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SUMMER 2019 WINTER 2017

INSIDECOLUMBIA’S COLUMBIA’SCEO CEO INSIDE


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CONTENTS Inside Columbia’s CEO • www.ColumbiaCEO.com • Volume 10, Issue 4

12

Opening Bell: The Buzz On CoMo Biz

16 Data Bank: Missouri’s Export Partners

40

18 Up & Coming: The Ladder Report 20

Entrepreneurial Spirit: Representing Women In Untraditional Careers

24

John Ott: Building A Future From Columbia’s Past

28 Construction Projects Around Columbia 40 Gary Ward: A Project With Promise 46 Four Books to Read This Summer 48

CEO Roundtable: Columbia’s Leaders Speak Out

58

5 Granola Bars To Keep In Your Desk

64 Networking 74

Publisher’s Note

ON THE COVER:

Plans are moving ahead with the MU’s new $220 million research facility called Translational Precision Medicine Complex. Research teams will focus on medical research and the building is MU’s highest capital funding project.

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B R ATI E L

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2019 10 2019 2019 2019 •20 •

•19•

Y E RS A

Locally Owned

111 East Broadway, Suite 310 • Columbia, MO 65203 573.999.2662 • www.tigercr.com

STAFF Chief Executive Officer Carla Leible cleible@zrgmail.com Publisher Emeritus Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net Publisher Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net Associate Editor Peg Gill peg@insidecolumbia.net Contributing Writers Jack Wax, Dr. Suman Ahuja, Christi Kemper, Eli Marchbanks Photo Editor L.G. Patterson lgpatterson@insidecolumbia.net Art Director Tim Flanner tflanner@zrgmail.com Graphic Designers Jenn Smith jsmith@insidecolumbia.net Megan Schmeling mschmeling@insidecolumbia.net Jon Sheltmire jsheltmire@zrgmail.com Advertising Coordinator Jeff Ausmus jausmus@zrgmail.com Marketing Representatives Cathy Atkins cathy@insidecolumbia.net Matt Melton matt@insidecolumbia.net Karlie Klimes kklimes@insidecolumbia.net Karrington Scott kscott@insidecolumbia.net Kylee Laurine klaurine@insidecolumbia.net Busines Manager Becky James rjames@zrgmail.com Distribution Associates Steve Leible

I passionately serve and relate to extraordinary clients, who in turn value and appreciate the work I do. I grow together with my clients, optimizing their accounting and management procedures as a trusted, respected and valued advisor.

When we discovered Rebecca Knipp, I knew she was exactly what we needed to grow our business, and frankly, to survive. She was better than any full time employee – she was already an expert in her field, and no additional training was necessary. She could pick up the ball and continue to carry it forward.

~ Becky Heinrich, President Schriefer's Office Equipment

Inside Columbia’s CEO magazine Zimmer Strategic Communicatios 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200 Columbia, MO 65201 573-875-1099 • www.ColumbiaCEO.com

Inside Columbia’s CEO is published quarterly by Zimmer Strategic Communicatios LLC, 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, MO 65201, 573-875-1099. Copyright Zimmer Communications, 2018. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo. Annual subscription rate is $19.95 for four issues.

Optimized CFO & Controller Services LLC PO Box 7201, Columbia, MO 65205 | 573-220-1019 | rebecca@optimizedcfo.com Please Recycle This Magazine.

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OPENING BELL

TH E B UZ Z ON COM O BI Z

Construction Progress

PHOTO BY L.G. PATTERSON

CoMo Agriculture Park Almost Complete

A

fter several missed grand openings, the new Columbia Agriculture Park, which will host the Columbia Farmer’s Market, is almost ready for business. At the time of press, the rain had kept construction delayed and the organization was waiting to see if the first Saturday

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market at the MU Health Care Pavilion would take place. The first phase of the project included grading and ground work, irrigation, vendor parking, paving of the plaza and some sidewalks, and the middle section of the pavilion structure. Construction of the second phase

of the building project will include an 11,000-square-foot outdoor classroom area, a one-room schoolhouse, a playground, a garden demonstration area and a greenhouse space. The campaign has raised more than $4 million in the past 18 months and donations have been from public and private sources.


OPENING BELL

News You Need To Know

PROVIDED PHOTO: LES BOURGEOIS

BOONE COUNTY LUMBER NAMED 2019 SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR The Columbia Chamber of Commerce named Boone County Lumber as the 2019 Small Business of the Year. For more than 50 years, Boone County Lumber has been a building material retailer that specializes in forest products, siding and decking, hardware and tools. While they mainly serve mid-Missouri, they have shipped product internationally. The company has been a larger investor in the community; they have donated thousands of dollars worth of materials and time to organizations like the Voluntary Action Center, Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture and True/False Film Fest. Other finalists for the annual award included Focus on Health Chiropractic, Fortified Roofing and Siding, LLC, Kliethermes Homes & Remodeling, Inc. and White Dog Promotions, LLC.

LES BOURGEOIS VINEYARDS CHANGES OWNERS Curtis Bourgeois, former owner of Les Bourgeois Vineyards, has retired after 32 years of working in the vineyard. The new co-owners, Jacob and Rachel Holman, took over the reins on April 2, along with an anonymous outside investor. The Holmans have held leadership positions at Les Bourgeois for many years. Jacob started at the winery in 1999 and rose to the ranks of head winemaker in 2006. Rachael worked as events and marketing director for seven years at Les Bourgeois before being named CEO in 2013. Les Bourgeois is located in Rocheport and includes a restaurant with a blufftop view, a tasting room off I70 and a more casual tasting and eating outdoor experience at the A-frame deck and pavilion.

It was sweet success for Teanna Bass, who won second place in the campus-round of this year’s UM System Entrepreneur Quest pitch competition. She won $10,000 and a chance to compete in the semifinal round against the top three campus finishers from St. Louis, Kansas City and Rolla. Bass founded Sweet Tea Cosmetics, a business she started in her high school senior year and then from her Columbia apartment while in college. In her junior year, she received a grant for a storefront in the MU Student Center. In 2018, Bass opened the store in a corner of the center where she applies makeup and has expanded to employ a nail technician and two hairdressers. She is a senior in Textile and Apparel Management. 14

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PROVIDED PHOTO

SWEET TEA COSMETICS FOUNDER WINS ENTREPRENEURIAL AWARD


PROVIDED PHOTO

N E WS BRI E FS

COLUMBIA SAFETY & SUPPLY NAMED BEST WORKPLACE IN INC. MAGAZINE

ZIMMER COMMUNICATIONS LAUNCHES NEW INBOUND MARKETING DIVISION

Columbia Safety & Supply has been named one of Inc. magazine’s Best Workplaces for 2019, in the fourth annual ranking of the fast-growing private company sector. Inc. collected data nationwide and selected the company as one of 346 finalists. Each finalist took part in an employee survey on topics including trust, management effectiveness, perks and confidence in the future. Columbia Safety & Supply headquarters, located along Rangeline St. on E. Boone Industrial Blvd., offers perks for its employees. The facility features a full kitchen stocked with snacks, a gym, a production studio and multiple breakrooms. Along with these amenities, the company offers other benefits such as competitive salaries, health care, paid volunteer time off and flexible scheduling. The company has been aggressively expanding its staff over the last few years. In 2018, the company added nearly 40 employees to its Columbia headquarters and expects to add 100 new positions over the next year.

Zimmer has launched an all-new division of their company: fuze32. The new division will focus on inbound marketing, which involves creating digital content in the form of blog posts, eBooks, videos and more, then promoting this content utilizing email, social media and traditional and digital platforms. Such content is designed to impact businesses’ SEO, causing them to rank for relevant industry searches and resulting in an increase in website traffic and an influx of online leads. Inbound marketing makes lead conversion a seamless process by eliminating the uncertainty of traditional outbound marketing methods, all while positioning business as thought leaders, or experts, in their industries. Zimmer Communications is the owner of 10 radio stations in the Columbia/Jefferson City market, various digital properties, and Inside Columbia, Boom and CEO magazines. The expansion has been in process since Jan. 1.

StoryUP, the makers of a virtual stress relief product called Healium, has been selected to present in June at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit at the Hague, Netherlands. The Missouri startup, incubated at the Missouri Innovation Center, was chosen from a pool of 5,000 applicants from 120 countries. The Global Entrepreneurship Summit is an annual gathering of entrepreneurs, innovators, investors and thought leaders from around the world. Healium’s product was hand-picked to engage with more than 300 investors managing trillions of dollars of assets. Healium is the world’s first augmented and virtual reality platform powered by wearables via a brain-computer interface or the user’s smartwatch. With 225 million wearables in the market currently generating 2D data dashboards, Healium’s patent-pending technology is transforming how users interact with their biometric data.

PROVIDED PHOTO: THERMAVANT

STORYUP WINS SEAT AT GLOBAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP SUMMIT

THERMAVANT’S OPENS ITS NEW MANUFACTURING FACILITY In May, ThermAvant Technologies hosted a grand opening celebration for its new 33,000-square-foot manufacturing facility at 2508 Paris Road. ThermAvant’s move, which more than quadrupled its space, stemmed from growing demand for the company’s thermal management hardware and services. The firm has worked with the AFRL, NASA, National Science Foundation, Army Research Laboratory, Office of Naval Research, and the Missile Defense Agency. SUMMER 2019

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OPENING BELL

DATA BAN K

Missouri’s Export Partners The Top 10 Buyers Of Missouri’s Goods In 2018

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ccording to a February study by the Department of Economic Development, over half of all Missouri’s export income in 2018 came from the top two recipients. Canada purchased $5.5 billion in goods, followed by Mexico ($2.6 billion) and China ($782 million). Korea was the fastest-growing recipient, moving up from tenth place to seventh place — an increase of 26 percent. What product was being exported from Missouri? The top four industries (see below) exceeded $1 billion in exports and accounted for almost twothirds of all 2018 exports.

Missouri’s Top 10 Export Partners in 2018 ( IN M I LLI O N S)

Canada

Mexico

China

$5,545.8

$2,611.0

$782.8

Japan

$533.0

Belgium

$494.9

Germany

$437.2

Republic of Korea

$335.9

United Kingdom

$322.8

Australia

$313.6

France

$245.3

Missouri’s Top Ten Exports in 2018 ( IN M I LLI O N S)

Transportation Equipment Chemicals

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Food And Kindred Products

$1,365

Machinery, Expert Electrical

$1,350

Electrical Equipment, Appliances And Component

Computer And Electronic Products

$632

Fabricated Metal Products, Nesoi

$608 $510

Primary Metal Manufacturing

$450

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$2,542

$709

Agricultural Products

Plastics And Rubber Products

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$3,955

$363 Source: Missouri Economic Research and Information Center


WARM SPRINGS RANCH — ANHEUSER BUSCH CLYDESDALE BREEDING FACILITY Boonville, MO

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OPENING BELL

The Ladder Report Look Who’s Moving Up In Business MISSOURI EMPLOYERS MUTUAL has hired NOTHANAEL LEON as a process engineer. Leon joined MEM after more than 23 years in strategic business operations management with Xerox. JENNIFER JAMES, CPCU, has been added as a regional underwriting manager. James joined MEM in March from State Farm, where she spent 24 years in various underwriting and leadership roles. Most recently, James served as Fire Underwriting Services team manager. CINDY KUHN has been promoted from executive sales manager to director of sales. Kuhn joined MEM in October 2018. CENTRAL TRUST CO., an affiliate of Central Bank, announced that JOHN W. STRINGER, CFP was hired as trust officer and relationship manager. Most recently, John was a relationship manager for Central Bank of Boone County, where he worked with personal and business customers for more than five years. COIL CONSTRUCTION has added RON HALL to its team. As project manager, he will work directly with clients, and manage budgets and schedules throughout all phases of each construction project. Hall is a Hickman High School graduate and holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Columbia College. The MFA OIL CO. board of directors has named JON IHLER interim chief executive officer. Ihler will be responsible for 18

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overseeing the company’s day-to-day operations of the refined fuel, propane, Petro-Card 24, Break Time, Big O Tires and Jiffy Lube operations across an eight-state region. In 2014, Ihler was promoted to vice president of sales and marketing, overseeing sales, marketing and distribution as well as APM LLC, the dealer/wholesale company MFA Oil acquired in 2013. Ihler succeeds Mark Fenner, who had served as president and CEO since 2014. CONVERGENCE FINANCIAL announced that BILL COSTELLO joined the firm as vice president. He has more than 20 years of experience in client service, relationship management and strategic planning. His focus will be on identifying new growth initiatives and and implementing strategic planning. CALEDON VIRTUAL has promoted four current employees and added three more. BAILEY CALTON has been with the company for just over two years, working with clients and facilitating community relations. Calton now joins the agency’s leadership team as client service manager. DEB ROGERS has been promoted to business development executive. She joined the company in 2016 after earning degrees in International Business and Industrial Organizational Psychology. BILL CHLANDA has been promoted to senior graphic designer. Chlanda has worked as a graphic designer at the company for nearly two years. ALISHA LOPEZ has also been promoted to senior graphic designer. After two years at the agency.

BRITTANY CATRON has been hired as a new account coordinator. Catron is a 2018 graduate of the University of Missouri. HANNAH RILEY has been hired as a search marketing specialist. Riley is a graduate of Loyola University in Chicago. SEAN SUDDUTH joins the agency as lead marketing strategist after running his own business while living in Alaska. ALEX TIMBERLAKE joins TIMBERLAKE ENGINEERING as a new project engineer. In this position he will design HVAC, electrical and plumbing systems to meet clients’ needs for commercial buildings. He will work remotely for the firm from Colorado. Timberlake previously worked for The Ballard Group and for Architectural Engineering Consultants designing HVAC systems and other duties. JAMES ARNOLD has been named COLUMBIA COLLEGE’s new director of athletics. Arnold assumed the position on May 1, overseeing the college’s 17 varsity sports. Since 2017, Arnold was the associate director of Athletics and head women’s basketball coach at Westminster College. Prior to Westminster, Arnold served as an assistant women’s basketball coach and recruiting coordinator at Southeast Missouri State University. SOCKET promoted DAVE SILL to director of information technology after 20 years with the company. Sill will serve as director of a new dedicated information technology department. The company


U P & CO M I NG

added several new members to its team. As the new human resources specialist, CHRISTINA DABLEMONT will support employee growth and engagement initiatives. Dablemont has more than seven years of combined training and HR. ED KALK joins Socket’s information technology group as a server specialist. He previously worked at Dell EMC, where his background was in server and network engineering. In her role as fiber development specialist, CHRISTI WOLVERTON will head up efforts to identify new areas where residents are interested in building out their high speed fiber optic network. MIKE IRELAND recently joined THE BANK OF MISSOURI as regional bank president for central Missouri. He has 20 years of banking experience. He spent the past 17 years with Commerce Bank in the central Missouri market holding leadership positions in the retail, small business and commercial lines of business. He led the bank’s regional healthcare banking effort and most recently served as executive vice president of Commercial Banking for the central and eastern Missouri region. SIMON OSWALD ARCHITECTURE announced the promotion of NICK BORGMEYER and BRAD STEGEMANN to associate principal. Both are long-time project managers and architects and have been integral team members since 2004 and 2005, respectively. Borgmeyer earned his bachelor of science degree in architecture from Washington University and has led the firm’s technological advancements as well as managed some of the company’s largest projects. Stegemann holds a bachelor of architecture degree from Kansas State University, leads the firm’s development of project management standards. SUMMER 2019

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Girl  power A LOCAL BUSINESS ENCOURAGES G I R L S TO D R E A M B I G

BY ELI MARCHBANKS • PHOTOS BY LG PATTERSON

After searching through the entire store for T-shirts for Clara, her physical and fearless toddler, KOMU morning news anchor Megan Judy was frustrated: All of the shirts for girls featured princesses, unicorns and glitter, none of which reflected Clara’s personality. “I naively said, ‘Let’s make some shirts,’ ” recalls Megan’s husband, Cliff Judy. Less than a year later, their business, MyTurn, offers apparel with artwork featuring girls in roles where women are currently underrepresented. “Piloting was the field that blew me away,” Cliff says as he talks about learning that women currently represent only 7 percent of pilots. Other MyTurn clothing items draw attention to the facts that women constitute only 5 percent of CEOs, about 10 percent of construction workers and about 11 percent of astronauts.

The apparel isn’t just for toddlers. “As we were telling others about the business idea,” Cliff says, “more and more people were asking us, ‘What about my size? You’re going to have my size, right?’ ” In response to the interest, clothing sizes for MyTurn’s apparel range from 12 months all the way to 3XL adult sizes for both men’s and women’s clothing. For the artwork, Megan turned to a friend from high school. Amy Madej, a working artist and teacher in St. Louis, jumped at the chance to be a part of things. “I’m on the phone telling her the ideas we have for different things,” Megan says, “and, as we are on the phone, she is actually texting me drawings she made of what we were talking about.” Over the course of the past year, Megan and Cliff discussed their business idea with countless people: family, friends and other busiSUMMER 2019

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Cliff and Megan launched their new business, MyTurn, an apparel company that features women in nontraditional careers.

ness owners. They were thrilled by the supportive feedback they received. Cliff remembers a day when one particular consultant told them, “It’s time. You guys have done all this work, and it’s time to get things started; your plan will evolve as you go along.” “That was good advice for a couple of perfectionists,” Cliff says. “Every entrepreneur runs into these challenges, and no matter how well you plan, you have to evolve.” With the shirt designs done, the website built and a handle created for Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, Megan and Cliff placed their first order for shirts and MyTurn coloring books in April. Missouri Cotton Exchange printed orders for more than 60 customers order-

ing an average of two garments each. All eight of the MyTurn girl shirts were purchased, with baseball tees being the most popular clothing item. Megan’s mother picked up the first order of MyTurn coloring books, and Cliff ’s dad delivered garments to a boutique in Kansas City.

boutiques — St. Louis and Kansas City as well,” Megan suggests. With things up and running, Megan and Cliff continue to have ideas for the new venture, such as collaborations with STEM camps for kids/teens, and MyTurn children’s books. Megan and Cliff already have stories, and Amy is chomping to do the artwork. The business is inspiring others to help. A pilot acquaintance has volunteered to mentor a young girl who is interested in becoming a pilot. In addition to the eight original MyTurn girls found on their garments, Megan and Cliff recently added another: Ida the Investigative Journalist. This newest MyTurn girl is named after Ida B. Wells, an African-

“Do we hope this will grow beyond our basement? Absolutely, but we are not there yet.”

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In addition to ordering online, the couple is considering retail outlets for the apparel. “We would like to have some things available in some local places and


American woman born into slavery who became a journalist, political activist and suffragette. Cliff — program manager at Newsy — had recently done a story about Ida and met her great-granddaughter in the process. Cliff reached out to her about the idea, and she was thrilled to be associated with MyTurn. With all this going on, it seems that MyTurn is off to an auspicious beginning. “Do we hope this will grow beyond our basement? Absolutely, but we are not there yet,” Cliff says. While keeping their expectations grounded, in a recent interview on The Tom Bradley Show, they did let slip a secret hope that Megan has for the success of MyTurn. Cliff jokes, “I think the business is really just a front for Megan to try to get on The Ellen DeGeneres Show someday.

MYTURN KID

% OF FIELD MADE UP BY WOMEN

Astrid the Astronaut...................................................................................................... 11% Cecilia the CEO.................................................................................................................... 5% Clara the Chemist........................................................................................................... 24% Constance the Construction Worker.................................................................. 9.9% Fiona the Firefighter...................................................................................................... 34% Frankie the Farmer......................................................................................................26.6% Pilar the Pilot........................................................................................................................ 7% Rosa the Elected Official............................................................................................ 24% Ida the Investigative Journalist.................................................................................. 8%

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JOHN OTT BUILDS THE FUTURE FROM

COLUMBIA’S PAST

J

ohn Ott is giving a new life to a Columbia building that housed an old funeral home. Located on the corner of Ninth and Walnut streets, Parker Funeral Home is being transformed into an events center with seating for 450 people and standing room for receptions of as many as 600. Ott will add the property to his growing portfolio of downtown Columbia buildings that he owns and leases. Travis Tucker, owner of Bleu, has leased the building and will manage the Atrium Events Center. Ott

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BY JACK WAX l PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON is looking forward to its opening not just because he owns the property, but also because he expects that the weddings and meetings held there will bring new customers to other local businesses. “When you go to a wedding, if you’re from out of town, you usually get there early. People shop in stores, hang out, get a lunch or a drink before they go to the event. Because it’s on the edge of the arts district, it’s like a gateway, so we think that people will also be exposed to artists’ work from Columbia.” Ott has perfected the art of repurposing buildings to


“We get the greatest satisfaction ... in seeing buildings that were underutilized or hardly used at all, and now all of sudden they flourish with people enjoying them...” JOHN OTT Owner of Alley A Realty

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Alley A Realty

A PORTFOLIO PEEK

Below is a sampling of some the better-known properties that John Ott’s company owns and manages:

1. THE PARAMOUNT BUILDING, Ninth and Cherry Streets — now home of Kaldi’s Coffee and Bangkok Gardens on the street level and Paramount Office Suites on the second floor. 2. ALLEY A, between Ninth and 10th Streets — now houses Kampai Sushi, Shortwave Coffee and Speckled Frog Toys and Books 3. THE BERRY BUILDING, Walnut Street — now home to Sager Braudis Gallery 4. THE STEPHENS PUBLISHING BUILDING, 1020 E. Broadway — now home to Seoul Taco, Gunter Hans and Lizzi & Rocco’s Natural Pet Market 5. CAMPUS BAR AND GRILL, INGREDIENT, PICKLEMAN’S AND STARBUCKS, Ninth and Elm Streets 6. CAFÉ BERLIN AND PUTMAN’S STUDIO 1012, 220 N. 10th St. 7. LE BAO ASIAN EATERY AND DRINKCRAFT TASTING CAFÉ AND ROOT CELLAR, 310 N. 10th St.

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John Ott has renovated about 25 projects, most of them downtown.

fit the needs of the market. He’s preserved, restored and renovated historical buildings throughout the city. Ott estimates that his company, Alley A Realty, has completed about 25 projects, most of them downtown. The company manages space now occupied by retailers, restaurants, coffee shops, theaters, art studios and offices. Name a type of business, and Alley A Realty probably manages property that supports it. Alley A Realty isn’t a one-man operation. Ott’s partners include his wife, Vicki, and their son, Tanner, who oversees company projects in Ely, Minnesota, where he lives. Their daughter, Mackenzie, has a career with L’agence, a fashion company in New York City.

Alley A Realty is built on Ott’s entrepreneurial temperament, his love of historic buildings and his commitment to the business community. The company’s buildings are from past eras, yet they have become inviting places for a new generation of entrepreneurs and artists to set up shop. For instance, the old Stephens Building at Broadway and Hitt Street now is home to a restaurant and pet supply company; the Paramount Building now houses Kaldi’s on its ground floor and office space on its second floor; a gas station at 220 N. 10th St. is now the site of Café Berlin. Darwin Hindman, former mayor of Columbia, is an


enthusiastic fan of all that Ott has done for the city. “At a time when people had given up on downtown, he’d see the potential in an old building to become something new,” Hindman says. “He’s helped make downtown an interesting and thriving place.” Over the years, Ott has turned unsightly alleys into fun shopping areas. He’s even helped improve buildings he doesn’t own. By organizing local building owners, he gained support to have the ugly concrete canopy on Broadway torn down. Carrie Gartner, executive director of the Loop Community Improvement District (CID), has known and worked with Ott since he began his career in development. “He’s a very dogged visionary,” she

says. “Far and away, his biggest impact has been on the North Village Arts District.” Ott points out that the vision for the arts district was the result of a group of people, including Gartner. “What was really obvious was a demand for artists to work collectively. It was already happening on Orr Street. A lot of these buildings were empty or underutilized, and I was in a position to pick up a few of them,” he says. Ott didn’t set out to become a developer who specializes in repurposing historic buildings. As a student in journalism school, he interned at a Columbia radio station, creating ad campaigns and selling them to local businesses. The internship ended, but his interest in advertising and helping businesses grow didn’t. Going door-to-door in downtown Columbia, Ott not only became acquainted with business owners; he also gained an appreciation of the buildings that make up the District. Twenty years later, he was still in broadcasting but had progressed from sales rep to becoming one of the owners of Premier Marketing Group, which consisted of seven radio stations. After he and his partners sold the stations, he found himself in his early 40s and in a position to invest his profits in real estate. Vicki and he had already begun investing in real estate, having renovated a four-room schoolhouse in Rocheport. They held onto the property and managed it, turning the School House Bed and Breakfast into one of Missouri’s most prominent and successful bed-and-breakfasts. He went on to restore several other buildings in Rocheport before turning his attention to Columbia. Having found a formula for success, he has kept with

it for the past 15 years. “We’re a boutique business,” he says. “We do the construction, then we lease the buildings, then go on to manage them.” After spending so much time and money renovating a building, he’s selective about whom he rents to. “It’s not just about making money; it’s about putting businesses and places in our community that people are going to enjoy. We’re always looking for the best fit for the spaces we’re creating,” he says. Ott spends a lot of time on job sites, sometimes serving as general contractor. But for large jobs, he hires local commercial building contractors. Among the hazards of investing in old buildings is discovering structural problems that at first seemed to be mere surface blemishes. Ott has a calm, confident approach to unpleasant surprises. “Our attitude is that there’s always a fix. If it’s historically significant, it’s worth saving — that’s the test for us.” Ott considers preserving buildings and reusing their materials to be an important way to conserve resources. Although LEED energy efficiency designations are one way that builders showcase their commitment to efficiency, preservation is another. Many of Ott’s properties are using material originally manufactured in the late 1800s or early 20th Century. Asked what he enjoys most about his work, Ott answers quickly and sincerely: “We get the greatest satisfaction — I say we, meaning my wife, my son and I, along with the people that work with us — in seeing buildings that were underutilized or hardly used at all, and now all of sudden they flourish with people enjoying them, hanging out in them, working in them, spending time in them. I go by all of our projects and I think, ‘This is pretty cool.’ ”

“At a time when people had given up on downtown, he’d see the potential in an old building to become something new.” — DARWIN HINDMAN Former mayor of Columbia

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Construction Zone Building Projects Taking Place Around Columbia

NEW BUILDINGS IN COLUMBIA KEEP POPPING UP — and 2019 is no exception. Although Boone county issued 22 fewer residential, nonresidential and alteration permits in May of this year compared to last year, the county is still on par with previous year’s averages. With the economy continuing to boom, 2019 will likely match, if not rival, 2018 in permit numbers. The county issued 1,160 total permits in 2017 and 967 total permits in 2018. The steady number of both home and building permits continues to provide Columbians with new homes and buildings to enjoy.

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TRANSLATIONAL PRECISION MEDICINE COMPLEX

Corner of Hospital Drive and Virginia Avenue 265,000 square feet The projected completion date is Oct. 19, 2021 DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Burns & McDonnell

ADDISON’S SOUTH

4005 Frontgate Drive 6,200 square feet The completion date was February 2019 DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Coil Construction

COLUMBIA COLLEGE NEW HALL

68,455 square feet The projected completion date is July 8 DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Reinhardt Construction Co. and S.M. Wilson & Co.

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MEMORIAL STADIUM SOUTH END ZONE COMPLEX

600 E. Stadium Blvd. 200,000 square feet The projected completion date is prior to the 2019 football season DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Mortenson; Reinhardt Construction

NEW SOUTHWEST MIDDLE SCHOOL

126,431 square feet The projected completion date is August 2020

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM River City Construction, Timberlake Engineering, PWArchitects Inc. with ACI/Boland

SHELTER INSURANCE NORTH CAMPUS FACILITY

1803 W. Broadway 100,000 square feet The projected completion date is spring 2020

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Coil Construction, PWArchitects Inc.

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The Spirit of Columbia Community & Opportunity

Business Property Leasing & Sales n Exclusive Representation of: Office Buildings Retail Buildings Industrial Buildings Investments

n Seller/Landlord Representation n Buyer/Tenant Representation n Market Studies/Review n Opinion of Market Value

n Corporate Relocation, Expansion and Exit Strategies n Lease Agreement Review n Sale Contract Review n Build-To-Suit Offerings

573-445-1020 • www.PlazaCommercialRealty.com 2501 Bernadette, Columbia, MO 65203 • Fax: 573-445-2613 • E-mail: paulland@plazacommercialrealty.com Plaza Commercial Realty 2019 Market Report for Columbia, Missouri • ©2019


PROMOTIONAL CONTENT

Founder & CEO, Tom Trabue

STRATEGY FOR SUCCESS One of Tom Trabue’s favorite phrases is “Think Big – Act Small.” And he has done just that. Tom made a purposeful career shift from engineering to coaching in 2017 and now provides one-on-one coaching and team building for business owners and leaders across the country. Tom’s passion in life is helping people succeed, and business coaching was a natural next step. With his processoriented approach and passion for helping people, Tom is assisting seasoned clients and entrepreneurs break through barriers by starting with the basics – clarifying priorities, casting a vision

and setting goals. He assists clients in developing an intentional and unique strategy for success that includes laserfocused action steps, ownership and processes for accountability. You can see Tom’s own action steps taking shape throughout the city. A drive around Columbia provides a constant reminder of the impact that his engineering career has had on helping build the community – roads and bridges, housing developments, schools and other facilities. Tom is a process guy, a product of obtaining a B.S. degree in Architectural Engineering and being the son of a

highway engineer. Being process driven has resulted in tremendous successes It’s not all about business – although that’s the area he gravitates toward. Tom serves as a community organizer for 1 Million Cups, part of Columbia’s entrepreneurial ecosphere, and is active in the local Chamber as an Ambassador and various small business committees. He and his wife, Kim, have lived in the same neighborhood on the south side of Columbia since 1989. Each person, each business, has a next step. Tom can help you discover your ‘best next step.’ Give him a call today.

www.thenextstepstrategies.com 573-489-2091 | tom@thenextstepstrategies.com 32

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OUR LADY OF LOURDES INTERPARISH SCHOOL ADDITION

817 Bernadette Dr. 25,500 square foot addition The projected completion date is fall 2019

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM: Professional Contractors & Engineers, SOA

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI HEALTHCARE - PRIMARY CARE CLINIC

Corner of East St. Charles Road & Battle Avenue 27,800 square feet The projected completion date is fall 2020

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM SOA

ENDOVAC ANIMAL HEALTH NEW OFFICE

SCHLIB ANTIQUARIAN

6080 E. Bass Lane 23,200 square feet The projected completion date is early 2020

2615 S. Providence Rd. 8,500 square feet The completion date was January 2019

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Grove Construction and PWArchitects

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION TEAM Grove Construction, SOA

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BUILDING

COLUMBIA NEW BUILDINGS IN COLUMBIA KEEP POPPING UP — and 2019 is no exception. Although Boone County issued 22 fewer residential, nonresidential and alteration permits in May of this year compared to last year, the county is still on par with previous year’s averages. With the economy continuing to boom, 2019 will likely match, if not rival, 2018 in permit numbers. The county issued 1,160 total permits in 2017 and 967 total permits in 2018. The steady number of both home and building permits continues to provide Columbians with new homes and buildings to enjoy.


PROMOTIONAL CONTENT

Katie Wagner & Erin Hendershott OWNERS

573 HOME TEAM, COLUMBIA REAL ESTATE 573-355-4804 | 573HOMETEAM.COM Q: How long have you been in the construction, real estate or design business? A: Katie started as a Realtor 5 years ago and grew to the point of needing to hire another agent. She brought Erin onboard 2 1/2 years ago & created The 573 Home Team under the brokerage of Columbia Real Estate. Q: When was your company founded? A: We founded our company in 2016. We are both 50/50 owners & equal partners in all aspects of the business. Q: Tell us a little about yourselves. A: We are both fulltime Realtors servicing Boone County, specializing in the luxury market. Katie’s degree is in real estate and Erin has a background in advertising and marketing. The knowledge from these experiences helps us to set ourselves apart from the competition. Prior to real estate, we both held sales jobs with Fortune 500 companies. That training and work experience has served us well by bringing professionalism to the real estate industry. We are both currently working toward our broker’s licenses to better educate ourselves and serve our clients better. Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share about your business? A: The 573 Home Team has the strongest social media presence in the Columbia marketplace, which helps our clients’ listings stand out. We believe technology is the driving force behind where the real estate market is headed. We strive to have the newest tools in place to stay ahead of the game.

573-777-7653 | W W W.573HOME TEAM.COM


PROMOTIONAL CONTENT

J A S O N

Smit h

OWNER A BET TER CONSTRUC TION COMPANY 573-268-4082 | ABETTERCONSTRUCTION.NET Q: How long have you been in the industry? A: 23 years Q: Can you tell us a little bit about the history of your company? A: I founded the company in 2014. I had worked in construction for other companies for 18 years prior to that, but wanted to be able to deliver the quality results to my customers that are hard to provide through larger companies, so I decided to start my own business. Q: What drew you to the industry? A: I started remodel construction because of my love of turning something old into something new and beautiful. Q: What leads to a successful client relationship in your field? A: Excellent communication is the key aspect. It takes good communication for me to understand the client’s vision and bring it to life. Q: What is the most rewarding aspect of what you do? A: Hearing the client’s excitement when they see the finished product and love it. Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share about your business? A: I’m all about quality. I hold quality at the highest standards and make sure every job is done right. I feel that is something that is lacking in remodel construction a lot of times. I stand by my work and my customer service.

573-268-4082 | ABE T TERCONSTRUC TION.NE T


PROMOTIONAL CONTENT

C H R I S T I N A

Caldwell GEOLOGIST ALLSTATE CONSULTANTS

573-875-8799 | ALLSTATECONSULTANTS.NET Q: How long have you been in the industry? A: I started working in the civil engineering industry 2 years ago when I accepted a position with Allstate Consultants, focusing on construction testing and geotechnical exploration drilling Q: Tell us a little bit about the company. A: Allstate Consultants was founded by Ron Shy in 1975. In 2001 an ownership transition was initiated and the company is now owned by Cary Sayre, David Weber, Chad Sayre and Don Fischer. Allstate Consultants currently has 44 employees and three offices located in Columbia, Lee’s Summit and Marceline, Missouri, and provides consulting and engineering services all over the state. Q: What is the most rewarding aspect of doing what you do? A: The most rewarding aspect of my career is helping rural communities. Coming from a rural area myself, I understand the challenges these communities face with developing and maintaining infrastructure to support their rural populations. Being able to help maintain and improve these communities is something both Allstate Consultants and I find important and rewarding. Q: Is there anything else you’d like to share about the business? A: The growth and project diversity that Allstate Consultants is experiencing is exciting for both me and my coworkers. I look forward to continuing to grow my career and education and facing the challenges within my field.

573-875-8799 | W W W.ALLSTATECONSULTANTS.NE T


PROMOTIONAL CONTENT

B R A D

STEGEMANN ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL SIMON OSWALD ARCHITECTURE (SOA)

573-443-1407 | SOA-INC.COM

Q: How long have you been in the construction, real estate or design business? A: I have been in architecture for 15 years since graduating from Kansas State in 2004 with a Bachelor of Architecture (a 5-year professional accredited degree). Q: Tell us a little about your company. A: Founded in 1987 on the principle that architecture and interior design are intrinsically connected, SOA approaches design as an integrated process that aligns our client’s functional requirements with their desired image. Our projects vary greatly not only in size and scope, but also type of construction (new, additions, renovations and adaptive reuse) and client type (health care, educational, civic, institutional and corporate). Together, we create places that support and enhance how mid-Missouri communities live, learn, work, heal and play. Q: What are the qualities of a successful client relationship in your field? A: I think active listening, consistent follow up and follow through are key ingredients to building a successful client relationship. Q:What is the most rewarding aspect of what you do? A: Experiencing and getting to use spaces with my family that SOA has designed, be it the postpartum suites at Boone Hospital where my three children were born, or working on the Our Lady of Lourdes Interparish School addition, where my children attend. It is great to design a project, but it is ultimately rewarding when the project gets constructed and is used by the community.

573-443-1407 | SOA-INC.COM


PROMOTIONAL CONTENT

Susan Brandt, Kim Penton & Maggie Schneider WORKPLACE CONSULTANT, SENIOR DESIGNER, DESIGNER

WORKING SPACES

573-443-0370 | WWW.WSPACES.COM Q: Tell us a little bit about the history of your company. A: Working Spaces is celebrating 20 years in 2019, and we have a lot to celebrate. With showrooms in St. Louis, Columbia and Kansas City, Working Spaces has grown into a major player servicing clients across the country, providing the products and services they need to build truly inspired Working Spaces. We believe that providing a beautifully designed environment that highlights the unique culture and perspective of a company is crucial in attracting and retaining top talent in a highly competitive world. As we continue to expand, we remain guided by our core principle that each client deserves total commitment of service and attention to detail — and that no project is too big or too small. Q: What drew the three of you to the industry? A: We love the challenges of working with clients to find the right solutions for their space. Q: What are the qualities of a successful client relationship in your field? A: Our attention to detail along with communication is critical to successfully bringing the Working Spaces experience to each project. Q: What is the most rewarding aspect of what you do? A: We love the relationships that we are building in mid-Missouri. Our philosophy for working through the details to find the right solution for each space is refreshing to our clients.

573-443-0370 | W W W.WSPACES.COM


Gary Ward Overseeing Construction For MU’s Largest Building In Its History BY JACK WAX • PHOTOS BY LG PATTERSON

ON THE WAY TO HIS THIRD- FLOOR OFFICE , Gary Ward steps with an even, determined pace across the star-patterned floor tiles of Jesse Hall. It’s 8 a.m., and he has just finished his morning workout. His day started three hours earlier as he answered some emails and texts at home. In another 13 hours, he’ll put aside his electronic devices, quit reading and call it a day. Explaining his daily schedule, he speaks crisply, decisively. His demeanor and tone project the self-assurance of a leader. As vice chancellor for operations and chief operating officer at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Ward approaches his job with a sense of purpose, fortified with his enjoyment of a complex, challenging work environment.


For the past two years, he has also served as interim vice chancellor for student affairs, a position he expects will be filled shortly. In the meantime, he’s responsible for 38 managers and directors and the nearly 2,000 MU employees who work daily to accomplish the mission of MU Operations and Student Affairs. Although his days are filled with myriad details of hundreds of problems — think of anything that can go wrong with buildings, projects and people — he approaches his work with a bigpicture vision. “My job is to make sure everything we do is the best we can do with the least amount of money,” he says. “My philosophy — and I push it on to every single one of our directors — is that we must further the academic mission. It’s all built on stewardship.” For Ward, the idea of managing resources carefully and responsibly is a guiding principle. “I got into higher education because it’s not about making money. It’s about doing things better for mankind. I swore to myself that if I ever had the opportunity, I would be a good steward of state and family resources. We have a lot of students who, along with their families, are making great sacrifices to go here,” he says. If doing things better for mankind sounds a bit self-important for a job description, in Ward’s case it’s not. He is currently at work on a project that should be able to do exactly that. Ward is the administrator responsible for the construction of the largest building in the history of the university, the $221 million precision medicine project (soon to be named). Recently, the UM Board of Curators greenlighted the project. Federal, state and donor funding is on target, and the Kansas City-based firm of Burns & McDonnell is near completion of design development and site design, but

bidding and construction activities are already underway by Kansas City-based Whiting-Turner, the construction manager at risk. By the end of June, a groundbreaking ceremony will be held near the project site at the corner of Hospital Drive and Virginia Avenue, where the 265,000-square-foot center will be built. But the four-story building with a basement — impressive as it will be — is not the endpoint of this project. Within that building, as many as 68 principal investigators will lead MU research teams in developing precision methods of treating diseases. Each team will be tasked with finding treatments that will be more effective and have fewer side effects than those available to patients

players are being brought into this project, and we’ll start seeing the collaboration among these great minds. This truly is a project that can change the world.” It will be a few years before the building is complete and the researchers are in place. Ward has no doubt as to whether he’ll be able to bring the project in on time. “It will be done on Oct. 19, 2021 — and I joke that it will be finished by 8:45 a.m., which allows us a little time to set up,” he says. Ward’s confidence is based on a career in higher education spanning 32 years. He started at the University of Oklahoma, moved on to Penn State University and for the past 14 years has been at MU, where he has successfully overseen the completion of more than $500 million

I got into higher education because it’s not about making money. It’s about doing things better for mankind. I swore to myself that if I ever had the opportunity, I would be a good steward of state and family resources. We have a lot of students who, along with their families, are making great sacrifices to go here. — Gary Ward now. Researchers will target cancer, vascular and neurological conditions. Precision medicine relies on large sets of patient data from thousands of previous studies, combined with an understanding of the genetics of each patient’s disease. Ward is enthusiastic about his role in ushering in the future of medicine in Columbia. “Mizzou is one of only six public universities nationwide that can claim medical, veterinary, law, engineering and agriculture schools on the same campus, and we have the largest research reactor on a college campus. All these different

in construction projects. Growing up in Duncan, Oklahoma, he was introduced to construction work at age 10, helping to frame a barn. But a football injury ended any thoughts of hammering and climbing scaffolds for a living. After high school, he studied drafting at a vocational technical school, where a teacher recognized his potential and encouraged him to apply for financial aid at the University of Oklahoma. Ward went on to graduate from the university with a degree in architecture, becoming the first member of his family to benefit from a college education. SUMMER 2019

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“I stumbled into higher education,” Ward says. His wife worked in human relations at the University of Oklahoma and heard of a job opening at the physical plant. Beginning humbly, in a position that reported to a student supervisor, he became deputy director of the physical plant in three years. “I got more and more out of architecture and into administration because I liked the idea of bringing all the parts

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together — not just the building, but the finance part, the communication part, the people part.” While working at the university during the day, he went on to earn an MBA by attending evening classes. He credits his MBA with making possible his move from management to leadership. “It felt very natural and satisfying to look at these complex problems. I call it 360-degree thinking — you have to think about things

in front of you, behind you and beside you, and pull them together for a single goal. That continues to invigorate me.” Ward is also energized by the music of Miles Davis. Throughout the day, the sound of Davis’ jazz trumpet quietly fills the space between conversations in his Jesse Hall office. The music moves confidently, following lines of thought, much like someone solving complex problems and enjoying the process.


Columbia's Top Choice for

Commercial Construction Let Huebert Builders handle your next commercial construction project. From industrial buildings to churches to schools, our team has the expertise to complete a job from start to finish.

3407 Berrywood Drive Suite 201 Columbia, MO 65201 (573) 449-4996 | www.huebertbuilders.com SUMMER 2019

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THE READING LIST

Four Books To Read This Summer 100 Side Hustles: Ideas for Making Extra Money By Chris Guillebeau This best-selling author presents a full-color idea book featuring 100 startup stories of regular people launching side businesses that almost anyone can do: an urban tour guide, an artist inspired by maps, a travel site founder, an ice pop maker, a confetti photographer, a group of friends who sell hammocks to support local economies and many more. Case studies feature teachers, artists, coders and even entire families who’ve found ways to create new sources of income. Find inspiration for your next big idea. Soon you’ll be making money on the side while living your best life.

Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life By Kerry E. Hannon

The Success Lie: 5 Simple Truths to Overcome, Overwhelm and Achieve Peace of Mind By Janelle Bruland Have you bought into the lie that success constantly requires more, more and more? To achieve success, you must do more, work more hours, take on more projects and accept more responsibilities? If so, you’re probably experiencing a roller coaster ride of mixed results — being on top of the world one moment and crashing to earth at lightning speed the next, this book was written for you. You recognize the gap between where you are now and your highest potential, but don’t want to sacrifice your sanity to get there. Janelle Bruland has built a formidable bridge over that gap, proving that you can be successful in the business world and maintain balance in your personal life without constantly feeling stressed and overwhelmed.

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When you think of someone launching a start-up, the image of a twenty-something techie probably springs to mind. However, Gen Xers and Baby Boomers are just as likely to start businesses and reinvent themselves later in life. This book is an exciting roadmap for anyone age 50+ looking to be their own boss and launch their dream business. This book provides resources and guidance for launching a business. There are profiles of several successful older entrepreneurs, describing their inspirational journeys launching businesses and nonprofits, followed by Q&A conversations and action steps. The author walks you through her three-part fitness program: guidelines for becoming financially fit, physically fit and spiritually fit, before delving into how would-be entrepreneurs over 50 can succeed.

30 Days to a Happy Employee: How a Simple Program of Acknowledgment Can Build Trust and Loyalty at Work By Dottie Bruce Gandy   It’s not more money, bigger offices, better benefits or flextime. Recent surveys reveal that the number one reason employees quit their jobs is that they don’t feel valued on a human level. Growing employment opportunities and the lure of Internet companies have brought this problem to near crisis level. Now, Dottie Gandy, a former regional director with the Franklin Covey Co., provides a solution that will work to solve this problem. In this book, she gives a plan that managers can implement immediately and yields compelling results, including a renewed sense of mission that can have an impact on the bottom line.


Would Like to Thank

these individuals for their participation in the Roundtable discussion

B U I L D I N G CO L U M B IA

Randy Coil

Jerry Daugherty

Tim Crockett

Coil Construction

Reinhardt Construction

Crockett Engineering

John States

Tony Grove

Mark Timberlake

Little Dixie

Grove Construction

Susan Hart

Kim Trabue

Huebert Builders

Andy Bonderer PCE

Timberlake Consulting

Chad Sayre

PWArchitects

Allstate Consulting

Jen Hedrick

Jay Gebhardt

Simon Oswald Architecture

A Civil Group

CEO Roundtable presented by:

Building a Better Columbia for over 120 Years! tigadvisors.com | 200 Southampton Dr Columbia, MO 65203 | P: 573-875-4800

cfij SUMMER 2019

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building business Top Leaders Discuss Columbia’s Growth

BY CHRISTI KEMPER • PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY TRADITIONALLY SWINGS INTO HIGH GEAR EACH SPRING, as freezing temperatures ease up and the ground thaws. So, it’s a great time to check in with Columbia builders and developers about the state of the local industry.


CEO ROUNDTABLE

showed $808 billion in construction

starts, about a 3 percent increase over 2017, and predict similar numbers for

2019. That represents a deceleration from the previous three years, according to the Dodge Construction Outlook report.

Challenges

in

2018-2019

include higher mortgage rates and

material costs and cuts to tax advantages for homeowners.

The CEO Roundtable group echoed

many of the overall trends, including

rising costs, labor and regulatory chal-

RICH MILLER

lenges, and technology advancements.

TIG ADVISORS

In a pre-event survey, participants

characterized the current local business

climate as healthy but inconsistent and cautious, noting activity has slowed in 2018 and the first half of 2019. In light

of the decrease and some concern about

the possibility of another recession, some shared a strong sense of caution

“I think whether or not employees feel engaged is probably even more important than what

their title is or how much they get paid.

SAM BODINE

around making big decisions. They also consistently cited concerns about rising costs and a labor shortage in the area

— but some have a positive outlook and

see opportunity and room for growth in the current market.

JEN HEDRICK

“I think it’s still doing well,” Randy

SOA

Coil says, president and CEO of Coil In May, Inside Columbia Publisher

While many of the participants are

Construction. “We did have a surge after the recession in 2008-2009, and

Fred Parry hosted a CEO Roundtable

competitors, Parry started the discussion

while there were some markets that

with 14 leaders from local construction,

working together and communicating

not going to recover. The bricks and

at Zimmer Radio and Marketing Group

development, architectural, engineering and insurance companies. TIG Advisors co-sponsored

the

event

with

the

by recognizing the importance of

about trends and challenges to help everyone meet their common goals.

“We like to say iron sharpens iron,”

Broadway Hotel. The hotel’s award-

Rich Miller says, a partner at TIG

meal that accompanied the conversation.

Insurance

winning chef Jeff Guinn catered the

Zimmer Strategic Media President Don Zimmer and General Manager Carla Leible also sat in on the conversation.

Advisors, formerly known as The Group. “Businesses

are

sharpening businesses — so to come together in a forum like this is great.”

National construction data from 2018

grew pretty strongly, others still are

mortar on retail is going to remain slow, and it’s been slow and it’s going to continue that way. But there are other parts of the market that have done well in Columbia.”

The demographics of a college town

contribute to the dynamics and trends.

“With the enrollment decline, there

RANDY COIL

has been some concern in the retail ar-

SUMMER 2019

COIL CONSTRUCTION

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CEO ROUNDTABLE

eas and restaurants, but healthcare is

because of the costs,” he says. “The

horizon, with memories of the last

that have anything to do with e-

commercial building won’t sustain

Parry asked what lessons they took

still very strong,” he says. “Businesses commerce are also strong. So maybe it’s flattened a little bit, but I really

of PWArchitects, says by 2008 they

in recent years.

from 2002. That experience taught

Construction,

says

mid-Missouri since 1975, and Vice also seen costs deter potential projects “The public side of our work

coming to Columbia.

seems to be really growing,” he says.

medical. Great insurance companies.

have bought land — maybe they

“What’s Columbia got? Great

Shopping areas,” he says. “Columbia

is a great town, and I think a lot of people know that and we need to convey that.”

Fortune tellers With their fingers on the pulse

of the local economy, construction

and development leaders often get

an early sense of trends. Parry asked what they see coming down the

pipeline in the next two to three years. Jay Gebhardt started A Civil

Group

in

2000,

offering

civil

“But on the private side, people who

did a project six or eight years ago, 10 years ago, and then they buy this

layoffs when business slows down.

“That means when we are really

busy, we are cranking and pushing and working overtime,” she says.

Trabue talked about the shortage

Once planning and design get

around the table in agreement. She

worth it.”

underway, they hit the brakes. To

offset the challenges of cost and labor shortages, it would help to have a

strategy around what industries and

businesses Columbia wants to attract, he explains.

mid-Missouri, and heads nodded believes the shortage stems from the

layoffs during the 2008 recession, which discouraged college students from studying development-related fields and careers.

“The industry maintained senior

“Where is it that says, ‘We need this

people and there are talented  up-

have a targeted industry analysis for

big shortage in the middle because of

industry?’” he says. “I think we should

and-coming people, but there is a

that recession. It greatly affected our labor pool,” she says.

Some companies fared better

through the last recession than others. Little Dixie Construction was

able to keep its workforce and keep

engineering and surveying services.

our Boone County communities and

2008,” he says. “But now, the way that

amount of work coming in the door

assets and needs.”

We’ve got an extensive backlog of

assess their individual community

Recession lessons

in fails to mature into a project

fears of another recession on the

SUMMER 2019

Several

participants

John States.

“I think we were fortunate in

you look for projects has changed. work currently, and we’re seeing

of higher costs is an issue.

“A lot of the work that does come

I

them to stay lean so they can avoid

them busy, according to member

— and when it does, the sticker shock

INSIDE COLUMBIA’S CEO

had already learned some hard lessons

JERRY DAUGHERTY

This year they haven’t seen the usual

I

Kim Trabue, manager and treasurer

of mid-level project managers in

“Columbia is a great town, and I think a lot of people know that and we need to convey that.”

50

business in today’s climate.

hunk of land and they think that was

REINHARDT CONSTRUCTION

TONY GROVE

it’s shaping the way they conduct

President Chad Sayre said they’ve

developer or business interested in

GROVE CONSTRUCTION

away from that experience and how

Jerry Daugherty, president of

Columbia has a lot to offer any future

JERRY DAUGHERTY

Allstate Consultants has been

offering civil engineering services in

Reinhardt

PWARCHITECTS, INC.

the cost to build it.”

one in 2008-2009 still fresh in mind.

haven’t seen it decline in the recent two or three years.”

KIM TRABUE

rents that people can get for a

mentioned

more private [work] on our side,” as opposed to government projects other companies are seeing increase.


Rich Miller

“I think it just depends on the

niche you’re looking at and you’re going after,” he says.

At what cost?

will investors and owners accept

In Missouri, it’s adjusting annually

higher costs — rather than avoiding

in 2023. “You used to have employees

the new reality and start paying the or canceling projects.

“The cost aspect is, I think, the

No matter your niche, the issue of

biggest challenge that we’re facing,

Timberlake, president of Timberlake

now,” Timberlake says.

rising costs is a constant, says Mark

Engineering. They design heating, cooling, plumbing and electrical systems in commercial buildings.

the biggest headwind we have right

Costs are up in every major category,

including materials, technology, labor and compliance requirements.

“The cost has gone up, but the rents people are willing to pay have not yet gone up, so that’s really hurting us,” MARK TIMBERLAKE “The cost has gone up, but the rents

Tim Crockett, a partner at family-

people are willing to pay have not yet

owned Crockett Engineering, says

he explains. “I think that’s changing,

total picture.

gone up, so that’s really hurting us,” but it’s slow.”

So, the question becomes not when

will costs go back down, but when

labor costs are a huge piece of the “Everybody’s demanding a higher

salary, a higher wage,” he says, citing

the increase in the minimum wage.

from 2019 until it hits $12 per hour at double the previous minimum wage. Now they look at themselves

as being paid minimum wage or what

eventually will be minimum wage. So, your labor costs are going up. That’s going to affect everything.”

While some investors go headlong

into projects before hitting the wall

with costs, others are getting smarter about how they approach plans and investments.

“What we’re starting to see now

is a much more educated owner

ANDY BONDERER

PCE

about the construction industry,” says Andy Bonderer, CEO of Professional

Contractors & Engineers (PCE). “They’ve done their background. They’re aware of the tariffs. They’re

aware of the cement shortages. They’re much more educated about

schedules and different aspects of projects and energy usages.”

Little Dixie Construction recently

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Randy Coil, Jay Gebhardt, Susan Hart

completed its own headquarters on

and was the subject of numerous

Crockett says. “Once we get past that,

experienced the builder and owner

discussions at City Council meetings.

of our city is much different than in

LeMone Industrial Blvd., so States sides simultaneously.

“The costs are incredible, and then

you look at leasing the facility back,” he says. “How is this even going to be affordable?”

A tale of two cities The conversation turned to another challenge many of the participants

JOHN STATES

LITTLE DIXIE CONSTRUCTION

say they’re facing: a city that wants to

public hearings, work sessions and Two years in, developers are feeling

the effects.

“We have a lot of unexpected costs

that pop up because of the UDC,”

though, I think the temperament other communities.”

Crockett Engineering does a lot of

work in other cities and states. Development is difficult in those communi-

“The costs are incredible, and then you look at leasing the facility back. How is this even going to be affordable? ”

grow and evolve but isn’t necessarily welcoming to development.

One sticking point for many

around the table is the City’s Unified Development

Code

(UDC),

an

ordinance adopted by the city in 2017

that regulates land use, zoning, site development and subdivisions.

It’s safe to say it’s complicated:

“Four hundred fifty-eight pages and footnotes,” Hart says.

The UDC represents three years of

TIM CROCKETT

work the city undertook to overhaul

CROCKETT ENGINEERING

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existing

zoning

regulations

JOHN STATES Gebhardt says. “Street trees, for

ties for some of the same challenges

you have to have a tree every 40 feet,

ance issues — but he has found them

example. It seems kind of innocuous but if you’re doing a subdivision with

132 homes and you have to plant

700-and-something trees, it’s starting to impact the costs of those lots.”

The code is cumbersome, but

Crockett says the city does make effort to help developers interpret it.

“I think the city’s really agreeable

to helping us understand the UDC,”

here — like regulatory and compli-

to be more welcoming than Columbia. Susan Hart is vice president of

Huebert

Builders, a

commercial

construction and remodeling company

operating in Columbia since 1986. She said developers have to invest a lot of up-front costs to even assess

whether a development is feasible, which means a lot of money and risk


CEO ROUNDTABLE

Current local projects are already tied up in a project before

reasons and growers and individuals to

of regulatory and judgment challenges

expected to start in early 2020.

the city gets involved. So, facing a lot is expensive and adds to overall costs.

Kerri Roberts from TIG Advisors

says that amid the challenges, they’re

focusing on building their company

and their brand. “I think that if we

cultivate it for that purpose. Sales are

The law includes provisions about

dispensaries and other related facilities, but local municipalities still have some interpreting work to do.

“Boone County handled it very

would all focus on that versus waiting

well,” Gebhardt says. “They’re treat-

change the way our city looks,” she says.

grow it in a grow house, it’s an agri-

on consensus from the city, we would

On trend One way the cost challenge is playing

out: an increase in renovation projects

ing it like a pharmacy. If you want to cultural use. You can do it in any ag zoning. So, a very good, simple way to deal with it.”

Parry asks the group if Columbia

rather than new developments. That’s

and Boone County will be able to

remodeling space, according to Hart.

marijuana-related facilities.

been a good thing for builders in the

“I see a lot of people looking at a

building, thinking about buying it

because the development costs are too

accommodate the demand for medical “People are now saying Columbia’s

not going to be very friendly to this new industry,” Hart says. “They’re

“I see a lot of people looking at a building, thinking about buying it because the development costs are too much.”

SUSAN HART much” for a new build, she says. “So,

going elsewhere because, for instance,

to go and buy an existing building and

modified their amendment and they’re

they’re finding it much more affordable renovate it.”

She said some new projects even get

as far as owners buying land, making development plans and then realizing

they can’t rent out the property for

Springfield

and

Greene

County

treating it like a pharmacy. So [facilities

can be within] 250 feet within a school or a church” rather than the 1,000 feet required by the state.

what they need to cover costs.

Energy conservation

is medical marijuana. In 2018 Missouri

planning, costs and decisions made

Another trend on the group’s radar

voters approved Amendment 2, which

allows state-licensed physicians to recommend marijuana for medical

There’s an added layer to all the around

projects

today:

conservation measures.

energy

“We’re becoming a climate change-

by the companies represented

New Hall at Columbia College South Endzone Project at MU Our Lady of Lourdes Interparish School addition Nifong Medical Plaza Sportplex for Columbia Parks & Recreation Endovac Columbia Housing Authority – Providence walkway Cherry Street Dental Addison’s South Columbia Police Department – New North Facility Father Tolton High School New facilities for Columbia Public Schools, including Battle Elementary School, the Derby Ridge expansion, the Grant Elementary addition and renovation, and the new middle school

CPS Retirement System addition and renovation Callaway County YMCA addition Shelter Insurance Schilb Antiquarian Quaker Oats line expansion Bright Start Daycare Iron Gate Realty Tropical Smoothie Café Potbelly Sandwich Shop Bristol Ridge Spring Creek Plaza building Events Center at 10th and Walnut St. Habitat for Humanity MFA Breaktime Renovation of outpatient building for Compass Health Ragtag Theater on Hitt Street

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CEO ROUNDTABLE

centric type of government,” Randy

owners and added costs often aren’t

not going to dig out the foundation

That means federal mandates,

“Your appraiser isn’t going to take

building. There were just things we

Coil says.

changes to local code ordinances

that into account, and if he doesn’t,

“Whether it’s the addition of

in theory, but there has to be a better

and other regulatory changes.

solar panels, wind or geothermal, it’s going to be more and more

mandated across a variety of towns,” he says. “It’s already started, and I see that as probably one of the

TIMBERLAKE ENGINEERING

you know, if construction goes up

adds. “They should because they sell that to them.” The

more

energy-efficient

lighting systems, more efficient

improvement

sources and more.

“You can’t generate that much

electricity with solar panels as far as per square foot, so it’s going to take

some radical reductions in energy use to make that happen,” he says.

Rising costs came up once again:

“We’ve seen the cost of lighting

in buildings pretty much double,” Timberlake says.

Architecture), agrees.

“Somebody might purchase a

and say it’s almost move-in ready,”

approach does have benefits. “LED

HVAC systems, renewable energy

Jen Hedrick, president of SOA

(also known as Simon Oswald

“And tenants aren’t going to pay

appraisals go up 20 percent.”

through solar panels, low-wattage software-controlled

couldn’t do. “

building or be considering purchase

[pay] the utility bill, but you cannot

lighting,

and put insulation board on a 1920

20 percent, then let’s make the

Timberlake says the latest

approach to energy conservation

A CIVIL GROUP

or stronger correlation between,

more rent, necessarily,” Timberlake

energy code includes an aggressive

JAY GEBHARDT

the bank’s not,” he says. “It’s global

biggest changes in our industry in the next few years.”

MARK TIMBERLAKE

factored into appraisals.

lighting fixtures are an amazing that

has

been

made in the building industry,” Timberlake says. “They use less than half of the electricity and now

they’re costing down to the same as

of a building, and they look around she says. “You know, with a few

floor plan changes and a little paint, and new flooring. And then all of

a sudden, it’s a Change of Use and you’re talking with the city about the energy code and about required

modifications to exterior walls, exterior windows, exterior roofs, and then … forget it. It’s just not affordable or cost effective.”

All politics are local

what the old fixtures were.” It’s the

Everyone around the table expressed

that add cost.

city, either regulations, cooperation

high-tech lighting control systems Energy

conservation

require-

ments can be especially challenging on renovations, Hart says.

“You take an old building like

“Maybe we have to shift gears a little bit and think more about educating our citizenship, not just our city council.” JEN HEDRICK

some level of frustration with the or representation.

And while they might want things

to be different, it seems the citizens don’t — or don’t feel personally impacted by the regulations.

“The thing that struck me the

most in this last election was that we had two councilmen that ran unopposed,” Coil says. “That says a lot about the community. To me it says everybody must be okay. My

lights turn on. My toilets flush. Tony

Grove

started

Grove

Tenth and Walnut and we were

general

code in place,” she says of renovations

Construction in 2009, offering project

CHAD SAYRE

development,

contracting,

ALLSTATE CONSULTANTS

services. He

and

said

design-build

the

energy

regulations are difficult to explain to

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going to have to put the new energy on the old Parker Funeral Home location. “They started to relax that a little bit because they realized I’m

I’m paying my rent or making my

mortgage payment. My job’s secure. If the community feels that way, that it’s all okay and we’re doing just fine, it’s not going to change.”

Trabue says the community

might be the key.


Mark Timberlake, Carla Leible

“Maybe we have to shift gears

a little bit and think more about

educating our citizenship, not just our city council,” she says.

Hedrick also believes a grassroots

effort toward community education is a missing link. “I

think

people

just

don’t

understand or appreciate all that

goes into development of property,” she says. “It’s not that people are against

affordable

housing

or

development, so much as they hear all the rhetoric and really don’t know how to discern what all of that means.”

Gebhardt said the challenges

with the city could mean more residential

development

focused

outside city lines, in cheaper areas

to build like Boonville and Ashland.

“If we can show them that, wow,

we’ve got competition, then I think things might start to change a little bit,” he says.

Stormy weather

he says. “And the thing about that

Stormwater and sewer systems

is growth’s going to happen, and

the capacity for development in a

the city is really dependent on

are one factor that determines

whether it’s in the county or in

given area.

the sewer.”

who works in the south part of

to the city and he’s going to have

Gebhardt says. “There is no capacity.

him to “go a half-mile down the

Station and you can’t get in the

It’s going to be a lot simpler and a

“As Tim [Crockett] and anyone

If a client is looking at land next

town knows, there is no sewer left,”

to annex, Gebhardt says he tells

You can’t get in the Cascades Pump

road and find a piece of ground.

Route K Pump Station because

lot less expensive.”

KERRI ROBERTS

they’re full.”

TIG ADVISORS

“...My lights turn on. My toilets flush. I’m paying my rent or making my mortgage payment. My job’s secure. If the community feels that way, that it’s all okay and we’re doing just fine, it’s not going to change.” RANDY COIL That

means

there

is

no

development that isn’t already

planned in the south part of town,

Workforce challenges Getting back to the topic of labor, Parry

talks

about

partnerships

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CEO ROUNDTABLE

Tim Crockett, Rich Miller

between colleges and businesses,

and we can do virtual realities with

interested in trades. Is there a way to

Through the Columbia Chamber

designed to get more young people

things now, and design work.”

get more people in the labor pipeline

of Commerce, Hart is involved in

four-year college concept?

Portland, Oregon — bringing school

— especially in a town built on the Bonderer talks about work Hart

and he are doing with the Columbia Career Center, which is part of

Columbia Public Schools, to show

students what jobs in the construction industry look like.

“We’ve done a poor job of

Coil says. “Now we’re out here with

drones and we can figure all sorts of

topography and what’s under the soil,

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“I’ve been at Huebert Builders 30

years,” Hart says, “and 30 years ago

guidance counselors out for day-long

working together. That just doesn’t

experiences learning about jobs in commercial construction.

There are a lot of upsides to working

in the industry: Today’s construction

and development jobs carry vacation

TONY GROVE

marketing our industry for years,”

generation effect.

a program — modeled after one in

“The technologies and everything involved in today’s construction, especially commercial construction, it’s not the same as it used to be. It is a career now. It’s not a job.”

SUSAN HART

HUEBERT BUILDERS

Coil says another factor is an aging

workforce and loss of the multi-

pay,

healthcare

and

retirement

benefits, and good pay, Coil says.

“Because of the shortage of labor,”

Bonderer says, “construction workers

are now part of the salary negotiations.”

we had multigenerational families happen anymore, so I think we have to work on talking to our friends and

our circles of influence about the good careers in construction.”

Grove, who has a degree in

construction

management

from

University of Central Missouri, says education in construction is important

for people to understand how the

industry has changed and what it has to offer.

“You don’t just swing a hammer

anymore,” he says. “The technologies and everything involved in today’s

construction, especially commercial

construction, it’s not the same as it used to be. It is a career now. It’s not a job.”


ROUNDTABLE RAPID FIRE

What should we be talking about? I THINK THE COSTS. I just keep going back to that. Whatever we can do regulation-wise, educating, bringing up or building a labor force, etc., to get costs under control I think is the big thing. — MARK TIMBERLAKE We are challenging ourselves as a company to get better. Local business is the backbone of this community and it will take us having a growth mindset to keep the out-oftown companies from coming in and taking our clients and customers. As local businesses, we should all be challenging ourselves and supporting one another. 

— RICH MILLER

KEEPING OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES HERE.

WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT — SUSAN HART

I’d have to agree with costs. It seems to be the killer to me.

— TIM CROCKETT

— JAY GEBHARDT

I appreciate looking long and trying to figure out what Columbia and the community looks like in 2030, but also controlling costs, figuring out how to make projects more affordable. — JEN HEDRICK

COSTS. The association

Costs and RETAINING MORE BUSINESSES developing a work force. — JERRY DAUGHERTY IN TOWN. — JOHN STATES

and the education to appraisers and our lending institutions.

— TONY GROVE

DON’T THINK TOO SHORTSIGHTED. WHAT DO WE WANT TO LOOK LIKE IN 2030, AS A COMMUNITY? — RANDY COIL

LEMONADE OUT OF LEMONS. We haven’t talked about it today, but I think we have a very, very good insurance consultant — which is TIG, the Insurance Group — and some of the ideas that they’re working on to turn our assets in Columbia and Boone County into maybe one of the biggest incentives for work force retainage and work force development may be healthcare. — CHAD SAYRE A COOPERATIVE NATURE WITH CITY OFFICIALS WHERE EVERYONE ON THE TEAM WALKS AWAY WITH A SUCCESSFUL PROJECT. WHEN YOU WORK IN OTHER MUNICIPALITIES, THEY’RE GLAD TO SEE YOU. THEY APPRECIATE YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THEIR COMMUNITY. — ANDY BONDERER

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HEALTH CONNECTION

r e w o P rs

a b

Granola Bars Can Be Sneaky Candy Bars

I

f eating healthfully is your primary goal, granola bars might not be the best choice. Most store-bought granola bars and so-called protein snack bars are sugar-loaded candy bars disguised as healthy snacks. Nevertheless, almost all my clients — especially those who are always on the move — will request that I help them choose “healthier” snack bars to stash in their cars or office drawers so they don’t fall prey to the midafternoon sugar slump. If you merely focus on the packaging of these flashy and expensive snack bars, the false advertising might convince you that you’re not straying from your healthy goals, but a closer look at the ingredient list might prove otherwise. If eating for your health is important to you,

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skip the processed junk wrapped as granola bars and labeled as healthy options. When you’re pressed for time, look for a snack bar that offers at least 5 to 10 grams of protein, no more than 150 calories per serving and at least 5 grams of fiber. Also, avoid snacks loaded with added sugars — or worse, sugar alcohols such as maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. If the bar is made from fruits, that is an acceptable choice, but be vigilant of ingredients such as fruit juices, brown rice syrup, dextrose, maltose and organic cane juice. These are all different forms of added sugars snuck into the snack bar even though the label might claim the bar is “sugar-free.”


b y D R . S UMAN AH UJA

Five bars worth hiding in your drawer These five snack bars can be found at most grocery stores and gas stations, so if a sugar craving comes on or you’re running late, give one of them a try. Remember, these might be healthier in comparison to a regular granola bar or, worse, a candy bar; nonetheless, consume these in moderation and be mindful that these are processed snacks regardless of how many health claims the packaging might make.

Larabars One reason these happen to be my personal favorite is the use of limited ingredients. Most of the bars sold by this company are created using simple ingredients that can be easily found on the packaging. Don’t knock these because of the sugar content; in most varieties, the sugar is derived from dates, which is a far better source of sugar than sugar alcohols or added sugars.

Kind Bars Although there are a variety of flavors, the ones that stand out most are those that claim to have a low glycemic index. The glycemic index is an indication of the response of blood sugars elicited by a certain food item. To prevent blood sugar disorders, diabetes and other forms of chronic diseases including weight gain, it is best to look for foods with low glycemic responses. Much like many “healthier” versions of snack bars, this one also contains a variety of nuts — aka good fats, which help to curb hunger pangs.

One Bars With flavors like birthday cake and cinnamon roll, it’s hard to imagine that these bars are touted as healthy alternatives. Yet, they boast a protein count of 20-21 grams and are low in sugars. They do contain sugar alcohols, but if you are attempting to find healthy alternatives in the form of packaged foods, these bars are worth a try. The protein content will help curb appetite and the low sugars will keep you coming for more.

RX Bars If you can overcome the idea of paying significantly more for a snack bar, then look no further than an RX Bar, with a new-age label that lists the main ingredients in large type. RX Bars are mostly known for their protein content, and some varieties claim to be lower in sugars than their competitors.

Fiber One Bars Try one of these budget bars if attaining a high-fiber lifestyle is on the agenda. Be mindful that some flavors are higher in sugars; however, when an intense sugar craving hits, these might be your best cheat snack choice. The good news they come in a lot of flavors and are among the most affordable bars on this list.

Although it might be tempting to think that packaged foods can replace homecooked meals, the truth is that fats, sugars, salts and chemicals added to these foods are not just taste enhancers but also help to increase their shelf life. Therefore, no matter the claims, omitting these processed ingredients might not serve these food companies in the long term. However, when consumed in moderation, these snack bars are better choices than a variety of store-bought, sugar-laden snacks to silence that sugar craving.

Dr. Suman Ahuja completed her education at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and at Texas Tech. She has a doctorate in Clinical Nutrition.

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BUSINESS BASICS

b y CAR LA LE I BLE

Attract, Engage, Delight How Inbound Marketing Can Work For Your Business

Y

ou may have heard the words “inbound marketing” tossed around, but you’re not exactly sure what it means or how it works. Well, I believe that the inbound methodology is the key to successfully marketing your business. Inbound marketing is a process of attracting, engaging and delighting consumers via content, which in turn, results in businesses that provide value, build trust and position themselves as thought leaders, or experts in their industry. 

involves methods such as impersonal cold calling and does not place the consumer’s personalized wants and needs as the central part of the story. By using the inbound methodology, businesses build trust and credibility, thus leading to significant momentum gained with consumers. According to HubSpot Academy, “Inbound marketing is about adding value at every stage in your customer’s journey with you,” from the initial awareness of their need to post-purchase. 

Inbound Vs. Outbound Marketing One of the main differences between inbound marketing and outbound marketing is that with inbound, all focus is placed on the consumer and the business’ unique relationship with them. Outbound marketing is the more traditional approach that

The Three Necessary Components Of Inbound Marketing Inbound marketing consists of three components: attract, engage and delight. These components allow for businesses to have a more human approach to marketing by focusing on building relationships with customers and

prospects. This will ultimately allow your business to flourish and expand in ways never thought possible without inbound.  Step 1: Attract The first step of the inbound methodology is to attract. It’s important to note that businesses should seek to attract their target audience, or ideal customer. It would be a waste of time for everyone to come to your website as not everyone is interested in your products and services. You want hot leads who have a great possibility of becoming potential customers. Your business should publish creative ads, blogs and video content that is designed to attract this specific target audience. The overarching goal of the attract stage is to attract the right lead.  Target persona research must be done in order to determine how your business will attract your niche group of ideal customers. Businesses must first determine who the SUMMER 2019

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right lead is, then publish the type of content that will best resonate with that audience. Doing so attracts leads from far and wide and gives businesses a chance to further engage and impress these consumers.

extremely personalized. Encourage your sales and marketing staffs to empathize with the inbound leads who visit your website, as making consumers feel cared for is the key to securing their business in the future.

Step 2: Engage The second step of the inbound methodology is to engage. This step helps businesses begin to foster relationships. By having conversations with prospects, you create genuine relationships with them. This involves sharing relevant content once your sales staff gets to know these consumers’ unique needs. This type of communication can be done through email or online through bots, live chat and messaging apps. While connecting with prospects, businesses must ensure that everything is standardized, meaning that everyone in the company is on the same page. No matter who a prospect talks to, you want to be confident that they will receive solid answers.  Businesses must engage leads by being attentive and keeping conversations

Step 3: Delight The last step of the inbound marketing methodology is delight. According to HubSpot, you want to make sure your business is delivering the right information to the right person at the right time, every time. The delight stage is all about continuing to engage with consumers, even long after their final purchase. This creates happy customers who turn into brand ambassadors and send more customers your way.  Email and marketing automation truly comes in handy in this stage, as this provides a record of all conversations that have taken place and gives companies a chance to streamline communication while still keeping things personalized. Delighting customers means continuing to build off of

past relational and experiential data, further communicating to customers that you know them, you understand their needs and you are going to work with them to solve those. Inbound marketing is proactive and it focuses solely on the needs of the consumer, making each step highly customized. Remember: the customer is the most important part of this whole process. The inbound marketing methodology works because its three stages are built upon that foundation. It attracts the right leads, engages with them in a personalized way throughout the process and delights them with continuous support. That’s something a simple cold call could never accomplish. Carla Leible is the market manager for Zimmer Radio & Marketing Group. She has spent 16 years helping managers become great leaders.

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GP M.A.D.E. Foundation Kickoff Former Mizzou head football coach Gary Pinkel announced the launch of the GP M.A.D.E. Foundation on April 24 at Central Bank of Boone County. GP M.A.D.E. stands for “Gary Pinkel Making a Difference Everyday!” The foundation helps youth facing lymphoma and leukemia, or physical, economic or social challenges.

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Small Business Week The Columbia Chamber of Commerce celebrated the five finalists in its annual Small Business of the Year competition during Small Business Week, May 6-9. Seminars/parties were held for Boone County Lumber, Focus on Health Chiropractic, Fortified Roofing & Siding, Kliethermes Homes & Remodeling and White Dog Productions. Each business had the opportunity to tell attendees who they are, what they do and what makes them unique to Columbia. Boone County Lumber earned the honor of 2019 Small Business of the Year. 1

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Little Black Dress Gala Dozens of women donned their favorite little black dresses for the 10th annual Little Black Dress Ladies Only Gala on Friday, May 10, at Columbia College Southwell Complex. The event raised funds for True North of Columbia.

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1. Katie Crutchfield and Kim Scates | 2. Suzanne Ayers and Heather Jennings | 3. Laura Crouch and Elizabeth Herrera Eichenberger | 4. Melinda Cartwright, Heather Dimitt-Fletcher and Jolene Schulz | 5. Eva Anspach, Billie Connally, Shatenita Horton, Teri Reed and Amanda Henselman | 6. Monica Korba and Arianna Butler | 7. Jordi Johnson, Chris Sheedy, Donna Allgire, Kathi Betz, Kortney Betz, Rachel Flynn and Libby Opfer photos by ANGELIQUE 68

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DREAM

THIS BIG They’re brainstorming their next business idea.

They know it will thrive with a trusted team to guide them. You could be here, too.

ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS VISIT www.accountingplusinc.com

Create your own custom magazine. CONTACT US TODAY FOR A CONSULTATION custompublishing@zrgmail.com | 573.875.1099 zimmercommunications.com/custom-publishing SUMMER 2019

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N E TWORK I N G

DIVIDENDS

Columbia Ducks Unlimited Shrimp Boil More than 100 supporters came together for delicious food, good drinks and a great cause. All-you-can-eat shrimp with all the fixings, raffles and a silent auction benefitted Ducks Unlimited on May 4 at the Knights of Columbus Hall.

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1. Kaley Curtis and Jon Curtis | 2. Jeff Piontek and Jone Piontek | 3. Jason Sutherland, Jen Sutherland and Aaron Emel | 4. Eric Gilbert and Jennifer Roelands | 5. Calbert Colbert and Kelly Hequembourg photos by NANCY TOALSON AND WALLY PFEFFER, MIZZOUWALLY@COMPUSERVE.COM 70

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Gary Drewing, Owner Mary Jo Henry, Director of Marketing

BMW of Columbia and Mercedes-Benz of Columbia have

advertised in Inside Columbia and CEO magazines since their inceptions. The team at Inside Columbia is great to work with; they have a real can-do attitude. We absolutely recommend advertising in these publications. If you want to know what’s happening in Columbia, you’ll nd it in Inside Columbia! Mary Jo Henry

Director of Marketing | BMW of Columbia | Mercedes-Benz of Columbia

magazine For information on advertising, go to insidecolumbia.net or call 573.875.1099


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As a startup business, Lara has helped tremendously. She met with us, went over the projected numbers and then went to the bank with me. I felt so much more comfortable with her there helping answer questions. Amanda Quick, The Hatchery

Bloom Bookkeeping specializes in

providing useful financial reports for quick decision-making and easy tax

preparation. I do the work that helps Columbia’s businesses succeed!

ADVERTISING INDEX 573 Home Team................................................ 35 A Better Construction Company................... 36 Accounting Plus.................................................69 Allstate Consultants LLC................................. 37 Atkins, Inc...............................................................5 Binghams..............................................................19 Bloom Bookkeeping.......................................... 72 BMW of Columbia............................................ 75 Bush & Patchett LLC......................................... 72 CC’s City Broiler................................................... 4 Coil Construction...............................................17 Columbia EDP.....................................................19 Evans & Dixon, LLC............................................17 Hawthorn Bank.................................................. 76 Huebert Builders................................................45

www.bloombookkeeping.net

Image Technologies.......................................... 67 Inside Columbia-Advertiser Testimonial......71 Iris Media-The Dove......................................... 63 Mediacom..............................................................7 Mutrux Automotive.................................... 11, 60 Mutual of Omaha.............................................. 73 Optimized CFO...................................................10 PCE........................................................................62 Plaza Commercial Realty.................................30 Salter Lawn Service..............................................3 Simon Oswald Architecture........................... 38 Spark Promotions.............................................. 67 Steve’s Pest Control............................................ 9 The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton.......65 The Next Step, LLC............................................ 32 TIG Advisors.......................................................47 Tiger Court Reporting........................................10 UMB Bank............................................................. 6 University of Missouri Health Care.................2 Veterans United Home Loans......................... 13 Working Spaces, Inc......................................... 39 Zimmer-Custom Publishing...........................69

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Boone Hospital Trustees Should Kick BJC To The Curb

O

ver the past four years, our locally-elected Boone Hospital trustees have grappled with the daunting task of setting a new course for our county-owned hospital. Motivated by their desire to be responsive to the sweeping changes in national health care policy and local market conditions, the trustees recognized that the long-term viability of our community hospital would be in jeopardy if they didn’t immediately address how the hospital was being managed. More than a hospital, Boone has been a vital component of our community’s more than $1.5 billion health care economy. Beyond the nearly 2,000 jobs it provides, Boone Hospital’s financial stability continues to underwrite a significant portion of our county’s essential services including our health department, law enforcement and jail operations. Perhaps the most challenging task facing the Board of Trustees is how they will untangle themselves from their 31-year-old management agreement with St. Louisbased BJC HealthCare. The lease terminates at the end of 2020. What transpires during this 18-month transition period will be critical to the long-term success of our hospital. In full disclosure, I served on the Boone Hospital Board of Trustees for 14 years and resigned in January 2017 when I was elected to the Boone County Commission. Based on my experience with BJC HealthCare in the final three years of my term, I would strongly advocate for some sort of immediate termination settlement. Once BJC executives discovered that the lease with Boone Hospital would not be renewed, they have been lackadaisical in their day-to-day management of the hospital. 74

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The trustees announced their intentions to issue a new RFP for the hospital’s management on July 1, 2015. After posting a $12 million profit in 2016, the hospital posted losses of $11 million in 2017 and nearly $13 million in 2018. All indications are that 2019 will also be a year of devastating losses. Most are tied to accelerated depreciation being forced upon the hospital by BJC’s accounting department. A reasonable person might wonder if these “paper losses” were an effort to make Boone look weak as it considers new prospective partners. The truth is that Boone Hospital is still an excellent place to receive medical care. Boone’s ability to deliver world-class care has never been tied to its relationship with BJC but rather to its top-notch medical staff and the nearly 2,000 employees that put their heart and soul into the care they provide. In the past five years, BJC management has been dismissive of concerns raised by the trustees and the hospital’s top medical staff. In an effort to further weaken Boone, BJC has abandoned any form of business development efforts in the 35-county region Boone serves. BJC has also delayed recruitment efforts to replace retiring physicians while pushing the hospital’s primary surgical practice to move all of its surgical cases to cross-town competitor, MU Health Care. BJC’s refusal to collaborate or form alliances with local physicians has resulted in the opening of several free-standing surgical centers and clinics that have cherry-picked the most lucrative services away from the hospital. For all practical purposes, Boone has been relegated to simply providing low margin emergency room services and operating rooms for surgical procedures deemed unsafe for a freestanding surgical center. In what some would call a perfect

storm, most of Boone’s woes have been caused by a significant error in strategic planning by BJC executives. In 2016, in the aftermath of widespread health care reform, BJC switched from a revenue growth model to an expense containment model. At the same time, MU Health Care leaders were doing the exact opposite. While BJC executives were cutting expenses to the bone, MU Health Care was launching efforts to grow revenues by expanding service lines and partnering with outlying hospitals in Cole, Audrain, Pettis and Cooper counties and beyond. During this critical period, MU Health Care gained significant market share while Boone’s losses continued. While BJC HealthCare purports to be a tax exempt 501c3 not-for-profit organization, it had revenues in excess of $4.6 billion in 2016 with a net income of more than $207 million. Up until 2017, by all measures, Boone Hospital has been a cash cow for BJC for most of its 30-year lease. Now that the lucrative lease agreement is coming to an end, BJC has clearly taken its eyes off the wheel. In the end, I know Boone Hospital will emerge triumphant because of the excellent care it provides. The hospital’s trustees must choose whether to become a standalone hospital or align themselves with a different partner. Unfortunately, they find themselves in the very unfair position of “damned if they do, damned if they don’t.” The most prudent thing they can do now is to immediately sever ties with BJC, lick their wounds and begin rebuilding this once great and profitable hospital. They deserve our whole-hearted support in this monumental task.

Fred Parry

Founder & Publisher Emeritus fred@insidecolumbia.net


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