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September 2010 * indyschild.com


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Commentary & Parenting * Publisher’s Note: Tatum Parker and Family Prove That With the Lemons of Life­—You Can Make Lemonade

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DEAR TEACHER: Setting a Good Foundation, Reading to Middle Schoolers and Learning Numbers mommy magic: Recovering Perfectionism ask a teen: How to Boost Your Teen's Self-Esteem

fantastic field trips

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Eco-mod mom: It's All Green to Me

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Health & Wellness * pediatric Health: Back to School the Healthy Way

MISSION POSSIBLE: Captivating Students

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PEDIATRIC health: Now, Hear This

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special needs awareness: Gauging an IEP's Effectiveness

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special needs awareness: 10 Ways to Make Your IEP Work

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feature: Food Fantasies

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Around Town * FAMILY FUN IN INDY: Time Travel on Land or Sea Child l a n o i E x ce p t

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INDY PARKS: Hooray for Play

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museum note: Membership­— It's Worth More Than the Price of Admission!

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arts & enrichment: Kicking Up Confidence

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* RESOURCES

Creating good IEPs for kids with autism

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NEWS & SHOPPING * News You Can Use: Informing Parents with Every Issue

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Field trip guide

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open house guide

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Childcare & education directory

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special needs calendar

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special Needs Guide

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Arts & enrichment directory

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Calendar

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classifieds

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Cooking up a recipe for healthy living

Ask the Staff: What did you want to be when you grew up? When I was young, I wanted to be a teacher!

An astronaut

An artist

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A missionary or an opera singer

R O X A N NE

Second weddings 6 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

sk i

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ew

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I wanted to be the next Judy Blume!

A teacher

A ballerina, of course!

A teacher

j e nn i ca za

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K A R E N R I NG


Indy’s Child

FOUNDING PUBLISHER Barbara Wynne barbara@indyschild.com Publisher & President of Sales & Business Development Mary Wynne Cox publisher@indyschild.com Associate Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Lynette Rowland editor@indyschild.com sales and business development Jennica Zalewski jennica@indyschild.com Art Direction & Design Heather Lipe heather@indyschild.com Public Relations and Advertising Coordinator Erin Tulley erin@indyschild.com

Co mm e n ta ry & PARENTING

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Publisher’s Note

Tatum Parker and Family Prove That With the Lemons of Life—You Can Make Lemonade

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ine-year-old Tatum Parker was diagnosed with bone cancer shortly before her sixth birthday. She underwent 13 chemotherapy treatments at Riley Children’s Hospital and lost her curly hair, but gained a twinkle in her eye, a beautiful smile and emotional strength that few of us ever possess.

Tatum received a big backpack full of educational and silly toys from Colorado-based Gabby Krause Foundation to brighten her day during her chemo treatments. Tatum enjoyed her hours with the bag so much that her parents thought it would be wonderful to seek permission from the Krause Foundation to have Tatum’s Bags of Fun in Indiana so all pediatric cancer patients age two and older could have age-appropriate activities to enjoy on their first day of cancer treatments. Jayson and Kendra Parker launched the project with Tatum’s enthusiastic support. Younger brothers Tynan, 6, and Truitt, 3, helped chose games and books for the bags. Last year, the Parker family provided 300 backpacks to pediatric cancer patients at Riley Children’s Hospital

enjoyed being on a team. Everyone loves Tatum, and for that she won our Best Attitude Award.

and Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent. Tatum visits cancer patients when she returns to Riley for follow-up appointments. Even when Tatum’s cancer returned in her right lung in 2008 and she had to take an additional 11 chemo-treatments and 25 radiation treatments, at Tatum’s insistence, the family resolved to find a way to continue Tatum’s Bags of Fun.

How can you help? On September 11th, the Parkers are having a big Family Day at the Riviera Club, 5640 N. Illinois St. Indianapolis, starting with the Merrill Lynch Bull Run to benefit Tatum’s Bags of Fun. The day begins at 8:30 a.m. with a 5-mile run, 3-mile walk and lots of kids activities. Kids under 12 are free. Advanced registration is $20 and $25 the day of the event. Visit http://tatums.bagsoffun.org and you’ll find ways to donate a $350 bag in her name and participate in all the activities of the September 11th Family Day. Tatum’s Bags of Fun is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to delivering a backpack of age-appropriate toys and activities to every newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patient.

The good news is that Tatum celebrated excellent results in October 2009 and has enjoyed a full year of good health, school and athletics. This summer, Tatum was a member of my Junior Summer Wonders Tennis program this summer where she learned to play games and sets and

Controller / ACCOUNTANT Roxanne Burns roxanne@indyschild.com OFFICE MANAGER Karen Ring karen@indyschild.com ON THE COVER Kayla Bell with Chef Dwight Simmons from Kiss Z Cook. Information on classes, cafe and meals to go at www.kisszcook.com. COVER PHOTOGRAPHY Sara Morris COVER Girl's Outfit Aeromax Toys available at www.aeromaxtoys.com.

Indy’s Child 921 E. 86th Street, Suite 130 Indianapolis, IN 46240 317.722.8500 (p) 317.722.8510 (f ) indyschild@indyschild.com Copyright: Indy’s Child Parenting Magazine is published monthly. Copyright 2009 by Indy’s Child Inc. and Midwest Parenting Publications, LLC.All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Distribution of this magazine does not constitute an endorsement of products, commentary or services herein. For information on subscriptions, editorial guidelines, advertising rates and more visit www.indyschild.com.

INDYSCHILD.COM 7


NE WS & SHOPPING

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news you can use

Autism Society of Indiana to host Fourth Annual Excellence Awards The Autism Society of America’s Indiana Chapter will hosts its fourth annual Excellence Awards at the Athenaeum on November 20, 2010 at 6pm. The Athenaeum is located at 401 E. Michigan Road, Indianapolis, IN 46204.

2010 Healthy Kids Coloring Contest, sponsored by the American Heart Association

In an effort to encourage Indianapolis-area kids to develop a healthier lifestyle, the American Heart Association is hosting a coloring contest. The contest is open to children ages 12 and younger and contestants are asked to draw a picture of themselves making healthy choices. Contestants may use crayons, markers or pencils, but no computer graphics and drawings should be submitted on an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of white paper. All entries must be received by Friday, Oct. 8, 2010 and will be judged on creativity, originality and effectiveness. Entries should be mailed to: The American Heart Association, 6100 W. 96th Street, Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46278. Two winners will be chosen: ages 7 and under and ages 8 – 12. Winners will receive: A prize bucket from Radio Disney A prize pack from Indy’s Child Magazine A guest appearance on Wish TV’s “Indy Style” show The chance to record a PSA on Radio Disney

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For questions regarding the coloring contest, contact Tim Harms, American Heart Association, at 317-732-4700 or tim.harms@heart.org

8 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

The evening with dinner will be at 6 p.m., followed by a concert at 8 p.m. by Drew Tretick playing the electric violin. Mr. Tretick's performance is sponsored by the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. Mr. Tretick has established himself as an internationally recognized violinist and is a favorite with audiences for his expressive performances and warm stage presence. A graduate of the prestigious Juilliard School of Music in New York City, he has recorded and performed with the London Symphony Orchestra and others with appearances at Carnegie Hall and his solo tours have taken him throughout Europe and Asia. He has performed with Andrea Bocelli at a benefit for Bocelli’s ARPA Foundation and the Children’s

Partners Foundation. He has been on stage with with Chris Isaak, Glenn Campbell, Sandy Patti, Tony Bennett, Doc Severinsen, Stevie Wonder, Dionne Warwick, the late John Denver and others. To hear Drew’s music, please visit http://www. drewtretick.com or http://www.goviolin.com/. Tickets will be $75 each and are available at www. inautism.org under Upcoming Events. This year, the Awards Dinner recognizes excellence in five categories: Early Intervention, Advocacy/Self-Advocacy, Family Leadership, Direct Care, and Partnership. For more information about Autism Society of Indiana, please contact Dana Renay, Executive Director, at 317-658-2973 or dana@inautism.org, or Mary Roth, Administrative Assistant, at 317-695-0252 or mary@inautism.org.

The Little Mermaid Returns to Beef and Boards—Win Tickets! Hans Christian Anderson’s tale of the little mermaid takes children on a mystical adventure under the sea and beyond. The young mermaid, Melody, longs to experience the enchanting land above the sea. But because she is still a child, her father, Poseidon, will not allow her to go. See what happens when the young princess goes off to

a world very different from her own and what she learns along the way. In September, register to win tickets to The Little Mermaid just by registering for the Indy’s Child e-newsletter and then entering to win the week we announce the contest in our e-newsletter. Just visit www.indyschild.com, enter your e-mail address in our “Sign up for our Email Newsletter” button on the right and click GO!


Brain Balance Parent Lectures

Back to School with Diabetes? Know Your Rights! If your child has diabetes, back-toschool time may pose extra anxiety for parents as kids face the challenges of new routines, teachers and sometimes schools. It’s a big deal for any child to go back to school, but for a child with diabetes, every day is an important step in the journey of diabetes management. Students with diabetes are protected by several laws that prohibit discrimination due to diabetes, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. In addition, some children with diabetes may be protected under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). A disability is defined by these laws as a substantial limitation on a major life activity. For children with diabetes, major life activities include, but are not limited to, the major bodily function of the endocrine system, eating, caring for oneself, thinking, communicating and learning. In 2008, the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act (ADAAA) expanded the list of major life activities to include performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, learning, reading and working. The ADAAA provides that

major bodily functions are also major life activities. The law specifically includes the endocrine system. Children with diabetes are also protected by the Safe at School Diabetes School Care Act — an Indiana law that permits children with diabetes to attend their preferred school and carry their diabetes supplies with them, and allows students the right to test their blood sugar in the classroom. In addition, the law requires schools to have a school employee trained as a volunteer health aide to support the child’s diabetes management when no school nurse is present. As a parent or legal guardian of a child with diabetes, you have the right to address concerns about your child’s diabetes management and disability rights at school. The American Diabetes Association offers help to families dealing with diabetes. To learn more, please visit www.diabetes.org or contact Carol Dixon at cdixon@diabetes.org or 317-3529226, ext. 6732. The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services and information to hundreds of communities; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Their mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

Brain Balance Achievement Centers offer the Brain Ba lance Prog ram® in 29 nationwide locations. This proprietar y, nonmedical program has been successful in helping hundreds of children who suffer from ADD/ADHD, Dyslexia, Tourette’s, Asperger’s and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Brain Balance Achievement Centers are able to correct the child’s underlying brain imbalance, improve function and reduce/eliminate negative behaviors.

The parent lectures will discuss the 12week afterschool program, which first includes a comprehensive assessment of all areas of a child’s brain and body function. Then, by integrating physical and cognitive exercises with dietary change,

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To register for a parent lecture, please call 317-843-9200 and ask for Julie Peterson. Educators and professionals, such as occupational therapists, psychologists and pediatricians, are also encouraged to attend. Brain Balance Achievement Centers, 9510 N. Meridian Street, Suite D, Indianapolis Thursday, September 9, at 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, September 15, at 1:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 21, at 7:00 p.m.

Yo Gabba Gabba Returns to Indianapolis—Win Tickets! Win tickets to Yo Gabba Gabba Live featuring hiphop legend Biz Markie, performing at the Murat Theatre at the Old National Center on Wednesday October 13 at 6 p.m. Prize pack includes: 4 prime tickets (performance time TBD) Valet parking VIP crown room access 2 kids t-shirts 2 plush character clip-ons

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In September, register to win tickets to Yo Gabba Gabba just by registering for the Indy’s Child e-newsletter and then entering to win the week we announce the contest in our e-newsletter. Just visit www. indyschild.com, enter your e-mail address in our “Sign up for our Email Newsletter” button on the right and click GO!

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family fun in indy

Time Travel on Land or Sea Local Exhibits Take Visitors Back in Time tried to save each other in that situation. You might be surprised at some of the answers and you can apply it to modern day accidents to make them think about safety without lecturing on what to do in different situations. Other topics you could discuss might include why there weren’t enough lifeboats on board or why other ships didn’t come to rescue them quicker. The exhibit is open from September 25, 2010 to January 2011 at the Indiana State Museum. Tickets are available before the exhibit opens. Another option might be to take a trip back a few more decades on land at Conner Prairie Interactive History Park. September is Country Fair time at Conner Prairie. The whole family will discover what an authentic country fair was like when your great grandparents were kids back in the 1800s. The Country Fair runs September 18 – 19 and features everything from harvested crops to rare breeds of animals. Take the family on a cruise back in time on board a recreation of the Titanic this fall at the Indiana State Museum. If your kids are anything like mine, forget books and movies if you want to hold their attention for any period of time—particularly if you link the word ‘learning’ to it. Offering up a chance to pretend they are one of the passengers aboard the Titanic presents a lot more mystery and intrigue. The beauty of this exhibit is that it allows the kids (and you) to play and learn a thing or two together.

No visit would be complete without a visit to the Apple Store on the east side of the grounds. It’s open throughout September and October and will tempt your taste buds with everything from chewy gooey caramel apples to mouth-watering cider.

Here’s how it works: As you enter the exhibit, each visitor receives a replica boarding pass of an actual passenger who was on board the ship. You then begin a chronological journey through the life of the Titanic starting with the ship’s construction, to life on board, the ill-fated sinking and amazing artifact rescue efforts. Along the way, you will discover more than 240 artifacts recovered from the Ship’s debris field and see some of them in authentic room re-creations, such as first- and third-class cabins and hallways.

And those who are looking for a date night with music under the stars will want to check out Symphony on the Prairie. There are a couple of concerts still left this season. Enjoy the Music of Buddy Holly & Friends on September 2–3. There you will see John Mueller, who starred as Buddy Holly in the national tour of the Broadway musical The Buddy Holly Story. He will be joined by Ray Anthony as Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper’s son, Jay Richardson, as they perform their respective rock hits “Oh Boy,” “La Bamba,” and “Chantilly Lace.”

Just imagine your child’s face when he puts his hand up against an iceberg while learning about the heroes who tried to save the ship and her passengers. In the end, visit the “Memorial Gallery,” where you can take your boarding pass to the memorial wall and discover whether your passenger and traveling companions survived or perished. While Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet captured a fictional romance on board the vessel, it also ignited a love affair with the vessel and what it might have been like on board the world’s largest passenger ship back in 1912. We all know she struck an iceberg and sank, killing some 1500 people, many rich and famous, in one of the worst disasters at sea. But most don’t know about the many other purposes the ship served, such as carrying mail. (I know my kids don’t understand what we did in the “olden days” before e-mail and texting.) Here’s a little primer for you before you wow the kids and show them how smart you are: Tell them this whopper weighed 46,329 tons. A little tip to remember is that kids will comprehend better if you give them something they can compare. So, 46,329 tons is about the weight of 10,071 African elephants. The ship measured 882 feet 9 inches long, which would be the equivalent of three football fields. Another way to get the kids thinking is to tell them that it happened in the middle of the night and took two hours and 40 minutes to sink. Ask them to think of ways they might have

Plunge two and one half miles beneath the surface of the North Atlantic and immerse yourself in a once-ina-lifetime adventure of d iscover y— TITANICA. The world's greatest 10 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

deep-sea scientists and award-winning filmmakers are your guides in a high-risk journey to the resting place of one of this century's darkest tragedies. Narrated by Leonard Nimoy and shot by IMAX® on 70mm film, TITANICA reveals the clearest motion pictures ever captured of the Titanic. Witness startling images of the long-lost ruin contrasted with never-before-seen 1912

Those who choose the River City Brass Band on September 4–5 will be treated to one of America’s finest and most versatile brass ensembles. Big band, swing, and jazz are just a few of the musical sounds that will drift across the prairie as you relax on a blanket or in the picnic table area. Sometimes, it is necessary to take a step back in time to appreciate what we have today. Take the kids with you to the concert, as well. There is plenty of dancing and room to run—and maybe they will wear themselves out and fall asleep in the car on the way home. Kimberly Harms has four children (5-24) along with a grandchild and is the Associate Director of Media Relations at the Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association, www.visitindy.com. You can follow her on Twitter @kimberlyharms.

archival photos showing her in all her splendor. Feel the passion of the explorers, each obsessed with a different aspect of the expedition. Relive the memories of two survivors -- an exclusive interview with Frank Goldsmith and the poignant recollections of Eva Hart. An IMAX film of extraordinary power, TITANICA sheds breathtaking light on the legend that is Titanic.

IMAX at the Indiana State Museum is running a special for the IMAX movie TITANICA that will be airing during the Titanic exhibit. Those who see both the movie and exhibit can save on movie tickets and receive free parking. The movie is 2D, 40 minutes in length and opens September 25. Tickets to the museum will be $5 with free parking in the White River State Park underground parking garage with the purchase of an IMAX ticket.


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indy parks

Hooray For Play Indy Parks Makes Indianapolis a Playful City Turn off the television, silence the cell phone and head to a park. It’s playtime in Indianapolis! For the second year, Indianapolis is honored as a Playful City USA community by KaBOOM!, a national nonprof it organization dedicated to bringing play into the lives of children. What does that mean to you? Simple! Tell your kids, neighbors, friends and family to play every day, especially on September 18, 2010, our Indy Play Celebration. Sounds easy and fun, but not all cities have the playspaces to promote healthy bodies and minds—Indianapolis does! That’s why Indianapolis was recognized as one of 118 communities across 35 states for our commitment, mission and willingness to make play important. Research shows a strong connection between play and the development of social, emotional, cognitive and intellectual skills.

Here are some helpful ways to get playing on September 18: Douglass Park Making the Band: The Dorman Street Band sings gospel, urban and old school tunes. Stretch your vocal cords or bring your own instrument to start jammin’. 12-4 p.m. FREE INDOOR POOLS Krannert, Indy Island, Thatcher, La Shonna Bates and George Washington Community School Indoor Swimming: Call 327-PARK for times and fees or visit http://aquatics.indyparks.org

Garfield Park’s Conservatory and Sunken Garden Fruit and Candy Tour: Find out where some of your Plan to play together at an Indy Park or Greenway favorite yummy treats come from with a family-friendly Trail, a church or school playground, a museum, the tour of the conservatory and the tasty food it produces. zoo or cultural center, or even your own backyard. 11-12 p.m. $3 per person. Move or groove; bike or hike, and create memories while you play. Don’t stop after September 18 — Garfield Park plan a family play date every week to continue to Arts for All: You’ve heard of petting zoos with animals? nurture the health and well-being of yourself and What about with instruments? The Arts for All theme in your child! September gives kids hands-on fun with horns and strings at the Instrument Petting Zoo. 12 – 5 p.m. FREE.

Check out Indy Parks Fall Fun Guide to start playing the day away! Go to www.indyparks.org or call (317)327-PARK.

12 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

Eagle Creek Park Nature Discovery Program: Learn about the wonders of nature with guided tours to discover native plants, weird bugs, live animals and how you can help the environment. 1:30 p.m., FREE with park admission. Eagle Creek Park’s Ornithology Center Avian Adventure: Meet a raptor, explore a backyard habitat and take a guided bird hike. Free with park admission. Call 327-BIRD for times.


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museum note

Membership­— It’s Worth More Than the Price of Admission! Children's Museum of Indianapolis Offers HUGE Benefits with Membership

These days we all want to get the most out of our money. Going out to the movies, dinner, or other activities often gets put on hold when we need to reduce family spending. A great way to spend less without sacrif icing valuable family time is to purchase a membership at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis and visit all year long, as often as you want!

Time with family remains important even when everything else might seem to get in the way. A membership in The Children’s Museum gives families a great opportunity to spend valuable time together while enjoying the interactive exhibits, everchanging experiences, inspiring programs, and special events at the world’s largest children’s museum. Free general admission is just one of the many member perks. Member families also enjoy:

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Free Carousel rides Free magazine subscription to Extra!, the museum’s magazine and program guide

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20% discount on most programs and classes 15% discount in The Children’s Museum Store 10% discount on birthday parties Discount tickets

on

Haunted

House

Discount on general admission tickets

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Advance tickets and priority seating for Lilly Theater performances Advance tickets for SpaceQuest® Planetarium

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Invitation to exhibit preview days and members-only special events Early admission on First Saturday Member Mornings Community Connections: special of fers for local family-friendly attractions

Family memberships begin at $120 and includes membership benef its for up to two adults sharing the same household and all dependent children under age 21. Familyplus memberships are also available, which include a l l fam i ly-level membership benef its plus two guests per visit. That means your family can bring along friends or relatives to enjoy the experience, too. Do your children’s grandparents live close by and want to bring the grandkids for a visit? Grandparent memberships are also available and make a great gift. Grandparent memberships include benef its for two grandparents sharing the same household and all unmarried grandchildren under age 21. Your membership opens up a world of discover y and adventure for all ages. Everyone can enjoy extraordinary family learning experiences with a membership that pays for itself in less than three visits. Explore the wide variety of membership options and choose the one that’s right for you. There has never been a better time to be part of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. We can’t wait for you to join in the fun and start making memories! Jaclyn

Falkenstein is public relations coordinator for The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis.

Save $15 on your membership purchase during the month of September. Use code 051015 online at www.childrensmuseum.org or call (317) 334-4000 and mention this offer. INDYSCHILD.COM 13


H e a lt h & W e lln e ss

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pediatric health

Back to School the Healthy Way

Making Healthy Food Choices a Family Goal Without a doubt, food in the United States is more processed than in any other country. Add to that a busy lifestyle that most families maintain, and parents can feel as if they are losing the battle to keep healthy food choices in front of their kids. It also gets harder when they are back to school and spending less time at home. But parents can still influence kids of all ages to make healthy food choices—and they can do it in a way that is fun too!

In fact, as part of Project 18, Kara Borcherding, RD, a pediatric dietitian at Peyton Manning Children's Hospital at St.Vincent, has a number of tips to help you add fruits, vegetables, fiber and protein into your child’s diet so your he can get and stay healthy!

Mix it up. Borcherding often advises parents to group together uncommon combinations of foods, such as carrots and grapes. She says that mixing untraditional foods is very effective. “When you vary

colors and the items that you introduce— especially when you wouldn’t normally put them together—it can make lunch or a snack much more fun,” she explains. “You’d be surprised what kids will eat together, particularly when you start them young.”

she says. “You can pull a baggie straight from the freezer and add to your child’s lunch. By the time they eat at school, they are thawed out and ready to go!”

E at— don’ t drink—your calories. By all means, Borcherding advocates, push healthy beverages. Too many kids are drinking the majority of their calories through soft drinks and other sugared-up juices. She recommends water, skim milk or juices (no more than 8 oz/day) that are free of extra sugars and sweeteners.

Think again. Texture is important to children, as well. A child who won’t eat solid carrots, for example, doesn’t necessarily dislike carrots. It may just be the way they are presented. Borcherding had this problem with her own toddler. She shredded the carrots and her son gobbled them up. Keep it whole. “The more food is processed, the more nutrients we lose,” she Go covert. Sometimes you just need explains. Take the apple, for example. An to sneak them in. For older kids eating a apple is a great snack for your child. Applesauce sandwich or a wrap, add in thinly sliced is good too—but not as a good as a whole vegetables. Or add chopped vegetables to a apple. Apple juice? Good, but doesn’t contain pasta dinner, or add peas to rice. Combining nearly the amount of nutrients as in an apple. them as part of a dish may be just what your Borcherding is quick to point out that she’s child needs to eat them without complaining. not saying don’t give your child applesauce or another processed—yet healthy—snack. But, They may even like them, too! if given the choice, hand your child the whole Turn the weird-sounding into food alternative first. the wow-tasting. Borcherding says the “new” trend in vegetables is edamame. Give it the ol’ 1-2 punch. If you “Kids love to pop these beans out of a pod,” want to give your children a power snack,

try combining two of the food groups. teen, try offering them a pita pocket with Yogurt and fruit, whole-wheat crackers and their favorites. There’s something about it vegetables, string cheese and grapes—you that’s just more cool!” get the idea. Make a splash. Children should be Go low. Whenever possible, choose foods drinking water every day. If your child isn’t that are low in fat. Borcherding says this is a fan of water, consider finding a cool sports especially true for dairy products. “Kids no bottle they can carry at school. You could longer need high-fat dairy products (such as also put orange slices or lemon in their water to give it some flavor, or add strawberries to whole milk) after age 2,” she shares. the ice cube trays. Think creatively. Every kid likes ice cream on a cone. Borcherding recommends Many of these ideas are not only fun, but also giving that kid favorite a new twist. Fill simple. And your little extra effort will show ice cream cones with yogurt and top with your kids that you care about their health— berries and granola. She’s also turned “ants and they should, too. on a log” (celery sticks topped with peanut butter and raisins) into a zoo by topping them with animal crackers. And if your You and your child should check kids aren’t likely to pick up a banana or eat a out project18.stvincent.org. You’ll bowl of strawberries, then dump those items find helpful tools for eating right into a blender (add milk, yogurt and orange and getting physically active as juice—all healthy choices) and whip up a a family. And, for more tips on smoothie! healthy living for your child, call

Grow it up. As kids get older, you may want to offer foods in a more “adult” form. “Fancy it up a bit, she says. “If the traditional deli sandwich is boring to your tween or

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HEALTH & W ELLNE SS

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pediatric health

Now, Hear This

You Can Prevent Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Noise-induced hearing loss can result from a Power saws, concerts and racing cars: 110dB Here are some steps you can take to help prevent noiseone-time exposure to a very loud sound like induced hearing loss: Gunshots, fireworks: 140dB an explosion or by listening to loud noises Avoid prolonged exposure to loud noises over an extended period. Damage can start in (lawn mowers, power tools, racing cars, childhood and ultimately affect everything Many devices that children use today etc.) whenever possible. from school performance to relationships carry noise levels much higher than 85 with friends and family. decibels. For example, an MP3 player at In loud situations, move far away from the maximum level is roughly 115 decibels. source of the noise or use foam ear plugs The human ear is made up of three Other signif icant sources are loud toys, or earmuff protectors when possible. components: the external ear, the middle band instruments, video games/arcades, Turn down the volume and/or reduce the ear and the inner ear. Sensitive hair cells are snowmobiles, lawn mowers, leaf blowers duration of use for TVs, radios and stereos. located in the inner ear and convert sounds and power tools. into electrical signals that travel to the brain Children who listen to music or play and allow us to hear. Once these cells are You may or may not notice signs because video games with earphones should take damaged by noise, they cannot be f ixed. symptoms are usually gradual and rarely periodic breaks to allow the inner ear to painful. Your child or teen may f irst have rest or recover to avoid permanent injury. Noise-induced hearing loss is related to both trouble hearing high-pitched sounds or Loose-fitting ear buds maintain the volume the amount of sound and the amount of time conversations in crowded places. The most level below 80dB, and newer volumeexposed to it. Sound is measured in decibels common symptoms are vague feelings of limiting earphones are also available. (dB). Anyone who is exposed to noise levels pressure or fullness in the ears, close-up Some MP3 players also include parental at 85 decibels or higher for a long period of conversation that seems to be muff led or far controls to limit maximum volume levels. time is at risk. away, as well as a ringing sound in the ears.

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Here are some examples of activities and their Even though symptoms may go away, there F o r more in for m at ion, v isit noise levels: is at least some permanent damage. If you www.RileyHospital.org. suspect hearing loss, talk to your child’s Every day, children are bombarded by sound. Whispering: 30dB doctor about a hearing test and possibly an Dr. Stuart Morgenstein is And as technology consumes more and more examination by a specialist. of their lives, hearing loss is on the rise. a Pediatric Otolaryngologist with Normal conversation: 60dB

Music. Video games. TV. Traff ic.

Riley Hospital for Children.

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NE WS & SHOPPING

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eco-mod mom

Ayala’s Herbal Water

Gear Ties

Craving a zero calorie drink that doesn’t contain artificial sweeteners or preservatives? Ayala’s Herbal Water is a flavorful option when looking to hydrate without compromise. This new concept in flavored water is a delicious upgrade from plain h2o by artfully pairing complimentary herbs and infusing them into purified water. The Lemongrass Mint Vanilla flavor is delicate, yet flavorful, and leaves a refreshing feeling in your mouth. Six varieties total, best in a flight (many small samples). www.herbalwater.com Size & Price: 16oz, $2+

How can an inconspicuous, flexible and colorful object become something you always wish you had more of? Gear Ties are reusable rubber twist ties that come in a variety of colors and sizes. They are very affordable and have a useful purpose for every room in your home, not to mention your car, boat or office. Organizing computer or TV wires, marking wine glasses at a dinner party and even as a creative plaything, the uses for this simple yet innovative product are only limited by your imagination. Indefinitely reusable and made in the USA. Available September 1 at Menard’s stores nationwide. www.geartie.com $4.99-$6.99

Noodle & Boo Play-Date Sunscreen Tested on a play date in 90-degree weather, this boutiquestyle sunscreen performed beautifully. Though a little pricey and not completely all-natural, this silky sunscreen protected a small army of sweaty, adventure bound preschoolers without complaint. The application of the SPF30 cream went on smooth, rubbing in evenly without a greasy feel. Although it says it is unscented, it had a pleasing faint, natural smell that gently lingered on the kids. www.noodleandboo.com 4oz, $22

Noodle & Boo Reed Diffuser

Cool It Card Game The Union of Concerned Scientists have made their calculations and secured their pocket protectors to bring the people (ages 8-adult) an engaging card game addressing global warming. Teachers and homeschoolers will appreciate the online Teachers Guide. The 77 sturdy cards are divided into three categories: Solution Cards, Problem Cards and Special Cards. The idea is to find practical ecological solutions to combat real life problems like oil dependence and urban sprawl. The game is manufactured using recycled paper and vegetable-based inks. www.ucsusa.org/coolit $7.95

Spilt Milk & Cookies Inspirational Quotes “Kind words can be short, but their echoes are endless” –Mother Teresa. Spilt Milk & Cookies answers the call for inner peace with these inspirational quote cards. More than a dozen varieties such as “foodie,” “hero” and “giggle.” Each made in the USA box contains 36 cards, printed on recycled card stock and comes with a wooden stand. Perfect thoughtful and thought-provoking gift. www.spiltmilkandcookies.com $14.00

Kamibashi String Doll Gang These hand-crafted in Thailand 2-3” string characters come on a keychain with double sided tag that explains their individual special power. “Dexter,” for instance, helps you fly through your homework. He has a big head with wire glasses, checkered pants, geeky part and seed beads for teeth. “String Blade” looks like a hard-core roller derby girl with the power to jam past the pack. All keychain styles have a heavy duty lobster claw clasp. Kamibashi also offers smaller magnetized Original String Doll Gang. www.kamibashi.com $10.00 16 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

This delicately scented, faintly purple concoction in this simple reed diffuser channels feelings of cuddling a new baby while eating vanilla ice cream. If that sounds good to you, then you will enjoy the notes of peaches and cream with berries and honey. Perfect bridal, blessingway or baby shower gift. It comes attractively packaged and you simply open the vessel then insert and arrange the small skewer-like bamboo reeds. The oil is absorbed into the reeds and dispersed into the air. Of course, please remember to keep out of reach of little ones. Available online or at Nordstrom. www.noodleandboo.com 3.4 oz, $36

Tees for Change We like this T-shirt company that not only spreads peace and well-being with its inspirational message tees, but also because with its partnership with Trees for the Future, they plant a tree for every T-shirt you purchase. Shirts are made with environmentally-friendly bamboo (70%) and organic cotton (30%). Comfy, well shaped and they wash nicely, too. Also available: men’s, women’s and plussized shirts, as well as jewelry and handmade journals. www.teesforchange.com $32-$34

Love at First Bite: the Unofficial Twilight Cookbook Even if you don’t consider yourself a Twi-Hard (hardcore Twilight Fan), you may enjoy this genre-specific culinary guide. Considering the main characters in the Twilight series of movies and books rarely eat, there are a wide variety of recipes to pull from. 100+ pages of concoctions with Twilight-appropriate names such as Lion and the Lamb Stew, Jasper Cocktail or Charlie’s Catch of the Day Crab Cakes. The book is broken into sections dividing courses and beverages. Also comes with a party planning guide, quotes from the books/movies, trivia quiz and other Twilight treats. While the recipes are not gourmet nor particularly inspired, they are Twilight-inspired, and that’s good enough for me. www.unofficialtwilightcookbook.blogspot.com $14.95

The Green Year by Jodi Helmer Season by season and day by day, this book suggests small, inexpensive things you can do to be more mindful of the earth and each other. This September 20th (or today) consider reusing a 20-ounce water bottle in your toilet tank. Simply fill and sink it in the tank portion if you do not already have a low-flow toilet. The added volume will reduce how much water is refilled and thereby used when you flush making it a simple and inexpensive thing you can do to save water and your budget! Each page of the book not only gives the date and an eco-suggestion, but also a space to record an alternative to the suggested idea that works better for you. Printed on recycled paper and practicing what she preaches, the author emphasizes that “the small things add up.” To Helmer, I say bravo. www.green-year.com $14.95

Mom’s Best Naturals Cereals Perusing the cereal aisle at the grocery can be overwhelming and expensive. Narrow your search today to include the Mom’s Best Naturals line of kid-, budget- and earth-friendly varieties. The company is based in Minnesota and has been family owned for four generations. Both all-natural and wholesome, the production of these cereals is powered by wind energy. You’ll soon find yourself obsessed with the Mallow-Oats (as in marshmallows, of course) or Toasted Cinnamon Squares. Each serving has 10 grams of whole grain and you won’t find any high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) anywhere. A bonus? These cereals cost 20-50% less than popular national brands and other natural and organic brands. Cheaper, better tasting, good for you and ecologically mindful—sounds like a recipe for success! www.momsbestnaturals.com $2.29+

HABA Baby Toys If you consider baby toys with flashing lights and electronic sound an all out assault, then you will adore HABA Toys extensive line of clutching toys, rattles and pacifier chains. The Jingle Train clutching toy is a flexible ring of beech and maple carved pieces perfect for teething or entertainment. It has a little jingle bell and train segments that have been detailed with non-toxic paints and stains. The gentle chime of the bell intrigued our “little tester” and mom was impressed by the quality construction, too. Why buy BPA-loaded plastic toys when you can own or give a thoughtful, all-natural plaything from a German company that has been delighting children since 1938? Available at www.oompa.com $13.99 Kelly Huff is our resident Eco-Mod Mom. She is a professional chef turned stay-at-home mom who enjoys introducing her children to a variety of culinary delights and living life as organically and eco-friendly as possible. Want to suggest local artisans, organic ideas and products or culinary delights? E-mail her at Kelly@indyschild.com. Visit IndysChild.com this month to find her brand-new blog!


INDYSCHILD.COM 17


What are your favorite memories as a child? Do some of them include family vacations, school field trips, summer camp and special events at the theatre, museum or national park? As our lives fill with routine tasks, professional trips and a few weeks for family vacation, families depend on the creativity of schools and caretakers to ensure children get the same experiences we had. Field trips in the formative years are one of the most important activities teachers can provide for their students. As we all know, children learn by doing. They remember what they have personally experienced. Field trips are a type of experiential learning that gets children away from the traditional classroom setting and into a new style of learning. They can be as simple as taking a class of children out on the school grounds for a lesson in observation or as detailed as an out-of-state visit to a particular field site.

Little known museums

Columbus, Indiana is home to the Kidscommons Children’s Museum. Here, children from infant through fourteen years old spend time in the Childhood Garden, enjoy the state-ofthe-art computer lab in the Power Outlet, scamper up the 17-foot-tall climbing wall, or hang out in the bubble room. Museum favorites include the ExploraHouse, home of the world famous giant toilet, and Kids on the Move, a healthy lifestyles exhibit. “We have experienced success with school parent groups funding field trips to Kidscommons Children’s Museum. Several have used our programs as a reward for school fundraisers 18 INDY’S CHILD * September 2010

rather than giving kids a pizza party. We continually work with underwriting for transportation and have partnered with Bartholomew County Solid Waste Management District to offer free programs at an outdoor wetlands lab,” said Diane Robbins, director of education, proving that educational destinations are trying to make field trips affordable and attainable. Evansville Museum of Art and Science is located on the Ohio River, another historic destination full of history. The museum offers classes and hands-on exhibits taught by local artists and museum staff where children get their creative juices flowing. While you’re in southern Indiana, visit the Wesselman Nature Society and learn to make your backyard attract wildlife, if that’s what you wish. Canoe lessons and daylong canoe trips are available or earn your Boy and Girls Scout badges at the Wesselman Nature Society. What do computers, dinosaurs and astronauts have in common? They can all be found and experienced at the Imagination Station by ASSET in Lafayette. Visit every Saturday and explore a variety of interesting subjects from all corners of the science field. At Imagination Station, they believe hands-on learning is the most effective way for a child to retain information. In that effort, classes involve

experiments and child participation so that your child can be immersed in the scientific experience. Classes are designed for children six and older and require a five dollar admission fee to help pay for the materials. The Indiana Historical Society and Eiteljorg MuseumAmerican Art, National Art Museum of Sport take some preparation to make them fulfilling learning experiences. With larger groups, leaders have to do their homework to emphasize teaching points and ensure students are tracking and learn something they didn’t know before the day started.

Rural life & history

At Piney Acres Farm, students can mine for gems. “Folks purchase mining rough, sand with real gems in the bag, and place the sand in a mining pan and then place rough and pan into the sluice to wash out the sand and what is left are the gems,” said Rex Zenor, “We are new to offering tours or field trips, but are flexible enough to let parents or teachers come and use the farm to teach about agriculture and history. Most of our tours are in the fall with our pumpkin patch and corn maze then more visit when our Christmas tree farm is open.”


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Field trips not only expand children’s learning and experiences by providing them with hands-on experiences, they also increase their knowledge and understanding of the world in which they live. Tuttle Orchards offers Preschool Far m tours for ages up to f ive, Pumpkin Biolog y Tour a nd Apple s : Then and Now Tour both for kindergarten through second g rade a nd The Economics of Apples Tour for second through fifth grades. Tours begin September 15, 2010 and are generally a half hour. Kelsay Farms isn’t new to the field trip scene, they’ve been giving school tours for over 30 years in the spring, summer and fall. The best time to visit Kelsay Farms is in October. “We offer many attractions for children including farm tours, baby calves, corn maze, hayrides, Moo Choo rides, Bale Mountain and a huge straw bale play area,” said Amy Kelsay, education director. “We are adding the Baby Barnyard and Rope Maze this year while featuring live music, face painting, kids’ games and crafts on our Dairy Days Festival weekend October 15 through 17. Our group tours include a guide farm tour which includes a brief lesson on dairy foods and a dairy snack. These tours are based on Indiana academic standards and are handson. Children will see a modern milking parlor, over 500 cows and baby calves. They will also learn the importance of getting 3 servings a day of dairy and that milk leads to strong bones

20 INDY’S CHILD * September 2010

and healthy teeth. All students receive a goodie bag, cheese snack and a Kelsay Farms coloring book.” Crown Hill Cemetery provides educator handbooks, tree maps and cemetery maps. Some famous people laid to rest at Crown Hill include Benjamin Harrison, John Dillinger, Catharine Merrill and James Whitcomb Riley. See big cats, tigers, panthers and more at the Black Pine Animal Park in Albion, Indiana just north of Fort Wayne operated by Professional Animal Retirement Center, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-prof it organization. This is a permanent refuge for exotic animals in need, including retired performing animals and former pets. Over 85 in all, guests can see 14 big cats, bears, primates, birds, reptiles and more. Children of all ages will be in awe of the creatures normally found across the Atlantic living here in Indiana. The Indiana State Museum is home to thousands of items ranging from prehistoric fossils to current popular culture items and everything in between with new exhibits opening regularly. Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition opens September 25 – Januar y 16, 2011. This exhibit takes you on a journey back in time to experience the legend of Titanic like never before. The galleries in this fascinating Exhibition feature over 240 real artifacts recovered from the ocean f loor along with room re-

creations and personal stories; each highlighting a different chapter in the compelling story of Titanic’s maiden voyage.

Get out while you can!

Walking tours downtown are the perfect way to welcome a cool fall season and teach middle school and high school students about Indiana history starting with the Indiana War Memorial. Students will learn what role Hoosiers have played in fighting and defending our freedom. Historic downtown Indianapolis walking tour blends discussions of architecture and history in an ideal guided tour for fourth and fifth grade students. Visit www.historiclandmarks.org for more tours and group tour information

Field trips are first to go

Field trips not only expand children’s learning and experiences by providing them with hands-on experiences, they also increase their knowledge and understanding of the world in which they live.

The recent fuel crisis and educational cutbacks have forced most school districts to reevaluate the instructional importance of field trips. Mobile field trips have increased in popularity as these concerns often force educators to think outside the box to meet the experiential needs of students. Nikki Keever is a freelance writer living in Noblesville, Indiana with her husband and three children.


Field Trip Guide Indianapolis Zoo 1200 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, In 46222 Contact: Alicia Cornett, HIX Institute Administrative Assistant Phone: 317-630-2180 Email: edstaff@indyzoo.com Website: www.indianapoliszoo.com

Kidscommons provides educational programs for children pre-school through sixth grade that are agespecific and address Indiana Academic Standards, designed to stimulate creative thinking and problemsolving skills while enhancing classroom curriculum, either at the museum or in the classroom. Home school and scout programs also available.

Explore the Zoo & Gardens with your school group to learn more about animals from around the world. Exhibits at the Indianapolis Zoo highlight various habitats, including plains, deserts, forests and oceans. Reservations are required two weeks in advance of the visit date.

Marengo Cave US National Landmark

Kelsay Farms

Marengo Cave offers great field trips for all ages 363 days a year. Open daily 9am, Marengo Cave offers two easy walking tours, gemstone mining, picnicking, hiking as well as camping and camping cabins. For ages 10 and more, cave exploring trips are also available.

6848 N. 250 E., Whiteland, IN 46184 Phone: 317-535-4136 Email: amy@kelsayfarms.com Website: www.kelsayfarms.com Visit Kelsay Farms this Oct.! Dairy farm tours, hayrides, pumpkins, Moo Choo rides, Bale Mountain and a Corn Maze! Fall fun for the family! Group tours available.

Kidscommons, Columbus’ Community Children’s Museum 309 Washington Street, Columbus, IN 47201 Contact: Diane Robbins Phone: 812-378-3046 Email: educator@kidscommons.org Website: www.kidscommons.org

400 E State Road 64, Marengo, IN 47140 Contact: Reservations Office Phone: 812-365-9466 Email: ro@marengocave.com Website: www.marengocave.com

NCAA Hall of Champions 700 West Washington Street, Indianapolis, IN 46204 Phone: 317-917-6451 Email: hocmail@ncaa.org Website: www.NCAAHallofChampions.org The NCAA Hall of Champions offers an exciting opportunity to engage with the NCAA studentathlete. Interactive exhibits on two floors combined with unique and flexible meeting and event space make this the perfect place for visitors and groups of all kinds.

Science Central 1950 N. Clinton St., Fort Wayne, IN 46805 Contact: Jim Hodgin Phone: 260-424-2400 x 451 Email: registrationmanager@ sciencecentral.org Website: www.sciencecentral.org Science Central offers over 120 hands-on exhibits as well as programs, labs and demos in various areas of science, technology, engineering and math education. State standards are available for exhibits, labs, demos and programs.

Contact: Celeste Wolfinger, Museum Visit Coordinator Phone: 812-337-1337 ext. 11 Email: schedule@wonderlab.org Website: www.wonderlab.org A friendly learning environment with engaging hands-on exhibits that support Indiana process and content science standards. Group demonstrations and lab sessions are available. The gift store offers “real life” math experiences and “Science To Go” bags. WonderLab welcomes people of all ages and abilities. Ask about outreach services to schools.

Traders Point Creamery 9101 Moore Road, Zionsville, IN 46077 Contact: Amy Rhodes Phone: 317.733.1700 Email: tours@tpforganics.com Website: www.traderspointcreamery.com Our Organic Dairy Farm offers Tours allowing you the opportunity to learn how our healthy, delicious products are created from pasture to table. Tours are designed for families, schools, and specialty groups. We offer an age and interest appropriate look at the processes of our farm. A yummy tasting of our products can be added to the tours!

WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology 308 W. 4th St., Bloomington, IN 47404

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From the moment one decides to have children, the questions begin. How should they be raised, disciplined and educated? Options abound in the Indianapolis area for quality education, but when the time arrives to send your young ones off to school, should you go with a public or private education? According to a 2009 GreatSchools.com and Harris Interactive poll, nearly one in four parents are currently considering switching their child’s school either from private to public or public to private as a result of the economy. It’s a personal decision that shouldn’t be made based on generalizations. Many factors, of course, must be considered when making this very important decision for your child’s future. What are the costs? What are the advantages? What are the challenges? What makes private schools unique? Indianapolis private schools offer a plethora of opportunities for your children at all educational levels. From preschool to pre-college, the qualities of a private education could set your child on a positive path.

Preschool Power The early years of a child’s education will set the course for their educational future. Studies consistently show that children who attend preschool are more likely to graduate from high school and attend college.

The International School of Indiana provides a preschool (ages 3 through kindergarten) that is a full-day academic program. Students learn in either French or Spanish in a total immersion setting (meaning that children carry out all of their normal learning activities in the target language, thereby acquiring a new language at the same time as building their early academic and social skills). A Mandarin Chinese program is also offered and is total immersion for three-year olds, and ‘dual’ immersion together with English in grades pre-kindergarten and kindergarten. The curriculum includes numerical and literacy skills, world discovery, physical education, social and emotional development and the arts. Traders Point Christian Academy offers a Christian-based education for children from preschool through grade 12 with a mission to “challenge and educate students within the framework of a Biblical world view while leading them to a personal faith and transformed life in Jesus Christ.” Their early childhood program for children ages 2 to 5 focuses on the development of age-appropriate academic and social skills in addition to introductions to music, physical education and Bible stories. Children typically enjoy two field trips per year, as well. The Sycamore School encourages curiosity, experimentation and exploration for young, gifted children in preschool and kindergarten. Preschool students read and write to the extent of their ability. Reading, writing, and math instruction begin in kindergarten, and children are grouped with others having similar skills. Students receive instruction from specialists in Spanish, art appreciation, music, and physical education in addition to basic computer skills. Park Tudor’s preschool and kindergarten program focuses on helping children make the transition from home to school environments. Children attend full days that feature flexible arrival times, rest and regroup periods, structured activities (physical education, music, and computers), introduction to Spanish, an outdoor nature lab and monthly community field trips. 22 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010


A local private school may offer your child the advantages he or she needs to forge ahead at an accelerated pace thus placing them in a position for further achievement in the world of higher education. The mission of St. Richard’s School, an independent Episcopal day school, is to “foster knowledge and values for a lifetime through the implementation of our five pillars for success: faith, classic curriculum, leadership, civic responsibility and global readiness.” At the preschool level, classes are offered in language arts, math, art, French, fine and gross motor skills, faith development, physical education and social and emotional development. In addition, a portfolio system allows parents and teachers an appreciation of growth and progress and provides a collection of student work for safe-keeping.

English in grades 4 and 5. (Students need no prior foreign language experience to enter at any age level). The curriculum is supplemented by overnight camps, an after-school enrichment program and f ield trips.

At the elementary and middle school level, kids can go above and beyond the ordinary with the following private school options.

Trader s Poi nt Ch r ist ia n Academy’s elementary education division (kindergarten through 4th grade) focuses on “building knowledge, nurturing personal growth, and encouraging lifelong study within the context of the Biblical worldview.” Students are also encouraged to move from teacher-led thinking processes to learning to be their own thinkers. Middle school children (grades 5 through 8) prepare for high school with a growing emphasis on problem-solving, critical thinking and incorporating a Christian worldview into all subject areas.

The International School of Indiana educates students at the elementary school level to be bilingual. This is achieved through immersion teaching in French, Spanish or Mandarin Chinese in the elementary years, and a combination of foreign language and

At the Sycamore School, students study content that is more abstract, more complex, broader, and deeper than the norm. Studies are both accelerated and enriched through flexible grouping strategies, f ield trips, resource people, mentors, and written and visual media.

Elementary Advantages

24 INDY’S CHILD * September 2010

Instruction in music, art, Spanish, computer technology, and physical education is provided by specialists in each area. The Orchard School is an independent, nonsectarian school for students in preschool through grade eight. Children in the elementary program are encouraged to discover, explore and experiment as they learn. The program is designed to “engage developing minds, build self-confidence, allow a child to see the world from different perspectives, teach students to work together cooperatively, and develop a concern for others.” Park Tudor’s lower and middle schools (grades 1-8) offer “an active, family-oriented environment in which children are encouraged to take risks and develop confidence in their ability to learn.” Park Tudor offers an integrated Spanish language program beginning in junior kindergarten and continuing through grade 5. Spanish is completely integrated into the curriculum throughout these grades. Middle school students have the opportunity to study Spanish, French or Latin. In addition, Park Tudor has an extensive travel program beginning in elementary school. Fourth and

fifth graders may participate in a two-week exchange program to Montevideo, Uruguay or Valladolid, Spain. All fourth graders take part in an annual trip to Williamsburg, Virginia, and younger students also take annual trips to Camp Crosley and Camp Tecumseh. Middle School students visit Washington, DC and Dearborn, Michigan. St. Richard’s School strives to “shape our students’ intellectual, emotional, social, physical, and spiritual gifts by maintaining high academic expectations and ethical standards, and by encouraging and teaching moral and religious values, respect, service, and discipline in a climate of enthusiasm and joy.” In addition, St. Richard’s School has been nationally recognized for their foreign language program at the middle school level.

Reaching High in High School The most challenging time in a young man or woman’s life is often their first step into high school. A local private school may offer your child the advantages he or she needs to forge


ahead at an accelerated pace thus placing them in a position for further achievement in the world of higher education. The International School of Indiana High School combines the International Baccalaureate programs with a uniquely multicultural, internationally focused education, while still being firmly rooted in Indiana. All ISI students take on the full International Baccalaureate Diploma and meet the requirements for the Indiana Academic Honors Diploma. In addition, senior students complete a range of challenging tasks, including oral reports, presentations, projects and portfolios, and sit for externally assessed written examinations. Seniors also write a substantial research paper related to one of their six subjects. Traders Point Christian Academy’s high school offers a continuation of Biblically integrated curriculum with a college preparatory academic structure. Benefits of the program include small class sizes averaging 15 students, a laptop computer program providing all students with a personal laptop, intensive study in Spanish including travel to a Spanish speaking country in grades 9 and 10 and a wide variety of interscholastic athletic competition. Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School students follow a challenging liberal arts program to develop skills in critical thinking, communication and learning. Technology tools and writing are incorporated throughout the curriculum to enhance research, idea

development and presentation skills. Students are encouraged to be inquisitive and open to growth, thus discovering and exploring new ideas and issues. For example, this year eight Brebeuf seniors will be sharing with the entire freshman class the life lessons contained in Sean Covey’s book, “The Habits for Highly Effective Teens.” This has come about from the Dow AgroSciences Leadership Seminar the eight seniors attended last fall in which they studied this same book. These 8 students were so impressed with the wealth of the information and how impactful it could be for all Brebeuf students that they made it their mission to develop a way to pay it forward to the larger student body community. This year, they will pilot a potential annual freshman class program in which all Brebeuf Jesuit freshmen will receive the book, then they will be taught the lessons by their fellow eight student leaders with the help of a leadership expert. Bishop Chatard High School is dedicated to providing a Catholic education, including religious instruction, spiritual and moral guidance and developing attitudes essential for Christian living. The school’s primary focus is on college preparatory course of studies and includes an advanced placement and honors program, as well academic support for students with special needs. The newly implemented Summa Cum Laude Program, designed for students who are academically gifted, is one of only three such programs in the country.

addition to core curriculum and additional opportunities in fine arts, athletics and community service, students have the opportunity to travel to many countries in study-travel programs, including China, Peru, Spain, France, Egypt and Jordan. Park Tudor is only one of nine schools in the U.S. invited to participate in the international Model United Nations in The Hague, Netherlands. The mission of Cathedral High School, a Catholic college preparatory high school, is to “provide to a diverse group of students opportunities for spiritual, intellectual, social, emotional and physical growth through service and academic excellence.” Academic instruction is offered on three levels: honors, academic and college preparatory. An emphasis on technology in the classroom is prevalent at all levels. Cathedral boasts an exceptional success rate. In fact, 100% of the students from the class of 2008 were accepted to colleges and universities across the nation. University High School in Indianapolis is focused on academic, creative and physical achievement. Because the school is a small, it

is much like a close-knit community offering more opportunities for every student to participate and try new things. In addition, a three-week January term offers intense study and travel opportunities in nontraditional classes. For example, students in oceanic studies may learn to scuba dive, and acting students may attend productions locally and in Chicago. Other students may have the opportunity to intern at hospitals, law firms, schools or restaurants. As you can see, Indianapolis private schools boast a plethora of opportunities for families seeking to provide their children with the most unique and stimulating programs available. While no amount of money can be put on the value of education, many of the schools offer financial aid and can provide you with detailed information on questions you might have. To find out more information, visit our School Directory for complete contact details. Rebecca Todd is a freelance writer and author of the book What's the Point? -- Looking for Logic in Modern America.

Park Tudor High School offers students a challenging college preparatory program. In

INDYSCHILD.COM 25


Open House Guide Bishop Chatard High School

5885 Crittenden Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46220 Phone: (317) 251-1451 http://www.BishopChatard.org

Open House Dates: November 4, 2010 Bishop Chatard High School will host its annual open house from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, November 4. Bishop Chatard is the Archdiocese of Indianapolis North Deanery high school and is open to any student seeking a strong academic and faith-based education. For more information, visit www.BishopChatard.org.

Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School

2801 West 86th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46268 Phone: (317) 524-7050 Website: www.brebeuf.org

Open House Dates: Nov.4, Jan. 20, March 10 Brebeuf Jesuit strives to provide the best college preparatory education in Indiana, doing so in the fullness of Jesuit scholastic tradition, holding dear and taking most seriously its mission to prepare men and women for leadership in service to others.

Culver Academies

1300 Academy Rd., Culver, IN 46511 Phone: 1-800-5-CULVER Email: admissions@culver.org http://www.culver.org

Open House Dates: Sept. 18, Oct. 16, Nov. 13, Dec. 11

Open House Dates: Sun., Sept. 26,1:30 to 3:30 Maria Montessori International Academy offer programs for infant, toddler, pre-k, Kindergarten, and elementary 1st to 6th grade

Park Tudor

7200 N. College Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 46240 Phone: (317) 415-2700 Website: www.parktudor.org Open House Dates: Visit www.parktudor. org for specific "See Us in Action" dates

A college-preparatory co-educational boarding school with 790 students representing 40 states and 25 countries that educates, nurtures and develops the whole individual – mind, spirit, and body. With strong academics and college placement, a scenic 1,800-acre lakeside campus, unparalleled facilities, 55 sports teams, equitation, dance and performing arts, Culver offers its students the opportunity of a lifetime. Scholarships and financial aid are available.

Park Tudor is a private school in Indianapolis, Indiana. As an independent school for children age 3 through grade 12, we provide an individualized learning environment where children are encouraged to explore opportunities, exceed expectations and expand possibilities. Small class sizes, a safe and caring atmosphere, and numerous extracurricular activities ensure that each child at Park Tudor receives a unique educational experience catered to his or her individual needs.

Heritage Christian School

Primrose School at Anson

6401 E. 75th Street, Indianapolis, In 46250 Contact: Emily Iglendza, Director of Enrollment Management Phone: 317-849-3441 Email: Admissions@heritagechristian.net Website: http://www.heritagechristian.net Community Open House: Thurs., Nov 10 Prep K & Kindergarten Info Night: Thursday, Jan 13

Prep K - 12th Grade college preparatory, Christian school. Non-denominational & independent. The mission of HCS is is to glorify God through the discipleship of students and the pursuit of excellence in education with the Bible as the foundation and Jesus Christ as our focus.

international School of Indiana

Lower School: 200 W. 49th Street Upper School: 4330 North Michig, Indianapolis, IN 46208 Contact: Wagner Phone: 317.923.1951 http://www.isind.org

Open House Dates: Lower School - 200 W. 49th Street, Indianapolis (Classes in Action) Tuesday, October 19, 2010: 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 30, 2010: 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Upper School - 4330 N. Mich ISI is for Indiana-based students and families who see the future involving global competition and collaboration. ISI develops independent thinkers with a distinctive edge by facilitating the International Baccalaureate curriculum and language dexterity, within a multicultural setting at all levels of the school.

Maria Montessori International Academy

4370 Weston Pointe Drive, Ste. 100, Zionsville, Carmel, Indianapolis, an, IN Phone: 317-769-2220

26 INDY’S CHILD * September 2010

http://mariamontessori-intl.org

6484 Central Blvd. Whitestown, Zionsville, IN 46075 Phone: 317-769-4990 www.primroseanson.com

Open House Dates: Please call or visit our website for event dates/times The Primrose School at Anson is a top quality infant through Kindergarten facility. Our school is located on the West side of Zionsville at the intersection of state road 334 and county road 650 E. just off Interstate 65. We offer programs for children from six weeks to twelve years of age. Visit our website at www.primroseanson.com or call us at 317-7694990. Classes are filling up so call today!

Primrose School at Bridgewater 14711 N. Gray Rd., Westfield, IN 46062 Phone: 317-848-0123 www.primrosebridgewater.com

Open House Dates: Monthly events and daily private tours. Call today for more information. The Primrose School at Bridgewater is a private preschool offering innovative, educational child care for infants through private kindergarten and after school. As The Leader in Educational Child Care®, we offer an exclusive, proprietary Balanced Learning® curriculum including Spanish, sign language, technology, music, art, PE and all core academic subjects.

Primrose School of Carmel

780 West Carmel Drive, Carmel, IN 46032 Phone: 317.577.9480 www.PrimroseCarmel.com

Open House Dates: Tours Given Daily from 9 am - 4 pm (Call to schedule other times) Primrose provides a safe and nurturing environment where children are happy, engaged, and continually preparing for a brighter tomorrow. We have programs for Infants through a full-day Kindergarten, as well as a before and after school program for elementary school children. Call us to find out more or schedule a time to visit. We look forward to meeting you!

Primrose School at Gray Eagle 12290 Olio Road, Fishers, IN 46037 Phone: 317.577.9480 www.PrimroseGrayEagle.com

Open House Dates: Tours Given Daily 9-4 or call to schedule a visit See Primrose School of Carmel listing (above) for details.

Primrose School of Noblesville

15707 North Point Blvd., Noblesville, IN 46060 Phone: 317-773-4900 www.PrimroseNoblesville.com

Open House Dates: Stop in for a tour or call for an appointment

Primrose School at WestClay 13096 Moultrie Street, Carmel, IN 46032 Phone: 317-873-0123 www.primrosewestclay.com

Open House Dates: Monthly events and private tours daily. Call today for more information. The Primrose School at WestClay is a private preschool offering innovative, educational child care for infants through private kindergarten and after school. As The Leader in Educational Child Care®, we offer an exclusive, proprietary Balanced Learning® curriculum including Spanish, sign language, technology, music, art, PE and all core academic subjects.

St. Richard's School

33 E. 33rd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46205 Phone: 317-926-0425 www.StRichardsSchool.org

Open House Dates: October 14, 2010, 8:30-1:30 St. Richard’s School develops articulate, respectful students who are critical thinkers. Our graduates know how to


study, how to manage their time, and how to put forth their personal best. Art, music, physical education, and French begin in Pre-Kindergarten with Latin and Spanish added in grades 6-8. Come see us. You’ll be glad you did!

Sycamore School 1750 W. 64th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46260 Phone: 317-202-2519

www.sycamoreschool.org

Open House Dates: October 17, 2010 from 1-3 pm; call to schedule a prospective parent tour For 25 years, Sycamore has offered gifted kids a special kind of education with: active involvement in learning; a challenging, enriched curriculum designed for gifted learners; teachers trained, experienced in gifted education; an understanding of their academic, social, emotional needs; a learning environment of peers who think and learn like they do.

Traders Point Christian Academy 6600 S. Indianapolis Rd, Whitestown, IN 46077 Phone: 317-769-2450 www.tpcs.org

Open House Dates: October 6 & February 2: K - 5;October 13 & February 9: 6th - 8th; October 27 & February 16: High School Traders Point Christian Academy is 35 years old, fully accredited and serves 550 students in preschool - high school from four counties, 70 church bodies, and several nationalities. TPCA is at I-65 North and SR 334, convenient to the north and west sides of Indianapolis, Zionsville, Brownsburg, Carmel, and Lebanon.

University High School of Indiana 2825 West 116th Street, Carmel, In 46032 317-733-4475 http://www.universityhighschool.org

Open House Dates: October 3, November 14

University is an independent college preparatory high school. Small by design, University offers academic excellence in a close-knit community atmosphere, unique in the Indianapolis area. Faculty mentoring, four-year college counseling, a three-week January Term intensive and competitive but inclusive athletics are some of University's signature features.

Acorn Montessori School

620 Kinzer Avenue, Carmel, IN 46032 Phone: 317-846-1669 Website: http://www.acornmontessorischool.com Open House Dates: 10:30 a.m., First Wednesday of the month

Beth-El Zedeck Early Childhood Center

13097 Allisonville Rd, Fishers, IN 46038 Phone: 317-849-9519 Open House Dates: Monday, August 23rd. 7-9 p.m.

Meridian Montessori

5158 N. Kenwood Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46208 317-804-1784 http://www.MeridianMontessori.com

Open House Dates: We welcome visitors to our Children's House many times throughout the year. Please contact us to arrange a visit.

Montessori Garden Academy 4141 S. East Street, Indianapolis, In 46227 Phone: 317-782-9990

Open House Dates: Sunday September 12th: 2:00- 4:00 pm, Sunday October 17th: 2:00- 4:00 pm

The Orchard School

615 W. 64th St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Phone: (317) 251-9253 Website: http://www.orchard.org/ Open House Dates: Visit http://www.orchard.

org/admissions/tours-and-open-houses/ index.aspx for open house and tour dates. The Orchard School, an independent, non-sectarian, progressive school, emphasized experiential learning.

YOUR LISTING HERE!

Contact Jennica at Jennica@IndysChild.com

www.montessorigardenacademy.org

600 W. 70th St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Phone: 253-3441 Open House Dates: Visitors welcome any day year-round.

Cathedral High School

5225 E. 56th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46226 Phone: (317) 542-1481 Email: lrenze@cathedral-irish.org Website: http://www.gocathedral.com Open House Dates: Nov. 18

Clay Montessori School 463 E. Main St, Carmel, IN 46032 Phone: 317-580-1850 Open House Dates: Tuesday, August 24th. 7-9 p.m.

Fishers Montessori School

North & South at Christ Community Church

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Co mm e n ta ry & Pa r e n t i n g

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dear teacher

Setting a Good Foundation for the School Year, Reading to Middle Schoolers and Learning Numbers Your Questions of Teachers—Answered!

Setting a Good Foundation for This School Year

The First Steps in Teaching Children About Numbers

Parents: The new school year has started. The f irst few weeks are very important for setting a good foundation for the rest of the year. Here are some steps that you should take right away.

Question: My preschooler is having a difficult time with understanding numbers. He sees a group of apples but does not know that the group he is looking at is the same as the number 3. What activities can I do with him to help him learn more about numbers? – Challenged

1.

Make sure that the family calendar is in sync with the school calendar. This will help in planning vacation times and times when you may need to arrange for extra care for your children.

back-to-school or meet-the-teacher evenings, along with any other special meetings 2. Attend that affect your children. It's a quick way to become acquainted with your children's teachers and find out what will be expected of your children.

the school handbook so that you are familiar with school procedures. You will learn 3. Read how to report absences, handle medical appointments, drop off or pick your child up at school,

and contact teachers to arrange for conferences or to discuss any problems that might be going on at home. When everyone follows the same procedures, it definitely makes life a lot easier for the office staff and will help you avoid making mistakes in dealing with the school.

Answer: Number concept development involves learning words and symbols to describe quantities. Children best learn to do this when they handle everyday objects. Sorting activities will help him develop an understanding of collections -- how objects can be joined in collections or separated out and moved into other collections. Ordering activities emphasize the concepts of "less" and "more." Through counting, children come to understand the connections joining the number concepts together. Matching fosters the ideas of likenesses and non-likenesses between objects. Sorting Sorting involves such simple activities as putting oranges and apples in different piles. When children can place a number of objects together because for some reason they belong together, those children have started down the road to mathematical and logical thought.

the time to fill out all parent information cards. Make the appropriate changes if you 4. Take move, change jobs or get a new phone number. Schools need to be able to get in contact with you

Ordering Children first learn about ordering by physically putting objects in size order. Then they are ready to extend this concept to number. Begin by having your child find which object is larger or smaller of two paired items varying in size, such as shoes, cups or spoons.

involved in some school activity. You will learn so much more about how the school operates 5. Get and become better acquainted with teachers, staff and other parents. Find an area where you are

Counting Teach your child to count so he'll learn the names of the numbers. Then have him count a small number of similar items such as pennies, shoes or plates.

quickly if there is an emergency. If these cards are out-of-date, time may be wasted in trying to contact you.

able to participate. Since many parents work, most schools now have functions for parents before school, in the evening and on weekends. Schools also offer opportunities to help with one-day activities such as field trips, sports days and science-fair days.

Visit our Web site (www.dearteacher.com) and search for 6. additional things that should be done at the start of the school year.

"back to school" to find

Matching You can't assume that your son understands numbers until he can match sets of the same size. If you have five cups and five saucers then you have one cup for each saucer. Parents should send questions and comments to Peggy Gisler and Marge Eberts at dearteacher@ dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ Web site at www.dearteacher.com.

It’s a Great Idea to Read to Middle Schoolers Question: My son just started middle school. Is it still a good idea to read to him every night? – Avid Reader Answer: Don't quit reading to your son. All the experts recommend it. Studies even show that it is likely to increase your child's reading scores and his interest in reading. Furthermore, he is being exposed to a more advanced vocabulary. It is also a great way to communicate with him on a wide variety of subjects. And frankly, everyone enjoys listening to stories. Here are some hints to make your reading sessions as successful as possible:

28 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

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Be consistent in reading to your son every night. You needn't read for more than 15 minutes. Don't just read books. Magazine articles on topics that interest him are a good choice. Have him make suggestions about what he would like to hear. Be sure to choose age-appropriate materials (no childish stories). Try to complete a chapter a night when reading chapter books. For a treat, watch movies or videos of books after finishing them.


Childcare & Education Directory Child Care East

Kidz Luv Bilingual Academy & Educational Childcare 4118 N Sheridan Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46226\ Tumikia Gilbert 317-547-7323 tumgilbert@aol.com www.kidzluv.daycarematch.com Home: East: Christian - Catholic Monday - Friday, 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. Kidz Luv has provided early childhood education to families for 10 years. Our Educational Childcare cares for children Infant-3 years and our Bilingual Academy implements Spanish and Sign Language into our preschool cirriculum, and is for children ages 3-5. We are NAFCC Accredited, State Licensed and CCDF is accepted.

M eridian K essler Wee Folk Child Care

Meridian Kessler Neighborhood Indianapolis 317-926-3640 Ages: 4 weeks+

Quality in-home child care serving caring families for 20 years. (CPR, 1st aid certified, and state licensed). Two meals and one snack provided daily along with baby food and regular formula. We provide quality learning through play in a non-smoking Christian environment. Preschool program providing Kindergarten prep is available. $130/week. 7:15-5:30 M-F.

North

Jillian's Jellybeans 7955 Moore Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46228 317-945-9854 Fax: 317-328-9306 jaypeanutbutter@hotmail.com Early Childhood Home Childcare Center Location of School or Trader Point Preschool/Kindergarten Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: Daily drop-off rates are $25.00 a day for 8+hrs. Call for Full-Time rate and Parents' Friday Night Out. Hours/Dates: 5am-5pm or 6am-6pm Mon-Fri. Field Trips: Are assigned once or twice a month. Ages/Grades: 6weeks to 13years old.

Before/After School Care: Before and After School Care is offered. Drop off for Before School Care starts as early as 5am.

Peanut Butter Childcare

and

Jelly

2421 Butterfield Dr., Indianapolis, IN 46220 Mrs. Hatcher 317-205-9211 peanut_jelly@att.net http://www.peanutbutterjelly.info Low flexible rates vary with age. CCDF accepted; monthly specials. $50.00 registration fee. Drop in services available, Parent’s Night Out. Please call for more information! 7 DAYS A WEEK 24 HOURS A DAY Home Childcare Field trips to the Children’s Museum, The Indianapolis Zoo, Chuck E. Cheese’s, Monkey Joe’s, Snapperz and more! Ages 4 weeks through 4 years old Peanut Butter and Jelly Childcare offers a “home away from home” within a learning enviornment, and our professional caregivers provide quality care that kids deserve while also being allowed to be kids. Licensed, CPR certified, first aid, universal precautions, drug and criminal checks. Daily hot home cooked meals. Daily progress reports, kindergarten prep.

have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages toddlers, Pre-K and Kindergarten.

Carmel

Carmel Montessori Schools, Inc. Emily & Scott Rudicel 1402 W. Main St. Carmel, IN 317-580-0699 info@carmelmontessori.com carmelmontessori.com Ages: Pre-school through Kindergarten. Carmel Montessori School is located on the beautiful campus at St. Christopher’s Church on the NE corner of Main St. and Meridian in Carmel. Our directress is American Montessori Certified with 10 years head-teaching experience. We offer a beautiful, peaceful and positive Montessori learning environment. Extended days available.

Clay Montessori Peggy White 463 East Main St. Carmel 317-849-9519 or 317-580-1850 Ages: 3-6 Call for more information. (Affiliated with Fisher’s Montessori). Morning, afternoon and full-day programs.

SeekingSitters 1950 E. Greyhound Pass, Ste 18-301, Carmel, IN 46033 Kristin Slade 317-985-9505 kristins@seekingsitters www.seekingsitters.com Agency SeekingSitters Indianapolis North is the solution for all of your childcare needs. We are an on-demand service for families seeking babysitters. Whether your need is last minute, one-time, part-time, or full-time, we can solve your childcare dilemma. Visit SeekingSitters.com for more information and to sign up!

Schools

Brownsburg

Maria Montessori International Academy 431 E. Northfield Dr., Brownsburg, IN 317-852-3900 mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 12 months to 6 years Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and

Gymboree Play & Music 12524 N. Gray Rd, Carmel, IN 46033 Phone: 317-574-9626 carmelin@gymboreeclasses.com Gymboree offers unique Play & Learn, Music or Art events & parties. These events are lead by our professional teachers in our clean, creative and colorful environment. We can also bring the event to you with our mobile program. Ages birth - 5 years.

MINDS-IN-MOTION ADVANCED DEVELOPMENT CENTER 879 West Carmel Drive, Carmel, IN 46032 Patricia Acker 317-571-8752 packer@mimlearning.com www.mimlearning.com Election of program determines cost. Please call for list of programs/fees. Hours/Dates: Call for summer hours Ages 3, 4, & 5 Grades K-12 Monthly Open House DatesPlease call for dates/times. Minds-in-Motion is an Advanced Development program designed to stimulate the balance, visual, and auditory processes of the brain which maximizes learning potential. Our program ignites high level brain function which increases academic, athletic and social success! Over 2000 teachers in 4 states use Minds-in-Motion!

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The Montessori Learning Center Elizabeth Williams 1402 W. Main St. Carmel 317-846-8182 elizabeth@ themontessorilearningcenter.com

themontessorilearningcenter.com

Ages: Grades 1-3 The Montessori Learning Center Elementary program focuses on developing the whole child through interaction with an interdisciplinary curriculum. Our program specifically meets the needs of each child and is aligned with Indiana State Standards.

Primrose School at WestClay 13096 Moultrie Street 317-848-0123 Julie Bowman jbowman@primrosewestclay.com primrosewestclay.com Our programs are offered to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. We offer before and after school programs, including transportation. The Primrose School at WestClay is dedicated to providing outstanding educational care to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. Our curriculum is NCA accredited and offers many extras such as Spanish, technology, sign language, character development, music appreciation, art appreciation, science, social studies, reading, English, and math. Please call today to learn how more than 90% of Primrose students out performed the national average.

30 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

Carmel -Zionsville

Maria Montessori International Academy 4370 Weston Point Dr. Zionsville 317-769-2220 mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 3 months to 6 years old Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. The lead teachers possess bachelor degree and certification in Montessori Education. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages starting 3 months to 6 years located in Stonegate, Zionsville, IN.

East

Children of America 10830 Pendleton Pike Suite A, Indianapolis, IN 46236 Contact: Nicole Davis Phone: 317-826-0399 Email: coalawrencein@ childrenofamerica.com www.childrenofamerica.com

Type of School: Preschool/Kindergarten Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: See school Director for Fee Schedule Hours/Dates: 6:00 AM – 6:30 PM Monday - Friday Field Trips: Yes Ages/Grades: 6 wks thru 12 yrs Before/After School Care: Yes with Transportation provided to Lawrence schools Open House Dates: July 31, 2010 The Children of America difference is our commitment to your child's future. Innovation and creativity are the hallmarks of our teaching and the foundation of our infrastructure. With our qualified teachers and proprietary curriculum we provide your child with an unsurpassed learning experience.

Fishers

Fishers Montessori Peggy White 12806 Ford Rd and 131st and Allisonville Rd. Fishers 317-849-9519 or 317-580-1850 Ages: 3-9

317-577-9480 mindy@ primrosegrayeagle.com Ages: Infants thru full day kindergarten. Before/after care available. At Primrose School at Gray Eagle we offer much more than a daycare experience. Our exclusive Balanced Learning curriculum prepares your child for academic success while fully integrating character development - creating a well-rounded young individual. Our safe, secure environment will provide you with peace-of-mind, knowing that your child is safe, happy and growing everyday! Full Time: $220 - $320 per week depending on age. Visit PrimroseGrayEagle.com for more information.

G eist

My Backyard Fine Arts Preschool at Geist Sports Academy 11960 East 62nd Street Indianapolis 317-823-7734 geistsportsacademy.com Ages: 2 year-Pre K (5 year)

A quality learning environment offering preschool, kindergarten and elementary. Certification through American Montessori Society. 9-12, 12:30-3, 9-3.

NOW ENROLLING! Children will discover their unique selves and learn about the world around them through exploring the visual arts, creative movement and music appreciation. 9-11:45 a.m. M-Fri; MWF 9-1:30pm.

Primrose School at Gray Eagle

M eridian St. Michigan R d.

Mindy Smith 12290 Olio Road (Olio Road between 116th street and 126th street) Fishers

Maria Montessori International Academy 7507 N. Michigan Road Indianapolis


317-291-5557 mariamontessori-intl.org Ages: 3 months to 9 years old Maria Montessori International Academy offers a child centered Montessori program allowing children to learn at their own pace and are treated with respect. Teachers encourage and inspire children to do not only the minimum, but also their best, where learning should be a happy, joyous experience! Children learn how to think for themselves and how to solve problems in original and creative ways and have a positive self-image. Children participate in math, language, music, art, practical life, science, geography, and foreign language. The lead teachers possess bachelor degree and certification in Montessori Education. Discover the Difference at the Maria Montessori! Now accepting applications for all ages starting 3 months to 6 years located in Zionsville, IN.

Multiple L ocations Indiana Council of Preschool Cooperatives: ICPC Multiple Locations in Indianapolis Area For schools, see below. ICPC Line: 317-767-7596 Ages: Preschool classes for ages 2-5; other programs vary - Kindergarten, Stay & Play, Enrichment/Extended Days. Indianapolis Area Preschool and Kindergarten Cooperatives Cooperative Preschools: great for your child, great for you! Children and parents learn and grow together in the classroom with caring, experienced teachers. Indiana Council of

Preschool Cooperatives (ICPC) member schools are: Apple House: 6121 E. County Rd 100 S, Avon, 797-5925 Butler: 2411 Indianapolis Ave, Indy, 2264287 Downey: 111 S. Downey Rd, Indy, 359-5304 Edgewood: 4040 E. Thompson Rd, Indy, 767-7730 Fishers Point: 9959 E. 126th St, Fishers, 767-4312 Geist Orchard: 7879 N. 700 West, McCordsville, 336-7008 Meridian Hills Nursery School and Kindergarten: 7171 N. Pennsylvania, Indy, 2550831 Meridian Street: 5500 N. Meridian St, Indy, 767-3003 Northeast Cooperative Preschool and Kindergarten: 5805 E. 56th St, Indy, 592-9790 Parkview: 4550 central Ave, Indy, 380-0628 Speedway: 3000 N. High School Rd, Indy, 3562804 Willowcreek: 8170 Hague Rd, Indy, 5785488

Polly Panda Preschool and Bridgford Kindergarten 2944 E. 56th St.., Indianapolis Gail Hacker and Tammy Clark 317-257-9127 pollypandaindy@sbcglobal.net 17645 Oakmont Dr., Noblesville Mandy Galle 317-773-0387 Oakmontpollypanda@yahoo.com Six weeks through Kindergarten, summer program also available. Polly Panda provides a safe and healthy environment which enhances each child’s total growth. Our theme-based hands-on preschool program provides a wide-range experiences that foster learning, creativity and problem solving in all areas. A child’s sense of self-worth, independence and growth in social skills are developed through positive

interaction with peers and our well-qualified and loving staff.

The Early Learning Center 5249 David St, Indianapolis, IN 46226 Jenny Collins 317-423-8215 jennifercollins@msdlt.k12.in.us http://elc.ltschools.org Public School Operating Hours: 6:30 AM 6:00 PM Monday - Friday Ages/Grades: 6 weeks to Pre-Kindergarten Multiple Locations/ Northeast Indianapolis Locations: Amy Beverland 11660 Fox Rd, Brook Park 5249 David St, Mary Castle 8510 E 82nd St, Winding Ridge 11845 E 46th St. Every aspect of our centers - from the buildings themselves to the programs and curriculum - has been purposefully designed by the highly qualified staff according to “best practice” research in early learning to meet and respect the development and learning needs of the young child, ages 6 weeks-6 years.

Noblesville

Primrose School at Bridgewater 14711 N. Gray Road, Noblesville, IN 46062 317-848-0123

Julie Bowman jbowman@primrosebridgewater.com primrosebridgewater.com Please call to schedule a tour and to get tuition information. We are open Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. We take many exciting fieldtrips so please call to learn more specific details. Our programs are offered to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. Students in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten are required to wear school uniforms. Before/After School Care: We offer before and after school programs, including transportation, to students up to 12 years of age. The Primrose School at Bridgewater is dedicated to providing outstanding educational care to students ages 6 weeks through 12 years of age. Our curriculum is NCA accredited and offers many extras such as Spanish, technology, sign language, character development, music appreciation, art appreciation, science, social studies, reading, English, and math. Please call today to learn how more than 90% of Primrose students out performed the national average.

North

Arthur M. Glick JCC 6701 Hoover Road, Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-251-9467 emills@JCCindy.org

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JCCindy.org Ages: 6 weeks - Grade K Our loving caregivers and teachers demonstrate by example and encourage children to behave according to these values as the children are learning, playing and socializing with one another. The JCC embraces a learning-through-play teaching method to engage children in activities that promote creativity, accelerate learning and stimulate social interaction, all at each child’s individual pace.

Beth-El Zedeck Early Childhood Center 600 W. 70th St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Joanie Waldman 317-259-6854 jwaldman@bez613.org Ages/Grades: 12 mos.+, 18 mos.+, 2’s+ (8:50 am to 12:30 pm or 3:00 pm and choice of days). 3’s+ (8:50 am to 3:00 pm and choice of days). 4’s+/PreK (3 or 5 day option)and Kindergarten (5 full-day program 8:50 am to 3:00 pm) OPTIONS FOR ALL: Flexible hours. Availibility 7:30am-6pm, until 5:30 on Fridays.

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Full Academic Curriculum and Innovative Arts’ Enrichment. Our Program recognizes that intellectual, social, emotional and physical development are interwoven. Our children will thrive on exploration, creativity, curiosity, discovery, spontaneity and more important, lots of love!

Children’s Day In Nursery School and Traditional Preschool Christy Whaley 5500 N. Meridian St. Indianapolis 317-253-0472 cwhaley@msumc.org msumc.org Ages: Nursery School and Preschool The Children’s Day In Nursery School is a fully inclusive early childhood program with an emphasis on Christian values. It is designed to offer children 9 months to 3 years a positive and developmentally appropriate experience in the care of experienced caregivers. Classes are offered weekdays from 9 am to 2:30 pm. CDI Preschool program provides a quality developmentally appropriate education for 3, 4 and 5 year olds. Program includes weekly Christian Life Skills, First Steps in Music (ICC) and

Book Club. 3’s: T & Th, 4/5’s MWF. 9-2:30 pm. Summer Camp available.

Children’s Circle Preschool at Second Presbyterian Church 7700 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Regina Covey for Registration; Director Cara Paul for Curriculum 317-252-5517 rcovey@secondchurch.org Ages/Grades: 9 months to 5 years Now accepting applications. Children’s Circle Preschool is a weekday, developmentally appropriate, activity-based Christian program. We meet the needs of the whole child in a fun, creative, nurturing environment. Here, children can develop the skills necessary to live in today’s world. Our experienced faculty leads children toward discovery of who they are and what they can do. We embrace excellence in education by nurturing the whole child -- physically, emotionally, spiritually and intellectually.

Early Childhood Center, The Church at the Crossing John Drake or Kelly Belt 9111 N. Haverstick Rd. Indianapolis 317-575-6508 jdrake@churchatthecrossing.org churchatthecrossing.org Ages: 12mos - Pre-K 5’s

Our Mothers Day Out (12-35mos) 9:15-2:30 and Preschool (3yrs-PreK’s) programs provide relaxed, playful, secure environments that nurture creativity and encourage the exploration of God’s world, a wide variety of learning materials, & friendships, with readiness activities woven through each study unit. Need longer hours? Try our childcare ministry, The Neighborhood designed for 2-PreK 6:30-6pm M-F. Call for information and to schedule tours.

Fairview Early Childhood Program Melissa Peterson 4609 N. Capital Ave. Indianapolis 317-253-4990 mpeterson@fairviewpresbyterian.org fairviewpresbyterian.org Ages: 12 mo-5 yrs. (or up to Kindergarten) Fairview ECP has a developmental, experienced based curriculum in a warm and inclusive environment. Curriculum is designed to promote positive social behavior, respect for diversity, positive self-concept, independence, creativity and critical thinking skills. Come and visit us!

The Independence Academy of Indiana, Inc. 612 West 42nd Street Susan Le Vay 317-926-0043 susanlevay@IAindiana.org www.IAindiana.org

Ages/Grades: Grades 5 - 12

32 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010


Hours/Dates: 8am - 3:30pm M-F August - May Field Trips: Field trips average 1 per month (for curriculum and life skills enhancement) Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: $11,250. No financial aid currently available. We accept students with high-functioning autism, including Asperger’s Syndrome, who are able to work in a small group setting. Uniforms/Dress Code: Yes Before/After School Care: After school care available from 3:30 - 5:30pm. Open House Dates: Call us for a consultation and tour Created specifically for students with highfunctioning autism and Asperger Syndrome, The Independence Academy helps students achieve their highest level of independence and academic success. Dedicated and trained staff teach math, sciences, language arts, global studies, social and life skills, and more. Very small classes. Beautiful campus. A place to belong.

International School of Indiana Cathy Blitzer, Director 4330 N. Michigan Road Indianapolis 317-923-1951 isind.org Ages: 3 years old-12th grade ISI is founded on the belief that an introduction to a second language, exposure to different nationalities and ethnic backgrounds and an International Baccalaureate-driven curriculum all work together to foster critical and independent thought. $12,860 pre-k through 8th

grade and $13.600 for High School. Financial aid available for qualif iers.

Meridian Hills Cooperative Nursery School 7171 N. Pennsylvania, Indianapolis, IN 46240 Phone: 317-255-0831 Website: Http://www. meridianhillscoop.org Category of School: Private Independent Type of School: Preschool/ Kindergarten Location of School: North Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: $48 - $233/month. Financial aid available on a limited basis. Field Trips: Ages three through Kindergarten go on field trips periodically. Ages 2, 3, 4 and Kindergarten. Average class size: 14 Founded in 1960, Meridian Hills Cooperative School is dedicated to helping children, parents and teachers grow together. Classes provide a positive, nurturing environment for 2-year-olds through Kindergarten with a special emphasis on parent education. Parents help daily in the spacious classrooms, on a beautiful half-acre playground and with a caring, experienced staff.

montessori Centres Lynne Boone, Director 563 Westfield Blvd. W. Dr. Indianapolis

317-257-2224 montessoricentres@sbcglobal.net Ages: 2 1/2-3rd grade Stressing peace and respect for all, we’ve worked with children to develop critical-thinking and time-management skills since 1966. Montessoricertif ied lead teachers serve children aged 2 1/23rd grade. Our classroom structure and materials allow children to be self-directed and selfpaced. Our well-rounded curriculum includes French and Spanish, art, and computer labs. True Montessori environment serving children at all levels from gifted to special needs. Pre/K: 8:3011:30 or 8:30-3:15.

The Orchard School 615 W. 64th St., Indianapolis, IN 46260 Contact: Kristen Hein, Director of Admissions Phone: 317-713-5705 Fax: 317-254-8454 Email: khein@orchard.org Category of School: Private Independent Type of School: Preschool - Middle School Religious Affiliation: N/A Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: Applicants are selected without regard to their ability to pay tuition. Every effort is made to provide financial assistance where needed. Tuition is all-inclusive. Hours/Dates: School hours are 8:10 am to 3:20 pm. Before- and After-School Care available. Field Trips: Middle School: 5th

Grade to Cherokee, NC, 6th Grade to St. Louis, 7th Grade to Chicago, 8th Grade to Washington, D.C./ Williamsburg, Science Shadow Day. Elementary School: Various field trips throughout the year. Ages/Grades: Preschool 3/4 through Grade 8 Religious Affiliation: None Uniforms/Dress Code: Dress code described in Family Handbook. (No Uniforms) Before/After School Care: Before/after care available. 7-8 a.mm. and 3:30-6 p.m. Ranges from $5.25-$7.25 per day. Open House Dates: Call to schedule a personal tour, and check our Web site for the date and time of our annual Open House. The Orchard School, an independent, nonsectarian, progressive school, emphasized experiential learning. Orchard teachers engage the natural curiosity of children, develop academic excellence, and provide leadership experience through well-rounded education. Orchard's diverse community and commitment to multicultural education inspires responsible, global citizenship. Founded in 1922. NAIS, ISACS, NAEYS accredited.

Park Tudor 7200 N. College Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46240 David Amstutz 317-415-2777

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nfo@parktudor.org www.parktudor.org Private Independent: Preschool - High School Jr. KG (full-day) $13,300; Sr. KG-Grade 5-$15,630; Grades 6-12-$16,570 Trips for all grade levels, ranging from local to national and international depending on age. Ages/Grades: Junior Kindergarten (ages 3-5) - Grade 12 Dress code varies by grade level. Before- and after-school care offered. Visit web site for a complete admissions calendar. Park Tudor School’s exceptional educators and extraordinary opportunities prepare students to become confident and resourceful lifelong learners. The school community creates an inspiring collegepreparatory learning environment for highly motivated young people. Two-year Global Scholars program for juniors and seniors; 19 AP classes; fullday kindergarten; Spanish beginning at age 3.

St. Luke’s Early Childhood Programs 100 West 86th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46260 Bobbi Main-Jackson, Dir. 317-844-3399 mainb@stlukesumc.com stlukesumc.com Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: Available upon request Labor Day-Memorial Day 9am-1pm

34 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

with Summer Programs available Preschool 3 yrs (by Sept 1 of school year)-5 yrs, Parents’ Day Out 10 mos (by Sept 1 of school year)-3 yrs Tours available upon request. St Luke’s Community Preschool is a weekday, developmentally appropriate and experience based program. Two well-trained, degreed teachers are in each classroom. Parents’ Day Out is a structured play experience that provides parents some time for themselves on a regular basis on M, Th, F. We provide a warm and loving Christian environment in which children can learn and grow. Tours available upon request. Visitors welcome.

St. Richard’s School 33 E. 33rd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46205 Melinda W. Fisher 317-926-0425 x134 mfisher@strichardsschool.org strichardsschool.org Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: PKGrade Four $13,115 Grades FiveEight $13,715 2009 FA: $450,000 Multiple field trips per grade level offered each year Age three (3) through Grade Eight Prefer student to be three years old prior to June 1st for Pre-Kindergarten. Before/After School Care: Before Care: 7:00 - 8:00 a.m. After Care: 3:30 - 6:00 p.m. Independent Episcopal day school offering a community filled with academic rigor, faith based ecumenism and long-standing traditions. Its mission is to instill knowledge and values for a lifetime through

the implementation of five Pillars for Success: Faith, Classic Curriculum, Leadership, Civic Responsibility, and Global Readiness. Pre-Kindergarten (3) through Grade 8.

Sycamore School 1750 W. 64th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46260 Dr. Susan Karpicke, Director of Admissions 317-202-2500 skarpicke@sycamoreschool.org sycamoreschool.org 1/2 day programs range from $5,030 to $8010; Full-day PreK through 8th grade is $13,495 for 2009-2010. Financial assistance is available. Please contact dridings@sycamoreschool.org. M -TH 8:15 a.m. - 3:15 p.m.; F 8:15 a.m.2:15 p.m. Parent Tours: Please call 317202-2519 to schedule a parent tour. 2 yrs. 8 mos. - 8th grade At Sycamore, teachers trained in gifted education deliver a curriculum designed to challenge and engage gifted learners. Art, music, Spanish, PE and technology are taught at all levels. Extensive field trips, athletics, child care, financial aid, and a wide variety of after school activities are offered.

Northeast

Heritage Christian School 6401 E. 75th Street, Indianapolis, In 46250 Contact: Emily Iglendza, Director of Enrollment Management Phone: 317-849-3441 Email: Admissions@heritagechristian.net Website: http://www. heritagechristian.net

Open House Dates: Thursday, Nov 10 Prep K & Kindergarten Info Night: Thursday, Jan 13 Tuition: $3839 - $9130 Financial aid available for qualified families Biblical worldview learning Bus Transportation Available Before and After School Care High Ability Learners Program Honors and AP classes Fine Arts and IHSAA Atletics Accredited by the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) & NCA Prep K - 12th Grade college preparatory, Christian school. Nondenominational & independent. The mission of HCS is is to glorify God through the discipleship of students and the pursuit of excellence in education with the Bible as the foundation and Jesus Christ as our focus.

Indianapolis Jr. Academy 2910 East 62nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46220 Phone: 317-251-0560 Email: ijacademy@comcast.net Website: www.ijacademy.org Private Independent: Preschool - Middle School Religious Affiliation: Christian - Protestant/Other Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: egistration Fees - $250 Pre-school Registration - $125 Tuition: $3,515 Pre-School - $5,750 Hours/Dates: 8:00am - 3:30pm MonThurs 8:00am - 12:30pm Fridays Before/After School Care: 7:00am8:00am Mon-Friday, 3:30pm-6:00pm


Mon-Thurs 12:30pm-5:30pm Fridays Founded in 1963, Indianapolis Jr. Academy provides a well-rounded educational program with emphasis on spiritual, mental, physical, and social development. Our teachers are dedicated Christians who desire to prepare children academically and socially in an accepting environment where Christian principles are modeled and taught. The teachers enjoy enhancing the curriculum with thematic units, hands-on activities, and field trips to interesting places in our area. We currently offer grades Pre-K to 8th, along with a 3-year old Pre-School program.

Northwest

International Montessori School, Inc. 2150 West 96th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46260 Ranee Dhadialla 317-575-8733 rkd1948@sbcglobal.net intlmontessori.com Please call for more information on tuition 9 AM - 12 Noon or 9 AM - 3 PM with options for 7-9 AM, 3-6 PM Field Trips: Yes 3 - 9 years Before/After School Care: Yes Call to schedule a tour A unique & warm place for children ages 3-9 years providing quality Montessori Education including exposure to diverse cultures, languages, art, music and more.. Now enrolling for Summer and Fall 2010!

The Children’s House 2404 W. 62nd St. (near Michigan Rd.), Indianapolis, IN 46268 Susan Catania or Mary Sexson 317-253-3033 childrenshouse08@gmail.com2404 W. 62nd St. (near Michigan Rd.), Indianapolis, IN 46268 Susan Catania or Mary Sexson 317-253-3033 childrenshouse08@gmail.com thechildrenshouseindianapolis.com Ages/Grades: 2 1/2 years - 14 years of age The Children’s House offers a Montessori preschool. The four areas of our preschool are practical life, sensorial, math and language. The Montessori preschool is available on a nine or twelve month calendar. The elementary level is an ungraded, continuous-progress school where children discover and pursue their unique talents and needs. Each child is provided with an individual learning experience based on the assumption that children are naturally inquisitive and want to learn. The Children’s House has helped shape the lives of hundreds of Indianapolis Children since its founding under a Lilly Endowment grant in 1971.

South

Montessori Garden Academy 4141 S. East Street, Indianapolis, In 46227 Contact: Kelly Sikora, Director of Admissions Phone: 317-782-9990 Email: kelly@ montessorigardenacademy.org

Website: http://www. montessorigardenacademy.org Type of School: Preschool - Secondary School Cost/Tuition/Financial Aid: $425-$850 per Month Hours/Dates: Monday-Friday 6:30 am -6:00 pm Field Trips: Yes Ages/Grades: 18 Months- 4th Grade Uniforms/Dress Code: No Before/After School Care: Yes Serving toddlers, preschoolers, kindergartners and 1st-4th graders, MGA builds children's selfconfidence and nurtures their natural curiosity. It's different from traditional child care and early education because children "learn by doing" to achieve a sense of pride and independence. Early on, children learn to cooperate with each other and resolve their own conflicts respectfully. Rather than a "cookie cutter" approach, MGA’s caring teachers and individualized attention enable each child to reach his or her highest potential. Early childhood is a precious window of time when kids are most receptive to learning. Help build a strong foundation for your child or grandchild by investing in a rich learning environment now.

West

Imagine Indiana Life Sciences Academy—West 4950 W. 34th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46224 Keith Marsh 317-297-9100

keith.marsh@imagineschools.com Charter: Kindergarten - Middle School Free tuition Hours/Dates: 8 am - 3pm Ages/Grades: k-7 Before care 6:30 am- 7:30 After care 3 pm - 6pm Imagine having a choice to decide what is the best school option for your child, regardles of where you live. By choosing Imagine Life Sciences Academy West, you provide your child with a challenging education rich in math, arts, science and technology, with teachers who use innovative teaching techniques that prepare students for success.

Westfield

Montessori School of Westfield, Inc. 800 E. Sycamore Street, Westfield Mary Lyman, Directress 317-867-0158 montessoriwestfield@gmail.com Ages/Grades: Toddler- 15 months to 3 years; Ages 3-Kindergarten; Elementary 1: Grade 1-3; Elementary 2: Grade 4-8 Located on 3 wooded acres in Central Indiana, the Montessori School of Westf ield adheres to the academic traditions of Montessori while serving the present day child.

Your L isting H ere ! Contact Jennica

Jennica@IndysChild.com

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d l i h E xceptional C on Creating Good IEPs for Kids with Autism Embracing the "Individual" Focus of Individual Education Plans

What makes an IEP (Individualized Education Plan) successful for kids with autism and other special needs? By all accounts, measurable goals and a collaborative IEP team environment are two giant steps in the right direction. Still, there is more information parents should know about developing this important plan for their child. Following are key tips on how to create a successful IEP.

Know present levels of performance. To know where a child is going, the IEP team must know where the child is. Present levels of performance should be clear, measurable and written into the IEP.

Write measurable goals. “It is absolutely critical to have measurable goals,” says Jane Grimes, community development director for the Applied Behavior Center for Autism and founder and president of Hamilton County Autism Support Group. A measurable goal is one that a teacher can count or observe. Breanne Hartley, lead clinical director at the Verbal Behavior Center for Autism, agrees. “Measurable goals will ensure that a child's progress can be specif ically tracked in order to determine if the goal has been mastered or if the goal has not been mastered within the allotted time that the IEP identif ies. If the goal has been mastered, then a new goal can be put in its place to expand upon that skill area. If the goal has not been mastered, steps can be taken to determine why the goal has not been achieved, and as a result, different teaching methods can be assessed,” she says.

Make it a comprehensive plan. Hartley suggests parents help create a comprehensive IEP for their child with autism with goals that address many areas

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of academic development. These may include speech/ language goals, direction following goals, social and play goals, and any academic goals that are appropriate for the child's age and development level. In short, the plan should look at a child’s diagnosis, break it down and address those issues.

Attach a time frame to goals. Kyle Mitchell, special education teacher and board certif ied behavior analyst at the Applied Behavior Center for Autism, recommends parents see to it that time frames more specif ic than a sweeping 2010/2011 school year be placed on each goal. This will help the child continue to progress rather than plateau or regress in the event they master a skill early in the year. If no specif ic timeframe is attached to the mastered goal, then the child risks losing the achievement because the school’s focus may shift away from that task.

Be specific with goals. Mitchell says parents need to know what skill they want their child with autism to master and explain it well on the IEP. “To say you want your child to work on social skills tells you nothing. Say ‘I want my child to work on responding to initiations for attention,’” he says. Keep the “individualized” in the IEP. Parents should ask during the IEP team meeting if other kids in the classroom have the same goal or goals as their child. This will help the child avoid working toward cookie cutter goals that are not specif ic enough to his or her unique needs. Of course, the team cannot disclose who has what goals, but they can say whether or not another student has the same goal.

40 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

Track goals alongside state standards. Goals written into the IEP should connect to statewide standards for students at the child’s grade level.

Say NO to rollover goals. Parents should not allow the same goals to rollover from one IEP to the next. Even if a goal is not yet mastered, write different methodology for achieving the goal into the plan. Include what methods have been tried, failed and need to change so there is a paper trail.

Sleep on it.

If parents aren’t comfortable signing the IEP at the annual team meeting, then they shouldn’t do it. They can take it home, review it, and bring suggestions or questions back to the IEP team if necessary. Parents should, however, let the team know their intention to not sign it at the meeting so everyone is prepared.

Not signing the IEP is an option. What if a parent doesn’t agree with an IEP? Then don’t sign it. “Parents have to remember that they don’t have to sign the IEP,” says Mary Rosswurm, executive director of Little Star Center. The worst-case scenario is the school will have to fall back on the expired IEP, which the school and the state don’t want to do. Call a trained advocate. Grimes suggests parents call a trained advocate if they are concerned their child is not making progress, feel as though the teachers or school are not supporting what they want for their child, or are just overall anxious or confused about the IEP process.

Support groups like the Hamilton County Autism Support Group, Autism Society of Indiana, About Special Kids and others are ready and able to support parents. “If you are worried and concerned and, in some cases, very upset, you do need an outside trained third party to help support you and understand what you want to get out of your case conference,” she says.

Recognize the team. A collaborative and positive team environment is an important part of building a solid IEP. Parents should take the time with the team to recognize the work they’ve done and to celebrate successes. Carrie Bishop is a freelance writer and mother of two young sons whose daily antics inspire her work and her life. Contact her at freelancewritercarrie@gmail.com


RE SOURCE S

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special needs calendar

September 2010 Special Needs Calendar 09.11

Check out what’s happening this month for Central Indiana’s special needs community...

09.18

Special Olympics Equestrian Championship

Whe n: Sat., Sept. 11, 8 a.m. Whe re: Hen dric ks Cou nty Fairgro und s, Danville Cos t: Free 09.14 indi ana .org w.so ww

Hamilton County Autism Support Group meeting

Whe n: Sat., Sept. 11, 9 - 11 a.m. rch, Whe re: Whi te Rive r Chr istia n Chu 168 5 N. 10th St. Noblesv ille Cos t: Free ww w.hcasg.org

Preparing Specia for Your l Education Child ’s Conference C ase W h e n: training Tu

e s., S e W h e re pt . : C h u rc h S p e e d w ay U 14, 6 - 8 p.m. , 50 65 nite d M W C o s t : F . 16t h St ., In d et h o d is t re e fo r ia na p o ch p li s C o nt ac ild re n w it h d a re nt s of t: Mar y is a bilit ie Dela n e y a t 31 s 7- 5 69-9 171

09. 22

: cation u d E l Specia ap to and Processto 2:3 0 p.m. m d Roa Laws pt. 22, 9 a.m.C, 4919 ., Se als AR : Wed ter Se t. Way ne s a W hen E : e W h e r w a t e r Rd , F $60 Cold Cos t: w w. e at w a i n i ng n li n o r r t e / Re g is t i a l k id s .or g c e p s about

09.18

Than ms: More d Classroo iana’s Share ndrome Ind for Sy Down ay conference ucators d one and ed e pt. 18, S parentsen: Sat., . Wh

- 4 p.m 9 a.m. L illy : Ru t h W h e re r iu m, Riley Aud ito ’s Ho s pit al, en C hild r a r n hill D r., 2 0 7 B na p oli s In d ia $3 0 Cos t: a .o r g i nd ia n s d . w ww

10th Annua l Answers for Autism Wa lk

W he n: Sa t., Se pt . 18, 11 a.m . W he re: C ox ha ll Gard en s, 20 00 W. 116t h St ., C ar m el C os t: Donat io ns w w w.a aiw al k.or g

Special Olym pics Torch Ride an d R affle

W he n: Sa t., Se pt . 18, no on W he re: O’Rei lly Racew ay Pa an d So ut hsid e Har ley- Dav rk id so n an d Buell, In d ia na p olis C os t: $3 5 p er rid er w w w.s oi nd ia na .org

Know of an upcoming event benefitting Indiana’s special needs community? Email Carrie Bishop at freelancewritercarrie@gmail.com.

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Gauging an IEP's Effectiveness Individualized Education Programs — Making the Most of a Living Document

Meet with IEP team in spring. Check. Sign off on agreed-upon IEP. Check. Enjoy summer, go back to school, see that IEP is in effect. Check. Check. Check. Leave IEP on autopilot—not so fast.

A good IEP, or individualized education plan, is a living document, not an annual permission slip to sign and forget. In fact, it is not uncommon for IEPs to be revised throughout the year as dictated by the child’s unique and evolving needs. Parents must also know their involvement and advocacy throughout the special education process is critical to their child’s performance.

using to assess the child’s performance then see how this data stack up to state standards for the child’s grade level. Kyle Mitchell, special education teacher and board certified behavior analyst at the Applied Behavior Center for Autism, is on the same page. “You gauge progress by the the measurement that was written into the IEP goal. If you write a goal that Johnny will label these six shapes with 80 percent accuracy three out of five times, ask where they are [on that task],” he says. His example speaks not only to the

by being removed from what is expected of all kids. Teachers or the IEP team may modify what is expected or taught of the child, but there still should be a connection back to Indiana standards. In other words if a child is doing more community-based or functional curriculum, schools should connect what that child is doing to statewide standards.

Status Check So when should a parent check in on the progress his or her child is making toward the IEP goals? There is no one answer. The progress each child makes is as individual as the plan and A good IEP, or individualized education will vary; yet, some goals simply need to move faster than others. plan, is a living document, not an annual

Data ARE King Whether the stated goals within the IEP are academic, functional, behavioral or social, a permission slip to sign and forget. child must consistently work toward the written goals and his or her progress is to be reported back to the parent on a regular basis, t ypically ever y nine weeks or per the specificity of goals, but to their possible ambiguity from a school’s standard report card cycle. Ideally the goals written laymen’s perspective. into the IEP are measurable. If not, make that a priority. Repeat: make measurable goals a priority. Measurable So, how does a parent know if a measurable goal is goals based on a child’s present levels of performance worthwhile in the first place? After all, what does it really and written into an IEP add a level of accountability to mean if a goal says the student will label a certain six shapes the plan and provide insight into the effectiveness of the with 80 percent accuracy three out of five times? That is program. Loose goals, however well intentioned, can lead where good working relationships come in. An IEP team should be able to address the value or thought behind the to substandard support. goal and it should tie back to standards set for all kids at Fortunately parents are becoming more sophisticated in the student’s grade level. In other words, parents need to their approach to IEPs and now know that data are the best understand how their child’s goals and subsequently the progress toward the goals stack up to Indiana’s standards way to gauge their child’s progress. for all children. Lesa Paddack, the statewide parent liaison for INSOURCE to the Indiana Department of Education, agrees data are Taking it further, if there is no connection to what a child king for evaluating progress toward IEP goals. Specifically, who is receiving special education is doing back to core she recommends parents find out what tools the school is standards, then it could be said the child is being handicapped 42 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

For instance, an academic goal may be given more time than a behavioral goal. “If a student is exhibiting behavior that is escalating, you are not going to wait for nine weeks [to address it]. And a parent has the right to ask to reconvene that case conference when they feel there is a need to do so. If they are not happy, feel the IEP is not working or that it’s not being followed, they can always reconvene,” says Mary Delaney, regional programs specialist for INSOURCE. This is a point all experts stress. Parents can call an IEP meeting whenever they see fit. Legally, parents are as much a part of the IEP team as school personnel. After all, an IEP is not a contract until the parent signs off on it and the state wants that signature. Plus who knows the child better than his or her parent? “Parents can’t assume the schools will take care of their son or daughter,” says Scott Carson, assistant director of INSOURCE. “The insights the parents can bring to that discussion are very important in understanding what that student can or cannot do.”


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The main thing to remember is that parents should feel empowered to bring everyone on the IEP team together to discuss their child’s progress or lack thereof. It is also in the best interest of the child for details of the discussions, particularly what teaching methods are and are not working, to be documented. Then, detail what changes need to be made in order to help the child progress. “It is really important to bring folks together and get it in writing. Sometimes, where we see problems is when things haven’t been spelled out well in the IEP,” says Delaney. One group might interpret decisions one way, while others at the table interpret them another. A paper trail will help alleviate some of this difference of opinion. Should school data show a child is making progress yet the parent questions the findings, then the parent has the right to request an independent evaluation be done at the expense of the school to collect more data. The school, of course, does not have to agree to move forward with the request. The parent can then escalate their case and move toward resolving the dispute with the school district through due process; though this can be expensive, emotional and time consuming. Not ideal, but sometimes necessary.

Eyes on the Prize Throughout the day-to-day and year-to-year trials associated with an IEP, it’s important for parents to remember their ultimate goal for their child. “Keep in mind the long-term goals. Even in elementary school you should be focusing on high school and beyond. Sometimes if you don’t get the picture early on you may not build the puzzle you think you are building,” she says. Parents should consider how they want their child to be able to function in society after high school while looking for a job or attending college. “If you are shortsighted and only looking at that year, it doesn’t provide the longevity that you need when the school bus stops coming.” Carrie Bishop is a freelance writer and mother of two young sons whose daily antics inspire her work and her life. Contact her at freelancewritercarrie@gmail.com

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An IEP is as individual as the child for which it is written. Yet, there are a few general rules you can abide by to make the long and winding IEP road a success for your child.

w ay s

to Make Your IEP

WORK

44 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

1.

Be an involved parent and advocate for your child

2.

Build good working relationships with IEP team members

3.

Make sure the IEP team understands your child’s present levels of performance before drafting IEP goals

4.

Ensure all IEP goals are documented and measurable

5.

Request data to prove progress toward IEP goals

6.

Meet with IEP team if progress toward IEP goals is in question

7.

Document what is and is not helping your child progress

8.

Always monitor your child’s progress toward goals

9.

Request an independent evaluation if necessary

10. Always keep long-term goals for your child in mind


Special Needs Guide Applied behavior center www.appliedbehaviorcenter.org 6060 Castleway West Drive Indianapolis, IN 46250-1970 (317) 849-5437 The mission of the Applied Behavior Center for Autism is to provide high quality ABA and Verbal Behavior therapy and consulting services to children and their families affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders by using researched based ABA methodology delivered by highly qualified and certified professionals to increase language skills, social skills, academic skills, and reduce problematic behavior.

dsundberg@thebaca.com www.thebaca.com The Behavior Analysis Center (BACA) was established by Dr. Carl Sundberg and a group of highly trained Behavior Analysts who have worked with Dr. Sundberg for years. BACA uses Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) to teach language, social, academic, and life skills to children with autism and other related disabilities.

Brain Balance Achievement Center Indianapolis

9302 N. Meridian Street Ste. 355, Indianapolis, IN 46260 Contact: Julie Peterson/Clinic Director The Arc of Indiana Phone: 317-843-9200 107 N. Pennsylvania St., Suite 800, Email: julie.peterson@live.com Indianapolis, IN 46204 www.brainbalancecenters.com Phone: 317-977-2375 or 800-382-9100 Brain Balance Achievement Centers work with children Email: thearc@arcind.org who suffer from Developmental Disorders such as Autism www.arcind.org The Arc of Indiana, established in 1956 by parents of Spectrum , Asperger's, children with developmental disabilities, works every day ADD/ADHD, Dyslexia, Tourette's and other neurological to empower families with information and resources, disorders. The Brain Balance Program is unique in that it empower people with disabilities to be as independent as utilizes a comprehensive, multi-faceted approach designed possible, and inspire positive change in public policy and specifically to address the various difficulties exhibited or experienced by each child. public attitudes. Contact us. We’re here to help

Autism Parent Care, LLC

Cornerstone Autism Center

395 S 9th St Noblesville, Indianapolis, IN 46020 Contact: Dr. Jane Yip Phone: 317-503-1296 Email: aileda88@hotmail.com

360 Polk Street, Greenwood, IN 46143 Contact: David Ide, Center Director Phone: (317) 888-1557

Email: jsatterfield_siegel@hotmail.com

Dr. Satterfield-Siegel is a Board Certified Pediatric Dentist specializing in providing dental care for infants, children and patients that have special needs. We provide routine dental care, fillings, in office sedations and hospital dentistry for all of our patients. We build long lasting relationships with our families through active listening and understanding. New patients are welcomed!

The Independence Academy 612 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208 Contact: Susan Le Vay, Director Phone: 317-926-0043 Email: susanlevay@IAindiana.org www.IAindiana.org

first” philosophy and offers a supportive community of parents and professionals. Indiana’s original ABA center – providing services since 2002.

Worthmore Academy 3535 Kessler Blvd. East, Indianapolis, IN 46220 Contact: Brenda J. Jackson/ Founder & Director Phone: 877-700-6516 www.worthmoreacademy.org Private full-time alternative school for children with specific learning disabilities (Dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, Autism Spectrum. Asperger's Syndrome, PDD-NOS...) K-12th grade. 3:1 student:teacher ratio focusing on academic, social and emotional skills. A place where kids can feel "worth more!"

We are a private non-profit school located near Butler University, serving students with high-functioning autism Verbal Behavior Center (HFA) and Asperger Syndrome in grades 5-12. IA balances for Autism academic and life-skills development in a positive and 9830 Bauer Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46280 nurturing environment provided by qualified and caring Sabrina Shannon, Clinic Administrator faculty. Students graduate with an accredited high school 317-848-4774 diploma. sshannon@vbca.org www.vbca.org

Little Star Center 12726 Hamilton Crossing Blvd, Carmel, IN 46032 Mary Rosswurm, Executive Director 317-249-2242 maryr@littlestarcenter.org

The Verbal Behavior Center for Autism (VBCA) is an intensive treatment center that provides therapeutic services to children and families impacted by autism. The VBCA uses Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) with emphasis on Verbal Behavior.

www.littlestarcenter.org

Little Star is a structured, sensory-friendly place where YOUR LISTING HERE!!! Contact Jennica at Jennica@IndysChild.com to children with autism receive intense, individualized onewww.cornerstoneautismcenter.com have your listing added to one of our directories! Cornerstone Autism Center is an intensive day treatment on-one therapeutic intervention based on the principles of clinic dedicated to maximizing the potential of children applied behavior analysis (ABA). Little Star has a “family www.developmentalphysiopsychologydisorders.com Offering one to one intervention to children and adults with autism. Utilizing the science-based approach of with autism. Academic subjects and ABA included. Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), trained therapists work 1:1 with the Insurance Billable. children to improve language skills, address their academic and social needs and reduce any maladaptive behavior. Behavior Analysis

Center for Autism 11902 Lakeside Dr., Fishers, IN 46038

Devon Sundberg 317-288-5232

Dr. Jennifer Satterfield-Siegel 506 Indiana Ave, Indianapolis, IN 46202 Phone: 317 269-0026 or 450-1226 cell

INDYSCHILD.COM 45


AROUND TOW N

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arts & enrichment

Kicking Up Confidence

Martial Arts Teach More than Self-Esteem The phenomenon of martial arts for children is sweeping across the nation. Parents recognize the benef its of martial arts as the art is designed to build self-conf idence while developing core strength and motor skills. Parents need to gather information and observe classes for each of the different styles available. When doing this, understand the rewards of each martial art discipline before enrolling your children to a martial art studio or “dojo.”

Why Martial Arts According to a study by the University of West Florida, “The Effects of Martial Arts Instruction on Preadolescents’ and Early Adolescents’ Self-Esteem,” researchers discovered that self-esteem was higher after the f irst instructional c ycle of Taek wondo t ra i n i ng. Teacher instructions, expectations and assessments were clear. Students, therefore, gained conf idence to master def ined goals—that is, students intrinsically valued the instructional process of Taekwondo, and thus, applied the necessary effort to achieve. Learning environments that promote students’ taking control of their own learning through str uctured and ritualistic activities create for students an intrinsic purpose for learning. In the Taekwondo learning environment, students increased their feelings about themselves and reduced fear of failing after applying effort. “Martial arts is an individual sport that teaches focus, attention, discipline, coordination and respect amongst many other life skills whereas other sports may be team oriented but may not teach anything except the importance of competing and winning,” said Sensei George Nae, owner/master instructor at House of Martial Arts. Martial arts are rich in history, culture and allow parents an opportunity to also appreciate the art for more than the physical attributes, but also the character building and spiritual benef its. “Our traditional exercise forms called kata are a fantastic way to teach children the value of doing things just right. These exercises earned the martial arts a top level reputation of teaching self discipline and focus,” said Sensei John Adamson, head instructor of Adamson’s Karate Carmel, owner of Adamson’s Karate Noblesville and assistant coach of the USA AAU Karate team.

Work the body and build confidence Sensei George agrees that most of the martial arts techniques are physical and build strong, f lexible and healthy bodies and minds so, therefore, other sports can benef it from this. “Some children don’t initially perform well in a team sport environment. Mastering these non-competitive kata exercises give my students a great boost in their self-conf idence, while strengthening their legs and core muscles,” said Adamson. “Once they improve their selfesteem and their body gets stronger and more f lexible 46 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

they are able to perform at a much higher level in their other sports interests.”

“Martial arts is an individual sport that teaches focus, attention, discipline, coordination and respect amongst many other life skills whereas other sports may be team oriented but may not teach anything except the importance of competing and winning,” ­— Sensei George Nae, owner/master instructor at House of Martial Arts

From Japan, karatedo is a popular style for kids as it uses both defensive and offensive moves while also focusing on balance. It centers on the kata, which revolves around the inner strength of an individual in being able to defend against an enemy. It involves punches, kicks, blocking, techniques, sparring and chopping. This style is well-recommended as it will develop the child’s inner strength. Ju jitsu is another Japanese style that has its inf luence from Chinese martial arts. Originally designed for women, ju jitsu uses several defensive and offensive techniques in self-defense using a fair amount of sparring. Aikido is a style with its roots based on a spiritual teaching of the ki, a central force which moderates the f low of energy in the human body. This martial art harnesses energy and f inds a way to redirect it as a defensive martial art.

Attaining the black belt Rank and belts are not equivalent between arts, styles or even within some organizations. In some arts, a black belt is quite easy to obtain, usually expected in three years, while in others ten years may be common. Testing for a black belt is commonly more rigorous and more centralized than for lower grades. It is a common belief that belts are handed out more loosely in the West than in Asia, where the custom of using the color of the belt to indicate a practitioner’s rank originated. In Japan, however, rank often comes more or less automatically with time done and the black belt has little to do with the “master” level which westerners often think of when they hear the term “black belt.” “At four to six years of age, they will learn basic coordination, focus, attention and discipline along with a few self defense techniques, but there is no personto-person contact. This is what we call the pre-karate program. The seven to nine year old group, since they are older and understand control, focus and the other benef its of the previous program, it gets a bit more intense physically and there is minimal person-to-person contact. Our last kids’ program is the 10 to 13 year olds and this is intense, controlled contact in boxing/kickboxing and also there is grappling or f ighting on the ground techniques. This is one step down from the adults program. In our style, we do not award kids full black belts until they are 15 or 16 years old,” said Nae.

Different types of Martial ArtS There are different approaches in learning the wide variety of martial arts. These styles are based on techniques developed in Japan, China and Korea.

Kung-fu is perhaps the most popular martial art style, originating from China. Kung-fu involves various attack movements and defensive styles which can be similar to a dance. Practitioners usually engage in sparring competitions. Some style used in kung-fu is derived from animal movement and defense such as the ‘tiger claw,’ ‘crane’ and ‘snake.’ Korean martial arts, such as taekwondo, involve using ones legs in elaborate footwork and kick combinations. This style had been widely accepted in competitions and children have been receptive to its complex approach. Judo utilizes movement, which can be closely associated to wrestling, is also considered a very safe style. It focuses on mental development and the use of physical foundation in order to get an advantage over the opponent. This discipline teaches that size is not a deciding factor in a match, but technique and skill acquired at the dojo. Determining which martial art is best for your child depends on the quality of instruction of the style, the values of your family and the goals you want to attain, whether it’s self-defense or gross motor skills, to compliment other activities or overall health. Regardless of your motivation to begin martial arts for your child, he or she will learn an appreciation for the art and gain respect for themselves and the world around them. Nikki Keever is a freelance writer, wife and mother of three living in Noblesville, Indiana.


Arts & Enrichment Guide Dance

Indianapolis School of Ballet 502 N. Capitol #B, Indianapolis, IN 46204 Contact: Cathy Strauss Phone: 317-955-7525 Email: school@indyballet.org www.indyballet.org A premier dance institution, the Indianapolis School of Ballet offers professional, year-round instruction for ages 4 to adult, great performances, legendary guest master teachers, and diverse repertoire in state-of-theart facilities in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. Experience the joy and artistry of dance, health and f itness benef its, and a nurturing atmosphere at ISB!

Sports Geist Sports Academy 11960 East 62nd Street, Indianapolis, IN Contact: Dana Osler Phone: 317-823-7734 Email: dana@geistsportsacademy.com www.geistsportsacademy.com GSA is a childrens facility that offers gymnastics, tumbling, cheer, birthday parties, Summer Camps, Parent's Night Out, Gym Jams, a Fine Arts Academic Preschool and much more!! You just have to check us out!!!

Music Kindermusik by Musical Beginnings 606 S. Union Street, Westfield, IN 46074 Kim Bemis 317-867-3077 kimusik@musicalbeginnings.com www.musicalbeginnings.com Music & Instrument Performance Locations in Hamilton, Boone & Northern Marion Counties Kindermusik is a music and movement program for children, ages 0-7. You’ll play, listen and dance to music that will impact your child in profound ways. That’s because every song, story and two-step has a carefully chosen purpose in this creative curriculum - one that’s designed to stimulate and strengthen the vital neural wiring taking place in your child’s mind right now. A Kindermusik educator will guide you every step of the way so you know how each activity contributes to your child’s overall growth and development. You can learn

more about Kindermusik classes by browsing our site or calling our off ice.

Art & Enrichment JCC 6701 Hoover Rd., Indianapolis, IN 46260 317-251-9467 lbaier@JCCindy.org www.JCCindy.org

The JCC welcomes families and individuals of all faiths and backgrounds. More than three generations have grown up in the JCC’s early childhood education and camp

INDYSCHILD.COM 47


programs. Thousands walk through the JCC’s doors each week to work out in the modern fitness center, participate in leagues and exercise classes, swim, enjoy family programs and so much more. The JCC – Good for life!

Indianapolis Art Center Address: 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis, IN 46220 Phone: 317-255-2464 Email: info@indplsartcenter.org Creativity enriches every aspect of life and is integral to cognitive growth. The Art Center offers quality art classes for toddlers through teens in a variety of art mediums, including glass blowing (ages 10 and up), ceramics, sculpture, jewelry making, fiber arts, painting and drawing. Or take a class with your kids!

YOUR LISTING HERE! Contact Jennica Jennica@IndysChild.com

Visit us on the web at IndysChild.com

48 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010


Co mm e n ta ry & Pa r e n t i n g

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mommy magic

Recovering Perfectionism

Why Parenthood Doesn't Have to be Perfect I used to get my feelings hurt when people (e.g., my kids and husband) did not appreciate the fact that I spent 200 hours getting each child’s scrapbook perfectly, well— perfect. Why didn’t they care that, on top of pulling carpool duty, baking goodies for Field Day at school, helping sell Girl Scout cookies, and the laundry list of everything else I do, I make each kid’s scrapbook—each containing all 500 photos I took of my girls at Disney World. By the way, I’m in none of these photos because I was the one capturing all of the magic on f ilm. It was beyond me why they didn’t stand on their chairs and applaud when I glue-sticked the last magical memory in place. After all, with three kids, that is a lot of magic to cut and paste. Why wasn’t there a party in my honor to celebrate this accomplishment? Why did they smirk—indeed, act downright ungrateful—when presented a perfectly perfect scrapbook from our family vacation? Why? Why?! WHY?!

Feeling empty and hollow, I did some soul searching about all this perfectionism. What I realized is that sometimes I am ridiculous. I also realized that perfectionism comes with the territory of being a mom. The fact of the matter is that perfecting something that is already pretty perfect is kind of silly. Plus, kids (my kids, anyway) don’t care about having everything perfect all the time. So, why do we kill ourselves trying to make the perfect scrapbook, Easter basket or birthday cake? Trying to maintain that standard of perfection is not only hard, exhausting and ridiculous, but it makes us sometimes feel like we are going crazy, as well.

Feeling empty and hollow, I did some soul searching about all

L et t i ng go of this perfectionism. What I realized is that sometimes I am per fect ion is hard—especially ridiculous. I also realized that perfectionism comes with as a mom. To be honest, I like the territory of being a mom. per fect ion, but being perfect all the time is impossible! So with that, my name is Mary Susan Buhner, and I am Besides, perfection a recovering perfectionist. I do have momentary lapses is a standard WE of perfectionism, but I try to stop and laugh at myself. put on ourselves. Perfectionism isn’t just ridiculous—it’s also kind of funny. Ou r k id s ju st want to be loved, I ask all moms reading this column to learn from my feel safe and have mistakes. First, don’t be so hard on yourself. Providing a f u n. Wou ld I loving, safe and nurturing home counts big time! Second, like to think that give up on the notion that everything has to be perfect for somed ay they your kids. Each child is built differently and we have to w i l l apprec i ate honor the chaos sometimes. After all, perfecting perfection my ef for ts and only stresses us out and makes us seem ridiculous to our f lip through their children. Instead, take a few minutes each day to make a Disney scrapbook list (a mental one in your head or you can write it down) w it h fond ne s s ? of all the wonderful things you did today to make your Sure, what mother wouldn’t want that? Do I think they child happy, feel safe and loved. It may not have been perfect will nit-pick it to death? No. Do I think they will care to you, but to them—it’s magic! what color marker I wrote in or what glue stick I used? No! Mary Susan Buhner is a Life Coach for Moms and Do I think they will remember all the great fun we had as author of “Mommy Magic: Tricks for Staying Sane in the a family? Yes! Kids don’t care about perfecting perfection. Midst of Insanity” Visit www.Mommy-Magic.com for more information. Become a Fan of Mommy Magic on FaceBook! In fact, it kind of bums them out, which then bums me out, too.

INDYSCHILD.COM 49


the childhood obesity epidemic, we have to work together as a society including healthcare professionals, schools, government, religious organizations, neighborhoods and families.”

Childhood obesity is running rampant throughout the U.S. Over the past thirty years, the problem has grown by leaps and bounds with approximately one-third of America’s children now falling into the overweight or obese categories. In addition, Businessweek.com recently completed a study that ranked Indiana at number 15 of the top twenty laziest states, stating that Hoosier residents spend slightly more time engaged in sedentary activities than the average American. The consequences of this sedentary lifestyle can include high cholesterol, edema, diabetes, skin darkening (called acanthosis, it is due to an insulin resistance and inability to metabolize sugars), heart problems, high blood pressure, sleep apnea and depression. The growing problem can be attributed to many different behavioral and environmental causes combining to create an epidemic. Growing dependence on and accessibility to technology (one recent survey found that four out of five American teens—nearly 17 million—carry a wireless device, a 40% increase since 2004), and busy lifestyles requiring fast and easy meals and less time for family activities are just part of the problem. “It is a result of many factors,” says Lori Walton, Pediatric Weight Management Coordinator for the Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital L.I.F.E. for Kids program at St. Vincent. “Eating out more often, increased portion sizes, increased availability and marketing of processed “empty calorie” foods, decreased activity due to less gym and recess now offered at schools, increased technology resulting in less manual labor and excess T.V., computer and video game time, both parents working resulting in kids home alone and less time to prepare healthy meals, etc. In order to truly impact 50 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

Eating healthy is one of the top two methods of weight control (besides exercise). Take a little time to plan out meals with your children and ask for their input. Visit Web sites that specialize in healthy meal ideas like www.foodnetwork.com, www. eatingwell.com, recipes.kaboose.com, etc. Pick up books at your local library that recommend healthy, kid-friendly recipes such as Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids Eating Good Food by Jessica Seinfeld, The Sneaky Chef to the Rescue: 101 All-New Recipes and "Sneaky" Tricks for Creating Healthy Meals Kids Will Love by Missy Chase Lapine. One of the best ways to enhance your child’s palette for healthy and delicious foods is to scrap the staples of chicken nuggets, hot dogs and mac and cheese and help them head for greener pastures by helping them start a garden of their own and plan meals together. Why not create a “pizza garden” with tomatoes, basil, peppers, oregano, etc. or perhaps a “purple garden” with eggplant, purple peppers, edible purple flowers, etc. Grab a Jr. Executive Chef ’s outfit from Aeromax (as seen on our cover) (http://www.aeromaxtoys.com/Jr.%20Executive%20Chef. html) and let them help you whisk, mix, shake, chop and bake along with you. Making healthy food fun is the name of the game. In an effort to combat the problem on the school level, Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St. Vincent has developed the Project 18 Statewide School Health and Wellness Challenge. Designed in partnership with Marsh Supermarkets and Ball State University, the program is designed to “help kids and their families set goals, eat smarter and get active” by involving parents and educators. The project, which is named after Manning’s football jersey number, provides Indiana elementary schools with an 18-week health and wellness curriculum

designed to address the major risk behaviors in third-grade to fifth-grade students. Approximately 250 registered schools within 60 Indiana counties participated in the project last year and applications are now being taken to participate in this year’s challenge. For more information, visit the project website at project18.stvincent.org or call 317-338-KIDS (5437). It’s been said that it takes a community to raise a child, and while there may be problems with community schools such as highly processed lunches and fewer physical education offerings, the fact of the matter is, good habits begin at home and parents need to step up and set a healthy example for their children. “It’s easy to blame the schools,” says Dr. Sandeep Gupta, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Clinical Medicine at Riley Hospital for Children and Director of the Riley POWER (Pediatric OverWeight Education and Research) Program. “But in reality, children are only in school for onethird of the time. Schools are awakening to the issues and beginning to try harder. But a lot more can be done at home.” Yet how do you motivate your child to get up and get moving? According to Dr. Gupta, it is not about putting children on a strict diet and enforcing rules. It’s about being an advocate for a healthy lifestyle and setting an example. “Parents have to buy in for young kids, and adolescents have to buy in for themselves,” he says. “Emphasize a positive reinforcement system such as non-food


Approximately

one-third of America’s children now fall into the

overweight or obese

based rewards; not punitive, which will just lead to rebellion. It’s kind of like dangling a carrot in front of them, but in this case, REALLY dangling a carrot!” Begin by creating an atmosphere that is conducive to exercise. Cut back on access to screen time and provide more access to fun opportunities to exercise. A few simple outdoor games and activities can be the only motivation a child needs to get active. Toss a Frisbee or a ball, set up a sprinkler to run through or provide a hula hoop, jump rope or bean bag toss. Inside, clear a space for tumbling-type fun. It doesn’t have to be fancy; just a “free action space” where it is okay to jump, roll a ball or turn on the radio and dance.

categories.

However, don’t just set up the space and walk away. Get involved and instigate activities with your child. In short, if you make exercise a priority in your own life, your children will mimic your behavior. Go on family walks before dinner or dance to a favorite song. Your activity can be infectious for your child. Try this: blow up a balloon and tap it in the direction of anyone in your family. I guarantee they will hit it back. It’s a proven fact that even the most mature, sedate adult cannot resist and high-spirited game of balloon tap!

52 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

As your child’s activity grows, begin to chart progress and set goals. Make them simple and reward achievements with non-food related awards such as a half hour of screen time or even better, an activity-related outing to a favorite park, zoo or swimming pool. Local options abound for families and children wanting to get involved in programs outside the home. Personal Trainer Tod Esquivel hosts a plethora of fitness camps and courses for all ages. His Indy Fit Kids (indyfitkids.com), available through Cardinal Fitness Centers downtown, at Eagle Creek and in Castleton, is a place for your kids ages 5-15 to “get healthy by making better self-esteem, fitness, eating and mental choices.” Programs are individually designed and focus on exercise and making nutritional food choices. Family fitness and personal, in-home programs are also available. Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard recently launched “Get Fit Indy!” a citywide wellness initiative aimed at encouraging healthy lifestyles for kids and families. “I challenge all children living in Indianapolis to be active 60 minutes a day and eat healthy foods. Maintaining an active lifestyle and eating from the five food groups are great ways to be healthy,” said Mayor Ballard. The initiative’s Web site, www.indy.gov/kidsfitnesschallenge, highlights community partners’ programs, activities and events designed to help area families reach the goal. Additionally, the POWER program at Riley Children’s Hospital is offering an upcoming “POWER for a Healthier Tomorrow” health fair to be held September 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and featuring activities for kids, food demonstrations and health screenings for both adults and children. (For more information contact Riley Hospital for Children at 1-800-248-1199). FitCity, a division of Learning Well, Inc., is “an effort in central Indiana to motivate and empower Hoosiers to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors.” Providing information and community resources for good nutrition and physical activity, FitCity provides a wealth of information for Indianapolis residents looking to get fit and achieve a healthy weight. FitCity is funded by the Health Foundation of Greater Indianapolis with the goal of helping Hoosiers take simple steps to better health in order to reduce childhood obesity. Visit fitcity.org for more information. It’s not always easy to talk yourself into putting down the chips and the cell phone and get motivated, but once you’ve done it, the benefits are undeniable for both you and your family. You’ll be so glad you did. Rebecca Todd is a freelance writer and author of the book What's the Point? -- Looking for Logic in Modern America.


WHY OBESITY IS SO DANGEROUS FOR KIDS We all know that excess weight can increase our risk for chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes. But recent studies show that children undertake an especially serious risk to their future when they carr y around unhealthy body weight. Obesit y is a risk factor for t ype 2 diabetes, a chronic disease in which the body does not properly produce or use insulin — a hormone necessar y to convert food into energ y for ever yday life. Obesity in youth can lead to the early development of type 2 diabetes, a disease that requires lifelong, daily management. Diabetes can lead to devastating complications such as heart disease stroke, kidney disease, blindness and amputations. For youth with type 2 diabetes, these complications can develop at a young age and lead to early death. Just how widespread is type 2 diabetes in kids? One in three children born in the year 2000 or later faces a lifetime with diabetes. For minorities, that f igure jumps to 50 % . Roughly half of the 6,700 children in Indiana with diabetes have type 2. And that number is growing. We can help reverse these frightening trends by curbing the exploding epidemic of obesity in children and teens. Parents play a central role in helping their kids make healthy choices to prevent obesity and its consequences. Mom and dad help kids choose what to eat and how to play, and model habits that their children adopt as comfortable behaviors. When a parent sets a good example, a child has a greater chance of making good choices on her own.

Here are some simple tips for making healthy choices part of your family’s routine:

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Pack lunches for school and pick healthy options like fruit, vegetables and whole grains. Teach your kids to choose healthy foods in the school lunch line, too.

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Avoid processed snack foods, which are often packed with calories, fat, sugar and salt. Strive for balance in your meal routines.

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Make physical activity a normal part of life. Have your child ride a bike, walk next to the grocery cart or jump rope while watching TV. Invite your kids to help out with chores around the house and yard.

Get active today and learn how to help your children prevent t ype 2 diabetes by registering to walk on October 3 in the A mer ica n Diabetes Association’s Step Out: Walk to Fight Diabetes. Visit www.diabetes.org/indywalk or ca l l 317-352 -9226 to learn more.

INDYSCHILD.COM 53


Honoring the Blended Family

You’ve found someone you

want to spend the rest of your life with. You or that special someone have already started the adventure of parenting and therefore are merging more lives than your own as you plan to get married. According to the recent National Vital Statistics Report, one of three Americans is now a stepparent, a stepchild, a stepsibling, or some other member of a blended family. More than half of Americans today have been, are now or will eventually be in one or more step situations during their lives. Now in 2010, blended families are projected be the predominant family form in the U.S.; there is a pattern of success for blended families that has an astonishing 84 percent success rate. Putting your marriage first is the best way to begin a new chapter together. Discussing the sensitive needs of the children and committing to over-communicating 54 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010


with each other about the heart-felt details of what your new life will be like between yourself and your child’s “other” parent are at the forefront of every blended family. It is critical to maintain trust, confidence and a sense of compassion for everyone involved, beginning the day you start dating through the engagement and marriage.

Talking points when things get serious

Single parents, along with their children, have often endured emotional damages that created a bond between them few can understand. When a new adult with intimate relationships with the family becomes involved, children need to be nurtured and communicated with – at their level –and have their questions answered accurately and respectfully. It is a tragedy to merely assume your child understands your feelings for this new person in your lives and what’s transpiring between you and your future spouse. “The child did not choose this scenario, so however this plays out, each child needs to be responded to differently because their needs are different,” said Chad Sudsberry, licensed mental health counselor and attachment specialist, with offices in Avon and Indianapolis. How you connect with your child is a unique as they are. When they are ready to talk about heartfelt issues is something only parents can tune into and with the gravity of merging families, one has to be ready every moment of every day. “Universal play time is more specifically setting time aside for the parent and child to have time

to talk and play. Adolescents do hit and miss communication, meaning they wait until the parent is not paying attention to spring something on them as opposed to the parent pursuing the child to create an avenue for them to have dialogue,” said Sudsberry. “Just because you decide to get married, doesn’t mean your child doesn’t have needs, so including them in the decision is helpful. As parents, you have to know what makes the child feel special or let them feel how they want—even if they aren’t into wedding plans. Meet them where they are not where we want them to be.”

Moving forward as a family

Even with the distractions of wedding planning, at least one of the betrothed has to be the roots of the family – focusing on the future, the big picture, life after the big day. With this, the couple can keep the routines and normalcy of their family lives intact while being aware of the emotional needs of the child and each other. “One of the main challenges that everyone in the family has to deal with for the wedding and years to come is loyalty issues. Children will be wondering where your loyalty lies – with me or the new boyfriend or girlfriend and they will test that and want varying degrees of assurance. They feel they have lost one parent already and now they are aware that the other has found a new adult to share their life with so they may wonder, will they lose this parent too,” said Dr. David Chaddock, director of Center Point Counseling, Indianapolis. “Their question may be, what does this new merger mean; while the parent is excited, hopeful about their new love and the future. Parents want the kids

to be hopeful and optimistic, too, and hopefully they will be, depending on how they’ve handled the courtship and how long ago the divorce or separation has been. Conflicting loyalty issues are the major cause for divorces in second marriages.”

The wedding and events leading up to

Consider thinking through to what you want your child to be exposed. Have conversations about the implications of marriage both spiritually and legally. In detail, describe what events will take place before the wedding day, who will be around the family and for how long. With a joyful spirit, describe the exciting times ahead for the child or children and the happiness and potential challenges that come from being a new family. Being a part of the wedding planning or wedding party includes a lot of fun and responsibility and potentially being around some mature situations. Think carefully what you promise your child when discussing how they can participate in the events leading up to the wedding, whether standing up with the couple or choosing the type of cake you’ll eat. Younger children can take simpler roles including flower girl or ring bearer. At this age, it’s important to find someone to care for the child during the day or week of festivities while the bride and groom are otherwise occupied. “Flower girls and ring bearer should at least be four years-old and no older than 10. Kids who are 10 and older are perfect junior bridesmaids and junior groomsmen. Ushers, guest book and program attendant should at least be 13 years old. To keep

focus on the couple and not the children, have them go and sit down during the ceremony,” said Darcie Kornmeyer, vice president of Circle City Planners. On the wedding day, the new spouse may want to make a vow of commitment to the children as a part of the ceremony. The couple should first exchange vows to each other then the children can be asked to join the couple, if this is something of interest. Sharing promises for the new family can be symbolized with a special gift or tangible reminder of the vow – a necklace, family medallion or other gift that will last a lifetime.

What’s next

“As for the honeymoon, I’ve heard of families having the kids’ document or video their experiences everyday while the newlyweds are on their honeymoon. And have the bride and groom do the same. Then compare the videos at the end of trip,” said Kornmeyer. This person, with whom you share values, inspires you to grow personally and professionally, makes you laugh, carries your burdens and holds your hand through controversy and triumphs will do the same for the children in your life. The couple commits to love each other on their wedding day and love the children in your lives as their own as you enter into your next happily ever after. Nikki Keever is a freelance

writer living in Noblesville, Indiana with her husband, stepfather to her son and father of their two children.

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Co mm e n ta ry & Pa r e n t i n g

*

ask a teen

How to Boost Your Teen's Self Esteem Suggestions Straight from Kids

Have you ever heard of the saying, “only you can make yourself happy?” As hard as it seems to hear that—it’s true. Many teens in the United States have a problem with self-esteem. Healthy selfesteem is a child’s armor against the challenges of the world. Teens who feel good about themselves seem to have an easier time handling conflicts and resisting negative pressures. They tend to smile more and are more optimistic than other teens who might be struggling. And although it seems parents are the main influence in a teen’s life and how they see themselves, this can be good, but it can also be bad. Teens with low self-esteem can find everyday challenges to be sources of major anxiety and frustration. Understanding teens from their point of view can be very difficult, but it may also prove helpful in encouraging positive self-esteem.

Gabbie B., 10th grader, said that she believes that most self-esteem issues stem from parental influence.

When a parent looks down upon them it can turn into a life-long battle of self-esteem issues. Colleen S. and Hanna J., 11th grade, both said that if parents we’re more understanding they wouldn’t constantly feel at fault or feel bad about themselves. By being more lenient and understanding, parents could help boost their self-esteem through trust, compassion and confidence-boosting activities. Parents are the first line of defense in combating negative self-image. After discussing with dozens of teens about what parents can do to increase their teen’s self-esteem, they came up with a list of ten actions that parents could take to help boost their self-esteem. 1: Lexi S., 9th grade, said that if parents would just accept how their teen is, then their self-esteem wouldn’t be a main problem. Scott P. Sells writes in Parenting Your Out of Control Teenager that if you use all of your energy to change your teen’s personal identity,“you may win these battles but lose the war on bigger issues like drugs, alcohol, skipping school and curfew violations.”

2: Monica L., 11th grade, thinks that parents shouldn’t be such workaholics and put so much focus on money. Doing so takes away from family time and activities that could be used to enhance your teen’s positive self-image. Sells also writes that it’s important to get reacquainted with one another, find activities that have meaning for both of you and help build your teen up from the inside out.

6: Ally M., 11th grade, thinks teens could use more compliments. HealthyChildren.org’s Dr. Adele Hofmann notes that “We don’t tell our children often enough what they did right.” So hand out the compliments even if there’s a loss involved, make it sincere (kids do have a radar for knowing when you’re just being a mom/dad) and show them why they should be proud of who they are.

3: Marcus N., 10th grade, wants parents to interact more with their teen’s life. Take a genuine interest in what’s going on within their lives. Ask questions and if they can’t answer it, give them time to think about how to answer. Pay attention to timing and environment and remain open with them. You accomplish nothing by asking nothing.

7: Courtney M., 12th grade, says parents could reward their teen when they accomplish things. Rewarding accomplishments happens throughout our entire lives: Raises, promotions, certificates, bonuses, etc. Why not encourage goals and reward positive behaviors, accomplishments and hurdles? Not only will you inspire them to keep doing it, you’ll boost self-esteem, too.

4: Jenna K., 10th grade, says that by encouraging their teen to do what they are good at could make them feel good about themselves. Bottom line: encouragement translates into self-esteem.

8: Dennis M., 10th grade, thinks that parents should push their teens to be involved in positive groups. Parents might get overwhelmed with the number of groups their teen is involved in, but social involvement and team building are both positive influences on self-esteem— plus they look good on a college application.

5: Georgia L., 9th grade, says that parents should attend social events that support teens. Work and life often get in the way of being able to attend every event that your child participates in. However, even though they may never tell you, your support in presence is a huge dose of self-esteem every time you’re there.

9: Kris H., 8th grade, thinks that teens would feel better by being treated like a young adult. While being treated older, they would feel older and better about how they are. We don’t want our children to grow up too fast or give limitless boundaries, but as teens mature,

as pointed out by Maud Purcell, LCSW, CEAP, you need to avoid lecturing, nagging and guilt trips. Never break their confidence. Always accept feelings, apologize, increase autonomy, respect privacy, be a good listener and refrain from the bullet train of questions.They’re growing up and it’s important that parents adapt. 10: Meredith K., 12th grade, said that the most important thing to help boost your teen’s esteem is being loved the way they are. Your teen is constantly exploring who he wants to be—accept it. While you can encourage positive behavior, your child is trying on different identities and it’s important to love them for who they are. No matter what color their hair is, how weird the clothes might be or who they love, they’re still your child and unconditional love goes a long way at boosting self-esteem.

The biggest buffer of low selfesteem is to give them attention and motivation to do the right thing. A teenager’s life may seem like a huge struggle—we face many problems and obstacles that weren’t around when our parents were teenagers—but many are still the same: Dealing with school, problems with friends and keeping close with the family. We might not say it, but we need help keeping our self-esteem high! Having our parents in our life can make a huge difference in the way that we handle the problems we face. Just like you put bandaids on our knees when we were little, you can do the same thing for our self-esteem as teenagers.

While hearing teens discuss how parents’ fail the self-esteem test may be difficult to hear, it will make a huge difference in your teen’s life knowing that you want to help them feel Abbie Klingsmith is 16 years old and better about themselves. At wants to go to publicschool.com, professionals IU and become a talk about how teens have low pediatrician. She self-esteem because parents lack enjoys cheerleading and playing giving their teens motivation. softball throughout the year.

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Nationa l Constitution RESPECT Day Da y Celebration Idea: Treat EVERYONE with respect today, and every day for that matter!

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Celebration Idea: Visit the airport and watch planes take off. Make paper airplanes. Discuss where you'd fly if you could go anywhere in the world.

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Celebration Idea: Make a hat, of course! Try to make a hat out of balloons, paper bags or whatever other materials you can come up with!

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Celebration Idea: Try to go an entire day without complaining! Focus on the good in every situation!

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Celebration Idea: Indianapolis is FULL of great museums! Why not visit one you've never been to today?

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BROADWAY MUSICALS DA Y

Sources: familycrafts.about.com, brownielocks.com, holidayinsights.com, holidaysforeveryday.com & thenibble.com

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Se p tem b e r 2010 Wednesday 1 Critical Mass Book Discussion Group Wednesday, September 1; 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.; Book Talk Room The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers. Carmel Clay Public Library Book Talk

Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel. lib.in.us.

The Library Connects Generations! First Friday @ the Curve

Frederick Grue: the "Andrew Wyeth" of Indiana painters FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-232-3675.

are $25 - call 317-545-5451 for reservations. All proceeds benefit the Dyslexia Institute of Indiana: www. dyslexiaindiana.org/dream home. $25. Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home. Lost Run Farm, off of 421 and Templin Road, Zionsville. www.dyslexiaindiana.org/ dream_home. 317-545-5451.

First Friday Family Movie Night For ages 5-12; must be accompanied by an adult. 6-7:30pm. FREE. Washington Park. 3130 E. 30th St, Indianapolis. www.indyparks.org. 317-327-PARK.

Indianapolis Indians vs. Columbus Clippers $9 - $14. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

Thursday 2 Indianapolis Indians vs. Louisville Bats $9 - $14. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home Preview Party Be one of the first to tour the Dream Home while enjoying cocktails and hor d'oeuvres. Tickets are $75 - call 317-545-5451 for reservations. All proceeds benefit the Dyslexia Institute of Indiana: www. dyslexiaindiana.org/dream home. $75. Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home. Lost Run Farm, off of 421 and Templin Road, Zionsville. www.dyslexiaindiana. org/dream_home. 317-545-5451.

Saturday 4 Children and families are invited to browse three featured arts exhibits that highlight digital and traditional artwork by local children and young adults. At 7 p.m. there will be a special performance of childrens folk music by the musical group, Sarah Lee Guthrie and Family. Then, guests will have the opportunity to be interviewed for the Learning Curve podcast, "Library Lab." Central Library. 40 E. St. Clair St., Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4100.

15th Annual Rib America Festival

Family Storytime - Hooray for Grandparents! For young children & their caregivers. Bring the whole family to share literature through stories, rhymes and songs. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Indianapolis Indians vs. Louisville Bats $9 - $14. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-2693545.

Kenya Carnival Target Free Family Night FREE. The Children's Museum. 3000 N. Meridian St, Indianapolis. www.childrensmuseum.org. (317) 334-3322.

Friday 3 Indianapolis Indians vs. Louisville Bats $9 - $14. Victory Field. 501 W. Maryland St, Indianapolis. www.indyindians.com. 317-269-3545.

60 INDY’S CHILD * SEPTEMBER 2010

Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica.com.

Wine Down with HGTV's Joe Ruggiero Meet one of America's most trusted design authorities, HGTV's Joe Ruggiero. Joe will join the Dream Home designers for a night of wine, design, and fun. Tickets

September 4, 2010, 2 - 6 pm, Second Presbyterian Church, 7700 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis, IN, Our mission is to empower kids to be active leaders in the community by organizing inter-faith projects to raise awareness and money for orphans and vulnerable children in Kenya. Our goal is to support 100 Kenyan high school students for 2010, which will cost $32,500. At our last carnival we had over 30 games and this year we hope to have even more! Please visit our website for more information: kenyacarnival.com. $0 admission, $10 per ticket for games. Second Presbyterian Church. 7700 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. kenyacarnival.com. 317-246-7256.


r e so u rc e s 15th Annual Rib America Festival Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica.com.

Sunday 5 15th Annual Rib America Festival Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.ribamerica.com.

The 6th Annual Linton Music Festival The Linton Music Festival is the biggest festival you've never heard of! Featuring over 30 artists, the Linton Music Festival provides a safe, family-friendly venue for enjoying free music under the shade trees of Humphreys Park. Also featured are food vendors, a Kids' play area, a bungee trampoline attraction, and more! Fore more information and complete list of acts, visit www.lintonmusicfest.com. Friday: 6pm-10pm, Saturday: 12pm-10pm, Sunday: 2pm-9pm. FREE. Humphreys Park. Highway 54 West, Linton. www. lintonmusicfest.com. 812-847-0818.

Metamora Old Time Music Festival

them. Each week a new art project will be incorporated! Great for those that love to color and draw. 5:00pm5:45pm. $25/members $45/non-members. Westview Healthplex Sports Club. 3660 Guion Road, Indianapolis. www.westviewhealthplex.org. 317-920-7412.

Tuesday 7 Hip to Knit A monthly knitting program for those who knit and anyone wanting to learn. All ages and experience levels welcome. Visit www.greenwoodlibrary.us/ hiptoknit.asp for details. Greenwood Library. 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. www.greenwood.lib. in.us. 317-881-1953.

Community Tuesday at White River State Park The first Tuesday of every month means discounts at all of your favorite attractions: Eiteljorg, NCAA, Indianapolis Zoo, Indiana State Museum and White River Gardens. Visit Website for details. Discount Tuesday. See Website for details or call. White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www. inwhiteriver.org. 800-665-9065.

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Monday 6\ Ballet classes This class will teach your child the basics of ballet. Learn ballet movements and terminolgy as well as poise and grace. This class is great for beginners. Ages 3-5 Next session begins September 20, 2010. Mondays: 5:45pm6:30pm. Six week session: $55/Greenwood Residents, $60/non-residents. Greenwood Parks and Recreation. 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. 317-881-4545.

Brain Balance Achievement Centers offer the Brain Balance Program in 29 nationwide locations. This proprietary, non-medical program has been successful in helping hundreds of children who suffer from ADD/ ADHD, Dyslexia, Tourette's, Asperger's and Autism Spectrum Disorders. To register for a parent lecture, please call 317-843-9200 and ask for Julie Peterson. Educators and professionals, such as occupational therapists, psychologists and pediatricians, are also encouraged to attend. Brain Balance Center of Indianapolis. 9510 N. Meridian St. Suite D, Indianapolis. 317-843-9200.

Fall Lawn Care Class Fall is by far the best time of year to treat your lawn. Does yours need improvements or just maintenance? Proper planning and actions this fall will add great benefits to your lawn next year. Come learn about fertilizer, weeds, aeration, and much more! Presented by Richard Huber, M.D. and Master Gardener. Greenwood Library. 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. www.greenwood.lib. in.us. 317-881-1953.

The Mizfits FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Be a Junior Firefighter

Children's Craft Classes

10:15 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. Children ages 2 - 7 are invited for stories about firefighting. Special guests will be Indianapolis Fire Department firefighters who will talk about fire safety. Children can get their picture taken on the fire truck. Franklin Branch. 401 State Street, Franklin. (317) 738-2833.

The Greenwood Parks and Recreation Department is offering craft classes for children ages 10 and up. The craft classes will be held at the Greenwood Community Center the second Thursday of every month from 6:30pm-8:30pm. Please register one week in advance. Call 317-881-4545 to find out what craft is being offered each month and the cost. 6:30pm-8:30pm. Varies. Greenwood Community Center. 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. www.greenwood.in.gov. 317881-4545.

Coffee with the Dream Home Designers

Two days of traditional music in an historic setting along the Whitewater Canal. Free performances, workshops, demonstrations and displays. 10 AM to 9 PM Sat, noon to 6 Sun. Two stages, more than 30 groups. Other activities available: WVRR excursions on Flagg Coal 75 Steam loco, horse drawn canal boat, operating grist mill. FREE. Lane's End Farm. Lovers Lane, Metamora www. metamoramusic.pbworks.com. 765-647-2194.

Brain Balance Achievement Center parent lectures

Meet with the Dream Home designers as they discuss the design elements of the home. Coffee and a light breakfast will be provided. Tickets are $20 - call 317-545-5451 for reservations. All proceeds benefit the Dyslexia Institute of Indiana: www.dyslexiaindiana.org/dream home. $20. Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home. Lost Run Farm, off of 421 and Templin Road, Zionsville. www. dyslexiaindiana.org/dream_home. 317-545-5451.

Tony Hinkle FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-232-3675.

Moms and More Meeting at Center for Inquiry Snacks, conversation, light exercise, and reflection. Children are welcome with volunteers available to care for children while mothers converse. 10-11:30am. FREE. Center for Inquiry. 350 Canal Walk, Suite A, Indianapolis. www.mommymoon.org. 317-6548684.

St. Joe's Annual Fall Festival St. Joseph Catholic Church, located on 1375 S. Mickley will be holding their 3rd Annual Community Fall Festival on September 9, 10, and 11. This is an annual fundraiser for St. Joseph parish. The Festival will feature rides, a kid's tent, raffle, silent auction, white elephant, and many more fun activities for kids. Food will be served nightly including a spaghetti dinner on Thursday night and chicken fingers and mac and cheese. There is an opportunity to purchase ride tickets in advance. FREE. St. Joseph Catholic Church. 1375 S. Mickley, Indianapolis. www.stjosephindy.org. 317-502-3020.

Friday 10

Children ages 2-4 years can join us for this 6 week class where we will introduce the use of colors and art to

Thursday 9

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Indianapolis Art Center Open House

The Indianapolis Art Center's Annual Open House will be September 10 from 6-8 p.m. There will be plenty for kids and adults to enjoy. The Art Center is kicking off the 2010 Open House with a night of brand new art on exhibition and the chance to see what goes on during classes. Art demonstrators will be in our studio classrooms explaining their style of art and giving visitors of all ages the opportunity to get messy and try it out. Take a stroll in the Frank M. Basile Studio Shop and portico to purchase artist-made prints and paintings at the Sidewalk Sale. Snacks will be available for guests. The Art Center invites you to come try something new! The exhibition will be up from August 6 until October 3 during regular business hours. FREE. The Indianapolis Art Center. 820 E. 67th St., Indianapolis. www.IndplsArtCenter.org. (317) 255-2464.

Soul Bus FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-6242563.

WFYI's 13th Speaking of Women's Health Conference Join WFYI Public Media for its 13th annual Speaking of Women's Health conference presented by St. Vincent Women's Services on Friday, September 10, from 8 am -3pm at the Indiana Convention Center. The conference provides attendees with opportunities to "Tune in to Wellness" through keynote sessions, breakouts and health screenings geared specifically toward the health, well being and personal safety of women. The event also includes a gift bag and sitdown luncheon. Individual tickets are $40. A reserved table for 10 with priority seating is $500. Tickets can be purchased online at wfyi.org or by calling (317) 715-2009. Event proceeds will benefit WFYI's mission to enrich the Central Indiana community through its programming and educational outreach services. Individual tickets are $40; Reserved tables for 10 are $500. Indiana Convention Center. www.wfyi.org. 317-715-2009.

Colts Go Blue For United Way

All American Horse Classic

FREE. Monument Circle. 1 Monument Circle, Indianapolis.

This annual event, regarded as Indiana's premier horse show, will feature over 750 beautiful American Saddlebred horses and Hackney Ponies competing for over $700,000 in national championships. FREE. Pepsi Coliseum, Indiana State Fairgrounds. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.allamericanhorseclassic.net. 317 927 7500.

Friday Night Swing Dance Magical Finger Tips

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$12. Fountain Square Theatre. 1105 Prospect Street, Indianapolis. www.fountainsquareindy.com. 317686-6010.

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St. Joe's Annual Fall Festival St. Joseph Catholic Church, located on 1375 S. Mickley will be holding their 3rd Annual Community Fall Festival on September 9, 10, and 11. This is an annual fundraiser for St. Joseph parish. The Festival will feature rides, a kid's tent, raffle, silent auction, white elephant, and many more fun activities for kids. Food will be served nightly including a spaghetti dinner on Thursday night and chicken fingers and mac and cheese. There is an opportunity to purchase ride tickets in advance. FREE. St. Joseph Catholic Church. 1375 S. Mickley, Indianapolis. www. stjosephindy. org. 317-5023020.

at www.zionsvillelions.com. Zionsville Parks Dept. Zionsville Lions Park. Elm Street & S.R. 334, Zionsville. www.zionsville-in.gov/parks. 317-873-5540.

Saturday 11 Archaeology ID Days $7 adult; $6.50 Senior; $4 children 3 -12. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www. in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637.

All American Horse Classic This annual event, regarded as Indiana's premier horse show, will feature over 750 beautiful American Saddlebred horses and Hackney Ponies competing for over $700,000 in national championships. FREE. Pepsi Coliseum, Indiana State Fairgrounds. 1202 E 38th St., Indianapolis. www.allamericanhorseclassic.net. 317 927 7500.

St. Joe's Annual Fall Festival Zionsville 57th Annual Fall Festival The Festival kicks off with the Kiwanis parade down Zionsville's historic Main Street at 10:45am Saturday. Poor Jack Carnival & Midway will operate Friday night, Saturday and Sunday until 5pm with rides for all ages, midway games and food. This year a special VIP Carnival will be held for special needs children on Friday, September 10th. Festival times are 6pm - 11pm Friday (carnival rides), 10am - 11pm Saturday and 10am - 5pm Sunday. Additional information about the 57th Zionsville Lions Club Fall Festival can be found online

St. Joseph Catholic Church, located on 1375 S. Mickley will be holding their 3rd Annual Community Fall Festival on September 9, 10, and 11. This is an annual fundraiser for St. Joseph parish. The Festival will feature rides, a kid's tent, raffle, silent auction, white elephant, and many more fun activities for kids. Food will be served nightly including a spaghetti dinner on Thursday night and chicken fingers and mac and cheese. There is an opportunity to purchase ride tickets in advance. FREE. St. Joseph Catholic Church. 1375 S Mickley, Indianapolis. www.stjosephindy.org. 317-502-3020.

Zionsville 57th Annual Fall Festival

The Indianapolis Ballet - An Evening With The Stars

The Festival kicks off with the Kiwanis parade down Zionsville's historic Main Street at 10:45am Saturday. Poor Jack Carnival & Midway will operate Friday night, Saturday and Sunday until 5pm with rides for all ages, midway games and food. This year a special VIP Carnival will be held for special needs children on Friday, September 10th. Festival times are 6pm - 11pm Friday (carnival rides), 10am - 11pm Saturday and 10am - 5pm Sunday. Additional information about the 57th Zionsville Lions Club Fall Festival can be found online at www.zionsvillelions.com. Zionsville Parks Dept. Zionsville Lions Park. Elm Street & S.R. 334, Zionsville. www.zionsville-in.gov/parks. 317-873-5540.

Old National Center (Formerly Murat). 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469.

Family Arts Series: An Evening of Jazz with Rob Dixon and Friends

Grandparents Day, Hooray!

FREE. White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.in.gov/whiteriver.

Family Fun Day: Insects Stop by and learn about these critters and have a chance to explore the garden to see what you can find Registration required. $1 per person. Garfield Park Conservatory. 2505 Conservatory Dr., Indianapolis. www.garfieldgardensconservatory.org. 317327-7580.

Penrod Arts Festival

Junior Gardener Club Children ages 6-12 are invited to enjoy a fun-filled time in the Children's Garden. There will be a different topic each month. Registration required. 11am-12pm. FREE. Garfield Park Conservatory. 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. www.garfieldgardensconservatory. org. 317-327-7580.

Sunday 12 Celebrate Grandparents Day with your grandchildren with stories, songs and special activities. Nora Library. 8625 Guilford Ave, Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4470.

Zionsville 57th Annual Fall Festival The Festival kicks off with the Kiwanis parade down Zionsville's historic Main Street at 10:45am Saturday. Poor Jack Carnival & Midway will operate Friday night, Saturday and Sunday until 5pm with rides for all ages, midway games and food. This year a special VIP Carnival will be held for special needs children on Friday, September 10th. Festival times are 6pm - 11pm Friday (carnival rides), 10am - 11pm Saturday and 10am - 5pm Sunday. Additional information about the 57th Zionsville Lions Club Fall Festival can be found online at www.zionsvillelions.com. Zionsville Parks Dept. Zionsville Lions Park. Elm Street & S.R. 334, Zionsville. www.zionsville-in.gov/parks. 317-873-5540.

Monday 13 Chinese American Festival The annual Penrod Arts Fair has over 300 artists with work on display and six stages of entertainment, making it "Indiana's Nicest Day." Look for the IMA tent to enjoy activities for all ages. Visit penrod.org for more information. Advanced Tickets: $12 Public / $11 IMA members, Event Day: $15. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd., Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331.

Punt, Pass and Kick Boys and girls ages 6-15 years old can test their football skills at this year's NFL Punt, Pass and Kick. Our local winner will advance to the Sectional Competition. On-site registration begins at 8:30am. Participants must have a copy of thier birth certificate and wear gym shoes (cleats are NOT allowed). FREE. Old City Park. 304 S. Meridian Street, Greenwood. www.greenwood.in.gov/ parks. 317-881-4545.

FREE. Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis.

Social Security and Retirement Planning Financial Advisor Kyle Foyer will give a presentation on social security & retirement planning, followed by a question and answer session. Registration not required. For more information, call the Reference desk at 8443362. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3362.

Tuesday 14 Apples to Apples Come experience one of fall's favorite foods. Taste and learn some fun facts about apples. Recipes, tips, and tricks for enjoying this tasty treat will be shared. Greenwood Library. 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. www. greenwood.lib.in.us. 317-881-1953.

Quest for the West $8 adults, $7 senior citizens; $5 children. Eiteljorg Museum. 500 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.eiteljorg.org. 317-636-WEST.

Shop For Awareness Community Yard Sale benefiting the Alzheimer's Association. 9:00am-1:00am. For all 22 locations visit www.AmericanSrCommunities.com. www.AmericanSrCommunities.com.

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Fishers Parks & Recreation: Ice Cream Social I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream! Come and celebrate the end of summer with ice cream, songs, games, crafts, and a story. We will conclude our class with a yummy sundae bar. For ages 3-6 child only class, see below. Min 6/Max 10. Registration ends 9/7. R$16/ NR$24. Billericay Park Building. 12690 Promise Road, Fishers. www.fishers.in.us/parks. (317)595-3150.


r e so u rc e s Holliday Park Eco-Explorers Come out to Holliday Park and become a true eco-explorer! We'll spend our time hiking the trails, exploring the river, discovering history, getting dirty and making life-long memories in the out-of-doors. Children will be divided into a 5-7 year old group and an 8-10 year old group. Dates for the series are 9/14, /928, 10/12, 10/26, 11/9, and 11/23. Call 327-7180 to register. $30/seires. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

Sabrina Falls FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

details. College Avenue Library. 4180 N. College Ave, Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4320.

Do You Have Military Ancestors in your Family?

meditation Yoga is ideal for calming your breathing and increasing flexibility and strength. We'll focus on the practice of linking the breath to body movements in a smooth flow of poses (don't worry, we'll walk you through all of the poses). Optimal Wellness Center instructor Angela Cast will be instructing this class, open to beginners and experienced. Complimentary. Optimal Wellness Center. 4545 Northwestern Dr., Zionsville. www.WeCreateWellness.com. 317870-7220.

FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-2323675.

15th Annual Indianapolis Irish Fest

Chef's Taste $35. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org/connect/ dine. 317-920-2659.

Dads Appreciating Down Syndrome, or D.A.D.S. is a Down Syndrome Indiana group of fathers with children who happen to have Down syndrome. We hesitate to call our self a "support group", even though we do, in many ways, support each other. We prefer to think of D.A.D.S. as an "action group." You won't find us in a church basement drinking warm coffee and whining about having children with Down syndrome. Instead, you'll find us out in the community coaching our kid's sports teams, participating in our children's IEPs, volunteering at local Down syndrome fund raising events, and even sponsoring fund raising events of our own. Join us for dinner on us, to discuss the unique challenges and joys of fathering an individual with Down syndrome. For more information about D.A.D.S contact Ray Glowner at: rayglowner@sbcglobal.net. The D.A.D.S. facebook group is located at: www.facebook.com/ group.php?gid=110288739806. 6:30-8:30 P.M. FREE. Loon Lake Lodge. 6880 E 82nd St, Indianapolis. www.dadsnational.org.

Wednesday 15 American Community Survey FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-232-3675.

Brain Balance Achievement Center parent lectures Brain Balance Achievement Centers offer the Brain Balance Program in 29 nationwide locations. This proprietary, nonmedical program has been successful in helping hundreds of children who suffer from ADD/ADHD, Dyslexia, Tourette's, Asperger's and Autism Spectrum Disorders. To register for a parent lecture, please call 317-843-9200 and ask for Julie Peterson. Educators and professionals, such as occupational therapists, psychologists and pediatricians, are also encouraged to attend. Brain Balance Center of Indianapolis. 9510 N. Meridian St. Suite D, Indianapolis. 317-843-9200.

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This event is free for members and included with regular Zoo adm. Indianapolis Zoo. 1200 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.indyzoo.com. 317-630-2001.

Mystery Book Writers Panel Thursday, September 16; 7:00 p.m.; Book Talk Room Join authors Phil Dunlap, Tony Perona, Susan Crandall and other local mystery writers for this panel discussion about different styles and approaches to mystery-themed writing. This program will be of interest to aspiring authors. No self-published authors will be a part of the panel. For more information, call the library at 571-4292. Carmel Clay Public Library Book Talk Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-571-4292.

Friday 17

Children and teens ages 10 - 19 are invited for fun activities and snacks. Contact the branch for program

We will explore a nature related topic through books, a craft, a hike, and hands on experiences. Please remember all activities are outside, so dress for the weather. Parents are required to stay. For ages 3-6. Have you ever tagged a Monarch Butterfly? Learn why Monarchs are so special and help catch and tag some. $4 per Fishers Resident; $6 per non-resident. Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve. 10410 Hague Rd, Fishers. www.fishers.in.us/parks. 317-595-3150.

$19 adult; $10 ages 3 - 12. Indiana State Fairgrounds. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indianastatefair. com. 317-927-7500.

Saturday 18

An Etiquette Worshop presented to you by The PINK Foundation INC. Featuring Christie Herron of Excellence with Etiquette Young Ladies ages 14-17 are invited to join the women of the PINK Foundation INC atSalt of the Earth Baptist for a two part workshop entitled Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Lady. Learn how to apply makeup for the fresh and natural look. Discover which style of clothes best suit your body type and enjoy a lesson in fine dining and poise through self exploration. FREE. Salt of the Earth Churh. 4925 West 36th St., Indianapolis. www.pink-indy.org. 317-937-4910.

Sabrina Falls FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-6242563.

Super Jaguars Weekend/ IUPUI Soccer Doubleheader

Bob & Tom Comedy All Stars $30.50. Old National Center (Formerly Murat). 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/ murat. 317-632-7469.

Country Fair

$1. IUPUI Natatorium. 901 W. New York St, Indianapolis. www.iunat.iupui.edu. 317-2743518.

Back by popular demand! Enjoy a night of family fun while playing board games, doing puzzles, BINGO, open gym, and more. Snacks and games will be provided, just bring your family out for an exciting evening. For all ages. No registration is required. FREE. New Britton Elementary School. 8660 E. 131st Street, Fishers. www.fishers.in.us/parks. (317)595-3150.

Indy Kids Consignment Fall sale is September 16-18 at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds in Noblesville. Offering 11,000 square feet of high quality, new and gently used children's clothing, toys, furniture and gear. We are now accepting teen clothing for our Teen Consignment Zone. Consignor and Volunteer registration now open Earn 60%-75% TOP DOLLAR - for your kids items Join thousands of other smart parents who are saving big bucks on kids stuff. Complete Details at www.IKCsale.com. Hamilton County Fairgrounds. 2003 Pleasant St., Noblesville. www.IKCsale.com. 317-847-2529.

Our free yoga class is the ideal way to spend a beautiful summer Friday—in rejuvenating movement and

O'Reilly Auto Parts 4 Wheel Jamboree Nationals presented by Geico Powersports

Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Lady Monarch Mania Preschool Program

Indy Kids Consignment Fall Sale

Free Yoga Class

FREE. Monument Circle. 1 Monument Circle, Indianapolis.

Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis.

Fishers Parks & Recreation: Fall Family Game Night

Youth Night

Your Money Bus Tour

The walk itself is actually more of a family day, with music, a sensory activity tent, a silent auction, and inflatable slide and rock climbing wall. The walk is a one mile, wheelchair friendly walk of solidarity, which takes place following a balloon release. For more information please visit our website www.aaiwalk.org or contact Patty Reed at 317-403-4308. Coxhall Gardens. 2000 West 116th Street, Carmel. www.co.hamilton.in.us. 317-896-5874.

Indy Kids Consignment Fall Sale Indy Kids Consignment Fall sale is September 16-18 at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds in Noblesville. Offering 11,000 square feet of high quality, new and gently used children's clothing, toys, furniture and gear. We are now accepting teen clothing for our Teen Consignment Zone. Consignor and Volunteer registration now open Earn 60%-75% TOP DOLLAR - for your kids items. Join thousands of other smart parents who are saving big bucks on kids stuff. Complete Details at www.IKCsale.com. Hamilton County Fairgrounds. 2003 Pleasant St., Noblesville. www.IKCsale.com. 317-847-2529.

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10th Annual Answers for Autism Walk

Hispanic Heritage Fiesta Down Syndrome Indiana D.A.D.S. Meeting

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Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www. connerprairie.org. 317-776-6000.

Digging through the Past, Building to the future A Fundraiser Event for the Hamilton County Parks with Music, food, Vendors and live animals as well

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as a kid's area. All fund raised go back to the Parks to provide a safe atmosphere for kids and families to enjoy. FREE. Strawtown Koteewi Park. 12308 E. Strawtown Ave., Noblesville. 317-770-4408.

Jones Brothers Ride for Hemophilia

they work or with family and friends. Walkers ask others to support their walk effort by sponsoring them with a donation to the American Heart Association. The Heart Walk is a wellness event that encourages healthy lifestyle choices. Many participants are heart disease and stroke survivors; others walk in honor or memory of a friend or family member who has or had heart disease or stroke. 8:00 a.m to 12:00 p.m. FREE. Participants are encouraged to collect donations. Celebration Plaza, White River State Park. 801 W Washington Street, Indianapolis. www.americanheart.org/presenter. jhtml?identifier=3073251. 317-873-3640.

O'Reilly Auto Parts 4 Wheel Jamboree Nationals presented by Geico Powersports

9:00-11:00 Sign up. Sheridan American Legion. 406 E. 10th St., Indianapolis.

$19 adult; $10 ages 3 - 12. Indiana State Fairgrounds. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indianastatefair. com. 317-927-7500.

Sky's the Limit Fruit and Candy Tour Enjoy a family friendly tour of the Conservatory focusing on the tasty treats it produces. Ages: 3+ Registration required. $4 per person. Garfield Park Conservatory. 2505 Conservatory Dr., Indianapolis. www.garfieldgardensconservatory.org. 317327-7580.

Indianapolis Start! Heart Walk Walking is great for your health AND a fun way to raise money for the American Heart Association. It's easier than ever to fundraise with the American Heart Association. Sign-up and begin sending e-mails to fundraise online. Walkers can organize teams at the companies where

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FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

sspom Hosts Fall Children's Clothing and Equipment Sale Southside Parents of Multiples' (SSPOM) Fall Children's Clothing and Equipment Sale will be held from 8am12pm, on Sat, Sept 18, at Greenwood High School located at 615 W Smith Valley Rd. The sale is free and open to the public. Hundreds of mothers of twins, triplets and more, along with other area moms, will be selling high-quality, gently used children's items, items, including clothing, toys, furniture, maternity clothes and more. For more information regarding the sale

call 317-767-5704. FREE ADMISSION. Greenwood High School. 615 w Smith Valley Rd, Greenwood. sspom.org. 317-767-5704.

15th Annual Indianapolis Irish Fest Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis.

Super Jaguars Weekend/ IUPUI Volleyball

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$1. IUPUI Natatorium. 901 W. New York St, Indianapolis. www.iunat.iupui.edu. 317-274-3518.

Holliday Park: Naturalist on the Loose

Indy Kids Consignment Fall Sale Indy Kids Consignment Fall sale is September 16-18 at the Hamilton County Fairgrounds in Noblesville. Offering 11,000 square feet of high quality, new and gently used children's clothing, toys, furniture and gear. We are now accepting teen clothing for our Teen Consignment Zone. Consignor and Volunteer registration now open Earn 60%-75% - TOP DOLLAR - for your kids items Join thousands of other smart parents who are saving big bucks on kids stuff. Complete Details at www. IKCsale.com. Hamilton County Fairgrounds. 2003 Pleasant St., Noblesville. www.IKCsale.com. 317847-2529.

Have you ever touched a toad? Smelled skunk cabbage? Join us as we grab some of the coolest stuff from the nature center and head out into the park. We'll even provide some fun activities you can do on your own. No registration required, meet your naturalist under the gazebo at the Holliday Park playground. FREE. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www. hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

Indianapolis Colts vs. New York Giants Various Prices. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www. lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452.

Joan Hamilton Band FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Your Money Bus Tour FREE. Monument Circle. 1 Monument Circle, Indianapolis.

15th Annual Indianapolis Irish Fest Military Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis.


r e so u rc e s O'Reilly Auto Parts 4 Wheel Jamboree Nationals presented by Geico Powersports

Monday 20 Bookworms For children in grades 1 & 2 Mondays, September 13 & 20; 4:00 - 4:45 p.m. & 6:30 - 7:15 p.m.; Storytime Room September Themes: Hats Off to a New School Year, Wacky Days. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel. lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

$19 adult; $10 ages 3 - 12. Indiana State Fairgrounds. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indianastatefair. com. 317-927-7500.

Country Fair Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www. connerprairie.org. 317-776-6000.

The Rising Sun Festival of Fine Arts and Crafts Two days of exceptional art, music, food and wine. Located along the Ohio River on Main Street in Historic Downtown Rising Sun, Indiana. First-rate artwork from painting, pottery, photography and jewelry to handmade furniture, woodwork, musical instruments and fine crafts featuring artists from all over the country. The Rising Sun Festival of Fine Arts and Crafts offers art lovers 2 days of fantastic art amongst the charming historic buildings and flowered streetscapes of Downtown Rising Sun. FREE. Downtown Rising Sun. Main Street, Risinf Sun. www.enjoyrisingsun.com. 888-776-4786.

DIY MondaysMake Your Own Postcards Saving the Planet Stylishly! Learn how to turn ordinary items into artwork. No registration is required. For teens in middle school or high school. All materials and refreshments will be provided at no cost by the Friends of the Carmel Clay Public Library. Carmel Clay Public Library Young Adult Lounge. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us.

Tales for 2s & 3s For children ages 2-3 & their caregivers. Mondays, September 13 & 20; 10:00 - 10:00 a.m. & 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.; Storytime Room Tuesdays, September 7, 14 &

21; 10:00 - 10:00 a.m. & 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.; Storytime Room For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Tuesday 21 Family Game Night Families are invited to play a variety of fun and educational board games with their children. Fountain Square Library. 1066 Virginia Ave, Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-2754390.

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discuss the 12-week afterschool program, which first includes a comprehensive assessment of all areas of a child's brain and body function. Then, by integrating physical and cognitive exercises with dietary change, Brain Balance Achievement Centers are able to correct the child's underlying brain imbalance, improve function and reduce/eliminate negative behaviors. To register for a parent lecture, please call 317-843-9200 and ask for Julie Peterson. Educators and professionals, such as occupational therapists, psychologists and pediatricians, are also encouraged to attend. Brain Balance Center of Indianapolis. 9510 N. Meridian St. Suite D, Indianapolis. 317-843-9200.

Jackson Browne $33.50 - $99. White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ whiteriver.

Library Kids Adventures For students in grades 3-5. September Themes: Back to School LKA Style, Candy Fun, Minute to Win It. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib. in.us. 317-844-3363.

Brain Balance Achievement Center parent lectures Brain Balance Achievement Centers offer the Brain Balance Program in 29 nationwide locations. This proprietary, non-medical program has been successful in helping hundreds of children who suffer from ADD/ADHD, Dyslexia, Tourette's, Asperger's and Autism Spectrum Disorders. The parent lectures will

Scott Jarman FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Tech Tuesdays Every Tuesday, the library offers a drop-in program that focuses on a different computer/online-related topic. Topics for September are: 14 - Facebook, 21 - Skype,

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28 - Health Series: Online Food Tracking. The sessions begin with a short presentation and then are open for questions about any computer related topic. Registration is not required. For more information, call the Reference desk at 844-3362. Carmel Clay Public Library Computer Training Room, 2nd Floor. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3362.

Wednesday 22 Book Buddies For children ages 4 - Kindergarten. Wednesdays & Thursdays, September 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23; 4:00 - 4:45

p.m.; Storytime Room. Super stories and cool crafts. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Fishers Parks & Recreation: Toddler Tales Come enjoy some bonding time with your toddler while meeting new people! We will read a story, sing songs, and have activities all focused on farm theme. Caregivers must attend and participate. For ages 18-30 months. Min. 4/Max. 10. Registration ends 9/16. R$10/NR$15. Roy G. Holland Memorial

Park Building. 1 Park Drive, Fishers. www.fishers. in.us/parks. (317)595-3150.

Noble of Indiana's Annual Celebration

Little "Ones"

$30. Hyatt Regency Indianapolis. 1 South Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis. www.hyatt.com. 317-6321234.

For children ages 12-24 months & their caregivers Wednesdays, September 8, 15, 22; 10:00-10:30 a.m., 11:00-11:30 a.m. & 12:00-12:30 p.m.; Storytime Room. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Mystery Book Group One Step Behind by Henning Mankell. Carmel Clay Public Library Book Talk Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us.

Thursday 23 Appreciating Native Trees & Shrubs $5 public; $3 members. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www. imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659.

Book Buddies For children ages 4 - Kindergarten. Wednesdays & Thursdays, September 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23; 4:00 - 4:45 p.m.; Storytime Room. Super stories and cool crafts. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Organize and Document your Geneaology Research FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-2323675.

Friday 24 A Fancy Nancy Parfait Soiree For girls ages 3-6 & their caregivers. Friday, September 24 & Saturday, September 25; 11:00 a.m. - noon & 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.; Program Room. Dress in your fanciest dress-up clothes and walk down the runway, as well as participate in fancy activities and have a parfait! Adults accompanying children may also dress up. Free tickets are required and will be available online or at the Children's desk beginning Friday, September 17. Each person - adult and child - must have a ticket to enter the program. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317844-3363.

Friday Night Swing Dance $12. Fountain Square Theatre. 1105 Prospect Street, Indianapolis. www.fountainsquareindy.com. 317686-6010.

CA3 FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-6242563.

Free Kid's Yoga Class

Homeschool Book Bunch For homeschooled students in grades K-5. Friday, September 24; 10:30 - 11:15 a.m.; Storytime Room. Join this reading club for a monthly book discussion, snacks and fun activities based on the selected theme. Book lists with titles for the September theme, "Tickle Your Funny Bone," will be available at the Children's desk upon registration. Registration is required and begins on Friday, September 3 online, in person, or by calling 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www. carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Ladies' Night Out

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Join the Optimal Wellness Center and yoga instructor Angela Cast for a free kid's yoga class, as we encourage kids to enjoy movement Each class features fun yoga poses based on a children's story such as "Where the Wild Things Are" and "Moody Cow Meditates." The classes are unique to the students so we may find our inner warrior with jedi yoga or use our magic wands on a journey through Fairytale Land with our princess yoga. Complimentary. Optimal Wellness Center. 4545 Northwestern Dr., Zionsville. www. WeCreateWellness.com. 317-870-7220.

In today's society, women often don't take enough time to care for themselves. We've created Ladies' Night as an opportunity for women to depart from the stresses of life and enjoy an evening of pampering and wellness We invite you to join the Optimal Wellness Center and our premiere partners for a full evening of wellness services. We'll provide healthy snacks and wine, facials and spa services, massages, reiki, footbaths, all natural hand treatments and skincare consultations. Prices start at $10 per service, and some are complimentary. Optimal Wellness Center. 4545 Northwestern Dr., Zionsville. www. WeCreateWellness.com. 317-870-7220.

Library Babies

WestFest Preview on the Circle

For children birth - 12 months & their caregivers Thursdays, September 9, 16 & 23; 10:00 - 10:20 a.m.; 11:00 - 11:20 a.m.; 12:00 - 12:20 p.m.; Storytime Room. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

FREE. Monument Circle. 1 Monument Circle, Indianapolis.

Ladies' Night Out Ladies, take an evening away from the stresses of life and enjoy some time for yourself at the OWC Our Ladies' Night features a variety of wellness services from the best natural wellness businesses in our community. This month, we're pleased to offer


r e so u rc e s the following services: massage therapy, facials, allnatural nail care, reiki, foot bath detoxification, ear candling, waxing (eyebrows), complimentary skin consultations, and complimentary stress analysis. Please call OWC at (317) 870-7220. Services begin at $10 - please call for pricing details. Optimal Wellness Center. 4545 Northwestern Dr, Ste. a, Zionsville. www.WeCreateWellness.com. 317870-7220.

Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Lady

Holliday Park: Junior Girl Scout Overnight Looking for an overnight adventure for your junior girl scouts? Let us take care of the planning and just come along for the fun! We will begin the evening by cooking dinner and earning our Outdoor Cook badge. After an evening hike, we will watch a movie and settle in for the night in the nature center. Saturday morning we will earn the Butterfly and Wildlife badges. Dinner, breakfast and snacks will be provided. Whole troops are welcome with and adult to scout ratio of 1:5. Call 327-7180 to register. $20/ scout. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

Saturday 25 2nd Annual Hemophilia Walk Reg: 8:30 am Walk Begins: 10:30 am. Fort Harrison State Park.

A Fancy Nancy Parfait Soiree For girls ages 3-6 & their caregivers. Friday, September 24 & Saturday, September 25; 11:00 a.m. - noon & 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.; Program Room. Dress in your fanciest dress-up clothes and walk down the runway, as well as participate in fancy activities and have a parfait! Adults accompanying children may also dress up. Free tickets are required and will be available online or at the Children's desk beginning Friday, September 17. Each person - adult and child - must have a ticket to enter the program. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Program Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Bats Night Hike at Ritchey Woods

come along for the fun! We will begin the evening by cooking dinner and earning our Outdoor Cook badge. After an evening hike, we will watch a movie and settle in for the night in the nature center. Saturday morning we will earn the Butterfly and Wildlife badges. Dinner, breakfast and snacks will be provided. Whole troops are welcome with and adult to scout ratio of 1:5. Call 327-7180 to register. $20/scout. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www. hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

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Marsh Hoosier Classic: Decatur Centrel vs. Plainfield $11 advance; $15 day of event. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www. lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452.

Marsh Hoosier Classic: Milan vs. Indian Creek $11 advance; $15 day of event. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www. lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452.

An Etiquette Worshop presented to you by The PINK Foundation INC. Featuring Christie Herron of Excellence with Etiquette Young Ladies ages 14-17 are invited to join the women of the PINK Foundation INC atSalt of the Earth Baptist for a two part workshop entitled Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Lady. Learn how to apply makeup for the fresh and natural look. Discover which style of clothes best suit your body type and enjoy a lesson in fine dining and poise through self exploration. FREE. Salt of the Earth Churh. 4925 West 36th St., Indianapolis. www.pink-indy.org. 317-9374910.

Archaeology ID Days $7 adult; $6.50 Senior; $4 children 3 -12. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637.

Broad Ripple Village Historic Home Tour $12; $10 in advance. Broadripple Village.

Building Blocks of Successful Grant Writing: Developing a Successful Board FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-2323675.

Campecine Film Festival FREE. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317920-2659.

Create a Coral Session $7 adult; $6.50 Senior; $4 children 3 -12. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637.

Crossroads 20-10 Indianapolis City Market. 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. www.indycm.com. 317-634-9266.

Free Range Childhood featuring Donald Davis and Carmen Agra Deedy Experiencing nature at night can be fun and exciting Join our nature staff for a night hike. Begin your evening at the fire. Bring food (like hotdogs or s'more fixin's) and drinks for the campfire. We supply marshmallows and roasting sticks. Afterwards, we will explore the woods. Celebrate these amazing acrobats of the dark and learn about our only flying mammal. We will search for signs of bat life with some high tech devices. $4 per Fishers resident; $6 per non-resident. Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve. 10410 Hague Rd., Fishers. www.fishers.in.us/ parks. 317-595-3150.

$10 adults; $5 children 5 - 12. Eugene and Marilyn Glick Family Foundation. 8425 Woodfield Crossing Blvd. Ste 300, Indianapolis. 317-232-1882.

Leaf Collective - An Autumn Equinox Concert FREE. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659.

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Marsh Hoosier Classic: Roncalli vs. Cathedral $11 advance; $15 day of event. Lucas Oil Stadium. 500 S. Capitol Ave., Indianapolis. www. lucasoilstadium.com. 317-262-3452.

years and up. No charge for children under 3. $4 per Fishers resident; $6 per non-resident. Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve. 10410 Hague Rd., Fishers. www. fishers.in.us/rwnp. 317-595-3150.

PlayFit: World Wide Day of Play $15 advance; $20 at gate. Massachusetts Avenue. Downtown's NE Quad, Indianapolis.

$15.50; $14.50 seniors; $10.50. The Children's Museum. 3000 N. Meridian St, Indianapolis. www. childrensmuseum.org. (317) 334-3322.

Meet a Hero

Rocky Ripple Art Festival

Zoo guests will have the opportunity to have one-onone contact with the 2010 Indianapolis Prize winner Iain Douglas-Hamilton as he details his decades-long fight to save the African elephant. Iain DouglasHamilton is a real life hero, and for one day only Zoo guests will have the opportunity to meet him and other extraordinary 2010 Indianapolis Prize finalists. From 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Indianapolis Zoo Dolphin Gallery, guests can meet these heroes and learn more about conservation around the world and at the Indianapolis Zoo. ree for members and included with regular Zoo admission. Indianapolis Zoo. 1200 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.indyzoo.com. 317630-2001.

11th annual Rocky Ripple Festival in the Park. It's FREE and fun for all ages Live music all day long, over fifty artists/artisans, interactive childrens' activities, volleyball court-sized sandbox, playground, rescue dogs, and so much more Bicycle racks provided by Pedal and Park. New this year: bicycle mechanics on site to provide light fall tune-ups. Broad Ripple Brew Pub

Mass Ave Festival

Community prepared festival food. All proceeds help support green spaces and parks in Rocky Ripple. Free Admission. Hohlt Park in Rocky Ripple. 842 W. 53rd St, Indianapolis. www. rockyripple.org & www. facebook.com/#!/event. php?eid=140038732686879&ref=ts. 317-414-5018.

FREE. Scottish Rite Cathedral. 650 N. Meridian St, Indianapolis. 1-800-489-3579.

Sitar Recital by Pundit Nayan Ghosh

The Monarch Butterfly is an amazing insect. Join us to learn more about this unique creature. On this day, we will focus on the adults and why and how scientists tag them. Min 10/Max 30. Cost is per participant ages 3

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$20 advance; $25 door. Eugene and Marilyn Glick Family Foundation. 8425 Woodfield Crossing Blvd. Ste 300, Indianapolis. 317-232-1882.

$20. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www. imamuseum.org. 317-920-2659.

Smithsonian Museum Day Free admission to those holding Smithsonian Museum Magazine coupons. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Free admission to coupon holders. President Benjamin Harrison Home. 1230 N. Delaware St., Indianapolis. www.pbhh.org. 317.631.1888.

Sunday 26 Norbert Krapf & Gordon Bonham FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-6242563.

West Fest $5 Youth, $9 Members and adults, $1 off for. Eiteljorg Museum. 500 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.eiteljorg.org. 317-636WEST.

The Art of Meditation

Yack and Snack Book Club Children ages 8 - 12 are invited to discuss their favorite books over snacks generously provided by the IMCPL Foundation. This book discussion will focus on "The 39 Clues" by Rick Riordan. Wayne Library. 198 S. Girls School Rd, Indianapolis. www.imcpl.org. 317-275-4530.

Girls Night Out

Scottish Rite Walk for Dyslexia

Monarch Butterfly Tagging at Ritchey Woods Nature Preserve

The People we Love featuring Donald Davis and Carmen Agra Deedy

Massage, Hand Treatments, Foot Treatments, Chair Massage, Facial Massage, Brow Wax, Food & Fun. Bring a friend and come hang with the girls. 6-9PM. Choose 3 services for $30. Eden's Pathway. 5496 Emerson Way, Indianapolis. www. edenspathway.com. 317.205.9377.

Moms and More Meeting at Center for Inquiry Snacks, conversation, light exercise, and reflection. Children are welcome with volunteers available to care for children while mothers converse. 10-11:30am. FREE. Center for Inquiry. 350 Canal Walk, Suite A, Indianapolis. www. mommymoon.org. 317-654-8684.

13th Annual Carmel International Arts Festival The 13th Annual Carmel International Arts Festival will take place on Saturday, September 25th and Sunday, September 26th. This Arts Festival brings together 140 juried artists, competing for top honors in their media field. Creative displays from new and renowned artists will provide festival goers with the opportunity to view professional displays and purchase unique works of art. Art pieces have been judged on originality, style, and professionalism in varied forms of art media. FREE. Art festival. Main Street and Rangeline Road, Carmel. www.carmelartsfestival.org. 317-846-5494.

Meditation is for everyone Learn more about the art of meditation and how to maximize your benefits from incorporating it into your wellness lifestyle. Meditation is a heightened sense of awareness, accomplished by using concentration, inner focus and total mind/ body relaxation. Combating the many stresses that we encounter daily, meditation helps to relieve tension and stress as well as optimize concentration and mental health. Visit www.WeCreateWellness.com for more info. $15.00 per person. Optimal Wellness Center. 4545 Northwestern Dr., Zionsville. www. WeCreateWellness.com. 317-870-7220.

13th Annual Carmel International Arts Festival The 13th Annual Carmel International Arts Festival will take place on Saturday, September 25th and Sunday, September 26th. This Arts Festival brings together 140 juried artists, competing for top honors in their media field. Creative displays from new and renowned artists will provide festival goers with the opportunity to view professional displays and purchase unique works of art. Art pieces have been judged on originality, style, and professionalism in varied forms of art media. FREE. Art festival. Main Street and Rangeline Road, Carmel. www.carmelartsfestival. org. 317-846-5494.

Monday 27 Family Films For young children & their caregivers. Monday, September 27; 10:00 - 10:30 a.m. & 11:00 - 11:30 a.m.; Storytime Room. Tuesday, September 28; 10:00 - 10:30 a.m., 11:00 - 11:30 a.m. & 7:00 - 7:30


r e so u rc e s p.m.; Storytime Room Harry, the Dirty Dog; The Poky Little Puppy, Whistle for Willie. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel. lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Greenwood Library. 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. www.greenwood.lib.in.us. 317-881-1953.

Indiana Farm Machines FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-232-3675.

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Mother-Daughter Book Club

Holliday Park: Tales and Trails

"An Evening at the President's Table"

For girls in grades 4-5 & their mothers. September Book: Registration is required & begins Tuesday, August 31, online, in person, or by calling 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317844-3363.

Join the Holliday Park staff for an exciting morning as we dive into the pages of our favorite children's books and then venture out to explore the natural world for ourselves. We will be inside and out, so dress for the weather and be ready to have fun! This is a parent/child class. Call 327-7180 to register. $5/child. Holliday Park Nature Center. 6363 Spring Mill Road, Indianapolis. www.hollidaypark.org. 3173277180.

Gardening in Indiana: Begin Now for a Bountiful Spring!

Wanna Blog? Presented by the Writers' Center of Indiana (WCI) This crash course will teach you how to set up a blog and offer strategies for promoting it. At the end, you'll be ready to launch your own blog. Registration is required, either online at www.indianawriters.org, by phone at 317-255-0710, or download a class registration form at www.indianawriters.org and mail to PO Box 30409, Indianapolis, IN 46230-0407. $20 members/$30 nonmembers/$16 WCI senior, teacher, student memb. Carmel Clay Public Library Book Talk Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel.lib.in.us. 317255-0710.

Did you wish all summer long that you had planted a vegetable garden, but never seemed to get around to it? Come learn about garden bed preparation and planning tips for gardening (vegetables, perennials, and shrubs). With some work invested now, it won't matter how wet it gets next spring, you will be ready. FREE.

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at 844-3363. Carmel Clay Public Library Storytime Room. 55 4th Avenue S.E., Carmel. www.carmel. lib.in.us. 317-844-3363.

Bob Williams FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

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Wednesday 29 Greg Ziesemer FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Reception at the Benjamin Harrison Home; dinner and program at the Conrad, Indianapolis. Featuring Barry Landau, Presidential historian and author of the best-selling "The President's Table - Two Hundred Years of Dining & Diplomacy". Landau is recognized as one of America's foremost experts on the Presidency and White House protocol. He is the leading collector of Presidential artifacts and memorabilia. Reservations required. Five levels of individual and corporate tickets. President Benjamin Harrison Home. 1230 North Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.pbhh.org. 317.631.1888.

Emily Ann Thompson FREE. Indianapolis Artsgarden. 110 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.indyarts.org. 317-624-2563.

Fiction to Film FREE. Indiana State Library. 140 N. Senate Ave, Indianapolis. www.statelib.lib.in.us. 317-232-3675.

Mike Posner

A Small Act $9 public; $5 members. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.imamuseum. org. 317-920-2659.

An Evening with Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert $25 - $100. Clowes Memorial Hall. 4600 Sunset Ave, Indianapolis. www.cloweshall.org. 317-940-6444.

Drop-In Play Date For young children & their caregivers. Bring your babies, toddlers and preschoolers for this fun, informal outing. Choose your favorite activities. For more information, call the Children's & Youth Services desk

$25. Old National Center (Formerly Murat). 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/ murat. 317-632-7469.

NEED EVEN MORE GREAT IDEAS ON THINGS TO DO???? If so, go to www.indyschild.com and sign up for our FREE weekly e-newsletter! Each week you'll get the top 5-10 events delievered right to you inbox! Plus - you'll gain access to exclusive contests, news and much more!!!

INDYSCHILD.COM 69


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2010- 2011 Before and After School Program Occurring Mon-Fri Through Thursday, May 26, 2011. Before school care is available from 6:30 a.m. until classes begin. After school care is available from the time classes dismiss until as late as 6:00 p.m. Before and After School Program is available in the following school districts: Wayne Township, Avon Community School Corporation, Brownsburg School Corporation,and Plainfield School Corporation. Contact the Member Services Desk for availability or for more information, 317-484-9622. Wayne Township, Avon Community School Corporation, Brownsburg School Corporation,and Plainfield School Corporation. c/o 7811 W. Morris Street, Indianapolis. www.indymca.org. 317-484-9622.

Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Lady Ongoing Each Saturday Beginning Saturday, September 18, 2010. An Etiquette Worshop presented to you by The PINK Foundation INC. Featuring Christie Herron of Excellence with Etiquette Young Ladies ages 14-17 are invited to join the women of the PINK Foundation INC atSalt of the Earth Baptist for a two part workshop entitled Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Lady. Learn how to apply makeup for the fresh and natural look. Discover which style of clothes best suit your body type and enjoy a lesson in fine dining and poise through self exploration.. FREE. Salt of the Earth Churh. 4925 West 36th St., Indianapolis. www.pinkindy.org. 317-937-4910.

Art in the Garden Occurring Daily Beginning Saturday, September 25, 2010 Through Sunday, November 14, 2010. Indianapolis Zoo. 1200 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.indyzoo.com. 317-630-2001.

Breastfeeding Support Group Ongoing Each Thursday. Offered by Riverview Hospital. Mothers meet and are supported by each other and lactation consultant. 10:30 am-12:30 pm. FREE. 365 Westfield Rd, Noblesville. 317-7767202.

Community Tuesday at White River State Park Occurring on the first Tuesday of each Month Through Tuesday, November 30, 2010. The first Tuesday of every month means discounts at all of your favorite attractions: Eiteljorg, NCAA, Indianapolis Zoo, Indiana State Museum and White River Gardens. Visit Website for details. Discount Tuesday. See Website for details or call. White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. www.inwhiteriver.org. 800-665-9065.

Country Fair Occurring Daily Beginning Saturday, September 18, 2010 Through Sunday, September 19, 2010. Conner Prairie. 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers. www.connerprairie.org. 317-776-6000.

Free Public Family Tours Ongoing on the second Saturday and fourth Saturday of each Month. The IMA offers free, 30-minute tours for families with children of all ages on the second and fourth Saturday of each month. 1:30 and 2:30 pm. FREE. Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis. imamuseum.org. 317-923-1331.

Friendship Flea Market Occurring Daily Beginning Saturday, September 11, 2010 Through Sunday, September 19, 2010. Vendor spaces selling a wide array of 70 INDY’S CHILD * September 2010

goods and speciality food. All blacktopped roads for baby buggys and wheel chairs. Horse drawn trolley rides to and from town, stay late and enjoy the campfire and live country music. Free Admission, $3.00 parking. Friendship Associates Inc. Street Rd. #62, Friendship. www. friendshipfleamarket.com. 859-341-9188.

Open Auditions for St. Paul's Choir School

Occurring Daily Beginning Wednesday, September 01, 2010 Through Saturday, October 30, 2010. $7 adult; $6.50 Senior; $4 children 3 -12. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www. in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637.

Occurring Mon-Fri Through Thursday, September 30, 2010. Auditions are under way for the St. Paul's Choir School. Note: Children DO NOT need to be a member of St. Paul's or the Episcopal Church. This Choir School is the only free program in Indy offering choral scholarships and funding for private instrumental lessons. It is and open to children ages eight to fourteen. No prior music experience necessary. Auditions typically take place between 4-7pm. Contact Choir Master, Robert Richter, for more info or to make an appointment for your child. FREE. St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 6050 North Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.stpaulsindy.org. 317-253-1277 ext.29.

Gondola Fest

Rock Stars, Cars, and Guitars

Occurring Daily Beginning Wednesday, September 01, 2010 Through Friday, October 29, 2010. Various Prices. White River State Park. 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis.

Occurring Daily Through Sunday, September 12, 2010. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free with museum admission. The Children's Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.childrensmuseum.org. (317) 334-3322.

Holes

The Children's Museum Preschool

Occurring Daily Beginning Saturday, September 25, 2010 Through Saturday, November 06, 2010. It's been an award-winning book and a hit movie. Now see it onstage! A lost treasure. A multi-generational curse. Racial injustice. And a bizarre correctional facility where kids serve time digging holes in the desert. Found guilty of a crime he didn't commit, Stanley discovers more than dirt as he digs - in this quirky comedy, he also finds new friends, the power of perseverance and the truth about his family's past. What will he find at the bottom of the next hole?. Ticket prices start at $20. Indiana Repertory Theatre. 140 West Washington Street, Indianapolis. www.irtlive.com. 3179164834.

Occurring Daily Beginning Tuesday, August 31, 2010 Through Friday, December 10, 2010. Prepare your child for lifelong learning success at the new Children's Museum Preschool. In a stimulating and immersive environment, children ages 3 through 5 can explore, discover, and create using the resources of the world's largest children's museum while also having fun and making friends. The Children's Museum Preschool is designed to enhance your child's existing preschool program or to be your child's only preschool experience. Choose from 1, 2, or 3 day-a-week class options for a 14-week period. Children must be 3 years old on or before Aug. 31, 2010 and toilet-trained to enroll. 9 a.m.-noon. $20 per three-hour session for museum members and $25 for non-me. The Children's Museum of Indianapolis. 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. www.childrensmuseum. org. (317) 334-4000.

From Ancient Seas to Modern Water

Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home Occurring Every Sun, Fri & Sat Beginning Saturday, September 04, 2010 Through Sunday, September 19, 2010. Old World charm meets modern style in this year's Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home. Join us for a tour of this Tuscan-style home - a luxuriously sized showcase exhibiting some of the best interior design in the city. Tickets are $12 at the door; $2 off coupons are available at participating Marsh locations. All proceeds benefit the Dyslexia Institute of Indiana: www.dyslexiaindiana.org/dream home for event dates and times.. $12. Indianapolis Monthly Dream Home. Lost Run Farm, off of 421 and Templin Road, Zionsville. www.dyslexiaindiana.org/dream_home. 317-545-5451.

Mary Poppins Broadway's Perfectly Magical Musical Occurring Daily Beginning Thursday, September 23, 2010 Through Sunday, October 10, 2010. $23.50 - $130.00. Old National Center (Formerly Murat). 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. www.livenation.com/murat. 317-632-7469.

O'Reilly Auto Parts 4 Wheel Jamboree Nationals presented by Geico Powersports Occurring Daily Beginning Friday, September 17, 2010 Through Sunday, September 19, 2010. $19 adult; $10 ages 3 - 12. Indiana State Fairgrounds. 1202 E. 38th St., Indianapolis. www.indianastatefair.com. 317-9277500.

The Little Mermaid Occurring Every Fri & Sat Beginning Friday, September 17, 2010 Through Saturday, November 06, 2010. Take a magical musical journey under the sea at Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre when the Pyramid Players proudly present The Little Mermaid this fall. For more information or show schedule, visit the theatre's web site, www. beefandboards. com. Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre. 9301 N. Michigan Rd, Indianapolis. www.beefandboards.com. 317-872-9664.

Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition Occurring Daily Beginning Saturday, September 25, 2010 Through Monday, January 31, 2011. $17. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www.in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637.

Odd Indiana

NEED EVEN MORE GREAT IDEAS ON THINGS TO DO????

Occurring Daily Beginning Saturday, September 04, 2010 Through Saturday, February 12, 2011. $7 adult; $6.50 Senior; $4 children 3 -12. Indiana State Museum. 650 W. Washington St, Indianapolis. www. in.gov/ism. 317-232-1637.

If so, go to www.indyschild.com and sign up for our FREE weekly e-newsletter! Each week you'll get the top 5-10 events delievered right to you inbox! Plus - you'll gain access to exclusive contests, news and much more!!!


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CLA S S IFIED S Your Listing Here! Contact Jennica at jennica@IndysChild.com

TM

Kids table & chair rentals delivered to your home or event location!

Kids table & chair rentals delivered to your home or event location!

(317) 446-7750 tabletopsfortots.com * Parties * Family Events * Play Dates * Neighborhood Events *

WANTED CHILDREN FOR LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT STUDY

Children who do and do not stutter between the ages of 3 years and 5 years 11 months are being recruited for a research study on speech-language development and stuttering at IU. PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE $50 AS WELL AS FREE SPEECH-LANGUAGE TESTING.

To learn more, please visit our Web site www.indiana.edu/~spdislab or contact Dr. Julie Anderson at (812) 856-1240 or judander@indiana.edu INDYSCHILD.COM 71


Indy's Child // September 2010  

Indy's Child is Indiana's #1 Parenting Magazine!!! In this issue: Cooking Up a Recipe for Healthy Living, Mission Possible: Captivating Stud...

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