanded opportunity to serve Columbia and the entire mid-Missouri area,” Garrett says. After more than 20 years in the business, Garrett says he sees more and more homeowners seek out the high levels of professionalism and personalized service that small businesses like his can offer. “Our customers' appreciation of excellence helps drive us forward and is what continues to propel our industry forward, allowing small business owners to grow and create sustainable business models,” Garrett says.

GARRETT PAINTING | 1305 A OLYMPIC DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO | 573-386-5890 | GARRETTPAINTING.NET

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TOWING IN COLUMBIA

TIGER TOWING You could say Tyler Doyle and his wife Jenny were “driven” to own a towing company by the fast-paced nature of the business. They purchased Tiger Towing in October 2021, and agree their favorite part of their new occupation is being able to help people who need their vehicles towed at a reasonable price. The Doyles say they're proud of two things in particular about their new company: “We are a familyowned business, and we’re honest and trustworthy

people.” They hope these two strengths will help them become highly successful. Their goal over the next five years is simple: “We would love to be the best company in Columbia that everybody knows about.” The couple’s favorite way to relax is — ironically — in a vehicle! “We live in Jefferson City so that 30-minute drive home is quiet and gives us plenty of time to unwind.”

TIGER TOWING | 414 NEBRASKA AVE., COLUMBIA MO | 573-449-3754 | TIGERTOWING.COM

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ENGINEERING McCLURE Ryan Fuller loves being able to help people turn their visions into reality as a project manager at McClure. While he is an engineer, Fuller says they consider themselves “visioneers” at McClure, people who are driven to make lives better. “We do whatever it takes to get your job from concept to completion,” he says. Fuller has been with McClure for 10 years, and it’s been a perfect fit. He knew early on that he would never be able to sit behind a desk, completing the same tasks day after day. That drive led him to civil engineering, where “I knew I would face unique challenges and tasks with each new project,” Fuller says. Now, he gets to work on a variety of projects, working with clients to help them achieve their own goals. It’s that process of helping clients realize their vision that Fuller loves most. “Every project is different and has different goals and priorities,” he says. “Seeing the project through the eyes of our client and understanding those goals, whether it’s profit, enhancing user experience, improving community or a multitude of other possibilities is what I look forward to most.” Being a Columbia native, Fuller says it’s incredibly special when he’s able to work on projects that have a real impact on the community, especially when it comes to Mizzou. “Being a Mizzou alumnus, I thoroughly enjoy when I get to help the university grow and improve its spaces, enhancing the student, faculty and alumni experience,” he says.

Fuller particularly enjoys the end-of-project ceremonies or ribbon cuttings, as they give the best opportunity to fully understand the impact of a project. He recalls the ribbon cutting for the new State Historical Society of Missouri building downtown and how it was quite the spectacle in Peace Park, with speeches from politicians and major contributors, and enough people present to fill the entire building. “When you can fully realize how many different people contribute to making a project happen, plus the number of people impacted by your project, it brings a great sense of pride,” he says. As the engineering and construction industries move forward and continue their rapid growth, Fuller says more and more engineers will be needed, and there’s already a shortage. While private development has fueled some of that growth, there’s a significant need when it comes to public infrastructure. As more federal funding is approved, the engineering industry will need to try and meet the growing need, Fuller says. At McClure, they’ll do whatever they can to meet engineering needs locally. Since 1956, the employeeowned company has expanded to a firm of 205 professionals in 11 offices across Missouri, Iowa and Kansas. “We are committed to providing outstanding project delivery services, personal communication and innovative yet cost-effective solutions,” Fuller says.

McCLURE | 1901 PENNSYLVANIA DRIVE, SUITE A, COLUMBIA MO | 573-814-1568 | MCCLUREVISION.COM

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PLASMA COLLECTION

CSL PLASMA As a leader in plasma collection, CSL Plasma is committed to excellence and innovation, and that commitment is personified by Dee Rider, center manager, and Rachel Martin, assistant center manager. Both Rider and Martin love being able to see the donors who go through the center, knowing that their contributions are helping to save lives. For Martin, it’s personal. Her nephew has a chromosomal abnormality that may eventually require the type of medications made from plasma donations.

Rider decided to change tracks after managing a pharmacy for nearly 11 years. “I wanted to be on the other side of helping patients by helping create lifesaving medications,” Rider says. Martin and Rider both point to the one-year anniversary celebration CSL Plasma held in October that brought in more than 100 new donors as one of the most special events so far. The duo knows that lives depend on the work they do, which makes everything more meaningful.

CSL PLASMA | 1325 GRINDSTONE PLAZA DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO | 573-615-1642 | CSLPLASMA.COM

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LIFE INSURANCE

VALERIE NINICHUCK, SHELTER INSURANCE For Valerie Ninichuck, who's been with Shelter Insurance® nine years, being an agent aligns perfectly with her desire for community involvement. "Life insurance is about protecting members of a community and their families," she says. She views her job as an extension of her volunteer efforts at Boone Health, Metro Rotary, The American Red Cross, The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri and Columbia Cleanup.

Ninichuck really enjoys helping people and writing life insurance gives her the opportunity to do that. One client who stands out was a recently divorced woman who wanted to protect her children and discuss life insurance options, as she was about to leave the country. "Trips, new children, buying a house, marriage … are triggers for individuals to purchase life insurance," Ninichuck says. "Knowing we were able to get the policy before she left … was satisfying."

VALERIE NINICHUCK, SHELTER INSURANCE | 1729 WEST BROADWAY, STE. 8, COLUMBIA MO 573-615-4090 | SHELTERINSURANCE.COM/VNINICHUCK

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PHYSICAL THERAPY AND SPORTS MEDICINE

PEAK SPORT AND SPINE Peak Sport and Spine has certified athletic trainers providing sports medicine in all four high schools in Columbia and also covers middle school athletes as well. Certified athletic trainers Stefanie West, Josh Little, Phil Threatt, Bryce Roark and Jared Hyler all became passionate about physical therapy/sports medicine through their own experiences after sustaining injuries as student athletes. One of the greatest rewards of the job, they say, is watching an athlete return to the sport they love following an injury, knowing as athletic trainers they played a part in that return.

West says, "It is a 'proud mom' moment for sure to see my athletes win state titles, secure a college scholarship and even medal in the Olympics." They predict an upswing in their profession in the next five years, with more certified athletic trainers in high schools, as well as in nontraditional settings. Hyler is curious to see what the new option of earning a master's degree in athletic training will bring. "I think there will be less ATCs available, but hopefully there will be a higher desire to be an ATC, and a higher retention rate over the next decade."

PEAK SPORT AND SPINE | 3301 BERRYWOOD DRIVE, #204, COLUMBIA MO | 573-449-8771 | PEAKSPORTSPINE.COM

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LANDSCAPING/FINE GARDENING

RIVER HILLS LANDSCAPING LLC For Sue Laffey, there’s nothing better than being outdoors. Her love of the natural world is what led her to landscaping and, once business started taking off, her husband, Kent, “did not have much choice” but to join, creating River Hills Landscaping LLC. Two decades later, the couple continues to find joy in every aspect of a project, from prepping to planting. “I love plants,” Laffey says. “A landscape design is like putting a puzzle together, using the light and space to

determine what goes where.” During the global pandemic, Laffey says landscaping saw an increase as part of the home improvement bump, and she doesn’t see that interest waning in the next few years. Plus, new perennial and shrub varieties are regularly being introduced that bloom longer, brighter and stay more compact, giving commercial and residential clients more options for their projects.

RIVER HILLS LANDSCAPING | 2801 NORTHLAND DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO 573-289-4609 | RIVERHILLSLANDSCAPING.COM

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SPIRITUAL CARE COLUMBIA PSYCHOLOGY HEALING CENTER LLC COLUMBIA PSYCHOLOGY HEALING CENTER specializes in spiritual care/chaplain services, psychological evaluations, counseling, support groups and wellness services. It is an association of independent mental health providers offering psychological and spiritual services to children, adolescents, adults and families. Each provider uses evidence-based practices and has their own unique and diverse professional background and faith. The Rev. Laird “Chap” Thompson, a retired Army chaplain and major who provides spiritual life-coaching, and Dr. Emily Crawford-Thompson, a licensed clinical psychologist, find it rewarding to see you live into the fullness of who you were created to be. It is a wonderful feeling to have a part in helping heal mind, soul and spirit. The Thompsons are honored when people open their hearts and share their life journeys. Every person has a unique and important purpose, and the Thompsons are passionate about helping you discover yours. “Psychological evaluations and counseling are much more than a career. It is my life’s calling. My parents kept a picture of me when I was 4 years old, sitting in a chair with a clipboard in my lap while appearing to listen intently to my stuffed animals,” Dr. Emily says. Chaplain Laird says, “I was called into the ministry encountering God while serving in the U.S. Army in Germany.” The Thompsons often hear relief expressed by those who gain insights and express that they are now hopeful and excited for their futures. “I feel honored to be used by God to help people and see lives changed, healed, and restored,” Chaplain Laird says. It brings them great joy to hear of improved connection with self, others, values, and purposes. They recognize the courage that seeking

help requires and are honored to offer a safe space in your healing journey. Dr. Emily opened Columbia Psychology Healing Center in June 2020 after seeing the need for individuals to address spiritual distress by having the option of meeting with a chaplain onsite. Chaplain Laird lovingly conveys hope, truth and wisdom to help you discover your dreams and restore your true identity. He is solutionfocused and has a lot of experience building resiliency from trauma, loss and other crises while working in health care, hospice and disaster relief as well as in the military. Chaplain Laird offers a spiritual perspective for those who are interested, and he helps people of all faiths and belief systems. Future growth of support groups, which include Show Me Soulmates, Resiliency, Purpose, and Dreams, Mindfulness and Grief groups, Health Care/First Responder Support Groups, and Show Me Social Skills Autism Support Groups for Adults and Teens, will be needed to help in these unprecedented times. Dr. Emily will continue to offer strengths-based, collaborative and comprehensive psychological evaluations to help teens and adults with a variety of concerns such as autism, trauma and ADHD. She is looking forward to incorporating additional therapeutic assessment techniques and spiritual gifts. The Thompsons encourage self-care and practice it themselves through the love of animals, especially their three kitty cats. These animals bring so much joy and laughter, and remind them to play, rest and enjoy the moment. This is one reason why Dr. Emily offers emotional support animal letters to those who might benefit from one.

COLUMBIA PSYCHOLOGY HEALING CENTER LLC | 1900 N. PROVIDENCE ROAD, SUITE 327, COLUMBIA MO 573-818-7010 | COLUMBIAPSYCHOLOGY.COM

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GROUP FITNESS ORANGETHEORY FITNESS - COLUMBIA Owner Ann Ruesy opened the Orangetheory Fitness (OTF) Columbia studio in 2018. Her head coach, Jamie Gleeson, has been with Ruesy since the beginning. Studio Manager Ashley Swanegan and Assistant Manager Abigail Davis came on board in 2021. Interestingly, both had been affiliated with Orangetheory Fitness studios in other states — Swanegan, in Florida, and Davis, in Nebraska. Their strong belief in the Orangetheory Fitness approach prompted them to join the team here after moving to Columbia. The manager duo loves OTF and coming to work every day. "Seeing the progress and pride people had in themselves during transformation challenge weigh-ins at the end of March was one of the highlights," they say. "When people put in the hard work and push themselves, and then see the results — it's so inspiring! Another highlight was watching people compete in the Dri-Tri (Orangetheory’s version of a triathlon) for the first time, especially when they weren't sure they could even do it." Gleeson, too, loves seeing different individuals working toward their goals, saying, "People wanting to better themselves and push through challenges mentally and physically. It's awesome the relationships that we've created along the way." She says she has seen so many “I never thought I would ... and then I did” moments. "One was when a member (now a really good friend) first started OTF after having a brain aneurysm 15 years ago. One day, he started jogging on the treadmill," Gleeson says. "Shortly afterward, he told me that was the first time he ran since the aneurysm. About two weeks ago, he did his first jump squat. Inside

those walls, you get to see people accomplish things that they thought were impossible in the moment, but they quickly realize, with the push and support in the studio, nothing is impossible." Gleeson has always loved fitness and the competition of constantly trying to be a better version of herself. "Physical activity and exercise started as a fun hobby and quickly turned into a lifestyle," she says. Swanegan's background is in math and education administration. "I love numbers and working with people," she says. "Managing OTF allows me to continue to help others become healthier, happier and get more life every single day." Davis believes the OTF community is like a family. "The relationships we have with our members and seeing the support they give one another is truly something special. And once you try the workout, you'll see, it's addictive!" When asked what the next five years might hold for her industry, studio owner Ruesy says she hopes the trend is for more people to focus on health and wellness. She encourages everyone to join find a fitness routine that works for them. "The past two years of dealing with COVID-19 probably derailed many people's goals. Hopefully it also motivated a few to get started on a new fitness journey or re-engage with what they were doing," she says. "Whatever form it takes, whatever motivates you to get off the couch, we hope people find inspiration to feel better, eat better and to live a healthier and longer life.”

ORANGETHEORY FITNESS | 3103 W. BROADWAY, #115, COLUMBIA MO 573-381-0388 | COLUMBIA.ORANGETHEORYFITNESS.COM

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RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

THE KLEMPKES For Dean and Amber Klempke, realtors with Iron Gate Real Estate for four years, houses aren’t simply structures: “We LOVE houses!” the husband and wife team say. “They’re full of possibility and let's face it, fun to explore and imagine living in.” Their favorite part of working in their profession is helping people. “The real estate process can be difficult for anyone, and we’re honored to be advocates for our clients.”

One highlight of their real estate careers happened this year, when they helped their 21-year-old daughter navigate buying her first home. “We tell our kids houses are savings accounts you can live in, and we’re very glad she’s building wealth so young.” As for the future? “We believe our city will continue to grow as it has for the last several years,” The Klempkes say. “We’ve seen both buyers’ and sellers' markets, and we’re excited for whatever the next few years will bring.”

IRON GATE REAL ESTATE | 2635 S. PROVIDENCE ROAD, COLUMBIA MO | 573-424-4236 | AMBERANDDEAN .REALTOR

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MORTGAGE LENDING

FIRST STATE COMMUNITY BANK When Jacob M. Garrett purchased his first home, he thought about how rewarding a career in mortgage loans could be. Now, he’s spent the past three and a half years with First State Community Bank as a mortgage loan officer for the central Missouri market, where he covers Columbia, Mexico, Moberly, Macon, Marshall, Boonville and Lake of the Ozarks. “It has been my passion since day one in this position to help families

buy their dream home, first home or save them money by refinancing,” Garrett says. As the central Missouri markets continue to grow, he sees nothing but promise in the future with more new home builds and both first-time buyers and those looking to upgrade. That growth may even allow for a couple of new team members on the home lending team at First State Community Bank, Garrett says.

FIRST STATE COMMUNITY BANK | 300 DIEGO DRIVE, COLUMBIA MO 573-818-3765 | FSCB .COM/PERSONAL/HOME-LOANS/JACOB-GARRETT

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COMMERCIAL PRINTING

WITT PRINT SHOP The process of printing has fascinated Brian P. Kirmse since graduating from Mizzou. After working as a photojournalist, he found his love of tone printing, commercial offset and digital printing. And for the past 23 years, he’s followed that passion as owner of Witt Print Shop. “My favorite part of commercial printing is the complexity and understanding of the print world,” Kirmse says. “The challenge of figuring out what works best for my clients and providing them with the most

cost-effective and professional products with updated technology is fun.” Kirmse says one of the most important pillars to the print shop’s success has been not only having a great team of employees, but a supportive family. Both of his sons grew up at Witt Print Shop and learned a great work ethic, while his wife of 30 years has constantly supported both Kirmse and the business. “If we didn’t have God in our life, success in our family and work simply wouldn’t exist,” he says.

WITT PRINT SHOP | 1901 VANDIVER DRIVE, SUITE B, COLUMBIA MO | 573-443-7227 | WITTPRINTSHOP.COM

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FENCES AND DECKS

KRETCH’S CUSTOM EXTERIOR Three years ago, Drew Kretzschmar began Kretch’s Custom Exteriors after noticing the high demand for exterior work “and no one to fulfill it.” Since then, he’s been using his past experience in landscaping, construction and welding to give customers quality finished products. “The satisfaction of happy customers and the craftsmanship of each and every project” are his favorite parts of the job, Kretzschmar says. One of Kretzschmar’s most memorable moments

was the feeling of completing his very first project from start to finish and how humbling it was to see the final product. As the industry progresses, he says he thinks the demand, and the creativity in the craftsmanship itself, will only continue to grow. When he’s not working, Kretzschmar enjoys spending time with family, hunting and enjoying the outdoors. And he always takes Red, his red heeler, everywhere.

KRETCH’S CUSTOM EXTERIORS | 12100 E. OWENS SCHOOL ROAD, HALLSVILLE MO 573-219-6011 | KRETCHSCUSTOMEXTERIORS.COM

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HIGH TECH EYE EXAMS PERFORMANCE EYECARE For Dr. Justin Kendall, optometry combines his interest in health care with his passion to work with people and have strong personal interactions. “You get to meet people with different backgrounds and personal stories, and it’s rewarding to be there for them in a time of need and help improve their day-to-day lifestyle,” he says. “The combination of medicine and personal interaction was a huge draw for me, and it drives me to stay up to date with the new aspects of the profession, while also allowing me to use my natural people skills to keep up relations on a daily basis.” Dr. Dirk Massie, owner of Performance Eyecare, purchased the former In Vision Eye Care Center in October. The office remains an independent eye care clinic with Dr. Kendall as optometrist. Dr. Kendall earned a bachelor of science from Mizzou and graduated with honors from optometry school at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. His optometric fields of interest include pediatric care, management of ocular disease and specialty contact lenses. Performance Eyecare prides itself on its high-tech exams that are painless, thorough and precise without using dilation or air puffs. Instead, the office uses optomap retinal screening that allows for a state-of-theart view of the back of the eye, allowing for early detection of glaucoma, macular degeneration, hypertension and more. To replace air puffs, the office uses an eyedrop that then helps the doctor determine eye pressure while

looking through a microscope. It is painless and more accurate than the air puff method. Performance Eyecare also can take a 3D image of the glands in eyelids to determine if patients suffer from dry eyes and test the pigment level in retinas to determine if they are at a higher risk for degenerative disorders. Optometry is advancing rapidly to meet the needs of the evolving world. As more and more time is spent using cellphones, computers and tablets, Dr. Kendall says there will be a growing need for visual correction in young people. “Our ability to limit the amount of nearsightedness and eye strain via blue light filtering glasses and myopia controlling contact lenses will be crucial to keeping future generations from debilitating eye issues,” he says. Dr. Kendall’s favorite moments are those where the entire family is involved. “I will never forget the day I successfully fit a new pair of glasses on an 8-monthold who we discovered to be having vision issues. The bright smile that popped up not only on her face, but also on mom and dads was a sight that sticks with me to this day,” he says. “I always feel fulfilled knowing that I can make lifelong relationships with patients through optometry that will change lives for the better.” When he’s not working, Dr. Kendall can be found at home with his wife and their sheepadoodle puppy, Somer. The Kendalls are avid bikers who enjoy using the Katy Trail.

PERFORMANCE EYECARE | 30 E. SOUTHHAMPTON DRIVE, UNIT 109, COLUMBIA MO 573-874-3937 | PERFORMANCEEYECARE.COM

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HOW THE WESTBURY RAISES THE STANDARD

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At The Westbury Senior Living we understand the importance of healthy living and strive to help each resident live the fullest possible life. In addition, Westbury residents enjoy many opportunities to both dine and live well, including: DROP-IN DINING The Westbury’s restaurant, Butler’s, is a tribute to Columbia area resident Cora Butler, Arrow’s Chief Wellness Officer. It offers: • All-day-dining - open 7 a.m.-7 p.m. so residents eat when they want. • Made-to-order - so residents can eat what they want — even breakfast for dinner! • Anytime availability - The 24-hour bistro offers residents the option to grab a coffee, sandwich or salad any time of day or even a snack in the middle of the night! BRING ON THE FRIENDS AND FAMILY At The Westbury Senior Living, guests are always welcome! Variety is the “spice of life” and our residents are encouraged to mix it up and invite who they want, when they want. (nominal fee) • Invite your BFF to join you for dinner Leave the cooking to us so you can have quality “girl time” without the clean-up. • Have the family over for brunch - Sunday brunch can be quite the family affair at The Westbury. Our superb and varied brunch menus ensure that even the most discerning (or picky) guests will find the foods they love. • Host your own holiday party - The Westbury has you covered for your next big gathering. Reservable spaces range from our private dining room to a large multipurpose club room with a full kitchen. Don’t worry, we can cater your event! • Entertain the ladies at happy hour - Happy hours hosted by The Westbury are the place to be! Guests can join residents for beer, wine, cocktails, appetizers and live music. Guy Cashman has crafted his culinary skills as a chef in college dining services at Stephens College, Westminster College, and Missouri Valley. He has worked as a Personal Chef in Columbia, Owner and Executive Chef of a restaurant in Boonville, and Project Manager of Dining Services at Nike in Memphis. His career has taken him on a journey of interesting and fulfilling jobs all which have influenced his approach to the dining experience and shaped his culinary talents.


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BUTLER’S

COLUMBIA’S NEWEST RESTAURANT, AND YES IT’S IN A SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY Guy Cashman, Culinary Director of Butler’s restaurant inside Columbia’s new Westbury Senior Living, has a fresh take on what the culinary dining experience should be like in senior living. His career has been founded on a simple belief: “I am only as good as my last meal” This belief coupled with the farm-totable concept of serving freshly prepared meals using locally sourced ingredients whenever possible, results in incredible, high-quality cuisine for The Westbury’s residents, staff, and guests. “I would describe my style of cooking as home style comfort food. Fresh made

from scratch! Aromatic and full of heartwarming flavor. Though, I love to incorporate a diverse variety of culinary trends while finding inspiration in both cultural influences and local favorites.” The restaurant at The Westbury Senior Living follows an uncompromising commitment to providing a quality senior experience. From breakfast all day to elegant dinners, from bistro selections to catering – Butler’s proudly delivers a consistent, diverse menu offering a wide selection of options. With multiple menu options and madeto-order meals every day, residents may

enjoy both old favorites and new cuisine delights. Our executive and sous chefs at The Westbury will plan and prepare a truly memorable culinary experience, with delicious and innovative meals sure to satisfy your every craving. Delight taste buds and energize your life. Our menu selection allows you to try something new and be confident that whatever you select will be delicious and nourishing. We are always looking for that perfect balance between flavor and nutrition. Just because food is healthy doesn’t mean it has to be boring!

FRESH IS THE NAME OF THE LONG GAME THE IMPORTANCE OF HEALTHY EATING “You are what you eat” has long been considered the mantra of healthy people around the world. Today, however, we know it is true, as evidenced by the longevity of people in what is known as the “blue zones”. Discovered by National Geographic Fellow Dan Buettner, the “blue zones” are specific areas where people live the longest and are the healthiest: Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya, Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece, and Loma Linda, California. Buettner based his investigations on earlier research by Gianni Pes and Michel Poulain published in the “Journal of Experimental Gerontology” that pinpointed Sardinia as the home of the most male centenarians on Earth. Ultimately, Buettner and his team

located other such “blue zones” and discovered they shared nine commontraits, which he dubbed Power 9. Of these, three apply to what and how to eat to achieve a longer and healthier life. • 80% Rule – A reminder to stop eating when the stomach is 80% full. • Plant Slant – A variety of plants are the mainstays of each “blue zones” diet, supplemented by other plant-based foods, and limited meat, egg and dairy products. • Wine @ 5 – In all but one of the “blue zones”, moderate, regular consumption of wine is considered a healthy habit, preferably with meals and in the company of friends and family.

Eating well feels great

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Nature’s best hope starts in your yard with native plants from Missouri Wildflowers

Nursery. Native plants bring nature home. View our plants online or visit the nursery at Brazitio, just south of Jefferson City. 9814 Pleasant Hill Rd, Jefferson City, MO 65109 | 573-496-3492 | mowildflowers.net

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

SPRING 2022

publisher’s note “It’s not what we have in life, but who we have in our life that matters,” is a quote that might just sum up this issue of Boom. Who Ted Glasgow had in his life mattered greatly six years ago when he desperately needed a kidney transplant. His life partner, Laurie Hines, donated a kidney for someone else through a paired kidney exchange, allowing Glasgow to get the kidney he urgently needed. The two were wheeled into surgery together and his health, and life, improved dramatically. In this issue you’ll also read about the best of friends: Nancy Wilson and Judith Lee. Let me just say this: if you know these ladies, you love them. Their upbeat attitude, get-it-done philosophy and laughter is contagious. Read how these best friends style hair during the day and style delicious desserts afterwards. Of course, one relationship that is essential to many of you is the one with your grandchildren. Therefore, we’ve included an article you won’t want to miss on how to foster important bonds with your grands. Writer Sarah Lyons, as a mother of six, shares with us four tips for strengthening that bond. And finally, our relationships are often bonded over meals! Don’t we love to sit down to dinner with a best friend? In this issue, we’ve scraped up dozens of matchbook covers that I think you’ll enjoy seeing. From Bullwinkles to Haden House, we’ve used the matchbook covers to help cover Columbia’s history. Did you know that National Best Friends Day occurs every year on June 8? I hope after reading this issue you’ll reach out to others with the simple gift of friendship.

Enjoy!

Melody Parry Publisher

Email me at melody@insidecolumbia.net

staff Chief Executive Officer Carla Leible Founder & Publisher Emeritus Fred Parry Publisher & Managing Editor Melody Garnett Parry Associate Editors Madeleine Leroux Peg Gill Art Director Tim Flanner Graphic Designer Madelyn Jones Photo Editor L.G. Patterson Advertising Coordinators Jeff Ausmus Kalie Kramel Stefanie Joseph Marketing Representatives Cathy Atkins Laura Wagner Josh Arnold Hayden Haumann Michael Herschel Office Manager Becky James Distribution Associate Steve Leible Contributing Writers Jack Wax Sarah Lyons

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can enable you to look past the headlines. … Avoid emotional decisions – Many

response to these changes. Achieving your financial goals may present

people let their emotions drive their investment choices. When the market goes through a

challenges, but it doesn’t have to cause you years of worry and distress – as long as you get

downturn and the value of their investments drops, they sell to “cut losses,” even though these same investments may still have good business fundamentals and promising futures. Conversely, when the market is on an uptick,

the help you need.

some poeple chase after “hot” investments, even when they become overpriced and may have very little room to grow. But a financial advisor can help keep you from making these fear- and greed-based actions by only recommending moves that make sense for your situation. … Work toward multiple goals – At various times in your life, you may have simultaneous

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Edward Jones is a licensed insurance producer in all states and Washington, D.C., through Edward D. Jones & Co., L.P. and in California, New Mexico and Massachusetts through Edward Jones Insurance Agency of California, L.L.C.; Edward Jones Insurance Agency of New Mexico, L.L.C.; and Edward Jones Insurance Agency of Massachusetts, L.L.C

Member SIPC

BOOM MAGAZINE 111


in this issue SPRING 2022

good stuff 115

News Brief

Read about the Missouri Bicentennial Quilt, which was celebrated as part of the state’s bicentennial. Boone County resident Willie Morris’ design was chosen to symbolize the county.

good life 116

Meaningful Memories

Interested in strengthening the bond between you and your grandchildren? Our writer, a mother of six, relays four tips. 118

Striking Businesses

Take a moment to remember your favorite Columbia restaurants, night clubs and businesses with a look at these vintage matchbook covers.

120

Friends For Life

115

Judith Lee and Nancy Wilson share a 40-year friendship and so much more. Find out about their profitable and sweet pastime.

124

The Perfect Match

Did you know 33% of adults are at risk for kidney disease? Read about the journey of two families as they battle kidney disease.

118

112 BOOM MAGAZINE

120


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BOOM MAGAZINE 113


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Now welcoming new move-ins! Call 573.621.8016 to learn more about moving to Lenoir Woods! 3710 Lenoir Street Columbia, MO 65201 LenoirWoodsLiving.org

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NEWS BRIEF

A Stitch In Time A

Quilts Piece Together Missouri’s Heritage s part of Missouri’s bicentennial celebration, the State Historical Society of Missouri found the perfect way

BY MELODY PARRY PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

probably would not be chosen.” But Morris’ entry was selected and she got to work

to weave the state’s heritage into a piece of artwork:

executing the quilt block design. The style is called a confetti

the Missouri Bicentennial Quilt. In late 2018, the State

block. The Burr Oak tree branches were appliqued, and then

Historical Society of Missouri and Missouri Star Quilt

the leaves were laid out as pieces with a fragment of tulle on

Co., in partnership with the Missouri State Quilters Guild,

top. She then quilted over the tulle to make sure the pieces

teamed up to create the Missouri Bicentennial Quilt.

stayed in block. “It was my first attempt at that type of block,”

The Missouri Bicentennial Quilt is made up of one-of-akind blocks representing all 114 Missouri counties and the independent city of St. Louis, designed by quilters from

she admits. Morris has been quilting for years, but “picked up quilting seriously after I retired,” she says. While the bicentennial celebration may have ended in

or associated with each county. In Boone County, resident

2021, the quilt exhibition continues to tour throughout the

Willie Morris’ design was chosen to symbolize the county.

state. The quilt can be seen on display for the remainder

“We had to have the design idea sent in September 2019.

of 2022 at State Historical Society of Missouri research

I saw a beautiful photo of the Burr Oak tree and thought

centers in Rolla, Springfield and Kansas City, before it is

it might be perfect to represent the county,” Morris says.

loaned to the Missouri Quilt Museum for long-term display

“I thought with all the talented quilters in our area, mine

in fall 2022.

BOOM MAGAZINE 115


116 BOOM MAGAZINE


Making Memories

BY SARAH LYONS

How To Foster The Important Bond With Your Grandchildren

G

rowing up I had a close relationship with my grandparents and have wonderful memories of our time together. My grandma loved to teach me about plants, to play card games and to cook together. My grandpa took me camping, fishing and was always sneaking us extra dessert. Grandparents and their grandchildren have a special bond. This will look different for each family but there are some ways you can strengthen the bond between you and your grandchildren.

Spend Time Together

Time spent together will help grandparents and grandchildren bond naturally. Every family is different, but some ideas could include cooking together, running errands, attending the child’s sporting events or school activities, going to the park, playing board games, going to a movie, sitting and talking, or going out to dinner. Some grandparents find that having a set time assures they have time with their grandchildren. For example, every Saturday morning you go to breakfast or every Tuesday you babysit while the parents have a date night. If you do not live in the same city, try using a phone or video call at a set time each week. The nice thing about weekly calls is that it allows for followup on things the next week. If you are struggling with things to talk about with your grandchild, send their parents a quick text asking them for some ideas for talking points. Maybe they had a big math test, a soccer game or a playdate with a friend. A little extra effort on the part of both the parent and grandparent can help strengthen the bond between grandkids and grandparents, even from a long distance.

Let Parents Discipline

A common source of conflict between parents and grandparents can be discipline of children. Grandparents may have different disciplinary styles or feel different behaviors deserve reprimanding. In most situations, parents should be responsible for any discipline needed. This allows grandparents to enjoy the fun aspects of time with the grandkids. When bringing up the subject, be kind and patient and explain that you don’t want anything to come between you and the grandkids and affect the special relationship you have. If discipline must be handled by the grandparents, try to stay as close to the parents' disciplinary style as possible or delay punishment for when parents return.

Spoil Them A Little

Grandparents love to spoil their grandkids with treats, gifts and love. Check in with the parents and make sure they are comfortable with any treats and gifts you may give. When everyone is on the same page, your grandchild can feel loved, spoiled and accepted by both their parents and grandparents. My kids know that when they spend the night with my parents, they will have doughnuts for breakfast the next morning. They can also count on any number of sweet treats while they are visiting. When their birthday comes around, they usually get spoiled by gifts from their grandparents as well. At home, sweet treats are limited, toys are purchased on occasion, and doughnuts for breakfast are not the norm. While I may be cringing at the sugar-induced coma that my kids will be in when they come back home, the kids feel a closeness to their grandparents for allowing them to have a few extra treats. They

feel like they share a secret — which really isn’t a secret at all — with their grandparents and it goes a long way to strengthening their bond. That, to me, is worth allowing a few extra treats from their grandparents on occasion. When presented this way, most parents and grandparents can come to a compromise everyone is happy with.

Set Limits

All of these things can help build the grandparent-grandchild bond, but if the parents are not comfortable with what is going on, it will end up creating anger, resentment and possibly damage the relationship between the grandchildren and their grandparents in the long run. Set limits that everyone understands and can live with. For example, it is okay for grandparents to break the rules and let the kids have ice cream for dinner but it is not okay for them to ride in the car without a car seat. Make sure that the child, the parent and the grandparents know what the family’s unbreakable rules are so that everyone is on the same page. Grandparents are important because they have life experiences and love to share them with their grandchildren. They have the opportunity to share their love and time without the pressures parents face in raising children. Kids who have grandparents in their lives can count themselves lucky; foster and build this relationship as much as possible. Your grandkids will cherish the memories for their lifetime, and so will you. Sarah Lyons is a mom of six children, including triplets. She was blessed to have four living grandparents in her life until she was in her 40s and appreciates the role her parents and in-laws play in the lives of her children. BOOM MAGAZINE 117


Matchbook Memories

Souvenirs Help Tell Columbia’s History

Bullwinkles

Many college students in the 1980s remember Bullwinkles for happy hour specials and good entertainers, including singer Sheryl Crow. The nine-time Grammy winning artist in college could often be found playing at Bullwinkles with her local band Cashmere. Located at 1107 E. Broadway, Fieldhouse stands now in its place.

Haden House

Located on Rangeline, this converted plantation home was the first upscale restaurant north of I-70. It was opened by Jack Crouch in 1974. The restaurant soon expanded to include Original Jacks and a ballroom, where prom and wedding guests frequented. Diners enjoyed the piano bar and southern-style fare featuring prime rib, cabbage casserole and ham and bean soup.

Famous Freddy’s

Located at the corner of Hitt and Locust streets, in the 1980s Famous Freddy’s was the only place to serve Chicagostyle hotdogs with all the fixings. The restaurant was known for its cheese fries and onion bricks, which were thinly slice onions, dipped in batter and deep fried, and served as a square block.

Shattered

Popular with the college crowd, Shattered was the late night, underground dance club. First located on the lower level of Cherry Street in the old Strollway Center, the bar later moved to 514 E. Broadway.

Bobby Bufords

Bobby Bufords and its upscale sister restaurant, The Medium Rare, were popular destinations for upscale dining in the '80s and early '90s. Ali Hamrah and Jack Crouch owned the restaurants located off Stadium and I-70. Bobby Bufords’ signature meal was hog heaven pork chops, Caesar salad and brownie delight for dessert. 118 BOOM MAGAZINE


BOOM MAGAZINE 119


A Recipe For Success Nancy Wilson And Judith Lee Share A 40-Year Friendship

BY JACK WAX | PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

J

udith Lee and Nancy Wilson have discovered the essential ingredients that make for a longlasting friendship — a load of fun, a fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants attitude and just a pinch of the serious stuff. Their recipe for friendship keeps them laughing and having a good time as they work or travel together. Their

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lighthearted approach to life flavors their personalities, their cheerful voices and the sweets they bake together. Baking for them is a treat, as much for them as for their customers. Sometimes they bake together; other times they split the process up and each bakes in her own kitchen. It helps that they live only a block from each other. Friends for more than 40 years, they’ve learned how to work together, if not in harmony, at least in concert with each other. “We both know what pushes the other one’s buttons,” Lee says. “Sometimes, she’ll tell me when I’m icing a cake what I should be doing, and I just take a deep breath and know she’s going to be the cake boss that day,” she says laughing, not complaining. Their baking isn’t a get-richquick scheme. It’s a pastime they’d be doing anyway, one that pays for itself and generates some profits. “We’ve never baked something and had to throw it away because no one wanted it,” Wilson

says. Their baked goods find their way onto the dessert tables of fundraisers or special events throughout Columbia. They are usually busiest just before a holiday, such as Easter or St. Patrick’s Day. The reason their “bakery” has no name or a business plan is because it isn’t really a business — it’s just something Lee and Wilson do in the evenings or weekends that they enjoy and that helps them save extra money to spend on trips they take together. Both have had long and successful careers in the hairdressing industry. Starting in the ‘70s they worked for the Regis Corporation, where Wilson managed the Columbia Mall store and was responsible for several other Regis salons in the state. Lee managed the Springfield Regis salon, then went on the road for the company to become an educator, teaching Regis hairdressers throughout the nation the fine points of their craft. Now, they work at the Green Meadows Hair Co., where they cut, clip, dye, wash and style hair. “I only work four days a week now,” Wilson says.


Judith Lee (left) and Nancy Wilson work, travel and bake together. BOOM MAGAZINE 121


Wilson and Lee's baked goods find their way onto dessert tables throughout Boone County.

“We’re old,” she adds with a laugh. As for Lee’s hours? “Monkey see, monkey do,” she quips. Although they could both retire, they enjoy their work at the salon too much to consider leaving. “I’ll work as long as

Lee also enjoys getting to know the people who sit in her chair, but she especially enjoys the challenges and pleasures of styling hair. “I like advising people what they can do,” Lee says. “I like transforming their hair.”

gain a pound or two, and a pan full of cinnamon rolls. They can bake just about anything, “Pies, cakes, cookies, whatever anyone can think of,” Wilson says. Lee remembers that they have a spare cake pop and hurries into the

"Sometimes, she’ll tell me when I’m icing a cake what I should be doing, and I just take a deep breath and know she’s going to be the cake boss that day." I can,” Wilson says. “It’s my social life. I’m so used to being with people that if you took that away from me, I’d be a mess. And my poor son would probably run away if I quit working — it’d drive him crazy.”

122 BOOM MAGAZINE

While talking about their baked goods, Lee scrolls through her phone and shows some pictures of their creations — a million dollar chocolate cake so big and chocolaty that just looking at could cause a person to

kitchen to bring it out as a sample of their work. While their sweets may not help reduce calories, the calories they carry are tasty and made with quality ingredients. “We make our own


vanilla,” Lee says. “When Bruce, Wilson’s husband, passed away, all the alcohol that was in his closet eventually went to make vanilla.” Wilson chortles, “If Bruce were alive, he’d croak, or at least he’d roll over if he knew.” Bruce would sometimes travel with the two friends on trips that took them throughout the world. Regis awarded trips to managers who met production goals, and most years Lee and Wilson were among the top performers for the corporation. A few years ago, Lee and Wilson wanted to go back to London and tour the city in style, not sparing any expense. The only problem was that going first class would cost more than they wanted to pay. How to take the trip and not feel that it was too extravagant? That’s when they got serious with their baking and decided money from their sales would go toward luxury travel. They bought their tickets to London, made their reservations and had high hopes of going — just before the pandemic shut the city down. Two years later, they can talk about the ruined plans and laugh about it. Some people might mope or turn bitter when life hits them with a curve ball. Lee and Wilson don’t have a self-pitying bone in either of their bodies. They held onto their unused plane tickets and decided that this past February, they’d use the baking money to take a deluxe small ship cruise in the Caribbean. This time, life hit them with a snowball. They woke up the morning of their trip and were snowed in, unable to back out of the driveway. Taking their bad luck in stride, they put their sun lotion away and tried to enjoy the snowy midMissouri weather. “Now, we have more trips planned in the U.S.,” Lee says, “and we have to use the tickets in the

next few months.” Resilient? Flexible? Or just determined to

have a good time regardless of what life throws at them? The friends have both had their share of sad times but have gotten past them. Wilson lost her husband about six years ago. Lee’s energy, enthusiasm and creativity helped her get past the grief of losing her father about 15 years ago. “After the funeral, friends and family were gathered to eat together. We were all sitting there and I got up and said, ‘OK, this is the announcement: We are going to New York City and the trip is open to anyone who wants to go. So, let me know.’ And a few months later we took off. I just couldn’t stand the thought of being in the house without my dad during the holidays,” Lee says. If it’s Christmas, Lee and Wilson are in New York City. They love going there to see plays, people watch, go to museums and do all the things Midwest

tourists do in the Big City. “We fly on Christmas day and come back four days later, in time to make everyone pretty for New Year’s Eve,” Wilson says. As avid football fans, they can be found at home games of the MU Tigers and at Arrowhead Stadium for Kansas City Chiefs games. Two years ago, they bought their first season tickets for the Chiefs. Again, the pandemic sidelined them, but it was a temporary setback. As the pandemic receded, they got back in the game — or at least in their seats. Part of what make the women so compatible is that they share a similar approach to life. It’s a goodhearted way of relating to others that comes naturally and probably accounts for their success as bakers and hairdressers. Wilson explains: “I’ve seen people who come in (to Green Meadows Hair Co.) and maybe something terrible has happened to them — they’ve been ill or lost a family member. First of all, you massage their head, and they’re pretty happy. And when they get out of there after you’ve been kind with them and help them look so much better, they leave with a wonderful attitude.”

BOOM MAGAZINE 123


Transplanting

Hope One Simple Decision Can Save A Life

Did you know that 33% of adults are at risk for kidney disease? And in the U.S. alone, more than 90,000 people are on waiting lists to receive a kidney. Meet two Columbia individuals: one who is critically seeking a kidney match and another who donated a kidney for her partner. By Jack Wax | Photos by L.G. Patterson

Zachary Arnold Hopes For A New Kidney

A

friendly mutt and four kids are playing in the front yard. Zachary Arnold opens the screen door, shoos the dog and tells his kids that he’s going to be inside talking to the visitor for a while. Arnold is a stocky guy with a solid handshake. His voice is friendly and strong. His attitude is positive, and he looks like what he is: a 35-year-old father who is busy looking after his four kids after school. Except there’s a lot more to Arnold that isn’t obvious. Most days he spends three-and-a half to four hours in his bedroom, hooked up to his home dialysis machine. His wife, Eliza, and he have been trained to insert the needles in his arm and to monitor the live-saving machine, which does what his kidneys can’t — filters his blood, removing waste. Arnold has zero kidney function, which means that dialysis isn’t a choice: It’s an absolute necessity. The home dialysis machine and his family’s support keep him going and keep him hoping that it won’t be much longer before a donor kidney becomes available. Until he gets a transplant, he will be tied to the machine, and, at best, his future will be on hold. Arnold

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tries not to think about a worst-case scenario, which could involve infections or other organs failing. But with just one call, his hopes for a healthy future could be realized. Arnold has been waiting for that call since August 2020. “My transplant team could call at 2 a.m. and say they have a donor, and it’s time to come in,” he says. “When I first started dialysis, I’d get excited when the phone rang, but now I use reverse psychology, telling myself ‘this isn’t it.’ When the time comes, it’ll happen,” he says. Not just any kidney from any donor will work for Arnold or anyone else needing a transplant. Complex blood tests of potential donors and recipients have to match, showing a high degree of compatibility. Perfect matches are rare, and weaker matches could lead to rejection of the new kidney. This is Arnold’s second time around the transplant block. He was 19 years old and leading an active life, wrestling and looking forward to college, when both his kidneys started failing. Until that point, the only health problem he had was high blood pressure, which was controlled with medicine. When kidneys lose most of their ability to

function, dialysis begins and usually can’t stop until a kidney transplant. Arnold was put on a waiting list, started dialysis, and about four years later he got the call that a matched kidney was available. After recovering from the transplant operation, he resumed his life. “It was great, and I was free again. I could travel and do what I wanted,” he says. But he knew that it was only a matter of time before the transplanted kidney failed. Although transplants from a live donor can last 20 or more years, Arnold’s transplant came from a deceased donor, and those transplants typically don’t last as long. Arnold did what he could with the time and health the new kidney gave him — he went about living his life, trying to stay healthy. He coached wrestling and worked as a welder, frequently traveling for oil and natural gas companies that employed him. But about two years ago, Arnold noticed that he was getting tired more quickly, that he was gaining weight and that his face, ankles and hands were puffy. He was disappointed but not too surprised when a doctor gave him got the news that the transplanted kidney


Zachary Arnold, who is waiting for a donor kidney match, works hard to keep it from affecting his family members' lives

was failing. “The doctors told me they were glad I got more than 10 years out of it. Over that time, I had forgotten what it was to be on dialysis,” he says. Arnold fell back into the familiar routine, spending hours most days tethered to the dialysis machine. It’s not just that dialysis takes so much time out of his day, but, “Sometimes I get too tired or sick to go to the kids’ activities,” Arnold says. All four of his children — two boys and two girls ages 6 to 10 — are wrestlers. “And I enjoy taking them to practice or tournaments,” he says. Recently, he and the family got back home from a tournament late at night. “Lawton, my 9-year-old, stayed with me during the treatment. I have to have somebody with me the whole time in case there’s an emergency, and my wife had to look after the other three kids,” he says.

Arnold works hard to keep his illness from defining his or his family members’ lives. “I’ve got much bigger things to think about than just being sick — like my kids being successful in school and their sports. I try not to let my health problems affect my family. I don’t think my kids understand that death is a possibility for not doing my treatments. As far as my kids know, Daddy just needs this to feel better.” Wrestling is a big part of the family’s life. Arnold’s kids are the family’s third generation of wrestlers. “My uncle was a wrestler and both my brothers wrestle,” Arnold says. One brother is the wrestling coach at De Smet High School in St. Louis, and his younger brother, J’den Cox, is the famous two-time world champion. The entire family is helping raise awareness about the need for kidney donors. “J’den

has been helping with a podcast and videos,” he says. “The message is that lots of people need kidney transplants. It’s not about me. I'm a platform for getting the message out. “ Family, friends and wrestling contacts have stepped up as potential donors. About 100 people have taken the first step and checked out whether they were eligible to donate a kidney to Arnold. Of these, 50 met the health guidelines for donating but none were a good enough match. But Arnold can hope. “Two weeks ago, I got a call that a kidney came up that was pretty close to matching me. I was fifth in line. But it turned out to be a better match for one of the four people in front of me. Because of my previous transplant and my antibodies, I can basically receive a kidney from only 5% of the population,” he says. BOOM MAGAZINE 125


Six years ago, Laurie HInes donated a kidney so her partner Ted Glasgow would have access to a kidney transplant.

Laurie Hines’ Donation Gave A New Life To Her Life Partner

A

rnold has never met Laurie Hines, a fellow Columbian, but Hines knows exactly what he’s going through. Hines, who is in her 60s, has only one kidney. She was born with two, but donated one exactly six years ago so that her life partner, Ted Glasgow, would get the transplanted live kidney he desperately needed. Although Hines and Glasgow were not a match, they took part in a “paired kidney exchange,” where kidneys are exchanged between two incompatible pairs. It’s a sort of swap. Basically, it allows an 126 BOOM MAGAZINE

incompatible donor, such as Hines, to donate a kidney on behalf of someone else. Through this type of donation, Glasgow received a live kidney from a donor in New York; Hines’ kidney was transplanted into a person in Minnesota. For the past five years, Hines has been the executive director of the Missouri Kidney Program, a state-funded program administered by the University of Missouri School of Medicine. “When Ted first got sick, I knew nothing about donations, other than the romanticized version we see on social media of people

being heroes, and, of course, I knew a bit about deceased donations,” Hines says. Glasgow, who worked as a physical therapy aide at Boone Health, was in such good physical condition that he was winning bodybuilding contests in his spare time. Because of his exceptional strength, he was often assigned the largest, most difficult patients to help. He had no idea he had kidney problems until he found himself in the intensive care unit. “Ted got sick with no lead up of symptoms, which is pretty typical of people crashing into end-stage kidney disease,” Hines says. He was diagnosed with a kidney disease prevalent among African Americans, FSGF. “We tried for a year to keep him from ending up on dialysis,” she says. “In-center dialysis is a life-saving treatment, but it’s a brutal treatment, and the odds of surviving five years on dialysis are less than 50/50.” For the two years that Glasgow was on dialysis, Hines would keep him company at the center for about an hour each session until Ted would get groggy and drift off to sleep. Like Arnold, they were in limbo, waiting for a donor kidney. “Quite a few people got teed-up and tested for Ted, but nobody made it through the medical evaluation — except for me,” Hines says. That was good enough. Ted spent his last day on dialysis on March 14, 2016. “On March 15, we both went into surgery at Barnes,” Hines says. “They wheeled me in first and took my kidney. Then they woke me up — which was lovely — and I got to watch Ted’s new kidney arrive by helicopter from the airport.” Less than three days later, they were back at home in Columbia with their relatives helping them through their convalescence. Hines had been skeptical when her surgeon said she’d only have a bit of discomfort, but “he was absolutely right,” she says. “I had a very small incision and they pulled my kidney out.” Since then, she has enjoyed good health and doesn’t feel


any negative effects from having donated her kidney. Glasgow recovered and is now able to continue working out most days. He’s retired but experiencing some health problems post-transplant. His kidney, though, is doing what it should, thriving in its new host, allowing him to stay off dialysis. Overall, the couple’s experience has not only improved Glasgow’s life but has also given Hines an exceptional perspective on the problems of both donors and transplant recipients, a perspective that assists her work for the Missouri Kidney Program. “Being a living donor and a caregiver, I can use my personal experience as a groundwork for people in a way that almost nobody else can,” she says. The program she directs supports research and education of patients and health care providers, partnering with dialysis and transplant centers statewide. Its wide range of services include direct financial aid to help qualified patients travel to and from dialysis or transplant centers, as well as indirect financial aid that covers health insurance premiums for transplant patients and that makes it possible for low-income clients to continue on Medicaid. To reduce the costs of the drugs that patients must have, the Missouri Kidney Program set up a centralized drug program managed by Kilgore’s Medical Pharmacy that distributes medicines statewide at a reduced price. Hines also wrote and now distributes the My Transplant-Ready Workbook. “We have the only such workbook in the country that helps patients who are ready for a transplant but could use some help working through the process,” Hines says. Hines isn’t content to wait until patients need her program, when their only options are dialysis or a transplant. “I want to move the program upstream, to stop people from going to end-stage renal disease. “Ted should not have crashed with a diagnosis we never expected, but that’s pretty classic,” she says. While patients and their families struggle with the consequences of kidney

disease, they can find hope in one fact, according to Hines. Missouri has one of the nation’s most successful organ donation registries. Of the state’s 6 million people, a bit more than 4 million have checked the box on their

drivers’ licenses to donate their organs at the time of their deaths. That one simple decision means the world to anyone needing a kidney. As Arnold says, “Why not donate? You can’t take it with you.”

What You Need to Know about Kidney Disease and Transplants Kidneys are fist-sized organs that remove the body’s waste and regulate various hormones. 33% of adults are at risk for kidney disease About 37 million adults in the United States have chronic kidney disease. Most are undiagnosed. Diabetes and high blood pressure are responsible for 2/3 of chronic kidney disease cases. African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asians, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans are at high risk for kidney disease, with African Americans being four times as likely to develop kidney failure. Recent statistics show that in the United States 22,817 people received donated kidneys in one year. More than 90,000 people are on waiting lists to receive a kidney.

How to Donate Register as an organ and tissue donor at the time you renew your driver’s license or state ID. Or you can register online at donatelifeMissouri.org. When your life is over, you’ll be giving others a chance at a better life. If a family member or someone you care about needs a donation and you’d like to be considered for a live donation, contact the Midwest Transplant Network (https://mtn.org) or the National Kidney Foundation (www.kidney.org) Some Good Samaritans donate a kidney and do not specify who should receive it. If that’s something you’d like to consider, the organizations mentioned above will provide support and guidance to you. BOOM MAGAZINE 127


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BEAUTIFUL BLING

Add Some Sparkle With These Gems

STYLED BY MADELYN JONES | PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

No matter the reason, sometimes it’s nice to add a little sparkle, a little glitz, a little bling.

So we went to the experts, and Betz Jewelers and Buchroeders Jewelers provided some of their most glamorous pieces for our three models, Jessica Caldera, Kathleen Bruegenhemke and Stessie Millner. All three ladies are connected to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Mid-Missouri, which is hosting its annual Brunch and Blingo event June 11 at the Country Club of Missouri. INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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1. Diamond cluster lever hoops Buchroeders Jewelers $2,995 2. Multi-blue topaz and diamond 14-karat white gold ring Betz Jewelers $1,425 3. Radiant and platinum eternity band Buchroeders Jewelers $14,450 Oval cut diamond east/west eternity band Buchroeders Jewelers $10,895 Oval diamond eternity band Buchroeders Jewelers $12,980 Diamond tennis bracelet Buchroeders Jewelers $15,500 Diamond riveria necklace Buchroeders Jewelers $16,950 4. Multi-blue topaz and diamond 14-karat white gold ring Betz Jewelers $1,425 Multi-blue topaz and diamond 14-karat white gold necklace Betz Jewelers $1,865 Sterling silver crystal stations bracelet Betz Jewelers $159 Sterling silver crystal baguette bracelet Betz Jewelers $195 Sterling silver crystal moons bracelet Betz Jewelers $159

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5. Peridot and diamond 14-karat yellow gold ring Betz Jewelers $1,195 Peridot and diamond 14-karat two-tone gold pendant Betz Jewelers $2,659 Peridot and opal 14-karat yellow gold earrings Betz Jewelers $1,219 6. Montana sapphire and diamond 14-karat rose gold ring Betz Jewelers $4,392 7. Pave diamond dog tag pendant necklace Buchroeders Jewelers $2,135 8. Diamond riviera necklace Buchroeders Jewelers $16,950 Diamond tennis bracelet Buchroeders Jewelers $15,500

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5

WEEKEND

GETAWAYS Rest, Relax and Relish Some Time Away By Madeleine Leroux

WHO DOESN’T LOVE A VACATION?

Personally, after the last two years, I think we’ve all earned at least one good, long vacation. But that isn’t always workable. Schedules, costs and even paperwork can become barriers to a lengthy trip, but you can’t let that stop you from disconnecting and checking out what lies beyond mid-Missouri. We’ve provided some tips for five weekend getaways to help get you started. Whether you’re looking for a solo sojourn, a family affair or a romantic respite, there’s something for everyone in the getaways on the following pages. Drive safe! 134 BOOM MAGAZINE


Oaklawn Racing Resort

Garvan Woodland Gardens

HOT SPRINGS AR Running of the tubs

Drive time 7 hours and 8 minutes Highlights

Garvan Woodland Gardens Gangster Museum of America Lake Ouachita State Park

Activities for...

Adventurers: Marineland, Adventureworks, Inc. Relaxation: Bathhouse Row, Chrysalis Day Spa and Skin Care Center This one may be best for a long weekend, like three or four days, as it is definitely the longest drive of our five featured getaways. But it’s a destination that’s worth a longer weekend. There’s so much to do in Hot Springs, and we have very little space to get into it all, so let’s get right to our favorite part: the World Championship Running of the Tubs. This annual event takes place on the famous Bathhouse Row and is a unique way of celebrating Hot Springs’ historic past. Set for June 3, with awards taking place June 4, the Running of the Tubs is truly something to see, with costumed teams racing customized wheeled bathtubs through the street. And spectators are encouraged to show up in robes, slippers and shower caps, and armed with water guns to really lean into the theme. Photos courtesy of Visit Hot Springs Garvan Woodland Gardens

BOOM MAGAZINE 135


Lake Taneycomo

BRANSON

Silver Dollar City

MO

Drive time 3 hours and 16 minutes Highlights

Table Rock Lake National Tiger Sanctuary Titanic Museum Attraction

Activities for...

Thrill seekers: Castle of Chaos, Bigfoot Fun Park Outdoor sports enthusiasts: Trophy Run, Big Cedar Lodge There is no shortage of things to do in Branson, from theme parks to live shows in just about every category to fishing and hiking. It’s truly hard to pick just a few things to focus on when there’s so many options! Looking for entertainment? Check out places like WonderWorks where exhibits are meant to challenge the mind or the Hollywood Wax Museum, which really doesn’t need further explanation. Looking to get back to nature? Head to Table Rock State Park or Branson Lakes. We could go on and on, but you should really just find out for yourself.

Photos courtesy of Branson/Lakes Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

136 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

Anthem of Rock


HANNIBAL

MO

Drive time 1 hour and 42 minutes Highlights

Mark Twain Riverboat Rockcliffe Mansion Cave Hollow Theatre Mark Twain boyhood home

Activities for...

Families: Mark Twain Cave Complex, Hannibal Trolley Company Sightseeing Tours History buffs: Haunted Hannibal Ghost Tours, Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum This historic town, best known as the boyhood home of Mark Twain and the setting for Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, is a great option for fans of history and literature alike. One of the community’s signature events returns Memorial Day weekend — the Twain on Main Festival. A celebration of the life and works of Twain, this year’s event is themed around the author’s 1872 semiautobiographical travelogue of his adventures in the Wild West, Roughing It. The western-themed festival includes arts and crafts, food and drinks, music and live performances, and lots of vendors. It’s a perfect time to explore all that Hannibal has to offer! Mark Twain Riverboat

Photos courtesy of Hannibal Convention & Visitors Bureau

Mark Twain Cave INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 137


O'Malleys

WESTON

MO

Drive time 2 hours and 27 minutes Highlights

National Silk Art Museum Weston Brewing Company Green Dirt Farm Creamery

Activities for...

Nature lovers: The Redbarn Farm, Weston Bend State Park Antique hunters: Jeff’s Architectural Salvage Yard at Old River Landing, Main Street Antiques

Downtown Weston

The pre-Civil War town of Weston may not have been on your radar before, but we strongly advise you check it out. This small town has some unique features, including the Weston Brewing Co., first established in 1842 and reopened in the 21st century. The best way to check out the place is to visit O’Malley’s Pub, where you can enjoy a drink within the three-vaulted limestone cellars 55 feet below ground. The pub’s adjacent patio and courtyard frequently hosts live music for another option to enjoy a warm summer evening. The town is also home to the National Silk Art Museum, which houses the world's largest collection of rare silk art tapestries from the 18th and 19th centuries. Photos courtesy of Weston Chamber of Commerce The Coal House 138 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


INDIANOLA

IA

Drive time 3 hours and 45 minutes Highlights

National Balloon Museum Des Moines Metro Opera’s Summer Festival Buxton Park Arboretum Des Moines Metro Opera House

Activities for...

Couples: West Hill Brewing Co., La Vida Loca Winery, Summerset Winery Hikers: Great Western & Bill Riley Trail, Lake Ahquabi State Park, Annett Nature Center

A Thousand Acres

Not too far north from us lies this small town in southcentral Iowa. And while, like many small towns, it has a few specialties worth noting, what really put this spot on our radar was the National Balloon Museum. This museum archives more than 200 years of ballooning, with exhibits and collections. It’s a perfect fit for Indianola, which is known for prime flying conditions and hosts the National Balloon Classic, a nine-day ballooning event that fills the Indianola skies. (This year, it’s slated for July 29-Aug. 6, just in case you were wondering.) And the answer to the question you are currently thinking of is yes, balloon rides are offered to the general public during that event. Photos courtesy of Iowa Tourism Office National Balloon Classic

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 139


Growth Spurt How to Pick the Best Early Season Produce. One of the best things about late spring/ early summer is the abundance of fresh seasonal produce. But picking — no pun intended — the top of the crop requires some savvy. We asked several local resources for tips on how to select the best early season bounty or successfully cultivate your own.

By Peg Gill Photos by L.G. Patterson 140 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

OUR PRODUCE PRO PANEL Tammy and Greg Sellmeyer, owners of Sellmeyer Farm Steve and Caroline Andriano, owners of Blue Shepherd Farm Lexi Linsenman, development manager with the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture (CCUA) Mallary Lieber, CCUA garden pro associate Heidi Hinneman, AmeriCorp VISTA volunteer coordinator and CCUA apprentice Don Ginsburg, Columbia garden enthusiast


THE LAST STRAW(BERRY) More like the first. Tammy and Greg Sellmeyer, owners of Sellmeyer Farm in Fulton, have been growing early strawberries for 20 years. The two grow them as annuals, as opposed to perennials, which means they put in 3,000 plants annually — just the two of them, by themselves. The Sellmeyers raise Chandlers, a variety intended for hoop house production. By using their hoop house, the Sellmeyers can get a head start on growing. "In years past, we've gotten strawberries as early as mid-to-late April," Tammy says. Growing earlier and in a hoop house helps to prevent their berries from being ravaged by spotted wing drosophila, a serious fruit fly pest that loves soft

fruit and berries. Tammy says when you grow strawberries, you're going to get the most and biggest berries your first year. "Every year after that, the amount and size goes down." She says the berries also get smaller throughout the season. Many home growers keep the same plants and, when those put down runners (so called because they are horizontal stems that run above the ground and produce new ‘baby’ clone plants at their ends), they're allowed to run into the aisle between the rows. The grower will then mow off the center of the old row, essentially yielding them new plants every year.

Pro Picking Tips (Mallary Lieber) "For maximum sweetness and flavor, pick berries a day or two after they are fully red. Berries picked before they are completely red will eventually turn red, but they will not sweeten.” Slightly unripe fruit can be used for making jam. Under favorable conditions, expect a total yield of about one quart of fruit per foot of matted row. Immediately remove berries that do not ripen because they harbor diseases and attract insects.

Storage Smarts (Mallary Lieber & Tammy Sellmeyer) Tammy recommends slicing fresh strawberries after purchasing and placing them in a covered container in the fridge. “Don’t wash them until you're ready to eat them. They'll last

longer. They're ripe, so when they start molding, it's usually on the bottom. Slicing makes the berries less heavy and likely to smush, which can contribute to mold.” Mallary’s tip is to freeze sliced strawberries with sugar to eat months later, noting it’s “a great way to recall spring during the cold winter.”

Home Growing Hints (Tammy Sellmeyer) Tammy says that in the first two years of your strawberry plants’ lives, any runners should be cut off from where they originate, to force the plant to focus all of its efforts and energy on fruit production.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 141


A CASE OF THE BLUES At least a few pints! Fresh blueberries are the bumper crop at Steve and Caroline Andriano’s Blue Shepherd Farm in Rocheport. The couple also raise mountain sheep, hence their farm’s name. The Andrianos first planted blueberries in 2012 and Steve says they have about 800 plants. He likens blueberry plants to his farm’s mountain sheep: “Both are essentially dependent on you as soon as you get them. All you're doing is keep them alive.” Not intending to be morbid, Steve explains: “By the time there's a problem with a blueberry plant, it's too late. By the time you know there's a problem with sheep, it's too late. All you're doing is staying out in front of them, keeping them healthy and being organic.” He acknowledges being organic makes it a little harder but says “you just fight problems with what's available organically.” Blueberries are a little high maintenance. “It's a real needy

plant and wants a certain soil moisture content. Can't be too wet, can't be too dry — they want a certain amount of organic content,” Steve says. “They definitely want pH at a certain level that's not natural for here. They need a lot of nutrients because they're like little factories. You'd say, ‘Why? They just make blueberries.’ Well, blueberries are made up of calcium, magnesium, copper, nitric acid, potassium and phosphorus. The plant just doesn't magically generate phosphorus, it converts it. So you’ve got to figure out how much phosphorus do you need?” The Andrianos offer “u-picking” by appointment through their website for about six weeks, usually starting the first week of June. They say, “Mother Nature decides it. So it could be the second week. And then it usually goes to the second week of July, at the very latest.”

Pro Picking Tips (Steve Andriano) “Look for larger, plump, firm berries.” “Don't wash berries until right before you use them. When you wash a berry, you disturb the fibers on the outside and it starts breaking down and it'll just deteriorate more quickly if you wash it.”

Storage Smarts (Caroline Andriano & Mallary Lieber) Mallary suggests keeping berries in very shallow containers or very small jars. “If you have them more than a couple layers thick, the weight of the other berries is going to smush the ones underneath.” Caroline’s method is to put them on a cookie sheet and place it in the freezer. “When they're solid, we just bag them in zip bags and put those in the freezer.”

Home Growing Hints (Mallary Lieber) The MU Extension Center says blueberry flowers and fruit grow from buds on one-year-old wood. A certain amount of new 142 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

growth each year is essential for sustained production as they grow from buds of the previous growing season. You should also remove flower buds for the first two growing seasons “to allow the plant to become established and develop into a more vigorous plant.” The third growing season gets tricky and production should be based on size and vigor of the plants, according to the MU Extension Center. “Vigorous three-year-old bushes can be allowed to produce a small crop, while most if not all flower buds from weak third-year plants should be removed.” Mallary advises to allow berries to get to full maturity, if it can be helped. Mallary: “If left on the bush after ripening, blueberries do not spoil for at least one week. Their flavor and sweetness continue to increase. Unfortunately, this makes the berries very attractive to birds."


NO ASPARA-GUESSING When it comes to asparagus tips — as in tips on how to select or grow your own crop, CCUA Garden Pro Associate Mallary Lieber can help. She says there's a huge market for fresh, locally grown asparagus because it's so different from what you buy in the store. And since asparagus reseeds itself, it’s fairly easy to grow. One of the earliest asparagus varieties is Purple Haze. Purple asparagus is a bit nuttier and sweeter than green or white because it has about 20% more sugar in

its stalks. Although the stalks are purple on the outside, inside they’re the same color as a green spear. Many people enjoy purple asparagus raw. But as pretty as it is raw, once cooked it turns green. Mallary recommends prioritizing purple (and red) fruits and vegetables in your diet. “Purple (and red) fruits and vegetables aren’t just beautiful. They are full of antioxidants called anthocyanins. Eating more

purple and red will literally improve your health at a cellular level. Antioxidants protect cells from damage, are correlated with heart health and might help reduce the risk of several cancers.”

Pro Picking Tips (Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture)

Quality growing conditions create tastier asparagus and the spears can be thick or thin. Look for uniform size when shopping at the market for even cooking. The MU Extension Center says stalks should be firm and not at all limp, and the tips should still be tight. “Look for where they were grown. Local veggies are always better! If you think about it, people aren't very fresh after traveling thousands of miles either, and we are still alive. Veggies that can make the journey and still look good aren't bred for flavor." – Heidi Allemann

Storage Smarts (Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture) Store asparagus on ice. Wrap with a damp cloth then refrigerate or put in a glass jar with an inch of water in a cool spot. Asparagus should be eaten two to five days after picking.

Home Growing Hints (Mallary Lieber) It’s best to start asparagus from crowns. The first spring, a year after planting, do not harvest any spears. Allow them to become ferns and build the strength of the crowns. The second spring after planting, if the plants were strong and healthy during the previous growing season, only pick asparagus for two weeks. After that, allow the spears to develop into ferns. In the following years, harvest the spears when they’re 6-8 inches tall, up to July 1. Either snap or cut them off at ground level. Wait as long as possible to cut back the ferns in the fall. If you cut them back too soon, it will negatively affect the next year's crop.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 143


NOT A CAR(E)ROT IN THE WORLD What’s up, doc? Actually, what’s down. Carrots are a root vegetable, as well as a coolseason one. When daily high temperatures exceed 80 degrees Fahrenheit, carrot color and taste will diminish, rendering them bitter and woody, according to the MU Extension Center. Carrots come in a variety of colors, the classic beta carotene boasting orange, as well as yellow, red, purple and white. All colors supply valuable nutrients, though what those nutrients are will vary depending on the carrot color.

They need a loose, friable (easily crumbled) soil to develop a good shape. ‘Forking,’ when a carrot develops multiple prongs, is caused by anything that impedes root growth. This includes roundworms, stones or heavy, compacted soil. Another common carrot concern cited by MU Extension is planting carrot seeds too deep. They should be planted no deeper than ¼-inch. It takes about three weeks for carrot seeds to germinate and emerge from the soil, so you shouldn’t be concerned as long as you didn’t plant them too deep.

Pro Picking Tips (Mallary Lieber) Mallary advises choosing produce with some of the greens still attached. “If some of the greens are still present you know the crop was harvested recently and is, of course, more nutrient dense. Carrots that travel far and are stored for prolonged periods of time will have all of the greens removed, as that is the part that goes bad first.”

144 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

Storage Smarts (Mallary Lieber) Mallary says to wrap up carrots and other root vegetables in a moist towel before refrigerating, “basically to trick them into thinking they are still in the ground.”

Home Growing Hints According to the MU Extension Center, carrot roots can get sunburned, resulting in bitter, green tops. Help prevent this by hilling soil around the shoulders of the carrot roots.


GETTING THE (RA)DISH Columbia garden enthusiast Don Ginsburg has been growing radishes for 20 years. "I always start from seed," he says. But he experiments with many different varieties including French Breakfast, China Rose and White Icicle. With so many different types, there’s quite the variety in terms of the resulting radishes. Red is the color most closely associated with radishes, but they can range from red and pink, to white and every hue in between. Green and black radishes are even native to a few countries. That’s not all that can differ. "They come in various shapes

and sizes from round to oval to carrotshaped," Don says. Radishes are rich in antioxidants and minerals like calcium and potassium; nutrients that help lower high blood pressure and reduce your risks for heart disease. Perfect for gardeners who are impatient or room-restricted, radishes are quick to develop, don't take up a lot of

space and can be grown in a garden bed or container, such as a grow bag. Of course, radishes can be eaten raw, as is commonly done, but are quite delicious grilled and have an entirely different texture and flavor, Don says. In addition, their greens can be enjoyed in salads and used to make pesto. Plus, the small seedlings that are thinned during the early growing stages can be eaten in salads.

Pro Picking Tips (Don Ginsburg) Don’s advice: “When buying at farmer’s market or grocery, look for the greens to be bright green, fresh and perky. You don't want any browning or wilting. The radishes should be hard, firm and crunchy.”

Storage Smarts (Don Ginsburg) Store them in a plastic container in the refrigerator and they can store well for two weeks or more, Don says.

Home Growing Hints (Don Ginsburg) Seeds can be planted in late winter, early spring or even fall. To give them room to mature, thin them about 2 to 3 inches apart. Plant every 10 days to two weeks to have a continuous crop. Move the dirt to determine how large and ready a radish is. Remember, younger equals more tender. If they grow too long, they will begin cracking and become woody. INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 145



Inside Columbia

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First-time Author Pens Poignant Pages ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

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Get Me To The Greek (Wedding) ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

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Local Events Of Note ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

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Arrow Rock Soon To Be Site Of Antiques Symposium

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

From June 15-July 16, the Missouri Symphony Orchestra's (MSO) Hot Summer Nights will return but singing a different tune: It'll be the Summer of Conductors, showcasing talented conductors from all over the nation to see who will become the next music director of the MSO.


insider BOOKSHELF

The Ultimate Road Trip LOCAL AUTHOR’S DEBUT NOVEL TELLS UNCONVENTIONAL TALE.

W

BY SOFIA PEREZ · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON ith summer comes

to stay occupied in her job as a choral

vacation, which

director, but her days have become

women's fiction, upmarket fiction

for some can mean

monotonous, the grieving is unbearable,

or book club fiction. Basi says she

loading up the car

and she knows that change is imminent.

realizes that the story sounds like it

with suitcases and snacks, and hitting

When going through her daughter’s

could be very depressing as the main

the road with loved ones. Local author

room to begin taking inventory of all

character struggles to deal with such

Kathleen Basi’s debut novel, A Song

that was left behind, Miriam finds a flip-

heartbreaking losses. “I had to think

for the Road, tells the story of an

a-coin road trip app that her children

carefully about how to keep it from

unconventional cross-country road trip

had created for her and her husband to

becoming so heavy that it couldn't

that becomes a journey of discovery.

take upon becoming empty nesters. In

bear the weight of human interaction,”

After all, she says, a road trip is never

search of answers and adventure, and in

Basi says. “It needed a lightness to it in

just about the destination.

hopes of honoring her family, she takes

order to find a readership.” Basi says

A Song for the Road follows Miriam, a

148

The book can be described as

a road trip across the country. But no

she also knew she couldn't write a book

recently widowed mother who lost her

road trip is complete without obstacles,

about a woman traveling across the

husband and twin teenagers in a drunk

twists and turns, and Miriam faces her

country alone, which helped lead her to

driving accident one year ago. She tries

fair share, both external and internal.

create the character of Dicey, a young,

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022


insider BOOKSHELF

pregnant hitchhiker who travels across

AAA map of the United States and did a

Basi says this site delivered the UFO

the country with Miriam.

Google search for places to see and then

viewing platform in Hooper, Colorado,

Basi says she was shocked at the

started putting sticky tabs all over the

and the High Trestle Trail Bridge in

positive reaction to her book, which

map. I wanted to highlight really cool

Iowa as well. But she also visited some

was released in May 2021. She worried

but less obvious places,” Basi says. “I

of the landmarks in person when

about who would purchase a book about

narrowed the list down by figuring out a

possible. “Anything I felt like we could

a dead family in the middle of a global

route that could be done in six to eight

drive and go see, we did — so I visited

pandemic when everyone was worried

hours of driving between stops because

the Cincinnati waterfront, Cahokia,

about losing their own families. “I was

that was about all I thought was realistic.”

Hannibal and the Iowa trail.”

surprised because it turned out that it

She also used a website called Roadside

A Song for the Road is available locally

was exactly the right time for this book.

America, which is described as an online

at Skylark Bookshop and Barnes and

We were sensitized to how important

guide to offbeat tourist attractions.

Noble.

our families were because we were cut off from (our extended families) in many cases,” Basi says, adding that these types of stories help remind us of how precious the gift of family and love is. Family is something everyone really needs when there’s a lot of stress, like during a pandemic, she says. Outside of writing, Basi is a church choral director, which is similar to the career of Miriam. The banter, jokes and things that happen at choir practice in the novel are things that Basi has experienced herself. But outside of that, Basi and Miriam are completely different people. “Characters interestingly develop their own reality. A character morphs into their own person throughout the revision process, and that’s a really fun part of the revision process. It’s like they become real people,” Basi says. Miriam struggles with things Basi’s never had to struggle with, but a lack of experience doesn’t mean a lack of empathy or understanding. “I wanted to highlight some of those things in the hope that it would illuminate the human experience for other people,” she says. Writing A Song for the Road required careful planning, as Basi wanted the road trip to make sense and match up with real locations. The first landmark she decided on was the Cahokia Mounds in Collinsville, Illinois. “I spread out a big INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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insider WEDDING

Knot News

PEGGY TERZOPOULOS AND NICK RASMUSSEN EXCHANGE VOWS. BY PEG GILL

Photography by the Marions

P

eggy Terzopoulos and Nick Rasmussen exchanged traditional vows in a minimal,

non-denominational ceremony at the Atrium on Tenth, with the bride's second cousin presiding. For the theme, Peggy says, "I wanted a more ‘romantic’ vibe, so we went with fewer pastel colors overall for decoration and flowers." In a nod to an old wedding custom, Peggy's "something new" was a pair of Tiffany stud earrings from her sister and maid of honor. Nick's grandma's sapphire bracelet, a 30th wedding anniversary gift from Nick's grandpa, served as Peggy's "something blue." In keeping with Greek tradition, the bride was spotlighted in a dollar dance during the reception — much to the couple's surprise and the guests' delight. On a more somber note, the couple recognized those not present in a unique way: "Instead of having a remembrance table," the couple says, "we had the guests get up and dance to a song with us to honor the people who couldn't be with us that day." "Opa!"

To submit your wedding for consideration, send information and photos to mleroux@insidecolumbia.net. Include your and your spouse's names, occupations, wedding date, location and your photographer's name.

Peggy Terzopoulos and Nick Rasmussen were married on Sept. 5, 2021, in Columbia. INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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What’s Going On THE EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Dates and events are subject to change. Please visit the event website for the most up-to-date information.

MAY MAY 18 BEE KIND TO YOUR MIND

COSMO PARK Parks & Rec's Family Fun Fests are the third Wednesday of the month during May through September. They offer entertainment for the entire family including music, food trucks, live performances, art activities, face painting and more. To celebrate Mental Health Awareness Month, the series kicks off with a chance to embrace nature and learn how to care for the earth and ourselves. 6-8 p.m.; free; como.gov/parks-andrecreation/special-events-2/family-fun-fest/

MAY 8–14 ANNUAL BIKE, WALK & WHEEL WEEK

THROUGHOUT COLUMBIA Take part in this annual Columbia celebration of being active. There are lots of biking, walking and wheeling events scheduled. Hours and events vary; free; pednet.org

MAY 20 OZARK MOUNTAIN DAREDEVILS 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR

MISSOURI THEATRE If you were a fan of "Chicken Train" or any other of this eclectic group's other hits, you won't want to miss them when they come to Columbia. 7 p.m.; from $52; concertseries.missouri. edu

MAY 28-29 PEDALER'S JAMBOREE

COMO TO BOONVILLE This annual biking-based music fest along the MKT trail over Memorial Day weekend begins at Flat Branch Park and ends at Boonville's Kemper Park. 8 a.m.; prices vary; pedalersjamboree.com

JUNE JUNE 10 "SOUL" (PG)

COSMO PARK Movies in the Park kicks off with this tale about Joe, a middle school band teacher whose

life hasn’t quite gone as expected. His true passion is jazz and he’s good. But when he travels to another realm to help someone else find their passion, he soon discovers what it means to have soul. 8:45 p.m; free;.como.gov/parks-andrecreation/special-events-2/movies-in-thepark/

JUNE 11 STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

SERENITY VALLEY WINERY A fun-filled afternoon of family friendly music, food and vendors followed by fireworks! All proceeds benefit Central Missouri Honor Flight. 4 to 9:30 p.m.; $5 entry fee, children under 3 free; facebook.com/ MidMoStrawberryFestival/

JUNE 25 HOPE FOR HEROES 5K

COSMO PARK, JEFFERSON CITY, VIRTUAL Hosted by The Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri, Hope for Heroes benefits the VIP Veteran Pack Program, providing additional nutrition to food-insecure veterans. 7:30 a.m.; $35; sharefoodbringhope.org/ hope5k INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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insider

SPOTLIGHT

Phrenological Head Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York Photo by John Parnell

Focus On Folk

ARROW ROCK TO HOST FOLK ART SYMPOSIUM. BY PEG GILL

F

ounded in 1959, Friends of

director and CEO of the American

feature appraisals for another event," he

Arrow Rock is dedicated to

Folk Art Museum (AFAM) in NewYork.

says.

historic preservation and

Busch's presentation, in observance of

Although not a folk art collector

history education. It's fitting that the

the 60th anniversary of AFAM, will focus

himself, Breitwieser has a deep

town's J. Houston Tavern is the longest

on the cultural importance of American

appreciation for the form. "Folk Art has

continuously operating tavern west of the

folk art, highlighting pieces within the

such character, not only utilitarian but

Mississippi. It's also fitting that the group

museum's collection.

also artistic," he says.

is hosting an Antiques and Decorative

Halleye Bone, quilt and quilted textile

Arts Symposium, "The World of Folk Art,"

historian, appraiser, conservator and

at the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theater this

author, will present a program on 19th

May.

and early 20th century quilts. Bone

Chet Breitwieser, president of Friends of Arrow Rock, is a well-respected antiques specialist and will be one of the

Details

is certified by the American Quilter's Society, among other distinctions. Lark Mason III will present a program

WHAT

symposium's four speakers. He'll share

on 18th and 19th century Chinese,

Antiques and Decorative Arts

his most-requested program, “Caring

Japanese and Korean folk art. A highly

Symposium, "The World of Folk Art"

for Your Antiques and Heirlooms.” In

respected specialist in Asian furniture,

the antiques business for more than 40

art, porcelain and decorative arts,

WHERE

years, Breitwieser is the one-time owner

Mason comes from a family of devoted

Arrow Rock Lyceum Theater

of McAdams Ltd. in Columbia, a member

historic preservationists, with its own

of the Certified Appraisers Guild of

family auction house, in New Braunfels,

WHEN

America, past president of the Mid

Texas. Like Breitwieser, Mason and his

Saturday, May 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Missouri Antiques Dealers Association,

father, Lark E. Mason, are often seen on

and has the distinct pleasure of working

"Antiques Roadshow."

with the Triage Team of Appraisers on

Don't let mentions of "Antiques

COST $100/per person includes lunch

Roadshow" mislead you — unlike the

VIP $150/per person includes reserved

PBS series, the symposium will not

seating, lunch and cocktail reception

symposium. "It's been nearly 20 years

offer attendees an opportunity to bring

with speakers after the symposium

since we hosted an antique forum," he

items for appraisal. "There was so much

says. "I approached the board with the

we wanted to share with the speakers'

idea in November of 2020 and they

program, we were afraid if we did

voted unanimously to host another."

appraisals the day would run too long,"

the PBS series "Antiques Roadshow." Breitwieser is thrilled about the

The keynote speaker is Jason T. Busch,

WEBSITE Call 660-837-3231or visit www.friendsofarrowrock.org

Breitwieser says. "We may be able to INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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Inside Columbia

views C O N T E N T S

159 Dueling DJs

∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

161 On The Town

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169 A New View

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Darkow Draws ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

173

The Final Word

“DO" NORTH

Now that Mizzou North is being razed, what should become of the land where it stood? Should the university gift it to the city for a green space? Or will Mizzou go for a "green" of a different sort and sell? What would you like to see happen on the site?


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views

DUELING DJS

A Creative Competition WHO IS THE BETTER VISUAL ARTIST?

Each issue, two on-air talents from two different Zimmer Communications’ stations will take on a seemingly simple challenge to see who comes out on top. This issue, Producer Hannah from 93.9 The Eagle and Tim Taylor from 96.7 KCMQ take on a blind portrait challenge to see who can come out on top. Make sure you visit insidecolumbia.net to see video of the full challenge!

THE CHALLENGE

You have three minutes to complete your best portrait of Todd Alan from Clear 99 without looking at your paper.

THE CONTENDERS

Producer Hannah from 93.9 The Eagle, armed with ambition and a Sharpie, and Tim Taylor from 96.7 KCMQ, wielding a self-deprecating attitude and, also, a Sharpie.

THE OUTCOME

In a surprise move, both participants also attempted to include Todd’s Great Dane Odie in their portraits. After careful consideration of all the elements, Todd declared Producer Hannah the winner, as she had a face that was “at least somewhat together.”

It feels pretty good to win. It would feel better if the dog’s tail was attached to its body, but it feels pretty good. - Hannah

I think Odie would have picked mine and that’s all I care about. - Tim

WANT TO TAKE UP THE CHALLENGE? Do your own blind portrait and share the results with us on social media! Don’t forget to tag @insidecolumbiamagazine and use #DuelingDJs! INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 159


Life Insurance THEY LOST YOU, do you want them to have to worry about money too?

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160

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

Phyllis Nichols, Agent 1006 West Blvd N | Columbia, MO 65203 573-443-8727 | phyllisjnichols.com |


views ON THE TOWN

Boone County Mizzou Alumni Charcuterie Event Nancy Monteer, Lawanda Rogers and Susan Groshong

The Boone County Chapter of the Mizzou Alumni Association partnered with Graze by Carrie to host a charcuterie event March 13 at Waves Cider Co. Nearly 50 people spent the afternoon creating their own hand-crafted grazing board, led by Carrie Schlimme of Graze by Carrie and a Mizzou alumna.

Jane Wagner, Barbara Schneider and Marcia Walker

Angela Dahman and Alex Ethridge

Date March 13

Location Waves Cider Co.

Photos by Nancy Toalson and Wally Pfeffer, mizzouwally@compuserve.com

Andrea Love-Downs and Jeff Downs

Krystin Cooper and Carrie Schlimme

Robin Walker and David Baker

Matt Pitzer and Kate Pitzer

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T H E

B A N K

From corner stores to professional firms, The Bank of Missouri is a partner you can count on. As a local, community bank, we work closely with you to understand your priorities. We bring the financial expertise, so you can focus on what you do best. Get started at BANKOFMISSOURI.COM.

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O F


views ON THE TOWN

MFA Oil Rootin’ Tootin’ Chili Cookoff The 16th annual MFA Oil Rootin’ Tootin’ Chili Cookoff, presented by JES Holdings, was held March 5 at the Holiday Inn Executive Team from DogMaster Distillery and Agents National Title Insurance Co.

Center. More than 30 teams participated, serving up their best chili while raising more than $90,000 for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Columbia.

Date March 5

Location Holiday Inn Executive Center Kelsey, Julie and Mike Lyman

Team from JES Holdings

Photos by Nancy Toalson and Wally Pfeffer, mizzouwally@compuserve.com

Team from Veterans United Home Loans

Team from Shelter Insurance

Stacye Smith, Liz Schulte and Jewell Simms

Greg Brockmeier and Rachel Klosterman

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

163


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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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views ON THE TOWN

Columbia Independent School Gala The Columbia Independent School held its annual gala, with a theme of I Love Rock & Roll, at The Atrium on Tenth on Feb. 11.

Date Dennis Harper, Sara Harper, Justin Perry and Kathy Perry

Feb. 11

Location The Atrium on Tenth

Photos by L.G. Patterson

Kristin Coyle and Rob Coyle

James Fairlamb and Marieta Fairlamb

Randy Sinquefield and Laura Sinquefield

Bill Kinney and Bridgid Kinney

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views ON THE TOWN

Boy Scouts of America Great Rivers Council 2022 Patron Breakfast The Boy Scouts of America Great

Scott Atkins and Mun Choi

Rivers Council held its annual patron breakfast Feb. 22 at the Holiday Inn Executive Center. University of Missouri President Mun Choi was the emcee and Terry Fossum, an Eagle Scout and reality TV show winner, was the featured guest speaker. David Keller, Allan Moore and John Fabsits

Eric Morrison and Brian Toohey

Date Feb. 22

Location Holiday Inn Executive Center

Photos by Wally Pfeffer, mizzouwally@compuserve.com

Julie Stansfield and Michele Froese

Bill Costello and Matt Garrett

Richard Mendenhall and Elton Fay

Jeanne Sinquefield

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167


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views A NEW VIEW

A New View

BEING A PHOTOGRAPHER, I HAVE ACCESS TO SOME UNIQUE POINTS OF VIEW IN THE COMMUNITY.

Assignment: Opening Day for the Kansas City Royals The Location: Kauffman Stadium, Kansas City, Missouri

N

othing signals the start of summer like Major League Baseball. In February, I was concerned that summer wouldn’t happen because of the MLB lockout, but the players and owners were finally able to settle their differences just in time to belatedly start the season. Now, the summer fun can start. I know summer would (probably) still happen without baseball, but it wouldn’t be the same. Sure, we’d still have the scorching heat and humidity, and we would spend our time at the pool or on the golf course, but without baseball, those hot months would be just boring.

Photographing the excitement of a home opener is one of my favorite assignments. The stadium is clean and feels fresh with added features and attractions for the new season. The players are enthusiastic to start and the crowd is excited for their home team to get going with a clean slate. Everyone is happy. Baseball makes everyone happy. So I say, “PLAY BALL” and be happy.

L.G. Patterson

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views DARKOW DRAWS

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CPS' Steady Deadline APATHY RAGES AND NOBODY SEEMS TO CARE.

BY FRED PARRY

T

he results from last month’s municipal election included few surprises. Beyond the continuing trend toward a more progressive Columbia City Council and school board, the biggest surprise among the results may have been the overwhelming support for the $80 million bond issue put forth by Columbia Public Schools (CPS). More than 76% of those voting on this issue voted in favor of the proposal. Such broad support would normally indicate district patrons are very much satisfied with how the school district is being run. However, in this case, one could argue to the contrary that most of us are apathetic and clueless about what’s really happening in our public schools. Proof in point may be the recent assessment scores shared with Board of Education members showing a steady decline in district performance. The numbers speak for themselves. Using the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) chosen by CPS in their comparison to 13 other Missouri school districts, also chosen by CPS, the quality of education our children are receiving has been on a steady decline for much of the last six years. The most recent MAP test scores for mathematics show CPS students ranked ninth out of the 13 comparison districts. Among Black students, CPS ranks eighth out of 13. Among students receiving free or reduced lunches, CPS ranks 10th of 13. In communication arts, Black students enrolled in CPS classes rank 13th out of 13 … that’s right, dead last. The big surprise to most of us is that CPS students have fallen below the state’s averages for basic proficiency levels in almost every single category. The lone exception in 2019 was

algebra 1. While some will choose to argue that MAP scores are an unfair way to measure the district’s effectiveness, they are, nonetheless, the chosen metric CPS uses to measure its success. Even if MAP scores were completely irrelevant, CPS also uses a platform called iReady to measure proficiency in math and reading. Like the MAP assessments, the iReady scores show a consistently downward trend dating back to 2016. I’m most bothered by CPS’s lack of transparency in these matters. The aforementioned test scores were shared with CPS board members during a 7:30 a.m. work session that was not recorded or live-streamed as normal board meetings are. If not for a handful of engaged parents attending this meeting, this news may have never seen the light of day. Back when CPS ranked high among its peer school districts, there would be a plethora of press releases, public speeches and frequent references to our excellence. When the scores began to fall in a precipitous way, we didn’t hear a peep from CPS officials. Current CPS Superintendant Brian Yearwood has been on the job for less than a year. I had a chance to interview him for my CEO Roundtable radio show and we had a candid conversation about the challenges CPS is facing. It’s clear to me that Yearwood is a man of great competence and integrity. It’s also clear to me that he might not be around long. His attempts to fix our district will be met with intense resistance from progressive school board members. He will also be stymied by the stranglehold that teacher unions currently have on our district. Ten of the last 10 school board

candidates endorsed by the CMNEA have won their seats and union members won’t tolerate any move that makes our teachers more accountable for student outcomes. This will likely prove to be an impossible situation for Yearwood. Those of us who have had children educated in the CPS system know that the district has an abundance of outstanding teachers who care deeply about their students. Unfortunately, these teachers are overshadowed and run over by a vocal minority of bullies hellbent on advancing union-sanctioned directives. The issues they advance are a distraction from doing what needs to be done in the classroom. If you have children in CPS, you owe it to yourself to watch Jason DePrima’s YouTube video about CPS’s Tableau Scorecard. Search for “Columbia (MO) Public Schools (CPS) Academic Performance 2015-2021.” This short video will give you the context and an understanding of the ways our school system is failing us. The only path forward is for district parents and community leaders to become actively engaged in the governance of our public schools. There’s too much at stake for us to simply assume that someone else is paying attention. Failing to stand up now means that our local schools will keep heading in the wrong direction. As Albert Einstein once said, "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” It’s time we tried something different.

Fred Parry Founder & Publisher Emeritus fred@insidecolumbia.net INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

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ADVERTISING INDEX

3Fifteen Primo Cannabis....................................... 28 Advanced Radiology...............................................4 Ai Painting Plu..........................................................48, 81 Allstate Consultants LLC ...................................... 21 Alpine Builders, LLC................................................ 58 Alternative Community Training, Inc.................. 36 Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre ................................ 128 Automated Systems .............................................. 73, 164 Avant Supported Living ......................................... 67 Bank of MO .............................................................. 162 BMW of Columbia ................................................. 10 Boone Health ........................................................... 16 Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton ..................... 68, 114 Bronze by Design .................................................... 59, 168 Burrell Behavioral Health ...................................... 44, 54 CC’s City Broiler ...................................................... 3 Chris McD’s ............................................................. 52 City of Columbia ..................................................... 55 Columbia Academy for Learning & Enrichment 62 Columbia Dent Company LLC ............................. 154 Columbia Healthy Smiles ..................................... 63 Columbia Psychology Healing Center ................ 92 Commerce Bank .....................................................5, 106 Compass Chiropractic ........................................... 12 Convergence Financial .......................................... 38 Coyote Hill ............................................................... 146 CSL Plasma .............................................................. 88 Dean & Amber Klempke ....................................... 96 Edward Jones - Gina Mauller ............................... 111 Faber Law Firm ........................................................ 26 First State Community Bank ................................ 97 Fleet Feet Sports Columbia .................................. 21 Four Points Catering and Eclipse ........................ 150 Garrett Painting ...................................................... 84 Hawthorn Bank ....................................................... 176 House of Caregivers .............................................. 77, 108 Jefferson City Convention & Visitors Bureau ... 27 Joe Machens Lincoln ............................................. 2 Kretch’s Custom Exteriors .................................... 99 Las Margaritas ........................................................ 8-9 Legacy Life Services of MO .................................. 18 Lenoir Woods .......................................................... 114

174 INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022

Living Canvas Tattoo & Body Piercing ............... 156 Lombardo Homes of Columbia ........................... 66 Magelings LLC ......................................................... 47 McClure Engineering Company .......................... 86 McVey Mowing LLC ............................................... 69 Mediacom ................................................................ 113, 170 Menard Inc .............................................................. 31 Mercedez-Benz of Columbia ............................... 15 Mid MO Reproductive Medicine & Surgery ..... 72 Missouri Eye Consultants ..................................... 74 MO Vein Care ......................................................... 51 MO Wildflowers Nursery ..................................... 109 Moberly Area Community College ..................... 76 Molly's Jewelry Design ......................................... 75 Mutrux Automotive, LLC ...................................... 166 NH Scheppers Distributing .................................. 172 Orangetheory Fitness ............................................ 94 Our Lady of Lourdes Interparish School ............ 70 Paisley Bow Tique ................................................... 13 Parks Amusement .................................................. 25, 64 Peak Sport & Spine ................................................. 90 Performance Eyecare ............................................. 100 Restoration Chiropractic ...................................... 78 River Hills Landscaping ......................................... 91, 158 Rost Landscaping & Superior Gardens .............. 14 School House Bed & Breakfast ............................ 23 Shelter Insurance - Valerie Ninichuck ................ 89 Sky Zone ................................................................... 33 Socket Telecom LLC ............................................... 175 State Farm Insurance - Phyllis Nichols .............. 160 Suites at Concorde ................................................. 31 SumnerOne ............................................................. 152 Sylvan Learning Center ......................................... 83 Terrace Retirement Community .......................... 41, 82, 107 Tiger Towing ............................................................ 85 TrueSon Exteriors & Interiors .............................. 6 voco Tiger Hotel ..................................................... 11, 60 Wendy L. Sprouse Agency ................................... 80 Westbury Senior Living ......................................... 104 Witt Print Shop ....................................................... 98 WR Wealth Planners ............................................. 56


INSIDE COLUMBIA MAY/JUNE 2022 175


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