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AUGUST/ SEPTEMBER 2012

ISSUE 8

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FOR THE PEOPLE OF

BRADFORDBY

THE PEOPLE OF BRADFORD

FEATURING: CENTRE PAGE PULLOUT “WELCOME TO INDEPENDANT BRADFORD” | TONY BENN | KEITH NAREY | JUSTIN SULLIVAN


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MOVING ON UP This time last year I was an underachieving undergraduate fretting over my future. Fantastic opportunity…three week, unpaid internship in London, fat chance. I was angry and bitter. The New Labour dream had turned sour. Education, education, unemployment is what he should have said. Mountains of debt and nothing more than a two-bit degree to show for it. Woe, woe and thrice woe I cried. Those bastard bankers have cocked up my career before it’s even started. But as John Lennon once said, “You won’t get anything unless you have the vision to imagine it”. It was down to me to make the most of a bad situation. I cannot begin to take credit for what happened next. Only a madman would have dreamt up such a hairbrained project, “I’m going to start a free cultural magazine based in Bradford ran entirely by volunteers, you up for it?”. “Erm, yeah, I suppose so, lets give it a bash”. All of a sudden I’m the editor of a magazine and things are looking up. My education is being put into good use and I begin to believe in myself again. I’ll spare you the autobiography except to say that HowDo?! Magazine has given me experience and opportunities that seemed a distant dream this time last year. Who knows what lies ahead? But this will be my last issue as editor and I look back with a great sense of pride and privilege at what has been achieved so far. I send the same message to my predecessor as I do anyone hoping for a lucky break… ‘From austerity comes enterprise’. David Cameron likes to call it big society; at HowDo?! we tend to refer to it as DIY endeavour. It doesn’t matter how you dress it up, what matters is that it is incredibly hard to get by out there unless you are prepared to get stuck in and do stuff for free. Don’t expect things to come to you, they probably won’t. Find something you are passionate about and turn it into something tangible. And do it in Bradford. If you can make something work in Bradford, you can make it work anywhere. It’s been a pleasure.

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11 AUGUST/ SEPTEMBER 2012

ISSUE 8

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5 BANKING – WH£RE IT ALL W£NT WRONG By Steve Wilson

8 THE STRANGE DEATH AND INTERMENT OF KEITH NAREY By Nick Toczek

10 TONY BENN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD By Iain Bloomfield

ourHERITAGE

13 FELIX MARSH RIMMINGTON By Lauren Padgett

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bradfordBUSINESS

15 WORKING FOR SOMEONE ELSE By Daniel Walker

food&DRINK

17 MY LOCAL

By Steve Wilson

19 WHY I BAKE BREAD By Richard Ramsden

artisticPERSPECTIVE

24 THINK GINK

By Mr Johnston

sWORD

27 SKY QUARTET MICHAEL METCALFE Foreword by Jane Steele

people&ART

35 WHAT ON EARTH IS BETTAKULTCHA? By Albert Freeman

37 CHRISSIE FREETH

46

By Lorain Behrens

39 PERSONAL BEST – PAUL FLOYD BLAKE By Hayley Sargent

theatre&PERFORMANCE

41 CRICKETERS ARMS COMEDY NIGHT By Dan Berry

43 SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT BRIAN HIBBARD – A TRIBUTE By Bobby Weaver

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45 STAYING IN – THE DOMESTICATION OF THE UNDERGROUND By Andy Abbott

46 DIY OR DIE By Joe Clarke / Katie Jennings / Emily Graves

47 LIVE REVIEWS 309s, Lou Diamond Phillips, Broken Hearts Club & Jed’s Blues Band

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51 JUSTIN SULLIVAN By Michelle Dalgety

filmREVIEW

54 STUDIO GHIBLI SEASON AT THE MEDIA MUSEUM By Mike McKenny

secretBRADFORD

56 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW, SEE, HEAR & VISIT.

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58 BRADFORD’S MOST COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF WHAT, WHERE AND WHEN.


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BANKING WH£RE IT ALL W£NT WRONG

BY STEVE WILSON

THE BANKING CRISIS MAY BE SEVERAL YEARS OLD NOW BUT THIS YEAR IT SEEMS THAT THERE IS NO END OF BAD NEWS LEAKING FROM A ONCE SO HIGHLY REGARDED SECTOR. HAVING WORKED FOR A DIVISION OF BARCLAYS BANK FOR TWENTY FIVE YEARS UNTIL RECENTLY I AM NOT SURPRISED IN THE LEAST BY RECENT EVENTS.

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lthough I worked for a small product led subsidiary we were encouraged to work closely with our corporate banking colleagues. And so, for the last ten years or so of my Barclays life, No 10 Market Street, Bradford, was like a second home. There were some marvellous characters but around the beginning of the new millennium it seems that those on high began a process of systematically getting rid of anybody who had a streak of individuality, fearlessness or an independence of mind; in the process the bank lost some highly experienced, knowledgeable staff and the culture within Barclays changed beyond recognition. I may have only seen this at an admittedly very micro level but this was happening on a national scale and was not unique to Barclays. The old bank manager was deemed out of favour as a new breed of supposedly super sales people were brought in, often with no banking experience; in truth many of them were not that good at selling. Decades of experience and hard won respect from customers were deemed instantly replaceable as the bank aggressively chased market share which would have culminated on a macro level in the disastrous acquisition of Dutch basket case ABN Amro, were it not for being out bid at the eleventh hour by Fred Goodwin’s RBS. On a local scale most major corporate branches like Bradford had a senior director backed up by an experienced team of empowered managers and a clear progression route available for the support staff for anybody who wanted to develop their career. By the time I

left there was little evidence of any internal career progression, most simply aspiring to get through the day and little autonomy was held by any manager. The computer says “no”! Although the business I worked for was essentially a sales culture, this was rare at the time; the bank as a whole struggled with the concept as many employees had not joined Barclays Bank expecting to end up pushing products that were largely unwanted, understood nor needed by their customers. Banking is essentially a dull business as are its core products; by attempting to, in effect “sex up” the offering, banks were merely finding new ways to enhance their margins. New business development takes years in mainstream banking because the art of prising highly valued customers away from other banks takes a very long time; a bank has to do something seriously bad to persuade a customer – personal or corporate – to up sticks and leave. If you don’t believe me wait until all the fuss has died down and lets see how many customers have changed; most believe that all the banks are as bad as one another anyway and it is hard to argue against that at present; crucially the banks know this too. The dawning of a new era in Bradford was brought on by the early retirements enforced on a raft of experienced managers and the adoption of a model that was universally disliked by customers, with the removal of almost all individual autonomy and a heavy emphasis on sell, sell, sell when chasing the annual target. How ironic that this removal of local, personal autonomy preceded the greeddriven crash of the last decade?

It was out with the old and down with the old office walls as well. The days of open plan, brightly, coloured offices were here with coloured charts covering the walls to show everybody just how badly you were doing at this new selling lark. To cap it all casual dress was introduced; as most bankers are not noted for their fashion sense the days at the office began to resemble Gardeners’ World. It is tempting to reflect on the beginning of the last decade and see the very early localised signs of madness, which would become a global contagion by the end of the decade; from small acorns grow great oaks, as they say. The old ways were not perfect but there was an understanding of business life and what customers wanted from a banker. Much of what has been uncovered has been the mis-selling of misunderstood and inappropriately complex, ultimately over-priced products. Banking is not about selling because if you have a brand behind you as strong as Barclays – past tense, perhaps – you do not have to sell. It was always about trust and building relationships, but the stresses driven by the higher echelons for instant results and personal reward eroded these values. In our small business a succession of often small men came and went on a personal mission to change the world; they all jumped ship at around the three year mark and the chaos they left behind became clear for all. It was simply unchecked, unmanageable and unachievable madness driven purely by greed that ultimately destroyed a great brand.

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THE STRANGE DEATH AND INTERMENT OF KEITH NAREY

Photography By Brian Shackleton

BY NICK TOCZEK

BORN IN BRADFORD ON 9 JANUARY 1948, KEITH NAREY WAS EDUCATED AT GRANGE GRAMMAR SCHOOL AND LATER TOOK A DEGREE IN PEACE STUDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD.

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t was his family that founded the local building company, Narey Construction, and he was a second cousin of Gerry Sutcliffe, the Bradford South MP and Shadow Minister for Immigration.

A die-hard Labour Party activist, Keith was nevertheless expelled from the party during Neil Kinnock’s mid-eighties purge of all the prominent members of The Militant Tendency. This was the influential Trotskyite group on the party’s far left. Keith had long been a local mainstay of this faction, which the party now saw as an electoral liability. Throughout the seventies and early eighties, Keith was a familiar figure in the centre of Bradford, street-selling The Militant, campaigning on a wide range of local and national issues, and speaking at rallies and other such gatherings. He was also an outspoken and courageous opponent of the National Front, the BNP and other racist groups active in the city. In addition, he took up local community issues in and around Thorpe Edge, where he lived. He was, for example, chairman of the Friends of Haigh Beck, fighting to preserve it. From 1990 until his death in 1997, he worked as a barman at The Brewery Tap, the pub at the bottom end of Idle, opposite Thorpe Edge on Albion Road. I’d often meet him there and – if the pub wasn’t busy – we’d talk about writing, literary plans and (of course) politics. Like me, Keith was a writer. As a playwright, he’d established the Keith Narey Players to perform his plays in and around Bradford. Shortly after his death, his play about the Manningham Mill Strike of 1891, A Party

8

THE SECURITY OFFICE IN A TOWER BLOCK “ IN WERE FOUR SURVEILLANCE SCREENS, EACH

ON THE ESTATE. ON ONE OF THESE, THE SIN That Will, was performed at that very mill as part of the celebration of its re-opening as a community arts space. Around the same time, his short novel, Season, was published in his memory. And so to Keith’s untimely death in the wake of the UK General Election as held on 1 May 1997. As the results came in next day, it became clear that the Labour Party under Tony Blair had gained a landslide victory over John Major’s Conservatives, thereby ending thirteen years of Conservative leadership. Still a Labour Party man at heart and someone who’d despised Thatcherism and its aftermath, Keith joyously celebrated this victory. A leading light of Bradford CAMRA (Campaign for Real Ale), he liked real ales, of which the Brewery Tap has always stocked a good selection. That night, understandably, he drank more than he normally did. There’s a sad irony here. As a traditional old-school socialist, Keith would have loathed Blair’s New Labour and all that it stood for – not least its commitment to America’s post-9/11 ‘War on Terror’. Back then, though, the election outcome was simply a case of Labour seeing off the Tories, and so a drunken but happy Keith left the pub around midnight, staggered over


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www.bradfordeye.co.uk

K FURTHER UP THE HILL AND OUT OF SIGHT SPLIT SEVEN WAYS, ONE FOR EACH CAMERA NGLE SECURITY GUARD SAW KEITH’S FALL.

the road and headed into Thorpe Edge. Not far from his flat, he lost his footing, tripped and fell. Primarily to counter crime, the estate was monitored by a battery of surveillance cameras which Bradford Council had set up in response to a residents’ campaign, one in which Keith himself had been actively involved. It’s therefore doubly ironic that it was one of these very cameras that captured a grainy image of this tumbling figure, flailing arms breaking his fall, one shoulder glancing off the wall, a knee sustaining a bruise. Otherwise, he was unscathed. Unfortunately – at least according to the post mortem report – as he fell and lay there, winded and unconscious, he vomited and began to inhale it. In a judgement angrily disputed by his family and friends, this was recorded as the cause of his death. What is clear is that Keith lay out there, unattended, for at least an hour in the cold. And it was very cold. Snow fell that night in some areas of Scotland and the north of England, though what part this weather played in his death was not addressed. A second unresolved issue was precisely

when during that time he’d been sick and had choked. The obvious concern here is that he might he might have survived if help had arrived sooner. As it was, a bizarre series of unfortunate delays led to him being left there for so long. In the security office in a tower block further up the hill and out of sight were four surveillance screens, each split seven ways, one for each camera on the estate. On one of these, the single security guard saw Keith’s fall. At the coroner’s inquest it emerged that this guard couldn’t go to his aid because he wasn’t permitted to leave his post. Guards were forbidden to do so for fear that they might either be attacked or deliberately distracted. Though the emergency services were called, an ambulance wasn’t sent because drunks had previously abused ambulance men. Instead, the police were alerted. However, they didn’t arrive until an hour later because they’d been dealing with an armed robbery. Whatever the facts though, Keith died. Like many Yorkshiremen, Keith had been a keen cricket fan. Every season, he’d umpired for the Brewery Tap cricket team. In keeping with his wishes and to honour his memory, regulars in the pub held a collection to buy the urn which contains his ashes. This can now be found in the pub. It stands in a small glass-fronted recess just to the right of the stage on which rock bands play every weekend. Why are his ashes there? So that, once a year, the pub team and a Bradford CAMRA team can hold a commemorative cricket match in which they play for his ashes.. though regardless of which team wins, Keith’s ashes stay where he wanted them to be, in the pub in which he worked and socialised and (of course) talked politics. Go over and raise a glass to him if you’re in there. He’d like that.

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TONY BENN

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD BY IAIN BLOOMFIELD

Photography by John Bolloten


The evening was in two halves; the first An Evening With saw Benn questioned by chair Samantha Norman, the second was a question and answer session. Benn, the pilloried, leftist, ‘swivel-eyed’ danger of right-wing imagination was, in the flesh, polite, measured (as we knew he would be) and frail looking, his reminiscences polished by years ‘on the road’, quite remarkably Radio Four on the face of it. But underneath, oh, underneath...

I AM OLD AND KINDLY BUT I AM NOT HARMLESS ”

SAID TONY BENN, ON STAGE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD.

Underneath we got to see the man who has ‘lived his political life backwards’, moving ever leftward, from front bench to back bench, leaving parliamentary politics to oppose the onward march of western imperialism at rallies and festivals, seeking out the grassroots and still dedicated to reminding the Labour Party it is there to represent the interests of the working class.

the evening, reminded us, perhaps fuelled by his own hounding by the press, that it is policy not personality that matters, that if we call Tony Blair a ‘war criminal’ we miss the broader political consensus around imperial adventure in the west. If we talk about Thatcherism we miss the essential point that Conservatism represents power and money.

Benn communicates a tremendous sense of history. Here is a man shaped by the Victorian Liberalism of his parents, taught the difference between kings and prophets, between ‘signposts’ and ‘weathercocks’, politics and personality. A man who saw death in the Blitz, lost a brother on active service and came out of the war determined to make peace, a man who saw at first-hand Nye Bevan’s struggle to establish the welfare state, held senior office as Postmaster General at the very dawn of the communications revolution, and conducted the last interview with Saddam Hussein before the deluge.

There is both a simplicity and power to Benn’s worldview; Conservative = Money and Labour = People. In answer to a question I was able to pose during the interval he talked about George Galloway’s success in the Bradford West byelection. He first spoke very warmly about the man’s intelligence, his “brilliance” and the power of both his writing and speaking. Secondly he talked of Galloway opposing the power of business globally, and how that power dictated policy and the consequent erosion of representation for people, how he felt that those views had connected with Bradford voters. He spoke with some regret about Galloway having left the Labour party, as he felt those views could be, should be, made within the

This sense of history flows through everything he says and this, to me at least, gave some hope in seemingly hopeless times. It matters that that the NHS was never a given, and that Nye Bevan had to fight and fight hard to allow people free access to high quality medical care.

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’ve reflected on that statement quite a lot since. It sums up both the man, now, in his 87th year, and the evening we spent with him on 20th of June.

Benn reminds us that “history is made by people campaigning not by politicians”; that what made Britain great is parliamentary democracy, not a monarchy that just offers a continuous celebration of itself; that we choose who leads us and have the opportunity to get rid if they fail us, through the ballot box. Amidst the cash for questions/cash for duck ponds cynicism we are fed daily, he tells us that that still matters.

parliamentary party.

When asked, Benn disagreed that politicians were less honest now than before and made the case for scepticism rather than cynicism. He also, and this was a continual trope throughout

Again, this sense of the importance of the grassroots, the power of people, was something that Benn returned to again and again both in

conversation and in answer to questions. The rights of both Kashmiris and Palestinians to self-determination, that young people need to understand the world, decide what they believe in and then campaign for that, the excitement he feels when casting his vote and the power inherent in that act, the importance, in the face of demonisation, of the need for Muslim communities to stick together and at the same time find areas of agreement outwards. I am the father of children, it really matters to me that the world they are growing up in is one of hope, that they can look outwards and see a world that allows them some formative presence rather than simply a reactive one, that they understand their connectedness to others is a process of doing and that they feel it important to both care and do something in the interests of people they will never meet. I also hope that the world will give a fair deal to my youngest child, who has a condition called Prader-Willi Syndrome. I cannot say I feel that the general drift of things in my adulthood has been in that direction, that the vulnerable are more protected, that we feel a greater responsibility towards ALL in our society. I feel, particularly now but of much longer standing, that the principles that lay behind the creation of the welfare state are being eroded in private as well as political ways, being forgotten. Benn spoke, both in jest and with utter seriousness, of “leaving Parliament to concentrate on politics” and in this, for me, lies the key as to exactly why, whilst undeniably “old and kindly”, he is not harmless. These ideas are radically ‘harmful’ to a political and press fuelled zeitgeist that would cynically have it that ‘there is nothing we can do’, that ‘it doesn’t matter how you vote, they are all the same’. A zeitgeist shaped by kitchen cabinets, closed doors, political elites, presidential-style personality politics, do-nothing celebrity, the drip erosion of our belief that what we do changes anything, the destruction of our belief in ourselves as a society – “There is no such thing as society”, remember? Benn reminds us that there is.

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CHEMIST BY DAY, CRIME FIGHTER BY NIGHT ourHERITAGE

n o t g n i m m i R h s r a M x i l e F BY LAUREN PADGETT

THIS YEAR RIMMINGTONS PHARMACY OF BRIDGE STREET, BRADFORD IS CELEBRATING 170 YEARS SINCE IT WAS FIRST ESTABLISHED. RIMMINGTONS FOUNDER WAS AN INTERESTING CHARACTER - BY DAY HE WAS A COMMUNITY CHEMIST, BY NIGHT HE WAS F. M. RIMMINGTON, CRIME INVESTIGATOR, INVOLVED IN SOME OF THE MOST GHASTLY AND GRUESOME CASES BRADFORD HAD EVER SEEN.

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arly in his career Felix Marsh Rimmington worked for Peter Squire, Queen Victoria’s personal chemist in London. After learning from the best Rimmington set up his own chemist shop on Ivegate, Bradford. He moved to Bridge Street in 1875, and the pharmacy still serves Bradfordians today, complete with the original Victorian drug shelves. Rimmington’s unique skills in analytical chemistry made him useful to the police and local authorities. By 1857 he was helping investigate poisonings and murders, often attending autopsies and giving evidence in court. He was involved in the 1858 Bradford lozenge poisoning. A young confectioner’s assistant had been sent to buy daft, a powdered mineral used as a bulking agent in drugs and foods. At the druggist’s he was told to help himself from a barrel in the cellar. He returned to his boss with the ‘daft’ and it was used to make lozenge sweets. These were then sold in bulk to a sweet stall in Green (now Kirkgate) Market. Twenty people died of arsenic poisoning and hundreds became ill. The police quickly identified the cause as the sweets. The young assistant had wrongly gone to the arsenic barrel. Clues were there but missed, such as the sudden illness of the employee making the sweets and their unusual colour. Rimmington established that each lozenge had nine grains of arsenic in them – a fatal quantity. Those involved were charged with manslaughter, but the judged dropped the case as he said it was an unfortunate series of events. This tragic event brought about tighter restrictions on the selling and storing of drugs and chemicals.

Not one to rest on his laurels Rimmington continued to study new scientific developments and helped other chemists do the same. Throughout his career he had letters and papers published in newspapers and journals, describing his investigations, and his own methods of treating ailments, such as tapeworms. He travelled the country, reading his papers and speaking at conferences.

the body, checking nearby drains and sewers for discarded evidence. He examined the stomach contents and found currants, from a currant bun eaten just before the murder. A suspect was questioned, but released as the investigation reached a dead end. Even today Jack the Ripper historians and investigators, including crime writer Patricia Cornwell., claim it was a real Ripper murder.

Rimmington’s services to Bradford were rewarded in 1874 when he was given the prestigious title of Borough Analyst by the Local Government Board. For centuries sellers and manufacturers had secretly been tampering with food and drugs by adding dangerous bulking agents or watering the product down to make a better profit and hoodwinking buyers. Rimmington helped the local authorities enforce the 1875 Sale of Food and Drugs Act, which made illegal the unadvertised adulteration of food and drugs. When substances sold in Bradford were suspected of tampering Rimmington was sent samples to examine. Some of his findings included watered-down milk, cider that was really treacle, dirty water and fusel oil, butter that contained no actual butter, and sweets containing poisonous lead as a food colouring.

Felix Rimmington passed away in 1897 and is buried in Undercliffe Cemetery. His son George continued running the family business until his own death in the 1940s. The business was then run by the Hirst family for three generations. The Bridge Street pharmacy was bought by Cohen’s Pharmacy in 2000, and then became a Lloyds Pharmacy. It had the Rimmington’s name restored and went back to being an independent pharmacy in 2009 when two local pharmacists bought it. They don’t solve crime like F. M. Rimmington, but they do serve the people of Bradford by offering medicinal products and advice, plus a free repeat prescription and delivery service. They have set out to preserve this intriguing story, fascinating history and unique heritage that the pharmacy and its founder gave Bradford, before it is lost in the depths of time.

In December 1888 Rimmington dealt with a more gruesome and disturbing investigation. The police had asked him to investigate a suspected Jack the Ripper murder in Bradford. The remains of eight year old John Gill had been discovered, after he was reported missing. His body had a noose around his neck and was horribly mutilated. One ear had been cut off, limbs dismembered, and his organs removed and placed on him. His chest cavity had been cut open and his shoes placed inside. The police and press were quickly comparing this to the then current Jack the Ripper murders in Whitechapel, London. Rimmington investigated the crime scene and

While other Victorian Bradford businesses such as Busby’s and Brown & Muff ’s department stores and jewellers Fattorini & Sons have disappeared,), Rimmingtons remains on the high street.

13


BY DANIEL WALKER - RESIDENT ACCOUNTANT FOR HOWDO?! MAGAZINE, ON LOAN FROM ALL ACCOUNTED 4.

LOOKS LIKE I’M STILL HERE FOR ISSUE 9, UNLIKE MULTIPLE MEMBERS OF A LARGE BANKING INSTITUTION SOME MAY BE FAMILIAR WITH, SO SOMETHING WENT RIGHT.

F

ollowing on from last month’s article, Working for Yourself I thought it might be beneficial to cover working for someone else, particularly where many of you may have received a P60 and or a P11d lately, hopefully nobody got their P45.

adds up. If your tax code is wrong or you feel your tax has been incorrectly calculated now is a good time to phone HMRC. Run through your P60 with them. If you’re right a cheque or, now HMRC have entered the 21st century, maybe even a bank transfer will be winging its way to you.

Working for somebody else as Paying (Tax) As You Earn (PAYE) is relatively straightforward. The clue is kind of in the name, you pay it as you earn it. The payroll or finance guys at your place of work should deal with all this for you, but this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s right. There are numerous pitfalls people can fall into, leaving them out of pocket.

One final note, anything contained on your P11d is a benefit in kind, and therefore taxable. I know you might not want to hear this but this means it should be added to your wage and the relevant tax deducted. If this is not happening you may need to speak to your employer and or HMRC and ensure it does, otherwise you may find yourself with a nasty catch up charge, which can in some cases be demanded as a lump sum.

First thing to check is your tax code - if this is incorrect you could be over/ under paying on a monthly basis. The standard code is currently 810L. If the code contains an R or W1 you are effectively paying Week 1 tax, and this means your annual allowance is not being taken into account. Codes can be lowered or increased under certain circumstances so don’t worry too much if it is different. Every year you should receive a P60 detailing how much you have been paid and how much has been deducted - this is a good time to check everything

bradfordBUSINESS

WORKING FOR SOMEONE ELSE

If there are any specific topics that anybody would like me to include in my article please get in touch with the HowDo?! team and I will try my best to accommodate. Please remember to take anything included in the article with a pinch of salt, this DOES NOT constitute financial advice, merely a friendly poke in the right direction.

BUSINESS IN PROFILE: THE SPARROW BIER CAFE PUBLICAN LES HALL (FAR LEFT) TALKS WITH HAIGH SIMPSON

WHAT IS YOUR BUSINESS? The Sparrow Bier Cafe is a small, friendly bar specialising in the sale of interesting hand pulled ale, quality craft keg products and bottled beers (70 or so) from all over the world.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED? Marko and I realised a few years ago that we had a shared ambition to open a small bar. We packed in our jobs and went for it with the “what’s the worst that can happen” attitude

WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE? Plenty of people were really supportive but we couldn’t believe how negative some folk were. They will remain nameless. Despite this, and significant expenses we persevered.

SO HAS IT BEEN A SUCCESS? CAMRA pub of the year 2012 and great times at the bar suggests it has. But the hard work continues and there are lots of adjustments and improvements we are desperate to make.

WHAT’S YOUR VISION FOR BRADFORD CITY CENTRE AND WHERE DO YOU SEE YOUR BUSINESS IN FIVE YEARS TIME? We want The Sparrow to become a feature in the City; it is the first bar of its type and we hope it becomes part of Bradford’s future. The position as regards Bradford as a whole is more complex than many realise but signs of regeneration are there. Whilst big retail names will, of course, help I also believe smaller independent businesses are equally important and all bodies that is the Council, Landlords etc - should work together to encourage business growth on a small scale at street level.

15


CORN DOLLY FREE HOUSE

Your local multi-award winning pub Eight real ales, pool table, Quality German lagers including Staropramen & Riegele Food Served Monday to Friday 12pm - 2pm Opening Times: Mon - Thu 12:00pm - 11:00pm Fri & Sat 12:00pm - 12:00am Sun 12:00pm - 18:00pm 110 Bradford Road BD1 4 DE 01274 720219

THE

NEW INN Bringing back a traditional pub to Thornton

Open 7 days a week for great home cooked food & drinks This month’s specials: Springbock Austrian beef & free ice cream for kids Live Music every Saturday (See What’s On pg.58) Every Monday: Rhythm & Blues Jam Session. Musicians & drinkers welcome. Selection of Real Ale & Craft Beers: this month’s special is the Japanese draught beer Asahi, Various Boxed Craft Ciders & Draught Cider Several Premium Lagers: this month’s special is Cobra. Beer garden, Car Park & Disabled Facilities JOIN US FOR UP TO DATE INFORMATION & OFFERS

FOR BOOKINGS CONTACT JOHN: 07525326064

363 Thornton Road, Thornton Village, Bradford, BD13 3JX


food&DRINK

TEXT

MY LOCAL

BY STEVE WILSON

I’D ALWAYS VIEWED THE WHITE BEAR, THIS SCRUFFY LITTLE PUB PERCHED ON TOP OF THE HILL OVERLOOKING IDLE VILLAGE AS THE SORT OF PLACE MY DAD AND HIS DAD WENT TO DRINK; INHABITED BY COFFIN DODGERS WITH NO PROSPECT OF MEETING WOMEN WHO OWNED THEIR OWN TEETH. I’d always viewed The White Bear, this scruffy little pub perched on top of the hill overlooking Idle Village as the sort of place my dad and his dad went to drink; inhabited by coffin dodgers with no prospect of meeting women who owned their own teeth. I have called it “The Scruffy”, with affection, for many years, albeit the irony has been lost on some. Demonstrating my love of the pub, all three of my houses have been dominated by the almost gravitational pull of the place – circling no more than half a mile whatever direction. My earliest recollections of it are as a pioneer, well ahead of New Labour, of twenty four hour drinking although café culture was certainly an accidental by-product rather than an aspiration. In those days the Bear was run by an old Irish couple named Billy and Pat who have long since passed on in search of an nip or two of Jameson’s in the clouds above. Pat was a feisty little woman who ruled Billy with an iron rod, not that Billy seemed to notice as generally he never sobered up. Each time Pat was out of sight he could be seen sneaking a “nip”; she almost always caught him out and some of the ear-bashings he got were comical but it never deterred him, battered and bruised as he was. Whether Billy should have been driving towards the end of his tenure at the Bear is also a matter of doubt and not just down to his blood being 40% proof. Billy’s eyesight was not great, perhaps from blurred vision from the many batterings, so trips out in his Mini Metro were always fraught with danger although mainly for other motorists. Outside the Bear is a very busy and tricky cross-road which Billy would take a unique approach to, one nowhere to be seen in the Highway Code. Revving hard he attacked it like a ski jumper oblivious to oncoming traffic from either side or coming up the hill. In effect he was Idle’s first suicide bomber; cars would screech to a halt and pedestrians would duck out of the way as Billy, courtesy of Jameson’s, flew off down the hill. Billy was equally unconcerned by licensing laws and especially the notion of opening hours. As I said this was well before New Labour bent over for the Pubcos and brewers under the ruse of giving us all twenty four hour drinking, ignoring the gradual transformation of town centres into war zones. Billy was clearly ahead of his time and the Bear was always “Open All Hours” as long as you made it in there by 11pm: the official last orders. Many times we left to a lovely sunrise and although far from Mediterranean the haze accompanying a night in the Bear was enough.

Those that do not know better may suspect that pubs like the Bear are drunken trouble hot-spots but nothing could be further from the truth. The only scuffle I have seen in nearly thirty years (apart from the Pat and Billy show) was for the last bag of pork scratchings. And now the next chapter begins with Michael and Sara taking over; this follows the retirement of Lady Pamela after a decade or more. The signs are good, already several youngsters in danger of lowering the average age from sixty have been turfed out with their Blackberrys and coffee is now available as café culture returns again. Worryingly though, there is now talk of a refurbishment; why should we be suspicious? Well, most pub refurbs are probably dreamt up by some chinless wonder in a London office who will have never been near the well-worn “hole” they now wish to rebrand. The fact is that most pubs need nothing more than a dusting down and the Patsy Cline Greatest Hits CD chucking out; there is no need for flowers – real or otherwise – or a colour scheme likely to require sun glasses for a night out. The Bear has some great features, take the affectionately known Railway Carriage for instance; a two seat bench set into the hearth as iconic as the sofa in Friends. Or the bar stools so rare these days where many have sat until sleep has overcome them facilitating a slow slump forward onto the bar top. Of course we have mod cons with the ubiquitous television but, thankfully, no Sky Sports, albeit for a while we did have commentaries from Costas and Spiros via Bankrupt Athens TV and a dodgy receiver. Like most pubs we have the quiz – in fact there’s barely a night where we don’t have one. The PA system is the only surviving pre-war wind up Marconi set and regular quizmaster, Mick, has a weekly battle with feedback replicating a set of African drums; that’s before the weekly battle with the organized clans of contestants fiercely competing for the free gallon of ale on offer. The Bear is evidence that life continues in all forms, indeed in sheer defiance at locals across the country. Despite successive governments’ desire to fleece the pub trade dry and their spineless kowtowing to the greed of the new breed of pub owning companies the pub survives simply because it is an essential part of a way of life. So a message to any double cuff-link wearing designer hovering over plans for the Bear: send Michael the budget, let the locals give the place a scrub up and we will have a party with the rest.

For a time we ran White Bear FC and one day, with the game was called off early, I popped into the Bear around 9am one Sunday to tell Pat not to bother with the culinary fare of the day only to be amazed to find the pub full with the lads from the Watmoughs, the local print works, having just clocked off the night shift. This truly was continental drinking at its finest.

SAT 22ND SEPT - SUN 7TH OCT / FREE / THE SPARROW, NORTH PARADE, BD1 3HZ OKTOBERFEST CELEBRATE GERMAN’S LARGEST BEER FESTIVAL HERE IN BRADFORD WITH A GREAT SELECTION OF BAVARIAN BEERS TO CHOOSE FROM.

17


food&DRINK

why I Bake Bread BY RICHARD RAMSDEN

I MADE A COUPLE OF SOURDOUGH LOAVES YESTERDAY. THEY STARTED OUT THE NIGHT BEFORE IN A MIXING BOWL, A LADLEFUL OF STARTER MIXED WITH FLOUR AND WATER. MORE FLOUR IN THE MORNING, SALT, KNEADING, PROVING, SHAPING, BAKING. 24 HOURS OF WAITING WENT INTO THOSE LOAVES. SLOW FOOD, INDEED.

T

his batch was different from the last. Not as sour, and lighter, with a higher, softer crust and bigger holes, the Holy Grail of the sourdough baker‌cutting that loaf open and finding big gaps made my breakfast. It would have been easier to pop out to the shop for a loaf, even easier if I’d sent one of the kids to get it for me, but speed isn’t the reason I bake bread. It might sound odd, but bread making is a kind of loose communion for me. It’s a time I use to relax, to reflect. There’s time involved, and structure, and action. There’s space to think. There’s time to just wait. Waiting is under rated. If it’s done with patience and purpose, it can be a means to many ends. Lots of things get worked out when I wait for a bread to rise or as I work through some frustration or other by kneading, pushing, pulling a ball of dough for ten minutes or so. Bread making is the most elemental form of cooking, it’s an ancient art that’s changed little over the years. Yes, there’s a lot of science in a commercial loaf, but that’s not what I’m talking about, nor are many commercial loaves ‘bread’ in the way I understand it. I cook little else that has such a strong sense of the basic, of the very essence of being, of being alive.

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I’ve been baking bread for years, and the small thrill of slicing into one of my loaves never leaves me. What will it be like? Will that little tweak have worked? Will there be holes? Please let there be holes‌ Its exciting, a small discovery, a little victory. You don’t get a sense of personal triumph by opening a bag of sliced white.

ime! t r e

My bread repertoire is fairly narrow. I use a good, basic recipe, that lends itself to white, wholemeal or seeded loaves, and then there’s a reliable sourdough that’s improving as the starter ages. My bagelsare pretty good, and I can turn my basic recipe into a passable focaccia or naan.

Check out those sou’westers!!

The best bread I make, though, is a simple French baton, a light baguette with a crisp crust and a deep and earthy taste. It’s worth the eighteen odd hours it takes to make from start to finish, and it knocks any supermarket approximation for a six. That might all be in my head, but that’s part of the point‌it’s a good bread because it’s my bread, my baguette, something I made myself, something that has soul. I’m going to carry on making bread. I hope to do it for the rest of my life. I want to be an old man, kneading a dough in the same way I’ve done for fifty or sixty years. I want to shape a loaf, let it prove, bake it, and I want it to taste the way it does today. I want to be using the same sourdough starter then as I am now. I want that starter to live in my fridge for decades, and, every now and then, I want somebody to take a small part of it and start their own starter, a child of mine. But most of all, I want our kids to understand where their food comes from. I want them to see the magic of a rising loaf, to plunge their hands into a soft dough, to shape a boule and to eat toast, knowing that they’d had a part in the making, in the process. I want this to be normal, to be the way things are. And I want them to carry on themselves, for them to show their kids how bread is made, just as I showed them. I want this to be my gift to them.

Congratulations to Towngate Fisheries, Idle. Last month they raised a total of £1123.23 for the Fishermen’s Mission. See their website for more great offers:

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Did You Know??

You can buy freshly-baked specialist breads from Shipley Health Store, Westgate, Shipley. Their bread is packed full of nutrients thanks to a lengthy fermentation period and moreover it tastes absolutely great.

WWW.SHIPLEYHEALTHSTORE.CO.UK

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th 7 No r , e Parad . rd Bradfo 274 Tel: 01 2 9 2 2 72


‘Bradford’s Best Kept Secret’

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MONDAY-THURSDAY* 2 courses £10 * 3 course £12.50 FRIDAY & SATURDAY* 2 courses £12 * 3 course £14

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*T’s & C’s Apply Menus Dishes And Prices May Be Subject To Change Without Prior Notice

September DINNER MENU STARTERS

Roasted butternut squash soup with a hint of cumin & crème fraîche Napoleons classic prawn cocktail, Marie Rose sauce & little gem (£1.95 supplement) Goats cheese & tomato tartlet, dressed rocket & beetroot syrup Pressed gammon terrine, apricot chutney & crusty bread Salmon & spring onion croquette, tomato & dill salsa

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Grilled sea bream fillet, ratatouille vegetables & crispy basil Butter roasted chicken breast, sage & onion mash, Yorkshire pudding & red wine sauce Chargrilled sirloin steak, garlic roasted potatoes, green peppercorn & mushroom sauce Pork escalope; baked in pancetta ham with gruyère cheese, tarragon jus Beer braised shoulder of lamb, bubble & squeak, rosemary jus Flat cap mushrooms & feta cheese, baked in filo pastry with spinach, pimento syrup

FROM THE GRILL

Grills, served with slow roast tomatoes, button mushrooms and hand cut chips Fillet steak (£5 supplement) Sea Bream Fillet We recommend the following sauces to compliment your grill: Au poivre £1.50 Diane £1.50 Hollandaise £1.50 All main courses served with a selection of vegetables & potatoes

DESSERTS

Warm pear & almond tartlet, with vanilla ice cream Chocolate & orange pot, with shortbread Steamed treacle sponge, with whisky custard A selection of cheese with with celery, fruit & biscuits All products served could contain nuts or nut derivatives. If you have a serious food allergy, let us know before you order.

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INTERNATIONAL AWARD-WINNING BREWERY

SEPTEMBER BEER FESTIVAL One of the beer events of the summer! Saltaire Brewery showcase their best brews and use their industry knowledge and connections to source a wide range of the most interesting beers & ciders from across the UK . Friday 14th September 4pm-10pm Ticket only - available in advance from 1st July from the brewery or at the June Beer Club. 150 extra available on the door - first come, first served.

Saturday 15th September 12noon-10pm Pay on the door. First come first served, so come early! Q

ÂŁ5 per ticket includes programme, souvenir glass and first pint

Friends of Saltaire Brewery Allgate Dark Star Buxton Crouch Vale Wold Top Old Spot Titanic Magic Rock Liverpool Organic Blue Monkey Jarrow Stroud Marble Junction Bristol Beer Factory Otley Nethergate Milestone

Q Wide range of beers from some of the best contemporary breweries across the UK Q All beer served through hand pumps from our chilled cellar Q Improved Cider and Perry bar with over 15 varieties Q Featuring Hammonds Saltaire Band on Saturday afternoon Q Marquee with additional seating outside Q Hot food available

The Brewery, Dockfield Road, Shipley BD17 7AR Tel: 01274 594959 info@saltairebrewery.co.uk www.saltairebrewery.co.uk 20 minute walk along the canal (towards Leeds) from Saltaire Village and 10 minute walk from Shipley Railway Station. Visit our website or follow us on facebook for details of events, monthly beer clubs and our exciting range of beers.


BRADFORD CAMRA PUB OF THE YEAR 2012 As featured in The Guardian’s Top Ten UK Craft Beer Bars

THE SPARROW BIER CAFÉ, 32 NORTH PARADE, BRADFORD, BD1 3HZ


“The service is good & the food is tasty� Voted ninth best curry house in Britain.

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Authentic Kashmiri Cuisine since 1964

Offering an experience with charming staff, good service and exceptional quality of food to ensure guests come back for more. Sweet Centre restaurant provides an authentic surrounding combined with authentic traditional taste.

10% Discount offered to students and staff of the University & College

Eid Mubarak Also taking bookings for the festive season Our restaurant & banqueting suite caters for a variety of occasions: Weddings Conferences Charity Dinners Special Occasions

110-114 Lumb Lane, Bradford, BD8 7RS 01274 731735 www.sweetcentrerestaurant.com


24


HAILING FROM THE NORTH-EAST, GINK IS A WEST YORKSHIRE BASED ARTIST WHO’S ILLUSTRATIONS OBSERVE, COMMENT, AND ENCAPSULATE A VARIETY OF CHARACTERS AND SCENES. MR JOHNSTON MET UP WITH HER RECENTLY TO DISCUSS HER WORK.

H

ailing from the North-East, GINK is a West Yorkshire based artist who’s illustrations observe, comment, and encapsulate a variety of characters and scenes. Commoditisation, gentrification, globalisation, the environment, people, places are all themes of her work (and it would seem streams in her conscience). Based on a theme of secretBRADFORD this exclusive series of artworks created for HowDo?! Magazine carries the similarly significant meanings and reflections. Study the lines and study between the lines, and you will see her interpretation of our fair city and her love for people and life. WHAT STARTED YOU DRAWING AND WHEN DID YOU DISCOVER PEN AND INK? I got a calligraphy set when I was really young for Christmas once and I loved it. I bent all the nibs so they were less predictable and started scraping ink into all sorts of different materials and dousing it in bleach afterwards. It upset a lot of people. WOW SO YOU FOUND YOU CHOSEN MEDIUM AS A CHILD. WHERE DID YOU TAKE IT FROM THERE? It seemed to produce such a rasping and guttural effect so I used it for everything, even at university where it was all about drawing very precise and calculated straight lines digitally, I refused for the most part. When I failed my final year my tutor sat me down and told me it was because I had no concept of reality. It was right then and there that I decided that I’d rather be skint and making a go at illustrating than getting paid a heavy wage to worry about what one straight line would look like next to another straight line. WHAT’S USUALLY YOUR STARTING POINT FOR A NEW PIECE OR SERIES? I probably spend too much time thinking. It’s a case of biding your time until you can picture a whole idea in every smallest detail and then just going for it. The trick I’ve also learnt is to never put the idea into words. As soon as that happens, it becomes distorted by the words you’ve chosen to bind it to and any reaction you receive from it. It loses its power to grow and just dies, infuriatingly, in front of your eyes. It sucks all the juice from your oranges. WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO CREATE? People inspire me. It’s hard not to walk down the street and wonder what someone has in their fridge, what their insides look like, what bad things they’ve done or where they keep their treasure. Things that happen, stories, passing comments, irregularities, cracks in walls, a split-second glance at an eye, some things just stick and then I want to try and reproduce it. MAYBE A SILLY QUESTION BUT DO YOU HAVE FUN WITH THE IMAGES YOU DRAW? I have a lot of fun trying to push things as far as I can. I enjoy the feeling of distain I have with myself when something comes out that even I wonder

GINK TANK

Film: Le Triplettes de Belleville by Chomet Album: The Knot by Wye Oak Book: If On A Winter’s Night A Traveller by Italo Calvino Poem: When you rang at Dick Mid’s Place – E. E. Cummings

where it came from, like a pure unadulterated stream of consciousness. I think that’s why I like making things slightly feral and disjointed, it feel like it’s taking the shine off it. Everything has an undertone of disenchantment no matter how beautiful it may appear, and poking fun at it makes it a bit more real and easily accepted. HOW HAS YOUR ART EVOLVED AND WHERE DO YOU SEE IT GOING? It’s become a lot cleaner and much more refined I think, which I’m in two minds about. I don’t particularly have an emotional attachment to my work, it just becomes something I have to look at. I’d like to get back up to working on a larger scale as things seem to have gradually shrunk, although I had much more of a nonchalant attitude when I was younger; ‘ if it looks like shit I don’t really care, I’ve just enjoyed making a mess’. I guess the resulting change of that is sucking it up and taking pride in what you do.I’m looking at experimenting more with different techniques, but my biggest hope is that I still get a good response from what I do and I don’t start taking myself too seriously. Otherwise I may have to have words. WHAT ARE YOU WORK ON AT THE MOMENT? I’m working on some more personal stuff as I feel I’ve not really pulled at those teeth for a while now, but it will also give me chance to dabble into printing a bit more. I’ve got a few big plans that I’m looking to get out in the next year, and possibly look into getting into different media more with various collaborations. ANY EXCITING PLANS FOR THE FUTURE? Lots, I just need to write them all down. ANY GOSSIP TO SHARE WITH US? David Bowie is going on tour in January and apparently his outfits are more ridiculous than ever.

artisticPERSPECTIVE

GINK TALKS WITH MR JOHNSTON


THE

INN

EST. 1901

EDWARDIAN GASLIT ALE HOUSE A RANGE OF CRAFT BEERS & AUTHENTIC CIDER LARGE CELLAR BAR AVAILABLE FOR GIGS & PRIVATE HIRE: ATTRACTIVE TERMS FOR PROMOTERS COMFORTABLE FUNCTION ROOMS AVAILABLE TO MEET WITHOUT CHARGE HOME TO THE BEEHIVE POETS, GREEN DRINKS, HOWDO?! SUNDAY SOCIAL MEETINGS, ROCKERS & ROLLERS, RUSTY HAT

171 WESTGATE, BRADFORD, BD1 3AA www.newbeehiveinn.co.uk - 01274 721784


JANE STEELE

I

’ve never read ‘A Rebours’ (Against Nature), the text which is thought to be fictionalised as the ‘poisonous French novel’ which influenced Oscar Wilde’s Dorian Gray. However, I imagine I’d feel the same way about it as I do about these poems: awe-struck, deeply impressed and profoundly unsettled. There’s a Shakespearean power in some of Michael’s imagery. I also found something out which inspired me to write a poem. It cropped up in a documentary on BBC4 entitled ‘Delius: Composer, Lover, Enigma’. It turns out that Delius fathered a mixed-race child in the woods in Florida, where the family had an orange plantation. He left them both and returned to England. Ten years later he returned, ostensibly filled

sWORD

WELCOME TO OUR WILD-THEMED EDITION. IN KEEPING WITH THIS, I FEEL PRIVILEGED TO PRESENT MICHAEL’S METCALFE’S ‘SKY QUARTET’. with a sudden desire to fettle the family oranges but more probably, the documentary asserts, to find his estranged lover and child. I was going to present you with my poem about this, but it’s not finished because I’ve been in hospital. Deadlines dictate that I can’t shilly-shally any longer. So far, the thing is like a cobra with stomach problems: it has the necessary fangs but is too querulous and wishy-washy to do anything with them. I hope to share it another time. Now, all I will say is that I thought I’d recorded the programme for research purposes; that’s what it said on my list of recorded shows. Then, when I accessed it, it turned out it was a programme about Pink chuffin’ Floyd. I couldn’t help but feel that, even now, Delius continues to slip through the fingers of Time.

MICHAEL METCALFE

SKY QUARTET Night-Movement In a silent and slow dance of butoh, See the moon as she moves, hungry and sly, Penetrating to the heart of the sky. With the softest of sisters, laying low Or crystal and silent, framing the show. Angels of silver that flicker and sigh, Angels of bronze sing their love as they lie Flocks in the pool of her beautiful glow Until the sun will come to clear away The thought of fun, to briskly start the day. A remorseless order, in scolding tone, With scalding breath. In the high seat, alone, He will sit as he is: bone-dry, aware, Lacking in love but abundant in care.

Against Nature, Against Fate O sun, from where does your authority Emerge, to look on us with burning face? Day-bound grandstander of lifeless ill-grace, Panoptic He-rose of bland surity, Have you come again to mock us, grinning? Joylessly grinning, with a mouth of bleach, Here to melt our transgressions and to teach Us the only way to cease our sinning? If only for a few happy moments, I’d found a shelter and a place to hide, Would I ever have sought a eyeless guide To outface your light and gilded serpents? Some grey, infandous negation I’ll search For, still yet: to hide from your eye and birch.

Night-Shroud I feel sick when I look at the sky Tonight, covered over in acid cloud, Grimly mirroring (so clear and loud) e. The false suns that sit with harrying eye. An amber blanket, or copper veil, d. A rusty clamp or vice, a poisonous hood. I miss the generous Other, but would Never ask of the Beautiful Pale To play in this baleful orange-grey. She’d only say: “I’ll hide myself away! I recall night as the blackest field, Where, with a sigh, my moonbeams unreeled nreeled And with joyful shudders lit through the he void. This smothering horror I must avoid.”

Daylight’s Return The sun will see this morning as a crime When not a sliver of a beam of light Can irrupt from the refulgent and slight Curtain that hangs in the morning sublime. In love’s silver room, in this clouded clime, Where plumages teem in restful daylight, Sky’s great blamer must now remain from sight. I suppose that we will dream for a time, Until the gloaming re-establishes The dry-rot silence of nature’s wishes, And glaring night arranged above it all. Or will winds come to pull away the shawl? And amber angels dimly flame to light? Bloom, and sing their love for the naked night?

27


Studio Bijoux Art & Tattoo Studio 9A North Parade, Bradford BD1 3JL

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Daley’s

Est.1946

YOUR LOCAL, A FAMILY RUN, INDEPENDENT ART STORE GREAT DISCOUNTS ON TEXTBOOKS - STATIONERY & ART MATERIALS DISSERTATION BINDING - A3/A4 COPY & PRINT - B/W & COLOUR Open Mon-Fri 9am-5.30pm 3 Grove Terrace (opposite Bradford College) t: 01274 727800 f: 01274 393062 info@daleysbookshop.co.uk

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ODEONuncovered CALL-FOR-ENTRIES

8th-30th September, South Square Centre Thornton, Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD13 3LD. t: 01274 834747 www.southsquarecentre.co.uk

An exhibition of artwork inspired by the campaign to save the former Bradford Odeon building.

Please submit your artwork, design and photography to: South Square Gallery, c/o Beryl Robinson or alternatively email matthew-shaw@sky.com if you require collection. All entries will be returned and should be submitted with your full name, title of work and address.

VWXGLREĹRX[EUDGIRUG#JPDLOFRP

www.joolzdenby.co.uk

an exhibition of artwork inspired by the Bradford Odeon and the campaign to save it.

www.cityoffilm.co.uk

The 1in12 Club

Games in the Park, the outdoor events programme, is also taking place from July onwards, in Hull (www.hullcc.gov.uk); Ryedale (www.ryedalefolkmuseum.co.uk); Harewood House (www.harewood.org).

Liberty +Equality +Solidarity

21–23 Albion Street Bradford BD1 2LY 01274 734160 www.1in12.com

Games in the Park is part of New Worlds which is a strand of imove; a Cultural Olympiad programme in Yorkshire

Established 1981

www.imoveand.com @imoveand imove has been funded by Legacy Trust UK, creating a lasting impact from the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games by funding ideas and local talent to inspire creativity across the UK. New Worlds is a partnership between Alchemy; Bradford Council’s Department of Regeneration & Culture; Harewood House; National Centre for Early Music; National Media Museum; The Northern School of Contemporary Dance. Games in the Park also involves partnerships with Hull City Council and Ryedale Folk Museum.

Games in the Park – The Exhibition at Cartwright Hall Art Gallery, Bradford runs from 28 July - 2 December 2012.

ODEON. SAVE IT.

Richard Eurich, 1903-1992 Gay Lane 1952 oil on canvas Collection: Bradford Museums and Galleries © The artist’s estate/The Bridgeman Art Library

Led by Bradford Council, Games in the Park has been conceived, brokered and curated by Alchemy

Bite my nails and lick my thumbs— something crusty this way comes! Yes the 1in12 club is a legendary venue nestling in the very heart of Bradford since 1981. Yes we do offer extraordinarily cheap refreshment to our members (pints from £1.30). Yes we do offer an extensive lineup of live music from across all genres in one of the most unique venues in the north. But surely there’s more to the 1in12 club than this? YES!! Members of the 1in12 can get involved in any number of activities and get involved in an array of collectives: —The Cafe Collective Cooking up wholesome and cheap vegan food on a Saturday afternoon —The Library Collective Cataloguing one of the most extensive collections of anarchist literature in the world —The Peasants Collective Green fingered types tending to the clubs large allotment —The PA Collective Offering skillshares in music technology and the chance to take the reins on gig-nights —The Bar Collective Ensuring the members are adequately watered —The Climbing Club Dangling from ropes for shits and giggles —The Print Collective Letterpress printing with antique delights To find out more about how to become a member and for more information about gigs and events (or just to join us for a pint), pop in any evening Thursday to Sunday from 7pm (and Saturday daytimes) to grab an application form. Membership costs just £3 per year for unwaged types and £5 per year for those who are waged. Bargain!


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ALBERT FREEMAN WENT ALONG TO AN EVENT TO FIND OUT.

?

people&ART

What on earth is

BETTAKULTCHA STARTED OUT ON TWITTER, AND THAT’S STILL LARGELY HOW WORD OF IT SPREADS. THE THIRD OF THESE UNIQUE EVENTS WAS HELD IN JUNE AT HAND MADE IN BRADFORD, A NEW AND EXCITING ARTS VENUE THRIVING WITHIN THE FORMER ZAVVI STORE.

B

ettakultcha is essentially a roomful of people who watch others expatiate on a topic – or as Bettakultcha refer to it, “a passion” – of their choice. These five-minute mini speeches are backed up by 20 15-second PowerPoint slides they’ve put together. Pretty much anything goes, so long as it is not a pitch – and censorship is foreign at Bettakultcha! It’s now an established cultural event in Leeds with a great following. Curators – Ivor Tymchak and Richard Michie – are always exploring new venues and cities to host, Bradford adding to a list of many. Arriving, I anticipated many in attendance would be Tweeters. In fact I was introduced to a new game by Abi (@SewYou) - Twitter Bingo: spotting Twitter friends you’ve never met in the flesh. I had considered preparing a talk. However, as this was my first Bettakultcha event I decided to observe; to get a feel, and see what the norm was. What did I glean? There isn’t a norm. The two curators each took turns to do a talk. Richard shared what it takes to be a ‘professional northerner’ while Ivor spoke about being a caricaturist. Two presentations stuck in my mind: Paul Kerfoot (@TheBulletman) engaged the audience talking about his Nana and bananas, and Kate Booth (@ andreakatebooth) talked animatedly about coming out as a lesbian.

keenly nodding. Butcher David Lishman (@Butcher_dlish) talked of pig curing and sausages, and Dr. Michael Porter (@ PortersDNA) discussed Science vs PseudoScience, taking a humorous swipe at the cosmetics industry and homeopathy. As a vegan who also uses homeopathic treatments, neither of these talks were particularly ‘up my street’ - but that’s BettaKultcha for you. If you hope to agree with everything – think again. If you expect to think, learn, agree, disagree and laugh – in equal measures, and within a matter of moments – you won’t be let down. As I’d contemplated speaking about one of my “passions” anyway, I was quietly pleased to learn that a Bettakultcha night ends with the “Random Slide Challenge” aka: a few audience members are offered the opportunity to speak, unprepared. In this you talk (and possibly after a few soda pops, adding to the fun) accompanied by a set of slides you haven’t seen. You make of the images what you can. It was quite a daunting task, and yes I felt a bit of a tit, but everyone’s on your side - they know the score. And besides, life is about risks. I would like to do a proper, prepared talk at a future Bettakultcha event. As the only imposed restriction is no pitches, I wonder if anybody has thought of subverting this rule to speak about the effect a cricket pitch can have on a match. There’s a fiveminute, 20-slide talk in that, I’m sure.

Next Bradford Event:

26th Sept @ Hand Made In Bradford

I’ve recounted part of Paul’s talk since the event, starting many a conversation with this interesting fact: “Did you know that we all eat bananas the wrong way up?” Kate’s talk managed both enlightenment and entertainment and Ivor Tymchak learnt something too: wearing black M&S knickers isn’t a lesbian quirk; all women do it, as was demonstrated by a room full of women

HAVE SOME ART FOR THE BRADFORD ODEON? Fight to save our Odeon inspires exhibition that wants you to contribute your art. People of Bradford, we’re calling on you to submit pieces for an upcoming art exhibition celebrating the life of the city’s beloved Odeon Cinema. Launching on 8th September, at the South Square Centre in Thornton, the Odeon Uncovered exhibition will chart the history of the iconic building – from the laying of the very first bricks in 1929, right through to the present day fight to save “her” from demolition. The exhibition will cover the venue’s life as a cinema, concert hall and theatre, which played host to stars like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. It will also record the gutsy fight of our campaigners, who have garnered support from famous names including David Hockney, Alan Bennett,

Photography By Tim Green

Barbara Windsor and Channel 4’s Restoration Man, George Clarke. “The building has been closed for 12 years but there’s still a fight to keep her alive,” says Mark Nicholson of the Bradford Odeon Rescue Group (BORG). “Public opinion in favour of saving the Odeon is very strong, so we want to invite the public to share in this event, and submit any photos, artworks, memories and memorabilia they have of the building.” The exhibition runs until 30th September, then will go on display in the window of the POP-UP Gallery in Bradford’s Centenary Square from 6th to 30th October. Artwork, design and photography to be posted or hand delivered to Odeon Uncovered Exhibition, South Square Centre, South Square, Thornton, Bradford, BD13 3LD. Alternatively, email matthew-shaw@sky.com with digital pieces. The closing date for submissions is 28th August.

Matt Shaw

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CAKEWALK HANDMADE & VINTAGE, ILKLEY BY LORAIN BEHRENS

For nearly five years, an Aladdin’s Cave of craft and vintage wares has been delighting visitors. Cakewalk Handmade & Vintage has showcased the work of local artists and designer makers on the second floor of its premises, tucked away round a corner of Ilkley town centre. But now it is closing - to evolve into pop up events and fairs. Owner Emma Straw has joined forces with Aileen Brindle Projects to create a new fair. The

JOURNEYS & MIGRATIONS @ HAND MADE IN BRADFORD BY LORAIN BEHRENS

Bradford Jesus Man walked past my house the other day. I would like to think he was following the trails of sand, sugar and salt which led on the opening night to Hand Made in Bradford, for the venue’s latest exhibition entitled Journeys and Migrations. And indeed he did pop up again - this time on the big screen, as Bradford Walking Man. Simon Warner’s 11-minute silent documentary entitled The Excursion had its audience transfixed as they followed the habit-clad character as he tangled

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Village Green Fair will celebrate a variety of small, green, local businesses, some handmade, vintage and recycled, but also food, beer and plants. There will also be live music from local musicians; an Ilkley Brewery Beer tent; a 1970s ice cream van called Sunshine Scoops parked outside; a cafe and other surprises. It’s tough in retail at the moment as everyone knows. The time feels right to retain the essence of Cakewalk, but to adapt and move on to something new. While running the shop or at events to promote it, Emma has met many talented local people with a wide variety of skills

with traffic amid the streets of Bradford. Organiser Fabric received an incredible response to its call for contributions, with 50 applications received from across the UK. The resulting exhibition is breathtaking. The space is dominated by Eva Mileusnic’s two floor-to-ceiling 3D panels on the theme of a human landscape. Holly Rowan Hesson’s Journey Train is a collection of literal snapshots glimpsed as the world rushes by; Drew Ward’s charcoal interpretations of the roof structure of St Pancreas and fire ladders of New York delight in their Vorticist precision. Alice Fox’s journey is ongoing, and her delicate folding books depict tide marks gathered at Spurn

and small businesses and believes that bringing them together for events will really appeal to customers. The first fair will be at The Robinson Library and Village Hall, Timble, near Otley on Sunday September 23 from 11am to 4.30pm. More information can be seen on The Village Green Fair Facebook page . There will also be a pop-up Cakewalk as part of The Ilkley Art Trail in October and Cakewalk will appear at other fairs and events.

Point; elsewhere white gloves are provided for visitors to gingerly pull open a feathered book. Gloriously choreographed by Ann Rutherford and Steve Bishop, Fabric’s exhibition hosts live art, stories, travelogues, photography, meanderings and interventions, augmented by audio events and walks in neighbouring open spaces. Follow Journeys and Migrations on Twitter @ fabricbradford with daily postings of prose from a mysterious travelling #postcardpoet More details at www.fabricculture.co.uk

The exhibition will be at Hand Made In Bradford, 1 Tyrrel Street until 6th October.


BY LORAIN BEHRENS

EASY TO GET A ROMANTICISED VIEW, BUT I WISH I LIVED IN A TIME WHEN “ IT’S THE SKILLS OF CRAFTSPEOPLE WERE MORE VALUED THAN THEY ARE TODAY. ”

people&ART

CHRISSIE FREETH CHRISSE FREETH’S LIFE IS STEEPED IN THE PAST. HER HOME IS AN 1856 FORMER MILL HOUSE IN THE WORLD HERITAGE SITE OF SALTAIRE, AND EVERY NOOK AND CRANNY OF EVERY ROOM IS FILLED WITH REMINDERS OF DAYS GONE BY.

I

t is not surprising then to learn that Chrissie’s love of the past goes back a long way. As a teenager, she was fascinated by archaeology, and among the many pictures on her walls is one of her when she was featured in a newspaper for having unearthed a 500-600-year-old skeleton.

“At the time, I lived in Redditch, very near to the ruins of a medieval Cistercian Abbey. I used to take part in excavations,” explained Chrissie. Next to the abbey was an 18th Century water-powered mill, and it was there that Chrissie took her first job as a museum assistant. “They had a lot of textiles displayed there, haberdashery items, and a very active embroidery group. Although I loved archaeology, textiles became an interest for me too, and stayed with me even as I went on to do a degree in archaeology.” It was the degree that brought Chrissie to Bradford. The university was a centre for the study of human remains, and the base of Charlotte Roberts, one of the most pre-eminent paleopathologists of the time, who went on to become Chrissie’s PhD supervisor. After finishing her degree, which included a course on archaeological textiles, Chrissie was awaiting the results of her PhD when she suffered a family tragedy when her brother was killed while on holiday by a speeding driver. He was 27. “It was a big turning point in my life. The last thing I wanted to do was continue to study human remains. I slid into a horrific depression and it left me questioning what I really wanted out of life, and if indeed a mainstream academic career was what I really wanted. “ Chrissie still has one foot in the door of academia. As an honorary research fellow in archaeology at Bradford University, her recent research has focused on patterns of health and well-being in Victorian working class women in Saltaire, and the social context in which rag rugs were made and used. “Such rugs would have been ubiquitous in Saltaire houses, a necessity on the cold stone floors. They went by many different names, depending on where they came from - rag rugs, peg rugs, clippy rugs, tabby, proddy and proggy to name a few! “I recalled having seen a rag rug in the Black Country museum in the Midlands, and having been intrigued and influenced by it when I was young. I have always liked rag rugs, and did have a go at making one when I was a kid. With my interest in archaeological textiles, it seemed the right thing for me to take up.” It is hard to believe that Chrissie only started making rugs a year ago. Her creations are formed using new and vintage fabrics as well as homespun fibres.

“I love making them. It’s so relaxing, so creative. The best thing is that I can have a vision of what I want to make in my head, and can make it real. “ I’ve always done embroidery, crochet, knitting, so making rugs has become a natural evolution of my interest in textile crafts. “ If proof was in the pudding, then Chrissie knew she had found her talent when she had a stall at the Saltaire Makers Fair in May this year. Not only did she sell some of her rugs, she also sold out of her starter kits, and has recently been approached by local stockists for her kits. “The Makers Fair was my first event and it was amazing. I loved every second of it!” Chrissie had set up her rug frame and visitors to the fair were encouraged to have a go at rag rugging. “It was wonderful to engage with people who had memories of making rugs. It is sad that those memories are not going to be around for much longer, but so many young people wanted to have a go and the tradition can live on through them.” Chrissie’s inspiration is varied, focusing on her surroundings, landscapes, local stories and her career as an archaeologist. She collects vintage rug making equipment and is always keen to hear people’s stories and memories of mat making and is committed to keeping the craft alive. Her favourite rug is one with a young woman standing on moorland, with a quote from Emily Bronte: No coward soul is mine. Other images represent a ghost story of a young girl who fell from one of Wycoller’s seven bridges, as she tripped in a rut formed by the weaver’s clogs; Art Deco, Bloomsbury, and of course the iconic Salts Mill. Chrissie, a member of the Guild of Long Draw Spinners, recently turned her hand to spinning, buying fleece from Woolfest in Cockermouth. The fleece is then washed, dried (“somewhat difficult at the moment,” comments Chrissie, casting a glance at the grey July skies); carded, and spun on her wheel which she has fondly named Morag. “I decided that if I was going to make my own yarn, I was going to do it properly, how people would have spun wool in the past. It’s a pain, but it is an art, and being able to turn a smelly, daggy* fleece straight off the back of a sheep into something so luscious and soft that you can rub your face in it, is so rewarding!” * Daggy /dag- dried sheep’s poo. A member of the West Riding Ruggers, Chrissie can be found in the directory of the Heritage Crafts Association. For more information about Chrissie’s work and her workshops, go to www.dizziebhooked/wordpress.com

37


MAN’S REAL HOME IS NOT A House, BUT THE Road, AND LIFE ITSELF IS A JOURNEY… BRUCE CHATWIN, WHAT AM I DOING HERE?

JOURNEYS & MIGRATIONS, HAND MADE IN BRADFORD

WWW.FABRICCULTURE.CO.UK

PLENTY TO DO FRONT ROOM DISCO

Shipley’s eclectic indy marketplace and café, for all things a little bit different. 10-3pm Sat. 13 Oct, 24 Nov and 8 Dec

Vinyl only night playing 7”s, 12”s and albums, with themes and curators. Last Sat. of each month: 15 Sep (Saltaire Festival special), 29 Sep, 27 Oct, 24 Nov 7.30pm – 11.30pm – £1.50 entry More info: recordclub.org.uk

Shipley’s community cinema bringing the best of film to our little corner of Yorkshire. shipleyfilmsociety.org.uk

An eclectic alternative mix of music covering indie, alternative, ska, reggae, punk, disco and 80s pop. Third Saturday of each month starting 20 Oct 2012, 8pm – 11.30pm

Next Shipley Slouch pop-up café Sunday 23 Sep – booking essential CREATIVE // COMMUNITY // CULTURAL // SPACE — FULLY LICENSED BAR The Kirkgate Centre 39a Kirkgate Shipley BD18 3EH Tel: 01274 580186 www.kirkgatecentre.org.uk www.twitter.com/kirkgate_centre


BEST

people&ART

PERSONAL

PAUL FLOYD BLAKE@IMPRESSIONS GALLERY, BRADFORD BY HAYLEY SARGENT

PAUL FLOYD BLAKE’S RECENT EXHIBITION AT IMPRESSIONS GALLERY FEATURED A SERIES OF PORTRAITS OF YOUNG ATHLETES TAKEN OVER THE COURSE OF FIVE YEARS. HAYLEY SARGENT MANAGED TO CATCH UP WITH ONE OF HIS SUBJECTS, 19 YEAR OLD, BRIGHOUSE BORN KAYAKER ROBERT JEFFRIES. PHOTOGRAPHY © PAUL FLOYD BLAKE COURTESY OF IMPRESSIONS GALLERY

WHAT IS GOING THROUGH YOUR MIND WHEN YOU ARE ON THE WATER?

INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT JEFFERIES When I was about six I started playing football now and again.

I never really think anything when I am on the water, kind of everything gets blocked out of my mind. I rarely hear people on the bank when I am racing, people will be shouting my name to go faster and whatever but I just don’t hear them because I block everything out. All I think is: Want to win, always want to win.

WHAT IS IT YOU ENJOY ABOUT SPORT?

TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT HOW PAUL WOULD COMPOSE A PHOTOGRAPH?

HOW OLD WERE YOU WHEN YOU STARTED GETTING INTERESTED IN SPORT?

The adrenalin rush of racing and being on the edge pretty much all the time. HOW DO YOU THINK THIS HAS AFFECTED YOUR CHILDHOOD?

I think I have had less time hanging around on streets and parks. I have always been training or doing course work in school. WHO INSPIRED YOU TO TAKE UP SPORT?

Loads of people have inspired me to do sports - people who have shown that they can get to world championships. HOW DID YOU HEAR ABOUT THE PROJECT?

Paul came to me and my dad. I think it was a fundraising event for the 2012 Olympics. I just thought it would be a bit of fun now and again WHY DID YOU CHOOSE KAYAKING?

I liked the challenge of trying to stay upright and then became more involved in the sport and just grew to like going fast. TELL US ABOUT YOUR TRAINING ROUTINE.

My training ground is in Mirfield. I train four times a week, mixed variations of training, from long-distance paddling to short-distance sprints and focusing on my techniques and starts. It’s a great place to train as it has both canal and river with mixtures of deep and shallow waters WHERE WERE YOU IN YOUR KAYAKING CAREER WHEN PAUL APPROACHED YOU?

I was 13 when Paul approached me I think, or around about that, and I was the quickest junior sprinter in Yorkshire as well as the highest ranked junior marathon paddler in Yorkshire. I had just become involved in Wild Water Racing which was the first world championships I went to which was in Switzerland. My main aim is to stay with Wild Water Racing

He would always ask my opinion of where I wanted to stand and he would let me just produce a pose from being natural standing there. He would come to any event I was at if he wanted to take a picture; he came to my house to take some there and he has been as far as South Wales. HOW DO YOU FEEL HAVING YOUR PHOTO EXHIBITED IN A GALLERY AND PUBLISHED IN A BOOK?

I feel quite proud that Paul has picked me along with other athletes. I think the photographs show me growing up as a paddler and show me getting bigger and more involved in sport. I feel proud and also bit nervous to see what people will think of them. WHAT ARE YOUR ASPIRATIONS?

My ultimate goal is to become a world champion at Wild Water Racing or get on the flat-water sprint team, which is an Olympic discipline. The short film made by Arts in Yorkshire in collaboration with New Focus can be seen at Impressions Gallery or on the Arts in Yorkshire website http://art.yorkshire.com/exhibitions/paul-floyd-blake-personal-best Personal Best Paul Floyd Blake finishes runs until September 9. For more information visit www.impressions-gallery.com Hayley Sargent is a member of Impressions Gallery’s young people’s advisory board New Focus , an initiative to make Impressions Gallery even more accessible for young people, to raise awareness of Bradford as a cultural hub for photography, and to share the ideas and opinions of young people. To find our more follow us on Twitter @ImpNewFocus or like us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/NewFocusImpressions

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www.saltairebookshop.com Thousands of 2nd hand & new books. Fast ordering service. 1 Myrtle Place Saltaire BD18 4NB (Top of Saltaire Rd nr the roundabout)

Tel 01274 589144 Open 10am-5pm, Tuesday-Sunday


BY RACHEL KAYE

BRADFORD INDUSTRIAL MUSEUM MOORSIDE ROAD, BD2 3HP

WEDNESDAYS:10.30AM - 3.30PM For a medium which is meant to be dead, print seems to be kicking pretty hard. The print geeks amongst us will be more excited than is entirely appropriate to discover that Bradford Industrial Museum has a printing gallery with a reconstructed Victorian printing office and authentic, restored machines. Get there on Wednesdays between 10.30am - 3.30pm to see volunteers demonstrate and explain the craft of letterpress printing. And they’re giving away typeset souvenir bookmarks.

DAVID HOCKNEY SALTS MILL, SALTAIRE

WED-SUN:10:30AM - 4PM You’ve now got more time to check out the work of one of Bradford’s most famous sons; 25 Trees and other Pictures by David Hockney is now remaining at Salts Mill in Saltaire until January 2013. In the projection room you can see Hockney’s recent works on the iPhone and iPad, which cannot be seen anywhere else in the UK. Then there’s the 27ft long photographs of the same 25 trees on a Bridlington street at three different times of year.

CRICKETERS ARMS COMEDY NIGHT BY DAN BERRY

LIKE MANY OTHERS I’D ALWAYS ASSUMED THE PHRASE ‘THERE’S FUNNY FOLK IN KEIGHLEY…’ WAS AN UNFAIR GENERALISATION RATHER THAN A LITERAL FACT. YET THE CRICKETERS ARMS, TUCKED AWAY DOWN CONEY STREET, IS A HAVEN FOR FUNNY PEOPLE. VERY FUNNY PEOPLE INDEED. Once a month, discerning cheer-n-beer-hunters can be found in this cosy little pub having their humeri tickled by an impressive array of up-and-coming and established stars of the stand-up scene. The evening’s proceedings are held together by regular MC, Chris Brooker, whose enthusiastic yet easy-going style sets the mood for the audience and settles the nerves of the acts. Throughout the night Brooker orchestrates the crowd like a big friendly ginger conductor, ensuring each performer is welcomed onto the stage warmly by the appreciative mob. The lack of a bearpit atmosphere, and the dissuading of witless heckling, enables the gagsmiths to shine and enjoy the night as much as the showgoers do. Everyone wins! For the evening of How Do’s visit, we were treated to a very strong opening set from Katie Mulgrew – possibly the best thing to come out of Lancashire since the M62. Katie was paying a return visit to the Cricketers, having previously performed in one of the try-out spots – the middle section of the show dedicated to those tentatively putting their feet on the bottom rung of the comedy ladder. This time these spots were fearlessly occupied by Laura Matron and Jay Hampson – both of whom may find themselves off the comedy ladder pretty soon and riding up to the penthouse suite on the escalator of mirth instead, such was the competent, confident and masterful delivery of their routines. Hampson, in particular, is destined for great things… Keep an eye out for him in the future! And rounding off the laughterfest was yer grannie’s favourite, headliner Andrew O’Neill – steampunk’s very funny philosopher king - effortlessly blending cheery left-field whimsy with the underlying menace of a tattooed metal-head. Some people will try to tell you that we are living in dark times – but John, James, Victoria and the rest of the staff at the Cricketers in Keighley obviously don’t believe that. So book yourself a ticket for the next gig - priced at an austerity-friendly five pounds - pop along to Coney Street on the last Thursday of the month and be prepared to laugh like a drain.

SALTAIRE HAND MADE

FREEDOM STUDIOS IS LOOKING FOR WRITING TALENT!

18TH AUG & 15TH SEPT: 10AM-3PM

STREET VOICES 4 IS A FREE PLAYWRITING COURSE FOR EMERGING WRITERS AT THE BEGINNING OF THEIR CAREERS; POETS, NOVELISTS, RAPPERS, COMIC BOOK WRITERS. ANYONE WHO WOULD VALUE A SUPPORTED APPROACH TO WRITING FOR THE THEATRE AND FOR PERFORMANCE.

CAROLINE ST. SOCIAL CLUB

Bradford is still having a hard time in terms of retail but it’s worth remembering there are independents out there who offer something a little different and special if you know where to look. Worth a punt is Saltaire Handmade Arts and Crafts on 18th August and 15th September 10am -3pm at Caroline Social Club where you can get your hands on designer made arts and crafts. The event coincides with the Saltaire Farmers’ Market – selling a range of local produce from independents.

The course is led by playwright and screenwriter Mark Catley and it will include structured writing workshops, one-to-one mentoring sessions and the opportunity for public performance. You don’t need to have written for theatre before, but you do have to be committed to writing. You also need to be motivated, open to constructive criticism and committed toattending all the course dates. The workshops will be held at FreedomStudios in Bradford and the Civic Theatre in Barnsley.

VVOO L.L .

Previous graduates of Street Voices courses have gone on to join the BBC Academy and have full-length plays commissioned. The course runs from October 2012 to February 2013. For more information contact Deborah:

01274 730077 deborah@freedomstudios.co.uk. www.freedomstudios.co.uk.

S E E K I N G B R AV E N E W W R I T E R S

theatre&PERFORMANCE

AUGUST/ SEPTEMBER PREVIEWS


Theatre in the Mill, Gallery II, Music at Bradford University

e thin g dif f e r e n t m o s e c n e i ... Exper THEATRE – PHOTOGRAPHY – DANCE YOU CAN HEAR, SMELL AND TASTE – MUSIC – TAKE A PICTURE OF YOURSELF LEAPING, FLYING OR LEVITATING – FOLK NARRATIVES – PROJECTIONS – SONIC ART – FILM SCREENINGS – POP UP BUSKING PERFORMANCES – AN ALMOST WELL TUNED PIANO – SPOKEN WORD – INTERACTIVE ART – A PLACE TO DREAM – THEATRE GAMING – STORYTELLING –

ed v ol

or v w n r i i he t t Get u bo tists a

Take part

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ar & talk to

‘SOME OF THE BOLDEST AND MOST INTERESTING WORK IN THE REGION’ Yorkshire Post

Our friendly, welcoming venues are open to all. Meet and relax at our Theatre bar (featuring a hand picked selection of American Craft and British favourites with seasonal specials at non theatre prices).

CHECK OUR WEBSITES FOR FULL DETAILS OF WHAT WE’VE GOT COMING UP www.bradford.ac.uk/theatre www.bradford.ac.uk/gallery www.bradford.ac.uk/music Twitter @braduniarts

HOWDO SPECIAL OFFER 2 X TICKETS: £10 Very special offer for readers of HowDo book two tickets to any full priced Theatre in the Mill performance this season for £10 (usual price £16) quote ‘HowDoSept’


theatre&PERFORMANCE

SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT BRIAN HIBBARD – A TRIBUTE BY BOBBY WEAVER

BRIAN’S DEATH DID NOT GO UNNOTICED. QUITE RIGHTLY, ALTHOUGH THE EXTENT OF THE NEWS COVERAGE SURPRISED ME. HAVING THE HABIT OF SLAVISHLY COPYING EACH OTHER, MAINSTREAM MEDIA INEVITABLY TEND TO REITERATE THE SAME ERRORS AND OMISSIONS: BRIAN’S DEMISE IS NO EXCEPTION.

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or his comrades, colleagues, fellow travellers, friends and lovers in this northern town there is a glaring omission: the word Bradford, where Brian arrived at the beginning of the 1970s. He worked with Moving Being, a dance-based theatre company before joining The General Will as it emerged from its University origins. At that time the troupe was performing the satirical agitprop works of David Edgar, then working for the T&A, before moving on to higher things. The omission contains the error: Brian was not a singer-turned-actor. Nor was he an actor-turned-singer, for he was more than both. On his passport it said Artiste. I saw that when I got my first passport to go on tour with The General Will in the Netherlands. We were presenting a play about prisons, adapted from the work of an ex-con, and a cabaret show entitled Old Hats. By that time Noel Grieg had become the major writer for the company, as well as being theatrical director. Under his auspices even Brian was able to transcribe some of his improvisational flair, with such notable cameos as Old Charlie’s Monologue. “We’d lived in our house for forty-three years, the Missus And me. We’d a coupla kids, or worrit three? There were Morris and Doris and Ernie and Esau, hang on A minute, I think there were four.” (And so on for several hilarious pages.) This he performed with his plate removed. Far from an embarrassment, his missing front teeth, the result of a youthful enthusiasm for rugby, had become something of a partypiece. In like manner he would render “Please don’t burn the shithouse down”, under the influence of liquor. (Words and music available on request, but only to over eighteens.) Later he would claim to be the only performer to have removed their teeth in Coronation Street, or any other soap for that matter. David Edgar pays tribute: “He proved above all that you don’t have to sacrifice the politics to the entertainment, or the entertainment to the politics. You can have the best of both.”

up the Fourth Idea bookshop collective and his magnificent personal library now resides at the 1 in 12 club. Above lived Dusty Rhodes, who needs no introduction in Bradford. Brian’s stagecraft was consummate. Never one to play the same piece in the same old way, he was constantly innovative. But beware! Not content with being prepared to outrageously upstage you, in an attempt to provoke a response, he would also delight in inventing new bits of business designed to corpse you, preferably at crucial moments. He was a joy to play with. The seventies were heady days. The optimism of the sixties had not been completely eroded: it did not seem entirely impossible that the world could change for the better within a lifetime. The various metamorphoses of The General Will both reflected and strove to enact that social consciousness. Although the often bitter debates that accompanied those attempts would contribute to the withdrawal of public funding for the company and its eventual collapse, the efforts were not entirely in vain. The problem of who represents who, and under what conditions, still plagues us today, both in the artistic and the political domain. The experience gained whilst seeking something else, and the tentative responses to the questions posed informed the subsequent development of all involved. “Fail again. Fail better”, said Samuel Beckett. Some ex-members of The General Will, including Brian and me went on to work in Gateshead, Deptford, and elsewhere, developing plays in conjunction with community organisations, or bringing live events to unorthodox settings. Later Brian got a ‘proper job’ with 7:84 (Not Scotland) for the play One Big Blow, a touring show with much a cappella singing and based in a mining community, which played at the Theatre in the Mill. The seeds of The Flying Pickets were sown. It is here that the mainstream story starts: Google it, Wikipedia it, there’s loads of it. But we in Bradford know there’s more to it than is presented out there. Suffice to say that the Flying Pickets Only You topped the charts for five weeks in 1983. Subsequently Brian became well known for his later television and film work, achieving a Bafta Cymru award for his role in the film Little White Lies.

Brian had auditioned me in a most unorthodox fashion, in 1971, I think. Never was a speech delivered nor a note struck, but we ended up strutting (but not fretting too much), like the poor artistes that we were, for several years together: from Colraine to Eindhoven, from Stirling to St. Tropez. We even shared a flat. Below lived Ruben Goldberg, gone but not forgotten. He set

Old actors do, in fact, die, but the memory of gifted moments endures with those lucky enough to have shared them. All love to his partner Caroline and their three children, Lilleth, Cai and Hafwen.

Photography By Steve Stills

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BY ANDY ABBOTT

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STAYING IN THE DOMESTICATION OF THE UNDERGROUND I CAN’T PUT A FINGER ON EXACTLY WHEN IT HAPPENED, AND I’M NOT SURE EXACTLY HOW IT CAME ABOUT PERHAPS IT’S A COMBINATION OF AGE, JOB, LOCATION ETC. - BUT I’VE RECENTLY CAUGHT MYSELF ASKING ODD QUESTIONS LIKE ‘WHAT DO KIDS DO NOWADAYS?’ ‘WHAT DO THEY LIKE?’ AND IMPORTANTLY, ‘WHERE ARE THEY?’

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efore you start to pick up the phone, this isn’t accompanied by the creaking open of a box of kittens or the rustling of a bag of Werther’s Originals, but is the product of a less creepy and more urgent issue about the audience for alternative/ underground music. We talk a lot about the lack of numbers at events in Bradford - ‘There’s so much good stuff going off but not enough people at it to make it sustainable’ - and there’s various approaches to addressing this; HowDo?! being one of them. But no matter how much we ‘make a noise’ about what’s happening, cross-market, join-up, target audiences, improve accessibility and so on, I do wonder if there’s not a deeper and less easily solved root to the problem of people not going out. I’ve written previously about the shift in individuality, subjectivity and world view that technology produces - with relation to the access to ‘facts’ mobile internet allows: see ‘No Doubt’ in issue 3 of HowDo?! The gadgets and technologies we create to assist us with our daily lives bite back; changing our habits, social relations and personalities in increasingly less visible but irrevocable ways. Technology, as an extension of the body and mind, naturalises certain ideologies and behaviours so they seem like common sense or are unbreakable customs. In his recent exhibition at South Square Gallery in Thornton, Simon Boase explored the everyday but nevertheless strange phenomenon of the collapsing of time and space that occurs with internet web browsers. In a video projection we were invited to spy on a session of Simon’s internet surfing, where he rarely had less than seven windows open on his browser, each with a YouTube video, webcam, Skype conversation, Soundcloud file or some other pane of entertainment. Through these means we are simultaneously ‘at’ a rave in Berlin, a house party in Tehran, listening to music produced in Leeds, watching a mainstream MTV video and so on, skipping erratically between one and the other until they become indistinguishable; almost the same thing in the same place. What intrigued me about this exercise was the fact that it made visible the norm of how people both disseminate and experience ‘live’ music today. When I think back to why I started playing

in bands when I was 14 or so, it felt like that was the only way to make music. Likewise, shortly afterwards when I started to play and organise gigs in youth centres, pubs, boat clubs and village halls, it was because that was the only way to share what we were doing with others. Today, making music on a computer is much simpler, faster, cheaper, easier - and nine times out of ten has better results - than the hassle of learning an instrument, finding people to play with, buying and lugging around bulky equipment, rehearsing and recording in pricey studios and so forth. Similarly, the need to share and get feedback on your creative output is immediately satiated with a quick upload to Bandcamp or Soundcloud and a link via social networking sites. It is so much more cost effective, less risky and more comfortable than booking a venue, inviting people and then having to watch their faces as they get bored and wander off. I’m conscious here of sounding cynical and patronising but my point is not to claim the world is any better off for me and my friends fumbling through Nirvana and Prodigy covers to pissed-up 15 year-olds in a shed in Matlock than if we’d been sat at home on a computer. Rather, I’d like to identify and make some sense of the ramifications that this new technology-aided paradigm holds. As George Galloway is eager to point out: with its high proportion of youth, Bradford will be the ‘youngest’ city in Europe by 2020. Whilst his interest is in how the current government will (fail to) provide employment for this mass of youth, mine is a little more self-interested. What relevance will music venues, pubs and social centres have for a wave of young adults whose primary ‘venue’ for musical entertainment has been the computer screen and mobile smart phone? What kind of underground scene can we envisage when the very idea of ‘going out’ is becoming outmoded; absurd even? If the real underground network of creative expression is potentially found in the bedrooms, studies and living rooms of a thousand domestic dwellings should we bemoan the ‘lack of engagement’ with our gigs, exhibitions, festivals and cultural events? If people are still being creative and communicating then who are we to judge? Things change; get over it Grandad! We could argue that cyber-space is more democratic

and inclusive than the real world; there are no borders, no geographical divisions. People are able to present themselves as whoever they want, identities are fluid and changeable rather than fixed and rooted. There are communities of interest and affinity that are not limited by parameters of region and proximity. The prevailing counter-argument is, of course, an economic one. Without the ‘market’ of youth ‘investing’ in our pubs and clubs with their disposable income - if such a thing will exists by 2020 - there is no chance of economic growth or sustainability at the local level. Now, I’m unconvinced that capitalism is sustainable even with youth spending their wonga in pubs and clubs, so to me it’s beside the point. There is, however, a more social dimension to going out that risks being lost forever in the domestication of the underground. Collective experiences of live music, like sport, theatre, art and so on, are the site for chance encounters. It is in these spaces where people that don’t know each other - and normally never would – come together, share an experience, meet, collide, chat at a bar, fall in love, etc. What is learned in such chance encounters is an appreciation of difference and of the value of true hospitality; that is, of being open to someone you don’t already call a friend. Now, this does happen in the communities of interest of the internet, but the tolerance for those that are ‘different’ or initially dislikeable is much lower, and the scope for meeting someone ‘other’ to yourself is narrower. So, my argument for the preservation of our pubs, clubs, venues and social centres - and the urgent need to build a culture of going out to enable this - is not about money, but about conserving the potential for encounters that teach us about hospitality. Real hospitality (which might lead to genuine friendship and love) is an extension to the unfamiliar - to a stranger - and is a first step in thinking and creating a fairer, better world. The home, however, is not conventionally a place for strangers and this is why collectively owned and experienced spaces are so important. They are a common resource, and deserve supporting, conserving and fighting for as we do our green spaces, communal parks and forests. Time to get out and explore the great outdoors!

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DIY OR DIE INTERVIEW BY JOE CLARKE / KATIE JENNINGS / EMILY GRAVES

SOMETIMES SURPRISING THE “ IT’S AMOUNT OF YOUNG LOCAL BANDS THAT ARE ABOUT AT THE MOMENT AND WHEN THEY’RE GIVEN A STAGE THEY CAN REALLY PULL A CROWD.

WHAT IS YOUR VISION? DIY or DIE aims to create a monthly space for people to see bands and go dancing. The night has a strong DIY ethos which believes that you should be the fun you want to see in the world. Expect to hear some riot grrrl, punk, indie, electro and pop, live music from Town Bike and Martha and the homely additions of local zines and free cake. DIY or DIE is particularly keen on making our event a safe space for queer and trans folk, and welcomes anyone who wants to do likewise. This is important because there is already a lot of mainstream gay venues but none that provide queer spaces. We want to have a space that is an alternative as we recognise commercial entertainment, whether gay or straight expects people to act in a certain way especially in relation to sexuality, gender and appearance. It is a non-profit night, based around having fun, so head down and see what we’re up to. WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST CHALLENGES FACING PROMOTERS IN BRADFORD? Finding a suitable space that’s safe and inclusive. We’ve found many other venues in Bradford to be lacking in one way or another – drinks are too expensive, not enough room to dance, an excess of ancient taxidermy. Hence why we’ve chosen the 1 in 12 Club; we’re all committed members of the club and we’re looking forward to hopefully welcoming people who may have only seen one or no sides of the club! DO YOU THINK THERE IS A LACK OF ENGAGEMENT FROM THE CITY’S YOUTH AT THE MOMENT? There are pockets of activity happening all over Bradford that are organised or supported by younger people. It’s sometimes surprising the amount of young local bands that are about at the moment and when they’re given a stage they can really pull a crowd. With this being said, the scene at these events is very male dominated. It would be great to see some more female promoters and bands stepping forward to fill this gap. HOW WILL THE NIGHT BE PROMOTED/FUNDED? This night is going to be an extension of the monthly DIY or DIE radio show on BCB so there will be a good amount of crossover between the two. We’ll also be making use of the DIY or DIE blog [www.network23.org/diyordie] to keep people

updated with events, reviews of new music and our current musings on Bradford happenings and beyond. We reckon it is really important to make as many links with existing groups or places that are making good things happen in Bradford and so we look forward to hooking up to spread the word with like-minded people that share our ethos. As for funding, we’re going to be starting from scratch. All the bands we’ve been talking to have been really understanding when it comes to money and want to support the DIY aims of the night. Seeing as we’re not for profit we’ll splitting everything made on the door between the bands, the 1 in 12 and the kitty for future events. WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT INGREDIENT IN A SUCCESSFUL CLUB NIGHT? We think it’s important to have enthusiasm for the project as a whole – without this, it would be easier to go to bigger nights in different cities instead of making something exciting happen on your own turf. Also, we recognise that it might take a while for the night to take off and for people other than our friends to come along but we’re planning to have more than enough fun to make it worth our while! DO YOU HAVE BIGGER PLANS LONG TERM? More bands. More dancing. More cake. It would be good to collaborate with other groups around Bradford and see some events happening that bring together the passions for music, film and art within the creative scene in the city. WHERE DO YOU SEE BRADFORD’S NIGHT-LIFE IN 5 YEARS? It would be great to see more DIY events get established around the city. Collectively organised arts events seem to taking off in a big way at the moment with the Ante Art fair, Shipley Alternative and the recent Zine Fayre at Handmade Bradford organised by the Loosely Bound Collective. It would be good to see music and film events approached in the same way. We’ve got a good selection of gigs and club nights happening here and there in Bradford - but with a handful of great venues and an abundance of people wanting a little bit more, it would be nice to be spoilt for choice on a night out. WHAT ARE YOU LISTENING TOO AT THE MOMENT? Kreayshawn, Azealia Banks, remixes of MIA, Grimes, old school Gossip, Hottub, Missy Elliot, Martha, Woolf, Friends, Spoek Mathambo. TELL US WHEN AND WHERE? 8pm on Friday 21st of September at the 1 in 12 club (Albion Street, just off Thornton Road). Have a look on our blog or tune in to DIE or DIY on BCB to find out more.

www.network23.org/diyordie

BOPS / THE MILL, PRESTON STREET / BRADFORD / FRIDAY 20TH JULY REVIEW BY ALEKSANDRS NOVIKS

What can I say about BOPS latest party at The Mill…Truly amazing. Excitement starts to build from the moment I join the queue. An enthusiastic line of people bop their heads in unison as trembling bass soaks through the limestone walls of the old factory building. I couldn’t wait to get inside. Some serious security checks on the door and I’m in just after 11. It was my first time at the Mill, the unusual layout left me confused at first. But human flow picked me up and soon showed how things work around here. Up on the top floor bass is the order of the day,

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from slow dreamy dub step vibes to chaotic drum um and bass. Downstairs is a haven for house and odic techno lovers. Pumping grooves and melodic rhythms drive from the speakers and get the dance nce floor moving. Everywhere I went I felt great. Of course, it’s all about music you say and I completely tely agree, but the atmosphere BOPS managed to create eate was astonishing. If you like electronic music of all variations you don’t have to go to Leeds anymore. Just check eck p off BOPS facebook page to make sure you’re on top what’s going on and where.

IF YOU LIKED BOPS YOU WILL LOVE THIS... BOSH HOSTS ED SOLO @ REVOLUTION, FRI 29TH SEPT


LOU DIAMOND PHILIPS

THE NEW INN / THORNTON BRADFORD SATURDAY 7TH JULY

THE NEW BEEHIVE INN BRADFORD FRIDAY 20TH JULY

“Fiddling and swinging without being pervy”. That’s how one member of the 309s describes their music. Another is a little more forthcoming, explaining that what they play and love comes from 40s and 50s America; the all-too-short tunes, written for radio play, that preceded both rockabilly and rock and roll. Optimistic, ironic, lively and very, very danceable.

Having temporarily reformed to celebrate some friends’ birthdays, excellent local post-rockers Lou Diamond Philips are soon to find themselves again quartered at universities across the country. On this balmy Friday night, in the basement of The Beehive, we have been gifted a second chance to say goodbye to them.

REVIEW BY BOB MARK

The band is made up of a fiddler who can fly when the mood takes him, not to mention singing and playing the trumpet; a guitarist and lead singer with an Elvis-like stance and charisma to match; a stand-up bass player with a glorious baritone; a rock steady drummer, playing the startling wooden drum kit he made himself and a singer, in her shimmering 50s Vogue frock, with such a voice: from light as a feather to an uvula-rattling growl. At the New Inn they treated a packed house of regular fans and the Saturday night crowd to 30 numbers in two sets over the best part of three hours. The band’s passion for their genre and their musicianship were self evident in how they played and the fun they themselves were obviously having. Laughing on stage with each other and the audience? Whatever next? The dance floor heaved for the entire second set, and rightly so. A shame that pub acoustics aren’t always kind to lyrics, which are such an important part of this kind of music. Aside from the great band the New Inn itself must not be forgotten: spacious, with welcoming locals and hard grafting, friendly and efficient bar staff. If you’re a punter treat yourself and go see the 309s. If you have a venue, book ‘em.

REVIEW BY MICHAEL METCALFE

A part of what makes them so good is their resistance to easy pigeon-holing and labelling. Though they have the classic four-piece set-up of two guitars, bass and drums they manage to chart a singular path, baring only fleeting similarities to genre figureheads like Slint and Tortoise. They have a Kraftwerk-like ability to find the spaces between emotions, between sensations. Able to effect subtle shifts in colour and mood, they successfully avoid falling into the blustery, dull, overwhelming, quiet-to-loud dynamics of most of their post-rock contemporaries. Hypnotic and immersive, their songs sometimes evoke the effects of (let’s euphemistically say) artificially-altered states of consciousness, though their is always an appreciable sense of focus no matter how hazy it gets. Thanks to Peter Lewis’ drumming, the set remains danceable and fun throughout (though there are few takers for dancing tonight – too early in the evening perhaps?). Lou Diamond Philips is a bloody terrible name though.

THE BROKEN HEARTS CLUB BAND

KING’S ARMS / HIGHGATE / BRADFORD SATURDAY 21ST JULY REVIEW BY DAVID HEDLEY MOORHOUSE

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THE 309S

I arrived at the Kings Arms in time to hear the band being accosted by locals requesting Elvis and Beatles covers. The BHCB obliged with friendly banter, assuring them of a good night. They were not wrong - by the time the guys had finished their first mammoth set, they had already won the crowd over, with people dancing and tapping along to the skiffletastic music. BCHB are four members: Jerrad Barraclough on guitar and vocals; Mark Yates on double bass; Craig Bussey on drums and vocals; and Alice Gilmour on violin and flute. This is the kind of music that just makes you smile and puts you in a really good mood, a new wave of folk with a pinch of funk, and seasoned with plenty of beautiful harmonies. All of the songs were enjoyable to the ear, especially the standout tracks Smart Money and Don’t Stand Down, which the band opened with, instantly relaxed the curious crowd and slowly drew more people as they smashed into their second set - by this time most of the bar were clapping and dancing along. The band have a new album out called TheElectricPictureShop, named after the TV repair store outside the band’s favourite pub, Fanny’s Ale House in Shipley. If you get the chance to see them they’re well worth a trip out. They’re also guerilla buskers and could turn up to a park, forest, train station or museum near you soon.

JED’S BLUES BAND / THE KIRKGATE COMMUNITY CENTRE / SHIPLEY / SATURDAY 23RD JUNE REVIEW BY ATO AME

Jed’s Blues Band began playing their first set at about 9.15pm. His opening track ‘How Many Years’ (the B side to his debut single ‘Dirty Water’) brought the packed room to life. For the next 45 minutes the band delivered a fantastically played blues set, with uplifting guitar and keyboard solos, a super-tight rhythm section and Jed’s unique blues voice & harmonica. Jed ended the first set with a bottleneck/slide guitar composition called ‘Things I Used To Do’. Following a short set by Swamp Water Blue, support act Richard Marriott took to the stage with his spirited solo acoustic guitar tunes, songs such

as ‘Hard Times Come Again No More’ and ‘I Aint No Country boy’ were done complete justice by his energetic yet intricate guitar picking style. From 10.30pm ‘till it done’, we were back in the capable hands of the ‘Mighty Mr. Jed’ and his ‘Brilliant Blues Band’.The second set started with a sizzling, no hands barred version of Howlin’ Wolf ’s ‘Boom Boom Boom’. This song saw every member of the band take an instrumental solo. ‘Spoonful’, ‘Roll & Tumble’ and ‘Two Trains Running’ showed the diversity of the band, from the ‘Doorsesque’ rendition of ‘Spoonful’ to the funk/blues style of ‘Two Trains Running’.

By 11.30pm all stations on the blues train had been successfully visited by Jed and his Blues Band. Since the early 70s Jed’s Blues Band have toured Britain’s pubs & clubs with the band members changing and evolving around their keystone Jed. Over the many long years of its existence Jed’s blues band have become more and more accomplished and tonight we as an audience have experienced 40plus years of blues skill and dedication.

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REVIEW BY ALEXANDRA GLACET WWW.ALEXANDRAGLACET.COM

2012 GRASSINGTON FESTIVAL DRAWS IN THE CROWDS DESPITE FIGHTING THE WETTEST JUNE IN 100 YEARS.

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fter a very wet and dreary June, we look back over the colourful two weeks that were the Grassington Festival. The annual event is held every summer and hosts a wide variety of acts, music and art. This year was the first time Creative Director Kate Beard and her team was at the helm and the focus was on creating a diverse and stimulating event. With previous festivals mainly concentrating on folk and classical performances, it was important to branch out and make the festival more accessible to all generations and tastes. That in mind the range of acts on offer has been vast and covered many areas of interest. We’ve been treated to a diverse art trail, poetry workshops from parliamentary writers, abstract installations and a giant inflatable maze! All that before we’ve even had a chance to see any musical, comedy or theatre shows. 2012 saw

superstar Billy Ocean gracing the stage for the finale. The singer, whose career has spanned four decades, sold out the marquee venue at such speed that requests for tickets were popping up at every turn, and for good reason. The packed out venue went berserk for the performance of hits like: When the Going Gets Tough and Suddenly, with a cheeky encore of the O’Jay’s Love Train and the singers smash, Caribbean Queen. The marquee also played host to TV star and comedian Alan Davies, appearing in Grassington ahead of his forthcoming tour Life is Pain, as well as popular jazz hero Hugh Masekala, The Unthanks and The Animals. With downpours affecting so much around the country it was wonderful to see festival organisers, volunteers out in all weathers creating an action packed programme, and making sure events went ahead whatever the weather had in store. That said, there were a

few dry and sunny days and they were grabbed with both hands. Crowds gathered in the main square to watch the assortment of free shows and get involved in the numerous workshops. Come evening, the Town Hall and local pubs turned into thriving entertainment venues with a wondrous selection of delights taking place around every corner. There has been criticism that the diversity of acts has taken away from the feel of the festival. I have to disagree. Before anyone points out that this is the first time I have been involved in the festival, I do realise that; however, in order to flourish and grow change is crucial and what has been done this year will set the bar for the future. Instead of disapproving perhaps lending a hand and giving constructive feedback will allow for both the organisers and locals to be truly behind the festival and what it brings to this beautiful part of the world.

REVIEW BY JAY TURNER

MAGIC LOUNGEABOUT IS DESCRIBED AS ‘A REFINED UNWIND’ AND THE EXPERIENCE CERTAINLY HAS AN AIR OF CLASS For one fabulous weekend at the end of July the grounds of Broughton Hall were transformed into a stunning magical playground aimed to satisfy the needs of even the most sophisticated pleasure seekers in North Yorkshire. Magic Loungeabout is described as ‘A Refined Unwind’ and the experience certainly has an air of class. Luxury yurts, hot showers and gourmet food are only a few of the aspects which separate it from the majority of music festivals. Chic’s Friday night performance was my highlight but it was also wonderful to be introduced to a number of local acts across the weekend in the fringe tent. Revellers danced well into the night away as DJs performed whilst the bar stayed graciously open till 4am. The festival has a real family feel to it and attracts an older audience than most festivals. Young families had a notable presence, encouraged by the safe and friendly surroundings. Everyone was completely chilled out in an atmosphere which can be described as nothing other than perfectly relaxed. With all the bails of straw, fairy lights, lanterns and a truly spectacular light show I felt enormous belief in the value of innocence and it felt great to let go and absorb all that is simple and beautiful about life.

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REVIEW BY DOUGLAS THOMPSON

BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF THE YORKSHIRE DALES FROM THE FIELDS JUST OUTSIDE SKIPTON; ITS EASY TO FIND WITH A Beautiful views of the Yorkshire Dales from the fields just outside Skipton; its easy to find with a warm famous five welcome from the landowner. The Full Circle tent was awesome with good tunes, costumes to hire, food of both vegan and carnivore persuasions most excellently provided for plus the best god damn cup of coffee I’ve ever drank at a festival. The specially brewed festival beer Saturnale could be found on tap in the arts tent bar and was a summer pint of tasty goodness. The weekend was warm, cosy and comfortable with plenty surreal arts n stuff happening. The Mobile Gabba Disco crew with their D.I.Y. Hacked Yamaha drum synth and stylaphone combo provided a dirty little highlight as did the Rag & Bone collective who knew how to hold a party out the back of a van. The Darkspark fire and UV diablo show started out Saturday night and Distorted Panda drilled deep and dirty well into the night.


REVIEW BY KATE WELHAM

‘WOULDN’T IT BE FUNNY IF...’

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hese five little words are the reason that Beat-Herder commands the kind of rabid loyalty that made offering tattoos of the festival logo on site a simple matter of supply and demand, rather than a dare. ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we had a row of urinals that looked like a pelican crossing and called it Babbey Road? ‘ ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we built a tiny church with pews, and altar and stained-glass windows, and put a DJ in there instead of a vicar?’ ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we held a Sunday Service with a real choir but got them to sing hits from the 80s instead of hymns?’ ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we had a tent that looks like a living room, with armchairs, lamps and flock wallpaper, and put the DJ in a mirror over the mantlepiece?’ ‘Wouldn’t it be funny if we had a theatre group running round, pretending to be protesters, pirates, or a bus?’ Describing Beat-Herder to the uninitiated as simply ‘a music festival’ is like describing Edinburgh Fringe as ‘Jim Davidson, but bigger’. Music is both a tiny element of the experience, and a constant rhythm underpinning the exploring of a woodland wonderland. Much like Glastonbury, the collective

atmosphere of the festival itself outshines any one of its performers, but because of the well chosen bill you will still find yourself dancing from place to place rather than walking by the end of the weekend. The clump of trees at the centre of the site is where the friendly non-stop beats emanate from throughout the day and night, and even for someone who doesn’t do clubs it’s easy and fun to dip in and out of the perpetual movement and chat of the Toil Trees. This year, Mr Scruff did a seven-hour set, and some of the dancers were probably there for the whole thing. While other music festivals might have their roots in live gig promotion, Beat-Herder started life as an annual freeparty in these very woods. In the same way as Beacons is the Leeds scene on holiday in a field in Skipton, so Beat-Herder is the Bradford scene on holiday in a field in Gisburn. And one thing we do well is DIY events. In the beginning, there was a soundsystem and Micky’s Tea Shack, a few bonfires, and nothing else. The next year, there was a three-storey treehouse and a few lanterns. The stage in the next field was an afterthought, because live music wasn’t really something Toil Soundsystem ever really did, and the festival is still refreshingly unselfconscious about who it books. So much so, that the same local acts come back year after year, like old friends to a party: the Lancashire Hotpots, Alt Track, Captain Hotknives, Lala and the Boo Ya, Utah Saints, Foxes Faux and Eddie Earthquake and the Tremors are always on.

NARKED OFF YOU MISSED IT ALL THIS SUMMER? TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE FOR BINGLEY MUSIC LIVE: MYRTLE PARK // 31ST AUGUST-2ND SEPTEMBER WWW.BINGLEYMUSICLIVE.COM

The Whip, back this year on the main stage on Saturday afternoon, get one of the best crowds of the weekend, as it’s fancy dress day. The theme, following the trend of one letter per year to spell out ‘BeatHerder’, is ‘A’. The Whip play to, among others, an axolotl, Amy Winehouse, the alphabet, some Angry Birds, Anneka Rice, the cast of Ab Fab and the Amish. This year the big Saturday headliners are Orbital. I’ll level with you, all I really remember are lights, noise and dancing with an astronaut and an aquarium, but it’s ecstasy on a stick, and powered exclusively by supermarket own-brand energy drink and a bit of gin on my part. There are some gurners here, we may as well accept it, but most seem to burn out on the Friday night and leave the rest of us to enjoy a less volatile and more sincere kind of joy. There was almost a riot (on Facebook) a couple of years ago, when the Lancashire Hotpots announced they wouldn’t be able to instigate the annual giant conga from the mainstage, as Bernard would be on a charity bike ride through France. The only form of crowd control that could be deployed was to replace them that year with a mystery guest who turned out to be Mr Motivator, leading a workout on the Sunday afternoon. It’s all very well whipping up a stage and some fencing a few days before, booking the purveyors of the mainstream or underground hits of the summer, and calling on McPizza, Carlingsberg and some waltzers to provide the between-bands entertainment, but that’s not really Beat-Herder’s style. Instead, they spend months on this labour of love; planning the multitude tiny things that make a typical major festival look like a characterless void in comparison.

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BEAT-HERDER

And if a new band does particularly well at getting a dancealong going - as The Other Tribe, Middleman or The Whip did in previous years - they’re added to that growing list of friends of the festival.


The brand new regular roots venue

Caroline Street, Saltaire, BD18 3JZ

Malcolm Holcombe Sunday 23rd September

Danny Schmidt & Carrie Elkin Friday 5th October

BRADFORD

IRISH CLUB Céad Míle Fáilte HOME TO: THE TOPIC FOLK CLUB (EVERY THURSDAY) JATP JAZZ (1ST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH) THE JODIE KENNEDY SCHOOL OF IRISH DANCE (SATURDAYS)

Traditional Ales & The Best Guinness in Bradford

My Darling Clementine Friday 19th October £11/£9 Caroline Social Club members Buy your tickets from: Saltaire Bookshop, 1 Myrtle Place, Saltaire. BD18 4NB Jumbo's Records, 5-6 St Johns Centre, Leeds, LS2 8LQ 'Like Us' - TLRat Saltaire 'Follow Us' - TLRatSaltaire Full details and tickets available online:

www.theliveroom.info 01274 542021 / 07855164182

Games League (x2 full size snooker tables) * Luncheon Club * Irish Language Lessons Jam Sessions (Sunday) * Portrait Drawing (Wednesdays) * Music Lessons (Wednesdays)

Free Student Membership Opening Times: Mon-Fri: 7:00pm -12am Sat & Sun: 11:00am – 12am

Rebecca St, Bradford BD1 2RX

Tel: 01274 732000

www.bradfordirish.com


INTERVIEW & REVIEW BY MICHELLE DALGETY

YORKSHIRE MUSIC COLLECTIVE CHATS TO JUSTIN SULLIVAN OF NEW MODEL ARMY, AHEAD OF THE BRADFORD GIG.

YMC: Finally, a hometown gig? JS: We haven’t done many hometown gigs in recent years, and we heard about this club Utopia opening and it’s actually a decent little gig.

liveMUSIC

JUSTIN SULLIVAN

INTERVIEW

YMC: One of your fans was worried that the roof wasn’t high enough for the pyramids! JS: Haha, it’s one of the strange rituals that take place at our gigs. New Model Army is a strange kind of group, it’s a type of music that no one knows how to describe but it attracts certain kinds of people from all over, a lot of very interesting people really. It’s an underground kind of thing and it’s brought people together from all over the world; it’s one of the things I’m most proud of. YMC: when did you first notice you had a large following? JS: About 1982! The first following we had funnily enough was from Wolverhampton, not Bradford. Our first big break was doing The Tube on TV in the early eighties when we managed to get a lot of the Wolverhampton crowd to the studio, and we played and they went crazy and it looked like something was happening. YMC: Are you planning any new recordings? JS: Yes, we’ve been meaning to do a new album for ages, we’ve got a slightly new sound in our heads and we started recording stuff and writing songs but we keep getting put back, our studio burned down on Christmas Eve, then Nelson our bass player of 22 years decided to leave the band, so we had to find a new bass player, then two weeks ago we had £15,000 of equipment stolen from our van so we’ve had to re-buy guitars and stuff. YMC: I’m sure some equipment will be hard to replace. JS: That’s right, you can replace pedals and electronics but guitars aren’t like that, they’re a kind of extension of you. There’s one acoustic guitar I’ve had for 20 years, an Irish Lowden and it’s a beautiful guitar. I can’t imagine they can sell it as it’s battered - it looks like nothing but sounds like a million dollars, it’s like an attachment to me. YMC: New Model Army’s career seems to have been marked by setbacks and tragedies. JS: Any band that has been going this long have their setbacks, you can say that about anyone’s life, I’m 56 now and anyone my age will have had lots of setbacks, you find friends, you lose friends, good things happen, bad things happen and we all go on. YMC: Music is a great saviour, if you are talented enough to make it, you can get through a lot.

NEW MODEL ARMY / UTOPIA 28 JUNE A New Model Army gig is an occasion, not just a gig. It’s so rare to see them in their hometown that there’s a real buzz in the city. The day starts in Centenary Square, a meeting point for ‘the family’, that amazing bunch of New Model Army fans who travel from all over the world to see them. Once in Utopia, Bradford’s newest live venue, we have the first treat of the night; Justin and Dean are performing an acoustic set in support of the main gig. I think this has to be the first time I’ve seen a mosh pit form for an acoustic set, but New Model Army fans are into the gig from word go and already people are on each other’s shoulders! The venue is packed and there’s a general feeling we’re part of something special, as there aren’t a lot of venues in Bradford for a hometown gig and who knows when we might get one again. The full band is on now, kicking off proceedings with Get Me Out. It’s a dream of a set list - I’m sure everyone must have their favourite in here somewhere. If there was one song they had to play it was Green and Grey , and they did! In all over 20 songs spanning their 32-year career. It was great to hear I Love The World in the encore – it seems half the world was there.

JS: Yes, but it’s not just the things we do – yes, you can express your demons through music but I’m a music fan as well so like anybody else I’ve got my favourite songs that I don’t play and try not to listen to until I really need them. Music is like magic because it transforms things, it’s an amazing magic power and the only way it loses its power is if you use it too often, if you play your favourite song again and again its starts to lose its power. I think most of us who love music save our favourites for when we really need them. YMC: What advice would you give to young bands starting out? JS: The only advice I’d give is do it because you love it, do what you love, follow your instincts completely, don’t worry about what other people tell you that you should do to become successful, a lot of that is just pure luck, but a lot is willpower and sticking with what you believe in and what you love. YMC: After so many years, how do you keep the momentum going? JS: Because we love it! What can be better than playing music you really believe in to people that have paid to see it. That’s about as good as it gets! FULL INTERVIEW ON www.soundcloud.com/yorkshiremusiccollective

51 0


liveMUSIC

Photography By Douglas Thompson

BRADFORD SUNSPLASH 2012

YOU MISSED IT.

////// INSPIRATIONAL SOUND //// RADIO SHOW//////////////////

//

NOT TO BE MISSED. SUBDUB // SATURDAY 22ND SEPTEMBER IRATION STEPPAS SOUND SYSTEM & MUNGO’S HIFI SOUND SYSTEM VOX WAREHOUSE, NEW CRAVEN GATE, LEEDS, LS11 5NF // 10PM - 5AM

PETE DUBLAB FILLS US IN ON HIS INSPIRATIONAL RADIO SHOW... WHAT IS IT? The Inspirational Sound radio show on rootslabintl.com – the international 24/7 roots reggae and dub online radio station. Broadcasting from deep inside the Dub Lab studio at a secret location in Bradford. WHO’S IT BY? Inspirational Sound – Bradford’s Dub Defender and the crew behind Dub Lab, Bradford’s long running dub night. Established in 1999, Inspirational have played all over Europe and recorded artists including legends Johnny Clarke and Sugar Minott at their studio. They have been flying the flag of dub music in Bradford for over a decade and have brought sounds including Iration Steppas, Disciples, Vibronics and Alpha & Omega to perform in the city. In 2009 they set up a record label to release their music on vinyl including releases from Bradford singers Stephanie and Dan-I. Their brand new release ‘Afaid A We – Murray Man / Original Soundboy – El Fata’ out now on 10inch vinyl. Check www.dublab.co.uk for full information and to pick up a copy. WHAT’S IT ABOUT? Roots reggae and dub music. Inspirational Sound playing the music they love – whether 70’s Jamaican reggae, 80’s UK roots or up-to-date digital dub they got it!! They also play unreleased exclusive ‘dubplates’ from producers around the world as well as their own productions mixed and produced at ‘Dub Lab’ studio. The show includes guest singers and MCs live on air and guest selectors from around the world. WHEN IS IT ON? Each and every Wednesday 7-9pm WHERE CAN YOU LISTEN? www.rootslabintl.com ONE WORD TO DESCRIBE IT Dubwise


53


STUDIO GHIBLI SEASON @ THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM

BESIDES DISNEY, DREAMWORKS ANIMATION AND PIXAR – STUDIO GHIBLI MAY BE THE MOST FAMOUS ANIMATION STUDIO IN THE WORLD, AND PROBABLY THE BEST OF THE BUNCH. A retrospective some of this great Japanese animation studio’s films is on this month at the National Media Museum. The founders of the studio are Isao Takahata and Hayao Miyazaki. Both have maintained high quality of animation that combines elements of myth and realism. Some of Miyazaki’s best directorial work is presented here (except for The Cat Returns, which he produced). Another thing that makes this retrospective special is that Studio Ghibli retains some of the traditions of hand drawn animation, and is an exemplar of this almost extinct art, which is sadly being replaced by garish computer animation.

things, as the compositions of the domestic settings recall the films of the great Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu. The fantastical element of the film reminds us of the haunting, The Spirit of the Beehive (which also tells a similar tale of two sisters). Ultimately, the film focuses more on atmosphere and mood, than plot or quick fire comedy skits. Then there is Kiki Delivery’s Service, which is an enjoyable but minor work from the master, and the same could be said of Ponyo. Yet the latter’s use of watercolours for the background is beautiful, and the use of digital animation is unobtrusive. After that, is Princess Mononoke; this is a great example of epic storytelling, whose images evoke the works of past masters like Akira Kurosawa and David Lean. The film brings together the threads that occupy Miyazaki’s work: one’s responsibility to the environment and all living things. The film states that if one doesn’t respect nature, it will retaliate and destroy all in the process. Spirited Away and Howl’s Moving Castle are wonderful examples of Miyazaki’s work in his

late period. The animation is beautiful and the stories are enchanting. In both stories, we find the young protagonists complacent and selfish, but throughout the tales, they learn to become responsible and selfless people; of course, anchored by the spirits that our heroes can only see. Lastly, the weakest one playing is The Cat Returns, a spin off from the lesser-known and superior Whisper of the Heart. This one is clearly aimed at much younger viewers but has some nice sequences. Miyazaki’s films tell stories that have real resonance in childhood experiences without making any sentimental concessions. Like all good children’s fiction, it prepares them for the world and acknowledges the pivotal part of their life without overly idolising it. His films are melancholic and mournful about the transitory periods of his young protagonists’ lives. The world he creates is that of the mundane veering into the fantastical to then segue back to ordinary life. There is a love of the common place and our ability to use our imagination to escape it. There is a beauty to these films where the imagination takes flight.

We begin with one of their best films, My Neighbour Totoro, which tells the story of two young sisters coping with the illness of their mother, but soon find a way to escape it, by spending time with benign spirits living in the nearby forest. Miyazaki wonderfully creates the spirits, forest and the house. The real charm of the film is the attention to detail of the smallest

TOM VINCENT - WHY STUDIO GHIBLI?

HOWDO ASKED TOM VINCENT, FILM PROGRAMME MANAGER AT THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM WHY HE SELECTED STUDIO GHIBLI FOR SUCH A COMPREHENSIVE SUMMER OUTING AT THE “Apart from their artistry and beauty, the things I like most about the Studio Ghibli films is that the child characters remind me of real kids - they can be funny and carefree one minute, then serious minded or selfish the next. They always seem to be negotiating with the adult world - growing up. Hayao Miyazaki cares deeply about making the best films for children that he can, and while Ghibli films have become known and loved all over the world, Miyazaki has stayed faithful to this goal for over two decades. Children deserve great films, and we should celebrate all the great kids’ cinema that we can find.”

WWW.THINKGINK.COM


Good day to all you HowDo?! film fans. Most of my film viewing over the last rain-soaked months has been on the road, attending one of the most respected documentary festivals in the world, which is based right here in fair old Yorkshire. This is, of course, the Sheffield Doc/Fest. I also managed to venture further afield, for my first visit to Britain’s longest continuously running film festival, the

EDDIE: THE SLEEPWALKING CANNIBAL (BORIS RODRIGUEZ) – EIFF Having not been very impressed with genre offerings at festivals for the last year or so, this CanadianDanish coproduction is a surprisingly satisfyingly funny comedy-horror film which even manages some genuine pathos despite a ridiculous setup. Lars (Thure Lindhardt) is a renowned Danish artist suffering from a creative block. He seeks a change of environment, moving to a remote area of Canada to teach at an art school. The nephew of one of the school’s pivotal patrons is a child-like adult mute called Eddie, who, according to the arrangement with his generous aunt, can sit in the classes. Striking up a friendship with Lars means that when his aunt suddenly dies, the school ask if Lars will look after Eddie in order to secure part of the dead woman’s will. It is then that we find out about Eddie’s specific type of midnight munchies, just as Lars finds out that seeing such disturbing imagery brings back his painting-mojo. A strange and murderous partnership ensues, resulting in an allegory for mankind’s seeming need to find and satisfy vices.

filmREVIEW

MIKE’S FESTIVAL ADVENTURES Edinburgh International Film Festival. I’ve included reviews of three out of the fifteen films I saw in a total of three days below, including two reviews I’ve left as exclusive to HowDo?!. For more you can check my reviews for Film&Festivals Magazine at www.filmandfestivals.com

HOSPITALITÉ (KOJI FUKADA) – EIFF This off-kilter tale of changing domestic norms in contemporary Japan introduces a household that is already a little unconventional; Mikio Kobayashi, his much younger second wife, his sister and his daughter (from his first wife) all live in a tiny house that doubles as a small printing business. The film’s depiction of ‘traditional’ Japanese society, embodied by the local neighbourhood watch, are averse to any unconventionality and battle to maintain control in their local area in the face of “all these foreigners”. The marginally unconventional family setup is expanded upon at every subsequent plot development, beginning with the entrance of the intriguing, mysterious and mischievous figure of Kagawa, along with his ‘wife’. Manifesting the points about foreigners raised by the neighbourhood watch and representing an unwelcome, dubious otherness, his wife has a non-fixed Western identity; she says at one point that she is from Brazil and later that she is from Bosnia, all the while sounding like some form of antipodean. Every convoluted layer builds upon this rift between foreigners/unconventionality and established society until a crescendo of activity at the film’s close. The xenophobia on show becomes part of the same examination of - small c - conservatism that the film focuses on in the domestic setting, as the ‘honour thy duty and get on with it’ approach that the Kobayashis restrict themselves to throughout the film is implied

EVIDENTLY... JOHN COOPER CLARKE (JOHN ROSS) – DOC/FEST This terrifically paced documentary has a staggering array of big name talking heads, from Stuart Lee to Steve Coogan, Craig Charles, Jarvis Cocker and many more. You might think it’d be simple to create something so entertaining with the subject matter being one of the most entertaining stage presences that has not only endured, but expanded in the population’s hearts and minds. But the filmmaking craft and use of cinematic language must also be commended. Appropriate for a film about poetry, chief amongst the film’s achievements is the rhythm and pace it maintains. It flicks between archive material, talking heads and contemporary Clarke recordings in perfect ratios. Key pieces of his work are teased out by the talking heads at various rates before being performed in full. The highlight of a hilarious post film Q&A with the man himself was Clarke’s answer to the question “what’s your aspirations now?” To which he answered: “I want a disabled sticker for my car”. He then went on to declare what he considers to be a major injustice: “there are fellas in wheelchairs now climbing the Himalayas… I can’t do that, but who’s got the sticker eh?”

THE PLAZA Earlier this year, the Great Horton based children and young people charity, The Joshua Project were visited by a Channel 4 documentary crew and a young man supposedly struggling to find employment, with the guise of making a documentary series on the benefits of volunteering for the young unemployed. Well this young volunteer turned out to be none other than 24 year old poker player and millionaire Andrew Feldman, and the show of course, was actually Secret Millionaire. Well Andrew has donated £25,000 towards restoring The Plaza Cinema, the cinema that ran – from 1914 – 1963 - on the very site that the Joshua Project now operates from. Reinstating this popular local landmark will be of great benefit to the community. Having held a couple of test screenings already, one of which was a manic day of Superhero festivities, there will be more test screenings coming up in the next couple of months with an aim to have some of the essential equipment installed in September, ready for a few months of testing before running fully beginning early next year. In addition to weekend screenings, The Plaza will be working closely with youth and community groups as well as schools in the region to provide imaginative

and innovative ways of continuing the fantastic work already conducted by The Joshua Project. Though Mr Feldman’s donation has helped kickstart this project, there is a significant amount of work still to be done. Continuing the Joshua Project’s emphasis on community engagement and society building things by its people, for its people, The Plaza is looking for anyone interested in getting involved. From volunteers, to film enthusiasts that want to become members, to local businesses that see the obvious advertising potential of such a large project, along with businesses and individuals who wish to become headline sponsors and help The Plaza be what it can be, providing far more for the community than your average cinema would ever dream of. For more information:

email film@joshuaproject.org.uk www.joshuaproject.org.uk

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secretBRADFORD

SALTAIRE FESTIVAL Saltaire Festival fills West Yorkshire’s only UNESCO World Heritage Site with arts, music, fun and food for 10 days each September. This year’s Festival - from 6 to 16 September - is the Tenth, with a programme as varied and exciting as usual. Headliners include writer and broadcaster Stuart Maconie, author Anne Fine and Country music’s ‘King of Pain’, Hank Wangford. A special attraction this year will the Aagrah Food & Drink Festival in Roberts Park on 15 and 16 September, with cookery demonstrations, celebrity chefs and a food garden restaurant. Also new this year is the open gardens trail, a heritage symposium on the first “Lords of Saltaire”, author Stephen May and comedy troupe Pappy’s, and it wouldn’t be a Tenth celebration without the Festival Party - Now We Are Ten, on 7 September. Returning Festival regulars include the Yorkshire Food Fair, a Makers’ Fair Festival Special and free music on the Piazza Stage. The Festival programme is online at www.saltairefestival.co.uk now find the latest Festival news on Twitter at @SaltaireFest or Facebook (“Saltaire Festival”). Tickets are on sale on the Festival website, from Saltaire Visitor Information Centre, & from Hand Made in Bradford, BD1 1RU

ILKLEY LITERATURE FESTIVAL BY HAIGH SIMPSON Ilkley Literature festival is back this autumn with a stellar line-up including Michael Palin, Michael Portillo, Sandi Toksvig, Paddy Ashdown, Jeremy Vine, and Benjamin Zephaniah. This year’s celebration has been influenced by a momentous summer , with Simon Armitage’s Stanza Stones Poetry Trail linking sport and culture, the Festival’s unique perspective on monarchy and empires, and a special project linking the Festival, Harewood House, Alchemy and Cartwright Hall Museum in Bradford. Also making a welcome return are the festivals free ‘fringe’ events, along with Children’s weekend and much more.

www.ilkleyliteraturefestival.org.uk

TREEHOUSE CAFE & SHOP

The Treehouse Cafe is the UK’s original Fair Trade Cafe and is entirely volunteer run. It serves up a vegetarian, vegan and “free from” menu, which mainly consists of soups and cakes during the summer months.. With free wi-fi avaliable to all, it is the perfect lunchtime hideaway. The Olive Branch Shop in the basement provides Fair Trade, Organic and “free from” food and drinks; Fair Trade and recycled gifts; jewellery, clothes, shoes and bags; toiletries & household products; stationary, books and CDs.The Treehouse Cafe is part of the Desmond Tutu House Anglican Chaplaincy and the Peace and Social Justice Centre and despite continued building works is still open on reduced hours:

CAFE: Mon - Fri 11am - 2pm (+ events) SHOP: Mon - Fri 11.30am - 6pm (4pm on Wednesdays) NEW WEEKLY VEGAN GROUP MEETING: Wednesday 12.30pm!

OWL WATCHING BY JANE STEELE For a long time prior to this experience I had yearned to see an owl in the wild. Driving home from a friend’s at dusk one evening I went through a very short stretch of road in which I saw, within ten seconds, no less than three owls plus a badger. Total joy. On three unforgettable occasions great brown wings swooped down from the left and across the windscreen. I then saw - mercifully far enough ahead for me not to run it over - the striking, monochrome bulk of the badger as it crossed the road, its gait both lumbering and lively. Honestly, owls are like buses. You wait for ages and then....

BRADFORD JAZZ CLUB BY STEVE ARLOFF It is often the small, secreted things that enrich the town’s culture. And one of Bradford’s finest hidden gems is JATP Jazz, one of Northern Britain’s premier jazz clubs. JATP Jazz was established in 2000 and since its inception has hosted the very best of Modern Jazz from across Britain to come and perform right here on our own doorstep. JATP Jazz holds gigs on the first Friday of each month (plus some extras) at The Bradford Irish Club and anyone out there who loves jazz, and those who are yet to discover its brilliance, are warmly invited to come along at 8 for 8.30 p.m. Get down and hear the best jazz outside London for the miserly sum of £7. what’s not to like. www.jatpjazz.blogspot.co.uk

ARTWALKS BY SARAH JONES The artwalks cater for those with a love of walking and an interest in art. They take place on Wednesday afternoons, meeting in parks, canalsides and towns across the Bradford district. They are led by Community Health Champion David McCormack and are free of charge. Come along regardless of whether you have any artexperience. The walks will give you a chance to discover or improve skills, meet others and to absorb the wonderful sights of Bradford. For a schedule please contact Sarah on: 07811 572403 or email: sarah.jones@bdct.nhs.uk

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AUGUST/SEPTEMBER Wed 15th Aug_ CREATIVE TREADS @ BRACKEN HALL ARTWALKS IN BRADFORD @ SHIPLEY MARKET Thu 16th Aug_ THURSDAY NIGHT AT DELIUS @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ ARTIST TALK W/ PAUL FLOYD BLAKE @ IMPRESSIONS GALLERY, BD1 1SD Fri 17th Aug_ THIS OBSCENE BABY AUCTION PRESENTS; That Fucking Tank + Guns and Knives + Gerrard Bell-Fife @ THE 1 IN 12 CLUB, BD1 2LY A TOUCH OF CLOTH; Dj Alec playing alternative music from the last 50 years @ BLACK SWAN, BD1 2JH Sat 18th Aug_

:::Eid Mubarak:::

BROKEN HEARTS CLUB BAND @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ BLUES BROTHERS TRIBUTE CABARET DINNER @ NAPOLEONS, BD1 4DR TWISTED CULTURE; synth rock band @ BLACK SWAN, BD1 2JH WAITING FOR WEDNESDAY feat. Anna Watkins @ THE NEW INN BD13 3JX Sun 19th Aug_ GAMES, CHANTS AND WEAVING GAME @ CARTWRIGHT HALL Fri 24th Aug_ BANK HOLIDAY BREAKFAST CLUB; ; Homemade vegetarian fried breakfast served from 11am-2pm @ THE TREEHOUSE CAFÉ, BD7 1BN BRADFORD BOAR FESTIVAL; 3 days of music, food and festivities over the August Bank Holiday; raising money for Help For Heroes (also 25th and 26th) @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ ANDY & LIESA’S 10TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY; live bands @ BLACK SWAN, BD1 2JH SILENT WALK WITH PHIL HARDING; Sound artist and composer Phil Harding, will lead participants on a “silent” sound walk through the City @ HAND MADE IN BRADFORD Sat 25th Aug_ BANK HOLIDAY BREAKFAST CLUB @ THE TREEHOUSE CAFÉ, BD7 1BN RICHARD HARRIS EXPERIENCE @ THE NEW INN BD13 3JX Sun 26th Aug_ BANK HOLIDAY BREAKFAST CLUB @ THE TREEHOUSE CAFÉ, BD7 1BN LIMITED EDITION; House & Garage – DALE CASTELL & DJ Q +more @ THE MILL, PRESTON STREET, BD7 1LU Wed 29th Aug_ FREE FAMILY DAY; cake decorating, henna art, face-painting and family portrait fun @ CARTWRIGHT HALL ARTWALKS IN BRADFORD @ KIRKGATE CENTRE, SHIPLEY Thu 30th Aug_ WHAT THE FOLK? @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ Fri 31st Aug_ NO HANDS + THIS OBSCENE BABY AUCTION PRESENTs; Hot Club de Paris; Bradford’s no. 1 alt/pop party @ POLISH CLUB, BD5 0BH BRONTE FESTIVAL OF WOMEN’S WRITING @ BRONTE PARSONAGE MUSEUM AND OTHER VENUES IN HAWORTH Sat 1st Sep_

Sun 2nd Sep_ Tue 4th Sep_

KASCARADE @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ OLD SCHOOL ENEMY; original gusty indie punk @ THE SHIPLEY PRIDE NORTHERN SOULS & MOTOWN DINNER @ NAPOLEONS, BD1 4DR BLACK SWAN PUNK ALLDAYER; 9 live bands @ BLACK SWAN DO MISS AMERICA @ THE NEW INN, BD13 3 JX MAKE YOUR OWN ‘ZINE’ WORKSHOP; look at what a ‘zine’ is and the many ways people go about creating them @ WEST YORKSHIRE PRINT WORKSHOP WF14 8AT TALK BY PHOTOGRAPHER TIM SMITH @ CARTWRIGHT HALL STAFF BENDA BILILI; Disabled Congolese street musicians make mesmerizing rumba-rooted grooves @ HOWARD ASSEMBLY ROOMS, LS1 6NU

AWAY WITH WORD; Poems, articles, tales, raps, word. @ GLYDE HOUSE, BD5 0BQ Thu 6th Sep_

KEIGHLEY BEER FESTIVAL

The 24th CAMRA Keighley Beer Festival will again offer a stunning range of over 60 cask beers from Yorkshire and beyond as well as traditional ciders. Thursday 6th - Saturday 8th @ CENTRAL HALL, ALICE STREET, KEIGHLEY // www.keighleybeerfestival.org.uk REVENANT SOUNDS & HIDDEN HISTORIES @ CAROLINE SOCIAL CLUB BEN BLUE WATERS & IMANI HEKIMA @ BLACK SWAN, BD1 2JH HERITAGE OPEN DAY; meeting with ‘Mr. Lister’ benefactor of Cartwright Hall & view Lister Park from Cartwright Hall balcony @ CARTWRIGHT HALL KEYSTONE ACOUSTICS; music at the castle @ CASTLE HOTEL JATP presents: THE KEVIN JAMES QUARTET @ BRADFORD IRISH CLUB, BD1 2RX Sat 8th Sep_ NO/GLOSS FILM FESTIVAL; local and international independent film @ WHARF CHAMBERS, LEEDS LS2 7EQ THE MEXANINES @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ PIGWITCH, SUICIDE BY COP AND GUESTS @ BLACK SWAN RUBBER KAZOO; 50s/60s swing @ THE NEW INN BD13 3JX Sun 9th Sep_ TEDDY BEARS PICNIC; picnic on Shipley Glen @ BRACKEN HALL Mon 10th Sep_ BABE IN ARMS 2009-2010 CHILDENS @ ALHAMBRA STUDIO Thu 13th Sep_ THURSDAY NIGHT AT DELIUS @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ Fri 14th Sep_ THE END FRETTS & SUPPORT @ BLACK SWAN BELLA GAFFNEY; live music @ THE CASTLE HOTEL Sat 15th Sep_ SALTAIRE VINTAGE HOME & FASHION FAIR @ VICTORIA HALL BD18 3JS THE SALTAIRE FULL MONTY CABARET FUNDRAISER; feat. The Everly Pregnant Brothers + more @ CAROLINE STREET SOCIAL CLUB, BD18 3JZ BRITISH RACING GREEN @ DELIUS LIVED NEXT DOOR, BD7 1BQ THE RED ROOM & THRIFTSHOP XL; VJ Mash up Legend with Bradford’s best known cowboy doom funk quintet @ The New Beehive Inn PUBLIC Presents MICKY SLIM @ THE MILL, BD7 1LU Fri 7th Sep_

MON 17TH - SUN 30TH SEPTEMBER BRADFORD FRESHERS FORTNIGHT SEE CENTRE-FOLD PULLOUT PROGRAMME CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL PEACE DAY @ THE TREEHOUSE CAFE ST.TANTRUMS; punk rock live @ THE SHIPLEY PRIDE DOLLY PARTON TRIBUTE CABARET DINNER @ NAPOLEONS BD1 4DR GINGER AND THE RODGERS; classic pop rock @ THE NEW INN BD13 3JX Wed 26th Sep_ BETTAKULTCHA BRADFORD @ HAND MADE IN BRADFORD Fri 28th Sep_ KULA BULA; contemporary rock n’ roll @ THE NEW INN BD13 3JX Fri 21st Sep_

WEEKLY EVENTS BEEHIVE POETS; Mondays @ NEW BEEHIVE INN, BD1 3AA RHYTHM & BLUES JAM; Mondays @ NEW NEW INN, THORNTON, BD13 3JX THE DRAWING CLUB; Tuesdays @ DELIUS ARTS CENTRE, BD7 1AA YOGA; Fridays; 6 week course starting 14th Sept @ DELIUS

ARTS CENTRE, BD7 1AA TIME FOR TEA; Fridays, free tea and cakes for over 55s @ IMPRESSIONS GALLERY, BD1 1SD TOPIC FOLK CLUB; Thursdays @ BRADFORD IRISH CLUB, BD1 2RX JAM NIGHT; Sundays @ BRADFORD IRISH CLUB, BD1 2RX

LIVE JAZZ; Sundays @ CITY VAULTS, BD1 1NS

ONGOING EXHIBITIONS PERSONAL BEST by Paul Floyd Blake the stories of 16 young athletes in the build up to the Olympics and Paralympics @ IMPRESSIONS GALLERY, BD1 1SD DOMINIC MASON-ARTIST IN RESIDENCE @ SOUTH SQUARE CENTRE AMY CHARLESWORTH; canvas exhibition @ BRADFORD INDUSTRIAL MUSEUM NARRATIVE; Antlers Gallery presents the work of six artists who deal with themes of books, literature and paper in very differing ways @ MANOR HOUSE SILK - BRADFORD + THE SUB-CONTINENT; an exhibition of the connections between Bradford + the subcontinent in relation to silk @ CARTWRIGHT HALL GALLERY BD9 4NS PERSONAL BEST by Paul Floyd Blake the stories of 16 young athletes in the build up to the Olympics and Paralympics @ IMPRESSIONS GALLERY, BD1 1SD IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE; An exhibition exploring the relationship between movement and media @ NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM BD1 1NQ GOLDEN THREADS; An exhibition making links between historic and modern Bradford @ BRADFORD INDUSTRIAL MUSEUM BD2 3HP

If you would like your event to appear in HowDo?! please use subject heading ‘listings’ and send to:

For more what’s on information in West Yorkshire:

www.fabricculture.co.uk www.bradford.gov.uk/events follow us for up to date What’s On Info:

AIRE VALLEY WATERWAYS EXHIBITION; exhibition by Shipley’s-based photographer Tim Smith @ CENTRAL HALL, BD21 3JD LEAP YEAR; UK based artist Yan Wang’s positive take on the idea of Leap Year. From 17th September @ UNIVERISITY OF BRADFORD, RICHMOND ATRIUM, BD7 1DP THE SALON; by Nudrat Afza; aptures the end of an era. Through Nudrat’s gentle and enquiring lens, we glimpse the disappearing world of the salon and its regular customers – amongst them, elderly ladies who have been coming for years for their usual wash and set @ GALLERY II, UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD, BD7 1DP ART OF ARRANGEMENT: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE STILL LIFE TRADITION; Drawn from National Media Museum Photography Collection, includes photographs by Ansel Adams, Harold Edgerton, Roger Fenton, Edward Steichen, William Henry Fox Talbot and Madame Yevonde, Chris Killip and Don McCullin. @ THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM, BD1 1NQ

sam@howdomagazine.co.uk www.facebook.co.uk/howdomagazine @howdobradford

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HowDo?! Issue 8 August/September  

A magazine for and by the people celebrating grassroots arts and culture.

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