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Back to School Issue Classy Clowns Return to Indy What Your Teens Aren’t Telling You

August 2009 * indyschild.com

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Sept. 10 – Sept. 13 Opening Night prices start at Only $10! (Service charges, facility and handling fees may apply.)

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Back to School Bash! Savannah will be signing autographs immediately after the concert!

Indianapolis Zoo Saturday, September 12 12 Noon Concert is free withwith general admission zoo. Concert is free general admissionto to the the zoo.

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K12 gets kids thinking big.

It’s what happens when they get to take soil samples. Plant seeds. Study earthworms. All in their own backyards. That’s thanks to K12 and our award-winning curriculum, individualized to bring learning alive, one child at a time. Every subject is delivered online, with hands-on activities, plus books and support from expert teachers.

when kids get into learning, learning gets into them. Options include: • Full-time, tuition-free public schooling in many states • An accredited online private school available worldwide • Over 150 courses including foreign languages, AP, and electives available for direct purchase We’re America’s largest online curriculum provider for grades K through 12. Because we give every student a chance to think big. Learn more at

K12.com. Interested in a full-time public school option? The K¹² program is available through the Hoosier Academies, tuition-free public charter school programs authorized by Ball State University for grades K-11, that offer state-certified teachers and a unique blend of traditional, brick-and-mortar schooling and online learning. School starts soon, and space for grades K-9 is filling up fast! Join us at an upcoming event to discover the exceptional education hundreds of Indiana students are using to find their true potential. Visit www.K12.com/ha for a complete listing, or to find out how you can enroll in time for fall!

www.K12.com/ha 866.912.3348

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ACADEMIES

6/30/09 3:02:54 PM


final trim 10x13

Are your kids ready to walk for their future? Walk Into My Future is a first-of-its-kind opportunity for our children to raise money for their future education. With pledges from friends, family, and the community, thousands of young Hoosiers will gather on September 25 to walk a 5.29 kilometer route. The money each one raises will be deposited in his or her own 529 college savings plan account. When: September 25, 2009 Where: White River State Park, Indianapolis Who: Children and families who want to save for college Join us as we celebrate a future of education and hope!

Visit walkintomyfuture.com for details and registration information. If you are not an Indiana taxpayer, consider before investing whether your or the beneficiary’s home state offers any state tax or other benefits that are only available for investments in such state’s qualified tuition program. IN2096A 0709 IN2096A_IndyChild_FNL.indd 1

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August 2009 table of contents

20

Back to school basics

NEWS & SHOPPING * News You Can Use

RESOURCES 08

One Chic Mama: Fit, Organized and Fabulous for Fall

16

Health & Wellness * PEDIATRIC HEALTH: Health and Safety at the Indiana State Fair

39

PEDIATRIC HEALTH: Taking Down Childhood Obesity

40

Special needs awareness: Navigating Special Education Services for Your Child 41

Around Town * Museum Notes: Engaging All Ages This School Year

26

STANDARDIZED TESTING

15

profile: Over the Top—The Circus Returns to Indy

18

ARTS & ENRICHMENT: Put Me in Coach—Getting Kids Into Sports

34

PROFILE: Girl, Play Hockey!

40

FAMILY FUN IN INDY: Action-Packed August

44

Commentary & Parenting * Publisher’s Note: Girls Inc. & the National Junior Tennis League

07

Ages & Stages: Teething Toddler Tips, Back to School Savings, Free Fun Online

10

TEens & Tweens: Avoiding the Over-Programming Dilemma

13

My Parent, My Mentor: Back on the Horse Again

14

Growing up online: The Three E’s of Technology

42

dear teacher: Your Back to School Questions Answered

43

RESOURCES * Childcare & Education Directory

37

What your teen doesn’t tell you

30

Arts & Enrichment Directory

34

SHOPPING CORNER

39

Calendar

45

Party Directory

55

Local farmers markets, orchards & produce guide

50

CLASSIFIEDS

51

Loved my family and friends.

Indy’s Child to celebrate 100 years!

I loved my family, country and parents who made it possible.

To have fostered a love of creativity & literature. E-mail your letters to editor@indyschild.com

S TAFF: A SK THE is st u g Au

To pass on the need for acceptance. To let my family & friends know they are loved.

Two wonderful, civic-minded daughters.

To have been a loving wife, mother, daughter, sister & friend. ip

e

t you wan What doac y to be? your leg

h e at her 6 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

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My amazing ability for sarcasm. ce

Your Legacy?” “What Will MBoe nth.

n Brooke Va


Indy’s Child

Co mm e n tary & PA R E NTING

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Publisher’s Note

Girls Inc. and the National Junior Tennis League Celebrating 40 Years of Service in Indy

Founding Publisher Barbara Wynne Publisher/President Mary Wynne Cox Executive Vice President Richard Dickinson Editor-In-Chief Lynette Rowland Marketing DIRECTOR Rachel Wynn Art Direction & DESIGN Heather Lipe Assistant of business development Josie Fine Accountant Brooke Vance On the cover Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey’s clown, Tom Dougherty. Also included: Ryleigh Manning, Miles Garrett and Ali Nakata. Cover photograhy by: Lindy Christoper of Sisters Child Photography. Cover clothing provided by: Little MissMatched Clothing (LittleMissMatched. com) and Little Capers (littlecapers.com).

Girls Inc. Girls Inc. will celebrate 40 years of bolstering leadership and educational opportunities for girls on Thursday, August 6 at the annual Touchstone Awards luncheon at the Westin Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. You are invited to attend but you must get your reservation in before August 3. Register on line: www.girlsincindy.org. I attend this luncheon every year and am moved by the young girls who join each table and share their Girls Inc. experiences. Months of dedicated planning and promoting the mission and goals of Girls Inc. have been underway at malls and special events. The Touchstone Awards are going to recognize two more outstanding women to be role models for the hundreds of girls who attend Girls Inc. sponsored activities. The 2009 honorees are Ellen K. Annata, president and CEO of United Way of Central Indiana and Alpha C. Blackburn, president and CEO of Blackburn Architects. Girls Inc. has programs to empower girls to be strong, smart and bold. In Indianapolis, Girls Inc. takes their numerous programs to private, public and charter schools and any youth service organization. Curriculum for the programs are developed at the Girls Inc National Resource Center located

at 441 West Michigan Street in Indianapolis. They prepare booklists for girls 2-14 that emphasize strong female character and they have book reviews for many books recommended for after school programs and parents to encourage raising “Strong, Smart, and Bold” daughters. Information about programs you can incorporate in your schools can be obtained by calling 317634-7546.

A winter program allows the more promising and dedicated player the opportunity to play year round. The program is made affordable by the successful fund raising and support of the USTA and other organizations dedicated to serving youth. A majority of the support comes from individual donors and local businesses and foundations that believe in the program that the late Arthur Ashe began in 1969.

Many programs developed by Girls Inc. promote science and math skills. Their educational goals culminate in scholarship opportunities.

To celebrate the 40th Anniversary of NJTL in Indianapolis, a brunch is being held on November 15 to highlight activities and the local chapter being named National Chapter of the Year by the USTA. Your attendance is requested and an opportunity to share in the program’s success stories. I can assure you, I will be there. Call NJTL for an invitation or an opportunity to volunteer in a worthwhile organization: 317-575-8803.

National Junior Tennis League The National Junior Tennis League of Indianapolis began as Riverside Upswing with generous funding from Lilly Endowment in 1969. The program has expanded to 25 different public sites in Indianapolis, including Indy Parks and schools having tennis facilities. Over 1600 children participated this summer. Congratulations to Nancy Carr, executive director, along with her staff and enthusiastic board of directors. For over 40 years they have developed neighborhood partnerships to serve families throughout Indianapolis. The mission of NJTL has grown to foster education by teaching life skills during practice sessions and on match days.

May your transition from summer to back to school go well and your family be empowered to make this the best year ever. And as always, thank you for supporting Indy’s Child advertisers and our publication and send your letters to editor@indyschild.com.

Subscribe today to the magazine or our free weekly newsletter all at...

indyschild.com we want to hear from our readers! Send your letters to the editor to editor@indyschild.com

Indy’s Child 1901 Broad Ripple Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46220 317.722.8500 (p) 317.722.8510 (f ) indyschild@indyschild.com Copyright: Indy’s Child Parenting Magazine is published monthly. Copyright 2008 by Indy’s Child Inc. and Midwest Parenting Publications, LLC.All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not constitute an endorsement of products, commentary or services herein. For information on subscriptions, editorial guidelines, advertising rates and more visit www.indyschild.com.

Sean, age 13

What does our 96% success rate mean to Sean? It means being able to live with autism and overcome a variety of behavioral challenges. It means communicating with gestures, sign language, and words instead of physical and emotional outbursts. And it means enjoying activities that were once very challenging. For more than 40 years, Damar has served thousands of children and adults, with 96% achieving more independent lives. And Sean is just one shining, smiling example. For volunteer or donor opportunities, please visit damar.org

6067 Decatur Boulevard Indianapolis, IN 46241 317.856.5201 26176.DAM 2009 Print_INDCH_7.375X6.125 4C.indd 1

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N E WS & SHO PPING

news you can use

NEWS you can use *

New Product Tests For Lead in the Body There’s a new product on the market called LeadConfirm that allows parents to know whether their kids are being exposed to excessive lead levels in the body by using their saliva. This brand new technology is one-of-a-kind and sure to be an important tool in the war against lead. Lead poisoning is the leading environmentally induced illness in children with nearly one million children five years and younger having lead levels equal to or greater than the levels experts consider “dangerous.” Lead poisoning can cause learning disabilities, slowed growth and developmental delays. Children often get lead poisoning by eating lead based paint chips or breathing in lead based paint dust. LeadConfirm is the first test that does not require any needle sticks or blood from the body. Just a few simple swabs of the inside cheek is all that is needed to determine how much lead your child has been exposed to. LeadConfirm Professional comes with an FDA approved collection device that

8 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

should be administered by a doctor or healthcare professional. Once the saliva is collected, the vials are sent to a lab with the pre-paid envelope provided in the kit and the results can be accessed online or by phone within 5-6 business days after the lab receives the kit. The tests are analyzed CLIA by state-of-the-ar t Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with Mass Spectrometry X2 (LC/MS/MS) technology to determine the amount of lead present in the body. Positive results should be followed up with a physician for further analysis and treatment. LeadConfirm Professional is available at www. drugstore.com, www.amazon.com, www. testcountry.com and at other distributors. The Product retails for $79.99 (includes lab fee and prepaid envelope to the lab).

Free Roller-skating Offered in an Effort to Reduce Obesity Skateland Indy has partnered with FitCity to encourage families to get out and exercise for a healthy lifestyle. This is part of an on-going effort by FitCity to combat childhood obesity. Free skate sessions will be offered from 6-9 p.m. on Thursdays, June 4-August 6. Skateland Indy is located at 3902 N. Glen Arm Rd. Families who visit Skateland Indy at least six Thursdays this summer will be entered in a grand prize drawing. According to the Roller Skating Association International:

• Roller-skating provides a complete aerobic workout and involves all of the body’s muscles—especially the heart. • Roller-skating is equivalent to jogging in terms of health benefits-caloric consumption, reduction of body fat and leg strength development.

• Roller-skating is recognized and recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) as an aerobic fitness sport. The number of calories burned per hour while skating at 6 mph is 350 and 600 while skating at 10 mph. “FitCity is excited to provide families with an affordable and fun alternative to exercise this summer,” said Eleather Baker, program director. “This is just one of the many ways we are encouraging Hoosiers to make a healthy move in an effort to turn the Circle City into a Fit City.” FitCity is a community-wide childhood obesity campaign designed to educate and motivate local residents to make a healthy move and shake the title of the “eleventh fattest state in the nation.” To find fitness, nutrition or wellness resources around Indianapolis, local residents can call 2-1-1 or visit www.fitcityindy.org. For more information call FitCity at (317) 536-1216 or Skateland Indy at (317) 291-6795.


N E WS & SHO PPING

Traders Point Creamery Introduces Safari Sundays at the Farm Traders Point Creamery and organic dairy farm stands for more than its happy herd of 100 percent grass-fed Brown Sw iss cows, awardwinning cheese, yogurts and other del icious dair y products, and a restaurant ser ving up the f inest in healthy, f a r m f resh, pa late pleasing cuisine. It’s h igh advent ure ! I n t r o d uc i n g Safari Sundays at the farm. Hop on our 10-seater Safari Car and get into the green. Explore the pastures, the gentle hills, the nooks and crannies and see our friendly cows up close. Follow up the off-road fun with a scrumptious Safari Sund ae, our Creamline Artisan vanilla ice cream with

your choice of gourmet organic chocolate sauce, exotic fresh fruit topping, toasted almonds, granola, mini chocolate chips and fresh whipped cream. Safari rides run every Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. beginning July 19. Twenty-minute Fun Rides are $10 per person, including the tourtopping sundae. Or take a group of up to nine on an hour-long “Private Tour” excursion for $150. Cocktail Cruises feature wine, beer and a selection of our delish cheeses. The Safari Car can also be reserved on weekdays and Saturdays; it’s perfect for birthday parties, family gatherings and corporate events. For reservations, email events@ tpforganics. com or call 317-733-1700.

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news you can use

Perseverance and Determination Rewarded for Lawrence Central Senior Who Spent Last Year and A Half Battling Cancer It was towards the end of 2007 when Isaac Andrew Adjei first felt the pain in his left knee. He loved to play basketball and also ran track and field. Because Andrew was a very active child, his father assumed this was a sports injury, a possible stress fracture. They were, unfortunately, wrong.

Ilesha Seyoum, Andrew’s Integrated Chemistry and Physics teacher, nominated Andrew for this award based on his supportive nature and encouragement to others even through his most difficult times. Seyoum says, “There were times when Andrew felt openly sad about his health; the loss of hair, changes in skin When the pain in his knee was too much color, and extreme difficulty in learning for Andrew to bear, he was unable to go Destiny (sister), Issac Andrew Adjei, April (mother), & Issac (father) to walk again with his prosthesis.” to school; his mother and father took him 8-hour surgery to remove a tumor, his left knee, to see the doctor. X-rays and blood checks The Annual Achievement is given once part of his tibia and most of his fibula. He has were done, but with no results. They were told in the fall and again in the spring. The first since been through strenuous physical therapy. of the possibility of cancer, though the doctor place winner receives $2000 from Club also felt there was a good chance it was a stress Z! for higher education. Andrew will be To hear, at the age of 16, that you will not play fracture. Andrew was placed on crutches for one able to use his award to pay for room and basketball or run again was tough for Andrew to month. Two weeks went by and the pain was board, books, supplies and/or tuition. digest. “Chemo was the worst part; it hindered still unbearable. On February 11, 2008 he went me from doing what I wanted to do.” After the Andrew will be attending John Carroll in for an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). surgery, Andrew was unable to walk for 7 months. University in the fall. He will be majoring in Accounting and Japanese. Andrew’s On February 14, 2008 at 7:30 am, Andrew’s Andrew’s determination to succeed in school goal is to graduate from John Carroll family was notified of the news: Andrew and his strength to persevere was recently was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma; a bone University, continue an additional two rewarded. He was named the latest first place cancer which is commonly found in the bones years of school, obtain a law degree, and recipient of the “National Annual Achievement around the knee. Andrew was, surprisingly, someday start his own law firm. Award” from Club Z! Tutoring Services. not scared when he was first diagnosed. “I Maggie Schilling, the area director for Club Now 18, Andrew has nothing but hope for was not scared until the first time I went to Z! Tutoring said, “Andrew’s strength and the future. He truly believes he will be able the hospital. At first, I was really only worried perseverance to maintain nearly perfect grades to play basketball soon. He is still doing about graduating on time.” and continue his education through what will physical therapy. Andrew says, “You don’t be one of the toughest times of his life, is the know what will happen tomorrow, so do For the next year, Andrew went through a total reason he was named the first place recipient of the most you can today.” of 31 weeks of chemotherapy. He also endured an the Annual Achievement Award.”

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ages & stages

8 Tips to Help Ease the Teething Toddler Not All Solutions Are One Size Fits All

6.

Cheek rubbing, ear pulling, crankiness, drooling, coughing, chin rash, biting or gnawing, diarrhea, fever, runny nose and all around sleeplessness. Doesn’t sound like a fun time, does it? But teething can be an all around unpleasant experience for your baby. After all, with twenty primary teeth coming in by age three, there’s nothing quite as unpleasant as something burrowing its way through your skin. But what can you do to help cut the pain and how do you know which one works? Only you can f ind out what works best for your baby.

1.

7. 8.

3.

Seek out new suggestions from other parents such as Natrabio Teething Relief Liquid, Boiron Homeopathic Medicine Cam ilia Teething Relief, etc. Raid the kitchen cabinets for cloves or clove oil, licorice.

Whatever solutions you come up with, tr y different methods to f ind out which one works best. But make sure to share with other parents what worked.

Teething rings come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Most are f illed with water and chilled to provide a numbing capacity on the gums.

2.

Baby Orajel or other numbing agents are great for temporary relief. (Check with your doctor).

M assaging your baby’s gums with your f ingers can provide pressure to help alleviate a little pain. A cold bottle of water or cold cup of water can provide the

same sort of numbing that teething rings do. Plus, the water acts as a re-hydration method if your baby has diarrhea.

4.

Cold foods like yogurt, pureed soft fruits or applesauce are good methods and provide nutrition, too.

5.

When all else fails, you can also try Infant Tylenol but make sure you check with your doctor f i r st. Never g ive you r baby med icat ion without asking your pediatrician f irst.

O N T H E P R O W L M AY 2 3 – L A B O R D AY Presented by

indianapoliszoo.com

The Indianapolis Zoo

Positively Amazing!

10 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

A Leader in Conservation


COMM E NTA RY & PA R E NTING

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ages & stages

Smart Lessons in Back-to-School Savings How Online Shopping Makes the Grade

Add Up Extra Savings Before you start hunting down everything on the must-have list, check for printable coupons or online coupon codes on Web sites such as: Couponcabin.com: The site is updated several times a day, and you can sign up to get a weekly newsletter alerting you to new deals. Back-to-school shopping is an annual ritual that millions of parents participate in each year. In fact, back-to-school time is one of the biggest shopping seasons of the year, second only to the winter holidays. Last year, Americans spent more than $54 billion on supplies, clothes and electronics for school and college-age kids, according to the National Retail Federation, with jeans, backpacks and electronics as some of the most popular back-to-school products.

Getting what students need and keeping the costs reasonable calls for some smart shopping strategies. The easiest place to start is at your computer. These tips will help you study the online possibilities and earn some A+ deals.

Retailmenot.com: Get helpful feedback from users on what coupon codes worked and which ones didn’t. Smartsource.com: Entering your zip code lets you find deals specific to your area. Be on the lookout for free shipping offers on these sites, as well. If you’re not careful, shipping costs can negate any savings you may have found.

Do Your Homework You might find a great deal on a backpack or computer, but is the cost savings really worth a possible trade off in quality? Find out how products stack up to real world use at sites such as Epinions. com, where users share their product experience. At ConsumerSearch.com, there are expert and user reviews shown

side by side for each product. A little research can save you time, hassle and money down the road.

Get the Latest Scoop If you know exactly what you want to buy, sign up for notifications from Craigslist. com and eBay.com. Both sites will notify you of new listings matching your search criteria — so when someone wants to sell that Juicy Couture jacket you’re looking for, you’ll know right away. If you need help deciding how to get the best product for your money, look at online buying guides. Not sure which laptop to get? Need help figuring out what kind of backpack or desk chair to get? Check out a mix of user and professional reviews at Bing.com/shopping or read Overstock.com buying guides — there are helpful tips on what to look for and how to make a smart choice. Another way to stay in the loop on savings is to sign up for retail newsletters and emails. You can also check online retailer sites for RSS feeds that automatically send you updates on promotions as they occur. A well-timed

update on a new sale lets you get in on the savings early.

Get Cash Back A growing trend in smart online shopping is participation in programs that give you cash back. Web sites such as Bing.com have partnerships with major retailers to offer items at great prices. Registered users shop for name brand items and when purchases are made through the site, they automatically get a percentage of the purchase price back as a cash rebate. More details on how this works can be found at bing.com/shopping/ pages/howtouse.aspx. The amounts, which change daily, can be sent via check to your address or deposited into a bank account or PayPal account, and after a 60-day waiting period, the money is yours. “This is a great way to save money on school supplies,” said Bridget Tate, Bing Shopping product manager. “When you look at how much back-to-school items such as laptops, clothes, backpacks and tech gadgets can cost, that 5 or 10

percent really helps.” During back-toschool season, adds Tate, Bing Shopping will be offering even higher percentages of cash back (up to 50 percent more). Getting the kids ready for school again doesn’t have to cost a fortune. Smart shopping will send them off in style and leave you with a smile. To learn more about how to be a smart online shopper and get cash back this back-to-school season, visit Bing.com/shopping.

Shopping That Pays Back Shopping with the following merchants through Bing.com could give you savings like these: Back to School Gear and Gadgets HP, 5% OfficeMax.com, 3 to 5% BarnesandNoble.com, 10% Back to School Fashion Shoemall.com, 19% Sears.com, 2 to 8% Old Navy, 4% Ebags.com, 11% Foot Locker, 20% Benefit.com, 2% Beautychoice.com, 10% Nordstrom.com, 3%

All materials courtesy of: Microsoft

With five more days, covering three weekends, you can have more fun than ever before! With free entertainment like the Peking Acrobats, Hedrick’s Racing Pigs and the International Circus Hall of Fame there has never been more to do at one low price! Discount tickets available at Indiana Walmart stores, CVS/pharmacies, The Marten House Hotel, Indiana Farm Bureau and www.indianastatefair.com.

Demi Lovato presented by VOICE.TV august 10

International Circus Hall of Fame august 17

Peking Acrobats Daily

midway Daily

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ages & stages

Free Fun Online

New Sites Make Relaxing Fun for Kids (And Parents) Café.com is a free online service dedicated to casual gaming. There are dozens of fun, easyto-play online games suitable for any age group. There’s also a social element for those who enjoy connecting with others through multiplayer games and networking options. Hulu.com is a free video service that offers unlimited streaming of hit TV shows, movies and clips. There is a large selection of videos from more than 100 content providers, including Fox, NBC Universal, MGM, Sony Pictures Television, Warner Bros. and more. Users can choose from more than 900 current primetime TV hits and access them any time from anywhere. A lot of people are looking for affordable entertainment these days. In fact, according to a recent Nielsen Online Global Consumer Survey, 56 percent of us are cutting back on out-of-home entertainment.

Books, movies, video games and music are great ways to relax and have fun at home, but their costs can be hard to justify. Fortunately, there are websites where you can get these items for free.

Pandora.com is a free online music service. Enter the name of one of your favorite songs or artists to create your personal music station. Pandora will search a vast collection of music to find songs with musical similarities to your choice. Then you get to enjoy a unique listening experience created just for you. Swaptree.com is a site where you can trade books, CDs, DVDs and video

games that you don’t want, for the books, CDs, DVDs, video games that you do want. Unlike other e-commerce sites, on Swaptree all the items are free and you only pay for shipping, which is typically around $2. Greg Boesel, Swaptree co-founder, says “You simply list the items that you are trading and the items that you want, and the system sets up trades for you with other users. One of the great features of Swaptree is that when you list an item for trade, we instantly show you thousands of items that you could receive in trade for that item.” To make the trade transactions even easier, you can print accurate postage and mailing labels right from the site. The site provides relief for parents who are frustrated by how quickly their children get bored with new video games or when they no longer have any interest in the DVDs that they used to watch constantly. Once you are finished with an item you’ve traded for, you can list it again and get something else for free. “In this economy,” says Boesel, “Free makes a lot more sense than shelling out full price for media items.” For more information, visit swaptree.com. Courtesy of Family Features

A U G U ST 1 5 & 1 6

Celebrate and learn about the 150th Anniversary of Air Mail featuring the 1859 Balloon Voyage, and meet Olesya Rulin from High School Musical on Saturday.

connerprairie.org

NEW EXPERIENCES. NEW ADVENTURES. 12 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009


Co mm e n tary & Pare n t i n g

teens & tweens

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Avoiding the Over-Programming Dilemma Teaching Teens the Importance of Free Time

The summer days go quickly. Suddenly it’s “scheduling time” again, and we find ourselves trying to figure out how all of our kids’ upcoming activities can fit into a week: “If the piano lesson is on Tuesday night, then you can take the Monday/Wednesday swim team class; but if the math tutor can only come on Thursday, we’ll have to switch dance to Friday at 6 p.m. which means you’ll have to take the Saturday morning computer skills session and you won’t be able to keep your babysitting job with the Mueller’s.”

worse yet, get into “trouble?” (We’ve been told what idle hands can lead to.)

Hobbies and extracurricular interests can be wonderful for tweens and teens. These activities provide the learning experiences they crave and help them grow both intellectually and socially. Mastering new skills gives them a sense of purpose and builds self-esteem. Trying out new projects and pastimes, finding out what they are good at, discovering their likes and dislikes, and meeting and interacting with others, help kids shape their identities and grow beyond their own families.

Sometimes parents contribute to this problem as well. In an effort to keep their kids occupied with productive activities or offer their kids options that weren’t available when they were young, it’s easy to go overboard. The result can be too much pressure and not enough down time. Adolescents have a growing capacity for selfdiscovery. But they also need some quiet time in order to discover that they can be comfortable with solitude and with themselves. This allows them to develop the kind of self-confidence that can help them steer clear of seeking quick fixes in more dangerous ways. When they know how to live without being constantly entertained or rushing from one activity to the next, they have more confidence in their ability to tolerate unfilled time.

But where is the line between taking advantage of these opportunities and being overscheduled? Is it possible to give kids too many chances to learn and grow? Are they susceptible to the same feelings of stress that adults feel when they have too much to do and not enough time in which to do it? On the other hand, if they have too much free time, might they feel unproductive and bored? Or,

Young teens are especially vulnerable to over-scheduling. Because of the demands of homework and school activities (band, chorus, athletic teams, etc.), kids may already be very busy before adding on additional after-school interests. And since their enthusiasm for exploring their expanding world can exceed their ability to set limits for themselves, they can easily feel overwhelmed.

Down time helps to promote self-awareness and growth. The early 17th century poet, George Herbert, wrote, “By all means, take some time to be alone . . . and see what

thy soul doth wear.” Time alone gives kids a chance to let their minds wander, to feel their feelings, and to reconnect with themselves. During unstructured time there is room for daydreaming, creativity and spontaneous growth. Half an hour with “nothing to do” pushes a child to look inside for inspiration and direction, allowing him to discover and become his authentic self. (That’s half an hour spent in quiet, not staring at the TV.) When helping your child lay out their schedule for this school year, try to plan in some quiet, unstructured time. Keep these guidelines in mind:

Activities should be balanced with breaks and free time. Kids shouldn’t move from school to sports to homework without a pause. Help them to take breaks in between activities, or purposely plan one free day each week to give them a chance to relax and recharge. The signs of over programming can be subtle. A child may appear anxious or agitated, overwhelmed or on-edge. He may have trouble concentrating or staying awake in school. He may begin to withdraw or grow more quiet than usual, missing activities because he “doesn’t feel good.” (Stomachaches and headaches are common complaints of overscheduled children.) His energy level may appear lower than usual, and it may be harder to get him to complete his regular tasks.

Involve your child in the scheduling and decisionmaking process. Make observations and suggestions but let her make the final choice about which sport or skill to try next, whenever possible. Help her to learn about the realistic limits of time, finances and energy. If she wants to participate in five activities but you can only afford three, help her to prioritize. Help her to make activity choices that create balance between physical and cognitive skills, relational and individual talents. Modeling healthy behavior is one of the most effective ways to teach it. When you create and sustain your own balanced spaces between work, laundry and the PTO, you and your children can reap the benefits of the physical and emotional peace that comes from simply “being.” The capacity to be alone is a mark of emotional health and inner security. When kids know that they can tolerate some empty time and space in their lives, they don’t need to run from it. Without this kind of security they are more likely to feel the need to “fill in at any cost,” which can push them toward substance abuse or unhealthy relationships just to keep from being alone. Lisa Schab is a licensed clinical

social worker in Libertyville, Illinois, and the stepmother of two, ages 25 and 29. She can be reached at 847-782-1722.

Splash Like an Egyptian, Sleep Like a King!

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Small Steps Can Make the Back to School Rush Fun Again School will be up and running before we know it. For some of us, we begin the slow release of summer’s flexibility, getting our kids back on schedule and beginning to plan for the fall. For others, we hang on tightly to the last freedoms of summer, accelerating the loose schedules until it is madness everywhere. I admit, I have been in that second category more than once. Summer and its freedom from academic and scheduling pressures are tough to let go. But one thing I have learned over time is that we really can have the best of both worlds, a little bit of freedom and preparation can coexist. We can play and plan. Here are some great tools to help you enjoy your last weeks of summer and still be ready for the bell to ring at school.

Warm up the engine Start giving your child some drills in math. Math is the f irst thing to go over summer. Printing out one drill sheet a day for the last weeks of summer should do the trick. Web sites like www.mathfactcafe.com also offer online games and f lash cards kids can work on. Not as fun as Uno, but not so bad either. Make sure your child gets back to reading if they aren’t already. Keep books, magazines or comics in the car and lying around. Make them read in 15-30 minute sittings, depending on their ages. All you are doing is warming up their engines before school starts—a great gift for them.

14 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

cones and a walk through the neighborhood. It’s often the small events that mean so much to us.

Frame it Kids respond to how we see things. When we view the world dispassionately and are jaded, we model that for our children and we block their joy. This doesn’t mean we all have to be Pollyanna, but it does make sense for us to frame things for our kids in a way that allows them to be open and excited about life. For instance, “It’s going to be so much fun getting all your school supplies. What kind of folders are you going to pick out?” This turns the trip into an adventure, instead of, “Can you believe they need all of this stuff ? We never had all of these supplies when I was a kid.” Master List Create a master list of all loose ends of fall: clothing, registration for school or day care, haircuts, shoes and school supplies. Either create an all day event with your kids to gather the items (this sounds terrifying to me) or take an hour every day for a week to gather the items. When tasks are broken off into little steps, the minutia of the details can actually be framed into fun outings. Make it Matter Do something special every day that represents summer freedom: ice cream after dinner, star watching or going to the fair. Make each of these activities an event for you and your children. It’s okay if you only have time for ice cream

Try some of these simple tools to juggle two things at once, basking in the joys of summer and getting ready for the year ahead.

To learn more about Maria Murphy, a mom, psychotherapist and writer, go to her wellness site, www.simplyputtogether.comAsk for her FREE chore charts to get your school year started out right.


A ROUND TOW N

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museum notes

Engaging All Ages This School Year

New Preschool Program at Children’s Museum Educates Youngsters August is back to school time. Parents and children alike scramble to get acclimated to new teachers, friends and routines. The kids are excited and prepared to learn and explore new things. But back to school time isn’t just for the big kids. Preschoolers can enjoy new learning experiences at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. The museum is kicking off its fall series of preschool programs and the little ones are in for a treat.

Children ages 18 months through age 5 can enjoy the more than 20 programs slated for this fall. Each program is designed to engage kids in fresh and exciting learning experiences. Katie Fairman, family programs coordinator says, “The programs are an excellent way for children to begin socially interacting with others their age in a classroom setting.”

As kids learn about new things and faraway p l a c e s they’ll be learning in the museum’s n e w , expanded classrooms. In addition to new amenities like cubbies, sinks and restrooms, the expansive windows take up an entire wall from floor to ceiling, filling the room in natural light Fairman says, “Each room has large windows so children can see the sun shining, snow falling and cars going by as they participate in programs throughout the year,” She continues. “The classrooms are a wonderful place for children to learn, explore and have fun.”

In addition to learning to play through Playscape, 3- to 5-year-olds can enjoy several of the programs happening this fall. First, they can learn how people live all over the world. Structures of all shapes and sizes from log cabins, tipis, apartments, Fun is what they’ll have when they explore their feet to modern houses exist, which they can compare in Silly Feet. Besides using their feet to paint, they’ll to their own homes. They’ll get to explore the compare their own toes to animals with webbed museum’s newest exhibit, Take Me There: Egypt, to feet or paws. From land animals with interesting 08305 VT_INDY CHILD Page 1 sea creatures in Under the Sea, feet AM to underwater see how people live in EgyptAD today.12/11/08 10:58

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the kids will explore what creatures exist in the deep blue by exploring our What if…gallery. October programs are bursting with fun-filled activities including creatures of a different kind. Kids can learn all about spiders in A Spider’s World and find out why the eightlegged creatures are so critical to the circle of life. The kiddos will create spider webs and other pieces of spider art to take home and share. After playing with spiders, kids can learn all about pumpkins in Pumpkin Patch. They’ll read stories and learn about how pumpkins grow. Before heading home they’ll decorate their own pumpkin to take home. Halloween is right around the corner. Let the little ones celebrate Halloween at the museum in a friendly haunted house. The kids can come dressed in their costumes and enjoy age-appropriate play including singing songs, decorating the classroom and topping off the day with a yummy treat.

our resident bear and learn what polar bears love to eat and how they live in the coldest, far away place on Earth. In another place far, far away, the youngest Star Wars fans can enjoy Padawan Preschool. While learning about different Star Wars worlds and training, the youngest Padawans can create their own very own Star Wars characters. Many more programs covering broad interests abound this fall at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Fairman says, “Our philosophy is that children learn through play. We encourage children to choose activities they enjoy as they participate in the program.” All programs require registration and prices vary. Parents can attend but are not required to if the child is over age 3. For more information and to register please visit us at www.childrensmuseum.org. We look forward to seeing your children this fall.

Kimberly Clements is Public Relations Intern at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

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1 multi-taskinig botanicals AHAVA skincare is a natural and botanical based line that’s infused with the exotic properties of Dead Sea minerals.With the creation of their new Mineral Botanic line, AHAVA brings its signature minerals and plant extracts to their cream body cleanser, infusing it with botanical goodness and making it a great multi-tasker. Try the orange and frangipani scent; the orange adds vitamin C and antioxidants and the frangipani tones skin, leaving it soft and supple. This scented body cleanser also helps to strengthen collagen and improve skin’s elasticity, leaving you with fresh, youthful skin and a divine scent. Free of parabens, AHAVA’s products are ideal for sensitive skin. Find it at www.ahavaus.com for $19.50! 2 bamboo for two As widely accepted as breastfeeding has become, it’s still something that, at times, calls for modesty and privacy. Bamboo for Two is a wonderful cover-up designed just for breastfeeding mothers and their babies to let them nurse discreetly without distraction. Created as a clever poncho, Bamboo for Two has a cowl neck so you can easily take a peek at baby while she’s nursing, yet will keep her from being distracted by her surroundings. Made from lightweight, breathable bamboo, it helps to keep mom and baby cool and comfortable without drawing attention. Available in black for $46 at www.bamboofortwo.com.

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3 tote your gear in style Busy moms on the go don’t have to sacrifice style just because they carry the world on their shoulders—or in their gym bags. Now there is a stylish solution to keep everything in its place while helping mom look chic as she moves through her day. Crafted from waterproof twill and trimmed with Italian leather, each Physhion bag features a waterproof lining and comes equipped with compartments for your cell phone, iPod, gym pass, diapers, bottles and even a programmable lock for your locker. Big enough to serve as a gym bag, diaper bag, and hand bag all in one, Physhion bags are available in Fashionista, Vixen, Siren, and Hipster styles to keep you fashionable while you stay fit. Available for $225 - $350 at www.physhion.com. 7 Pictured: Fashionista, $225. 4 walk it off Summer is coming to a close and you still haven’t lost your baby weight. Why not let your feet help you along your way. Fitflops, the “flip flop with the gym built in”, are so called because of their ability to load muscles and engage them for longer, giving your legs a workout while you walk. Fitflops keep your feet properly aligned and help to improve posture, tone calves and thighs and can even provide relief from heel spurs, chronic back pain, sciatica and osteoarthritis, among other conditions. Plus, they just feel good on your feet. So slip on your Flipflops and whittle your bottom half into shape while running errands or just running after the kids. Find them at www.workoutsandals.com for $45 - $75.

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5 your perfect reflection Along with the sunfilled days of summer comes the endless battle we have to protect

our skin. Prolonged exposure to UVA and UVB rays, pollution and wind can all leave our skin feeling stripped and dry. AminoGenesis’ Perfect Reflection is an amino acid-based anti-aging serum that nourishes your complexion and has been proven to repair sun damage, relieve dryness and decrease the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Perfect Reflection is full of powerful antioxidants, including vitamins A, C and D, that help to improve skin’s elasticity and firmness, reduce dark spots and help skin remain soft and supple. Perfect Reflection is a water-based formula that rapidly delivers moisture and skin-rejuvenating nutrients to give you beautiful, youthful and healthy skin. Perfect Reflection is $69 from www. aminogenesis.com.

6 your guide to cropped pants Cropped pants, capris, clamdiggers. They may be known by many names, but these short pants have become known and loved by women of all ages, shapes and sizes, and with good reason. Cropped pants offer a cool alternative to full-length trousers or jeans and are perfect for when the weather starts heating up. As popular as they are, wearing cropped pants can be a bit trickier than you’d think. Here are a few tips to help you select the best style for your figure: 1. Make sure the hemline ends at the narrowest part of your leg. If it stops at the widest part of your calf, your legs will appear larger and shorter. 2. Pleats? Please, don’t. They only serve to add volume where you want to minimize it. 3. How about cuffs? Cuffs are best on those with long, nimble legs and should be avoided on those with short legs. 4. Opt for cropped pants that have straight or barely flared legs. They’ll balance out hips and keep you proportional. 5. To create an elongated leg line, pair your cropped pants with heels or some of the season’s hottest wedges. Flat shoes can give this look a dowdy appearance.

Now your only real dilemma with wearing cropped pants should be choosing a color. Go for one of the season’s pale neutrals or a darker color if your bottom half is heavier than your top.You’ll look chic and keep your cool too.

7 glam it up All hair products are not created equal. Pick up a bottle of GLAMsplash shampoo and you’ll see what I mean. This dense, color-friendly shampoo is packaged in a bottle with a feminine silhouette and infused with seaweed, sea kelp, algae extracts and botanical oils combined to create a lustrous cleansing experience perfect for all hair types.With its rich texture, you only need a dab to create a head full of lather that leaves your hair looking luxurious. This means that a single bottle will last you for several months, giving busy moms an indulgent experience as well as more bang for your buck. Created by Raleigh-based hairdressers, Dawn Bender and Justin Dare, GLAM products have been showcased at Hollywood’s Golden Globes, yet are created to help women make the most of their beauty routine at home. Try the other GLAM products including GLAMdrench (a rich double that adds strength and shimmer), GLAMilluminate (a nongreasy laminating gel that gives hold while controlling frizz) and more to keep your hair looking glamorous. Products are available at www. glamloungeraleigh.com for $10 - $21 Mary Michele Little is a mother of two, wife, entrepreneur and blogger who lives in Raleigh, N.C. Read more of her tips at www.onechicmama.com.


A ROUND TOW N

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profile: over the top

Over The Top

Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Circus Returns to Indy Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents Over the Top, a wacky and whimsical circus spectacular led by a showman in the tradition of P.T. Barnum himself, Chuck Wagner. He returns to The Greatest Show On Earth® for his second tour of duty as the Ringmaster. A veteran of film, television and Broadway with over a quarter of a century of entertainment experience, Chuck is thrilled to be entrusted once again with the ‘big hat’. “I have the greatest job on Earth. I get to be in the Circus and at the Circus at the same time!”

Over the Top features clown Tom Dougherty (on the cover of Indy’s Child this month. Always eager to engage audiences, the multitalented Dougherty (an accomplished musician and actor, too) especially likes the energy that comes with recruiting a child to assist in the seemingly simple task at hand—for example, in this performance, the happy pastime of blowing bubbles. “My aim is to help unify them, to make them all feel they’re part of the laughs and excitement.” Tom considers clowning a noble profession, if not something even greater. “A clown is a magical creature, with all the powers of a magical creature.” Judging by the expressions on the faces of children of all ages, he’s absolutely right.

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As summer wanes, the first days of school quickly approach, throwing local families into a frenzy of preparation. Children are nervous; parents are worried. Money is flowing — often much more than you wanted or expected to spend — for supplies, clothes, doctor visits and lunch fees. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, last year Americans spent $7.6 billion at family clothing stores in August, a total only surpassed by holiday sales in December. Another $2.4 billion was spent in bookstores in August 2008. Back to school can equal big stress and big bucks. But it doesn’t have to. Indy’s Child contacted local experts and organizations for tips on preparing for back-to-school — and sticking to your budget.

“Once Upon a Child has always been popular with families with younger children, but about a year ago we really started seeing a trend with older students shopping retail,” says Kim Burtner, coowner of the Fisher’s Plato’s Closet and three Once Upon a Child locations (two on the northside of Indianapolis and one in Greenwood). At Plato’s Closet, buyers select high-end designer and store brands in current styles — nothing older than 1 ½ years, Burtner says. Buyers scour the malls and fashion magazines to assure customers are getting the latest trends.

Gathering Supplies

The list of back-to-school supplies seems to grow longer and more complicated each year. Add to that new shoes, clothing and uniforms and the task can become time-consuming and potentially budget-busting.

Burtner says popular items this fall include longer shirts, darker denim, layering, Bermuda shorts, graphic tees and hoodies. “We need hoodies,” she says. “We never get enough hoodies.” An advantage of resale shopping is finding a variety options in one store.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your children about budget issues. By letting students help create and manage the budget, back-to-school shopping can become a teaching moment, says Rebecca Haynes-Bordas, AFC, extension educator, with a specialty in family resource management, at Purdue Extension-Marion County. First, determine needs versus wants, and make a list of each. “Needs are for survival,” Haynes-Bordas explains. “Wants are desired but not necessary.” Second, develop a budget. Decide how much you can comfortably afford to spend on back-to-school clothes and supplies. Finally, develop a spending plan based on your budgeted amount. To save money during your shopping trip, HaynesBordas recommends the following: • Distinguish between designer and store brands. “Don’t pay more for somebody else’s name,” she says. • Check construction on clothing, backpacks and other materials. Make sure they will last throughout the year.

“You’ll find a lot of brands all in one place,” Burtner says. “You can mix and match — everything from vintage to preppy.” Burtner urges families to shop resale stores early and often. Fall styles usually hit racks in July, and new items are added frequently.

Healthy Start

Before children walk through the school door, many must visit the doctor for an annual check-up, sports physical or required immunizations. For many families, this is only as complicated as calling the pediatrician for an appointment. For others — those struggling financially or who don’t have health insurance coverage — the task is much more daunting. Fortunately, many local agencies and healthcare professionals have joined together to help. Covering Kids and Families of Central Indiana works to help local families without health insurance navigate the tedious process of getting coverage. “If you need health insurance, contact us,” says Program Director Pam Humes. “We think everyone should have access to health care. We’re here to help people because it can be an intimidating process.”

• Consider cost per use. If the item is something that will be used regularly, it may make sense to pay more for better quality rather than to buy a cheaper version that will need to be replaced often.

Through a network of referral agencies, they also offer help and hope to families who need vision and dental screenings, school physicals and immunizations.

• Watch for sales. Stores often offer back-to-school specials throughout August.

One of the biggest annual initiatives is the Back to School Family Day, planned this year from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, August 1, at the Marion County Health Department, 3838 N. Rural St. in Indianapolis.

One popular option for back-to-school clothes is the resale shop. Since children outgrow clothes quickly and teens can quickly switch trends, pieces can often be found in like-new condition. Options throughout the city include Goodwill stores, Once Upon a Child, which offers children’s clothes up to youth size 16, and Plato’s Closet, which specializes in trendy, designer styles for teens and older students.

advantage of free vision and dental screenings, sports physicals, immunizations and other health-related information from about 50 vendors, along with games, food and entertainment. Humes urges families to arrive early, especially if children need to snag an appointment for a physical, since physician time is limited and crowds are expected to be large — up to 20,000 people are expected. All struggling families are welcome, not just those without health insurance. “The event is to help get kids and families ready to get back to school,” Humes explains. “We know people who are just struggling for basic needs, and this event is designed for them.” For more information about the Back to School Family Day, call 221-2464. Covering Kids & Families general information is available at 317-221-3178. For bilingual information about both the organization and event, call 317-221-2039.

Smooth Transition

The first day of school can be nerve-wracking for any student, but the first day at a new school can be down-right stressful. Helping your child become familiar with the school, his teachers and potential classmates will help ease some anxiety, says Kimble Richardson, MS, LMHC, LCSW, LMFT, physician and referral liaison at St. Vincent Stress Center. Most schools offer tours or an orientation program to new and transitioning students. Even if you miss the formal program, it’s still important to call and arrange a private tour. Point out your child’s classroom, the restrooms, the lunchroom, library, gym and other areas he might need to find on the first day. If possible, meet the teachers or other staff members. For younger children, parents can plan a play date with neighborhood children who might be riding the bus or be in the same class. Help your child find a friendly face on the first day. While older children might not appreciate a traditional play date, arranging for a familiar face to greet them is still a good idea, Richardson says. Call to see if the school has an ambassador program or if a student council member or other representative might let your child shadow her for the day. Finding a welcoming face in a crowded lunchroom can be very reassuring to new students. Just because children will attend a new school with old friends — such as moving to middle or high school in their current district — don’t assume nerves aren’t an issue. (continued on page 23)

“Through our work, we learned that lots of kids, as they were going back to school, didn’t have the basics,” Humes says. All children who attend Family Day will receive a free backpack and the chance to get other needed supplies, such as pencils, crayons, glue sticks, scissors and binders. Families can also take INDYSCHILD.COM 21


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“Say, ‘I remember when I was a student going into high school and I was a little nervous. If you feel that way, too, it’s OK,’” Richardson suggests. “They may roll their eyes at you, but it’s important to normalize it.”

Stahl encourages parents to involve their children in lunch planning. “When they’re invested in helping pack the lunch, they’ll be more interested in eating the lunch,” she says.

First-day jitters are normal, but long-term symptoms might call for professional counseling, Richardson says. If your child has a dramatic change from his normal behavior or has high anxiety for more than a couple of weeks — vomiting, heavy crying, spending lots of time in the nurses office or causing problems at home — he recommends contacting a healthcare professional.

It is possible to provide a healthy school lunch on a budget. Stahl offers these tips:

Healthy Eats

Each morning, parents hope that the healthy meal they pack in their child’s lunchbox ends up in his stomach, not the cafeteria trash can. “No matter how nutritional, if the child won’t eat it, then it’s not very healthy,” says Robin Stahl, RD, registered dietician with Community Health Network.

(Continued from page 21) “Even if you have a child who’s outgoing, they can have some anxiety when starting a new school even if they know most of the people there,” says Richardson, the father of twins entering high school this fall. “Making the change from elementary school to middle school or middle school to high school is a big transition. These are major life changes in your child’s growing up years, and it’s normal to be a little anxious or scared.” He recommends talking to your child, perhaps sharing a funny story about your own f irst-day jitters.

Stahl urges parents to remember variety. Mix things up. While an apple is a healthy choice, sending an apple for lunch every day can become boring. Throw in berries, bananas, kiwi, canned pineapple. Send fresh veggies with a variety of dips. Surprise your child with a wrap or pita pocket instead of regular sandwich bread. “Variety is extremely important when you’re trying to boost nutritional value,” she explains. “If they know they’re going to see the same thing every day, it’s not that interesting.” But Stahl admits that kids sometimes get stuck in a rut. “Kids go through phases, too, when they’ll only eat peanut butter and jelly or ham sandwiches, and it’s important to respect their wishes,” she says. “Try to send one new thing along with their old favorites.”

• Individually packaged products are more expensive, so buy in bulk and divvy up the foods at home. • Consider off brands or store brands. • Instead of deli meat, buy a turkey breast or ham to cook and slice yourself. • Consider canned fruit in it’s own juices. You give up some of the fiber, but you still get the nutrients, Stahl says. • Consider buying a school lunch, which can be an affordable and healthy alternative to a brown bag lunch. Lisa Young Stiers is Senior Staff Writer for Indy’s Child and Cincinnati Parent Magazines and lives in Brownsburg, Indiana with her two children and husband.

Free Back to School Supplies & Services Back to School Family Day 2009, hosted by Covering Kids and Families of Central Indiana, will be Saturday, August 1, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Marion County Health Department, 3838 N. Rural St. Indianapolis. Families can receive free school supplies (children must be present), health screenings, health information, immunizations, sports physicals and entertainment. Questions? Call 317-221-2464. Bilingual information is available at 317-221-2039.

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Now enrolling for Fall 2009 • Private Full Day Kindergarten

Now offering full and part time infants (full only), toddlers and preschool Indpls: 2944 E. 56th (1 1⁄2 miles east of Keystone Ave.) 257-9127

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Give them the head start they deserve Classes and One on One Tutoring Available 4yrs. Old and Up Classes are Filling Up Fast! 1030 E. 86th Street, Indianapolis 46240

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Ask me what I learned at Orchard today.

• Nutritious Meals & Snacks • Excellent Teachers

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Foundations to the Academic

(Dance, Gymnastics,

Standards for Birth to Five

Music and Spanish)

• Paths to Quality Provider

Family owned for 25 years

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ready for the world stage

Give your child the foundation to succeed in a changing world. Discover how the International School of Indiana’s unique multi-cultural, internationally acclaimed education program can enrich your child’s opportunities for college and beyond.

Orchard is committed to developing the hearts and minds of young people. Leadership, critical thinking, confidence, communication skills, integrity, character, social skills, as well as proven high school and college success are hallmarks of an Orchard education.

+1.317.923.1951 www.isind.org

Visit Our Open House, Sunday, Oct. 18, from 1-3 p.m.

IS09021_IndChld_EighthPgAd.indd 1

6/15/09 10:36:04 AM

INDYSCHILD.COM 25


On January 12th, Dr. Tony Bennett was sworn in as Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction and immediately began creating a focus on student learning. His vision is to have academic achievement and career preparation to be the best in the United States and on par with the most competitive countries in the world. “Ben net t’s agg ressive goa ls include promoting a statewide culture of academic excellence where 90 percent of students pass both Math and English/Language Arts sections of ISTEP+, 90 percent of students graduate from high school and 25 percent pass AP class in high school. If this happened then we would lead the country,” said Cam Savage, Director of Communication with the Department of Education.

Measuring up Standardized testing is a method used to measure statewide and national academic progress. ISTEP+, the Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus, measures what students know at each grade level. “Based on Indiana’s Academic Standards, standardized tests like ISTEP+ are created by the Department of Education with outside vendors and teachers around the state. Tests align with each grade level and review committees evaluate tests for bias,” said Savage. “Testing is critical to tell us whether students are achieving and becoming proficient learners. Tax payers spend six billion dollars a year on education and cannot go without knowing how students perform.”

Standardized Testing Making Sense of State Requirements and the Benefits of Core 40. When was the last time you stretched your mind and delved into a subject matter that had either professional or recreational applications to your life? Discovering a new hobby or considering a change in career will trigger memories of studying, testing and the rush of success. Maybe you’ll be the best at what you do – even the best in the nation.

26 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

Students in grades three through 10 are required to take ISTEP+ tests. The tests include multiple choice, essay and short answer questions covering English and language arts and mathematics at grades three through eight as well as science at grades five and seven. The spring 2009 ISTEP+ tests included the same questions as the fall in addition to grades four and six science and grades five and seven testing in social studies.

A typical day during ISTEP+ testing Students are encouraged weeks in advance by teachers and administrators to get a good nights rest and eat a healthy breakfast during the week of ISTEP testing. The test takes between four to seven hours depending on the grade level. Depending on the school district, the test is administered over three mornings. Every student tested receives a comprehensive individual Student Report showing student performance in terms of Pass+, Pass or Did Not Pass. Families of students in all tested grade levels will have access to a copy of the student’s short answer and essay responses. According to Cynthia Roach, assessment specialist with Indianapolis Public Schools, she gets paper reports to schools and distributes parent login information for families to access on-line ISTEP+ results. “New in 2008-2009 school year is the ability to allow access for students, parents and teachers to read reports

online,” said Roach. Results are distributed a few months following testing.

Make the adjustment for success In January of 2007, Governor Mitch Daniels announced that ISTEP testing would take place in the spring only as opposed to fall and spring testing. The cost of the test was $31 million annually. By having one test annually instead of fall and spring, it will drop to $29.5 million each year for two year, then $28.5 million for the third and fourth years. 2009-2010 will be the first year students in grades three through 10 will only take a spring ISTEP+ test. “ISTEP+ testing was in the wrong part of the school year. We shouldn’t be testing 2nd grade material in the fall of 3rd grade, then receive the results from the exam in December or even January,” said Representative Bob Behning.

Student success is priority Each school corporation is responsible for taking the ISTEP+ results and implementing adjustments on a broad level as well as for individual students. “State funding is generated and put to use in the Remediation Prevention Grant and is awarded based on how much need a student has. These funds go directly to the schools for Saturday, summer and afterschool programs,” said Wes Bruce, Chief Assessment Officer with the Indiana Department of Education. “We also have diagnostic tools available to schools that became available for the first time last year. These are tools teachers can use throughout the year as check points on progress.”

Thoughts to consider One can only imagine the diff iculty to provide fair and unbiased information on thousands of unique students with the same measuring tool. This challenge is as diff icult as encompassing your child’s entire personality in one word, understanding your child has days of unparalleled joy and days of exhaustion and fear. Parents are to be students of their children, ultimately responsible for their physical, mental and spiritual well-being. Sixty-three percent of voters believe that a student’s progress for one school year cannot be accurately measured by one standardized test, according to a bipartisan poll conducted in May by the American Association of School Administrators. If this is the case, parents can read and study the academic standards online and discuss specific concerns alongside their child’s teacher. Be hands-on in your child’s success by volunteering at the school, take time to review homework and ask questions about their day. By equipping your child with a passion for learning, you will be giving a gift for years to come and a lifetime of success. Nikki Keever is a freelance writer living in Noblesville, Indiana.


There are more tests after the sophomore year High School GQE testing In the fall of 2009, incoming freshman will be the first group of students to take the new GQE, Graduation Qualifying Exam, which consists of Algebra I and English 10 exams taken whenever students complete the corresponding course. Previously, students took one big test in grade 10 that covered English, language arts and math. The new GQE consists of two smaller tests that students will take after completing courses in Algebra I and English 10. By testing at the end of each course, the content will still be fresh. Some students take Algebra I in middle school, so allowing students to meet this testing requirement earlier clears the way for them to pursue other higherlevel math courses. Because students already take end-of-course tests in Algebra I, changing the GQE requirement actually cuts down on the number of tests students have to take. CORE 40 Indiana’s Core 40 is the academic foundation all students need to succeed in college, apprenticeship programs, military training and the workforce. Students who take strong academic courses in high school are more likely to enroll in college and earn a degree. Current high school courses are labeled CORE 40. This is not a special set of courses, just notation that certain courses are a part of the CORE 40 curricula. CORE 40 helps prepare for collegiate success. It’s not just about getting in, it’s about finishing. Anything less may mean taking remedial high school coursework in college, which means it will take you longer to finish and will cost you more in college tuition. It also means you’ll have a greater chance of dropping out before you get your degree. That’s why Core 40 is a college admissions

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requirement: In fall 2011 you won’t be able to start at a four-year public Indiana college without Core 40 or a documented equivalent. Most private colleges require students to have at least this level of high school academic preparation. The Core 40 diploma can help you earn money for college. Indiana students who complete a Core 40 diploma and meet other financial aid and grade requirements can receive up to 90 percent of approved tuition and fees at eligible colleges. Core 40 with Academic Honors graduates can receive up to 100 percent and some colleges also offer their own scholarships specifically for students who earn this diploma.

Visit these websites for more information Indiana Academic Standards: What does your student need to know? dc.doe.in.gov/Standards/AcademicStandards/index.shtml

Find your area schools testing results and school data www.doe.in.gov/data/

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Riley Hospital for Children Needs Your Help! Riley Hospital for Children needs healthy full-term infants between 2 and 36 months of age to evaluate how the lung grows. The evaluation takes approximately 2-3 hours. You will be compensated for your time participating in the evaluation. If interested in obtaining more information, please call (317)274-3604.

Experience the Farm this Fall at Kelsay Farms • School Field Trips • Tour the Farm • Corn Maze • Dairy Snacks • Moo Choo Rides • Pumpkin Sling Shot

Opening Day Oct. 3 School and group field trips being scheduled now! Located on County Rd. 250 E. in Whiteland between Tracy Rd. & Worthsville Rd. (East of I-65)

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28 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009


BTW dont txt & drive TYVM Kids at play are easily distracted, so it’s up to drivers to pay attention. Texting, using a cell phone or changing songs on an MP3 player increases the chances of an accident. In fact, according to the American Automobile Association, every two seconds a driver’s eyes are off the road, he or she is twice as likely to be involved in a crash. For more information on distracted driving and to find yard sign events and pickup locations near you, visit KidsDart.org.

INDYSCHILD.COM 29


R E SOU RC E S

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childcare & education directory

Child Care Meridian Kessler

A Nanny Referral, Solutions Home Staffing

We come to you! Machelle Hartford 317-319-0027

m@SolutionsHomeStaffing.com

SolutionsHomeStaffing.com Nannies for all schedules and needs. We place professional nannies who have been meticulously screened for experience, background and character. Our nannies are educated women who love to work with babies and children. A nanny can offer the one-on-one care that nurtures your child’s individual needs. Allow your children to learn, play, and rest at their own pace, in the comfort of their own home. We place permanent nannies for full-time and part-time; and short-term nannies for new mother’s, summer care, vacation and sick child/ parent care. All nannies have a minimum of three years, full-charge nanny experience. AYS Inc.

Several locations in Central Indiana 317-283-3817 www.ayskids.org Ages/Grades: 3 years old to 6th grade

AYS operates youth programs At-Your-School, including before- and after-school, early childhood, kindergarten, and summer programs. At AYS, children receive homework help, hands-on learning, art & music enrichment, exercise, nutritious snacks, socialization and FUN! Our highly trained staff makes AYS the safest place for kids. Visit our website to see if we are at your school! Wee Folk Child Care

Meridian Kessler Neighborhood Indianapolis 317-926-3640 Ages: 4 weeks+

Quality in-home child care serving caring families for 20 years. (CPR, 1st aid certified, and state licensed). Two meals and one snack provided daily along with baby food and regular formula. We provide quality learning through play in a nonsmoking Christian environment. Preschool program providing Kindergarten prep is available. $130/week. 7:15-5:30 M-F.

Schools Brownsburg

Maria Montessori International Academy

431 E. Northfield Dr. Brownsburg 317-852-3900 www.mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 12 months to 6 years

Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages toddlers, Pre-K and Kindergarten.

Carmel

Carmel Montessori Schools, Inc.

Emily & Scott Rudicel 1402 W. Main St. Carmel 317-580-0699 info@carmelmontessori.com www.carmelmontessori.com Ages: Pre-school through Kindergarten.

Carmel Montessori School is located on the beautiful campus at St. Christopher’s Church on the NE corner of Main St. and Meridian in Carmel. Our directress is American Montessori Certified with 10 years head-teaching experience. We offer 30 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

a beautiful, peaceful and positive Montessori learning environment. Extended days available.

offered to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age.

Call for more information. (Affiliated with Fisher’s Montessori). Morning, afternoon and full-day programs.

The Primrose School at WestClay is dedicated to providing outstanding educational care to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. Our curriculum is NCA accredited and offers many extras such as Spanish, technology, sign language, character development, music appreciation, art appreciation, science, social studies, reading, English, and math. Please call today to learn how more than 90% of Primrose students out performed the national average.

Coram Deo Academy

Seeking Sitters

Clay Montessori

Peggy White 463 East Main St. Carmel 317-849-9519 or 317-580-1850 Ages: 3-6

651 W Main St Mr. Scott Taylor 317-645-6397 scottbtaylor@att.net www.CoramDep-IN.com Ages/Grades: K-12 Grade

Coram Deo Academy exists to assist parents in their duty of biblically training their children by offering academic instruction that is distinctly and consistently Christ-centered and classical. Utilizing classical tools of learning and a distinctly Christian worldview approach to education, we desire to graduate young men and women who, as servants of Christ, are equipped spiritually, intellectually and artistically to engage and shape the culture with the claims of the gospel to the glory of God. Kindergarten Connection 14350 Oakridge Road Jennifer McRoberts 317-843-1125 Kindergartenconnection@hotmail.com www.Kindergartenconnectiononline.com Ages/Grades: Pre-Kindergarten classes: must be 4 by September 1, 2009. Kindergarten Enrichment classes: open to kindergarten aged children Kindergarten Connection provides each child with stimulating and challenging activities which utilize a variety of learning styles. Kindergarten Connection incorporates a multi-modality approach to learning using visual, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic activities. The skills taught are: prereading, reading, math, basic phonics, computer, writing/printing, social. Kindergarten Connection has a maximum teacher/student ratio of 1:5. The Montessori Learning Center

Elizabeth Williams 1402 W. Main St. Carmel 317-846-8182 elizabeth@themontessorilearningcenter. com

www.themontessorilearningcenter.com Ages: Grades 1-3 The Montessori Learning Center Elementary program focuses on developing the whole child through interaction with an interdisciplinary curriculum. Our program specif ically meets the needs of each child and is aligned with Indiana State Standards.

Oogles n Googles U

430 N. Range Line Road Danya Mendell 317-228-9177 dmendell@ooglesngoogles.com www.ooglesngoogles.com Ages/Grades: threes/fours/fives

Oogles n Googles U is located in the Carmel Arts and Design District. This Pre-K learning center, opening its doors fall 2009, integrates arts, culture, reading and Spanish from professionals from within the district into its daily activity. Curriculum designed and taught by preschool instructors with over 50 years of combined experience. Primrose School at WestClay

13096 Moultrie Street Julie Gayes 317-873-0123 jgayes@primrosewestclay.com www.primrosewestclay.com Ages/Grades: Our programs are

1950 E. Greyhound Pass, Ste 18-301 Kristin Slade 317-985-9505 kristins@seekingsitters www.seekingsitters.com

SeekingSitters Indianapolis North is the solution for all of your childcare needs. We are an on-demand service for families seeking babysitters. Whether your need is last minute, one-time, part-time, or full-time, we can solve your childcare dilemma. Visit SeekingSitters.com for more information and to sign up!

Carmel - Zionsville

Acorn Montessori School

620 Kinzer Ave., Carmel, IN 46032 Janet Noll 317-846-1669 acornmontessori@aol.com acornmontessorischool.com Ages/Grades: 3-6

Acorn Montessori School is the oldest Montessori school in Carmel, celebrating 24 years in business. Our directress has a Masters degree in Education and 27 years experience teaching Montessori. We are the only Montessori school offering the spiritual formation curriculum of Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (optional after school program). Our environment offers an easy transition between your home and your child’s first elementary school. We offer flexible hours. The Indiana School of Etiquette and Protocol

760 Starkey Road, Zionsville Ms. Barbara Munson 317-873-4786 msmunson@indianaetiquette.com www.IndianaEtiquette.com Ages/Grades: 1st - college

The Indiana School of Etiquette and Protocol increases childrens’ and young adults’ awareness and self-confidence by teaching crucial social and dining, and life skills that will play a large part in their future sucess. Maria Montessori International Academy

6857 West Stonegate Drive Zionsville 317-769-2220 www.mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 3 months to 6 years old

Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. The lead teachers possess bachelor degree and certification in Montessori Education. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages starting 3 months to 6 years located in Stonegate, Zionsville, IN.

Central

Todd Academy, Inc.

302 N. East Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 Sharon Todd 317-636-3100 director@toddacademy.com www.toddacademy.com

Ages/Grades: Age 10 or 5th grade thru -grade 12 Todd Academy serves gifted middle and high school students who are seeking a learning challenge. Classes are designed to be fun while motivating the student to stretch academically. Working with the IUPUI SPAN program allows students to take college classes when they are ready for more challenging educational opportunities

East

Irvington Math Center, IMC

5535 E. Washington St 317-602-3733 GMcDermott@IrvingtonMath.Com www.irvingtonmath.com Ages/Grades: Kindergarten thru- grade 12

Our mission at IMC is to enhance mathematics learning for all ages. We offer tutoring services in small groups or one-on-one k-12 students; on-line support; monthly enrichment seminars for k-12 students; monthly topical seminars for parents; test preparation courses ACT, SAT, GQE. Trinity Lutheran School

8540 East 16th Street Amanda Hoover 317-529-0138 eliwhit9799@yahoo.com www.trinityindy.org Ages/Grades: Pre-school for ages 3-5yrs & K-8th

Our school is a loving environment. Our main goal is to teach and show our children and families the love of Jesus! Faith-Compassion-Achievement! Our students strive academically and spiritually in a faith enriched enviroment.

Fishers

Fishers Montessori

Peggy White 12806 Ford Rd and 131st and Allisonville Rd. Fishers 317-849-9519 or 317-580-1850 Ages: 3-9

A quality learning environment offering preschool, kindergarten and elementary. Certification through American Montessori Society. 9-12, 12:30-3, 9-3 Primrose School at Gray Eagle

Mindy Smith 12290 Olio Road (Olio Road between 116th street and 126th street) Fishers 317-577-9480 mindy@primrosegrayeagle.com Ages: Infants thru full day kindergarten. Before/after care available.

At Primrose School at Gray Eagle we offer much more than a daycare experience. Our exclusive Balanced Learning curriculum prepares your child for academic success while fully integrating character development - creating a wellrounded young individual. Our safe, secure environment will provide you with peace-of-mind, knowing that your child is safe, happy and growing everyday! Full Time: $220 - $320 per week depending on age. Visit www. PrimroseGrayEagle.com for more information.

Geist My Backyard Fine Arts Preschool at Geist Sports Academy

11960 East 62nd Street Indianapolis 317-823-7734 www.geistsportsacademy.com Ages: 2 year-Pre K (5 year) NOW ENROLLING FOR 2008-2009. Children will discover their unique selves and learn about the world around them through exploring the visual arts, creative movement and music appreciation. 9-11:45 a.m. M-Fri; MWF 9-1:30pm.


R E SOU RC E S

Meridian St. - Michigan Rd. Maria Montessori International Academy

7507 N. Michigan Road Indianapolis 317-291-5557 www.mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 3 months to 9 years old Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in

original and creative ways and have a positive selfimage. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. The lead teachers possess bachelor degree and certification in Montessori Education. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages starting 3 months to 6 years located in Stonegate, Zionsville, IN.

Multiple Locations Indiana Council of Preschool Cooperatives: ICPC

Multiple Locations in Indianapolis Area For schools, see below. ICPC Line: 317-767-7596

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• Flexible schedule- choose your days • Extended day option • Convenient location • Caring for ages 6 mos.- 5 years • Theme-based curriculum with experienced staff Mention this ad and 1st Semester Supply Fee is Free with paid registration by August 26, 2009.

Ages: Preschool classes for ages 2-5; other programs vary - Kindergarten, Stay & Play, Enrichment/Extended Days. Indianapolis Area Preschool and Kindergarten Cooperatives Cooperative Preschools: great for your child, great for you! Children and parents learn and grow together in the classroom with caring, experienced teachers. Indiana Council of Preschool Cooperatives (ICPC) member schools are: Apple House: 6121 E. County Rd 100 S, Avon, 797-5925 Butler: 2411 Indianapolis Ave, Indy, 226-4287 Downey: 111 S. Downey Rd, Indy, 359-5304 Edgewood: 4040 E. Thompson Rd, Indy, 767-7730 Fishers Point: 9959 E. 126th St, Fishers, 767-4312 Geist Orchard: 7879 N. 700 West, McCordsville, 336-7008 Meridian

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childcare & education directory

Hills Nursery School and Kindergarten: 7171 N. Pennsylvania, Indy, 255-0831 Meridian Street: 5500 N. Meridian St, Indy, 767-3003 Northeast Cooperative Preschool and Kindergarten: 5805 E. 56th St, Indy, 592-9790 Parkview: 4550 central Ave, Indy, 380-0628 Speedway: 3000 N. High School Rd, Indy, 356-2804 Willowcreek: 8170 Hague Rd, Indy, 578-5488 Noblesville Christian School

1687 N. 10th Street Rolland Abraham 317-776-4186 rabraham@ noblesvillechristianschool.org NoblesvilleChristianSchool.org

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Give your child the tools to handle social situations with ease. Ensure that they will have leadership skills to last a lifetime. Classes are starting for fall, please call or email to enroll. Licensed teacher and certified etiquette consultant.

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317.873.4786 msmunson@IndianaEtiquette.com www.IndianaEtiquette.com INDYSCHILD.COM 31


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childcare & education directory emills@JCCindy.org www.JCCindy.org Ages: 6 weeks - Grade K

Ages/Grades: Preschool - 9th Grade Affordable Christian Education in Hamilton County. State accredited, NCS combines academic excellence with Christ-centered teaching. The result: students who are loved and motivated everyday. Our full-day Kindergarten is 25-66% less costly than other programs, with music, art, library, gym and music weekly. Come share the excitement at Noblesville Christian! Polly Panda Preschool and Bridgford Kindergarten

2944 E. 56th St. and 17645 Oakmont Dr., IndianapolisNoblesville Gail Hacker & Tammy Clark & Mandy Galle 317-257-9127 (Indy) 317773-0387 (Noblesville) pollypandaindy@sbcglobal.net Ages/Grades: Six weeks through Kindergarten, summer program also available.

Our loving caregivers and teachers demonstrate by example and encourage children to behave according to these values as the children are learning, playing and socializing with one another. The JCC embraces a learning-through-play teaching method to engage children in activities that promote creativity, accelerate learning and stimulate social interaction, all at each child’s individual pace.

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Full Academic Curriculum and Innovative Arts’ Enrichment. Our Program recognizes that intellectual, social, emotional and physical development are interwoven. Our children will thrive on exploration, creativity, curiosity, discovery, spontaneity and more important, lots of love!

Beginnings Preschool and Parents’ Day Out

Children’s Day In Nursery School and Traditional Preschool

First Baptist Church of Indianapolis 8600 N College Carol Mann 317-574-6454 cmann@fbcindy.org www.fbcindy.org Ages/Grades: 6 months - Preschool Offering flexibility for days of choice, Beginnings strives to meet the physical, spiritual, social and emotional needs of children from six months through age five. Beginnings is designed to provide secure, loving care for young children and to offer parents a consistent time to care for themselves. Openings available now.

Polly Panda provides a safe and healthy environment which enhances each child’s total growth. Our theme-based hands-on preschool program provides a wide-range experiences that foster learning, creativity and problem solving in all areas. A child’s sense of selfworth, independence and growth in social skills are developed through positive interaction with peers and our well-qualified and loving staff.

Beth-El Zedeck EaRly Childhood Center

600 W. 70th St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Joanie Waldman 317-259-6854 jwaldman@bez613.org Ages/Grades: 12 mos.+, 18 mos.+, 2’s+ (8:50 am to 12:30 pm or 3:00 pm

North Arthur M. Glick JCC

6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-251-9467

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32 INDY’S CHILD * August 2009

Christy Whaley 5500 N. Meridian St. Indianapolis 317-253-0472 cwhaley@msumc.org www.msumc.org Ages: Nursery School and Preschool The Children’s Day In Nursery School is a fully inclusive early childhood program with an emphasis on Christian values. It is designed to offer children 9 months to 3 years a positive and developmentally appropriate experience in the care of experienced caregivers. Classes are offered weekdays from 9 am to 2:30 pm. CDI Preschool program provides a quality developmentally appropriate education for 3, 4 and 5 year olds. Program includes weekly Christian Life Skills, First Steps in Music (ICC) and Book Club. 3’s: T & Th, 4/5’s MWF. 9-2:30 pm. Summer Camp available. Children’s Circle of Second Presbyterian Church

7700 N. Meridian St.,

Indianapolis, IN 46260 Regina Covey for Registration; Director Susan Stewart for Curriculum 317-252-5517 rcovey@secondchurch.org Ages/Grades: 7 months to 5 years Children’s Circle is a weekday, developmentally appropriate, activity-based Christian program. We meet the needs of the whole child in a fun, creative, nurturing environment. Here, children can develop the skills necessary to live in today’s world. Our experienced faculty leads children toward discovery of who they are and what they can do. We embrace excellence in education by nurturing the whole child -- physically, emotionally, spiritually and intellectually. Early Childhood Center, The Church at the Crossing

John Drake or Kelly Belt 9111 N. Haverstick Rd. Indianapolis 317-575-6508 jdrake@churchatthecrossing.org www.churchatthecrossing.org Ages: 12mos - Pre-K 5’s Our Mothers Day Out (12-35mos) 9:15-2:30 and Preschool (3yrs-PreK’s) programs provide relaxed, playful, secure environments that nurture creativity and encourage the exploration of God’s world, a wide variety of learning materials, & friendships, with readiness activities woven through each study unit. Need longer hours? Try our childcare ministry, The Neighborhood designed for 2-PreK 6:30-6pm M-F. Call for information and to schedule tours. Fairview Early Childhood Program

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www.seekingsitters.com

Weekdays at 6 am on WFYI 1


R E SOU RC E S Melissa Peterson 4609 N. Capital Ave. Indianapolis 317-253-4990 mpeterson@fairviewpresbyterian.org www.fairviewpresbyterian.org Ages: 12 mo-5 yrs. (or up to Kindergarten) Fairview ECP has a developmental, experienced based curriculum in a warm and inclusive environment. Curriculum is designed to promote positive social behavior, respect for diversity, positive self-concept, independence, creativity and critical thinking skills. Come and visit us! Hoosier Academies

5640 Caito Drive Kathy Isenberg 317.547.1400 kisenberg@k12.com www.hoosieracademy.org Ages/Grades: Serving grades K-11 Hoosier Academies are tuition-free public charter school programs authorized by Ball State University for grades K-11, that offer state-certified teachers and a unique blend of traditional, brick-andmortar schooling and online learning. Families get access to the exceptional K12 curriculum and patented methodology for online learning, support from passionate, state-certified teachers, and an involved school community. K12 is the leading curriculum provider for public online schools serving kindergarten through high school.

Ages: 3 years old-12th grade ISI is founded on the belief that an introduction to a second language, exposure to different nationalities and ethnic backgrounds and an International Baccalaureate-driven curriculum all work together to foster critical and independent thought. $12,250 pre-k through 8th grade and $12,960 for High School. Financial aid available for qualifiers. KinderCare-Woodfield Crossing

Meagan Koeneman 8485 Woodfield Crossing Indianapolis 317-257-3911 070739@klcorp.com www.kindercare.com/070739 Ages: 6wks - 12 years Monday-Friday 6:30am - 6:00pm. Tuition varies with phonics and math programs. Meridian Hills Cooperative Nursery School & Kindergarten

7171 N. Pennsylvania School phone 255-0831 Ages/Grades: Ages 2, 3, 4 and Kindergarten Founded in 1960, Meridian Hills Cooperative School is dedicated to helping children, parents and teachers grow together. Classes provide a positive, nurturing environment for 2-year-olds through Kindergarten with a special emphasis on parent education. Parents help daily in the spacious classrooms, on a beautiful half-acre playground and with a caring, experienced staff. Northside.

The Hutson School

7245 E. 75th Street Janet George, Principal 317-377-0544 fellowjanetgeorge@gmail.com http://www.hutsonschool.org Ages/Grades: 1-12

Montessori Centres

Lynne Boone, Director 563 Westfield Blvd. W. Dr. Indianapolis 317-257-2224 montessoricentres@sbcglobal.net Ages: 2 1/2-3rd grade

The Hutson School, a pure Orton-Gillingham School serves children in 1st-12th grade with dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, ADHD. Students may have difficulties with organization and time management. The program complies with Indiana academic standards.The High School offers two academic paths: College Preparatory & General Diploma. Faculty are OG Fellows, Certified, and Associate Leveled from the AOGPE. and licensed Educators. Hutson is a member of AOGPE & a provisional member of ISACS. Children travel from across the state to attend.

Stressing peace and respect for all, we’ve worked with children to develop critical-thinking and time-management skills since 1966. Montessoricertified lead teachers serve children aged 2 1/23rd grade. Our classroom structure and materials allow children to be self-directed and selfpaced. Our well-rounded curriculum includes French and Spanish, art, and computer labs. True Montessori environment serving children at all levels from gifted to special needs. Pre/K: 8:3011:30 or 8:30-3:15.

The Independence Academy of Indiana, Inc.

St. Luke’s Early Childhood Programs

612 West 42nd Street Ruth Padgett 317-926-0043 ruthpadgettTheIndependenceAcademy.o Website: www. TheIndependenceAcademy.org Ages/Grades: Grades 5 - 12

100 West 86th Street Bobbi Main-Jackson, Dir. 317-844-3399 mainb@stlukesumc.com www.stlukesumc.com Ages/Grades: Preschool 3 yrs (by Sept 1 of school year)-5 yrs, Parents’ Day Out 10 mos (by Sept 1 of school year)-3 yrs

Created specifically for students with high-functioning autism and Asperger’s Syndrome, The Independence Academy helps students achieve their highest level of independence and academic success. Dedicated and trained staff teach math, sciences, language arts, global studies, social and life skills, and more.Very small classes. Beautiful campus. A place to belong.

Developmentally appropriate play-based curriculum provided in which children grow socially, emotionally,cognitively, and physically. Readiness skills, motor development and music incorporated into curriculum. Parents’ Day Out is a structured play experience in a warm and loving environm

International School of Indiana

Sycamore School

Denise Wagner, CFRE 4330 N. Michigan Road Indianapolis 317-923-1951 ext. 316 www.isind.org

Dr. Susan Karpicke, Director of Admissions 1750 W. 64th Street Indianapolis 317-202-2500

skarpicke@sycamoreschool.org Ages: 2 years 8 months - 8th grade. At Sycamore, teachers trained in gifted education deliver a curriculum designed to challenge and engage gifted learners. Art, music, Spanish, PE and computer technology are taught at all levels. Field trips, athletics, and a wide variety of after school activities are offered. Admission testing required. Scheduled parent tours most Wednesdays throughout the school year. Private tours may be arranged. $4,900-$13,155 (08-09). Financial assistance available. Please contact dridings@ sycamoreschool.org The Orchard School

Kristen Hein, Director of Admissions 615 W. 64th St. Indianapolis 317-713-5705 khein@orchard.org www.orchard.org Ages: Preschool 3/4 through Grade 8 The Orchard School, an independent, nonsectarian, progressive school, emphasized experiential learning. Orchard teachers engage the natural curiosity of children, develop academic excellence, and provide leadership experience through well-rounded education. Orchard’s diverse community and commitment to multicultural education inspires responsible, global citizenship. Founded in 1922. NAIS, ISACS, NAEYS accredited. Call to schedule a personal tour, and check our Web site for the date and time of our annual Open House. Applicants are selected without regard to their ability to pay tuition. Every effort is made to provide financial assistance where needed. Tuition is all-inclusive. Before/after care available.

Northeast

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childcare & education directory

local food every day and our programming is heavily integrated in arts of all mediums. Open House Dates: August 22nd

West The Children’s House

2404 W. 62nd St. (near Michigan Rd.), Indianapolis, IN 46268 Susan Catania or Mary Sexson 317-253-3033 childrenshouse08@gmail.com www.thechildrenshouseindianapolis.com Ages/Grades: 2 1/2 years - 14 years of age The Children’s House offers a Montessori preschool. The four areas of our preschool are practical life, sensorial, math and language.The Montessori preschool is available on a nine or twelve month calendar. The elementary level is an ungraded, continuousprogress school where children discover and pursue their unique talents and needs. Each child is provided with an individual learning experience based on the assumption that children are naturally inquisitive and want to learn. The Children’s House has helped shape the lives of hundreds of Indianapolis Children since its founding under a Lilly Endowment grant in 1971. Montessori School of Westfield, Inc.

800 E. Sycamore Street, Westfield Mary Lyman, Directress 317-867-0158 montessoriwestfield@gmail.com Ages/Grades: Toddler- 15 months to 3 years; Ages 3-Kindergarten; Elementary 1: Grade 1-3; Elementary 2: Grade 4-8 Located on 3 wooded acres in Central Indiana, the Montessori School of Westfield adheres to the academic traditions of Montessori while serving the present day child.

Indianapolis Jr. Academy

Crystal Willis 2910 E. 62nd. St. Indianapolis 317-251-0560 ijacademy@comcast.net www.ijacademy.com Ages: Preschool - 8th Grade Founded in 1963, Indianapolis Jr. Academy provides a well-rounded educational program with emphasis on spiritual, mental, physical, and social development. Our teachers are dedicated Christians who desire to prepare children academically and socially in an accepting environment where Christian principles are modeled and taught. Offering grades Pre-K-8th and 3’s Pre-School program M-Th 8:15-3, Fri 8:15-2:30 with before/after care. Admission is subject to review by School Board. We participate in the Educational CHOICE Charitable Trust Program, call for rates.

Northwest

Indianapolis Early Learning Center 3901 W 30th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46222 Amanda Byrd 317-329-6299 asbyrd@indyearlylearning.org www.indyearlylearning.org Ages/Grades: Ages 3-5 We are a nonprofit preschool opening in September 2009. We are Reggio inspired and offer scholarships to at least 70% of our students. We serve all natural,

Our Shepherd Lutheran Church

Nancy Hebel 9101 West 10th Street Indianapolis 317-271-9100 nhebel@ourshepherd.org Ages: 3 years-8th Grade Enrollment begins for the public in February. Call the school office to set up a time to visit or come to one of our open houses. Check out our view book on our Web site. Visiting Our Shepherd Lutheran School is the most important homework you can do for your child. Scholarships are available for those that qualify. Financial aid and extended care is available.

Westfield Primrose School at Bridgewater

14711 N. Gray Road, Noblesville, IN 46062 317-848-0123 mreed@primrosebridgewater.com www.primrosebridgewater.com Ages/Grades: Our programs are offered to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. The Primrose School at WestClay is dedicated to providing outstanding educational care to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. Our curriculum is NCA accredited and offers many extras such as Spanish, technology, sign language, character development, music appreciation, art appreciation, science, social studies, reading, English, and math. Please call today to learn how more than 90% of Primrose students out performed the national average. INDYSCHILD.COM 33


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arts & enrichment

Put Me in Coach

Getting Your Kid Into School Sports There is no debating the value exercise brings to a young person’s mind and body. Research shows that exercise helps kids manage their weight, battle depression, gain a sense of self worth and so much more. The issue today is more whether or not parents are taking heed and seeking ways to make sure their kids are engaging in physical activity.

Sports are the outdoor classroom of life.” He adds, “Beyond the many physical benefits that we are all aware of, the tentacles of sports reach far out and shape children’s lives in so many other critical areas, too. Sports help form children’s attitudes, mold their values and define their character. They teach the importance of teamwork, playing by the rules, handling winning with class and losing with dignity, good sportsmanship, putting your best effort forth every time, and learning to persevere in times of adversity, among others. Those are all characteristics we want our own children to develop and carry with them the rest of their lives. These are the qualities that we look for in people that we choose to be friends with or hire to work with us. And it all springs from sports.”

Fortunately, our schools make this quest easier by offering a range of activities via competitive school sports. In fact, competitive school sports do more for our kids than provide an outlet for physical fitness. Through team sports kids gain critical thinking skills, learn how to work as part of a team, build self-discipline and create an environment for social interaction.

If you and your child are discussing whether or not to join a sport this academic year, following are a few tips that may help guide you through the decision-making process:

Indianapolis Colts linebacker Gary Brackett agrees that sports are important for today’s youth. He believes sports in general are good for all kids because of the sense of teamwork that develops through practice and competition. He admits that in sports things don’t always go well, but believes that if kids persevere, then things will work out for the good both on and off the field. “You don’t win every game, but losses really shape your character.” He also says sports helped give him direction in school. “They gave me something to do outside of school work and almost forced me to get good grades because I wanted to be eligible to play sports.” Looks like parents should add motivation to the list of why school sports are a good idea. Fred Engh, founder and president of the National Alliance for Youth Sports and author of Why Johnny Hates Sports places sports in the proper perspective. “I’m a firm believer that sports are the greatest tool we have in today’s society to help children develop positive character traits and life values.

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Know if your child is ready to get in the game. As any parent can attest, all children grow, mature and acquire skills in their own time; as such, it’s important not to force a sport on a child before he’s developmentally ready. In the insightful sports-parent book Home Team Advantage, author Brooke de Lench reminds us that there is no magic starting age that will help children get a jump on their peers. She does recommend that before joining organized sports, parents should consider their child’s basic skills like running and balance, their child’s maturity level and attention span, and for parents the ability to handle the stress of watching their child’s participation that may involve getting injured. Pick the right sport for your child. Football and basketball are great sports, but they aren’t for every child. Sign up for a sport that is interesting to your kid and is a match for his size. Also, it’s particularly important for kids 12 and younger to have opportunity to experience a variety of sports. Their focus should be on developing skills, learning sports and various positions within the sport, and figuring out teamwork. If competition feels too much, then many young kids will get discouraged and drop out of the sport entirely.

Ask questions. Before your child commits to joining the school sport, parents should ask a few key questions in order to determine if it’s the right decision: What is the time commitment in terms of practices and games? How long is the season? Will all children get an opportunity to play? Is there a fee for playing on the team? Get to know the coach. Once you give your child the green light to sign up, it’s time for you to get to know the coach. Coaches spend an incredible amount of time with their athletes and can have signif icant impact and inf luence on your child. It’s critical to have an open line of communication with the coach. Attend any preseason meeting the coach holds and be an active participant. Learn how the coach best likes to communicate with parents and stay in touch with him or her throughout the season. Breakfast is for champions. As Brackett says, if a kid is involved in sports, it’s a good idea to have nutritional balance to their diets. It is shown that kids who eat a nutritious breakfast concentrate better and have more energy throughout the day. If you want to help your child have a positive athletic experience, then do all you can to see that he eats a healthy mix of foods including whole grains, protein, fruits and vegetables to help ensure healthy performance in and out of play. Play for the sake of sport, not the win. Each year only a few select kids are awarded scholarships for their chosen sport and even fewer will go pro. In other words, sports really are more about the game, participating and having fun than about wins and losses. Parents need to keep their own expectations for their kid’s success in check and avoid conveying the message that winning is everything. So what’s left? Just you talking with your child about which sport looks most fun this year. Game on! Carrie Bishop is a freelance writer and mother of two young sons, whose daily antics inspire her work and her life.

arts & enrichment directory

Arts & Sports JCC

6701 Hoover Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-251-9467 lbaier@JCCindy.org www.JCCindy.org

The JCC welcomes families and individuals of all faiths and backgrounds. More than three generations have grown up in the JCC’s early childhood education and camp programs. Thousands walk through the JCC’s doors each week to work out in the modern fitness center, participate in leagues and exercise classes, swim, enjoy family programs and so much more. The JCC – Good for life!

Choral Music

Indianapolis Children’s Choir

4600 Sunset Ave. Laura Neidig 317-940-9640 lneidig@icchoir.org www.icchoir.org

34 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

The Indianapolis Children’s Choir is now scheduling auditions for fall choirs! This is a very simple assessment of a child’s ability to match pitch - no preparation nor singing experience required! Join a choir that rehearses on the campus of Butler University or one of our ten regional choirs! Call the ICC or visit our website for more information.

Dance

Fox Hill Dance Academy, Inc.

2255 Fox Hill Drive, Indianapolis, In 46228 Betty Wright 317-251-3007 BJZWdance@att.net foxhilldanceacademy.com

Professional staff, friendly atmosphere,competitive prices,parents can observe all classes from the closed circuit Thirty percent reduction in rates for adult students who join our performing tap company. Students ages 6-14 may audition for scholarships.

Music and Instrument Performance IUPUI Music Academy

535 W. Michigan Street, IT 378

Bill/Tina Budai/Everts 317-278-4139 musacad@iupui.edu www.musicacademy.iupui.edu The IUPUI Music Academy is a non-profit, educational organization whose mission, purpose, and primary activity pertain to arts education. The Academy is committed to providing high quality, professional music instruction to area residents of all ages and levels of ability. Meridian Music

12725 Old Meridian Street Hillary Blake, Director of Education 317-575-9588 hblake@meridianmusic.com www.meridianmusic.com

Meridian Music offers private lessons on almost every intrument. Harmony Road courses are also offered for children between the ages of 18 months and 6 years. add your listing here! Contact Rachel at Rachel@indyschild.com


Fall Registration is Now Open! Expand your child’s imagination and excourage lifelong positive values

Before & After-School Care at more than 100 locations, serving 138 schools in 23 school districts

Football, Soccer, Basketball, Baseball & More!

The YMCA of Greater Indianapolis 317-266-9622 www.indymca.org

Back to school and back to

FALL FUN at the JCC!

Check out our great fall programs: Dance Tennis Soccer Kindermusik

Swimming Gymnastics Karate And more!

With classes for parents & infants all the way to age 18, we’re positive your child will find an activity to love at JCC!

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How does my child join the Indianapolis Children’s Choir?

7/9/2009 5:20:25 PM

Call the ICC office at 317-940-9640 to schedule an audition Open to kids grades 4 – 8 No musical experience required! Only the ability to match pitch

www.icchoir.org

INDYSCHILD.COM 35


CREATE MAGIC

Theatre Workshops for Youth starting in September Preschool – 9th Grade • Acting – Musical Theatre – Storytelling • Saturdays – Weekdays – After School • Adult classes also available

INDIANAPOLIS CIVIC THEATRE 3200 Cold Spring Road On the campus of Marian College www.civictheatre.org

Classes at Indianapolis Civic Theatre 317-924-6770 x217 or www.jrcivic.org

HDSMuseum@comcast.net HOOKSMUSEUM.ORG/ 36 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009


What Your Teen Doesn’t Tell You The Shocking (and Expected) Truth

In the 1998 movie “Pleasantville,” contemporary teenage twins magically become characters in the fictitious “Leave it to Beaver”-esque show Pleasantville. Once there, they discover that those who deviate from the G-rated plot line change from black-and-white to color.Without communicating, their secrets are broadcast to everyone, vibrantly.

Those with older children – tweens and teens specifically – might find themselves wishing for a similar visual clue to shed light on their children’s daily lives. Increased independence and closer relationships with friends impact communication with parents, leaving them guessing about what’s really going on. There’s no magic formula for knowing the intricacies of our tweens’ and teens’ lives. Generally, this group communicates very little with parents – not surprising if parents look back on their own teen years. Understanding the why of this reality and the how to improve it is the first step parents can take in connecting with their adolescents and building a more trusting, communicative relationship.

“Nothing” If you ask a teenager what happened at school that day – barring the building burning down – you’ll probably get the standard answer: “Nothing.” Nine times out of ten, that’s probably not true. Tweens and teens are bombarded on a daily basis with all manner of information, running the gamut from the latest fashion trends to who’s going to the big party on Saturday night, and everything in between and beyond. Discussing these topics with parents isn’t standard practice for most teens.

Lots of teens feel like they’re on the defensive. One 19-year old said that was a problem at first, until she started to come clean with her parents. “That happened to me more in the beginning of high school because they knew I was lying,” she said. “I was on the defensive because they knew that I was wrong.”

“I don’t really tell my parents anything,” said a 14-year old high school freshman. He went on to explain that “gossip” is a big part of what’s left out of daily communication — but in an age of texting and cell phones, the rumor mill is likely the fastest thing going.

Finding someone besides parents to confide in can be challenging. “I wouldn’t feel comfortable coming to them [my parents] if I was in a bad situation. I don’t think I could talk to anyone,” said the freshman. “It would be weird to talk about that stuff with my parents. It would change the way they look at you.”

Much of what he leaves out he just “couldn’t imagine telling my parents.” He said, “my parents seem really suspicious, they don’t let me do a lot of things that others kids do. I feel like I’m being judged before I’ve done anything wrong.”

Teens often look to older siblings for support if they don’t feel comfortable talking to parents. “I tell my older sister everything,” said one 13-year old. “She’s been through it and she understands better than they would.” (Continued on next page)

Others find communication a necessity – a parent-mandated necessity. “My dad expects us to tell him what’s going on,” said one 14-year old. “I know sometimes if I do something wrong, he’ll be less angry if I’m honest with him about it, than if I try to hide it.”

INDYSCHILD.COM 37


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mentally ready for, such as intimate relationships and sex, as well as drugs and alcohol.

But, why? Anyone who has taken a Psych 101 class has learned something about the teen psyche. As parents, however, it’s not easy to understand how this norm applies to the moody, detached person who was once the apple of your eye.

No one answer for parents Parents have been raising teenagers since the dawn of humanity, so there must be some things we’ve learned along the way. One is clear: don’t stop trying to communicate.

“The main reason teens don’t communicate is because they’re trying to distance themselves from their parents in their search for their own identity,” said Shaena Gardner, PhD, a clinical psychologist in Indianapolis. “They don’t want to be their parents, they want to be something else. Who do they want to be? They don’t know, so they go out and experiment through trial and error.”

Beth, mother of two teenage boys in Fishers, said, “What I’ve learned is that based on their previous reaction, the next time you have to go into the conversation in a different way. That way they’re not feeling like they’re being jumped on or threatened if you approach it from a different angle. So you’re still getting the information that you want, but without them shutting down.”

This desire to establish an identity independent of their families leads to the creation of a new “family,” namely, their friends. In striving to gain acceptance to this family, teens can compromise their ethics and allow themselves to be pressured into activities they think are wrong.

Gardner suggests communicating with your teenager when they’re focused on other things, like riding in the car or shopping. “You’re more likely to get an answer than if you’re sitting across the kitchen table from them demanding an answer,” she said. Be sure to ask open-ended questions – that way you won’t get stuck with one-word answers.

As teens experiment, they “try different peer groups, clothing, musical styles, to see where they fit,” Gardner said. “They don’t want any parental input because they’re trying to distance themselves from them. How parents can get involved and help is being tolerant, understanding and open.”

Another piece of advice is to maintain their respect by sticking to your guns and following through.

An additional stressor stems from physical versus psychological maturity. Teens, especially older teens, are physically adults. Psychologically, not so much.

“I’ve found that there are a lot of kids where the parents remove a privilege and then it’s too difficult to follow through with it and monitor it,” said Tyler, a father of two teens in Carmel. “They tend to lose a little bit of respect for the parent.”

“They’re not emotionally capable of handling everything themselves,” Gardner said. “I think in our society the body is maturing even sooner, but the psyche is taking longer.” This can lead kids into activities they may be physically, but not

Other recommendations include communicating with other parents, keeping the kids involved in activities and sports, being aware of trends in fashion, music, texting and more, and, of course, constant vigilance.

Ideas from the experts The experts in this case are teens. Several talked about the best ways their parents communicated with them and how they felt most comfortable sharing their thoughts. One teen said that sometimes it’s hard to tell parents about bad grades. “When you’re not doing as well as you want to do, you don’t want your parents nagging more because you’re already nagging at yourself,” she said. When I was honest, “I found it easier to talk to them, because they would give me various tips and advice and it actually did help. As much as I didn’t want to believe they were right – they were. I think that’s the hardest part — admitting that your parents are right.” “A lot of kids get involved in stuff they shouldn’t because they’re bored,” said a 16-year old. “Drinking, drugs, sex – it’s because they have nothing else to do. That’s why I keep busy, so I don’t have time to think about that stuff.” Parents and psychologists also agree that keeping your teen involved will diminish their chances of getting involved in nefarious activities. “A bored kid is a kid waiting to find trouble,” Gardner said. “If a kid has extra time, they’re going to fill it with things that you probably don’t want them to do.” The best advice comes from a teenager who learned openness and honesty generally leads to trust and freedom, explained it this way: “I would say freshman and sophomore years I was more reserved, just for the fact that I still wanted to have that Daddy’s little girl kind of image to them,” she said. “Then I realized it was easier to tell them everything, the truth, if they asked questions about it. The more I told them, the more they trusted me, the more freedom I had.” Holly Wheeler is a wife and mother of two daughters, ages 6 and 3. When not mothering or running, she’s writing freelance articles for publications near and far from her home in Fishers, Indiana.

SometimeS, a parent’S perSpective

is the best medicine. It takes a world-class physician to determine how to best treat a child. Occasionally, it also takes a parent’s intuition. At Riverview Hospital, we offer both. Our team of physicians and nurse practitioners are board certified and highly experienced. They also have the nurturing instinct that comes from parenting. Above all, they are deeply committed to the wellbeing of your child. To find convenient, world-class care for your child, call Riverview Medical Group at (317) 565-0000 or visit riverviewmedicalgroup.org.

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pediatric health

Health and Safety at the Indiana State Fair Tips on Staying Safe This Fall children and families. And don’t forget the Clarian Healthy Lifestyles Pavilion where kids of all ages can benefit from a wide range of health screenings, interactive information and education displays on health, safety and fitness. But what’s most important is your preparation before going to the fair. Help ensure your family’s experience is fun, healthy and safe by considering these tips as you plan your family outing.

There’s no better end of summer celebration than the Indiana State Fair – the last chance before school begins to enjoy the sounds, sights, smells, tastes and activities only to be found at the fairgrounds.

Once again, Clarian Health will be a familiar presence. Be sure to visit the Riley Fun Park for special activities and displays for

Be realistic. Everyone goes to the fair for all kinds of “forbidden” foods and hours of fun, so recognize your limitations and the inevitable choices there for the taking. But also recognize there are things you and your family can do to stay in control, such as taking frequent breaks, eating a balanced and filling meal before you leave and getting a good night’s sleep the night before. Drink Water. Be sure to drink plenty of water before and during your visit. You can also take a cooler with you so water is readily available to prevent dehydration. Water can also help cut back on overeating.

Choose Wisely. With all of the food options available, choose your foods wisely. Foods such as grilled meats; corn on the cob and popcorn (with light or no butter); a cup of ice cream; and peanuts still allow you to enjoy the best of what the fair has to offer. Dress Appropriately. Don’t forget to dress for summer fitness and safety. Make sure everyone is wearing a hat, has generously applied sunscreen and is wearing comfortable walking shoes. For a nominal fee, power and manual wheelchairs are available for those in need of mobility assistance. Practice Safety. Do your children have identification should they become separated? Contact the new and expanded Riley Safety Store at Riley Hospital for Children, 317-274-6565, for information about safety products, including child locator devices and child ID products. Remind your children about good and bad strangers bad strangers do not always look scary. For assistance, Indiana State Police officers are accessible throughout the fairgrounds. Going to the Indiana State Fair should be fun, so please remember these tips to keep your family and friends healthy and safe.

K aren B runer Stroup, PhD, Director, Riley Community Education and Child Advocacy.

R E SOU RC E S

Do your child’s toys

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shopping corner

409 Massachusetts Ave Indianapolis, IN 46204 Open Mon-Sat 10-9 Sun 10-6 317.955.8697 (Toys) toll free (866) 784-8697 (toys)

www.MassAveToys.com Your Money Buys MORE at JBF! Be a part of the Nation’s Leading Children’s & Maternity Consignment Sales Event!™ SHOP and get fabulous deals on clothes, toys & more! SELL your items as a consignor and earn 70%! Sign up online! VOLUNTEER and shop the best deals first! Details online!

HAMILTON COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

SEPTEMBER 24TH-26TH Thursday & Friday, 9am-7pm Saturday, 9am-2pm! Half Price Sale!

shop.sell.save.smart!™

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Check website for details or call 317.379.9343 FREE ADMISSION WITH THIS AD! INDYSCHILD.COM 39


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pediatric health

Taking Down Childhood Obesity

St.Vincent Offers Education to Parents & Children on Risks and Obesity Prevention As kids get ready for the start of school, one of Indiana’s most famous athletes is determined to help kids kick off the school year with positive and healthy habits that will help them all year long.

For example, a class studying positive physical activities will learn about proper stretching and strengthening, how to avoid injury and good respiratory care.

with kids and get physically active as a family. Children can also sign up for the Project 18 MVP Club and receive daily e-mail messages and tips for living a healthy lifestyle.

During the holistic lessons, students will discuss the importance of sleeping, dealing with feelings and how to resolve conflicts, among other issues. They may role play, keep a dream journal or develop a new bedtime routine/ checklist to help them sleep easier.

If you want to help bring Project 18 to your child’s school, visit project18.stvincent.org or call 317-338KIDS (5437). The free program is available to all schools throughout the state.

Childhood obesity on the rise

Indianapolis Colts Quarterback Peyton Manning is reaching out to kids through Project 18, a community- and school-based program. While the program is available to anyone in the community, Project 18’s main playing field is schools across the state.

“Project 18 provides a comprehensive curriculum to help students get a play-by-play of how they can adopt healthier habits,” shares Karen Terrell, school wellness coordinator at Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent

Project 18 strives to help students maintain a healthy weight and develop good eating and exercise habits. Offered through the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent, the program will educate Indiana children and their parents about the risks obesity poses—and the defense plan they can use to break or avoid poor habits and replace them with good habits that will ensure a healthier lifestyle.

Being launched with the 2009-10 school year, the program is quickly becoming a top pick for schools—particularly given its championship prize: a school visit from Peyton Manning. Using both pre- and post-surveys, schools will measure improvements in knowledge and healthy habits. Terrell says some schools have even decided to measure Body Mass Index to help students assess their appropriate weight for their height. Toward the end of the school year, the school with the greatest improvement in health and wellness will receive a visit from Manning!

Using an 18-week curriculum – which adheres to fourthgrade Indiana health and science standards – Project 18 provides lesson plans and interactive activities in the areas of physical activity, nutrition and holistic (spiritual, emotional and mental) health.

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In addition to the classroom resources, teachers, students and parents can find helpful tools on the Project 18 website, including video games (blasting high-calorie bad guys!), videos on goal setting, recipes and tips on how to connect

Weight gain in children isn’t a bad thing. To a degree, it’s healthy and normal. But when it surpasses what’s necessary to support children’s bodies as they grow and develop, it can become a serious health problem. And Indiana children are particularly at risk: One in three Hoosier children is now overweight. Indiana was ranked the 11th most obese state in the nation. Lives are busier today and healthy meals and exercise seem to get overlooked. Plus, more sedentary activities, such as being on the computer, watching TV and playing video games, are challenging obstacles to overcome. Yet, overweight children are at a higher risk for several serious health problems – high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes, asthma, liver disease, sleep disorders and early puberty – both in the immediate future and later in life. And just as serious are the emotional and social issues brought on by obesity. Join Peyton Manning and Project 18, and help tackle childhood obesity!

profile: girl’s hockey

Girl, Play Hockey!

Heart Indianapolis Offers Hockey for Girls The sport of ice hockey has been around since 1875 when the first organized hockey game was played in Montreal. For many years, sisters played with brothers and friends on the ponds and lakes around the country. The first women’s game occurred in 1890 when the long skirts the players wore made goal-tending a breeze! Ice hockey is one of the fastest growing women’s sports in the world with the number of participants increasing 400 percent in the last 10 years. While there are not as many organized leagues for women as there are for men, leagues of all levels exist, including the National Women’s Hockey League, Western Women’s Hockey League and various European leagues, university teams, national and Olympic recreational teams.

Just this year, USA Hockey has declared a Tier Two level for Girls Nationals. Therefore, we now will have a total of 24 40 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

teams vying for the title of National Championships: 12 at the Tier One and 12 at the Tier Two level. Indianapolis has always enjoyed hockey, but the history of hockey for girls in Indianapolis has been somewhat sporadic. A group of interested girls and their families usually help to create a team which would last until the girls thought they were too old to play or moved on. Each rink had a few girls playing on the house teams and some of the girls eventually played on the boy’s high school teams. Katie McNamara was one of those girls. She started playing hockey at just five years old. She started playing with a boy’s team, then the first girl’s team in Indiana, the Indy Stars, was formed. Katie played with them until she was a sophomore when she joined the HSE High School team and played with them until her senior year of high school. Looking for a nationally ranked girls team, she moved to Cleveland, Ohio and finished high school while living with a host family and playing with the Ohio Flames. The team finished fifth in the nation. Katie says, “I love playing hockey more than anything. I have put so much time and work into the game, but it has definitely been worth it.”

Many girls who play ice hockey started because of an older brother who plays. We want girls and their families to consider ice hockey—even if you don’t know anyone that plays. It is wonderful exercise and builds self esteem in a way few sports can. Are you thinking about college and scholarships? Many programs are out there that you might not know about and many colleges need players for their teams. If colleges eventually include hockey, over 90% of girls who want to play in college can. Even better—hockey is one of the best sports to be in when scholarship money comes around because there are more teams than girls willing to play. Are you not a skater yet? No worries! Come give hockey a try. With all of the equipment on, it is much easier (and fun) to fall on the ice. Many local rinks have Learn to Play Hockey programs and a few organizations have specific programs for girls. For more information on where to get your girls and boys involved in hockey visit: www.eteamz.com/FishersYouthHockey/news/index. cfm?cat=324447 or www.eteamz.com/indianapolisyouthhockey/index.cfm Beg inner player or seasoned veteran—g irls hockey wants you ! For other questions contact Theresa at ptkirchgraber@ aol.com


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special needs awareness

Navigating Special Education Services for Your Child Understanding Hurdles to Get the Education Your Child Deserves

I could see the pride all over my sister’s face. Together, we celebrated the high school graduation of my nephew, Stephen. After he walked across the stage, shook hands with his principal and received his diploma, my sister looked at me and mouthed the words, “Thank you.”

Over the years, I’ve drawn on my professional experience to advise my sister to be a strong advocate for her special needs son. It wasn’t long before I saw that, even with my specif ic direction, navigating the resources available at Stephen’s school could be a huge challenge. Knowing that such hurdles are common to parents with special needs children, I want to offer a few tips to help other moms and dads make the most of school-based resources.

Follow up with your child After the meeting, talk with your child about the good things discussed, the problems to be worked on and next steps. Continue the conversation Keep working with your child’s teacher and, when necessary, ask for a follow-up meeting or phone conference. Consider all possibilities If you, the teacher and the principal are not able to f ind a solution that helps your child’s school performance, then your child might have a disability that affects his or her learning.

Whether attending a public or private school, children who have special learning needs might qualify for specialized services based on a number of special education categories – often referred to as “qualifying conditions” – that include:

Take charge During the meeting, discuss your list, take notes and ask for samples of your child’s work, examples of classroom behavior and ways you can help your child at home. If you do not understand something, ask for an explanation.

Initial Referral for Special Education Services, typically made in writing by a parent, teacher or doctor to the child’s teacher or principal. The school must respond in writing within 15 calendar days.

Evaluation Process, the school’s 2. Individual evaluation of the student’s abilities and needs. Must start within 60 days of the referral. of Special Education Services 3. Determination Eligibility. A Case Conference Committee

• Emotionally Handicapped (EH) • Communication Disorder (CD)

Assess what’s available Many schools offer supports for students within regular education (such as psychological services, speech and language services and curriculum and instruction modif ications) in addition to special education programs.

List your concerns Prepare for a meeting by putting together basic information about your child and listing your questions, concerns and ideas. Ask your child for input as well.

1.

• Learning Disabled (LD)

Start now If your child has a disability or you suspect a child might have learning challenges, contact your child’s teacher immediately to discuss your concerns.

Schedule a meeting Meetings and phone conferences can help you build a partnership with the teacher and school.

Steps to determine special education eligibility:

(including a parent and the child’s teacher) decides if the student is eligible for special services.

• Mildly Mentally Handicapped (MiMH) • Autism • Other Health Impaired (OHI).

There is also a category referred to as “504” – a specif ic section of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act referring to children with special learning challenges not qualif ied in other categories, such as Attention Def icit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). No one knows more about your child than you. That’s why you must work with the staff of your child’s school to set and pursue shared goals. By collaborating and advocating, you can help your child be successful in school and, one day, take that walk that made Stephen’s mother and me so proud.

Seek solutions In the meeting, tr y to arrive at a mutually agreeable plan.

Dr. Jim Dalton, Psy.D., HSPP, is a licensed child psychologist, and the Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at Damar Services, Inc. Visit Damar online at www.damar.org

Education Plan (IEP), setting 4. Individualized specific goals for the student and listing services needed to meet those goals. Must be delivered by the school district within 30 days after the determination of eligibility. Case Conference Committee develops the IEP and a copy is provided to the parent. Must be approved by the parent and Case Conference Committee. Review/Reevaluation. The IEP is 5. Annual reviewed annually and modified as needed.

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growing up online

The Three E’s of Technology Raising Kids who are E-Literate

When kids go back to school, they will certainly spend time learning the three Rs, but what about the three Es? For all their proficiency at texting, gaming and social networking, many young people skim the surface of technology and are unable to extract, evaluate and express new information. These three skills are crucial in an age of TMI (too much information). The facts your children learn this year are likely to be obsolete before they finish school. The ability to access, critique and share information will be valuable for the rest of their lives. The advantages to being E-literate are huge. People who have these skills can laser in on the information they need to make good decisions about everything from movie reviews to medical treatment, college courses to vacation destinations. They are also less likely to be taken in by the foolish or fraudulent information that is so prevalent online. Equally important, young people who have these skills are more employable-over half the jobs in the US are now classified as “knowledge workers,” people who get paid to access, apply and generate information. Teachers and librarians in many school districts are working hard to identify and teach these skills in part because a test of tech literacy will be part of the National Educational Assessment starting in 2012. Naturally, there’s debate about what such a test should cover. Most educators agree, however, that it has to go beyond technical details (how to use a search engine or fill in a spread sheet) to cover critical thinking (which search results are credible and why would you use a spread sheet in the first place)? Several private organizations already have suggestions about how to evaluate tech literacy. I-Skills, a test offered by the Educational Testing Service, is being used by universities and employers to evaluate how quickly students can identify relevant and accurate information. A typical question asks students to use a search engine to identity treatment options for a family member who has been diagnosed with a serious illness. Parents who are curious about what younger children should be learning at different ages can find useful guidelines from the Society for Technology in Education (tinyurl. com/2jga2m) and Learning.com (www.learning.com/tla/modules.htm) Although ideas about tech literacy differ in the details, they all boil down to three E’s that students should learn at school and at home.

Extract. The first step to finding information is figuring out what you want to know. Encourage your child to ask questions about interests ranging from what pet turtles eat to what are the rules for new drivers in your state. Once you’ve clarified the question, help your child think about the best way to track down the answer. Talk about the advantages and disadvantages of various sources such as books, newspapers, and websites. Compare results from search engines including Google, Yahoo and Bing. Talk about 42 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

the differences between reference works that are written by experts (Encarta.com) and those that are produced by collaboration among strangers (Wikipedia.com) Ask your child’s teacher or the local librarian to identify portals that will simplify the search for information in specific subject areas. (Or visit ala.org/greatsites.)

Evaluate. Critical thinking is the single most important skill a young person can have in the age of information overload. Talk to your child about point of view and how it affects the reliability of information. How can you find out who produced information, especially on websites? What are their credentials? Some authors such as reporters, researchers or teachers are trying to make an unbiased presentation of facts. Others have an agenda. Help your child figure out what it is. Do they want money, a vote, cooperation, and respect? Teach your child to be skeptical, not cynical. In a free society, people can say whatever they want. It’s up to your child to evaluate information by asking hard questions: What’s the evidence? Does this make sense? What’s the other side of the story? Express. Writing a report, making a PowerPoint presentation or taking a test may still be a valid way of determining whether a student has mastered new information, but it’s only the beginning. A recent survey from Speak Up found that many young people now say they have to “power down” when they go to school. Teachers and parents should unleash that power by encouraging students to express what they have learned through social networking groups, photo sharing, spreadsheets, video blogs, CAD projects, interactive games and virtual worlds. Students don’t need anyone to teach them this technology but they do need adults to help them deepen their thinking. Encourage your child to consider the pros and cons of various forms of expression. Who is the audience? What is the message? Will collaboration make the project better? How can you be sure everyone gets credit for his or her ideas? The three E’s should, of course, be embodied in every school’s curriculum, and parents will want to encourage both teachers and school boards to make these skills a priority. Still, considering how critical information management will be in the 21st century, parents will also want to take every opportunity to help their kids extract, evaluate and express at home. Carolyn Jabs, M.A., has been writing about families and the Internet

for over fifteen years. She is the mother of three computer-savvy kids. Other Growing Up Online columns appear on her website www.growingup-online.com


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dear teacher

Your Back-to-School Questions Answered

Grades, Reading Problems and the Effects of No Child Left Behind

The Secrets of Getting Good Grades Parents: Don’t believe for a minute that your children have to be geniuses to get mostly A’s and B’s. This is an absolute myth. What most need is a willingness to work hard, persistence in completing difficult tasks, self-discipline, a sense of responsibility, and a focus on doing their best. As parents, you are the mentors who can instill in them these habits that lead to success in school. You are also the ones whose involvement in their education is essential. It has been shown repeatedly that what families do to help their children learn is more important to their success in school than family income or education. To be involved, you will need to… Know what your children are doing at school. Talk with them each day about school. Look at all the work they bring home whether they are in kindergarten or high school. Expect your children to do homework or schoolrelated work every day for approximately 10 minutes for each year in school – starting in first grade. Show interest in your children’s education by attending as many school functions as you can. Handle academic difficulties and behavior problems when they first appear to resolve them quickly. Praise your children’s efforts so they know you are proud of the work they are doing in school. Help your children get organized so they arrive at school on time and ready to learn.

Child Afraid of Hard Work in Kindergarten Question: My son will soon be starting kindergarten. He believes that school will be a hard trial because he saw his sister doing so much homework this year in fourth grade. We’ve said it will be fun. What more can we do? – Wondering

early help can be secured for them. The National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) has developed this list of things for parents to watch out for when they are observing their preschoolers:

Answer: Your son is confusing what children are expected to do in kindergarten with what he saw his sister doing in fourth grade. Do you know any children who have just completed kindergarten or a kindergarten teacher who could describe the good experiences he will be having in kindergarten? If so, have him talk to them. This will give him a positive view of kindergarten. Also, if he could visit the kindergarten room, he would see all the fun things in the room. Plus, you should read to him books that describe what children do in kindergarten.

• Often unable to find the right word and speaks in very short sentences.

Early Signs of Future Reading Problems Question: My two children are both preschoolers. I am constantly talking to them and reading them lots of books. Still I’m worried about their being ready to read when they get to school. Are there signs that indicate the possibility of future reading problems? – Avid Reader

• Fine motor skills slow to develop. Has difficulty holding crayon or pencil, picking up small objects with fingers, copying basic shapes.

Answer: Over time, most children are likely to become good readers. Nevertheless, it’s helpful for parents of young children to know the signs that their preschoolers could be potential candidates for reading difficulties so

• Very small vocabulary and/or slow vocabulary growth.

• Even with age-appropriate instruction, struggles with remembering sequences such as numbers, alphabet, days of the week. • Difficulty pronouncing simple words. • Difficulty understanding simple directions and following routines. • Difficulty learning colors and shapes. • Extremely restless and easily distracted, compared to peers.

• Strong avoidance of certain activities, like storytelling and circle time.

Besides things to look for there are things that you can do according to NCLD that will encourage your child to develop into a good reader. You should: Read to your children every day. • Point out words and letters that you find in your daily routines, while shopping or traveling through the neighborhood.

• Go to the library and read books together.

For more information about your child’s early reading skills, visit NCLD’s “Get Ready to read website (www.getreadytoread. org) or www.dearteacher.com and search for “reading” under “Preschool.”

Effects of No Child Left Behind on Families Parents: If your young children are just starting school or are between the ages of 6 and 12, you need to be aware of how No Child Left Behind legislation is affecting them. First of all, children are now doing substantially more studying and reading – especially younger children. And you can expect to provide more homework help as children are being assigned more homework in reading and math to improve test scores. If your children are young, you can now expect to spend from 10-15 minutes several nights a week giving them additional practice in reading. Ideally, their teachers will give you some training so you can help them accomplish their objectives. To make this homework time more effective, give your children’s teachers feedback occasionally on the effectiveness of specific assignments. Parents should send questions to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ Web site at www.dearteacher.com.

• Sing songs and share nursery rhymes. INDYSCHILD.COM 43


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family fun in indy

Action-Packed August

Heart Pounding Music, Street Theatre, Games and Stunt Bikes Galore

Tired of hearing that irritating six letter word—“BORING?” Well, here’s a blast of energy that won’t just seep into your child’s consciousness—it will grab her by the shoulders and take her on a wild musical journey f illed with f lying props, brilliantly colored f lags and costumes f lowing elegantly across the f ield and music that is sure to get her heart pounding.

More than 40 drum and bugle corps will compete in Drum Corps International’s World Championships August 5-8 in Indianapolis at the Indiana Convention Center & Lucas Oil Stadium. Musicians (14-22 years old) play their brass and percussion instruments to elaborate choreographed routines. The music they play varies (pop, rock, jazz, swing, classical music, show tunes and symphonic). So there really is a little of something for everyone. If you’re not sure whether or not your youngster will really be moved, take a drive by White River State Park that week, where you can watch the competitors practice for free and witness the engaged look on your former zombie’s face. There’s an added value for those who attend one of the Drum Corps International (DCI) competitions. Several of the White River State Park attractions will offer admission at a 20% -25% discount to DCI fans. All you have to do is show your credential or Super Fan Pass. There will also be interactive exhibit booths and food vendors. For more information visit www.dci.org. Speaking of hitting the streets, you may want to check out Fringefest on Massachusetts Avenue in downtown Indy. This 10-day festival features theatre groups from all over the world. Think Off-Broadway mixed with dance, cabaret and comedy all available August 2130. The event features more than 300 shows with free “street theatre” to delight the entire family. Visitors are encouraged to buy a $3 festival badge onsite good for all 10 days, then pay $10 cash per person per show at the door, 30 minutes before any show. Student prices are $7 and children $5. The festival centers on six stages at five venues (The IndyFringe Building, Theatre on the Square, ComedySportz Indianapolis, The Phoenix Theatre and the Earth House. But the fun also spills out onto Massachusetts Avenue with a free outdoor stage, street buskers (performers doing everything from reading poetry to juggling, acrobatics and more), along with visual art exhibitions. Check out www.indyfringe.org for more information. 44 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

If your youngster wants to take center stage in the action, you may want to take him to experience Gen Con: The Best Four Days in Gaming at the Indiana Convention Center & Lucas Oil Stadium August 13-16. It is the largest consumer fantasy, sci-fi and adventure game convention in North America and features everything from card games and board games to live-action role-playing games, and miniature games. It’s a great place to people watch as visitors of all ages dress up as their favorite characters and get a chance to play in more than 6,000 gaming events. While there, you’ll want to explore the Family Fun Pavilion, which is dedicated to family and broad market games and will include exhibits, demos, face-painting and much more. There will be special admission pricing on Sunday, August 16th just for families in which a family of four can enjoy Gen Con for $28. Keep in mind, there will be kids-only events all four days including the Best Dressed Little Monsters on Parade, Tigers in the Snow, Pied Rats of the Care Bean and Screamin’ Eagles in the Snow. In addition to costume contests for all ages, there will be a life-size 10,000 square foot True Dungeon, an auction, along with an E-game arena that will display new releases and popular titles along with console and PC tournaments. Visit www.gencon.com for more details. If you’re looking for two-wheel excitement, there will be plenty of opportunities with the RedBull Indianapolis GP taking place at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway the last weekend of August. Teens who are into X-game type adventure should love this. See www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com for more. Motorcycles on Meridian will also be going on that weekend. Starting around 7 a.m. August 28 & 29, you can dream about the bike you’d like to have or show off what you’ve got. The XDL Stunt Show (motorcycle stunts) will happen on North Street about the same time near the American Legion Mall. There, you’ll see wheelies, stoppies, burnouts and other acrobatics. This year, it will feature a “meet & greet” so fans can meet the athletes, take pictures, and collect autographs. And, here’s a bonus for you: kids 12 and under are always free at XDL (accompanied by a paying adult). There is also a two-for-one military discount through the Military Ticket Program for $15. A young military family with two kids 12 and under can see the show for $15 total. Visit www.xdlshow.com for more details. All that activity is sure to help you work up a healthy appetite. Cash in on the discounts with a special date

night anytime between August 10-23 during Devour Downtown. It offers major discounts at high-end restaurants throughout downtown Indianapolis. For just $30 per person, you experience a delicious three-course meal at a fine dining restaurant, or take advantage of the casual dining restaurants offering two for $30. See www. devourdowntown.org for a list of participating restaurants. Or try something new in a class called Sushi for Sissies. Naked Tchopstix (Broad Ripple or at the 96th Street location) offers the class for groups of ten or more in which attendees learn about sushi (health benefits, how to make at home, history, how to eat and what goes with it). After all, it’s great finger food and what child doesn’t like using chopsticks or skipping the utensils altogether? You need to pre-register and there’s a fee of $12 per person (groups of ten or more are preferred). The fee includes tastings of 10 different pieces. Call ahead for reservations at 317-252-5555. Another food learning opportunity is available at Traders Point Creamery in Zionsville. It’s the state’s only organic dairy farm with an area in which the family can watch the cows being milked, watch the bottling and then have a delicious homemade ice cream or creamy yogurt in the Dairy Bar upstairs in the loft. These family friendly tours are available everyday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stroll the grounds and enjoy the beauty of a farm. Visit the calves and chickens, walk out to the pasture to see the herd, visit the milking parlor, and watch production while looking through the Creamery window. Sign up in the farm store and receive a map and information to facilitate your tour. If you go Friday night, you can watch the milking at 5 pm., visit the Green Market and even have dinner on the deck! Find out more about the tours that range from $2-10 at www.tpforganics.com. So, no more “BORING”. You can party ‘til the cows come home or get the kids so worn out that they’re hitting the pillow early after a day full of excitement. KIMBERLY HARMS has four children (ages 4-23) and is the associate director of media relations at the Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association. You can find all of these events and more at www.VisitIndy.com


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AUGUST 2009 Saturday, August 01 7th ANNUAL BACK 2 SCHOOL CAREER EXPO As part of the Back 2 School Christian Classic Weekend, Kingsley Terrace Church of Christ’s Community Service Ministry will host its 7th Annual BACK TO SCHOOL CAREER EXPO, Saturday, Aug 1st from 10am to 12 Noon. Registration begins at 9:00am SHARP!! It’s FREE and open to EVERYONE!! We will be giving away a limited number (while they last) of FREE book bags with school supplies to young people ages 10 years and older only. There will also be professionals discussing various career options and starting a small business. Door prizes will also be available. Please contact Diona Tharpe or Hope Gamble at the church office 317-924-9055 . 9:00am 12 Noon. FREE. Kingsley Terrace Church of Christ. 2031 East 30th Street, Indianapolis. ktcoc.com. 317924-9055. Madagascar 2 Dusk or around 9:15 p.m. Free. Holliday Park. 6363 Spring Mill Rd., Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 317-327-7180 CommUnITY Fair Marion County Superior Court, Jevenile Detention Center and Child Advocates hosts this free backpack giveaway, raffle, live entertainment, free food, games, and climbing wall. Booths will be manned by local community family-serving agencies. 11:30 a.m. - 4

Dave Matthews Band

Tonos Trio Tri-Ad 2 - 5. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516.

7 p.m. Varies. Verizon Wireless Music Center. 12880 E. 146th St., Noblesville. www.verizonwirelessmusiccenter. com. 317-776-8181.

Classical Mystery Tour: A Tribute to the Beatles

p.m. FREE. Juvenile Detention Center. 2451 N. Keystone Ave., Indianapolis. www.childadvocates.net.

Holliday Park Movie in the Park Bring some popcorn and candy and join us for an outdoor viewing of Madagascar 2. Movie will begin at dusk. Dusk. Free. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark. org. 3173277180. Movie Double Feature Come see Escape to Witch Mountain(97min) and Return from Witch Moutain(94min), both rated G. 2:00pm. Beech Grove Public Library. 1102 Main Street, Beech Grove. 3177884203. Selections from the Musical “Wicked” Six local teens will perform selections from the new Broadway Musical Wicked! They will be singing, acting and dancing to the extraordinary music and lyrics written by Stephen Schwartz. Some of the selections that they will be performing include: Dancing Through Life, Popular, Defying Gravity, Wonderful, For Good, and More! A musically comedic night of entertainment! 3p.m. - 5 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib. in.us. 317-579-0304.

Back to the Prairie by popular demand! These blokes broke attendance records with last summer’s performance at Conner Prairie. Hear your favorite Beatles’ songs performed exactly as they were written by musicians who look, sound and play like John, Paul, George and Ringo. “An incredible simulation,” raves the Los Angeles Times. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

Taylor, Ben Tebbe and Diane Timmerman. Much Ado About Nothing is directed by Nathan Garrison. Get there early for best seats. 8 p.m. FREE. White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.state.in.us/whiteriver/. 317-634-4567.

Sunday, August 02 Big Brothers Big Sisters Annual 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.bbbsci.org. 317472-3714.

Various Times. $5; $3 children. Indiana/World Skating Academy. 201 S. Capitol Ave., Ste. 001, Indianapolis. www.IWSA.org. 317-237-5565.

Family Bee Day Come learn about the fascinating world of bees and beekeeping. Join a real beekeeper and explore bee biology – with a special look inside the hive in our garden. This program is open to all ages, but registration is required. 2-3:30PM. Free. Garfield Conservatory and Gardens. 2505 Conservatory Dr, Indianapolis. garfieldgardensconservatory.org. (317) 327-7580.

Shakespeare on the Canal: Much Ado About Nothing

Holliday Park Creature Feature: Wild Canines!

Everyone should experience Shakespeare outdoors! Because we had such a huge response to last year’s Shakespeare show, Heartland Actors’ Repertory Theatre will perform Much Ado About Nothing. This well known romantic comedy will feature Sam Fain, Charles Goad, Scot Greenwell, Chris Hatch, Robert Neal, Matthew Roland, Michael Shelton, Phebe

Plants, animals, and insects, oh my! Join a Holliday Park naturalist as we take a look at some of Indiana’s most facinating creatures. We’ll spend our time inside and out, and may even be lucky enough to get up close and personal with some of the creatures! All ages, registration required. 2:00-3:00 pm. $3/ person. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring

Indy Challenge Pairs & Dance Competition

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Indianapolis.

www.hollidaypark.org.

Social Distortion 8 p.m. varies. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469. Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious Sundae from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317733-1700. Indy Challenge Pairs & Dance Competition Various Times. $5; $3 children. Indiana/World Skating Academy. 201 S. Capitol Ave., Ste. 001, Indianapolis. www.IWSA.org. 317-237-5565.

Monday, August 03 Summer Showtime Films: “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” 2 p.m. Free. Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100. Word 1 Computer Class Learn the basics of Word 2000 word processing program, including creating new documents from templates and wizards, opening existing documents, saving and printing documents, modifying margins, and formatting text by changing fonts, text size and alignment. 12 p.m. - 3 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-776-6939.

Tuesday, August 04

other families this summer. Don’t forget your lunch and picnic basket! Pre-registration is required. In case of inclement weather, this event will be cancelled. 12:302pm. FREE. West Park. 2700 W. 116th St, Carmel. www.carmelclayparks.com/?action=parksgrnways_ west. 317-848-7275. Farm Camp! Children can come spend three days being real “farm hands.” We’ll help milk cows, collect eggs, work in the garden, and tend the animals. It won’t all be work - they’ll also spend time hiking along Eagle Creek, discovering the ecosystem within and around the Creamery. And, of course, they’ll make crafts and food! Come meet new friends at the Farm and eat the Creamery’s yummy treats every day! . 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. $180 per camper ($10 discount for siblings attending either week. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317-733-1700. Free Family Film Festival Free Family Film Festival allows you to come see movies at various times throughout the summer. Stop by on the day and and time specified for a free showing. Kids meals available. Seating is limited. First come, first served. Showing: The Tale of Despereaux (G) and Igor (PG). 10 am. Showing: Mr. Bean’s Holiday (G) and Shrek the Third (PG). Showing: Kkit KittredgeAmerican Girl (G) and Kung Fu Panda (PG). 10 am. Free. Shiloh Crossing Stadium 18. 10400 East US 36, Avon. www.regmovies.com. 317-273-8780.

DCI Drum & Bugle Corps Solo & Ensemble Competition Indiana Convention Center. 500 South Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis. www.icclos.com. 317-262-3400. Indiana Fever vs. Chicago Sky 7 p.m. $14 - $79. Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www.consecofieldhouse. com. 317-917-2500..

Thursday, August 06 ”Baseball, Beer and Business Cards at Victory Field” Network with Young Professionals of all fields at the Indians game. Ticket includes unlimited food and beverage until 7 PM, networking event, and door prizes. 5:30-10 PM. $20 (first 200 registrants), then $25. 5:30 p.m. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.ypci.net/events/Event/Details. aspx?ID=20. 317-269-3545. 12th Annual Eagle Creek Park Foundation Golf Outing Registration at noon; shotgun start at 1 p.m. $700, Four-player team before July. Eagle Creek Park. 7840 W. 56th St., Indianapolis. www.eaglecreekpark.org. 317-327-7110.

Wednesday, August 05

A Taste of Ann Katz Festival of Books with Greg Dawson, author of “Hiding in the Spotlight: A Musical Prodigy’s Story of Survival, 1941-1946”

Acoustic Catfish 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Free. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317-634-9266.

7 p.m. $5/$3 members. Arthur M. Glick Jewish Community Center. 6701 Hoover Rd, Indianapolis. www.jccindy.org/. 317-251-9467.

Critical Mass Book Discussion Group August Book: The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky. 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Book Discussion: “On Beauty” 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. Free. Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100. Crosby, Stills & Nash 7:30 p.m. Varies. The Lawn at White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. livenation.com.

Back to School Celebration: Safe, Healthy and Happy Kids! Join us as we celebrate the start of a wonderful school year with active games, health screenings, immunizations, and school safety information. Sponsored generously by Target, the first Thursday of each month The Children’s Museum opens free of charge from 4 – 8 p.m. 4 - 8 p.m. Free. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.ChildrensMuseum.org. (317) 334-3322. Fishers Parks & Recreation: NFL Punt, Pass & Kick local competition Do you have an arm like Peyton Manning or a leg like Adam Vinatieri? Test your skills at the 2009 NFL Punt, Pass & Kick local competition. Participants compete based on age and gender in three categories. The top scorer in all age divisions from each local competition advances to the sectional competition. Please be familiar with the program format. Visit www. nflyouthfootball.com for competition rules. Download

Picnic in the Park Picnic and games is a great way to spend the day at one of Carmel Clay Parks & Recreation’s largest parks. Pack a lunch for the trip to West Park and enjoy a variety of games while meeting

and bring a completed official NFL Punt, Pass & Kick registration form. A birth certificate MUST also be submitted as proof of age during registration. For boys and girls, ages 8-15 (based on December 31 of current year). Thursday, Aug. 6 4:00p.m.–6:00p.m. Roy G. Holland Memorial Park Free! Pre-registration is not required. 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Free. Roy G. Holland Memorial Park. 1 Park Drive, Fishers. www.fishers. in.us/parks. (317)595-3155. Girls Incorporated® of Indianapolis’ 2009 Touchstone Awards and 40th Anniversary Celebration Whether you’ve known Girls Inc. for 40 years or 40 minutes, we want you with us to celebrate our 40th anniversary at the 2009 Touchstone Awards! The Touchstone Awards is an annual event, presented by Girls Inc. of Indianapolis, celebrating strong, smart, and bold Central Indiana women. New honorees Ellen Annala and Alpha Blackburn will be among the 40 women recognized this year as part of Girls Inc.’s 40th anniversary. As a special treat, Girls Inc. summer campers will showcase exhibits to teach guests about being strong, smart, and bold! Lunch will be served. Buy tickets online at www.girlsincindy.org! . 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. $125 per ticket, $1000 per table (seats 8 adults). The Westin Indianapolis. 50 South Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis. www.girlsincindy.com/index. asp?p=46. 283-0086 ext. 1022. Indianapolis Indians vs. Charlotte Knights 7 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545 Kindergarten, Here I Come! For children entering Kindergarten. Calling all Kindergarten kids! If you start Kindergarten this fall, join us for this fun program all about Kindergarten. We’ll read stories, play games, and make a craft all guaranteed to get you ready for that first fun day. Registration is required and begins Thursday, July 30 online, in person or by calling 844-3363. 4:00-4:45 p.m. or 6:30-7:15 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. One Stroke Painting Learn to blend, shade and highlight with one stroke and leave with a finished project. Taught by a level II OSCI Donna Dewberry One Stroke Instructor, this course is open to teens and adults. There is a $25 fee for which covers all materials and is payable at the time of class. We must have a minimum of six people to run the class and there is a class limit of 12 students. 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. $25. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-776-6939. Target Free Family Night 4 - 8 p.m. Free. The Children’s Museum. 3000 N. Meridian St, Indianapolis. www.childrensmuseum. org/. (317) 334-3322.

M O R E T H A N A N A RT C L A S S ces. MORE individualized attention. MORE fun. MORE choi IndplsArtCenter.org IndysChild_banner_071009.indd 1

46 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

Register now!

317.255.2464 7/10/2009 4:47:44 PM


re so u rc e s Zanna-Doo! 5 p.m. Free. Scotty’s Brewhouse. 1 Virginia Ave./3905 E. 96th St., Indianapolis. www.ScottysBrewhouse. com. 317-570-0808. Farm Camp! Children can come spend three days being real “farm hands.” We’ll help milk cows, collect eggs, work in the garden, and tend the animals. It won’t all be work - they’ll also spend time hiking along Eagle Creek, discovering the ecosystem within and around the Creamery. And, of course, they’ll make crafts and food! Come meet new friends at the Farm and eat the Creamery’s yummy treats every day! . 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. $180 per camper ($10 discount for siblings attending either week. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317-733-1700. American Accent 2 The American Accent is the study and practice of American English speaking patterns. Learners review intonation, word linking, and how Americans use the mouth and other facial muscles while talking. Participants also study the differences in spoken and written English. Learners who take this class must have taken American Accent 1. 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www. hepl.lib.in.us. 317-770-3251.

Friday, August 07 Bunny Hop Playtime Bundle up your babies and bring them to our new creative playtime! We’ll share a story and information about how you can help your little one prepare for reading readiness. And we will cap it off with the opportunity to play or participate in a special activity. Some sessions will be free playtime for just you and your little one. 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-579-0304. Cool Chilies Band 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Free. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317634-9266. Design Your Own Postcard Drop-in Craft Stop by and illustrate a postcard (or two) showing something you did or a place you visited this summer. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services Desk at 844-3363. 10:00 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. Indianapolis Indians vs. Charlotte Knights 7:15 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

Pop Tab Drop 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free. Monument Circle. 1 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Summer Nights Film Series: “Hustle and Flow” Dusk; Gates open at 6 p.m. $9; $5 members; $7 students; $5 12 & under. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. Tori Amos 8 p.m. varies. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469. Home School Skates Great Family Music Mix $3.50/per person includes skates Immediate family of 6-10 $15.00 11 or more $1.00/per person additional Ask about our special pricing for immediate family groups of 6 or more! . 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. $3.50 per person, includes skate rental. Skateland. 3902 N. Glen Arm Road, Indianapolis. www.skatelandindy.com. (317) 291-6795. Drum Corps International World Championships Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www. lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452. Mozart by Moonlight A Little Night Music is just one part of a really BIG night of Mozart at the Prairie. From the zany antics of Cosi fan tutte to the sophistication of Eine kleine to the mature genius of one of the master’s last symphonies, Mozart by Moonlight is the perfect evening to relax to the sounds of one of history’s greatest composers. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie. org/. 317-776-6000. Women of Faith: A Grand New Day Indiana Convention Center. 500 South Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis. 317-262-3400.

Saturday, August 08 4th Annual Indy Kids Triathlon 8 a.m. $25 per child. Sahm Park. 6801 E. 91st Street, Indianapolis. www.indyparks.org. 317-327-7275. Block Party ‘09 Block Party 09, Sat. August 8, 3-8pm, McCordsville Elementary 7177 North 600 West, McCordsville, IN. FREE event sponsored by Harvest Church includes food, games, bounce houses, wagon rides, fire truck, teen activities, and prizes. Bring canned goods or non perishable food items to donate to local food

August 6

pantry to be entered into a grand prize drawing. For more information see wwww.harvestchurchlive. com . 3-8pm. FREE. McCordsville Elementary. 7177 North 600 West (Olio Road and Mt. Comfort Rd.), McCordsville. www.harvestchurchlive.com. 317.730.7355. Community Drumming Circle 12:30 - 1:30. $3. Eiteljorg Museum. 500 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.eiteljorg.org/. 317-636-WEST. Hannah House Experience 8 or 9 p.m. $50.00--Reservation required. Hannah House. 3801 Madison Ave., Indianapolis. www. thehannahmansion.org/. 317-787-8486. Hoosier Farm & Garden Dinner Put on your garden clothes and bring a covered dish made with at least one Indiana ingredient. Come celebrate the goodness of fresh, locally grown food at the Hoosier Farm and Garden Dinner, a pitch-in meal on Saturday, August 8. The dinner is co-sponsored by Epworth United Methodist Church, the Heartlands Group of the Sierra Club’s Hoosier Chapter, and Slow Food Indy. All are welcome to attend the dinner at Epworth United Methodist Church, 6450 Allisonville Road, Indianapolis. After the meal, Todd Jameson, president of Slow Food Indy and owner of Balanced Harvest Farm, will speak about the benefits of eating local food. The celebration begins at 5:30 p.m. with demonstrations of home-made ice cream making and tomato juice canning, along with outdoor games for kids and adults. Hoosier barbecue baked chicken and soft drinks will be provided. All who attend are asked to bring a large salad, vegetable, dessert or other side dish to share, using at least one ingredient from an Indiana farm or garden. The cost to attend is $5 per person. Proceeds will support the programs of Epworth’s Green Team. 5:30. $5 per person. Please call to make a reservation. Epworth United Methodist Church. 6450 Allisonville Rd, Indianapolis. www.epworthindy.org/. 317-592-1595 for Northside Twins & Multiples. Indianapolis Indians vs. Charlotte Knights 7 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

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W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.eiteljorg.org/. 317-636-WEST. Science Saturday: It’s All in Your Head 10 a.m- 5 p.m. Free with general admission. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www. connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000. Taste of Downtown Street Festival featuring Tastes Like Chicken, The Late Show, The Tides 4 p.m. - 10 p.m. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery. com. 317-636-4516. World of Families: Second Saturdays Bilingual Storytime 2 p.m. Free. Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100. Mozart by Moonlight A Little Night Music is just one part of a really BIG night of Mozart at the Prairie. From the zany antics of Cosi fan tutte to the sophistication of Eine kleine to the mature genius of one of the master’s last symphonies, Mozart by Moonlight is the perfect evening to relax to the sounds of one of history’s greatest composers. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie. org/. 317-776-6000.

Sunday, August 09 Classic Concerts at Central 2 p.m. Free. Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100. Goldie 5 p.m. Free. Watkins Park. 2360 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. St, Indianapolis. www.indygov.org/eGov/ City/DPR/Parks/List/Watkins+Park.htm. 317-3277175. Holliday Park Creek Stomping The woods of Holliday Park are home to wetlands, ponds and seeps that are teeming with plants and wildlife. Dress for the weather and wear old shoes that you don’t mind getting muddy! All ages, registration required. 2:00-3:00 pm. $3/person. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

Mike Milligan and Steam Shovel 1 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317624-2563.

Indianapolis Indians vs. Charlotte Knights

Rhythm of Life: Drum Festival 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. General admission: $8; $7 ages 65 & up; $5 students; Free ages 4. Eiteljorg Museum. 500

Learning Kidnections Open House Learning Kidnections in downtown Fairland is having an Open House Sunday, August 9th 2 p.m.-5 p.m.

2 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545

Harvey & The Bluetones

August 13 Orquesta Bravo August 20 Bill Lancton Coalition & Horns Live concert series from 5:30-8:30pm in the middle of Zoo grounds. Rain location under the Party Pavilion. Discounts on Zoo admission available at Old National Bank locations.

1200 West Washington Street • (317) 630-2001 • indianapoliszoo.com

Animals on exhibit until 7pm!

A Leader in Conservation

INDYSCHILD.COM 47


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Games, crafts, samples of classes, refreshments, raffle, etc. fun for kids of all ages. Free. Learning Kidnections. 317-474-5231.

Mundo Beat 6 p.m. $3. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396. Try Ice Hockey Have you ever thought about skating hard and fast with a puck and scoring the winning goal? Why don’t you give ice hockey a try! Fishers Youth Hockey Association will be holding “Try Hockey” programs for those who have never played hockey, or are beginning hockey players. We will provide basic equipment and awesome coaches. Even if you don’t know how to skate, come give it a try. WHO: All Boys and Girls ages 5-12 years 1:00pm: Sign In 1:15-1:30pm: Equipment Fitting and Off- ice fun 1:30-2:30pm: On- ice with coaches 2:303:00pm: Question and Answer information available . 1:00pm to 3:00 pm. $10.00. The Forum At Fishers. 9022 E. 126th St. Behind the Fishers YMCA, Fishers. wwwfishersyouthhockey.com. 849-9930x103 Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious Sundae from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317733-1700. WonderLab’s Cubes, Streams and Steam: The Amazing Chemistry of Water Explore the weird properties of water through handson experiments and special demonstrations. See website for timing of special activities. Included with museum admission. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West 4th Street, Bloomington. www.wonderlab.org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25.

information, call the Children’s & Youth Services Desk at 844-3363. 4:005:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. 317-571-4292. Jimmy Buffet 8 p.m. Varies. Verizon Wireless Music Center. 12880 E. 146th St., Noblesville. www. ver izonw irelessmusiccenter.com. 317-776-8181. Guys Read: Captain Underpants For children entering grades 2-5. Come to the library and have some fun with games and activities from the Captain Underpants stories. Registration is required and begins on Monday, August 3, online, in person, or by calling 844-3363. 11:00-11:45 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers 7 p.m. $ 8 - $13. Victor y Field. 501 W. Mar yland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317269-3545.

Tuesday, August 11

call early. 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. $20. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-776-6939. Jungle Tales for Preschoolers Bring your preschooler to join us for nature-related stories, activities and crafts. This summer, you may choose between a morning and afternoon session each month. Registration required. 10-11AM or 3-4PM. $3. Garfield Park Conservatory. 2505 Conservatory Dr, Indianapolis. www.garfieldgardensconservatory.org. (317) 327-7580.

Acoustic Jazz Project 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. FREE. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www. indycm.com. 317-634-9266.

Sam King 6 p.m. FREE. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396.

Books for Lunch Bring your lunch and join other book lovers to chat about books. Noon – 1:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Free Community Drum CircleMake It Take It Craft

7 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317269-3545.

Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers

Jewelry Design Class for Teens and Adults

Bored? Board Games! For children entering grades K-5. Join us for a fun time of playing board games and activities. For more

All materials including tools are provided. The project is on display in the front lobby of the library. This is a fun, and easy class! Fee is $20. Class space is limited so please

Living Proof 5 p.m. Free. Scotty’s Brewhouse. 1 Virginia Ave./3905 E. 96th St., Indianapolis. www. ScottysBrewhouse.com. 317-570-0808.

Wednesday, August 12

Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers

Monday, August 10

Holliday Park Summer Concert Series Bring a picnic and join us for the electric violin music of Cathy Morris. 7:00 pm. Free. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www. hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

Mike Graves 7 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Cruefest 2 5 p.m. Varies. Verizon Wireless Music Center. 12880 E. 146th St., Noblesville. www. verizonwirelessmusiccenter.com. 317-776-8181.

Jammie Time For young children & their caregivers. Join us for stories, rhymes, and songs. Remember to wear your pajamas! For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. 7:00-7:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

latest best sellers and most talked about books. This month’s book is The Painted Veil by Howard Dully. 7 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317579-0300.

1 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545. Sean Mullady 6 p.m. FREE. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396.

Thursday, August 13

Drop by the library to make a fun craft to take home. No registration required. 10:30am-4:00pm. Free. Beech Grove Public Library. 1102 Main St, Beech Grove. 317-788-4203. American Accent 2 The American Accent is the study and practice of American English speaking patterns. Learners review intonation, word linking, and how Americans use the mouth and other facial muscles while talking. Participants also study the differences in spoken and written English. Learners who take this class must have taken American Accent 1. 11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-770-3251. Gen Con Game Fair Indiana Convention Center. 500 South Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis. 317-262-3400. Occurring All Weekend.

Friday, August 14

Books and Beans Book Discussion Group Come join other book lovers at the Hamilton East Public Library each month to discuss some of the

Dive In at The Monon Center Parents, wouldn’t it be great to get out for dinner and a movie? The Monon Center offers Parent’s Night Out

Tickets On Sale Now! KingTut.org

Witness over 100 priceless artifacts from the tomb of King Tut and other Egyptian Pharaohs!

Proud Cultural Partner

1-877-TUT-TKTS

An Exhibition from

ChildrensMuseum.org 48 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009


re so u rc e s one Friday of the month. Your kids will have a great time in a fun and safe environment with our trained staff. Kids will enjoy pizza and a snack while participating in arts and crafts, swimming and a movie. Children must be potty trained. Children ages 4 to 7 must arrive in their swimsuits and bring a towel. Children ages 4-12 years are encouraged to participate in this event. 5-9pm. $15 per child. The Monon Center East. 1235 Central Park Drive East in Rooms A & B, Carmel. www.carmelclayparks. com. 317-848-7275. Indianapolis Colts vs. Minnesota Vikings 7:30 p.m. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452. Summer Nights Film Series: “Dazed and Confused” Dusk; Gates open at 6 p.m. $9; $5 members; $7 students; $5 12 & under. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659. Zanna-Doo! 6 p.m. FREE. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317636-0396. The Music of Queen This symphonic rock hybrid brings you the best of both worlds. Hear a classical orchestra accompanied by a full rock band belting out Queen’s legendary hits, including “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” “We Will Rock You” and “Bohemian Rhapsody.”. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

Saturday, August 15 2009 Mass Avenue Criterium 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Various Prices. Massachusetts Ave. Downtown’s NE Quad, Indianapolis. www.nctcycling. com. 765-620-8358. Acoustic Catfish 2 - 5. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516. Family Storytime – Cows For young children & their caregivers. Bring the whole family to share literature through stories, rhymes and songs. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. 10:00-10:30 a.m. or 11:00-11:30 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. Fireside Chat with Hoosier HIstory LIve 11:30 a.m. Free. Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100. Indianapolis Racers Travel Hockey Association GU 19 Tryouts IRTHA will have a 19 and under GIRLS ICE HOCKEY Team this season. We will compete at the Tier 2 level with plans of being competitive at the USA Hockey Tier 2 Nationals in 2010. Tryouts will be held for all interested girls on August 15th, 10:30-11:30am and 2:00pm to 3:00pm Please come and tryout. 10:30am - 11:30am and 2:00 pm to 3:00pm. see website. The Forum at

Fishers Ice Arena. 9022 E. 126th St. Behind the Fishers YMCA, Fishers. www.racershockey.com. tkirchgraber@ racershockey.com or ptkirchgraber@aol.com. Nickelback 6 p.m. Varies. Verizon Wireless Music Center. 12880 E. 146th St., Noblesville. www. verizonwirelessmusiccenter.com. 317-776-8181. Waggin Tales For beginning, hesitant or struggling readers or those who love to read aloud. Improve your reading skills by reading aloud to our furry Pet Partner volunteer. Call to sign up for 15 minutes of reading time. 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-579-0304. The Music of Queen This symphonic rock hybrid brings you the best of both worlds. Hear a classical orchestra accompanied by a full rock band belting out Queen’s legendary hits, including “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” “We Will Rock You” and “Bohemian Rhapsody.” 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000. 150th Anniversary of Air Mail In 1859, John Wise lifted off from Lafayette, Ind., in a balloon with a bag full of mail. Celebrate the 150th anniversary of his historic flight with crafts, activities and stories all celebrating the first airmail delivery. Top off the day by soaring 350 feet above Conner Prairie’s new historic exhibit, 1859 Balloon Voyage. 10 am - 5 pm. Free w/general admission: $12/adult, $11/senior 65+, $8/youth, f. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., fishers. www.connerprairie.org. 317.776.6006.

150th Anniversary of Air Mail In 1859, John Wise lifted off from Lafayette, Ind., in a balloon with a bag full of mail. Celebrate the 150th anniversary of his historic flight with crafts, activities and stories all celebrating the first airmail delivery. Top off the day by soaring 350 feet above Conner Prairie’s new historic exhibit, 1859 Balloon Voyage. 10 am - 5 pm. Free w/general admission: $12/adult, $11/senior65+, $8/youth, f. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., fishers. www.connerprairie.org. 317.776.6006.

Monday, August 17 All Aboard! For children ages 3-5 & their caregivers. All Aboard for a celebration of trains! Join us for stories, songs and a simple craft. Registration is required and begins on Monday, August 10 online, in person, or by calling 844-3363. 10:00-10:30 a.m. or 11:00-11:30 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room B. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

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DIY Mondays Drop by to learn how to turn your trash into artwork. August craft: Button Earrings. All materials will be provided. For more information, call the Young Adult desk at 814-3983. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Young Adult Lounge. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Tuesday, August 18 LollapaLegos! For children entering grades K-5. Tons of Legos. Tons of possibilities. Tons of Fun. We can’t wait to see what you create! No registration is required. 4:00-5:00 p.m. o r 6:30-7:30 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel. lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Ballet Soiree For children ages 3-5 & their caregivers. Put on your tutus, leotards, and ballet shoes, listen to ballet stories, and dance the day away at the library. Registration is required and begins Monday, August 10 online, in person, or by calling 844-3363. 10:00-10:30 a.m. or 11:00-11:30 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room A. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Second Wind Trio 5 - 7. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www. easleywinery.com. 317636-4516.

Sunday, August 16 Acoustic Catfish 2 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563. Bill Lancton Quartet 6 p.m. $3. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396. First Annual Liar’s Contest during the Indiana State Fair This is your chance to tell your biggest lie or tall tale for cash prizes and ribbons! All ages invited to tell. No experience necessary. For details concerning the contest rules visit, www.storytellingarts.org. This should be a blast for contestants as well as listeners. 4 p.m. registration and 5 p.m. the contest will begin. Free once you purchase your fair ticket. Pioneer Village on the grounds of the Indiana State Fair. 1202 E. 38th St, Indianapolis. www.storytellingarts.org. 317-576-9848.

Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious Sundae from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.tpforganics.com. 317-733-1700.

Hey Parents!

Is your kid a big clown? Go to www.IndysChild.com and click on the Circus Contest link to enter a “Biggest Clown” photo contest, and you and your clown could win VIP tickets to the show as well as a special backstage meet and greet with some of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey performers!

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American Accent 1 The American Accent is the study and practice of American English speaking patterns. Learners review intonation, word linking, and how Americans use the mouth and other facial muscles while talking. Participants also study the differences in spoken and written English. Learners who take this class must have an intermediateadvanced understanding of English. 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-770-3251.

Extreme Mother-Daughter Book Club For girls in grades 6-8 with their mothers. This is more than just a mere book discussion group, it’s an experience! Join us for dessert and a fun hour of spirited discussion as well as a fun activity! In August, we will discuss Shadow Spinner by Susan Fletcher. Registration is required at the Young Adult desk or by calling 814-3983. 7:00-8:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Wednesday, August 19

Indianapolis Colts vs. Philadelphia Eagles

Hendricks & Holdman FREE. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396. Misery Loves Company Book Discussion Group This monthly book discussion group discusses specific titles as well as mystery genres. This month’s read is White Corridor by Christopher Fowler. 7 p.m. - 8:45 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-773-1384. Robert Bruce Scott 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. FREE. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www. indycm.com. 317-634-9266. WhiteLIes.tv Free Concert 6 p.m. FREE. American Legion Mall. 401 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. indianablackexpo.com. 317-239-5151.

Thursday, August 20 Benjamin Harrison’s 176th Birthday Celebration Enjoy a free tour and complimentary birthday cake to celebrate. Tour times: 12-6pm (last tour begins at 5pm). Free admission. President Benjamin Harrison Home. 1230 N. Delaware St., Indianapolis. www. pbhh.org. 317-631-1888. Dave and Rae 5 p.m. Free. Scotty’s Brewhouse. 1 Virginia Ave./3905 E. 96th St., Indianapolis. www.ScottysBrewhouse. com. 317-570-0808.

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8 p.m. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www.lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452. Indianapolis Indians vs. Louisville Bats 7 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

Friday, August 21 Bunny Hop Playtime Bundle up your babies and bring them to our new creative playtime! We’ll share a story and information about how you can help your little one prepare for reading readiness. And we will cap it off with the opportunity to play or participate in a special activity. Some sessions will be free playtime for just you and your little one. 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-579-0304. Indianapolis Indians vs. Louisville Bats 7:15 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545. Summer Nights Film Series: “V for Vendetta” Dusk; Gates open at 6 p.m. $9; $5 members; $7 students; $5 12 & under. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659.

Saturday, August 22 Beautiful Butterflies Butterflies are everywhere this time of year! Stop by the Conservatory to learn more about these winged creatures and explore the Garden for caterpillars and butterflies. Get some tips on attracting butterflies to your own yard. 10:30AM-12PM. Free. Garfield

Conservatory and Gardens. 2505 Conservatory Dr, Indianapolis. wgarfieldgardensconservatory.org. (317) 327-7580. Indianapolis Indians vs. Louisville Bats 7 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545. Space Chimps Dusk or around 9:15 p.m. Free. Douglass Park. 1616 E. 25th St., Indianapolis. www.indygov.org/eGov/City/ DPR/Parks/List/Douglass+Park.htm. 317-327-7174. Sullivan Hardware’s “Egg”naugural Egg Grill Fest $20.00. Sullivan’s Hardware. 6955 N. Keystone Ave., Indianapolis. www.chefjjs.com/events/indy-egg-fest/. 317-255-9230. Walk for Food AllergyMoving Towards a Cure Bring the whole family to the 2009 Indianapolis Walk for Food Allergy. The 2.3 mile walk benefits the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN). Walk alone or join a team, make a donation or just come out to support those with food allergies and raise awareness. We’ll have a raffle and lots of great activities for the kids. 9AM- Registration begins, 10AM- Walk starts. FREE. White River State Park. 801 West Washington Street, Indianapolis. www.foodallergywalk.org. 317888-7438 Rockapella The undisputed kings of contemporary a cappella, they’ve been featured on talk shows, TV commercials and the PBS program Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego? It’s music for the entire family. 8 pm. $20, Kids $10. Table $49 per person. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000. Family Canoe Adventure Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free with general admission. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

Sunday, August 23

Greg Ziesemer & Kriss Luckett 2 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317624-2563. Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers 2 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545. Safari Sundays at Traders Point Creamery We are kicking off our Safari Sundays! Safari Rides on our beautiful farm complete with a delicious Sundae from our Dairy Bar! We will also be offering Private Safari Rides, Guided Tours, Gourmet Picnics, Cocktails Cruises, Ice Cream Parties, Corporate Adventure, Wedding Limo for Bridal Party and more. 12-4pm. $10/person. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www. tpforganics.com. 317-733-1700. Family Canoe Adventure Sat. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sun. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free with general admission. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org/. 317-776-6000.

Monday, August 24 Digital Camera 1 Computer Class Learn to use your digital camera, different picture modes and menu options, various accessories available, basic terminology, and what to look for when buying a camera. 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl. lib.in.us. 317-776-6939. Family Films For young children & their caregivers. Wild about Books, Good Night, Gorilla, & Seven Blind Mice. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. 10:00-10:30 a.m. or 11:00-11:30 a.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Big Band Dance Sentimental Journey Dance Band

Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers

5 p.m.- 9 p.m. $14. Indiana Roof Ballroom. 140 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.indianaroof.com. 317-236-1870.

7 p.m. $ 8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.


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Tuesday, August 25

Friday, August 28

Sunday, August 30

Monday, August 31

Bill Langton 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Free. Broad Ripple Park. 1550 Broad Ripple Ave., Indianapolis. www.indygov.org/eGov/ Cit y/DPR/Parks/List/Broad+Ripple+Park.htm. 317-327-7161.

Bedtime Stories Dusk or around 9:15 p.m. Free. Broad Ripple Park. 1550 Broad Ripple Ave., Indianapolis. www.indygov.org/eGov/City/DPR/Parks/List/ Broad+Ripple+Park.htm. 317-327-7161.

Deep Fryed Acoustiblasters 2 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. http://www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Indianapolis Indians vs. Toledo Mud Hens 7 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

Bonnie Raitt with special guest Taj Mahal & The Phantom Blues Band

Drop-in Play Date and Legos For children of all ages & their caregivers. Looking for a fun, informal outing with your children and your friends? Bring your babies, toddlers, and preschoolers and pick your favorite activities – you’ll have plenty to choose from, from doodling and sorting to dancing and singing. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292.

Finnell Factor 5 p.m. Free. Watkins Park. 2360 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. St, Indianapolis. http://www.indygov.org/ eGov/City/DPR/Parks/List/Watkins+Park.htm. 317-327-7175.

Tot-Playgroup Tot-playgroup is for parents to use the Greenwood Community Center to workout while their child is in a supervised, structured, playful enviornment. This program is offered for children ages 1-7 on Monday, Wednesday, Friday mornings from 8:30am-11:00am. You can pay by the session or per day. 8:30am-11:00am M,W,F. Six week session: $36/ resident $54/non-resident. Daily fee: $4. Greenwood Community Center. 100 Surina Wa y, Greenwood. www.greenwood.in.gov. 317-881-4545.

7:30 p.m. varies. The Lawn at the White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Indianapolis. 317-233-2434. Donn and Savannah Smith 5 - 7. FREE Admission. Easley Winery. 205 N. College Ave., Indianapolis. www.easleywinery.com. 317-636-4516.

Wednesday, August 26 Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers 1 p.m. $8 - $13. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545. Krista Richter 12:15 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317624-2563.

Indy 1500 Gun & Knife Show Friday 2 - 8 p.m.; Saturday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Indiana State Fairgrounds-Toyota Exposition Hall. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indy1500.com. 405-340-1333. Jazz on the Avenue - X Factor 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. $10; $10 buffet. Madame Walker Theatre. 617 Indiana Ave., Indianapolis. www. walkertheatre.com. 317-236-2099. Summer Nights Film Series: “High Fidelity”

Tennessee Walker FREE. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396.

Dusk; Gates open at 6 p.m. $9; $5 members; $7 students; $5 12 & under. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum. org. 317-920-2659.

Thursday, August 27

The Wiggles 3 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. $18 - $35. Murat Theatre. 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation. com/murat. 317-231-0000.

Indiana Fever vs. San Antonio Silver Stars 7 p.m. $14 - $79. Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www.consecofieldhouse. com. 317-917-2500. Stevie Ray Vaughn Tribute FREE. The Rathskeller Biergarten. 401 E. Michigan St, Indianapolis. www.rathskeller.com. 317-636-0396. Summer Babies For children ages birth – 24 months & caregivers. For more information, call the Children’s & Youth Services Desk at 844-3363. 10:15 – 10:35 a.m. or 11:00 – 11:15 a.m. or 12:15 – 12:35 p.m. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us/. 317-571-4292. Thursday Night at The Movies for teens 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Free. Please call to register. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib. in.us. 317-579-0315. Sportbike Freestyle Championship XDL Fri. 1 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. & Sat. 6 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. Fri. $20; Sat. $10; $25 weekend pass & FEE ages 12 & under. Indiana War Memorial. 431 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.brickyard.com. 317-492-6455.

The Moody Blues 7:30 p.m. varies. The Lawn at White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapoilis. www.Thelawnatwrsp.com. 317-233-2434. WonderLab’s Annual Dollar Day Enjoy WonderLab’s lowest admission price of the year. 1:00 - 5:00 pm. $1 per person. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West 4th Street, Bloomington. www.wonderlab.org. 812337-1337 ext. 25. Trader’s Point Creamery Weekend Fun Join us for our new Family Sunday Brunch. The adults will love our Brunch entrees which include a Farm Scramble, Eggs Benedict, Tortilla Egg Stack, Mimosas and more. The kids will go crazy over our kid-sized Belgian Waffles topped with gooey caramel apples, strawberries or chocolate chips, whipped cream and a dusting of powered sugar. Yummy kidsized omelettes are also available! Wash it all down with our famous Hot Chocolate! Can’t make it Sunday? Bring the kids to our Saturday Farmers Market and stay for either our hearty Breakfast Buffet of our popular Lunch. Sunday Brunch: 9-12pm; Sat Buffet: 9-11:30am; Sat Lunch: 12-3; Market 9-12pm. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. www.traderspointcreamery.com. 317-733-1700.

Art Therapy Using art to explore your grief process following the death of a loved one. Adults only. No fee. Appointments available for Mondays or Tuesdays. FREE. St. Vincent Hospice. 8450 N. Payne Rd., Ste. 100, Indianapolis. w w w. s t v i nce nt .or g / ourservices/hospice/default.htm. 317-338-4008. Sportbike Freestyle Championship XDL Fri. 1 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. & Sat. 6 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. Fri. $20; Sat. $10; $25 weekend pass & FEE ages 12 & under. Indiana War Memorial. 431 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.brickyard.com. 317-492-6455.

Sportbike Freestyle Championship XDL Fri. 1 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. & Sat. 6 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. Fri. $20; Sat. $10; $25 weekend pass & FEE ages 12 & under. Indiana War Memorial. 431 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.brickyard.com. 317-492-6455. Motorcycles on Meridian Free. Monument Circle. 1 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. www.brickyard.com. 317-492-6455.

Saturday, August 29 Fall Lawn Care 2 p.m. Free. Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100. Indiana Fever vs. Chicago Sky 7 p.m. $14 - $79. Conseco Fieldhouse. 125 S. Pennsylvania St, Indianapolis. www. consecofieldhouse.com. 317-917-2500. Jazz in the Park 6 p.m. FREE. The Lawn at White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ whiteriver/familyarts.html. 317-233-2434.

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”The Berlin Airlift--A Legacy of Friendship” Occurring Daily Beginning Wednesday, August 05, 2009 Through Sunday, August 16, 2009. Indiana War Memorial. 431 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ iwm. 317-884-4001. 79th Annual Marion County Fair Occurring Daily Beginning Thursday, July 23, 2009 Through Saturday, August 01, 2009. One of Indiana’s largest county fairs with free concerts and other entertainment daily on the Park Stage, Demo Derby, Heavy Weight Horse Pulls, Truck PUlls, IMPD K-9 Demo, Motorcycle Races and more at the Grandstand. That state’s best midway presented by Drew Amusements and, of course, delicious fair food—including the Original Marion County Fair Elephant Ear! 4-H displays and demos and fun for the whole family. $5/Kids under 5 free. Marion County Fairgrounds. 7300 East Troy Ave, Indianapolis. www.marioncountyfair.org. 317-353-2444. A Sanders Family Christmas Occurring Daily Through Sunday, August 16, 2009. Featuring many vintage hymns, carols and bluegrass favorites of the Smoke on the Mountain series. The Rev. Mervin Oglethorpe has invited the Sanders to return on Christmas Eve, 1941, for another wonderful evening of singing and witnessing before the boys head off for World War II. Join the congregation of Mount Pleasant Baptist Church for the original sequel to Smoke on the Mountain. Written by Connie Ray, conceived by Alan Bailey, musical arrangements by John Foley and Gary Fagin. Tickets for main stage shows range from $34-57 and include a dinner buffet, full salad bar and unlimited coffee, tea and lemonade. beefandboards.com, 317-872-9664 . Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre. 9301 N. Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. Adult Summer Reading Program Occurring Daily Through Monday, August 03, 2009. June 1 – August 3 Enjoy books and earn prizes all summer long. Register online at www.carmelreads.org or visit the Readers’ Advisory Desk or Audiovisual Desk to get started. For more information, call 8143987 or 571-4281. Carmel Clay Public Library. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. 317571-4292. Children’s Craft Classes Ongoing on the second Thursday of each Month. The Greenwood Parks and Recreation Department is offering craft classes for children ages 10 and up. The craft classes will be held at the Greenwood Community Center the second Thursday of every month from 6:30pm-8:30pm. Please register one week in advance.

Call 317-881-4545 to find out what craft is being offered each month and the cost. 6:30pm-8:30pm. Varies. Greenwood Parks and Recreation/ Greenwood Community Center. 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. www. greenwood.in.gov. 317-881-4545. ComedySportz Ongoing Every Thu, Fri & Sat Beginning Thursday, July 16, 2009. Two teams of “actletes” take suggestions from the audience to perform hilarious, completely improvised scenes. This battle of wits comes complete with a referee and the “Star Spangled Banner.” All ages. Reservations recommended. $15; $12/students & seniors, $8/kids; Kids 5 and under FREE. Comedy Sportz. 721 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis. www.indycomedysportz.com. 317-951-8499. Create-a-Story Occurring Each Thursday Beginning Thursday, August 06, 2009 Through Thursday, August 20, 2009. : Children learn to tell, write, draw or craft stories based on characters from books. This is a creative story time for those in kindergarten through 3rd grade. Registration is required. 4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl. lib.in.us. 317-579-0304. Devour Downtown Indianapolis Occurring Daily Beginning Monday, August 10, 2009 Through Saturday, August 22, 2009. Looking for a great price for an excellent meal at some of Indianapolis’ best restaurants? Look no further than Devour Downtown. This semi-annual event (with winter and summer dates) features some of the best

restaurants in Indianapolis, and all of them offer a set menu of meals for just $30 per person! A few restaurants are even offering 2 for $30 dinners and $20 lunch specials! Visit the website to see the full list of participating restaurants, view menus and more! www. devourdowntown.org. 3-Course $30 per person. Participating Indianapolis Restaurants. www.devourdowntown.org. 317-673-4211. Emma and Addison’s World: Childhood Stories of 19th Century Zionsville - An Exhibit Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Through October, 2009. This exhibit features four areas around which the Higgins children’s childhood revolved: their home, their school, the I.C.&L railroad depot and businesses along Zionsville’s main street. Plus the back center of the exhibit space will feature a small porch which will serve as a stage for intimate programs for approximately 20 children. Sullivan Munce Cultural Center. 225 W. Hawthorne St., Zionsville. www.sullivanmunce.org/. 317873-4900. Ensemble Voltaire Ongoing Daily. “Telemann in Paris” www. ensemblevoltaire.com. 7:30 pm. $15/Seniors $10/Students $5. Trinity Episcopal Church. 3243 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www. indybaroque.org. 317-202-0546. Fairy Tales Can Come True Ongoing Daily. Children ages 8 and younger and an adult are invited to find that fairy tales can come true for all princes and princesses at the InfoZone’s first Storybook Party. 1:30pm. FREE. InfoZone Library Branch. 3000 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4430. First Friday Evening at WonderLab Occurring on the first Friday of each Month Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. Enjoy extended evening hours until 8:30 pm at one of the top 25 science museums in the US. Reduced admission of just $3 per person after 5:00 pm. Pizza available to purchase at the museum. 5:00 pm - 8:30 pm. $3 per person. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West 4th Street, Bloomington. www. wonderlab.org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25. First Friday Family Movie Night Ongoing on the first Friday of each Month. For ages 5-12; must be accompanied by an adult. 6-7:30pm. FREE. Washington Park. 3130 E. 30th St, Indianapolis. www. indyparks.org. 317-327PARK. FIRST STEPS IN MUSIC classes Occurring Wednesday

Each Beginning

Wednesday, July 15, 2009 Through Wednesday, August 12, 2009. The INDIANAPOLIS CHILDREN’S CHOIR will offer music classes geared for the preschool set ~ 3 to 5 year olds! Based on research and experience of one of America’s foremost early childhood music educators, Dr. John Feierabend. The goal of First Steps in Music classes is to enable all preschool-aged children to reach their full potential in singing, vocabulary, and movement skills. These selected activities come from the rich body of traditional children’s folk songs and rhymes. It is this combination of a researched- based curriculum, high-quality literature, and practical experience that makes the First Steps in Music exceptional. 6 to 6:40 pm. $ 50.00. Lilly Hall, on the campus of Butler University. 4600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis. www.icchoir.org. 317-9409846. Free Community Drum Circle Ongoing Each Thursday Beginning Thursday, July 16, 2009. Bongo Boy Music School is proud to announce our new affiliation with REMO, Inc. Bongo Boy Music School hosts a FREE Community Drum Circle every Thursday Night. No experience necessary. All ages and levels are welcome. Drums will be provided by Bongo Boy Music School and REMO. Parents bring your kids. Kids bring your parents and friends. 7:30-8:30pm. FREE. Bongo Boy Music School. 8481 Bash St. Suite 1100, Indianapolis. www. bongoboymusic.com. 317-595-9065. Free Family Tours at the IMA Occurring on the second Saturday and fourth Saturday of each Month Through Saturday, May 22, 2010. The IMA offers free, 30-minute tours for families with children of all ages on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. Free. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd., Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331. Friends of the Library Bookshop Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 01, 2009 Through Saturday, August 29, 2009. Friends of the Library Bookshop is open to the public. Most materials sell for one dollar. Book bags, calendars, book lights, and bookmarks are also available. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib.in.us. 317-579-0304. Garden Walks Occurring Each Sunday Beginning Sunday, July 19, 2009 Through Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Free guided walks through the IMA’s gardens on Saturdays and Sundays. Meet at the main visitor entrance to Lilly House. 1pm. Free. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis. www. imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331.


re so u rc e s to use items from nature to make fun and creative crafts to hang in your home and share with your friends and family. 5:306:30pm. $6. Raymond Park/Indy Island. 8575 E. Raymond St., Indianapolis. 317327-PARK. O.K. Program (For Boys) Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, July 18, 2009 Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Police officers work with boys who want to follow the right path in life. Boys will learn how to address diversity, respond to problems at school and how to handle other issues. 10 am - 4 pm. FREE. Windsor Village Park. 2501 Kenyon Ave, Indianapolis. www.indygov. org. 317-327-7162.

The Indiana State Fair • Aug. 7 - Aug. 23 • Indiana State Fairgrounds

Girls Night Out Ongoing on the fourth Saturday of each Month. Massage, Hand & Foot Treatments, Food & Fun. Bring a friend and come hang with the girls . 6-9PM. $30 includes everything. Eden’s Pathway. 2700 E. 55th Pl. STE. 5, Indianapolis. www.edenspathway.com. 317.205.9377. Home School Skates Ongoing on the first Friday of each Month. Great Family Music Mix $3.50/ per person includes skates Immediate family of 6-10 $15.00 11 or more $1.00/ per person additional Ask about our special pricing for immediate family groups of 6 or more! . 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. $3.50 per person, includes skate rental. Skateland. 3902 N. Glen Arm Road, Indianapolis. www.skatelandindy. com. (317) 291-6795. Hoosier Salon: the 85th Annual Exhibition Occurring Each Sunday Beginning Sunday, July 19, 2009 Through Monday, September 07, 2009. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Museum Admission: $7; $6.50 seniors; $4 children ages 3 - 12; FR. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.IndianaMuseum.org. 317-232-1637. How You Could Get Free Money for College Using Scholarships Ongoing Daily. Presented by Indy College Funding. This free seminar for parents is sure to fill up quickly. Please register online at www.indycollegefunding.com/ seminar.php or call 888-217-3190. 6:308pm. FREE. Carmel Clay Library. 55 Fourth Ave. Southeast, Program Room, Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. Indianapolis City Market Occurring Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, August 05, 2009 Through

Saturday, October 31, 2009. 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Free. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317-634-9266. IndyFringe Festival Occurring Daily Beginning Friday, August 21, 2009 Through Sunday, August 30, 2009. Various. uy a $3 festival badge onsite good for all 10 days, then pay $10. Massachusetts Ave. Massachusetts Ave./ Downtown’s NE Quad, Indianapolis. indyfringe.org. 317-522-8099. Junior Gardener Club Ongoing on the second Saturday of each Month. Children ages 6-12 are invited to enjoy a fun-filled time in the Children’s Garden. There will be a different topic each month. Registration required. 11am12pm. Free. Garfield Park Conservatory. 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. garfieldgardensconservatory.org. 317327-7580. Kelsay Farm Tours Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Open daily. Kelsay Farms. 6848 N. 250 E., Whiteland. www. kelsayfarms.com. 317-535-4136. Kids Chill Out Skate Occurring Daily Through Friday, August 28, 2009. 10:50 - 11:50 a.m. $6. Indiana/ World Skating Academy. 201 S. Capitol Ave., Ste. 001, Indianapolis. www.IWSA. org. 317-237-5565. Magic Oasis Occurring Daily (except Mon) Through Sunday, August 09, 2009. Back by popular demand, magician Marcus Lehmann returns to Lilly Theater to dazzle audiences with disappearing acts, floating objects and other baffling illusions that will leave your family asking, “How did he do that?”. 1 and 3 p.m. Free with museum admission. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000

N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www. ChildrensMuseum.org. (317) 334-3322. Make It Take It Craft Ongoing Each Thursday Beginning Thursday, July 16, 2009. Drop by the library to make a fun craft to take home. No registration required. 10:30am4:00pm. Free. Beech Grove Public Library. 1102 Main St, Beech Grove. 317788-4203. Making it in the Midwest: Artists Who Chose to Stay Occurring Daily Through Sunday, October 18, 2009. Explore the challenges facing working artists in the Midwest and discover the extraordinary talent found throughout Indiana and the surrounding region. Making it in the Midwest will bring together an important array of historical works, many of which are in private collections and have not been seen publicly for decades. By presenting both historical and contemporary perspectives, the exhibit uncovers the ways artists have earned recognition when working outside the centers of the art world. 9a-5p M-Sat; 11a-5p Sun. $7.50 Adults/$4.00 children. Indiana State Museum. 650 West Washington St., Indpls. www. indianamuseum.org. 317.232.1637. Mother-Daughter Book Club Ongoing Daily. For girls in grades 4 & 5 and their mothers. September Book: Willow Run by Patricia Reilly Giff. Special treats! Registration is required and begins Tuesday, September 2, either in person or by calling the Children’s & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. 6:307:30pm. FREE. Carmel Clay Library. 55 Fourth Ave. Southeast, Storytime Room, Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us/. Nature Crafts Ongoing Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, July 15, 2009. We’re going

Parents Night Out Ongoing Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, July 18, 2009. Parents, do you need a night out without the kids? Bring them to Bates on the first Saturday of the month for a few hours of freedom. Kids will be able to swim, watch movies, and participate in other activities. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Don’t forget your bathing suits. 6-9pm. $5. LaShonna Bates Aquatic Center. 1450 S. Reisner St., Indianapolis. 317-327-PARK. Paws and Read Ongoing Each Monday Beginning Monday, July 20, 2009. Young children who are reluctant readers are invited to practice their reading skills by reading to a trained and patient therapy dog provided by Therapy Dogs International. Excludes 12/8 and 12/22. 7pm. FREE. Warren Library. 9701 E. 21st St, Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4550. President Benjamin Harrison Home Tour Info Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. Tours are on the hour and half hour, 10 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Sunday tours in June and July from 12.30 - 3.30 p.m. Holiday closings: Harrison Home is closed Jan. 1 - 18, Indy 500 Parade and Race days, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and December 24,

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calendar

25, 26 and 31, 2009 and Jan. 1, 2010. AAA discounts are available; $5 adults and $2.50 students. Group rates are available; reservations must be made two weeks in advance. Please call to schedule (317.631.1888.) . 10 a.m. - 3.30 p.m. Adults (18-64) $8; Students (5 to 17) $3; Seniors (65 and older). President Benjamin Harrison Home. 1230 N. Delaware St., Indianapolis. www.pbhh. org. 317.631.1888. Star Wars™: The Clone Wars Exhibition Occurring Daily Through Sunday, January 31, 2010. This spring, a galaxy far, far away comes to The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis when STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS Exhibition opens March 23. The visual exhibition features artwork, costumes and other pieces used in the concept and production for STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS, the firstever animated feature and television series from Lucasfilm Animation. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free with museum admission. The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www. ChildrensMuseum.org. 317-334-3322. Tasting Tuesday Occurring Each Tuesday Beginning Tuesday, July 14, 2009 Through Tuesday, August 25, 2009. 5:30 - 7 p.m. FREE. Mass Ave Wine Shoppe. 878 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis. www. MassAveWine.com. 317-972-7966. Teen Time Occurring Every Tue & Thu Beginning Tuesday, July 14, 2009 Through Thursday, August 06, 2009. Teen Time, for 13 -18 year-old teenage girls, will consist of two 45-minute sessions, consisting of exercise and discussions around healthy choices. Teenage girls will experience an upbeat, energizing exercise class focusing on strengthening core muscles, developing better posture, increasing flexibility and sculpting their entire body. The program is open for any teenage girl regardless of her current physical activity. The second session will cover frequent questions on topics of interests to teenage girls. The

Dance Class

for Kids

•Ages 18 mos - Adult •Tiny Tot, Tap, Jazz, Ballet, Lyrical, Pointe •Professional Instruction •Viewing Windows •Performance Opportunities •Online Registration

G. Scotten Talent Center Celebrating 10 Fabulous Years in Fishers! gscotten.com ~ 317-841-1919

INDYSCHILD.COM 53


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calendar

topics include, self esteem, dating, staying healthy, adolescent health and dealing with peer pressure. Tuesday 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. and Thursday 2 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. $45 for a four week session. St. Vicent Women’s Hospital. 8081 Township Line Rd., Ste. 204, Indianapolis. (317) 338-4-HER (4437).

Tuesday Night Street Legal Series Occurring Each Tuesday Through Tuesday, October 27, 2009. Drag racing open to any licensed driver who meets the rules and regulations of the raceway. Gates open at 5 pm, racing at 5:30 pm weather permitting. O’Reilly Raceway Park. 10267 E Us Highway 136, Indianapolis. www. oreillyracewaypark.com. 317-291-4090. WonderLab’s Discovery Time Occurring Each Wednesday Beginning Wednesday, July 15, 2009 Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. Stop by for a special story, animal demonstration or hands-on science activity! Call 812-337-1337 ext. 2 to learn the topic of the week. This program is intended for children, age 6 and younger, with their caregivers. Older siblings are welcome. 10:30 am - 11:00 am (drop-in format). Included with museum admission. WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology. 308 West Fourth Street, Bloomington. wonderlab.org. 812-337-1337 ext. 25. Y-Teen Zone Ongoing Each Saturday. A sage, fun hangout for teens ages 11-19. Tournaments, guest speakers, basketball, ping-pong, games, music, fitness and nutrition workshops, swimming, other special events adn computers. Those who are not members of the YMCA must have a school identification card and all must complete a registration form. 7-10pm. Free to members; $5 for all others. Benjamin Harrison YMCA. 5736 Lee Rd, Indianapolis. www.indymca.org/ locations/branch.asp?id=18. 317-547-9622. Your Curious Kid and You Occurring Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, August 01, 2009 Through Saturday, August 29, 2009. This program is for preschoolers and a parent or caregiver. The program will begin with stories and crafts and then there will be free time with books and make-and-take crafts available. Information about the six basic reading-readiness skills that every child needs to know will be available at each program. No registration is required. 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. Free. Fishers Public Library. 5 Municipal Dr, Fishers. www.hepl.lib. in.us. 317-579-0304. Zoom! Sprints & Lap Races for kids pedal cars Ongoing Annually each July 13. FAMILY Special Event/Wheeled Racers. We’ll set up a track for pedal cars, big wheels, trikes, and kettle cars. Borrow ours or bring your own, the races will last all day. Make a race car craft to race too. All Play Spaces OPEN. Bounce House, Award Ceremony, and More. $3 per child. Adults Free. Rain or Shine. 11- 6. $3. The Play Connection. 10747 E US HWY 136, Indianapolis. www. theplayconnection.com. 3179184359.

54 INDY’S CHILD * AUGUST 2009

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local farmers markets, orchards and produce guide

38th and Meridian Farmers’ Market Thursday, August 6, 13, 20 & 27. 4-6:30pm. Corner of 38th & Meridian, Indianapolis.

and vegetables for retail and wholesale. 9-6pm M-F; 8-6pm Sat. S & E Produce and Flowers. 320 Griffith Road, Greenwood. www.sandegreenhouse. com. 317-881-2634.

Adrian Orchards Occurring Daily Through Sunday, January 31, 2010. Purchase fresh fruits/ veggies, etc. from Mid-June through August Mon-Sat 9-6pm, Sun 12-5pm. Sept through Dec Mon-Sat 9-7pm, Sun 12-6pm. Jan Mon-Sat 10-6pm, Sun 125pm. Adrian Orchards. 500 W Epler Ave, Indianapolis. www.adrianorchards. com. 317-784-0500. Allisonville Nursery Occurring Daily Through Tuesday, June 01, 2010. Fresh flowers, nursery, produce, etc. M-F 9-6pm, Sat 9-5pm, Sun 11-5pm Open year round. Allisonville Nursery. 11405 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.allisonvillenursery.com. 317-849-4490. Beasley Orchards and Gardens Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. M-Sat 9-6pm, Sun 12-6pm. Beasley Orchards. 2304 E. Main St., Danville. www.beasleys-orchard.com. 317745-4879. Binford Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 7:30-11am. Southwest corner of Binford and E. 75th St, Indianapolis. www.binfordfarmersmarket.com. 317-849-5555. Broad Ripple Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. Located in the parking lot of Broad Ripple High School. Produce, flowers, cheese, honey, beef, lamb, poultry and dairy. 8-12 noon. Broad Ripple High School. 1115 Broad Ripple Ave., Indianapolis. www.broadripplefarmersmarket. com. 317-299-7129. Carmel Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. Nearly 50 vendors selling Indiana grown and/or produced products. One of the largest farmers’ markets in the state. 8-11:30am. One Civic Square, Carmel. www.carmelfarmersmarket.com. 317-710-0162. Copeland’s Family Farm Market and Greenhouse

Spencer Farm Occurring Daily Through Tuesday, December 01, 2009. Mon-Sat 9-9pm, Sun 12 noon-8pm. Spencer Farm. 7177 E. 161st St., Noblesville. 317-776-1560. Stonycreek Farm Occurring Mon-Sat Through Tuesday, December 01, 2009. U-pick available. Mon-Sat 10-5pm. Stonycreek Farm. 11366 State Road 38 E, Noblesville. www.stonycreekfarm.net. 317-773-3344.

Franklin Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-11am. Johnson County Courthouse. www.franklinparks.org. Gardener’s Market Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. 7501 Westfield Blvd, Indianapolis. 317-2558288.

Taylor’s Farm Market Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. 2434 E. 750 N, Whiteland. 317-881-9611.

Greenfield Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-12 noon. 620 N. Apple St., Greenfield. www.hancockharvestcouncil. com. 317-462-1113.

The Apple Works Farm Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. 9-7pm. The Apple Works. 8157 S. 250 W, Trafalgar. www.apple-works.com. 317-878-9317.

Greenwood Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-noon. Greenwood Library. 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. www. geocities.com/greenwood/farmersmarket.

The County Market Occurring Daily Through Tuesday, June 01, 2010. Restaurant, craft market, farmers’ market and pumpkin fest. The County Market. 795 S. US Hwy 421, Zionsville. 317-769-4415.

Indianapolis Farmers’ Market at the City Market Wednesday, August 5, 12, 19 & 26. An outdoor market taking up an entire city block in the street between the City Market and the City-County Building. 101:30pm. Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317-634-9266. Irvington Farmers’ Market Sunday, August 2, 9, 16, 23, 30Northwest corner of park. Noon-3pm. Ellenberger Park. 5301 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis.

Occurring Mon-Sat Through Sunday, January 31, 2010. A family farm raising and selling our own fresh veggies, bedding plants, house plants and perennials as well as a wide variety of other produce from other growers. Morel mushrooms in season are also available. 9-6pm. 7312 Copeland Rd., Indianapolis. www. localharvest.org/farms/M21020. 317-862-1393.

Noblesville Main Street Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-12 noon. 205 W Connor St., No Sablesville. www.noblesvillemainstreet.com. 317-776-0205.

Cumberland Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-12 noon. 11501 E. Washington St., Cumberland. www.town.cumberland.in.us.

Wednesday, August 5, 12, 19 & 26. 4-7pm. Plainfield Chamber of Commerce. 210 W Main St, Plainfield. 317-839-3800.

Danville Chamber Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-12 noon. Northwest Corner of the Town Square, Danville. www.danville.org. Fishers Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-12 noon. Fishers Train Station. 11601 Municipal Drive, Fishers. www. fishersfarmersmarket.com. 317-578-0700

Stout’s Melody Acres Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Purchase fruits and veggies. M-Sat 9-7pm, Sun 116pm. Stout’s Melody Acres. 1169 N. State Rd. 135, Franklin.

Plainfield Town Center Farmers’ Market

Rita’s Backyard Occurring Daily Through Saturday, May 01, 2010. New this year: locally grown, naturally grown fruits and veggies featuring many heirloom varieties. Open year round. Rita’s Backyard. 12244 E. 116th St., Fishers. 317-842-4011. S & E Produce and Flowers Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. Family-owned and operated farm with flowers

The Old Farm Market Occurring Daily Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. 9-8pm. The Old Farm Market. 9613 E US Hwy 36, Avon. www.oldfarmmarket.com. 317-271-3447. Trader’s Point Creamery Green Market Occurring Each Friday Beginning Friday, July 17, 2009 Through Saturday, May 01, 2010. Producing fresh creamline whole milk, chocolate milk, plain and fruit yogurts. Fri. May-Oct 4-7pm, Nov-Apr 9-12noon on Sat. Traders Point Creamery. 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville. ww.traderspointcreamery.com. 317-733-1700. Washington Township Farmers’ Market Tuesday, August 4, 11, 18 & 25. 4:30-7:30pm. Washington Township Community Park. 1115 South County Rd 525 E, Avon. www.localharvest.org/farms/ M21278. 317-745-0785. Waterman’s Farm Market Occurring Daily Through Saturday, October 31, 2009. U-pick available. Open daily. Waterman’s Farm Market. 7010 E. Raymond St., Indianapolis. www.watermansfarmmarket.com. 317-356-6995. Whiteland Orchard Occurring Mon-Sat Through Thursday, December 31, 2009. M-Sat 9-6pm. Whiteland Orchard. 5559 N. Graham Rd, Whiteland. 317-535-8495. Zionsville Farmers’ Market Saturday, August 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29. 8-11am. Parking lot at Hawthorne and Main, Zionsville. 317-733-6343.


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party & entertainment directory

Celebrate your BIRTHDAY with us!

Birthday Parties Celebrate your child’s birthday party at the world’s largest children’s museum! Party Includes: H Private use of the birthday party room for 1.5 hours H Admission to the museum for up to 20 guests H Twenty Carousel ride tickets H Gift for the birthday child

H A themed birthday cake from Taylor’s Bakery (Serves 20) H Free gift registry in our award-winning Museum Store H Family friendly food prices H Themed party ware

HUGE Indoor Party Zone!

Rainbow playsets! Now offeri ng Playhouses! Pay & Play Goalrilla basketball goals! Call for de tails! Huge Rokenbok and Thomas the Tank Engine play areas!

To schedule your party or for more information, please contact the Museum at (317) 334-4000 or birthdayparty@ChildrensMuseum.org

317.773.3545 www.recreationunltd.com

Moonwalks and Inflatables

Call today to book your Bounce Zone Summer Special

CLEAN Units COURTEOUS Staff CONVENIENT FREE Set-up,Delivery & Pick-up $20.00 off your next rental when you mention this ad!!!

1 1/2 hour private party for 10 children only $125.00!! **limited time only. Some for a birthday, fieldtrip, restrictions apply. or any occasion party!

14701 Cumberland Road Fishers/Noblesville (just north of 146th street on cumberland rd.)

Fun? We are fun...BIG FUN!!!! JumpForJoyFun.com

577-5799

classifieds To place your ad here, contact Rachel at Rachel@IndysChild.com

WANTED

Express Sitter’s

A babysitting and Nanny Service

                 We send a babysitter or                         Nanny to your home,                    anytime that you need one.                     If you looking to run errands,      or just to have some time away, then           Express Sitters is your answer. 

CHILDREN FOR LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

Children who do and do not stutter between the ages of 3 years and 5 years 11 months are being recruited for a research study on speech-language development and stuttering at IU. PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE $50 AS WELL AS FREE SPEECH-LANGUAGE TESTING.

Call 317-581-1182   www.expressitters.com

BUBBLES THE CLOWN

To learn more, please visit our Web site www.indiana.edu/~spdislab or contact Dr. Julie Anderson at (812) 856-1240 or judander@indiana.edu

317-773-1449 or at dlawallen16@sbcglobal.net

• Kid and Family DJ Services • Moonwalk Rentals • Inflatable Slide Rentals • Tumblebus Classes - Parties • School Life Skills Programs • Fun Concerts for Kids and Families • Mik by Himself or with the Bounce House Band

317-577-5799

www.jumpforjoyfun.com www.mikthemusicman.com

WANTED: Serger table model

sewing machine, five-thread, selfthreading. 317-595-9306. Call after 6pm.

WANTED: Bedroom wall unit (no bed). 317-595-9306. Call after 6pm.

INDYSCHILD.COM 55


peytonmanning.stvincent.org

“I have the privilege to care for children and, through medical or surgical treatments, restore them to health.” - chris miyamoto, md

Pediatric ENT Specialist Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent

Indy's Child // 08.2009  

Indy's Child is Indiana's #1 Magazine for Parents!! In this issue: "Back to School Basics", "Standardize Testing" and "What Your Teen Doesn'...

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