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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAGAZINE

INSIDE COLUMBIA

MARCH/APRIL 2021

“Hawthorn Bank was so connected to the PPP loan process, they were able to help me secure funds with their “all-hands on deck” approach. I wanted to make sure our Columbia employees were covered. I don’t think I would’ve gotten the PPP loan as easily without a local bank like Hawthorn.”

– Brian Richards SaunaSpace

BEST BRUNCH BETS • POOL PARADISE • ROOM REFRESHES

“Hawthorn went the extra mile for me.”

Ryan Clifton

Commercial Loan Officer (573) 449-9933 NMLS #1006206

NASDAQ: HWBK ©2021, Hawthorn Bank

HawthornBank.com

insidecolumbia.net

Member FDIC


Omega-rich and a natural source of oleic acid, “aka-usi” (Known as the emperor’s breed in Japan) has become the “Best steak I’ve ever had” option on CC’s spring menu. We are so confident you will simply LOVE this exclusive new steak cut, that through the month of March, we are pairing this dish with a complimentary glass of Seven Falls Cabernet Sauvignon.

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DISCOVER HOW TO

DIFFERENTLY WHY WHAT YOU’RE “DOING” MIGHT NOT BE WORKING

Columbia Owner Dr. Jeremy Maxwell,

may be triggering that stress.

“We don't just want someone to "do" a

Oftentimes, food allergies can

behavior. We want you to change what

interrupt normal immune responses

Columbia, being “agents of change” is

you are "doing" to "become" a better

and chronic inflammation can

an integral part of our practice. Too

person. Change who you are. Engage

interrupt normal hormone production

often, when someone has an ache or

in long term changes and be the best

and metabolism. We then recommend

pain, we reach for a quick fix and

version of you that you can be." He

a plan to reduce inflammation to allow

basically “cover it up ” by popping a pill.

and his co-practitioners, Dr. James

the body repair and restoration. Proper

In effect, we mask the problem and

Hamilton and Dr. Jessica Smith, have

stress reduction, supplementation and

that can lead to more issues in the

more than 30 years of collective

chiropractic adjustments are vital to

long run. Suppose you develop a

clinical experience in helping their

great clinical results.

backache and mask it with medicine.

patients do precisely that.

For all of us at The Wellness Way,

You may unknowingly

OVERCOME BY “BECOMING”

overcompensate and add stress to

WE DON’T GUESS … WE TEST

other parts of your body. Of course,

We pride ourselves on being health

Columbia patients who embraced our

with certain prescription pain

detectives. We have each patient fill

philosophy and saw success. Who

medicines you also run the risk of over

out a Functional Assessment

decided they could change their

reliance and even addiction.

Questionnaire, or FAQ, to assess

approach to their health and go from

On the next page, read about two

what’s going on in each system of

“doing” to “becoming” the best

popping a pill — The Wellness Way

their body. Then we do testing based

versions of themselves.

philosophy advocates “becoming.”

on the answers to uncover where you

According to The Wellness Way,

are having the most stress and what

Instead of just “doing” — i.e.,

What Patt and Taylor have in common is that they both decided they were the ones in control of their health. They made a conscious choice to behave differently and committed to it. They discovered that The Wellness Way restoration clinics are part of a totally unique kind of health care network — one that thinks and acts differently, solving health problems where others can't. Isn’t

it time for you to discover us, too?

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Patt After suffering and struggling with shoulder pain for years, Patt’s doctor — whom she really liked and trusted — told her they were out of options and the only thing left was replacement surgery. She wasn’t ready to take that drastic step. A friend of hers had told her about The Wellness Way, Columbia and she decided to go to a lecture. She listened and felt it was worth a try. Patt admits she was skeptical at first. Especially when her testing revealed she was allergic to some of her favorite foods. She was advised to give up her coffee and cut out yeast. Basically, to upend her morning routine of coffee and toast. It wasn’t easy, but Patt stuck with it and got into a rhythm, which became her new routine. Her pain improved and her food cravings went away. She jumped onboard fully. She then noticed a dramatic weight loss, which she didn’t expect but says “was a wonderful side effect.” After a year and a half, there are now only eight things she can’t have, instead of her of her highest number of 32 at one point. In an ironic twist, she got back her beloved breakfast beverage — coffee but then decided she didn’t even like it!

Taylor Taylor was plagued by health and digestive problems during college. She had painful kidney stones and had her gallbladder removed. She was told by many, many medical professionals that she was just going having to deal with it — the not feeling well. She was told that being irregular and always sick was just going to be her new normal. But she refused to believe that. She then found Dr. Maxwell and The Wellness Way, Columbia. Our testing revealed what the full scope of her food allergies were — far more than just the four she’d been diagnosed with in college. After changing her diet and making sure she’s putting in the proper nutrients and supplements to help her gut get healthy, she knows she’ll never have to live that way again, and she couldn’t be happier.


TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT’S POSSIBLE From personal checking to commercial banking and the smallest loan to the largest investment, Central Bank of Boone County helps you turn what’s possible into what’s real. And as a community bank, we’re always looking forward — striving to create a better, stronger community for all. Discover more at centralbank.net/boone-county today.

Member FDIC


CENTRAL BANK OF BOONE COUNTY IS CHANGING THE WAY WE TALK ABOUT MONEY Prosperity. No matter how you define it, it’s something every person seeks. At Central Bank of Boone County’s ProsperU, people in our community can get closer to their financial goals — no matter how big or small they may be. WHAT IS PROSPERU? ProsperU is a 100%-free educational program that exists to help individuals and businesses of all experience and knowledge levels learn how to build a successful financial life. Classes, one-on-one meetings and community outreach programs destigmatize financial discussions and meet everyone exactly where they are — even if “where they are” is “What’s a budget?” WHAT SORT OF CLASSES DOES PROSPERU OFFER? Some of the classes include those about home buying, car buying, budgeting 101, understanding credit, creating a business plan and more. However, new classes are always being added to meet the needs of our community. WHO IS PROSPERU FOR? The short answer: Everyone. We know that financially stronger individuals mean a stronger community overall. So who does that include? Anyone, of any age, with any degree of financial prowess or lack thereof, whether you’re a client of Central Bank of Boone County or not. Participants have been as young as 14 and as seasoned as 80. Nobody knows it all and there’s always something to learn. And that’s okay! ProsperU is the place where you can ask the financial questions you need to ask, even if you think it’s something you should already have the answer to. Additionally, ProsperU partners with organizations like the Missouri Women’s Business Center, Central Missouri Community Action, True North of Columbia, Job Point and more. We’re proud to help members of our community that often don’t have easy access to financial services get the know-how they need, whether it’s learning how to save money or developing a business plan.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE CLASSES? ProsperU doesn’t stop when the metaphorical bell rings — in fact, most of the real learning and meaningful change happens outside the classroom in one-on-one sessions with ProsperU’s director, Sarah Moreau. These sessions are about setting and reaching personal goals, from as simple as creating a budget to as complex as buying a house. These financial matters are ones nearly everyone comes face-to-face with at some point in their lives, and we want to give ProsperU participants a safe, judgment-free space to talk about and tackle them. Ultimately, the more participants interact with the program, the more they get out of it. And that includes gaining more abstract things, like confidence, peace of mind, better sleep because they know their financial foundations are firm or because they have the tools and support they need to start a small business. At Central Bank of Boone County, we talk a lot about “endless possibilities,” and at ProsperU, we help you envision them more clearly.

Central Bank of Boone County is always looking for ways to be a better community bank, and ProsperU makes financial matters a little easier to talk about and understand. To find out more about how ProsperU is changing the lives of people in our community, check us out at centralbank.net/prosperu or feel free to reach out to us at 573-817-8900.


EXCEPTI here’s why. Our family has moved all over the country—to say we have a little experience working with realtors is an under-statement. Donna and Kyle have raised the bar for what we have come to expect from our realtors. Our latest move to Columbia alone has given us two rental investment properties and two personal home buys/sells. Donna and Kyle have seen us through them all. Moving to another state can often be stressful—house hunting in one short visit and working remotely can be tough. Donna and Kyle made it feel almost effortless. They were consistently mindful of our family’s lifestyle needs. Over the years, as our family’s needs have changed, Donna and Kyle have helped us navigate home buying and selling with ease. In a market where some homes sit for over a year, our house sold in two days! Donna and Kyle will work hard for you and your family every step of the way!

-Chelsea and Jonathan Bath


TIONAL. Donna Thompson Baxter 573.268.4435

Kyle Thompson 573.268.7947

Andy Burks 573.881.5804

Dana Alexander 573.864.1430

VANTAGE REALTY 573-825-5217 vantagerealtymo@gmail.com findallcolumbiahomes.com vantagerealtymo.com fb/ VantageRealtyCoMo ig/VantageRealtyCoMo 6100 S Sinclair Rd. Columbia, MO 65203


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ADVENTURE AWAITS THE 2021 BMW X3.

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Visit BMW of Columbia for a test drive today.

BMW of Columbia 1900 I-70 Drive SW Columbia, MO 65203 www.columbiabmw.com 573-446-2691


features

Inside Columbia

features March/April 2021

C O N T E N T S

112 ROOM REFRESHES APPEALING ACCENTS TO SPRING FOR.

116 PLANT ONE ON HOW TO GET LANDSCAPING YOU’LL LOVE.

106 BRUNCH BRIGADE 16 SPOTS SURE TO SATISFY.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 13


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C O

N

T

E

N

T S

March/April In every issue

16 FROM THE EDITOR 20 ONLINE

Life

50 DINING GUIDE

CEO 50

Insider

25 26 ENCOUNTERS Couple collaborates with local reverend to feed those in need.

121 122 BOOKSHELF A retired MU professor teams up with his daughter  on an amazing avian ode.

28

5 THINGS Post-pandemic pleasures: 5 things we yearn to see return.

126 WEDDINGS Local couple puts the “home” in their Oklahoma wedding.

30

HOME TOUR Talk about pooling your resources … an amazing outdoor oasis.

129 SPOTLIGHT Found fun:  An easy way to paint a more positive picture.

36 ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS State of debate: Is pending legislation legit or loopy?

Flavor

39 40 DINING OUT In the “market” for a new place to eat? You can’t fare better.

24

Views 133

135 139 140 146

ON THE TOWN A NEW VIEW DARKOW DRAW THE FINAL WORD

43 COCKTAILS This creative quaff’s a bright and effervescent  salute to spring. 45 DASH Fond of focaccia? We gotchia. 46 COOKING WITH BROOK Cluck luck: Chicken and waffles that wow.

On the cover

A sunny sample from one eatery in our brunch   feature on page 106. Photo by L.G. Patterson.

46 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 15


from the editor

OLIVIA DeSMIT

A SYRUPY SALUTE

CELEBRATE FAMILY AND FRIENDS THROUGH FOOD.

I

Olivia DeSmit

Managing Editor | odesmit@insidecolumbia.net Inside Columbia magazine

am a firm believer that breakfast food is good at any time of day. Pancakes and bacon for dinner? Sign me up. Cereal with fruit for dessert? Delicious. There is even a word for breakfast food eaten around lunchtime: brunch. But there’s one big difference between breakfast for dinner and brunch. One is perhaps seen as lazy or low maintenance, while the other has a reputation for meaning getting dressed up, spending too much on avocado toast and tossing back bottomless mimosas. Hey, I’m not one to turn down a mimosa or two, but not all brunches have to be the same. We compiled a list of some of the best brunches and breakfasts in Columbia, ranging from no-fuss traditional diner dishes to truffle-infused delights sure to dazzle. No matter your personal preference, I guarantee there will be something you will love almost as much as I love chocolate chip pancakes. Speaking of delicious dishes, check out our article on page 40 on brand new catery The Strollway Market, a collaboration between Beet Box and Harold’s Doughnuts. Together the two 'restaurants' have created a perfect breakfast or lunch spot with healthful, delectable soups, salads and sandwiches. Local couple Wayland and Renee Taylor are also fulfilling a hunger need in our community — in a very different way. As co-founders, along with Rev. James Gray, of the Reborn Blessing Boxes of Boone County, they have helped put up 10 blessing box pantries in Columbia to help those in need with the motto 'Take what you need, bring what you can.' The pantries are filled with nonperishable food, diapers and other essentials by volunteers, organizations and the Taylors themselves. To find out more about the program and how you can help, check out the article on page 26. While this entire issue doesn’t revolve around food — I promise — it is a focal point because not only can food be delicious and help create wonderful memories with family and friends, but during the past year while we’ve been mostly unable to celebrate anything, it’s something that can always be celebrated. The next time your kids ask if they can have chocolate chips in their pancakes, why not let them? Time with your family deserves to be celebrated. Happy reading — and eating!

16 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


For the sixth year in a row, Boone Hospital Center was ranked the #1 hospital in Mid-Missouri by U.S. News & World Report. We were also ranked #4 in the state of Missouri. U.S. News ranks hospitals based on 12 specialties utilizing a mathematical model combining reputation, mortality rate, patient safety and care-related factors such as nursing and patient services.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 17


Providing financial advice since 1913 Member FINRA | SIPC

Experience the Difference

Smith Moore Opens New Branch Location in Fulton Our team of experienced local investment professionals is ready to provide you with guidance to build, manage, and protect your family’s wealth. Connect with us today to schedule a meeting to discuss your accumulation, distribution, and legacy goals.

Inside Columbia Staff CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Carla Leible cleible@zrgmail.com FOUNDER & PUBLISHER EMERITUS Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net PUBLISHER Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net MANAGING EDITOR Olivia DeSmit odesmit@insidecolumbia.net

Tim Borman

Aaron Rigdon

Vice President E tborman@smithmoore.com

Vice President E arigdon@smithmoore.com T 573 544 2030 (Fulton) T 573 303 0256 (Columbia)

T 573 544 2028

Blaine McQuaid Pestle Client Associate E bpestle@smithmoore.com T 573 544 2031

Learn more at www.smithmoore.com 534 Court Street | Fulton, MO 65251 T 573.544.2027

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Peg Gill peg@insidecolumbia.net CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Brook Harlan CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Amanda Elliott, John Robinson, John Darkow, Kimber Dean, Maddy Melton ART DIRECTOR Tim Flanner tflanner@zrgmail.com PHOTO EDITOR L.G. Patterson lg@insidecolumbia.net GRAPHIC DESIGNER Joy Griffin jgriffin@insidecolumbia.net

18 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


LEGS HURT? FEELING TIRED? GET ACTIVE AGAIN! FIND OUT WHAT DR. MICHAEL RYAN CAN DO FOR YOU. Call today and talk to a nurse. Michael Ryan, M.D.

CALL (573) 632-2780 TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE VEIN SCREENING MISSOURI VEIN CARE 4004 Peach Court, Suite E Columbia, Missouri 65203

MISSOURIVEINCARE.COM


what’s online...

Enjoy additional digital content on our website and social media.

Inside Columbia Staff ADVERTISING COORDINATORS Jeff Ausmus jausmus@zrgmail.com Kalie Kramel kkramel@zrgmail.com Stefanie Joseph sjoseph@zrgmail.com

SLICE SQUABBLE

Visit our Facebook page for some behind-the-scenes action from the photoshoot for our “Dueling DJs” article, this issue featuring Cosmo from Y107 and Trevor from KCMQ’s takes on the best slice of ‘za in CoMo.

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Cathy Atkins catkins@insidecolumbia.net Lindsey Baxter lbaxter@insidecolumbia.net Josh Arnold jarnold@insidecolumbia.net Laura Fuchs lfuchs@insidecolumbia.net Blake Dunlap bdunlap@insidecolumbia.net OFFICE MANAGER Becky James rjames@zrgmail.com DISTRIBUTION ASSOCIATE Steve Leible

FOUR-LEGGED FRIENDS

Planning on adding a furry member to the family sometime soon? Check out our guide on what you need to know, buy and plan for before taking the plunge. Just visit our website and search Pet Parenting

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAGAZINE Zimmer Strategic Communications 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 www.InsideColumbia.net Office: 573-875-1099

Inside Columbia is published by Zimmer

DON’T WAFFLE. OR CHICKEN OUT!

Visit our website and check out the two videos from our Food Editor Brook Harlan on how to make the ultimate chicken and waffles (Page 46.) One video’s on chicken breading basics; the other’s on finishing with finesse.

/InsideColumbia.net 20 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

/InsideColumbia

@Inside_Columbia

InsideColumbiaMagazine

Strategic Communications, 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201, 573-875-1099. Copyright Zimmer Communications, 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo. Not responsible for omissions or information which has been misrepresented to the magazine.


LET’S CELEBRATE!

IN 2020, SCHEPPERS CELEBRATED 70 YEARS, BUT WE COULDN’T PARTY THE WAY WE WANTED TO...

SO WE WANT TO CELEBRATE 70+1

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 21


Details SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscription rate is $15 for 1 year. Call 573-875-1099 to place an order or to inform us of a change of address, or subscribe at www.InsideColumbia.net. For bulk subscription rates, contact Becky James at 573-875-1099.

ADVERTISING Inside Columbia is the best way to reach Columbia’s upscale consumers. Information about advertising is available online at www.InsideColumbia.net or by calling 573-875-1099.

NEWS RELEASES & EVENT NOTICES Contact editor at 573-875-1099, or email to editor@insidecolumbia.net.

ON THE TOWN Send your photos with the event description and subject names for captions to tflanner@zrgmail.com, or mail to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201. Not all photos received will be published.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send letters to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 or email to editor@ insidecolumbia.net. Inside Columbia reserves the right to publish any letter to the editor.

CUSTOM PUBLISHING Let us publish a specialty magazine exclusively for your company or organization. Call Melody Parry at 573-875-1099 or email melody@insidecolumbia.net

REPRINTS Want to reproduce an article you’ve seen in Inside Columbia? We can provide reprints and customize them on glossy stock for your promotional needs. Minimum quantity is 500 copies. Call Cathy Atkins at 573-875-1099 or email catkins@insidecolumbia.net.

/InsideColumbia.net 22 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


We know a good investment when we see one.

Travis Cook, CFP® CEO, Financial Advisor

Tyler Hoffmann Advisor Associate

Adam Bethel

Bill Costello

President, Financial Advisor

Vice President

CONVERGENCE FINANCIAL PROUDLY WELCOMES TYLER HOFFMANN to our team of financial professionals. With more than a decade of wealth management experience in mid-Missouri, Tyler brings his passion for financial planning and a client-centered, process-driven perspective to Convergence.

Fully invested in you. 200 E. Southampton Drive, Suite 102 Columbia, MO 65203 573-818-2264 • Convergence-Financial.com

Tyler’s education-based approach will provide Convergence clients with the right investment mindset, tools, and strategies to pursue their goals. And his focus on growing new and existing relationships will make Convergence Financial stronger, deeper, and better. To learn more about Convergence Financial, give us a call or visit us online at Convergence-Financial.com Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through Convergence Financial, LLC, a registered investment advisor. Convergence Financial and LPL Financial are separate unaffiliated legal entities.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 23


T H E

B A N K

From cuddly companions to buying the same chew toy for the third time, our pets are part of the family. As a local community bank, we work closely with our customers to understand their priorities and the changes that affect their finances. No matter how you choose to bank, The Bank of Missouri is here for you. Get started at BANKOFMISSOURI.COM.

O F


Inside Columbia

life C O N T E N T S

26

Local Couple Nourishes Community

28

Pre-pandemic Pining: 5 Things We've Missed

30

One Family's Poolside Paradise

34

All Hail Kale & Other Spring Produce

36

ROLL CALL

Do you suffer from heel and arch pain in your foot? Just roll with it! Roll your foot over a bottle or rolling pin, that is. The rolling motion will help stretch out your foot and provide some much-needed relief.

Capitol Idea: A Bevy Of Bills


life

ENCOUNTERS

Feeding a Community MEET THE COUPLE BEHIND THE BLESSING BOX PROGRAM.

BY PHOEBE KOFMAN · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

W

ayland and Renee Taylor

helping to build the construction as

mere week later they had put up their

have been working

well as the stocking of boxes. Some

first Blessing Box. “He’s [Gray] got the

tirelessly to feed hungry

organizations, such as Zeta Phi Beta, a

point of contact, he takes care of the

communities in Columbia and Boone

sorority of the University of Missouri,

legalities of getting the property and

County, especially those who have

will sponsor a pantry, which means that

then we do the structured work and

been hit hardest by the pandemic. One

they both helped fund and they steadily

get the food to come.” Wayland says.

major way they have contributed is

gather and donate food items as part of

While Gray clears any bureaucratic red

by helping co-found Reborn Blessing

their philanthropy.

tape, Wayland constructs the boxes and

Boxes of Boone County.

The Taylors have dedicated their

bases, ensuring that it will stay put no

These boxes function as pantries

lives to feeding the hungry. In doing

matter the weather. Renee makes hand-

that have mostly non-perishable food

so, they have connected with a rich

crafted signs for each box and places

items such as cans of soup, vegetables,

network of people also dedicated to

her business cards inside, both for

loaves of bread and snacks. These boxes

the same principle whom all work

those who may want to donate and for

feed the homeless population, families

together to make it happen. One of the

those struggling who need more help.

with small children, juvenile runaways,

people who they have met through this

Both Taylors monitor and fill the boxes

people on disability and the elderly.

network is Rev. James Gray, who is the

as many times as they can in a day to

In addition to food products, some

associate pastor at Second Missionary

ensure that no one goes to bed hungry.

pantries also store gloves, blankets,

Baptist Church. He was collecting

In addition to creating and filling their

hats, first aid kits, diapers and even

food for a family he knew personally

own pantries, they still continue to

menstrual products. Since its inception

when the Taylors stopped by to drop

help other pantries in their network.

in the fall of 2020, 10 Blessing Box

off their contribution as well as talk to

pantries have been put up in Columbia.

him about helping on a grander scale.

on each sign: “Take what you need,

Along with direct donations, Renee

“We wanted to do more, we’ve worked

bring what you can.” This creates a

Taylor manages any sponsorships or

with the homeless for years — we really

chain reaction of people helping other

monetary donations that come in.

felt compelled to do more food wise,”

people, but more importantly it creates

Many local business and churches

Renee says.

a sense of community. “We’ve never

have donated money to the program,

26 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

After speaking with Gray, just a

Renee Taylor writes their motto

worried about filling a box, because


life

ENCOUNTERS

Wayland and Renee Taylor (left) with Rev. James Gray stand in front of one of the the Blessing Box pantries in Columbia.

the donations will keep coming in,”

in the pantry — it's an experience,”

Renee says. “It's all about making an

Renee says. According to her, putting

due to the pandemic, they still plan

impact, even in a very small way.” She

a donation directly into the pantry

to continue putting up boxes around

says, "Children have come up to me

is a way to see first-hand the impact

Columbia long after the pandemic

and said, ‘Thank you, if you didn’t

that direct donations can have. Renee

ends. In terms of plans for expansion

come, I wouldn't have had lunch or

Taylor saw that impact when talking to

into other cities, Wayland says that

even a snack today!’ We’ve had families

a woman in need who told her that the

many counties in the surrounding area

and homeless in line share amongst

pantries were instrumental to helping

have the same need for food pantries.

themselves — it’s taught me so much

her put food on the table to feed her

“If you want to take the blueprint, we

about life,” she continues.

Although they started Blessing Boxes

family. One day soon after, that woman

do not want any credit for it, take it and

Along with monetary donations and

donated other items to the pantry.

run with it. That is our hope is to be

sponsorships, the Taylors say there are

“Because of that kindness that was

a pilot for other people but stay here,

many ways to get involved and it starts

shown to her, she is now compelled

where we can keep this up.” Wayland

with simply putting food donations

to give out of nothing, and I mean

says. Their focus will continue to be

in one of the many pantries around

nothing. We’re touching people’s lives,”

their community and their neighbors

town. “If you have a donation, put it

Renee says.

right here in Columbia.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 27


life

5 THINGS

Press Play

5 THINGS WE'VE MISSED FROM PRE-PANDEMIC. BY PEG GILL

OKAY, SO 2020’S been in the rearview for a couple of months now. Couldn’t have happened soon enough! Now that we’ve “Marched” a little way into the new year, it seems like a good time to reflect on some of the things that the pandemic precluded. With luck, we’ll be able to press play and get back to enjoying all the things we used to sometime again soon, especially these five:

1

Those Near and Dear to us. Emphasis on the “near.” Zoom

just can’t replace seeing family and friends in person, up close and, well, personal. Not being able to bear hug has been pretty unbearable. Even those painful pinches from Grandma when she tweaks your cheeks would be welcomed these days.

2

Routine Restaurant-ing. Ah, the good old days when

dining out was a piece of cake. (Or anything else you had a taste for.) It’s safe to say some still have reservations about it. Delivery and curbside help curb our cravings, but nothing beats partaking in person. With fewer seats, it’s been more like musical chairs — and at many of our favorites, reservations are de rigueur. We’re hungry for the return of unrestricted ambience.

3

Seeing Smiles. On actual people and strangers around us,

not the ones we’ve been seeing on TV shows, movies or series we’re streaming or on social media. Or on the same few faces we’ve been bubbled with. There’s just no masking the fact that it makes you feel good when someone smiles warmly at you while passing by.

4

Outta The Blue Outings. Remember last minute decisions

5

on destinations and thrown-together get-togethers? Things now require advance planning and prep. Capacity limits can really limit your ability to suddenly decide to just “show up” at something. Presuming there is even a “something” to show up at, that is.

Sweating the Small Stuff. And only the small stuff! Not the

relentless, draining extra layer of angst and anxiety that COVID added to our daily lives. Wouldn’t it be nice to only fret about what to wear to work, instead of whether you’re going to have a job? Gimme those good old basic small stuff sweat beads soon!

28 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


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Placid Paradise THIS OUTDOOR ENTERTAINING OASIS HAS IT ALL.

BY PEG GILL · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON JEREMY SPILLMAN READILY admits

the prospect of adding a pool to his

“I started dissecting details on pools

that early last year, when his family first

property. He discovered advances in

in any picture I could find,” he says.

floated the idea of putting in a pool,

technology had greatly improved pool

“I spent hours and hours until I had

it held zero appeal. He didn’t want

pump and heater efficiency. Beyond

a deep understanding of what can

the maintenance hassles or upkeep

that, he realized he could create a

change it from feeling like the Bellagio

costs. Nor was he eager to spend

sanctuary and “pseudo” spa/resort

for example, or a basic pool, versus a

money on something he knew, from

where his family and friends could make

more swanky modern boutique vibe

his experience as a builder, would add

memories until travel become feasible

that I wanted.”

little, if anything to the resale value.

again — and well beyond.

But that was all pre-pandemic.

Going into the project he had a good

Once Spillman realized which details would give him the clean look he was

idea of what he wanted but says it

after, he started drawing and pricing

favorite pastime of traveling. It also

evolved as he began laying it out. He

everything out. This included getting

closed the family’s neighborhood pool.

approached the pool the same way as

custom-made coping (the defining edge

Left high and dry, Spillman revisited

any of his new builds or renovations.

around the pool) as opposed to the

Once COVID hit, it took away his

30 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


The Goliath fiberglass pool unit by Thursday Pools measures 16 by 37 feet and holds 17,500 gallons. It’s 3 feet 8 inches deep in the shallow end and 6 feet 4 inches deep in the deep end. It features a Pentair sand filter, salt water generator and gas water heater. The pool wall, made with stone from Erdel and Woods, houses six water spouts. INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 31


The Spillmans had seen “swing” seats at different resorts they’ve visited and wanted to recreate that resort vibe they were missing so much during the pandemic. The firepit features stone from Erdel and Woods and Caesarstone exterior quartz countertops from Central Missouri Countertops.

normal bullnose you see on coping. He

waterfall sound were must-haves for the

my clients if we are doing an addition,”

says it’s a combination of small details

family, Spillman says, since they plan

he says. “‘Let’s make it count while the

such as that which make the pool area

to operate it almost all year. “There is

man power is there, as there is no other

feel the way it does.

no better place to read a book,” he says.

time you will do it as cost effectively and

One of his biggest challenges was

“Some days I work from the outside bar

then you only live through it once.’”

working with a backyard that had a

and listen to it in the background. It’s a

16-inch elevation change in a very small

huge piece of the overall ambience.”

your back when sitting at the bar, and a

footprint. “I felt like what it must feel

He designed the firepit so that it’s at

He also determined that by doing

radiant heater in the bar’s ceiling allows

like adding a pool in the middle of

an earth contact structure — just like a

heat to encapsulate you on a brisk day.

Broadway downtown with no space to

reverse walkout basement — he could

“I just couldn’t wrap my head around

stage anything,” he jokes. He knew that

do a 9-foot foundation wall and hide it

making an investment like this and only

with such an elevation change, a wall on

with the pool house. This would give

getting four months a year. For the extra

the pool was a must. He liked that idea

them more space, dodge engineering

investment, to gain at least three to four

for two reasons: The wall would serve

fees, and even better — create space for

additional months made it so worth it!”

as a jumping feature (without increasing

a bathroom next to the pool. “Everyone

The family swam late into the fall last

his homeowners insurance the way a

who had a pool preached how miserable

year, and won’t drain or cover the pool,

diving board would) and it would be the

it was to walk into a cold house slopping

outside of a solar cover when heating it

perfect place to add cascading water.

water everywhere to use the restroom,”

for use. They plan to resume swimming

“I really wanted to hear the sound of

he says. The idea evolved to a pump

again next month.

a waterfall,” Spillman explains. The

house and an outdoor bar and kitchen.

aesthetics of the space and the tranquil

“I really just took my own advice I give

32 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


The furnishings, light fixtures, umbrellas and bathroom décor touches came from Wayfair.

The bar/kitchen appliances are from Picks Gallery, a construction and remodel industry supplier. The 42-inch gas grill serves as a grill and griddle, accommodating anything from barbecue, to pizza, to brunch.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 33


life

HEALTH & WELLNESS

A Love for Local Greens SPRINGTIME PRODUCE YIELDS HEALTH BENEFITS.

BY KIMBER DEAN · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

S

pring is in the air, and seasonal

or Missouri farmers have Facebook

my body because most of the farmers

produce is bountiful! I’m from

pages, as well.

we use pick their produce the morning

Northern California, where

I love using local seasonal ingredients

of the delivery or farmers markets.

farmers markets have been popular

for many reasons. I like knowing I’m

Produce has the highest nutrients

since I was young. I was very pleased

supporting local farmers, families

within the first 24-48 hours of being

when I moved to Columbia by how

and our economy every time I buy

picked.

many local farmers are at the Columbia

locally and also that I know the exact

Farmers Market, but I still get asked

practices used by each farmer and have

with lettuces of all varieties, which are

how to find local farmers.

transparency about the way they farm.

great for switching up flavors, colors

One great resource is the directory

When I buy from a farmer, or a

Springtime produce is abundant

and nutrients in your salads, wraps,

of vendors on the Columbia Farmers

farmer’s market, I know the produce is

smoothies, juices, grilling or on top

Market’s website. Many individual farms

the highest nutrient density possible for

of tacos.

34 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


life

HEALTH & WELLNESS

MARINATED KALE

From Happy Food Cookbook Paleo | Grain Free | Vegan Preparation Time: 15-20 minutes Cook Time: 0 minutes Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients 1 bunch green curly kale, destemmed and roughly chopped 2-3 tablespoons avocado oil 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon sea salt

Directions Place kale in a metal bowl. Add avocado oil, garlic powder, onion powder, and sea salt. Massage kale by rubbing oil and seasoning into the kale gently with your hands until evenly coated. Serve cold as a side, as the lettuce in a salad, or you can sauté.

Lettuces are heart healthy, prevent

farmers and freeze it so that it

insomnia, aid digestion, are an

retains its nutritional value and

antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and

I can use it later in the year. It

are high in protein and omega-3s. As a

is also good to try and use every

bonus, their high-water content is extra

part of the produce you buy so

hydration. I love using Three Creeks

that you get your money’s worth.

Produce, The Sage Garden and Happy

For example, if I get carrots, I’ll save

Hallow farms for seasonal lettuces.

the tops for carrot top pesto or juicing.

Other local springtime produce I use

Perhaps what I use the most of

whether

at Nourish are items such as carrots

during the springtime is kale. We go

it is raw in a

from The Veggie Patch, celery from

through 30 to 60 pounds a week at

salad or being sauteed for a bowl. Check

Peggy’s Dome Garden, swiss chard from

Nourish depending on the season.

out the marinated kale recipe from my

Happy Hallow, spinach from Share Life

Kale yeah! We use local kale most of

first cookbook, Happy Food Cookbook.

Farm, microgreens from Stem to Table,

the year. Three Creeks Produce is our

and onions from Three Creeks Produce.

main supplier and is only available at

Kimber Dean is the co-owner of Nourish

It’s always best to buy in bulk from the

Clovers Natural Markets and a few

Café in Columbia and the author of

farmer for better pricing, if you can use

other select retailers.

"Happy Food" and "Happy Baking and

that much produce up in your recipes,

My favorite way to make kale more

or by freezing them for later. Sometimes

enjoyable to eat is by marinating. We

I will buy seasonal produce from

do this at the restaurant for all our kale,

Desserts." She is trained in both culinary arts and personal nutrition.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 35


life

ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS

Field Trip Pit Stop FINDING RELIEF ON THE ROAD.

BY JOHN DRAKE ROBINSON

O

ur family had an emergency. We were driving through a small Ozarks village, taking

a group of kids to visit Laura Ingalls Wilder’s house when the youngest announced she had to go potty. Now. We pulled over beside the town’s history museum. My wife Cheryl escorted the child quickly to the front door, where she saw the sign: No public restroom. The museum was closed, so we didn’t get a chance to test the museum’s humanity. Luckily, we made it down the road to a bank of public restrooms across from the Wilder house. The bathrooms were built strategically to cater to the needs of busloads of senior citizens who visit this historic home. On the way back to Columbia, we talked about Little House on the Prairie and life back then and the lack of indoor plumbing, which the children couldn’t fathom. “Why would somebody refuse to let you use their potty?” one child asked as we drove home. I told her things may change, if a bill in the Missouri legislature becomes law. The law would require any place of public accommodation to allow a customer to use an employee restroom when a public restroom is not immediately available. “But there’s a catch,” Cheryl told the children. “The customer must suffer

36 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


life

ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS

House of Representatives chamber of the Missouri State Capitol from Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, or

Arch in St. Louis as the official state

some other medical condition requiring

monument. “But my favorite monument

immediate access to a restroom. And the

is George Washington Carver,” one child

constitutional amendment to guarantee

customer must have a written doctor's

protested. “It has classrooms where you

the right of hunters and anglers in the

note explaining the condition.”

can do science experiments.”

state to engage in hunting and fishing.

“All that for a bathroom pass?” The

They all liked that the bill that would

likes sports.” I told them there’s a proposed

“Can’t we already do that?”

children were incredulous. They voted

require school districts to teach cursive

“I thought so,” came the chorus.

unanimously that they should always

writing by the fifth grade. And they

They weren’t sure if they liked making

have access to a restroom.

felt good that one proposed law would

Daylight Savings Time permanent. “But I

protect good Samaritans who rescue

do like playing outside past nine o’clock.”

Driving through Jefferson City we passed Missouri’s newly refurbished

animals from locked vehicles, if believing

Capitol dome, topped by the statue of

the animal is in danger. “Why does that

Ranchers Day." But they really got behind

Ceres, Roman goddess of agriculture,

require a law?” one student asked. I didn’t

designating May 10 of each year as

standing radiant after her recent

tell her that livestock are not covered.

"School Bus Drivers’ Appreciation Day."

makeover and skin rejuvenation to

They liked the bill designating every

They were okay with "Farmers and

“What about “Carload of kids to Little

repair a century of lightning strikes.

Aug. 31as "Random Acts of Kindness

Fewer schoolchildren will gather

Day," but wondered why every day isn’t

They think that’s a swell idea.

inside the Capitol beneath her feet

“Random Acts of Kindness Day."

Ceres smiled.

this year, to witness the workings of their government.

House on the Prairie Driver’s Day?”

Other measures caused similar debate. They were split on the proposed law

P.S.: Mansfield, MO now has new

prohibiting schools from suspending

public restrooms in the park across from

of schoolchildren discussed some of

kindergartners, or any child before

the history museum.

the proposals that will directly affect

they finish third grade. “It’s just a big

them. They unanimously endorsed

‘timeout,’” one kid reasoned.

So, as we passed Ceres, our carload

John Drake Robinson is a former director of the Missouri Division of Tourism

the proposal to make the corn dog the

They liked the option to participate in

official food of the Missouri State Fair.

a show choir or marching band to satisfy

and has driven every mile of highway

They understood why one legislator

the physical education requirement for

in the state. Read more stories at

wants to designate the Gateway

high school graduation. “Not everybody

johndrakerobinson.com

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 37


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Inside Columbia

flavor C O N T E N T S

40

New Eatery Aims To Corner The Market

43

Cocktail Creations: A Perfect Spring Sipper

45

Flirting With Focaccia

46

Classsic Combo: The Ultimate Chicken & Waffles

SOUPER IDEA

If cold pasta leaves you cold, try this trick: Serve it in a soup bowl! When noodles are spread out on a plate, they quickly get cold. Be sure to warm the soup bowl first — a cold one will cool your pasta right away. Also, mound the noodles up in the middle, so they stay hot as you eat.

50

Dining Guide


Jody Schomaker, Melissa Poelling, Casey Callans and Amanda Elliott

To Market, To Market

NEW SPOT OFFERS LOCALLY SOURCED, SCRATCH-MADE SOUPS, SALADS & SANDWICHES. BY PEG GILL · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

T

alk about a recipe for success!

Box. Although all involved are known

with global inspiration and hyper local

The new pop-up, The Strollway

for differing styles of food, they have a

influence and love bringing new brands

Market, which opened last

common denominator: “We love our

to life.”

month in the Harold’s downtown

town” Hamrah says. “We’re also all

location, is a collaboration from several

businesspeople, family people, cooks and

Casey Callans, who worked at both

very accomplished pros on Columbia’s

entrepreneurs. Functionally, Michael

Café Berlin and Nourish. “We plan

cuisine scene: Michael Urban and

is a clearly established and successful

to work hand-in-hand with Casey on

Melissa Poelling, co-owners of Harold’s

businessperson, Melissa is an assassin

inspiration,” Hamrah says, “and just

Doughnuts, and Ben Hamrah and

in the kitchen with an affinity for baked

plain having fun, and we’re very excited

Amanda Elliott, co-owners of Beet

goodies, Amanda and I build flavors

to see what they have in store!”

40 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

Rounding out the team is Head Chef


flavor

DINING OUT

The Market will not be a doughnut shop and will not be Middle Eastern. Hamrah says, “It will be a look and style of its own. But it will be operated by a group of friends with the common goal of representing the core values that we all believe in.” Adds Urban, “The community and loving your craft have always been the most important values at the core of anything Harold’s does, so we knew we had to stay true to that.” The collaboration is something they were all eager to do, according to Poelling. “As cooks and business people, we dream about opportunities to work with the friends you love and respect!” The idea came up when Elliott and Poelling were working together

We are all fans of the classics and feel that our historic little downtown would perfectly fit a classic little market right at its heart.

on a doughnut collaboration. Since

- BEN HAMRAH

Harold’s downtown location moved its production to its south location last year, the downtown spot has had more free time. The two met with the others involved and they decided to start a brand-new business. All agreed that a large void existed where locally sourced and scratchmade soups, sandwiches and salads are concerned. “This is where things started to take shape,” Hamrah says. “We are all fans of the classics and feel that our historic little downtown would perfectly fit a classic little market right at its heart. Historically, that area is considered the ‘Strollway District,’ so the name fell right into place. And here we are now, a new collaboration and a new chapter for a family business that has become a staple in our community.” Some would question the wisdom of opening at this time. But that’s precisely why The Strollway Market came to be. “This pandemic has completely changed

the restaurant industry forever,” Hamrah

love social media and plan to use it and

says.” We were all blindsided and all

email to keep our customers up to speed

tightened our ranks and settled in to

on everything we’re doing each day. We

weather the storm. Now here we are

will have staples but we’re not ready to

almost a year-in and we have to start

commit to them yet. We plan to let our

looking at what the future will look like.

new customers decide what stays and

People still need to eat, farmers still need

what rotates.”

to grow, and people still need to work.

There will always be a vegan option,

We’re just structuring ourselves in a way

and not just a “vegan” option, Poelling

that we never could have before. We

says. “We source what we consider to be

know what we’re dealing with now.”

the best produce available and therefore

Which is why for now, The Market is

it would almost be lazy of us not to

offering contactless pick-up and curbside

make them the stars. We will also have

only. No use of any big food delivery

plenty of gluten free options. We are

apps is planned.

also VERY excited to show off what we

The menu includes one sweet and one savory breakfast sandwich daily, as well as an assortment of monthly

consider to be an absolutely incredible gluten-free bread.” The Strollway Market is open

rotating soups, salads and sandwiches.

Tuesday – Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

“We will also have daily specials in each

Definitely worth taking a stroll to check

of those categories,” Elliott says. “We

it out.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 41


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flavor COCKTAIL

Rosé the Day Away THE PERFECT SPRING SIPPING COCKTAIL.

BY MADDY MELTON · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

T

his bright and effervescent spring/summer cocktail was inspired by my love of rosé and the rich taste of Plymouth gin. I had been toying around with the

idea of pairing the two together and after many different

Rosé the Day Away

variations, I finally came up with this fun cocktail. A few

Ingredients

of my other favorite ingredients really helped round it out

1¼ ounce Plymouth Gin

2 dashes orange flower

including Aperol, watermelon and orange flower water

½ ounce rosé watermelon syrup

water bitters

bitters. I combined the watermelon and rosé to create a

½ ounce Aperol

Splash of Prosecco

bright and juicy syrup and the Aperol helps balance out the

½ ounce lemon juice

sweetness with a touch of bitterness. Finally, a splash of Prosecco gives it that perfect amount of effervescence. This cocktail is great for hanging out on the patio on a beautiful weekend night or in the comfort of your own home.

To make the syrup Mix two ounces of a rosé of your choice, two ounces of sugar, one ounce of fresh watermelon and a pinch of salt in a pan. Bring to a boil, let cool, strain and use.

To make the drink

Maddy Melton is principal bartender at Flyover, where she has

Combine all ingredients, including syrup, but not Prosecco in

been inventing and mixing drinks since their opening.

a shaker. Shake well, pour into a coupe glass and top with a splash of Prosecco. Enjoy immediately.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 43


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flavor

DASH

Fo' Goodness Sake FOCACCIA BREAD INVITES INVENTIVENESS.

BY AMANDA ELLIOTT

IF I WERE TO TELL YOU that I adore focaccia it would be an understatement. If you have been at home exploring the world of baking, let me introduce you to your new best friend. This bread is remarkably easy to make and is delicious for eating on its own, as a base for pizzas, or sliced in half for a sandwich. The version here is a blank canvas for whatever you’re feeling frisky to add to it. Whether it's roasted tomatoes, caramelized onions, or herbs, this bread is a perfect vehicle to let your adventurous culinary heart play. Chef Amanda Elliott is the co-conspirator behind Beet Box and Milk and Honey, and co-owner of The Strollway Market, a recently opened eatery based out of Harold’s Doughnuts on S. Ninth Street. (See Dining Out page 48.) She is a regular contributor to Inside Columbia magazine and is always down for a spontaneous adventure. 

Focaccia Bread Ingredients

Directions

4 cups warm water

Preheat oven to 425. In a quart container, blossom yeast with sugar for 10 minutes. Add

2 tablespoons yeast

water/yeast mix to flour and add oil and salt. Combine, making sure to knead well. This

1 teaspoon sugar

can either be done in a stand mixer or by hand. Let stand at room temperature for 30

8 cups all-purpose flour

minutes to an hour till doubled. Oil an 18- x 13-inch sheet tray and spread dough out on

2 cups bread flour

pan; flip over to allow the oil to coat both sides. Let rest for 15 minutes and indent and

1 tablespoon salt

spread bread with fingers. If it springs back too easily, let it rest for 5 minutes and continue

1 cup oil plus 2 tablespoons more

working it out till it spans the whole pan. Salt the top and place in a preheated oven. Cook

for pan

10 minutes, turn and cook 8-10 minutes more. Take the temperature of the bread; it should be between 190-200. Let cool for 10 minutes and serve immediately. If you are using for the base of a thick pizza, par cook and add toppings and finish in the oven.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 45


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

A Waffly Good Combo THE ULTIMATE CHICKEN AND WAFFLES.

BY FOOD EDITOR BROOK HARLAN · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

M

y 6-year-old will go weeks at a time where she eats nothing but waffles. No, I do not make

WAFFLES The trick to the waffles is to not over-

too long it can have adverse effect and the chicken will lose too much moisture.

mix. You want the batter to just barely

I prefer using buttermilk, sour cream

them every time she wants them. I will

come together — this will prevent the

or yogurt. As long as you have about

make a few dozen at a time, freeze them

development of too much gluten. The

a pound or two cups total, you will be

on a tray, bag them and store them in

waffles can be ‘spiced up’ with just about

good for a single recipe. The acidity from

the freezer. With my generic recipe, I can

anything you want — a little cooked

the dairy will help tenderize the chicken

add chocolate chips, fruit, green onions,

bacon, pecans, sauteed shallots, green

as well as create a great contrasting

cooked bacon, toasted nuts or just about

onions or fresh herbs. Feel free to go

flavor with the outside crust after it’s

anything else. The recipe is also lenient

sweet or savory. I make three to four

fried. Herbs, spices and other flavoring

regarding the type of dairy that can be

times the batch below, let the waffles

are great to add at this point, but again,

used (milk, buttermilk, yogurt, sour cream,

cool, then freeze them lying flat on a

leave the salt until the last few hours,

alternatives such as oat, soy or almond

tray. After 8 to 12 hours, they can be

then mix.

milk, or a combination). This helps to use

removed and placed into zip closure

up things sitting in the fridge that may

bags. They can be frozen for 2 to 3

have an approaching expiration date.

months, then defrosted and cooked in

I love Panko breadcrumbs for most

BREADING

the toaster or oven. If you want to add

breading applications. Here, however,

what she wants to eat, not knowing what

an extra layer of crispness, the waffles

I prefer flour with some corn starch.

the answer may be, and not having a

can be thawed in the microwave for 20

The coating created by the marinade is

suggestion myself. Sometimes I regret

to 30 seconds until squishy, then quickly

enough to get the mixture of flour and

asking, but other times it makes me come

fried. This gives a great crisp outer layer

cornstarch to stick. One coating of the

up with ways to make that meal using

and a soft interior.

breading will do, but most of the time I

I have a bad habit of asking my wife

like to dip back into the marinade, then

items already on hand. One morning ‘Chicken and Waffles’ was the answer to

CHICKEN

back into the breading for a thicker,

my question. I thought for a second I had

I prefer boneless skinless chicken

crisper crust. The breading is also a great

waffles made. as well as breaded chicken,

thighs, but skinless chicken breast cut

place to add in some extra flavor or heat.

both frozen and ready to go. After we ate,

horizontally will also work. The chicken

Extra paprika, garlic powder, cayenne,

she said, ‘why have you never made this

should be about ½-inch thick. You can

chipotle powder, onion powder, salt, or

for me before?’ To which I replied, ‘you

pound it out with a meat mallet or the

black peppercan also create more flavor.

have never asked for it before.’

bottom of a small sauté pan.

The great thing about this recipe is that you can make three or four times as much

MARINADE

COOKING Whether you are pan-frying, deepfrying, using a tabletop fryer, or air

as you need, freeze the cooked waffles, as

I try to marinate between 8 to 24

well as the raw breaded chicken, for later

hours, but even 2 or 3 hours will help.

frying, use caution — it is hot! I like to

use. The chicken works great for chicken

Too much longer can make the chicken

fry between 360� to 375�. If the chicken’s

and waffles but could easily be turned

start to break down and lose too much

on the thicker side, maybe closer to 350�.

into a fried chicken sandwich, chicken

texture. Salt the last 3 to 4 hours before

You want to find that sweet spot where

parm or fried and sliced for a salad.

cooking, but not sooner. If the salt is on

the crust is getting crisp with a little

46 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 47


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

color, but not overcooked on the outside and raw on the inside. You should see a slow steady bubble while frying, that may get slower as it gets closer to getting done. You are looking for an internal temperature of 165� in the thickest part of the chicken.

FREEZING (Waffles) The waffles will need to be completely made and cooked, then cooled, to be frozen. They can be laid out onto a cookie sheet to cool, then put into the freezer until frozen all the way through. They can then be put into a zip closure bag in the freezer for 2 to 3 months. You can take them out as you need and cook in the toaster or oven until heated through.

FREEZING (Chicken) I find it best to freeze the chicken after it is breaded. It has the best properties being cooked after being frozen, as opposed to cooking it and then freezing it. This causes a little more concern because you will have raw chicken uncovered in the freezer. Please be careful and make sure not to overload so the chicken doesn't drip on other items. I find it best to cook directly from frozen. Start with cooler oil, closer to 300�, then turn the heat up after the first 3 to 5 minutes to 365�. You can then cook as you would normally until the chicken registers 165� in the thickest part.

TOPPING You can use real maple syrup, flavored syrup, honey or whatever other sweet substance you want on your waffles. The same goes for the hot chicken oil. As always, take or leave items listed, depending on how ridiculous you want to be.

WAFFLE VARIATIONS (For more than just Chicken and Waffles)

SAVORY

SWEET

· Cook 4 slices of bacon until crisp, add whites of 3 thinly sliced scallions at the end to cook. Leave the butter out of the recipe and add bacon and fat with scallions once cool, in place of butter. Top finished dish with thinly sliced green scallion tops

· Cook 4 slices of bacon, add 3 tablespoons of brown sugar after the bacon’s crisp. Then turn off the heat and stir in. Leave the butter out of the recipe and add bacon and fat with brown sugar in place of butter once cooled

· Add ½ cup blue cheese and ½ cup toasted pecans or other nuts to the batter · Add ½ cups sliced shallots, 2 teaspoons capers, 3 ounces chopped smoked salmon to batter · Add ½ cup diced sauteed ham, and ½ cup diced swiss cheese, and 3 sliced scallions

· Add ½ cup chocolate chips to the batter when stirring · Add 1 cup chopped fruit to the batter when stirring · Add ½ cup toasted nuts to the batter when stirring · Add ½ cup raisins to ½ cup warm rum and let sit for at least 30 minutes. · Add to batter one broken up Heath bar

48 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

CHICKEN AND WAFFLES R E C I P E

CHICKEN Marinade

2 cups buttermilk 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon paprika 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 tablespoon dry oregano

Breading

2 cups flour 1 cup corn starch 2 tablespoons kosher salt 1 tablespoon paprika 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon chipotle powder (optional for extra spicy) 1 teaspoon cayenne powder (optional for extra spicy) 1 teaspoon baking powder (optional for a slight puff in the crust)

DIRECTIONS Cook chicken using preferred method at a temperature between 360 to 375 degrees, closer to 350 degrees if the chicken’s on the thicker side. The crust should get crisp with a little color, but not overcooked on the outside and raw on the inside. Watch for a slow steady bubble while cooking, which may get slower as chicken gets closer to being done. The internal temperature in the thickest part of the chicken should read 165 degrees.

WAFFLES (Makes 4 to 6 waffles) 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 1 cup plain yogurt or sour cream or milk 1 cup milk or buttermilk 4 large eggs 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted Melter butter, oil or spray as needed for the waffle iron

SYRUP 4 ounces maple syrup 4 ounces honey 2 ounces Bourbon Pinch of salt 3 tablespoons butter

Mix all of the dry ingredients in a bowl. Mix all of the wet ingredients. Mix the dry ingredients into the wet, just until incorporated; a few lumps are fine. Make waffles as directed by instructions that came with the waffle maker.

DIRECTIONS Bring the maple syrup and honey to a simmer for about 7 to 10 minutes until the mixture becomes slightly thick (before it becomes caramel). Add the butter and salt and simmer until it becomes emulsified. Keep warm until ready to serve.

HOT CHICKEN BRUSHING OIL 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon chipotle powder (1 Tbsp for extra spicy) 1 teaspoon cayenne (1 Tbsp for extra spicy) 1 teaspoon pepper flakes ½ teaspoon garlic powder 2 tablespoons brown sugar ½ teaspoon kosher salt

Place all of the spices into a sauté pan. When all of the chicken has been fried, put about a cup of hot oil into the pans and stir the ingredients. Once the chicken has been fried, you can brush with the hot oil mixture or put the whole piece of chicken in the pan and coat both sides.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 49


flavor

DINING GUIDE

This section typically offers a rotating selection of restaurants in Columbia drawn from our online dining guide, but this issue we decided to mix it up. The following restaurants have all opened in Columbia within the past six months and bring something new to Columbia’s dining scene. To include your restaurant in our online dining guide, email peg@insidecolumbia.net.

CHI-TOWN EATS AMERICAN

Goat’s offerings include beans from Brazil, Ethiopia and Indonesia, among

THE STROLLWAY MARKET DELI & MARKET

2900 Trimble Rd #105

other countries.

114 S. Ninth St.

Chi-Town Eats’ owner, Angelo Smith

This collaboration from the seasoned

ELLIANNA’S DONUT SHOP DESSERT

pros behind Harold’s Doughnuts and

City to Columbia. The Chicago-inspired eatery that opened in October offers

1105 Grindstone Pkwy Ste 101

Columbia cuisine scene for locally

classics such as the Vienna beef hot dog,

Columbia’s newest donut shop, located

sourced, made-from-scratch sandwiches,

best eaten without ketchup of course.

near the DMV South office, Ellianna’s

soups and salads. The menu includes

For a true sampling of what they have to

delivers on their motto of “All you need

one sweet and one savory breakfast

offer, try the Cajun Fried Catfish, served

is love & donuts.” With traditional

sandwich daily, as well as an assortment

with fries, or the Gyro plate.

offerings such as glazed, long johns

of monthly rotating soups, salads and

Jr. wanted to bring a taste of the Windy

Beet Box looks to fill a void in the

and bear claws, and specialty pastries

sandwiches. It will also have daily

WICKED ASIAN WINGS ASIAN

such as biscuit and croissant breakfast

specials in each of those categories. For

sandwiches and kolaches, there’s

now, The Market is offering contactless

807 E Walnut St

something for everyone.

pick-up and curbside only, and is open

Since opening in October where Thip’s Wings has been serving up tasty boneless

CRAZY GOOD BURRITOS MEXICAN

and bone-in wings, with a wide variety

815 Business Loop 70 E

of flavor options. Try the Honey Garlic

With fresh ingredients and traditional

DELIA’S MEXICAN GRILL MEXICAN

Sriracha, Sweet Korean or Asian Zing

Mexican offerings, including Quesabirrias

201 N. 10th St.

wings, or any of their other 13 flavors.

and Sope, Crazy Good Burritos has been

One of the newest eateries to open in

Sides include fries, St. Louis-style fried

bringing authentic cuisine to the Business

the past six months, Delia’s debuted in

rice, crab Rangoon and egg rolls.

Loop since its opening in September. For

December 2020. The restaurant serves

breakfast, try the Homestyle Chilaquiles

authentic Mexican food with a flourish.

TOASTY GOAT COFFEE

or Suegra, an egg and Colby jack cheese

They’re known for their made-at-your-

between two yellow corn tortillas and

table-side guacamole and traditional

3301 W Broadway Business Park Ct. Suite A

topped with Suegra sauce, avocado slices

street tacos, including birria tacos.

Located inside Donut D-Light’s shop,

and queso fresco. Meat options for lunch

Also worth a try? Delia’s amazing spicy

Toasty Goat Coffee offers espresso and

and dinner, depending on the item,

margaritas (strawberry, cucumber and

coffee beverages sure to pair perfectly

include Carne Asada, (Pollo) chicken,

mango, to name a few.) Warning: These

with a sweet treat. Toasty Goat uses

Chorizo, Al Pastor (grilled pork) and

bevvies pack some zip in their sip! There

Coffee Shrub, a coffee distributor with

Lengua (tongue).

are plenty of options for fish, shellfish

Asian Bistro used to be, Wicked Asian

direct-trade agreements with coffee growers, which means coffee farmers are paid a fair price for their efforts. Toasty

50 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

INSIDE

Tuesday – Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. COLUMBIA (See story page 40.)

and veggie entrees, too.


CIVIL ENGINEERING TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING FORENSIC AND INVESTIGATIVE ENGINEERING Allstate Consultants LLC (Allstate) is a civil engineering consulting firm headquartered in Columbia, Missouri, and is committed to diversifying services by hiring competent, hardworking individuals in the disciplines of engineering, surveying, geotechnical and investigation.

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flavor

DINING OUT

SAKE SUSHI 16 S. 10th St.

Not technically “new,” Sake did reopen this past December under new ownership. In addition to traditional sushi items, Sake offers a series of signature rolls, including the Mizzou: spicy tuna, avocado, and cucumber topped with tuna, and the Lemon Drop: crab, cucumber, avocado, salmon and lemons. Other tasty options include its Eggs & Bacon, starring seared pork belly and braised oyster sauce, and two kinds of Sake Sliders: beef, ginger cilantro compound, greens, sriracha aioli and sue pickles, or: panko fried pork, napa slaw, sue cucumbers, and tonkatsu glaze. Open Monday - Saturday noon to 9 p.m. and Sunday 3 to 9 p.m. for dine in and carry out.

(left to right) Robin Weatherford, Komar Yem and Deb Rust

52 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


Phyllis Nichols is the State Farm agent who SHOWS UP and FIGHTS for you when you have to make a claim!

HOME · AUTO · LIFE · BUSINESS · HEALTH · PET · PROPERTY

Phyllis Nichols, Agent 1006 West Blvd N | Columbia, MO 65203 573-443-8727 | phyllisjnichols.com |


T

he Columbia community is home to a broad array of successful businesses — some wellestablished and decades-old, others recently started and up-and-coming. Although these companies span diverse industries, including health care, finance, energy and more, one thing they all share in common is the caliber of their leadership. Not only are they run by

individuals of immense integrity and vast vision, they are run by professionals who innovate and influence with their thinking as well. On the pages that follow, we hear from some of Columbia’s foremost thought leaders in the business world. They will also be featured in a short "Ted Talk-" style video, available for viewing on Inside Columbia magazine’s website in early March.


Sponsored

R E N E WA BLE E N ERGY

CRAIG STICHTER | ENERGYLINK

F

ounded here in Missouri in 2010, EnergyLink is an engineering, procurement and construction firm that installs renewable

energy and energy efficiency products for commercial businesses and nonprofits. Currently working with a variety of organizations across America, the company also handles funding and financial services to make the energy project process as simple as possible. You only work with the EnergyLink team — no intermediaries. The new Biden administration has demonstrated a commitment to renewable technology and energy efficiency with funding opportunities advancing. EnergyLink’s Project Executive, Craig Stichter, says the company has a clear vision of the future of solar and how to capitalize on it. He says the President's commitment to combat climate change, which includes reentering the Paris Accord, will prompt notable changes in the solar, renewables and energy efficiency space. These include energy storage tax

In addition, several funding platforms

looking to diversify by investing in large

credits and infrastructure spending for

designed specifically for solar systems

renewable energy projects using funding

electric grid resilience (tied to battery

for commercial and industrial energy

vehicles, netting them ROI as well as

technology either on the utility or

projects — such as C-PACE energy

corporate goodwill.

customer side).

bonds and SSAs — have been field tested over the past five years, Stichter

ENERGYLINK

single access tracking and bifacial solar

says, drawing intense interest from

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panels, are making solar more beneficial

the investment banking world, private

Columbia, MO 65201

and profitable than ever before, he says.

equity world, and oil portfolio investors

goenergylink.com

Groundbreaking technologies, such as

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 55


Sponsored

REGE N ERATI VE M ED I C I N E

DR. KRISTIN OLIVER | BLUETAIL MEDICAL GROUP

A

s co-founder of Bluetail Medical Group, Dr. Kristin Oliver offers a natural alternative to surgery and traditional pain management

for patients with orthopedic injuries and chronic pain, an area known as regenerative medicine. “Our group's focus is on orthobiologics —platelet rich plasma and stem cell therapy,” Oliver says. “We named our clinic after the blue-tailed skink because when predators grab its bright blue tail, it has a tendency to fall off. Because the lizard has stem cells at the base of its tail, it can regenerate a new one,” she explains. Oliver completed her residency and fellowship in Sports Medicine at the University of Missouri with clinical training at the Columbia Orthopaedic Group. She began performing orthobiologic injections 15 years ago, and has done more ortho-biologic procedures than any other provider in the U.S. “Our focus is platelet rich plasma and stem cell therapies, but we are studying the role of exosomes,” she says. These

articles in peer reviewed journals and

tiny sacs shuttle proteins and genetic

present at the national level routinely,”

information between cells and could

Oliver says. She hopes that one day the

potentially be used to carry molecules

novel therapy will be completely covered

that stop disease.

by insurance.

With six clinics in five states, Bluetail Medical Group is paving the way scientifically with regular meetings with the FDA. “We have published multiple

56 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

BLUETAIL MEDICAL GROUP 2807 W. Broadway Columbia, MO 65203 bluetailmedicalgroup.com


Sponsored

C O MM ERC I A L C ON STR UC TI ON

RANDY & DAVID COIL | COIL CONSTRUCTION

N

o one could have predicted the

Plus, many companies’ space needs were

students for specific jobs in the workforce.

turn 2020 took. Columbia’s

impacted. “Some are consolidating while

Finally, he says Coil Construction will

local economy was hit hard

others want more space to spread out,”

continue to use innovative technology to

by COVID-19, particularly

Coil explains.

serve its clients better — from on-site job

restaurants and retailers. But commercial

Companies are also eager to protect

cameras that provide real-time updates —

construction was not immune: “While

the health and safety of their teams, he

to drones. Clients, too, will be integrating

our trajectory may have bent, we're

says, using products and systems typically

more technology throughout their

still looking forward to building a better

found in health care settings and offices to

systems, he says, since green building

community,” says David Coil, executive

make them more germ-free. “Air quality is

trends are becoming more affordable,

VP of Coil Construction.

key, with a focus on innovations in HVAC

from solar panels to geothermal.

He points to several resulting developments and trends coming

systems and ionization products.” Coil says the construction industry

COIL CONSTRUCTION

into play. “Online retail, accelerated

will continue to need a skilled workforce,

209 E. Broadway

by the pandemic, is driving a need for

and must aggressively recruit, and that

Columbia, MO 65203

distribution centers and warehouses

we need to align our education systems

coilconstruction.com

with sophisticated technology,” he says.

with the needs of business, to prepare

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 57


Sponsored

BUSI N E SS I N SURA N C E

CODY THORNE | NAUGHT-NAUGHT AGENCY

I

n 1972, Tom, Rick and Harry Naught of Carrollton, Mo. started a small insurance agency in Jefferson City. They then expanded to other

Missouri locations, including Columbia. After merging with national broker AssuredPartners 3½ years ago, NaughtNaught is now the fifth largest property and casualty broker in the U.S. Cody Thorne, who’s been a producer with Naught-Naught Columbia for nine years, added the title of vice president/ sales team leader a year ago. He now helps with recruiting, client retention and business development, in addition to his producer role. “When people ask what I do, I say I just try to block and tackle well — i.e., do the fundamentals right, so that business owners’ insurance programs win,” Thorne says. He looks for financial levers business owners can pull to impact cost trends and stretch their dollars. He’s excited about the resources and national capabilities the merger has afforded him, allowing him to tap into subject matter experts in over 30 unique industry verticals and specializations. The insurance industry is currently

offer $2 million and we have to build towers.” He says now more than ever, he

experiencing a hard market, Thorne says,

operates with a “servant mindset," helping

with pricing challenges and underwriters

his clients with issues or challenges they

less open to quoting. “Umbrella carriers

face. Whenever a client comes to him with

are limiting the coverage amounts they’ll

a problem, he responds, "We’ll find the

offer,” he says. “Where in the past a carrier

solution together.”

would offer $10 million limits, now it will

58 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

NAUGHT-NAUGHT AGENCY 3928 S. Providence Road Columbia, MO 65203 naught-naught.com


Sponsored

FA M I LY M ED I C I N E

DR. DANIELLE KELVAS · DR. BRIDGET GRUENDER | LIBERTY FAMILY MEDICINE

L

iberty Family Medicine provides a

imaging, telemedicine, as well as after-

by Liberty. The availability of same and

unique approach to your medical

hours care for urgent concerns.”

next day appointments — coupled with

care that can save individuals and

Physicians in insurance-based clinics

all of the other benefits — make it easy

care for up to 3000 patients; with

to see why Liberty’s unique approach to

on a complete health care solution. As a

Liberty’s relationship-based approach,

health care is largely unequaled and may

Direct Primary Care practice, the focus

physicians carry between 600-800

be the answer you’ve been looking for.

revolves around the relationship between

patients, ensuring personalized care for

Regardless of whether you have health

the patient and their personal physician.

patients of all ages. Examples of services

insurance, reach out and learn more

offered include well-child checks,

about how Liberty can put the CARE

“Patients pay a monthly membership

well-woman care, depression/anxiety,

back in your health care.

fee which offers access to full primary

diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity/

medical care from their personal

weight loss and healthy living options.

business groups between 30-60%

Owner Dr. Bridget Gruender explains:

physician. Patients benefit from zero

By offering as many in-house services

LIBERTY FAMILY MEDICINE 2614 Forum Blvd., Ste. 100

copays, wholesale prescriptions

as possible, referrals only occur when

Columbia, MO 65203

dispensed in the clinic, no cost in-

absolutely necessary, resulting in 90%

libertyfamilymed.com

office procedures, discounted labs and

of your medical needs being handled

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 59


Sponsored

OR THOD ON TI C CA RE

DAVID RIES, D.D.S., M.S. | ROBINSON & RIES ORTHODONTICS

A

s an orthodontic specialist, Dr. David Ries has vast experience with both children and adults. His practice utilizes a variety of

techniques including clear ceramic and metal braces, and Invisalign. In fact, Ries is the leading Invisalign provider among mid-Missouri specialists. Besides an esthetic smile, there are many functional reasons for orthodontic treatment, and not just for the young. As we age, Ries says, our lower teeth continue to crowd up and hit heavy on the back of our upper teeth, making it harder for a dentist to easily provide care. “We can work with your dentist to develop a plan using orthodontics to restore your bite and help make present and future dental work last longer,” he says. And there’s no need to dread treatment, he adds: “Impressions that make you gag are not necessary in our office. We utilize intraoral digital scanners and 3D printing to make customized appliances.” The cutting-edge tech doesn’t end there. The practice offers a HIPPA-compliant

dental costs later because although teeth

virtual consultation platform. Simply go to

alignment may improve temporarily,

their website and follow the link. You take

interferences in the bite can lead to joint

five quick teeth selfies and within 48 hours

issues, relapse of tooth movement, wear

their team will set up a tele consult with Dr.

and fracture of your teeth due to lack

Ries to discuss treatment options.

of monitoring.”

Ries cautions against using the DIY “at home” tooth alignment options being marketed. “They can lead to increased

60 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

ROBINSON & RIES ORTHODONTICS 1609 Chapel Hill Road., Ste. B Columbia, MO 65203 robinson-ries.com


Sponsored

A RC H I TEC T URE

JEN HEDRICK · BRAD STEGEMANN · NICK BORGMEYER

SOA ARCHITECTURE

I

f Jen Hedrick, president of SOA

our clients at whatever point they come

Architecture, could change one

to us and craft our approach to align

thing about clients, it would be their

with their level of project understanding,

suited to implement a project that’s

timing. “Some believe they shouldn't

overall goals and expectations,” she

already mostly figured out,” she says.

get an architect involved in a project

says. “Our tried-and-true processes are

“But in many cases, it is critical to choose

until they have it all figured out, but the

designed to help them make confident,

an architect accustomed to leading the

opposite is true,” she says. “Involving

well-informed decisions.”

effort of figuring it out — one highly

SOA early in the game will clarify the

One size does not fit all, when it

obtain a building permit. Many architecture firms are well-

experienced in feasibility and preliminary

process, solidify solutions and eliminate

comes to projects, she says. They

the frustration of unforeseen hurdles

may be new free-standing buildings,

associated with costs, codes, permitting

renovations, remodels, additions to or

SOA ARCHITECTURE

and the construction process.”

adaptive reuse of an existing building,

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or tenant infill projects. If it involves

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they want and have a firm budget and

walls, floors and ceilings, Hedrick says

(573) 443-1407 | soa-inc.com

timeline, Hedrick says most aren’t sure

consulting with an architect may not only

of how to achieve their goals. “We meet

be advantageous but is likely required to

While some clients know exactly what

design studies, such as SOA.”

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 61


Sponsored

PHYSI CA L TH ERA PY

LINDSAY BELL · MARK DEMPSEY · SHELTON BLEVINS · TAALOR STEVENSON

PEAK SPORT & SPINE

P

eak Sport & Spine is the largest

care plans for all patients, along

the Central Missouri region committed

privately owned outpatient

with many convenient locations,

to outstanding, patient-centered

physical therapy company in

and the company is a provider for

physical therapy. Currently, Peak’s ever-

Missouri. As a 100% therapist

all major insurance plans. Peak is

expanding clinic base includes 37 offices

owned company, Peak has a truly

able to schedule a patient's initial

throughout the state of Missouri.

patient-centered approach, so your

evaluation within 24-48 hours and

At Peak, our entire staff looks

recovery is directed by you — not a

offers flexible hours for their patients.

forward to helping you meet your goals,

hospital or health care corporation.

Some specialties include vestibular

getting you back into life at your peak

Peak’s clinicians are allowed to base their

dysfunction, dry needling, fall

physical potential.

professional decisions on what is best for

prevention, Kinesio® taping to alleviate

you. This means the company’s success

inflammation and pain, and both laser

PEAK SPORT & SPINE

is built on the trust Peak develops with

and manual therapy.

Three Columbia locations:

its patients during their care, as well as

Peak was formed in 1994 as the

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referrals from practitioners who rely on

result of a merger between Peak

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the outstanding results Peak achieves for

Performance Physical Therapy and

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their patients.

Sports Medicine and Sport and Spine

peaksportspine.com

Peak clinicians offer individualized 62 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

Rehab — two companies with roots in


Sponsored

BUSI N E SS LAW

TIM GERDING | EVANS & DIXON, LLC

D

epending on where a business is in its lifecycle, its owners may require advice or representation on a wide range of legal matters:

contract negotiation, real estate and leases, labor/employer representation, LLC agreements, partner agreements and disputes/litigation, company termination, mergers/acquisitions, trademark/patent/copyright, to name a few. Evans & Dixon has attorneys whose practices are tailored to each of these areas, to provide the specialized counsel you need. Tim Gerding and fellow Evans & Dixon Columbia attorney Josh Oxenhandler both have deep roots here and are following in their respective families’ footsteps to continue a decades-long history of serving the business and legal needs of our community. Gerding knows an experienced business law attorney can help a business start, grow and succeed while protecting itself in the process. He knows local business owners appreciate an attorney

medical marijuana and COVID related

important decision and should not

who is experienced but also cognizant

issues — choosing the right attorney is

be based solely upon advertisements

of the owner’s legal costs in view of the

more crucial than ever. Not only should

success of the overall project — as well

your attorney have a solid foundation

EVANS & DIXON, LLC

as an attorney willing to take risks while

in traditional legal learning, they should

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factoring in critical legal calculations to

also be current on the rapidly changing

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ensure maximum profit with the lowest

legal issues of today — something

evans-dixon.com

level of liability exposure possible.

the attorneys at Evans & Dixon pride

With so many new and uncharted opportunities for businesses — such as

themselves on. The choice of a lawyer is an

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 63


CHECK OUT THE LATEST EDITION

COVERING COLUMBIA'S BUSINESS COMMUNITY

64 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


PIONEERING PROMOTION Rawlins To Shape Shelter

BUILDING BRIDGES Couple Brings Hope To Needy Nations

CHARTING A COURSE Leaders Look To 2030


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CONTENTS Inside Columbia’s CEO • www.insidecolumbia.net

94

69

NEWS BRIEFS: The Buzz on Como Biz

70

SHAKE IT UP: Michael Aslanidis Bottles Greek Seasoning

76

UP & COMING: The Ladder Report

78

BREAKING BENCHMARKS: Rawlins Named New Shelter President

94 CHANGING THE WORLD: The Cooks Provide Educational Opportunities Worldwide 97

CEO ROUNDTABLE: Columbia’s Leaders Speak Out on Columbia 2030

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ON THE COVER: Randa Rawlins makes history as the 13th (and first female) president of Shelter Mutual Insurance Co. Additionally, five other women are serving in executive positions at the top of Shelter’s hierarchy. SPRING 2021

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STAFF Chief Executive Officer Carla Leible cleible@zrgmail.com Publisher Emeritus Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net Publisher Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net Associate Editors Olivia DeSmit odesmit@insidecolumbia.net Peg Gill peg@insidecolumbia.net Contributing Writer Jack Wax Photo Editor L.G. Patterson lgpatterson@insidecolumbia.net

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Laura Fuchs lfuchs@insidecolumbia.net Blake Dunlap bdunlap@insidecolumbia.net Inside Columbia’s CEO magazine Zimmer Strategic Communications 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200 Columbia, MO 65201 573-875-1099 • www.ColumbiaCEO.com Inside Columbia’s CEO is published quarterly by Zimmer Strategic Communicatios LLC, 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, MO 65201, 573-875-1099. Copyright Zimmer Communications, 2021. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Not responsible for omissions or information which has been misrepresented to the magazine. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo.

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N E WS BRI E FS

OPENING BELL

News You Need To Know PLANS REVEALED FOR LAKESIDE DEVELOPMENT IN ASHLAND INCLUDING OUTDOOR ENTERTAINMENT Local entrepreneur Nic Parks touts his new Lakeside development in Ashland as “the ultimate outdoor entertainment and dining destination in mid-Missouri.” The development will be situated off Hwy. 63 at the Columbia Regional Airport exit. The 37-acre site will be highlighted by a large lake in the center of the property. The lake will be flanked by entertainment options and indoor and outdoor event spaces, including a drive-in and amphitheater. The property will be developed over several years and the master plan encompasses six phases. A large playground with a splash pad, ziplines and climbing structures, golf and a restaurant and bar are also proposed. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring. Parks also owns Silverball, Level Up and is CEO of The Pinball Company and Parks Amusements.

COMO COOKS SHARED KITCHEN IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS AT MIZZOU NORTH CoMo Cooks, a shared commercial kitchen at Mizzou North, is now officially open for business. The venture will give cooks a chance to turn their recipes into a business reality, regardless of background, income or status. The goal is to increase entrepreneurial success by providing accessible, inclusive and affordable kitchen space for starting and expanding local food-based businesses. Overseeing the kitchen is Bryan Maness, a restaurant industry professional with experience in kitchen management

and project launches. COMO Cooks offers tiered memberships starting at 10 hours a month with hourly fees starting at $15 an hour. REDI and The Loop CID teamed up to receive one of six national grants designed to help Columbia identify and support local, small-scale manufacturing along the Business Loop Corridor. The shared kitchen was a recommendation of the public visioning process.

NEW $30 MILLION SINCLAIR SCHOOL OF NURSING FACILITY UNDER CONSTRUCTION Construction has started on the University of Missouri’s new Sinclair School of Nursing facility, which is expected to be completed by spring 2022. The 64,585-square-foot, $30 million facility will be donor-funded and located at the same site on MU’s campus as the previous Sinclair School of Nursing. The new facility is expected to help meet the nursing shortage of an ever-increasing aging population. The new facility will be equipped with a simulation center where students can practice the fundamentals of patient care using state-of-the-art task trainers and simulators. The simulator rooms mimic a hospital setting and allow students to practice real-world scenarios that require them to think critically through complex patient issues and prioritize

their responses quickly. In the new facility, nursing students will be able to enjoy a commons space with a kitchenette and room for relaxing, conference and huddle rooms. The new building will allow the school to accept more qualified applicants and have the capacity to educate and graduate more nurses.

FORMER UM SYSTEM PRESIDENT GARY FORSEE DONATES $2 MILLION TO NEXTGEN Former University of Missouri System president Gary Forsee and Sherry Forsee have committed $2 million to support research that will provide data analytics to power the NextGen Precision Health initiative and other precision health research across the UMC system’s four universities. The gift will support the NextGen Data Science and Analytics Innovation Center, or dSAIC, which is based at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and operates

in partnership with the University of Missouri-Columbia. UMKC will receive $1.2 million and MU will receive $800,000. Gary Forsee, a Kansas City resident and former UM System president, is a 1972 graduate of Missouri University of Science and Technology. He serves as a member of the UMKC Board of Trustees and an emeritus director of the UMKC Foundation as well as a member of the NextGen Advisory Board. SPRING 2021

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OPENING BELL

TH E B UZZ ON COM O BI Z

Opa! Locally Created Greek Seasoning Hits The Grocery Shelves

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f you’re looking to spice up your food, look no further than Opa’s Greek Seasoning. Michael Aslanidis, co-owner of G&D Steakhouse, created the seasoning five or six years ago to enhance the restaurant’s Greek Pork Souvlaki dish, and it was a big hit. “I tried hundreds of times to get the right combination,” he says, until it was perfect. He put the souvlaki dish on the menu, and the customers kept coming back for more. “They suggested that I bottle the seasoning, and every year we’ve sold more and more of it.” Finally, in 2020, Aslanidis decided it was the right time to pursue marketing the seasoning to a larger audience. “In 2020, people were staying in and cooking more,” he explains. He compiled the nutrition information, created the labels, purchased the bottles, and uncovered the perfect name. “Opa is versatile; it means several different things,” he says. “It’s a cheer, or hurrah, and I can imagine people saying ‘Opa’ as they sprinkle it on food.” Customers can buy Opa Greek Seasoning at all three HyVee stores, Hoss’s Market, Amazon and, of course, at G&D Steakhouse. It can be purchased locally for $6.99. What’s the best food to sprinkle the seasoning on? “Honestly, you can put it on chicken, pork, burgers, vegetables, potatoes, popcorn — even frozen pizza. It just goes well on everything,” he says.

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MUTRUX AUTOMOTIVE We are your family friendly neighborhood full-service station.

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automotive

ARE YOU SET FOR WARMER WEATHER? With winter’s constant freezing and thawing, and water seeping into the pavement and expanding, many roads develop vehicledamaging cracks and potholes. By the time spring rolls around, your car could likely use some TLC, after it’s weathered winter’s worst in the way of those punishing potholes, freezing temps and the assault of salt on its undercarriage. Certain systems and components of your car or truck get taxed more heavily — such as your battery and suspension. Plus, it’s wise to have your vehicle checked for any rusted-out parts. Your brakes might need a break — or perhaps pads — after all that frequent and repeated pumping to prevent icy slides and fender benders.

WE’RE READY TO SPRING INTO SERVICE At Mutrux Automotive, when we service your vehicle, we also check many things that ensure you can roll into warmer weather trouble-free. We’ll also make suggestions as to what is needed to keep you safe in your vehicle as the season changes.

“Consider your windshield wipers and washers. We checked a car today and recommended windshield wiper blades. The customer said, ‘Oh yeah, I meant to tell you about those, we just moved here from California, and you know it doesn’t rain much there.’” - CINDY MUTRUX, CO-OWNER

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CHECK OUT WHAT WE’LL CHECK Cooling System Cooling systems do more than cool your engine. They also provide AC for the passenger compartment. That’s certainly something you want functioning fully come hot and humid weather! It’s important to maintain the appropriate

Tires Proper tire inflation is key. Every 10° change in ambient temperature could mean a gain or loss of one pound per square inch (PSI.) This means you should check your pressure regularly and add air to your tires as needed.

coolant-to-water ratio.

Brakes

Oil

While winter’s cold weather doesn’t necessarily harm your

Your motor oil’s responsible for lubricating the various moving components of your engine. Living in the Midwest with

brakes, a thorough inspection can keep them functioning at their best, particularly if you’re planning any summer road trips.

harsh winters, and then super-hot summers, it’s important to perform proper regular oil changes for the lubrication in the changing temps.

Battery Your battery needs to be maintained to provide the proper cranking amperage for starting your vehicle. Most batteries have a life expectancy of 3 to 5 years. This time slips quickly away as long as the car is starting. Then one morning you go to start your car and all you hear is a grunt.

Wiper Fluid/Blades

Belts, hoses, spark plugs, wires and cables These can go bad at any time of year, but if they go bad during the summer, you could be stranded somewhere in the sweltering sun.

Suspension With winter’s punishing potholes and cracks, it’s wise to make sure your suspension’s still in good shape.

With spring storms, and the onset of allergy season, your wipers may need to go into overdrive. Pollen can collect and coat your windshield, partially obscuring visibility. You want to make sure your blades are in good shape and your washer reservoir is filled with wiper fluid.

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ALERT OR ALARM? The check engine light comes on when there’s a problem affecting the vehicle’s exhaust emissions. If it comes on and stays on, make an appointment with a repair shop to have it checked. If the check engine light begins flashing repeatedly, it means the catalytic converter’s overheating. If this happens, drive to a repair shop immediately for further diagnosis.


automotive

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THE MUTRUX TEAM can take care of all your warmer weather automotive needs—and help keep small issues from turning into big ones.

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AT THE PUMP

You can stay cool and comfy in your car: Just pull up to the pump and let a friendly, smiling, knowledgeable member of the Mutrux team:

PUMP YOUR GAS CHECK YOUR ENGINE FLUIDS WASH YOUR WINDSHIELD CHECK THE AIR PRESSURE IN YOUR TIRES AND FILL THEM TO THE CORRECT PRESSURE IF YOU GET GAS PROVIDE FREE TREATS FOR YOUR KIDS AND YOUR DOGS GRAB A SNACK OR DRINK FOR YOU

MUTRUX AUTOMOTIVE 2100 W. Rollins Road 573-445-3313 | 573-445-1070 mutruxauto.com

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OPENING BELL

The Ladder Report Look Who’s Moving Up In Business ED STANSBERRY has been named executive director for the VOLUNTARY ACTION CENTER. Stansberry is filling the role that was opened by Nick Foster, who retired after nine years of service to the organization. He has a background as an entrepreneur, starting a paper distribution company with his brother in 1994. Stansberry is a Moberly native and relocated to Columbia in 1988 with his wife, Syd. He has strong roots with Broadway Christian Church having served as a board chair, co-chair of their vision committee and other roles within the church.

DR. DAVID RUSSELL has been named the interim president of COLUMBIA COLLEGE. He will serve in this position while a committee conducts a national search for a permanent president in the coming months. The college’s former leader, Dr. Scott Dalrymple, resigned in midNovember. Russell has been a member of the college’s Board of Trustees since 2016 and had served as chair of the college’s governing body since July 1. He also served as Missouri’s Commissioner of Higher Education and CEO for the Missouri Department of Higher Education in 2010. Prior to his role as state commissioner, Russell spent nearly 20 years working for the University of Missouri System in several senior administrative positions, including UM System chief of staff. Before his career in academia, Russell completed a highly decorated 22-year Army career as a commissioned officer, retiring with the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1991. CLIFF JARVIS

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has been promoted to vice president of Facilities Operations for the college. He has served as executive director of Plant and Facilities Operations since 2015. Jarvis oversees the college’s custodial, maintenance, campus safety and operational functions for the main campus in Columbia and all locations nationwide. Before joining the college, he served as the engineering supervisor for the City of Columbia’s capital improvement program. He also served as a civil engineer and as president of Engineering Surveys and Services, a Columbia-based engineering consulting firm. He holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Missouri and a master’s degree in business administration from UMKC.

OATS INC. has named JIM MUENCH as its marketing and communications coordinator. He will promote the work of the organization, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary. A graduate of Westminster College and the Missouri School of Journalism, Muench has worked for 30 years in mid-Missouri as a strategic communicator and journalist – both on a freelance basis or as an employee of organizations such as the MU News Bureau, Westminster College and the State of Missouri’s Division of Energy and Department of Economic Development. An author with three published books, he has taught English, journalism or strategic communication at several area educational institutions.

DR. RICHARD ENYARD is the new director of Human

Resources for the CITY OF COLUMBIA. Enyard, who has more than 22 years in human resource administration, replaced retiring Human Resources Director Margrace Buckler. He recently served as the executive director of Human Resources at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. Previously, Enyard held the positions of chief human resource officer at Elgin Community College; director of human resources and ADA coordinator at Eastern Illinois University; director of human resources at Stephens College; chief HR consultant at RKE & Associates; director of human resources at the Missouri Department of Corrections; and coordinator of employee relations at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Enyard holds a doctorate degree in higher and adult education, a Master of Science in education counseling and personnel services and a Bachelor of Science in educational studies counseling services from the University of Missouri.

DAWN SHELLABARGER was awarded CENTRAL BANK’s Presidential Caring Award for 2020 for extraordinary commitment to fellow employees and the community. She has volunteered for organizations including Audrain County 4-H, Columbia Sunrise Southwest Rotary, Missouri CASA and Rainbow House Ball. In addition to those activities, she personally stepped into help a coworker who needed support during a tough time this year. She serves as vice president of commercial banking. Shellabarger serves as vice president of commercial banking and began working for the bank in 2004. The bank named


U P & CO M I NG

C.O. SCHEFFER the banker of the year for 2020. He is the vice president of mortgage lending at Central Bank’s downtown location. In this role, he has consistently gone above and beyond for his customers during an extraordinary year for the mortgage department. Scheffer began his career as a teller in 2003 before working his way to the position of vice president of mortgage lending.

JENNIFER CRUMP has been appointed as the vice president of Enrollment Management at WILLIAM WOODS UNIVERSITY. She has 15 years of experience in college admissions and enrollment management. She previously served as associate director of Admissions and adjunct faculty member at Central Methodist University, and in the Admissions department at Columbia College, where she reached the level of assistant director of Admissions. She is also past president of the Executive Board of the Missouri Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers. Crump replaces KATHY GROVES, who now serves as the university’s vice president of Advancement. Groves brings 15 years of experience at William Woods to her new position. Since joining WWU in 2006, she has now served as director of Human Resources, vice president of Administration and vice president of Admissions.

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RANDA RAWLINS TAKES THE WHEEL AT SHELTER INSURANCE WRITTEN BY

PHOTOS BY

Jack Wax

L.G. Patterson

R

anda Rawlins didn’t intend to make history, but she did. This past January, Rawlins became the 13th president of Shelter Mutual Insurance Company, the first female president in 75 years. In July, when current CEO Matt Moore retires, she will assume the title of president and CEO. Her status as the first female to lead the company is nowhere near the top of her mind or the main way she defines herself. “I didn’t set out to work at Shelter with the idea of being the first woman general counsel or first woman executive vice president or first woman president. That’s not what I’m about. I came in with the idea that I had something to offer, and that I wanted to make this a better place to work for myself and others,” she says. Still, the significance of her status isn’t lost on her. “I try to balance the fact that this just isn’t about me. I know it means a lot to many people to see that the company recognizes your efforts regardless of your gender,” she says. As evidence of that recognition, Rawlins just has to look around her. Five other women are currently serving in executive positions at the top of Shelter’s hierarchy: Teresa Magruder, executive vice president; Stacye Smith, vice president of human resources; Marsha Carter, vice president of Shelter Life Insurance; Shawn Ricks, vice president of claims; and Tina

Workman, vice president of accounting. Rawlins is quick to point out that being a woman isn’t reason enough to land a position or to advance with Shelter. “I feel like we have given opportunities to many people in this company based on their work, skills and efforts — not on what they looked like,” she says. Rawlins is definitely not the new kid on the Shelter block. She has been with the company since 2002, getting her

parents worked harder than anybody I’ve ever known,” she says. Since the pandemic, Rawlins and her husband, Blaine Einspahr, have been able to spend more time on the farm, which she is now part-owner of. It’s a relaxing place for her and Blaine, where she can work remotely or take a break and mow the lawn. The couple enjoy golfing together and have been able to take a few get-away trips to break the monotony of the limited

Becoming Shelter’s first female president and CEO wasn’t a goal of Rawlins, but her new position is a recognition of her 19 years of steady and sure leadership. start as general counsel. Before moving to Columbia, she spent 20 years as an insurance defense attorney in private practice in Kansas City. She grew up on her family’s farm, outside of the small northeast Missouri town of Hale. Her mother was in charge of the family’s dairy operation and her father took care of the row crops as well as doing some custom farming. Rawlins attributes her work ethic to her home environment, where her parents raised four children in addition to running their farm. “My

travel that Covid-19 has ushered in. In pre-pandemic days, Rawlins enjoyed some international travel, helping with construction projects on church mission trips. Closer to home, she sits on the boards of the Columbia Airport Advisory, the Missouri Innovation Center and REDI. “I enjoy getting out and meeting people in the community who are working for better things for us, and Shelter has always done a very good job of supporting that,” she says. As a graduate of what

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Shelter Insurance has six women serving in executive positions. (Left to right) Teresa Magruder, Marsha Carter, Stacye Smith, Randa Rawlins, Shawn Ricks & Tina Workman was then known as Northeast Missouri State University, Rawlins has since served on the governing board of Truman State and on its foundation. Rawlins, like the other 1,200 employees who work at Shelter’s Columbia headquarters, has had to find ways of weathering the pandemic while conducting the company’s business. Most of the time, she works from her office, in a building that now seems almost deserted. Only about 150 employees are at their desks at any one time. “Although some of them come in for part of the day, then leave, the pandemic means that people are required to run our business from their kitchen tables or their basements, or in whatever space at home they’ve figured out will work,” she says. And as for marketing reps, travel is no longer a feature of their jobs. The challenges of selling and servicing insurance during a pandemic means that a problem-solving approach to every obstacle is a necessity. “We’ve had to figure out whether we can do it, how can we do it, and can we do it better,” says Rawlins. Part of doing things better means

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relying on others. Rawlins appreciates the expertise of those who she works with. “I can’t know everything there is to know about the insurance business. There are a lot of people in this building who know a lot more about certain areas than I do,” she says. Stacye Smith, vice president of human resources, has been on the Shelter management team for the past 16 years and has worked with Rawlins since her training days in 2000. “One of the things I noticed about her, right off the bat, is that you always know where you stand with her. She’s very direct and confident but has the knowledge to back it up,” she says. Rawlins combines her direct approach with a low-key and personable style of interacting with others. Teresa Magruder, Shelter’s executive vice president says, “When I think of Randa, I think of her calm demeanor and her consistency, even when topics are challenging and can be emotional.” For everyone in the insurance industry, keeping up with the latest technology is a continual challenge, one key to a profitable future. Rawlins looks

forward to leading Shelter through whatever changes new technology requires. “People can now buy their insurance online, if they prefer,” Rawlins says. “Some want to shop and buy online. Others want to shop online then buy from an agent in person." Shelter seems to have no problem implementing new technologies and keeping up with the competition. Over the years, typewriters morphed into computers, computers linked into networks, then networks linked to the Internet. From their modest start in Missouri, the company eventually expanded to 13 states. Now they are in 21 and are classified as a superregional company. Becoming Shelter’s first female president and CEO wasn’t a goal of Rawlins, but her new position is a recognition of her 19 years of steady and sure leadership. Behind that leadership is a deceptively simple philosophy that has guided her: “Be true to yourself,” she says, “and make sure you are taking advantages of opportunities. But sometimes, it’s up to you to make those opportunities for yourself.”

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

INSIDE COLUMBIA'S CEO

WOMEN IN BUSINESS These local Columbia women stand out from the crowd. We've dedicated this special section to their work, their creativity, their passion and their ability to transform our community.

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS GINA MAULLER-CRANE

FINANCIAL ADVISOR EDWARD JONES What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? As a long-term Columbia resident, I wake up every morning excited about my day. Who do I get to visit with and help today?

What is unique about your business? There's a perfect storm brewing in my industry. Not only are baby boomers getting older, increasingly retiring, many are living longer. They will also be passing down a significant amount of wealth over the next decade. Edward Jones is a nearly 100-year-old firm that’s continually listed as the leading choice for such investors. As a professional woman in a male dominated field, I’m confident I bring the perfect mix of expertise, passion, life experience and empathy to help clients reach their dreams today and for generations to come.

What or who has contributed most to your success? A wise person once told me to ‘always pay yourself first.’ That person was my grandmother Mattie. She worked hard and saved hard and invested what little she had, and it became more over time. Not only did she teach me about saving and investing, she instilled values I still hold dear — faith and family, integrity, work ethic and perseverance.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? Stay true to yourself. Over the course of my career, well-meaning people often told me I was ‘too this’ or ‘too that.’ Unfortunately, women are still judged by others' standards, but this doesn't mean they're correct. Give yourself grace and do the same for others.

What is your passion? I love to make a difference in my community and in my clients' lives. Understanding their hopes, wishes and fears, I partner with them for a lifetime to create a living, breathing, comprehensive goals-based financial plan. I ultimately provide peace of mind so they can focus on what makes them most happy day-to-day.

EDWARD JONES

2509 Bernadette Drive, Columbia MO 65203 573-445-7671 • edwardjones.com/gina-mauller Member SIPC

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS What do you love most about being women in business in Columbia? As a team, we love the opportunity to serve this community! Being an office essentially run by women, we feel a great sense of empowerment in helping people make changes to their health and in their lives. Each of us is able to bring our unique approach and skills to the table to contribute to the mission of the office as a whole.

What is unique about your business? Restoration Chiropractic is unique because each individual here makes it so special. We provide a light for the community — each time you walk into our office you are greeted by name and with a smile (even behind our masks!) We’ve been told by people who come in that they feel better just by being here, because of the bright and loving atmosphere we provide. We’re constantly trying to find ways to engage with our community and give back where we can, and we always strive to lead people in restoring hope, health and life!

What or who has contributed most to your success? First and foremost, the city of Columbia is the reason we are successful because the people in our community are the ones who trust us with

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MICHELLE MOBERG · KENDELL NUNNELLY JEANICE WILLIAMS · BECCA BOLDT CHIROPRACTIC ASSISTANTS

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

LEAH SIROIS OFFICE MANAGER

MORGAN MALLOY · KATELYN THOMAS CHIROPRACTIC ASSISTANTS

their health and give us the opportunity to help them restore the life they long to live. We also have incredible mentors in the chiropractic community who have helped us realize the vision for our office and instill a standard of excellence in the service that we provide.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? We always want to encourage and empower women in business. No matter what position or job you may have, always take ownership of it, because every single job is important. Your position matters and the impact you have on others matters. Don't ever wait for someone else to bring something out in you — seek what you can bring out in yourself and what that brings to your team and the people you serve. Be passionate about what makes you, YOU!

What is your passion? As a team, we can easily say that we all share a passion for helping people see changes in their health for the better and have quality restored to their lives. We’re also passionate about families — both our own personal families, and the families we serve in our office. We know that healthy children grow into healthy adults and we love seeing children grow up healthy!

Restoration Chiropractic 1413 Grindsone Plaza Dr., Ste 109 Columbia MO 65201 573-476-1000 chirorestoration.com

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS NANCY YAEGER

OWNER FLEET FEET COLUMBIA What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? The business community in Columbia is so supportive and truly cares about the other locally owned businesses here. We saw that so much this past year and gained so many new customers because fellow business owners checked out our store and shared their experiences with others.

What is unique about your business? We specialize in using technology to fit customers for the best footwear options for their feet. Our employees are all very well trained in what shoes will fit certain types of feet and medical conditions. We pride ourselves on the customer service we provide to each customer and give a 60-day guarantee and price match. We also sell apparel and accessories for running and pain management.

What or who has contributed most to your success? I am surrounded by a great team of employees who truly care about our customers and love helping people stay healthy and getting them into items that make them feel better.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? When you have a dream, don't let others put it down. There will be plenty of negative people so make sure to surround yourself with positive supporters who will help you bring your dream to life.

What is your passion? Helping people stay active and healthy. We have a saying that ‘Running Changes Everything,’ and I truly believe that. Walking and running can not only help you physically, but mentally. We are not just a store for runners. We help so many runners, walkers, people on their feet all day and people in pain. Your feet are the base of your body and you need to take care of them.

Fleet Feet Columbia

505 E. Nifong Blvd., Ste. 106 Columbia MO 65201 573-777-6955 • fleetfeetcolumbiamo.com 86 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


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WOMEN IN BUSINESS AMANDA JACOBS

OWNER JACOBS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? I love that Columbia doesn't seem to have much of a glass ceiling. Everywhere you turn there are women who own businesses or are top executives.

What is unique about your business? I’m a third-generation company owner. Being well-established gives us a history and understanding of the Columbia-area market. When you have the word "investment" you have to marry it with "risk." All investments carry some risk, and that's where Jacobs Property Management comes in. We're the risk manager for the property owner.

What or who has contributed most to your success? There's no way I could do what I do without the help of my fantastic team. I know everyone says they have a great team, but I REALLY mean it! What we do isn’t always easy, but it is incredibly rewarding, and I love seeing them get in there and rock it every day!

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? I'm part of an amazing group of small business owners located all around the country who have been meeting virtually since 2018. I literally don’t know what I would do without them. My advice is to find a tribe. You need a group of supportive peers who will encourage you and challenge you to be your very best.

What is your passion? Seeing how we positively affect others! Property owners are happy to have high-caliber residents. Residents are happy to live in quality rentals, with staff who are responsive to their needs. Our team is happy because our work is gratifying and our culture is great. Plus my dad is happy that he can enjoy a carefree retirement!

Jacobs Property Management 33 E. Broadway, Ste. 100, Columbia MO 65203 573-449-2558 • jacobspropertymanagement.com

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS NATALIE HARDIN

CEO LEAN KITCHEN CO. COLUMBIA What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? I love being able to serve as a role model for my daughter, showing her that through perseverance and hard work anything is possible. I love the opportunity to connect with and learn from other women in the Columbia community. Through these interactions, I’ve continued to develop my own leadership skills. At Lean Kitchen, I love seeing the daily impact we make on many different lives throughout our community.

What is unique about your business? Lean Kitchen Co. offers individually prepared, to-go meals that are healthy and delicious, saving you time and money. All meals are prepared FRESH in-store and can meet a variety of nutritional needs. We offer several different meal plans and also sell meals individually. We’re open 7 days a week at the southwest corner of Green Meadows and Providence. Our online ordering platform allows customers to order in advance for pick up or delivery on Mondays. We hope you’ll stop by and check us out for all of your meal needs!

What or who has contributed most to your success? My mom is the driving force behind my success. Growing up, she lived in poverty for most of her childhood. However, she pushed beyond her limitations to go college and graduate with a degree in education. As I grew up, we also faced many similar challenges, but she never let me give up and continued to challenge me to go above and beyond. She taught me to be independent and how to take care of myself. That perseverance and determination continue to drive me today.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? Don't be afraid to take risks. Be comfortable in the uncomfortable. I would not have started Lean Kitchen Co. Columbia if I had not taken the risk to step outside of my comfort zone.

What is your passion? Spending time with my family, being physically active, a good glass of wine, and making a difference in our community.

Lean Kitchen Co. Columbia

212 E. Green Meadows Road, Ste. 5 Columbia MO 65203 573-777-3636 • leankitchencolumbia.com 88 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


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WOMEN IN BUSINESS PHYLLIS NICHOLS

OWNER STATE FARM INSURANCE AGENCY What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? I love that Columbia offers a vast array of opportunities because of the diverse population. There is so much to see and do that the sky is the limit. As a businesswoman in Columbia, I take great pride in building relationships in my community and meeting their needs.

What is unique about your business? We know insurance can be confusing and probably not a subject that people even like to discuss. We make it our business to protect what is important to you in the most economical fashion that we can.

What or who has contributed most to your success? I would not be the caliber of agent or agency, if it were not for the strong team that surrounds me.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? You will face uphill battles in building your business but never give up. Find a strong mentor and team and make them your partners for life. Insurance is a wonderful industry to work in, but you must be honest and committed in order to be successful.

What is your passion? Knowing that at the end of the day, I have done everything that I can to protect my customers. It's incredibly rewarding to be able to be there for someone when they've needed me.

State Farm Agency

1006 West Blvd. N., Ste.102, Columbia MO 65203 (73-443-8727 • phyllisjnichols.com INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 89


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WOMEN IN BUSINESS MELISSA MENARD

REALTOR, PSA NEXTHOME PARADIGM What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? In my decade working as a Realtor here, I have fallen in love with the community of professionals who make this work possible. The Realtors, lenders, title companies, inspectors and contractors in my network are patient, accommodating, empathetic and endlessly professional, so I can embark on every project confident that everyone my clients interact with will be as careful with their interests as I am.

What is unique about your business? I take particular pleasure in connecting people with their community, so I've always given gift certificates to locally owned businesses to clients at closing. I love knowing they'll fall in love with them and keep going back. This year, I'm adding to that tradition by giving a gift in every client's name to the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture (CCUA) and either the Giving Gardens or the community-supported agriculture (CSA) of their choice.

What or who has contributed most to your success? I can't overstate how humbled I’ve been by the generosity of my friends in referring people. I haven't advertised until this year, as it’s the first year I'll be working full-time, so the lion's share of my work has come from friends. It's been a fabulous way to learn my trade and establish my professional network. I feel incredibly lucky.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? Be good to people and they will be good to you! I am constantly on the prowl for creative ways to thank and spoil the people in my world, particularly this year, when having coffee or drinks with people is off the table.

What is your passion? Community, and connecting people with it in lasting and meaningful ways. Followed closely by the desire to highlight our responsibility to steward the land.

NextHome Paradigm

3201 S. Providence Road, Ste. 204 Columbia MO 65203 573-673-6300 • melissa-menard.com 90 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


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WOMEN IN BUSINESS ELIZABETH STOTT

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP CHURCH What do you love most about being a woman in business in Columbia? The opportunity it gives me to meet new people and make connections with others in the community that I would not have otherwise. In addition to being a part of the Chamber of Commerce and Women's Network, I’m the project assistant on our new church building going up at the corner of Chapel Hill and Louisville. It will be completed this summer.

What is unique about your business? We are a church body that is multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and multi-generational, including a service on Sunday afternoons in Swahili for our African refugee members. We were established in 1978 and have a rich history in Columbia. Our pre-K through 12 school was established in 1981.

What or who has contributed most to your success? The grace, leadership, mentorship and unmerited love of the church leaders and my family and friends (during my growing up years, single years and married years) has contributed most to making me who I am today.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? Enjoy your life, your family, your time. Do things that are good for you. Make time for things you enjoy. The more you are a full and happy individual, the more you will bring to your family, your friends and your employer.

What is your passion? To see people connect with others in real relationships. This is transforming. I grew up in the church and feel like I experienced this genuinely for the first time in my 20s, and it was life changing. I live in transparent relationships with those I am closest to. We talk real life — struggles, joys, hard things, great things — all of it. I cannot imagine life without this and there is so much freedom in it.

Christian Fellowship Church

4600 Christian Fellowship Road, Columbia MO 65203 573-445-8561 • christianfellowship.com INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 91


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WOMEN IN BUSINESS What do you love most about being women in business in Columbia? KH - The ability to have a balanced life. I am fortunate to be able to have a legal career full of challenging and interesting work and the ability to place priority on raising a family and being involved in other areas and activities. CE - I take great pride in making a difference in this community. I love helping families and businesses achieve their goals.

What is unique about your business? KH - The compilation of lawyers and specialties in the Van Matre Law Firm allows us to confidently and competently serve the business and individual client facing a range of issues at different times and in different situations, as well as the ability to serve many different clients who need assistance in different areas. As an attorney and CPA, my practice focuses primarily on assisting clients with their estate planning, trust administration, probate and tax needs. CE - I am a multi-business owner. In addition to my legal practice, I co-own and operate

Columbia's Just Between Friends consignment sale with Nichole Clark. I focus my legal practice on business and estate planning needs, with a substantial portion also devoted to health care, and the legal challenges and needs of private health care providers. At Just Between Friends, the children's consignment sale that Nichole and I organize benefits thousands of local families and helps them provide for their kids — on any budget. We take great joy in knowing that we make a difference in the lives of these families and the community, including our charity partners. I am able to combine the business and legal experience I have in both industries to improve my knowledge and expertise in all areas.

What or who has contributed most to your success? KH - In the practice of law, there is so much benefit to learning from and surrounding yourself with great attorneys and professionals. I have been so fortunate throughout my career to be mentored by and learn from excellent lawyers, be exposed to varying and challenging issues, and to be able to benefit from the knowledge and assistance of my partners and professional peers.

achieve it. The roads that lead to success are filled with good character and grit. During my decade of legal practice I have been very fortunate to be surrounded by very talented and hardworking attorneys — to whom I owe much gratitude, as I have learned a great deal from them.

What advice or encouragement do you have for other women in business? KH - Bring value and excellence to what you do. Make yourself valuable to your firm or company and make the product you create or service you provide valuable to the market you serve. CE - Work hard. Stay focused. There's no reason you can't do whatever you decide you want to do.

What is your passion? KH - My family. I treasure every stage and step that we have gone through, and every experience and memory that is to come. CE - Fiercely loving my family.

CE - Hard work and determination. When an objective is set, I will work tirelessly to

Van Matre Law Firm

1103 E. Broadway, Columbia MO 65201 573-874-7777 • vanmatre.com

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KAREN HAJICEK

ATTORNEY/SHAREHOLDER

CASEY ELLIOTT

ATTORNEY/SHAREHOLDER

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THE JOURNEY OF A LIFETIME JIMI AND CRISTI COOK TAKE ON POVERTY IN UNDEVELOPED COUNTRIES WRITTEN BY

PHOTOS BY

Jack Wax

L.G. Patterson

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ome power couples are driven by ambition to make a name for themselves. To rise to the top of their Veterinary Medicine profession. To gather power and prestige. Jimi and Cristi Cook are looking for none of that. Among the most influential couples in Columbia, they are striving for nothing less than changing the world. One individual at a time, one community at a time, one nation at a time. And, so far, they have had an impact on thousands of people in communities in underdeveloped countries throughout the world. They are co-founders of Be The Change Volunteers (BTCV), a nonprofit organization started 13 years ago with the goal of providing educational opportunities worldwide. In their spare time. Working with a 19-member advisory council. With two paid employees — one in Africa and the other based now in Arizona.

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With about 160 or so U.S. volunteers each year, who work alongside of partnering local volunteers from foreign nations who help with their projects. With requests for the group’s help coming from around the world. While doing all that, they find time to raise funds and coordinate fourto-six oversees trips each year where the volunteers help build schools, parks, playgrounds and libraries. And now you can add book authors to their list of accomplishments. This year the couple wrote the book “Hand Delivered Hope,” which follows their adventures and challenges in helping communities around the world. All profits from the book go to the organization. Jimi serves as chairman of the board of BTCV while Cristi serves as secretary/ treasurer. In addition to their responsibilities for overseeing their nonprofit, they both have full-time

responsibilities at the University of Missouri — Columbia. Jimi serves as the Allen Distinguished Chair in Orthopaedic Surgery and director of the Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics and Mizzou BioJoint Center. Cristi is an assistant professor, also working at the Thompson Laboratory as well as a freelance veterinary radiologist. Between them, they have more than an armful of advanced degrees, published studies and honors in their chosen field of work: orthopedic research. When asked how he can possibly manage to get so much done, Jimi says jokingly, “I just do my real job and then work on my other real job.” Then he pivots and becomes serious. “I have amazing teams in both areas of work who really help to make it all happen. Having energy is the easy part because I’m passionate about both jobs. I love developing new ideas that will

help patients and thinking of regenerative solutions to orthopedic problems. I love being in the developing world, talking with and working with the people who live in other countries — they truly inspire me. And, I’m blessed that I don’t require a lot of sleep.” BTCV doesn’t swoop into underdeveloped communities, build a school, then head back to the comforts of American life. The organization partners with local communities and won’t build anything without the help and guidance of people in the area who will make sure the project is sustainable. Cultural respect is an essential part of every project. Among the 52 projects they’ve worked on so far are a school in Bihar, India, a community campus in Gayaza, Uganda, and a high school in Chino, Peru. Their first project was helping repair a school in Rwanda that had been the site of genocidal murders. For Cristi, one of the most challenging parts of working in underdeveloped parts of the world, such as Papua, New Guinea, is living within the cultural confines that limit the role of women. “I was raised to believe that I can do whatever I want, believing that if I put in the work, I could become a veterinarian and a radiologist. We were in Papua, New Guinea for 11 days for our first project there, and on the last couple of days, the men in the community finally gave me approval to get on the roof. Now, as we have built relationships through cultural exchange


and more projects, local women are actually working on the school, hammering and sawing. And this was unheard of when we went there the first time,” she says. Each project requires about a dozen American volunteers willing to travel from their comfortable homes to work and live for a few weeks in some of the world’s poorest communities. Volunteers pay for their own travel and food along with providing funds to cover much of the costs of the project. It’s not cruise ship travel. “One of my elevator speeches,” says Jimi, “is that I’m an orthopedic surgeon at a major university and I love to build toilets in the developing world. It has been amazing to see how clean, separate toilets, especially for female students, in addition to classrooms, libraries and playgrounds really do change everything for these deserving communities.” Debbie Waggoner has been volunteering for BTCV for the past seven years and has learned that each project is about far more than constructing a building or a playground. “Jimi and Cristi promote building relationships more than just building structures,” she says. When trying to explain how the Cooks accomplish so much, Grant Venable, one of the two BTCV fulltime employees, says, “I get only 24 hours each day, but somehow the Cooks get 36 hours each day, and I haven’t really figured that out yet.” He attributes their ability to keep so many balls in the air to their time management skills and their commitment to changing the world.

Venable, who lived in Columbia but now lives in Arizona, is in charge of much of the day-today operation of BTCV. “I want volunteers to be very engaged and in tune with our mission and the projects we’re working on,” he says. Explaining that mission, he adds, “We’re building schools because education

creates jobs and jobs are the only way out of poverty.” Jimi, who has two doctoral degrees from Mizzou, a DVM and a PhD, has seen firsthand the opportunities for a full life that education brings. “It’s something that opened every door for me in my career, and it’s something no one can ever take away from you. BTCV believes

in Mandela’s quotation, ‘Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.’” From their base in Columbia, Jimi and Cristi Cook are turning Mandela’s words into schools, libraries and playgrounds that truly are changing he world.

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Let’s get back to...

LIVING again!

Best Place to Get Steaks

Best Chef Dustin Norem

“It’s one of the best steakhouses in Mid-Missouri.”

— St. Louis Post Dispatch

(573) 445-7772 | 1401 Forum Blvd. | ccscitybroiler.com 96

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ROUNDTABLE Forward Focused Columbia’s Path To A New Decade By Olivia DeSmit Photos by L.G. Patterson

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he beginning of the new decade didn’t go the way anyone had expected, with the COVID-19 pandemic wreaking havoc on both small and large businesses, as well as consumers. With 2020 officially in the rearview mirror, local leaders are looking forward to what the next decade in Columbia will look like, and how the road there will be paved with improvements. Fred Parry hosted a CEO Roundtable at Zimmer Communications with 11 local business leaders and entrepreneurs that are up and comers in Columbia’s business scene: those who have a vested interest in seeing Columbia grow over the next decade. The event was sponsored by The Broadway Hotel; the hotel’s awardwinning Chef Jeff Guinn catered

the meal that accompanied the conversation. Attendees included business owners and leaders from the entertainment, healthcare, agriculture, real estate and development industries. The big question on everyone’s mind? How to encourage people and businesses to continue investing in Columbia? To answer this question, Inside Columbia conducted an online survey that polled more than 400 readers on their thoughts and visions for Columbia. The number one concern: crime. “Real or imagined, the perception is that Columbia has a significant crime problem,” Parry says. Other concerns included public infrastructure, race relations, youth opportunities, public schools and affordable housing, ranked in order of importance.

The Link Between Crime and Poverty

Jay Sparks, entrepreneurship coordinator at REDI, says Columbia is making strides toward improving crime and mental health in Columbia. “Chief Jones is putting in the mental health task force currently and I think that's a great step,” he says. “Does it solve all the problems? No, but I think it puts Columbia maybe more in the camp of forward thinking and looking ahead of things. “But,” he continues, “an awful lot of voices in Columbia don'In order to map out Columbia’s future for

the next decade, Inside Columbia Publisher Emeritus t feel like they're getting heard. Listened to and heard are different. There's a huge demographic in Columbia of people who may or may not be blue collar, but their earning

Columbia Concerns

Ranked by level of importance CRIME INFRASTRUCTURE RACE RELATIONS YOUTH OPPORTUNITES PUBLIC SCHOOLS AFFORDABLE HOUSING SOURCE: 2021 Inside Columbia survey

potential is under our county or our city average wage. People who don't see home ownership as an option, so they're stuck renting in areas of town that they might not think are desirable. They have a feeling of being stuck in life a little bit and I think sometimes if crime is occurring and you don't feel like you're being heard, all of that starts to dovetail and I think you see a snowball going down a hill.” Billy Polansky, executive director of Columbia Center For Urban Agriculture, further explains the

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Billy Polansky, Gina Rende, Craig Riordan


link between poverty and crime. “At CCUA, we work with a lot of low income families, and in my personal life too I'm a foster parent,” he says. “So what I've seen through that experience is kids in foster care, they're there because of poverty. And I think really our root cause of crime is poverty. How can we support families and

them a problem,” Brent Beshore, Founder/CEO of Permanent Equity, says. Situations range from being evicted to drug addictions to abuse. “Love Columbia says we obviously want to address that, that's the pain point, but we also want to come around you and get to know you and develop a relationship. I think

Existing businesses can also better partner with nonprofits to further improve their impact on the community, Dr. John Miles of Columbia Orthopaedic Group says. At Columbia Orthopaedic Group, they are working to get a Love Coffee kiosk in the lobby that will create more job opportunities and revenue for

I think one of the things in the city is we talk past each other a whole lot. What it really comes down to is relationships. BRENT BESHORE get them out of poverty and part of that is jobs that pay well but also provide things like child care. It's all generational poverty. We have to break that cycle. Crime is going to go down if we do that.” According to Parry, Columbia/ Boone County has a poverty rate of about 17%, which means that percent of our population is living at 200% of the federal poverty guidelines, he says. One organization that is helping lowincome families in Columbia is Love Columbia, formerly Love INC.

Community Relationships “Love Columbia takes people who are in cycles or deep in crisis and helps with short-term and the long-term, and they coordinate services around a family and try to get them up and out of that immediate thing that's causing

one of the things in the city is we talk past each other a whole lot. What it really comes down to is relationships.” One of Love Columbia’s ventures, Love Coffee, seeks to help meet employment needs in the community, another necessity to lower the poverty rate. Columbia’s lack of an onramp to sustainable employment for people without developed skill sets is concerning, Beshore says. “If you don't come in with skills already, it's really difficult to find jobs in this town that lead somewhere up and out.” One of his suggestions is to create a highly specialized call center in town that would enable people to work their way up to making a relatively high salary through upward mobility. “I think that would be a game-changer,” he says.

Love Columbia. “I noticed that there was a key thing missing when I visited Love Coffee,” he says. “That was patrons. So, I think we could get around that problem with our lobby with relatively captive people sitting there waiting with nothing else to do really. I think their revenue situation is going to radically turn around. And I think VU is talking about the same thing and maybe Shelter Insurance.” Hand-in-hand with community relationships, another key area to increase quality of life in Columbia is public amenities. According to the Inside Columbia survey, Columbians believe the most critical public amenities are more police officers on the street and vocational school/ job training. Other requested amenities included an improved airport, comprehensive mental

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kinds of events. That adds to why people want to locate here.” Adonica Coleman, owner of A2D Events and business coach for the Women’s Business Center, part-time director of community outreach for Broadway Christian Church and a board member of Ranked by level of importance Granny’s House and the Bold Academy, says her investment in the MORE POLICE ON THE STREET community is because of her four daughters. “I VOCATIONAL TRAINING would hope that if any one of them chooses to IMPROVED AIRPORT stay here that 10, 20 years from now that this MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES would be a place that they would want to be, PERMANENT HOMELESS SHELTER want to stay and want to continue to help grow.” CONVENTION CENTER Locally owned businesses play a huge ENHANCE PUBLIC TRANSIT role in quality of life and things to do in ICE SKATING RINK Columbia as well. Recent frustrations SOURCE: 2021 Inside Columbia survey amid the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated some local business owners’ issues with local and federal Pro-Business, Pro-Columbia government. “I don't really feel Even with concerns about crime that small business has any and poverty, Columbia is still kind of representation in our a vibrant and attractive place political system,” Gina Rende, to live, Jay Lindner, owner of Realtor with MALY Commercial Lindner Properties, says. “We’re Realty, says. “Obviously the bars still growing and Veterans and restaurants are struggling United obviously is a big factor beyond belief, but I feel like that in that, the University having is kind of across the country continued increased enrollment right now that small businesses and Boone Hospital. We have to don’t have that representation. make sure that we remain the It's just really sad because I healthcare magnet for this part felt that that was the point of Missouri and keep supporting of America. I'm hopeful that the University as we get events maybe we can see some change back in and True/False and with that if we have some more Roots N Blues and all of those health services, a permanent homeless shelter, conference convention center, enhanced public transit system and ice skating rink.

Public Amenities

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business minded political leaders on City Council.” Sparks echoed this sentiment: “Right now not a lot people are encouraged to come to Columbia, Missouri when we can't even get our bars and restaurants open past 10:30. There's no way that they can be successful and make what they were making pre-COVID until we can get bar seating back, until we can get longer hours, until we can get just better capacity in some of these things.” Inconsistencies in regulations and mandates have left certain businesses struggling more than others. “Bars and entertainment are the ones hit the hardest,”Nic Parks, owner of Parks Amusements, says. “On the entertainment side, when I thought we were trying to get Sky Zone and Level Up opened and all these things, now I feel we're going to lose some. We're going to not have things for people to do.” Businesses can’t continue struggling without any clear end or direction in sight, according to Lindner. “We deserve at this point to know when and how are we going to get back to some kind of normalcy,” he says. State legislation being introduced could make longer restrictions more difficult to keep in place. For Nick Orscheln, real estate manager of Orscheln Farm & Home, this is a good thing. “Columbia has been overly restrictive, on the state level they’re at least addressing it. This community relies on the tax dollars generated from our bars and restaurants.”


Jay Sparks, John Miles, Adonica Coleman, Tim Crockett


Brent Beshore, Nick Orsheln, Jay Linder, Nic Parks


Columbia’s Leadership Struggles Compared to surrounding cities, Columbia has had much more restrictions in place during the pandemic, prompting some business owners and consumers to take their business elsewhere. According to Nic Parks, “I'm asking the city to look at dreamers,

believe there’s power in a group like this,” she says. “We may not all agree on the same things, but we all have a vision for where we want Columbia to be in 10 years.” For Parks, that vision extends outside of Columbia. “As a company we're thinking about what can we invest entertainmentwise at the lake or outside of

City of Columbia,” she says. “We are competing with a lot of other towns for this business. We aren't going to get a lot of those big retailers. How do we get those meetings?” According to Parry, one of the things that we see local government doing is focus on telling business owners the reasons

We've become really hostile to business, which is problematic,” he says. “We're really proud of our town, but we've got to get with the program. If you're not growing, you're probably dying. DR. JOHN MILES

look at entrepreneurs and if I want to build a children's museum or an aquarium or a big ice skating rink complex here in Columbia and I want to put dollars to work towards that, I want to get some nods like ‘yes, let's talk, let's look at rezoning, what makes sense’ versus not even holding a meeting,” he says. Coleman agreed with the need for more communication between business owners and local government. “I don’t know if we need a convention center where once monthly there is a meeting of people like the ones on this roundtable, who are involved in making big ideas come true, but something like that because I

Columbia. That's unfortunate, because I love Columbia.” One such example is Parks’ newest venture: Lakeside, which he is building in Ashland. Craig Riordan, vice president of Coil Construction, believes other business owners will follow suit. “I think more of the successful business owners are going to feel that way, diversify out of Columbia, because they're concerned about when the next hurdle happens, is Columbia going to support me through it or are they going to make it more difficult?” Rende echoes this sentiment.“Ashland has been giving incentives and that's why they're getting business over the

why they can't do something versus saying here's what we've got to do and here's how you get it done. Dr. Miles is also concerned with Columbia’s anti-business environment. “We've become really hostile to business, which is problematic,” he says. “We're really proud of our town, but we've got to get with the program. If you're not growing, you're probably dying.” The good news is that some businesses, both in and outside of Columbia, are growing and developing. One example would be Ranken Technical College’s plan to come to Ashland. “That’s really exciting as a business owner,” Tim Crockett, owner of Crockett

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Engineering Consultants, says. “I think it will not only help fulfill open positions that we have at our companies, but also help folks that may not have certain skill sets.” Lindner recently brought a new business to Columbia: an Apple store called Simply Mac. “I think John Glascock is making things better,” he says. “I'm hopeful that if we get City Council processes

improved further, some of these businesses will want to come to Columbia.” Entrepreneurs such as Parks are part of the solution as well, Lindner continues. “We need more entrepreneurs that want to come in and open a business and invest their time and energy, because it's not easy getting things off the ground. There's not enough people in our

RAPIDFIRE “Communication is key. We all have a vision for where we want Columbia to be in 10 years and if that means that we need to have a continual conversation about it so that we can see what can be done behind the scenes to move us forward, then I think that that is super important.” - Adonica Coleman, A2D Events “I would love to see the gulf between on-campus and offcampus diminish. Mizzou needs to be a resource and open their doors to the community because from a workforce and population standpoint, they are truly a resource.” - Jay Sparks, REDI “You can find somebody to teach you how to do anything in Columbia and typically for free but where do you find all of those resources? If we had one place to get all of that, I think that would be huge.” - Gina Rende, MALY Commercial Realty “I would just like a bigger, feasible master plan for infrastructure, roads, utilities, because local people who are proud of their community will find a way to get things done.” - Craig Riordan, Coil Construction “I agree we need more job creation, not just more on the medical and the university front but the gamut of salaries for various positions.” Nick Orscheln, Orscheln Farm & Home “One of the things we lack in this town is an onramp to sustainable employment for people. Jobs like highly specialized call centers that have upward mobility I think would be a big game changer.” - Brent Beshore, Permanent Equity

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community that are interested in doing those kinds of things. “I would love to figure out how we can encourage more of that, and some of that may start with let's not shame people when they fail. We do a lot of that in this community. If somebody fails, we like to point it out. You know what? Entrepreneurs are going to fail. You've just got to get back up and keep going.”

What is your big idea that we ought to get in place by 2030 to improve Columbia? “We've got to get better relations with the city, including our permitting process and just the unknowns that we still face when we're trying to bring businesses in.” - Jay Lindner, Lindner Properties “Columbia is uniquely geographically positioned for a major sports park; it’s a really obvious thing we haven’t done to create more entertainment and civic activities.” - John Miles, MD, Columbia Orthopaedic Group “We need more business leadership in key positions in Columbia. Most of the largest contributors in this community are some of the biggest business minded individuals.” - Tim Crockett, Crockett Engineering Consultants “We need a task force for some of these key issues with business leaders and people who have can-do attitudes about fixing those problems. It shouldn't just be the people who show up at City Council meetings that have a voice.” - Nic Parks, Parks Amusements “In terms of jobs and poverty, having some way to attract more types of blue collar, or not college degree required jobs is something we really need, because there’s a base of people here who have nothing to do with the university, but they’re our community too.” - Billy Polansky, Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture

ROUNDTABLE


W E A R E H E R E F O R A L L YO U R T R AV E L N E E D S . WELCOME TO THE BROADWAY, a Doubletree by Hilton Hotel, the perfect launchpad for your next stay in Columbia. Spacious rooms. World-class dining. Rooftop entertainment. Steps away from Columbia’s unique shopping, vibrant art and exciting music scene. Just a few short blocks from the University of Missouri, Stephens College and Columbia College campuses. It’s all right here and waiting for you at The Broadway.

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T H E B ROA DWAYCO LU M B I A . CO M


By Olivia DeSmit • Photos by L.G. Patterson

W

e are big believers that brunch is not a specific type of food or a set hour, but rather a mental state. Any remotely breakfast-themed item can be deemed brunch if eaten before 2 p.m. at a leisurely pace and with more enjoyment than you typically have scarfing down a piece of toast on your way to work. Hence our roundup of offerings that may not meet the normal standard of what “brunch” is defined as, but we are defining it as an experience, not just a meal eaten

instead of breakfast and lunch. Whether you prefer your brunch served with a side of bottomless mimosas or a Fretboard latte, there are plenty of local restaurants to satisfy any pancake or eggs benedict craving. Not comfortable dining out? Order curbside or pick-up from any of the following restaurants to enjoy superb food in the comfort of your home — and you’ll already be set up for the food-induced coma sure to follow.


TRADITIONAL DINER

Ernie’s Café & Steakhouse If you’re craving a steaming stack of hot cakes or a cheesy omelet, Ernie’s is the spot for diner digs. With waffles, French toast and steak and eggs, they have everything your traditional breakfast cravings could ask for. Monday – Sunday 6:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

CLASSIC FAVORITES

Room38 With menu items like lobster eggs benedict, candied bacon and coconut French toast, Room38’s brunch is the perfect spot if you like a combination of traditional breakfast items and out-ofthe-box ideas. Try one of their specialty Bloody Mary cocktails, made with infused vodkas such as ghost pepper or pickled vodka or opt for the bottomless mimosas if you don’t have any Sunday plans. When the weather is warm enough, their outdoor seating and decorative “Cheers” backdrop make for the perfect photo op. Sundays 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

ALLERGY-FRIENDLY

Range Free Do you or a friend or family member have food allergies but still want to enjoy brunch out? Range Free’s delicious but diet restriction-friendly menu items are the perfect choice. Try their Belgian-style waffles made without egg, dairy or yeast, or a quiche made with a gluten-free quinoa crust. Range Free has a few more traditional offerings, including biscuits and gravy made with Patchwork Family Farms sausage and a Biscuit Sammich, with your choice of two toppings on a buttermilk cheddar biscuit. Wednesday – Friday 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., serving breakfast all day, unless sold out


SWITCHING IT UP

Beet Box Beet Box is like a box full of chocolates: You never know what you’re going to get, but you know it’s going to be delicious. With a fixedprice three-course offering, the possibilities are endless. Their Sunday brunch rotates every week, but past dishes have included chorizo hash with Stanton Brothers eggs, apple pancakes, candied walnuts and a Waves apple cider maple syrup and Huaraches with charred poblanos, radishes, queso fresco and frilly mustard greens. Sundays 10 a.m. until sold out

108 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


BREAKFAST PIZZA

Tellers If you haven’t tried Tellers’ breakfast pizza, you are definitely missing out. With a peppered gravy sauce, eggs, bacon and cheddar cheese, it’s just the right remedy to either a late night out or an early morning cheese craving. Tellers’ other brunch offerings include items such as chicken and waffles, French toast, blueberry pancakes and a hash scramble that rotates every Sunday. Enjoy your brunch windowside with a mimosa or bloody Mary, the way Tellers is meant to be enjoyed. Sundays 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.

A LITTLE SPICE

Glenn’s Café Glenn’s Café’s New Orleans-inspired dishes are no match for your spicy breakfast hankerings. Try the Eggs Nouvelle Orleans with shrimp, crab and crawfish cakes, sunny side up eggs and hollandaise sauce or the Chicken and Waffle with cayenne-maple bacon syrup. Breakfast cocktails include traditional Bloody Marys and mimosas, along with a white peach sangria and the Dirty Money, made with gin, freshly muddled avocado, cucumber and mint and topped with Sierra Mist. Saturday – Sunday 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

UPSCALE BITES

Eleven11 Looking for a perfect place for a breakfast date for you and your significant other or a group of girlfriends? Eleven11 is the ideal photo-op spot. Try one of their takes on eggs benedict, such as the Oscar with asparagus and crab cakes or a crimini mushroom frittata with sauteed spinach and bacon. Or, sip on a latte and munch on a Nutella turnover if you’re looking for something a little sweeter. Monday – Sunday 6 a.m. – 11 a.m.

HIPSTER HITS

HEARTY HOMESTYLE

Café Berlin

Broadway Brewery

You can’t go wrong ordering any of Café Berlin’s weekend brunch dishes, but we have a few favorites. Try the Walt, a waffle served with avocado, chipotle mayo, bacon, tomato, mixed greens and a fried egg or the Pulled Pork Hash, made with Patchwork Farms pulled pork, roasted potatoes, sautéed peppers and onion and topped with pickled red onion, jalapeno, chipotle aioli and a poached egg and served with Uprise Bakery rye. Looking for a weekday breakfast out? Café Berlin also offers a Monday through Friday breakfast menu with many of the same hits.

True to its pub-like feel, Broadway Brewery’s brunch offerings include hearty dishes sure to curb your appetite and leave you ready for a weekend nap. Try the croissant sandwich with scrambled eggs, Milton cheddar and ham or the corned beef hash with a side of creamed greens or home fries. For something a little lighter, sample the Smoked Salmon Bagel with cream cheese, pickled red onion, capers and arugula. The brewery offers Bloody Marys and mimosas, as well as the Michelada, a Flor Blanca Mexican lager and house-made Michelada mix to wash it down.

Carry out only Thurs-Mon 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Sundays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

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PUB GRUB

44Stone

MISSOURI-THEMED MENUS

Meriwether Café & Bike Shop With dish names such as the Louisiana Purchase and Lewis & Clark, Meriwether Café’s breakfast is sure to please any Missourian. The Louisiana Purchase comes with two buttermilk pancakes, sausage or bacon, eggs and home fries. For beverages, try their Bloody Meri, a mimosa or a Fretboard coffee. Monday – Tuesday; Thursday – Sunday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Closed Wednesdays.

VEGETARIAN & VEGAN CUISINE

Main Squeeze Whether you choose to be vegetarian or vegan for health or ethical reasons, you shouldn’t have to sacrifice taste. Main Squeeze’s breakfast offering are the perfect solution to what can be drab vegetarian cuisine elsewhere. Try the Vegan Egg Sandwich with Dave’s 21 Whole Grain Bread, Violife vegan cheddar, tomato, onion, spinach, avocado and chipotle mayo or the Egg Benedict Bomb with blackberry jalapeno jam, eggs, spinach, onion, tomato, tofu bacon, hollandaise sauce. Monday – Sunday 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. 110 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

SWEET TREATS

Sophia’s

Six satisfying pub-inspired brunch dishes make 44Stone stand out. Try the bread pudding with Irish cream liqueur and whiskey custard, maple syrup, vanilla Chantilly cream, soft fried eggs and house-made bacon or the Smoked Salmon Hash with brown sugar dill cured smoked salmon, crisp seasoned potatoes, onion, baby arugula, poached eggs and lemon hollandaise sauce. Their rotating Sunday roast offering is always a hit as well. Drink offerings include a Bacon Bloody Mary, Sunrise Mimosa and traditional Bloody Mary. Along with, of course, all their awesome ales and brews.

Sophia’s takes on French toast will leave even the sweetest tooth satisfied. Try the tiramisu French toast with coffee-infused maple syrup, cocoa and powdered sugar or the Frangelico monkey bread with house-made dough baked with cinnamon, sugar and butter and topped with Frangelico cream cheese icing. Sophia’s also offers savory takes including a Lobster and white truffle quiche, basil asiago breakfast steak and truffled benedict mornay. Drink offerings are broad, and include brunch go-tos such as Mimosas and Bloody Marys, as well as a host of other options.

Sundays 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

FARM-TO-TABLE

Barred Owl Butcher & Table

Although, if you don’t like waffles, there is either something wrong with you or you’ve never had a truly amazing waffle. Günter Hans’ liege waffles made with Belgian pearl sugar, which creates a caramelized glaze are sure to convert you. For a sweet take on a classic indulgence, try The Monte, with ham, cheese and European jam nestled between liege waffles.

Columbia’s newest brunch offering just launched in January, but it’s already a local favorite. From unique takes on eggs benedict, such as the Trout Cake Benedict with a hominy and cornmeal cake, poached locally raised trout meat and poached eggs, hollandaise and home fries to Wild Caught Gulf Shrimp & Grits, Barred Owl’s offerings live up to their unique farm-to-table dishes they’ve become so popular for. With more than 10 breakfast cocktails (and a few more non-alcoholic options), it’s the perfect spot for brunch with girlfriends or just because. Sip on the Birdogey, made with lemon vodka, Rieger's Caffe Amaro, Montenegro Amaro, lemon juice, honey, club soda and double strength Fretboard coffee, Principal Bartender Andrew Ruth’s take on the lemon-coffee flavor combination trending right now.

Saturdays 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Saturday - Sunday 10:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Sundays 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

WAFFLES

Günter Hans


MEAL WITH A VIEW

Les Bourgeois Bistro For an Instagram-worthy brunch, head to the Les Bourgeois Bistro. Their food offerings range from bacon pancakes with feta, chives and maple syrup to chicken and waffles with bleu cheese cream sauce, fruit and whipped cream. And while you’re at a winery, you might as well try a cocktail or two. Order the Bistro Mary, served with a charcuterie skewer, or the Paloma made with Jose Cuervo, lime juice, club soda and grapefruit juice. Thursday - Saturday 11 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

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Bring on Spring Fresh takes for décor you’ll adore.

Let’s face it, with COVID-19 concerns, we’ve been tucked inside our homes way too long! Have you seen the same scene far too frequently? Maybe it’s time to update your tired living spaces. To help you with some fresh spring style, our editors searched for items to help transform your quarantine space into something new and refreshing during uncertain times. Never underestimate what some punchy pillows, cute kitchen canisters or trendy table settings can do to help boost your mood.

Dining Room Confetti blue bowl. Tallulahs $18

Rabbit small urn. Tallulahs $19

Confetti blue tumbler and glass. Tallulahs $17.50 each

15” bunny on finial. Tallulahs $42

Tabula white salad and dinner plate. Tallulahs $13.50, $16

Mini and double topiary. Tallulahs $23 each

Blue painted table runner. Tallulahs $29.50

Belly creamer. Tallulahs $8

Garden placemat. Tallulahs $29 set

Baby sugar with lid. Tallulahs $8.50

Gingham green napkins. Tallulahs $4.75

Hibiscus white bud vase. Tallulahs $48

Early bird napkin rings. Tallulahs $4.50

Ceramic monkey jar. Tallulahs $8

Classic trivet lazy Susan. Tallulahs $225

White lunch caddy with hydrangea napkins.

Torre salt and pepper mill. Tallulahs $65 each

Tallulahs $19.50, $7.50

BY MELODY PARRY

112 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON


kitchen

living room

Spring vegetable round platter. Tallulahs $149

Program N Pattern pillow. Hockman Interiors $125

Bunny tureen. Tallulahs $289

Vega Fossil pillow. Hockman Interiors $112 each

Santorini small, medium and large canisters. Tallulahs $54, $59, $79

Cream embroidered throw. Hockman Interiors $105

Vintage navy bread bowl with lemons. Tallulahs $145

Accent tables. Hockman Interiors $350

Happy bunny towel set. Tallulahs $17

Rabbit with basket. Tallulahs $65 Cream fleur de lis vase. Kent’s Floral Gallery $70 White tulips. Kent’s Floral Gallery $20 bunch

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FEELING FAZED

WITH LANDSCAPING?

THIS PHASED APPROACH CAN HELP. BY PEG GILL

116 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


W When looked into separately, creating these new spaces can be a feasible and enjoyable project.

ith the arrival of warmer weather, we’ll all be spending more time outdoors. And with social distancing still a necessity, many of us will be more reliant than ever on our own yards and outdoor spaces for gathering, dining and entertaining. When that space is beautifully landscaped, it can make it all the more enjoyable. But what if your outdoor space lacks luster? Where do you start? We asked garden and landscape professional Allie Henneke, director of advertising and media relations for Rost Landscaping and Design, for some tips. “Creating a new outdoor space at your home can be exciting,” Henneke says. “Whether it is a planting bed to add some variety and color to your home, or a new patio for entertainment and relaxing, all outdoor creations can bring joy. At the same time, deciding how you want the space to look and what to put in it can be a daunting task.” She suggests creating a landscape plan in phases, to more easily change a task that’s now daunting to a yard worth flaunting. “When creating a new space, our design team advises you to break it down into three phases to make the design of it much easier to handle: Size & Layout, Filling the Space, and Finishing Touches,” she says. “When looked into separately, creating these new spaces can be a feasible and enjoyable project.”

Phase 1: Size & Layout

Henneke says the first step in creating a new space is to decide on the size of the area. This will of course be partially determined by the size of your property. “For any patio space, the amount of people you typically entertain needs to be considered. There needs to be enough space for everyone to be able to move around without feeling confined or crammed into one area. In a new planting bed, think about what would be proportionate to the home. Allowing Nate Anderson, Landscape Designer | Photographs by Dylan Rucker INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 117


enough space for a couple rows of plants is a good place to start.” Once size is determined, she says shape will need to be taken in consideration. “Bed lines that are free-form and flow smoothly give an aesthetic appeal while making the mowing along those lines easier.” Patio spaces can look good with either organic or straight edges, according to Henneke. “Depending on the style of patio that is desired, both can make an impact on the final product.” Okay, so you’ve determined the size of your new space. You’re ready for the next step.

Phase 2: Filling the Space

You may already have favorite flowers, plants or shrubs. You may also know that certain ones won’t do well here, either because of the climate or because the place where you want to plant them either gets too little or too much sun. Henneke says that in addition to types of plants, another consideration when filling that new landscape bed is the sizes of plants. “Plants will need to be able to fit in the area without overcrowding, but also need to fill in the space well as they grow towards maturity. This will keep the bed from feeling empty and allows less area for weeds to encroach. Using varying heights and colors will also add interest and appeal through the season.” Another aspect of this phase involves selecting what 118 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

Nate Anderson, Landscape Designer


ACADEMY

HERITAGE For Christ and Family

Quality Christian Education Partnering with Christian parents to prepare college-worthy character witnesses for Jesus Christ

University-Model®

A hybrid approach to academic excellence Committed to character development and college preparation

Heritage Academy K-12 Christian School 3 days in school / 2 days at home Teachers who care Personalized education Positive community Small class sizes Athletics

Don’t miss the all-school open house Wednesday, April 14th! material is desired, in terms of adding durables or hardscaping of any sort. “Whether it be stone or concrete pavers, both have attractive options. Each one will have selections that range in sizes and colors to create a patio that suits your style,” she says.

Phase 3: Finishing Touches Henneke says, “Adding the final touches may be the most fun part. Once the plants have been selected, it is just as important to consider what mulch to use. Wood and gravel mulch are both options that have a range of colors to finish off the look of that bed.” She says there are other elements that can really bring the bling to your new patio space. “Consider features that make it more functional for you to relax or host a gathering,” she advises. “Landscape lighting is an excellent addition to both landscape beds and patios. They provide additional viewing time at night, as well as added security around the home.” And don’t forget about adding features that can help prolong how long you’re able to enjoy your new space, both in terms of daily and seasonal use. “Other considerations might be firepits and furniture,” she says. As the temperatures drop, both can help extend your enjoyment into late fall and even early winter. Adding removable cushions to your seating not only makes it more comfy, it adds an extra degree of insulation as well. With so many styles and options, Henneke knows it can seem overwhelming, but says “by working within these phases simplifies the process, making it and the finished product more enjoyable.” Her final bit of advice? “… if DIY just isn’t for you, contact a designer so they can point in you the right direction!”

Learn more

heritageacademyofcolumbia.com

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 119


Artichoke Annie’s Antique mall Artichoke Annie’s, The Best In The Midwest.

www.artichokeannies.com Located east of Columbia off of I-70, at the Millersburg exit.


Inside Columbia

insider C O N T E N T S

122

An Ornithological Opus From A Father/Daughter Duo

126

Columbia Couple Weds In Stunning Setting

129

Rock Steady: Promoting Hope Amid A Pandemic

HARE WE ARE

There’s a well-known British phrase, “Mad as a March Hare.” Many think it refers to the odd way brown hares behave the month, during mating season. They leap, box and chase in circles. Of course, The March Hare’s also a character Lewis Carroll's 1865 classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.


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BOOKSHELF

Birds of a Feather

FATHER AND DAUGHTER COLLABORATE ON AMBITIOUS EFFORT. BY PEG GILL · PHOTO BY L.G. PATTERSON

J

ohn Faaborg’s love of birds took

Claire, who grew up regularly taking “field

make it fairly comprehensive but not too

flight early on. “My brother took

trips” with him both locally and across

large, nor too expensive. He wanted it to

me birding when I was 7 years old

North America. Of birds in general, Claire

be approachable, and suitable not only for

and I was hooked for life,” he says. “The

says she certainly loves them “more than

undergrads but serious birders too.

excitement of being able to identify birds

the average young person. It’s hard not to

was one of the first things that drew me

be grateful to them — they are the reason

conservation, he brings a unique

in, then I got concerned with populations

I'm where I am.”

perspective, saying, “Although there has

and such.” His interest would lead him to a career as a professor, retiring from MU after 40 years. “My teaching was centered

And where she is, is sharing a credit

As an expert on avian ecology and

been some serious work on the problems

on the cover of her father’s new book

that birds face in the recent literature

as illustrator.

(70% declines in population, for example),

The Book of Birds, Introduction to

in general birds are pretty common and

on general ecology, avian ecology and

Ornithology, was released in the fall of 2020.

visible, so I think people didn't realize

ornithology,” Faaborg says. “I mentored

It isn’t John’s first book — a larger version

that bird populations are declining and

24 Ph.D. students and 19 masters,

appeared in the late 1980s, and about 15

of concern. As long as we keep adding

published lots of papers and got to see

years ago, 12 of its original chapters were

population to the planet, we will have less

lots of the world.”

converted into what he describes as “a short

bird habitat.” He says to the extent that

but decent quality text.”

factors such as widespread use of pesticides

He passed on his ardor for all things avian to his children, including daughter

122 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

John’s goal for his latest book was to

or global warming are widespread and


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BOOKSHELF

long term, we can only do small things to

she can’t cite one saying, “I like lots of

help birds. “Feeders are mostly good, but

birds, there are so many beautiful ones.

they also attract birds to windows or might

I particularly likes kingfishers, and have

spoil and kill birds that we think we are

a soft spot for Waxwings, both Cedar

benefitting by our feeding,” he cautions.

and Bohemian.” Her dad, on the other

One of the most important things John

hand, doesn’t hesitate to name his: the

wanted people to understand with the

Puerto Rican Tody. “It is brilliant green,

book is why a bird looks the way it does.

tiny (half a ketchup package), and full of

“There is no other animal group with

personality,” John says.

quite as much variation in color as birds,”

The father/daughter duo say there was

he says, “and by using color in most of the

little friction during the process. “Most

graphics in this book, we hope to visually

of our work was very collaborative,”

give you some sense of that variation,

John says, “as Claire was working in the

while explaining it in the text.”

house.” She drew perched at a drafting

It was John who hatched the idea to

table in a large-windowed room at the

have Claire illustrate his endeavor, versus

back of the family’s Columbia home. John

using photographs, saying “it became a no-

twist of fate, she had the opportunity to

says, “Working with Claire on this project

brainer when we saw how good an artist

take her father’s final class the year he

has been one of my favorite lifetime

Claire grew up to be.” She had long drawn

retired. “I'm not an artist by trade,” she says,

memories.”

birds and other science illustrations, and

“the starving artist trope is all too real, but I

Claire says, “It is because of and for

studied both art history and illustration

take projects and commissions when I can.”

him that I have illustrated this book.”

at MU, earning her BA in 2012. In a lovely

When asked to name her favorite bird,

SEE YOUR FEET THE WAY WE DO

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 123


ADVERTISEMENT

TIPS TO ENSURE YOUR BEST FRIEND IS HEALTHY AND HAPPY

THE MISSION: NUTRITION We all want our pets to live long, healthy lives. But how can you make sure the food you feed is contributing? Knowing about pet food labeling can help ensure that every piece of kibble also brings peace of mind.

1. TWO BE SURE. Pet food labeling is regulated by the FDA. In addition, many states have adopted the model pet food regulations established by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), which are more specific, covering aspects such as product name, its guaranteed analysis, the nutritional adequacy statement, feeding directions and calorie statements.

2. FLUFF VS. FACTS. Many pet companies use descriptors such as “dinner” and “flavor.” When the label lists “chicken” alone in its product name, that means chicken must make up at least 95% of the total weight of the product (not counting the water used in processing.) But if “chicken” is followed by “dinner,” “entrée” or “platter,” only 10% of the entire product needs to be chicken. Similarly, a product whose name says “with chicken” is required to have only 3% chicken, and “chicken flavor” means very little chicken is used, only to add flavor.

3. WEIGHT A MINUTE. Pet food ingredients must be listed in descending weight order, but here’s a watch-out: Items that contain a lot of moisture, such as beef, poultry or fish, will likely be listed first. Water content is particularly relevant when looking at dry foods. Ingredients farther down the list may offer

more protein but may weigh less because the moisture has been taken out.

4. GET FILLED IN. Additionally, some fillers, such as corn, rice and potatoes, may be listed separately to give the impression that less of them exist in the total formula. By listing individual types of corn, for instance — flaked, ground, screened, kibbled — each type appears lower on the list, however, when combined they can often be more prevalent in the food than the meat source which isn't ideal.

5. INSISTING ON LISTING. To meet AAFCO regulations, manufacturers must list the minimum amount of protein and fat and maximum amount of fiber and moisture as percentages of the product. This is called the guaranteed analysis. Because moisture content can skew the percentages significantly, an accurate comparison of the guaranteed analysis of two pet foods is possible when they are converted to a moisture-free or dry-matter basis. This would come into play especially when comparing the guaranteed analyses of dry and canned food. To distinguish the nutritional value accurately, the moisture content must be taken into consideration.

lizziandroccos.com NORTH LOCATION 1610 I-70 Drive SW Columbia, MO 65203 114 INSIDE COLUMBIA DECEMBER/JANUARY 2021

SOUTH LOCATION 550 East Green Meadows Columbia, MO 65201


INSIDE COLUMBIA DECEMBER/JANUARY 2021 115


insider

WEDDINGS

A Will To Wed

COLUMBIA COUPLE GOES THE DISTANCE FOR THEIR DREAM DAY. BY PEG GILL · PHOTOS BY CHELSEA REECE PHOTOTGRAPHY

W

hen Elizabeth Duesenberg and Will DelGrosso were students at

Lindenwood College in St. Louis, they were introduced by mutual friends who were dating and wanted another couple to double date with. When Will proposed, he took Elizabeth to the very same spot on campus where they first met. He had asked her mom Pam ahead of time for permission to marry Liz, so Pam was on hand with a camera to capture everything. Elizabeth, who goes by Liz, knew that she had found “the one.” But when it came to finding a wedding dress that was “the one,” she couldn’t — and ended up buying three! “The third and final one was PERFECT!” Liz says. It was mostly crepe, while the bust and sleeves were a thicker lace material. The train had a beautiful lace design and she wore a cathedral veil with beaded trim. She accessorized with a dainty necklace and earrings from her mom and two sisters and wore her hair half up/half down with a braid down the center. The couple was married on Nov. 7 of 2020, at a venue called Dream Point Ranch in Bixby, Oklahoma. “I really wanted the perfect mix of bohemian and classic, trendy and traditional,” Liz says.

126 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


WEDDINGS

SCHAEFER PHOTOGRAPHY

insider

THE DETAILS BRIDAL GOWN White Traditions Bridal House St. Charles, MO HAIR STYLING Ash Franke Styles, Tulsa, OK BRIDESMAIDS' GOWNS David's Bridal, BHLDN PHOTOGRAPHY Chelsea Reece, Tulsa, OK FLORIST Crooked Roots Design, Tulsa, OK DJ/BAND Lion's Road Studios, Tulsa, OK CAKE Sweet Devotion Cakery, Tulsa, OK REGISTRY Zola VIDEOGRAPHER Reagan Lynn Films TUXEDOS Men’s Wearhouse WEDDING COORDINATOR Bethany Faber Events, Tulsa, OK RINGS Buchroeders Jewelers

“Dream Point has this outdoor ceremony

different aunt and uncle (Julie and John)

spot that overlooks the Arkansas river.”

prayed over them, blending part of a

Because the spot is gorgeous and truly

prayer from their own wedding with

breathtaking, they really didn’t decorate

half of an Irish blessing. When Liz and

much. One very special touch was an

Will were announced as husband and

arbor Will designed and built with

wife, they grabbed their dogs from the

a friend, out of trees Will cut down,

bridesmaids and walked them up the

sanded and assembled. Liz helped by

aisle. The beloved corgis, Nellie and

staining. The couple brought the arbor

Dasher, were all dressed up in a white

with them and decorated it with a huge

dress and tuxedo that Will’s mom made.

floral piece in the upright corner. Today, the arbor stands in their garden. Before the very traditional and religious ceremony, Liz’s mom and sisters gave her away. In a very nontraditional move, Will

Each bridesmaid wore a different dress, donning a mix of chiffon, satin and velvet that Liz describes as “sunset colors and tones.” The bride carried a loosely spherical

walked down to meet her to “November

bouquet of gold, blush and dusty

Rain.” He admits his choice was “different,

rose/mauve flowers wrapped tightly

but it’s one of my favorite songs and I

with blush ribbon, including roses

thought it would be so fun because we

and Amaranthus, with Italian ruscus,

got married in November! It just had to be

privet foliage and pampas grass. The

done and I’m so thankful Elizabeth gave

bridesmaids carried smaller, more

me the thumbs up to do it!”

neutral versions of her bouquet.

Liz’s Uncle Mike officiated, praying

The groom wore a very classic black

over the couple before marrying them.

tux with a neutral-colored tie. His

After exchanging their own vows, a

boutonniere was similar to the bridal

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 127


insider

WEDDINGS

bouquet and had a blush wrap. The groomsmen wore black tuxedos with a neutral-colored bow tie and a smaller boutonniere similar to the groom’s. The reception, held indoors at the same venue, featured cream-colored linens with white plates lined in gold. Different framed pictures from the couple’s engagement shoot held the table numbers which were stamped on the glass. Will’s mom had wine bottles made with the couple’s initials etched on them, which fittingly enough read WED. The three-tiered cake was strawberry and vanilla pastry with Italian buttercream and raspberry vanilla with Italian buttercream. The top two tiers were “naked,” and decorated with flowers. The bottom layer was sage green and had a gold trim. For Elizabeth, a favorite detail was how family-oriented the day was, including having their “fur babies” take part. “It would have felt like a piece of our hearts were missing if we didn’t,” she says. For Will, a highlight was seeing Liz walk down the aisle. “My best friend of almost a decade was about to become my wife and it was an image I will always cherish.” The bride's mother is Pam Duesenberg of St. Louis. The groom's parents are Nick and Barbara DelGrosso of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Due to COVID, the newlyweds had to abandon their grand honeymoon plans, but look forward to a trip to Seattle this summer. The new Mr. and Mrs. DelGrosso live in Columbia where Liz is co-host of “Liz and Scotty in the Morning” on Clear 99, and Will is an accounting assistant at Stephens College.

128 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


insider

SPOTLIGHT

Finding Fun

LOCAL GROUP CREATES UNIQUE GAME OF HIDE 'N SEEK. BY PEG GILL

I

f you live in Columbia, chances are you’re just a stone’s throw away from an incredible park or trail.

darkness of the COVID-19 lockdown. According to its Facebook page, “CoMo Rocks is a community project to

find, be sure you replace it with a rock that you have painted. • Hide all rocks outdoors (please don't

That proved to be invaluable last year, as

help inspire others and foster creativity

the pandemic forced us to forgo many of

in Columbia, Missouri, United States of

our favorite indoor activities and events.

America, and the surrounding area. It's

weather (such as acrylic) and use

Many turned to crafting, took up new

hide them indoors). • Use paints that will withstand

a hide-and-seek game of sorts. Grab a

a clear coat (such as mod lodge or

hobbies, or began baking bread. We

paintbrush, get creative, find some great

polyurethane spray) to seal it.

found inventive ways to keep ourselves

hiding spots, and be on the lookout for

both busy and buoyed. One local group

these hidden gems!”

found a helpful hybrid activity that

Some of the stunning stones painted

• Try to add the FB group name on the back of the rocks so people who find them will know where to post pics.

linked our proximity to parks with our

by members so far offer uplifting

need for hope: A Facebook group called

messages, such as “Be you,” or “Don’t let

CoMo Rocks.

anyone dull your sparkle.” Others have

as well as the FB posts, please

Given its name, you might think the

"FB CoMo Rocks." • Since kiddos will see the rocks

sported seasonal motifs, such as a Santa,

no inappropriate paintings or

group is made up of musicians, perhaps

snowman or candy cane. Others simply

comments. Any inappropriate posts

playing impromptu pop-up concerts

provided a bright spot in what otherwise

in unexpected places. But it’s actually

might not have been such a great day.

responsible for something else popping

The group is public, meaning

will be deleted immediately. You can find the group on Facebook, under “CoMo Rocks.”

up: Colorfully painted rocks or stones,

anyone can see who's in it and what

placed in unexpected spots where

they post, and it does have some

scientific study of rocks is called

unsuspecting passersby might find them.

general guidelines:

petrology. But in the case of CoMo

Although the group was actually

On an interesting side note, the

• Members are encouraged to post their

Rocks, the emphasis is definitely on the

formed several years ago, it was

pictures, stories or clues on its page,

“pet” part — they’re reminiscent of the

reinvigorated and found a renewed

and then hide new rocks or relocate

Pet Rocks that were popular in the mid-

purpose in 2020: Members realized it

rocks they find to a different spot for

1970s, bringing a smile rather than any

someone else to find.

scientific insight.

offered the perfect pastime to help pass time and boost our spirits during the

• If you want to keep the rock you

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 129


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Inside Columbia

views C O N T E N T S

133 Dueling DJs

135 A New View

136

Darkow Draws

138

The Final Word

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views

Dueling DJs

DUELING DJS

Two local radio personalities square off on a topic du jour.

Each issue, two on-air talents from two different Zimmer Radio Group stations will voice their opinions on what you might call a controversial topic. This issue, check out Trevor's and Cosmo's take on what they think is the "best pizza in Columbia."

Cosmo, 106.9 Y107 G&D Pizza

Trevor, 96.7 KCMQ Pizza Tree

I picked G&D's Greek style pizza because of the family

Pizza Tree in Columbia is the single best pizzeria in town!

atmosphere. G&D has been family owned and operated in

The freshness of ingredients, the ideal consistency of its

CoMo for almost 45 years. I also love it because of that perfectly

crust, and clever décor help slingshot it to the top of the

crispy, made-just-right-every-time crust! There's no need to ask for extra cheese because G&D pizzas pack plenty of the good stuff. My favorite? Do a little dance with the

other pizza options!  Just one of the ways they’re set apart from other places is how you can order by the slice. They always have traditional pizzas ready for

Country Music Special with only the freshest

single slice snacking, plus they’ll rotate more

meats piled high and served to your table just

creative pizzas in every day so you can try out

right! (See if owner Alex will give you the 'real

new styles!

story' of how it got its name.) We celebrate baseball team wins at G&D

All good pizza starts with the crust. And Pizza Tree’s crust is the perfect consistency.

and my son loves the pepperoni. Pro tip: Ask

It has the right amount of chewiness with the

for a side of gyro tzatziki sauce and dip your

ideal ratio between crust, cheese and toppings.

pepperoni slice in that! OPA!!! So good.

While Pizza Tree has all sorts of funky flavor options, my favorite pizza has green peppers, pepperoni and tomatoes.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 133


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views

A NEW VIEW

A New View

BEING A PHOTOGRAPHER, I HAVE ACCESS TO SOME UNIQUE POINTS OF VIEW IN THE COMMUNITY. Assignment: Driving to Springfield The Location: Rual Cooper County This was once somebody’s dream. That’s all I could think about when I drove past this house in a field along Hwy. 87.

Someone was once excited about moving their family into a new house on their farm. I picture them watching their kids grow as they play in the yard. I can see them preparing and eating the food that they grew in their garden. It was probably a happy place. Hopefully, the children who were raised there made the house their home and created many happy memories. Time changes, attitudes change and

some possessions that were once important are discarded for new things. Now the house is fighting to stay upright. It’s almost like it’s fighting to keep those memories and dreams alive.

L.G. Patterson

a, ve INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 135


views

DARKOW DRAWS

136 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021


Advertising Index INSIDE COLUMBIA AllState Consultants....................................................51

SOA Architecture –

Artichoke Annie’s Antique Mall..................................120

Jen Hedrick, Brad Stegemann, Nick Borgmeyer

Bank of Missouri........................................................ 24

State Farm Insurance – Phyllis Nichols......................... 53

Bluetail Medical Group – Dr. Kristin Oliver ����������������� 56

Stone Hill Winery....................................................... 38

BMW of Columbia.......................................................12

Suites at Concorde......................................................51

Boone Hospital Center................................................. 7

SumnerOne................................................................81

CC’s City Broiler ...................................................2, 130

The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton......................105

CenterPointe Hospital................................................ 42

The Terrace Retirement Community............................. 44

Central Bank of Boone County....................................6-7

The Wellness Way – Columbia....................................4-5

Coil Construction – Randy and David Coil �������������������57

Vantage Realty..........................................................8-9

Commerce Bank........................................................... 3

Zimmer Radio Group –

Convergence Financial............................................... 23

Children’s Miracle Network........................................ 22

Designer Kitchens & Baths.......................................... 29

60

Downtown Appliance..........................................42, 132

CEO

EnergyLink – Craig Stichter........................................ 55

Binghams................................................................... 68

Evans & Dixon – Tim Gerding...................................... 63

CC’s City Broiler......................................................... 96

Fleet Feet Sports........................................................123

Christian Fellowship of Columbia –

Genesis Company.......................................................14

Elizabeth Stott..........................................................91

Hawthorn Bank........................................................140

Coil Construction.........................................................71

Heritage Academy.................................................... 118

Edward Jones – Gina Mauller-Crane........................... 83

Lee’s Tire Company.....................................................19

Fleet Feet – Nancy Yaeger......................................... 86

Liberty Family Medicine –

Jacobs Realty – Amanda Jacobs..................................87

Dr. Danielle Kelvis, Dr. Bridget Gruender ����������������� 59

Lean Kitchen Co. Columbia – Natalie Hardin �������������� 88

Lizzi & Rocco’s Natural Pet Market..................... 124-125

Mediacom.................................................................. 66

Menard Inc................................................................ 44

Mutrux Automotive................................................72-75

Mercedes-Benz of Columbia........................................10

NextHome Paradigm – Melissa Menard..................... 90

Missouri Vein Care......................................................19

PCE............................................................................ 77

Mutual of Omaha – Wally Pfeffer..............................134

Restoration Chiropractic – Leah Sirois,

Naught-Naught Insurance – Cody Thorne ������������������ 58

Morgan Malloy, Katelyn Thomas,

NextHome Paradigm................................................. 38

Michelle Moberg, Kendell Nunnelly,

N.H. Scheppers Distributing Company.........................21

Jeanice Williams, Becca Boldt...............................84-85

Peak Sport & Spine –Lindsay Bell, Mark Dempsey,

State Farm Insurance – Phyllis Nichols......................... 89

Shelton Blevins,Taalor Stevenson............................. 62

SumnerOne................................................................81

Robinson & Ries Orthodontics –

The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton......................105

David Ries, D.D.S., M.S............................................61

Tiger Court Reporting................................................. 68

Rost Landscaping & Superior Gardens....................... 119

Van Marte Law Firm, P.C. – Karen Hajicek,

Rusk Rehabilitation Center..........................................11

Casey Elliott............................................................ 92

Smith Moore – Tim Borman, Aaron Rugdon,

Zimmer Radio Group – BrandKamp.............................71

Blaine McQuaid Pestle..............................................18

INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021 137


views

THE FINAL WORD

Columbia's Future A VISION FOR OUR CITY IN 2030

BY FRED PARRY

What do you think Columbia should look like in the year 2030? That’s the question we recently posed to a group of luncheon guests and to more than 400 readers of Inside Columbia magazine. The responses were as diverse and eclectic as the people who call Columbia home, but the common thread in all responses revealed a deep and abiding compassion for our quirky little city. Perhaps you won’t be surprised by the underlying concerns raised by our panel of luncheon guests and by the vast majority of survey participants, but I bet you’ll be inspired and encouraged by their combined optimism for how a good city can become a great city. Before looking forward, it’s always best to stop and take a candid assessment of the current situation. Topping the list of concerns is what many describe as a crime problem in Columbia. Real or imagined, there’s no doubt that this perception is indeed a reality for the majority of those who weighed in. While there have not been any dramatic shifts in crime statistics in recent years, it’s true that most people don’t feel as safe in Columbia as five years ago. Perhaps it’s due to overzealous media outlets proclaiming shots fired and other violence as “breaking news” at the top of every newscast. Maybe it’s the belief that it’s no longer safe to be in downtown Columbia after 10 p.m. The bottom line is that survey participants want more cops on the streets. To satisfy this desire, community leaders will have to find creative ways to pay for more law enforcement at a time when tax revenues 138 INSIDE COLUMBIA MARCH/APRIL 2021

are heading in the wrong direction. It’s true that the vast majority of those surveyed rate Columbia’s quality of life with very high levels of approval. The same can be said for local parks and recreational opportunities as well as the arts and cultural activity available to most citizens. Unfortunately, when it comes to opportunities for youth or race relations, opinions quickly move into negative territory. In addition to these two categories, this year’s survey revealed a strong desire for Columbia to enhance its offerings for vocational education and job training for non-college bound students. Perhaps the biggest anomaly in this year’s survey was the revelation that approval in our public schools had fallen considerably. Individual comments posted by survey takers revealed that most of the angst and disappointment our readers felt toward the Board of Education and Columbia Public Schools administrators was likely a direct result of how these leaders collectively responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. There’s no doubt that our nationally recognized public school system has lost some of its affinity among local patrons for keeping our schools closed for a prolonged period as compared to surrounding school districts. With more than 800 fewer students registered in the district and hundreds more who have essentially disappeared, there is much concern for the long-term impact on these students. Perhaps on a brighter note, our survey captured the lighter side of our readers’ vision for 2030. When we asked participants to tell us what retailers and

restaurants they wanted to see come to Columbia in the coming years, we found a remarkable commonality in their responses. There’s a strong desire to have a Whole Foods grocery store, Costco, Trader Joe’s and Nordstrom’s in Columbia. The responses regarding restaurants revealed a rather pleasant surprise. While many would love to see a Cheesecake Factory or P.F. Chang’s come to Columbia, a shocking amount of survey participants went out of their way to note their high satisfaction with the locally owned restaurants that already exist here. This was a nod to Columbia’s strong culinary scene. Be sure to read the article on page 97 for more in-depth coverage including thoughts on poverty, town and gown relations, and the desire for more frequent communication and intentional planning from our community leaders. In spite of our city’s current shortcomings, there was an undeniable sense of optimism about its future. Rather than letting the problems of the day derail our efforts to move forward and make Columbia a better place to live, there was a strong sense of confidence that Columbians can accomplish anything when we come together and work toward a common cause.

Fred Parry Founder & Publisher Emeritus fred@insidecolumbia.net

M


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Inside Columbia magazine March/April 2021  

Read about 16 Brunch spots sure to satisfy, room refreshes for your home and get the low down on landscaping you will love in this issue of...

Inside Columbia magazine March/April 2021  

Read about 16 Brunch spots sure to satisfy, room refreshes for your home and get the low down on landscaping you will love in this issue of...

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