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MAY/ JUNE 2013

THE THIRD & FINAL PART OF THE SERIES DOCUMENTING THE CITY OF BRADFORD THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY FEATURING: The National Photography Collection | Greg Hobson, curator of photographs at the National Media Museum Photography by Tom Wood, Peter Mitchell, Tony Ray-Jones, Martin Parr & Antoine Francois Jean Claudet

ISSUE 11

Collectors Edition

FOR THE PEOPLE OF

BRADFORD

BY THE PEOPLE OF BRADFORD


PRODUCER & DIRECTOR: EDITOR: MANAGEMENT: DEVELOPMENT: ADMIN & FINANCE: ADVERTISING: PROMOTIONS: DESIGN:

“THOUGH THE ROAD’S BEEN ROCKY, IT SURE FEELS GOOD TO ME.” Sod it. There’s Bob Marley telling ya what! In print. And as Bob so wisely versed, “some people feel the rain, others just get wet” - so true it is that you make what you will of any situation. So for all the shit I’ve withstood this past year, I am emerging feeling blessed by the life experience this project has dealt me, so I’d like to say thank YOU very much! With a great deal of pride (and relief ), I present the final part of the HowDo?! Magazine series. Special thanks to Jennifer Banks for her amazing contribution to this production, along with Michael Metcalfe, Amy Rooke, and Amy Sanderson. Big respect to Brian Liddy and Phil Oates for their thoughtful introduction to the Museum’s collections (and Rose for making me aware that it even existed!). Thanks to Bob Hick for holding the lamp and showing us the way. Jay Turner for being on my side. Annum, Mark, and Cristina. Haigh Simpson, James Kemp, Rob Walsh and James Heggie. Steve Bishop for looking after us at HMiB. Adrian & the repro guys at AB Wellham Printers. Lukas and Titch for their trust and friendship. Davidoo, Mariusz, Dr Abbot, Dom, Sam, Dusty, Karol, Andy K, +++. Special thanks also to my old dear & old man for being close and looking out for me, and to all those people who have given me their time and trust. Nuff ’respect! Mr Johnston. Out.

All the feature articles in this special edition of HowDo?! are written about photographs that are part of the National Photography Collection, cared for by the National Media Museum. The Museum runs tours of its archive facility Insight: Collections and Research Centre - Open Monday-Friday at 1pm. Places can be booked by calling 0844 856 3797. To find out more about the Museum & its collection visit

WWW.NATIONALMEDIAMUSEUM.ORG.UK/ COLLECTIONS

ADVERT DESIGN:

WHAT’S ON: PROOF READING: WRITERS:

The Museum’s visual collections are represented by the Science and Society Picture Library (SSPL)

WWW.SCIENCEANDSOCIETY.CO.UK

> AN INTRODUCTION TO ISSUE 11 BY JENNIFER BANKS

This photographic edition of How Do?!, the last ever issue of the magazine, celebrates Bradford by paying tribute to the National Media Museum, a vital cultural artery of the city. And with this last issue comes a first – it’s the first time The National Photography Collection has formed the entirity of an independent publication. So our thanks to the museum’s Phil Oates, Brian Liddy and Greg Hobson for generously sharing with us their in-depth knowledge of the collection. We’ve selected just over half a dozen images from the millions the National Media Museum holds and re-produced them on these pages. Being a minuscule proportion of its vast collection, they cannot accurately represent the enormity of the archive. But what we hope they do is illustrate the museum’s importance in preserving the history of photography and major works from pioneers of the art form – from its inception up to the present day. Acclaimed British photographer Tom Wood, whose retrospective is currently being exhibited at the museum, is one of those pioneers. He spoke to us about his work, as did Peter Mitchell and Martin Parr, other great British photographers whose images from the collection we’ve chosen to print on these pages. Not every photo we’ve chosen comes with a commentary from the person who took it, but each one tells a story. So are you sitting comfortably? Then we’ll begin…

PHOTOGRAPHY:

PRINTED BY:

SPECIAL THANKS:

DISTRIBUTED BY:

face.Wy

forwarding arts culture & enterprise.west yorkshire

For more info visit: www.facewy.co.uk

Mr Johnston Michael Metcalfe Jay Turner Jo Singh Annum Mughal Mark Porter Cristina Keleman HowDo?! Promotion Team Mr Johnston James Heggie Teresa Sweeney Emma Jane Clever Folk of Bradford Mr Johnston Alastair Platt (Ubel) Matt Hildreth (Outerspiral) Lewis Hackett (Prefix Studios) Ben Holden (Prints of Theives) Sam Musgrave Jo Singh Michael Metcalfe Jennifer Banks Amy Rooke Amy Sanderson Michael Metcalfe Chemaine Cooke Robert Thompson Sam Musgrave Emma Penny Sam Fish Tess Connor-Kavanagh Kate Wellham Tom Wood Peter Mitchell Tony Ray-Jones Martin Parr Antoine Francois Jean Claudet Peter Kopek Brian Liddy, Phil Oates & Greg Hobson (our creative collaborators at the National Media Museum)

DISCLAIMER: HowDo?! Magazine is an independent organisation that believes in creative expression. THE VIEWS EXPRESSED IN HowDo?! ARE THE OPINIONS OF THE WRITERS & DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF THE PUBLICATION.


ISSUE 11

Credits (top to bottom): Neil Armstrong, Peter Kopek, ©Tom Wood

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MAY/ JUNE 2013

6 THE NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COLLECTION; By Greg Hobson

10 IF YOUR HOUSE WENT UP IN FLAMES, WHAT WOULD BE THE FIRST THING YOU WOULD SAVE? By Amy Rooke

14 QUARRY HILL FLATS By Jennifer Banks

18 BACUP COCONUT DANCERS By Jennifer Banks

22 CHARLOTTE DESPARD By Amy Sanderson

#

BD indi

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OF FOUR INDEPENDENT 26 PHOTOGRAPHY CULTURAL VENUES IN BRADFORD By Peter Kopek

LAUNCHING: “HOWDO?! OFF-THE-PAGE” PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT: EXHIBITION & DIGITAL ARCHIVE @ GALLERY II, MAY 2013. During the month of May we will be working on collating and producing an exhibition & digital archive of independent cultural venues in the Bradford District (Past & Present). If you think you can help us to build a collection of photos collectively representing Bradford’s ‘scene’ then please get in contact with r’ Simon.

photography@howdomagazine.co.uk

or post to the HiddenBradford website Gallery by Tweeting #indiBD

30 TOM WOOD: ‘PHOTOGRAPHS 1973-2013’ In conversation with Jennifer Banks

34 LEG OVER By Jennifer Banks

38 HALIFAX RUGBY LEAGUE GROUND By Jennifer Banks

42 SECRET BRADFORD Promoting independent enterprise, community & localism + with the added value of discount Vouchers

46 HIDDEN BRADFORD

Kate Wellham introduces us to the all new Hidden Bradford website.

50 HOWDO?! WHAT’S ON & news of s new what’s on to take its place.

You can get up to date what’s on information by ‘liking’ us & ‘following’ us:

howdo magazine @howdobradford www.howdomagazine.co.uk


Bradford Arts & Community Resource Centre 1979-2013: thirty-four years of resourcing community action “Resources for democracy�

>What is it that they do?

>Opening

The Bradford Resource Centre & Community Statistics Project (BRC) is a voluntary and community sector (VCS) organisation that aims to increase the effectiveness and capacity of community and campaign groups through the provision of training, information, organisational support, reprographic and other facilities. Since it was set up in 1979, BRC has developed a reputation for being accessible and welcoming to a wide range of small community groups, particularly those who are excluded or suffering discrimination and those that aim to assert the voice of such communities to the Council, local business interests and other local decision maker. Over the years, BRC have worked in partnership with others in launching a variety of innovative VCS projects such as BIASAN (the support and campaign network for local refugees and migrant workers), the Bradford Centre Against Unemployment, Bradford Occupational Health Project (providing information advice and support on hazards at work to local people and local trade union branches), the schools and youth centres anti-racist project, the Advice Work Training Project (training volunteers to undertake welfare rights advice), and more recently the Low Pay Project (research and legal advice on low

Due to dramatic funding cuts in recent years, unfortunately the centre no longer has the open door it once had. Regular events include:

Every Tuesday: British Red Cross; offering advice & help, aiding correspondance with their families in their country of origin, providing the needy with a food & clothing bank.

Every Thursday: BIASAN;

The cafe provides a free meal in a social setting (help in the kitchen or serving up is always welcome!)

How to find us:

>Our Aim. To create a self-supporting centre that can continue to provide its frontline services regardless of support from traditional funding streams. How can this be achieved? More people & more organisations utilising the building; running their events & meetings through the centre. Conference, office & studio space is available at low cost and there is great potential for use in the space that is available.

>How can you help? -

Donate to the British Red Cross Food & Clothing Bank; ever more people are reliant such services Individuals with practical skills or businesses with time/resources to share; needed for

the general maintainance & upkeep of the building (which is owned outright) historically the centre has provided training and access to technical equipment, however, much of this infrastructure is now outdated and needs replacing or modernising. - Volunteers; The centre is looking for people with skills in developing strategies for gaining extra revenues in the voluntary sector, as well as individuals to muck in and keep the building open and running. -

Computers & IT equipment;

17-21 Chapel Street, Bradford, BD1 5DT 01274 725046 For more information visit:

www.brc-net.org.uk


BEACON Reg. Charity Number 1119463

Bradford Ecumenical Asylum Concern Hosting

Room to Care?

McKenzie Friends

Chat

“Without sufficient hard evidence of the persecution he had suffered, the Home Office did not believe his story and refused his claim for asylum”

F

awaz’, fled his homeland in Syria in 2009, leaving behind his family and all his possessions. He is a member of the Kurdish minority in Syria who have long faced routine discrimination and harassment by the government. Following the implementation of a law targeting Kurds in the northeast of the country, Fawaz took part in demonstrations, which were brutally broken up by police and soldiers. Many were arrested, including women and people with disabilities. Once the leader of his political party was arrested, Fawaz believed that his life was in real danger. With the help of his family he managed to raise funds to flee Syria and found his way to the UK to claim asylum. His problems did not end here though. Without sufficient hard evidence of the persecution he had

suffered, the Home Office did not believe his story and refused his claim for asylum - with no right of appeal. He was kicked out of his Home Office supported housing and lost the £35 week he had been

“his only option was to become one of the UK’s many destitute asylum seekers, forced to sleep on friends’ floors and sofas.” receiving; like all asylum seekers he was not allowed to work. Knowing that arrest and worse faced him if he returned to Syria, his only option was to become one of the UK’s many destitute asylum seekers, forced to sleep on friends’ floors and sofas. Research carried out during summer 2012 on behalf of Destitution Concern Bradford found

66 such destitute asylum seekers in the city, including ten children. Read it at: www.destitutionconcernbradford.org/

our sons if our positions were reversed. Our lives were enriched in many ways by his sharing this period of his life with us.”

Fortunately for Fawaz, BEACON’s Hosting Project (www.beaconbradford.org/Hosting) found him a home with volunteer hosts Steve and Margaret White in Allerton. With this period of stability plus help from local support agencies, he gathered further evidence and mounted a fresh asylum claim. This in turn was turned down by the Home Office but, due to the determination of his solicitor who found serious errors in their judgement, the decision was eventually overturned and he was awarded refugee status in March of last year. Steve says: “In the months he spent with us we grew to know him very well and he has continued to keep in touch with us since. We did no more for him than we would hope someone would do for one of

BEACON’s Hosting Project always needs more volunteer hosts like Steve and Margaret. Support is provided by project coordinator Will Sutcliffe and a small payment is available towards hosts’ expenses. Amazingly, hosts come back again and again to help, some having taken six guests in succession since the project began four years ago. Anyone interested in finding out more can contact Will on 07505 053149 or via host.beacon@yahoo.com. Pseudonym used


GREG HOBSON

THE NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COLLECTION; A WORLD-CLASS COLLECTION HOUSED IN BRADFORD, WEST YORKSHIRE. CONSISTING OF MORE THAN THREE MILLION ITEMS, THE NATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY COLLECTION AT THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM IS REMARKABLY DIVERSE AND FULL OF SURPRISE. IT HAS BEEN SHAPED BY THE WORK OF VARIOUS INDIVIDUALS AND INSTITUTIONS, DIFFERING IN THEIR COLLECTING PRACTICES AND CULTURAL AGENDAS, OVER A PERIOD OF ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY YEARS; IT CONSISTS OF THE COLLECTIONS OF, AMONG OTHERS, THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM, THE SCIENCE MUSEUM, THE KODAK MUSEUM AND THE ROYAL PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY. In addition, the collection has been supplemented significantly with items acquired and cared for by the National Media Museum, since its inception in 1983. These combinations create a uniquely rich and diverse collection, reflecting the multiple identities of photography and enabling the Museum to present different accounts of the impact of the photographic image on society. The collection inevitably spans a wide range of photographic interests, reflecting the technical, social, cultural and artistic uses of photography in a variety of contexts. A unique resource for the study and appreciation of photography, it has notable strengths in the art of photography up to the early 1900s, and is often described as having the best examples of 19th Century photography and photographic equipment anywhere in the world. The collection selectively traces the aesthetic and technical developments of photography, from the early experiments of pioneers William Henry Fox Talbot, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce and William Herschel in the 1830s, to examples of contemporary practice through many distinct groupings of material. As well as being strong in the early history of the medium, photographic processes, documentary and fine art, advertising and amateur practices are also all well represented. Movements that have shaped photography, such as Pictorialism, Modernism, Documentary and Postmodernism feature strongly in the collection. To complement this, a rich collection of printed materials and ephemera provide an important source of related information.

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Billy Liar contact sheet, Daily Herald Archive National Media Museum/SSPL


Some of the most significant printed material in the Museum’s collection can be found in the little known, yet quite astounding, Daily Herald Newspaper Archive. Published between 1912 and 1964, it was, for many years, Britain’s most popular newspaper. The archive is the extant picture collection of the the Herald and includes almost every photograph they published, as well as photographs that were sent to them by photographers and photo agencies, but never used. It is breathtaking in its size and content;

bodies of work by Anna Atkins, Hill and Adamson, Roger Fenton, Henri Regnault, Oscar Rejlander, Henry Peach Robinson, Lewis Carroll, Lady Hawarden, Julia Margaret Cameron, Peter Henry Emerson, Thomas Annan and John Thomson mean the collection offers exciting programming, publishing and research opportunities, as well as being regularly utilised in a high profile international loans programme. The collection contains many fine examples of work by leading 20th and 21st century photographers, such as Edward Steichen, Alfred Stieglitz, Man Ray, Moholy-Nagy, Brassai, Bill Brandt, Yousuf Karsh, Margaret Bourke-White, Gisèle Freund and Humphrey Spender. In recent years these have been significantly enriched with the strategic acquisition of large bodies of work by important, primarily British photographers, such as Tony Ray Jones, Fay Godwin, Martin Parr, Chris Killip, Graham Smith and Paul Graham.

Every significant British event, person or place is represented, as well as many hundreds of thousands of people and events that were newsworthy for one day only. It constitutes one of the most important photographic records of the social, cultural and political history of the UK held in any museum and is regularly used in our exhibitions and associated There is much in the collection that has huge potential programmes. Important 19th century holdings include the world’s largest and most significant collection of the work of William Henry Fox Talbot and his contemporaries – more than six thousand photographs, negatives, photoglyphs, notebooks and items of correspondence. The Talbot family made this remarkable bequest in 1934 and it established a template for contemporary collecting for the Museum to continue to follow; where large bodies of work by individual practitioners sit alongside contextual correspondence, publications and scientific and technological histories. Produced twelve years before Talbot and Daguerre announced their inventions in 1839, two of the very few surviving heliographs by Niépce and one unique plate made with lavender dated 1826-7 are the earliest known extant examples of the photographic image. Significant

for exhibition and publication. Horace Nicholls’ documentation of Edwardian Britain and the First World War is exceptional and Nick Hedges’ deeply moving record of poor housing conditions in Britain in the early 1970s is as powerful today as when it was made for the housing charity Shelter between 1969 and 1972. The collection continues to grow and evolve in exciting and relevant ways. Now, more than ever, photography plays a prominent role in contemporary life and part of the collection’s function is to provide further opportunities for investigation and exploration with this in mind. Building and using a comprehensive collection of the medium’s various cultural histories produces a greater understanding of what is particular, special and important to photography in the visual arts, media, popular culture and the everyday.

BIO Greg Hobson is Curator of Photographs at the National Media Museum in Bradford. His work spans the creation of exhibitions, collections care and development and the acquisition of photographs. He sits on several international photography jury panels and committees and lectures on the history of photography. Curatorial projects have included Animalism, Donovan Wylie’s Outposts and retrospective of the work of Tom Wood currently on show at the National Media Museum’s Gallery One.

Portrait of Thomas Blessingham aged 16, 22 June 1901 National Media Museum/SSPL


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PLENTY TO DO... Kirkgate Centre, 39a Kirkgate, Shipley BD18 3EH • Tel: 01274 580186 • www.kirkgatecentre.org.uk

Afternoon Record Club Ante Bumps and Babes cafe Bradford College adult learning Bradford Writers Circle Buddhaland Meditation Champions Show the Way singing group Construction Club Craft Club Dance for Life Fitness League Four Hundred Roses Front Room Disco Fybromyalgia Support Headway Bradford HALE health & wellbeing activities Italian Society community lunch Kickstart enterprise coaching Kirkgate Katch-Up Lego Fun days Live music Matinee Film Club Memory Club Neighbourhood planning & support Owlet tea dance Power Yoga The Record Club Ride the Tiger Tai Chi The Shipley Alternative marketplace Shipley and Baildon Blind Welfare Shipley & Bingley Voluntary Services Shipley Bread Group Shipley Film Society Shipley Healing Centre Shipley Slouch pop-up café Saber Taekwondo Social day care Unique Arts felt making Vocal Aires community choir Woodcraft Music group Vocal Aires community choir

creative community cultural space


AMY ROOKE

IF YOUR HOUSE WENT UP IN FLAMES, WHAT WOULD BE THE FIRST THING YOU WOULD SAVE? WE’VE ALL BEEN ASKED THIS QUESTION IN OUR LIVES - CONTEMPLATED IT OVER DRINKS IN THE PUB, USED IT TO BREAK THE TEDIUM OF A LONG CAR JOURNEY WHEN I SPY HAS BECOME TOO MUCH, OR JUST SIMPLY WONDERED ABOUT IT WHILST WE’RE SUPPOSED TO BE AT WORK, BUT WHEREVER I AM, THE ANSWER IS ALWAYS THE SAME. IN MY BEDROOM THERE IS A BOX, AND IN THAT BOX THERE IS A PILE OF PHOTOGRAPHS. Some are relatively recent - snapshots of friends, nights on the town, days on the beach, a 3ft ceramic cat that someone inexplicably came home with one night from the pub...others are older. Their edges are torn and frayed and some of the colours have faded, but the memories they contain continue to burst from the seams. There was a time when the existence of these photographs would not have been possible. Photography is not innate. Before the digital camera (that most of us are familiar with today) were thousands of prototypes, each one developing into something more advanced, more able, easier to use and easier to obtain. The first of these prototypes was developed by Louis Daguerre and Nicéphore Niépce, pioneers in the field of photography and the men responsible for the first known photograph, taken by Niépce around 1825 depicting the view from his window and originally titled View from the Window at Le Gras (for all his innovative thinking, he was apparently less original when it came to words). Niépce threw himself into experimentation, exploring an infinite chemical abyss in order to produce a much sought after permanent photograph. I remember dedicating a significant amount of time to creating my own pinhole camera and photographing beer cans after my friends claimed to have better things to do than stand stock still for 20 minutes for a resulting 5cm x 5cm piece of paper showing a dark shadow

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vaguely resembling their face. To me, it was the most exciting thing in the world, and it brought with it a revitalised appreciation for the art of capturing images that becomes hidden every now and again in a digitised contemporaneity that sees the capturing of hundreds of images per second (predominantly cats) on a device smaller than my thumbnail.

Each Daguerreotype is a one-off image they cannot be copied and pasted and, as the images are direct positives, there are no negative prints. Brian Liddy, Associate Curator at Bradford’s National Media Museum, recognises the uniqueness these photographs possess, ‘You can see them reproduced in a book, or in the pages of a magazine, but it doesn’t come anywhere near seeing the real thing in real life.’ Niépce created his first Daguerreotype by taking a simple sheet of pewter and coating it in light sensitive materials (lavender oil and bitumen, known to those of us who aren’t scientists as asphalt). He then placed this sheet of pewter into the back of a camera obscura and waited for eight hours before removing it, at which point the light from the pinhole had shed itself upon the light sensitive bitumen, which then solidified and created an image. After Niépce’s death, his work was passed down and developed by Louis Daguerre, who replaced the pewter with silver-plated copper sheets coated in silver-iodide.

After much experimenting, Daguerre discovered that by creating a barely visible image using a shorter exposure time, the image could later be developed and desensitised using the vapour from heated mercury and then cemented with salt water to create a fixed, permanent image. These were the starting blocks of what would eventually become to be known as the Daguerreotype (named after Daguerre himself - it’s not just a coincidence). Antoine Claudet was one of the first photographers to mass produce Daguerreotypes, working to evolve Daguerre’s original set-up by using chlorine instead of bromine in the developing process so as to increase the speed at which images could be captured and developed. This enabled him to photograph people as opposed to landscapes and create some of the first ever portraits - a phenomenon that took the world of the bourgeoisie by storm - including Abraham Lincoln, the first known portrait of whom is a Daguerreotype. Claudet’s portrait of a young boy in a military uniform shows the clarity and definition these early photographs were capable of, despite their simple foundations. This particular Daguerreotype was hand coloured, a technique that was used to enhance the aesthetics of the image and provide it with a modern element of realism. Despite the obvious arduousness of colouring an image on a sheet of copper that could be destroyed with the brush of a fingertip, pigment was in high

demand, especially when it came to portraiture, and photographers were eager to indulge their consumers. Claudet’s portrait of a young boy was also one of the first stereo Daguerreotypes to be created, taking a giant leap in the world of third-dimensional art. At first glance, both images appear to be identical. However, they are actually shot from two different angles, and although the difference in the two is so slight that it is difficult to make out, it is actually what makes the image 3-D when the twin set is combined and looked at through a stereo viewer. In a society that now utilises smartphones and digital cameras in lieu of a film camera, it is easy to forget (or ignore completely) the origins of photography and the revolutionary ideas that became the foundations of what would eventually become one of the most highly consumed art forms the world has ever seen. As Brian says, photography was not always as readily available as it is today. The process involved in creating a Daguerreotype was long and expensive, ‘it wasn’t something that was small and cheap and in everybody’s home,’ like it is today. The process of developing a photograph, the sheer existence of the photograph itself, was at the time a huge achievement until composition and content became imperative and photography began to manifest itself as an art form. Every photograph that exists today, whether it is taken using a homemade camera obscura or a £3000 Nikon, hidden in a box in a bedroom in Bradford or on show in a gallery in London, owes its existence to the founding fathers of photography back in the 1800s. Brian hits the nail on the head when he says that their work has ‘changed our lives on a fundamental basis to the extent that we take it for granted, and yet, can you imagine life without it?’


Antoine Francois Jean Claudet (1797-1867) Hand-coloured stereo daguerreotype portrait of a young boy in uniform, c.1855 National Media Museum / SSPL


25 years of support for

Arts and Creativity in Bradford

HATS OFF!!

to the team at HowDo?! for keeping the ribbons flying for Bradford.

Who will help keep them going?

For all event services visit: www.raisetheroof.uk.com


Theatre in the Mill, Gallery II, Music at Bradford University

THEATRE –FLAMBOYANT COSTUMES - PEACE BUILDERS– – MUSIC – SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSIONS – HOWDO?! OFF-THE-PAGE – EXHIBITIONS – THREADFEST – CONGRESSIONAL SPEECHWRITERS– PUBLICATIONS – PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTS – ORIGINAL NEW RADIO PLAYS – - RESEARCH AND COLLABORATION WWW.BRADFORD.AC.UK/GALLERY WWW.BRADFORD.AC.UK/MUSIC WWW.BRADFORD.AC.UK/THEATRE

Photograph by Peter Kopek

n i g h t d e if f e r e n t m o s e c n e i r ... e p x E


JENNIFER BANKS

QUARRY HILL FLATS IT MAY BE THIRTY-FIVE YEARS SINCE THIS PICTURE WAS TAKEN, BUT PHOTOGRAPHER PETER MITCHELL IS STILL PASSIONATE ABOUT ITS SUBJECT. “I LIKE TO SEE IT AS THE OPPOSITE OF A WEDDING PICTURE. WHEN YOU HAVE A GROUP OF PEOPLE OUTSIDE A CHURCH, THAT’S THE START OF SOMETHING BIG. WHEN YOU HAVE A GROUP OF PEOPLE OUTSIDE A DERELICT BUILDING, THAT’S THE END OF SOMETHING,” HE SAYS OF THE 1978 SHOT OF THE DEMOLITION OF QUARRY HILL FLATS IN LEEDS. An enormous housing complex constructed in the 1930s, the flats were built to offer a utopian alternative to poverty in the city. Generally regarded as having failed to do so, they were demolished in the late 1970s. The West Yorkshire Playhouse and an enormous government office building known as Quarry House were later built on the site. “I just used to walk through there en route to other places to take pictures,” Peter recalls of the flats. “Then they started to be demolished, and it took them five years to do it.” He documented that half decade of demolition in photographs, which featured in his 1990 best-selling book Memento Mori – The Flats at Quarry Hill, Leeds. Peter compiled the book from his photographs, historical newspaper reports, archival photos, blueprints and his own personal narrative to produce a comprehensive account of the scheme. “It’s the whole history, from my own archive and collection,” he says.

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“To begin with, they were demolishing it by hand because it was early concrete and pre-stressed steel. One of the first companies working on it told me that when they started at the top they just nibbled down like mice – they were frightened that the steel might ping, that it might spring and throw chunks of concrete across into Leeds market or the bus station,” he recalls.

“This photo of Noel and the lads was more or less the last picture of Quarry Hill flats. We got everybody at that spot and moved the cranes away. I just stood on top of a crane and took the picture.” Clearly, health and safety wasn’t an issue in those days. “I said at the time, ‘Shouldn’t there be things like hard hats?’ And someone said, ‘I know where there’s a hard hat.’ So there are one or two of the guys with them on,” laughs Peter. “Also, in the 70s you could just walk on site. They’d ask me what I was doing and I’d tell them I was taking photos. ‘Okay, well mind that lot over there, it’s dangerous,’ is the kind of thing they’d say. It’s different now and I have a lot of difficulty getting onto demo sights because you have to produce special insurance. You have to have the flash jacket and the hard hat and all the rest of it.” \ Indeed, Peter is famous for taking pictures of buildings that aren’t going to be around for much longer. “My photographs have always had demolition and things coming down and people used to say, ‘If Pete Mitchell’s photographing it, it won’t be there next week.’” But it’s only with the passing years that the disappearance of Quarry Hill flats has taken on significance. “It’s like a lot of things – they are not famous in their own time but become so later on when people come to meditate on them. That’s when people ask – why did we knock them down?

What about this great social experiment?” says Peter. Also a keen archivist, he recently re-played an old cassette recording of a 1986 radio talk show about the flats, which had gained a reputation as a rough neighbourhood. “The callers to the radio show were complimentary, both about the quality of the facilities and about the sociability, friendliness and neighbourliness. The flats had their own communal washing and ironing area, so particularly the more elderly ladies remembered this as a great social place to be. Four of five of them would do their washing at the same time and, I guess, have a good old chin wag. So now the flats have gone and there’s only that picture left, it has great sentiment to it.” Although he questions the wisdom of demolishing the flats, Peter acknowledges that it’s impossible to stem the tide of change. “It’s all somehow tied in with the fact that everything must pass. It comes to an end and this is just a celebration of change I suppose,” he says of the photo. “But it would have been good if something phenomenal had happened on that site, if amazing new social housing had been erected there. It’s an amazing hill and if you look back, Romans were there at one time. I’ve got a nice poster from 1836, which shows horse racing on Quarry Hill. There was also a spa there too – that’s something to live up and yet it has just become a piecemeal development.”

Clearly, Peter’s passion for this photograph comes from the history the site is steeped in and the values the flats represent. Values both he and the old lady callers cherish – neighbourliness, friendliness and sociability – values on which Quarry Hill flats were built. But, like the flats, they’re values that Peter has seen eroded over time, with the growth of the mortgage, the credit card and consumerism. “I think the demolition was all part of the retail therapy and credit card era that was coming up. My parents paid rent all their lives in London and there was nothing wrong with that. But now England has one of the highest rates of home ownership in the whole of Europe. We’ve got to get on the housing spiral and once you do, your credit card has got some credibility to it. And then you can get a bigger car and so on, and it’s bugger your neighbours,” he says – his take on today’s values – and it’s hard to disagree. “Another bugbear of mine is this idea that people are slowly getting lost. They don’t actually know how to make choices any more. They go along with the mass order of things, which they get from advertising, radio and television. Where are all the weirdos these days?”


Peter Mitchell (born 1943) ‘Quarry Hill Flats, Noel and the Lads, Eastgate, Leeds’ © Peter Mitchell


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JENNIFER BANKS

BACUP COCONUT DANCERS THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM HOUSES A SIGNIFICANT TRANCHE OF WORK FROM BRITISH PHOTOGRAPHER TONY RAY-JONES (1941-1972) WHO TOOK THIS BEGUILING PICTURE. TONY IS NO LONGER WITH US, AND IT’S ALSO PRETTY LIKELY THE OLD LADIES IN THE PHOTO AREN’T EITHER. HOWEVER, SOME OF THOSE BIZARRELY CLAD MEN ARE STILL VERY MUCH ALIVE, AS IS THE TRADITION THEY UPHOLD, WHICH HAS BEEN GOING FOR OVER 150 YEARS. What you’re looking at is a 1968 performance of the Britannia Coconut Dancers from the Pennine town of Bacup, situated between Rochdale and Burnley. The man at the front centre of the group is Dick Shufflebottom, now seventy-nine years old and still dancing with the troupe. Much of what is known of the origins of the ‘Coconutters’ and their folk dances is not entirely certain. The blackening of their faces is said to reflect a pagan or medieval custom carried out to disguise the dancers from being recognised by evil spirits. It may also reflect the mining connections of the dance – it is thought to have been brought to the North of England in the 18th and 19th centuries by miners and quarry men from Cornwall, where it’s said to have originated from the Moorish pirates who had settled there. The Coco-nutters’ costume – short red and white striped skirts, rosette-decorated hats and black breeches and jumpers – is thought to be authentic Moorish pirate attire.

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Not even sixty-five year old Joe Healey, a proud Coco-nutter and secretary of the dancers for the past eighteen years, can explain the reasons for the troupe’s tradition of dancing through the streets of Bacup – from one boundary of the town to the other – every Easter Saturday without fail. “They dance in all weathers – hail, rain, snow or ice,” he says. “That

is how it’s always been done but we don’t know why.” Like most traditions, those who uphold it care more for doing so than questioning it – it’s simply an accepted part of life in Bacup. “It becomes part of the fabric of the community and it knits villagers together. Families get involved in it. It’s passed down from father to son. Relationships form and it goes on and on and on,” says Joe. Tradition makes it a men-only troupe, and whilst the dances have female parts, there are no female dancers. The role of Bacup’s women in the Coconutters is a supportive one. “They are in the background, making all the costumes and looking after them, doing all the repair work, knitting all the jumpers, making the hats and the rosettes,” Joe explains. Like the men who have danced before him, once Joe joined the troupe, it took him up to two years of practice before his first public performance. “You’ve got to be sure of the dances, and your routines. You’ve got to be able to dance the male part and the female part, and you’ve got to be able to dance in any position – north, south, east or west,” he says. “There are five garland dances and two nut dances, so there are seven dances in all. But the two nut dances, Th’owd Crash and The Coconut Dance,

are the hardest ones to learn,” explains Joe. For the nut dances, each dancer wears wooden discs on his hands, knees and belt. During the dance, the discs are struck together in time to the music. The discs came to be known as coconuts, and that’s how the dancers earned their name. The Coco-nutters’ usual accompaniment is the English concertina but, for their Easter Saturday dance, musicians from the nearby Stacksteads Silver Band are used. The music, like the dance steps, has been handed down over the years.

If you’d like to be a Coco-nutter, you’d better dig out your Bacup passport, make sure you’re a bloke and then be very, very patient – as you’ll have to wait two years to join the troupe. “There’s always a waiting list for membership. It’s just something that people get involved in naturally,” says Joe. “We’ve got a pool of dancers. We need eight to do the dancing and I’ve got sixteen at the present time. The average age is fifty-six. The youngest man’s twenty-six and the oldest is Dick, at seventy-nine.” Although the tradition started with miners and quarry men, the current dancers are from a variety of backgrounds. “One’s a managing director, one owns a transport company, one’s a quarry man, one’s a

stone mason. One makes advanced medical products, one’s a fireman and one’s a school caretaker.” This is the troupe Joe is in charge of taking to festivals and performances all over the UK and Europe. It’s a bit of a jet set lifestyle he and his fellow dancers enjoy. “We don’t just do one dance on Easter Saturday,” says Joe, who’s notched up over two-thousand performances in his time as a Coco-nutter. “We dance all over the country. We dance at folk festivals in Germany, Belgium, Italy, France and Spain – it’s fantastic.” All this makes Joe something of a local celeb, but he’s not in it for the fame. “The fact is that Britannia Coconut Dancers as a troupe, it’s bigger than any of the men that join it. It’s an icon. It’s history that has made it, so we’re just custodians of the tradition.” Tony Ray-Jones took this photo in 1968. It was during a period of his career when he extensively photographed the English way of life in a bid to capture it on film before it became too Americanised. In the same year, he wrote: “My aim is to communicate something of the spirit and the mentality of the English, their habits and their way of life, the ironies that exist in the way they do things, partly through tradition and partly through the nature of their environment.” The Britannia Coconut Dancers couldn’t have been a more perfect subject for what he was trying to achieve. But unlike perhaps some of the other traditions he photographed at the time, there’s fat chance that Americanisation – or anything else for that matter – will ever encroach on the way the Coco-nutters do their unique thing. They’ve been at it for over one-hundred and fifty years and nothing’s going to change it.


Tony Ray-Jones (1941-1972) ‘Bacup Coconut Dancers’, 1968 National Media Museum / SSPL


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CHARLOTTE DESPARD

2ND AUGUST 1914, CHARLOTTE DESPARD CUTS A STRIKING FIGURE ON HER PLATFORM IN TRAFALGAR SQUARE. WHITTLED BY HER RELENTLESS WORK, DESPARD IS OFTEN PICTURED IN THIS POSE, A CURLED FIST RAISED ABOVE HER HATTED HEAD, HER PASSION AND ARTICULATION MET ONLY WITH CURIOUS LOOKS AND QUESTIONING STERNNESS. SHE WAS CONSIDERED SOMETHING OF AN ANOMALY AND OFTEN THE ONLY WOMAN TO SHARE A STAGE. Despard was an activist, a feminist, a pacifist, an animal rights advocate and a socialist reformer. Born in to an upper class family, she knew the opportunities and resources available only to the rich, but also the limits imposed on her and others by patriarchy and other social inequalities. Here, Despard is presenting at an anti-war rally. This rally appealed for all men to resist the fatal coercion of army subscription, seductively presented as a route out of the slums and as a means to support their families.

Two days after this photograph was taken, the United Kingdom entered World War I. As it proved, conscription offered a route out of abject poverty and into foreign trenches and death, a route that decimated a generation of young men and families.

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Though Despard knew the desperation in the slums of Battersea where she lived and worked during this time, her core concern lay with the emancipation of women. If women had the freedoms given to men, she argued, families would not be reliant on an army wage, nor would they exist in the poverty that necessitated it. Even with the advantages Despard had been born in to, she lamented her lack of opportunities as a young woman:

“There were moments in my hot youth, when I would rail against Heaven for having made me a woman. What might I not have been; what might I not have done had I the freedom and intellectual advantages so largely accorded to men?” However, unlike Thatcher, who was notable for her ascension from a ‘grocer’s daughter’ to an exclusive elite, Despard chose not to gain, but to give. She gave up the privileges that she was born in to, choosing instead to live in solidarity with those that she wished to help. She used her inheritance to support her activism: founding soup kitchens, health clinics, youth and working men’s clubs. In 1914, Despard also met Gandhi, inspiring her ‘passive resistance’ approach to direct action. This was used with great skill by Despard and the Pankhursts in the feminist cause of suffrage (the fight for the right of women to vote). As president of The Woman’s Freedom League, Despard advocated non-violent civil disobedience to wrestle away power from men and gain equality. This included chaining themselves to railings of the Ladies’ Gallery in the House of Commons, non-payment of taxes, refusing to complete census forms and demonstrations. Nevertheless, Despard spent two weeks in Holloway Gaol for her campaigning.

Despard’s activism was often in reaction to the constantly changing political climate. As a member and candidate of the Independent Labour Party (precursor to the current Labour Party), it is likely she visited its home in Bradford. In 1921 Despard went on to live in Ireland, where through her support of Irish self determination and presidency of the Women’s Prisoners’ Defence League meant that at the age of 83 she was active enough to be labelled “a dangerous subversive” by the Irish Free State. Three years later Despard travelled to Russia, where she befriended Eleanor Marx (daughter of Karl) and found another policital direction in communism. She died in 1939, aged 95. Almost a centuary after this photograph was taken, Despard and her lifetime of activism is often untaught in classrooms and silent in tributes. Perhaps it is Despard’s overt political affiliations, perhaps because the patriarchy and capitalism still hold the dominant narrative. Yet her concerns still loom large today. 101 years ago - two years prior to this speech - Despard was jailed for attempting to arrange an anti-war rally. Only 10 years ago the largest anti-war demonstration in the UK took place. Recording and understanding images help to ensure that knowledge is founded and mistakes need not need to be repeated. However, human memory is

fallible and short lived, especially in an age where we are expected to spend every second full and bombarded, moving on from one thing to the next. The archives held in Bradford’s Media Museum still have much to teach us, from times that we may have forgotten yet relive every day. Archives are also imperfect at times, and without context only symbolism and imagination can make sense of the contents. Unedited images from the media capture a moment in time that can be far truer than the Chinese whispers of reporters’ notebooks and editors’ spins. In image there is the capacity to capture the experience of the moment, allowing truths to be interpreted rather than dictated. The sweep of cropping lines here define the actual image that would be used in the paper in 1935. There’s no digital magic but a clear attempt to show only what is wanted. Like all media, The Daily Herald, who published this photograph, was likely to be no a stranger to spin and opinion in relation to causes. Images like this one give us not only the sense of a collective human memory, but also signs to both orientate from and find ourselves within. Looking at this image, you could find yourself relating to a personal view on war, politics, feminism and equality: questioning, being inspired, curious, sceptical, passionate or serious. There is a whole spectrum of stances to Despard and her causes here in this image. Where do you stand?


Unknown - Despard, speaking at an antiwar rally in Trafalgar Square, 1914 Published by Daily Herald 1935 National Media Museum / SSPL


PETER KOPEK THREADFEST 2012: MABU PRESENTS STALKING HORSE, 26TH MAY 2012 DELIUS ARTS CENTRE, GREAT HORTON ROAD, BRADFORD


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White space is good. Empty white space that is. It represents a place or a space that is yet to be defined by meaning or purpose. It is the in-between that is in essense a memory, but one that is uncertain; what could be, rather than what is. In a matter of fact, it could be, potentially, anything you imagine it to be! & that is the point here. You are invited to use this wee patch of white space for your own pleasure, and participate in our Off-The-Page Gallery project. We‘d like feedback on HowDo?! magazine to use for our ‘work-in-progress’ exhibition, which is happening during the month of May at Gallery II, University of Bradford. We will be analysing the magazine‘s output, exploring ideas for new creative media and mapping the cultural scene through social documentation, social auditing & intervention. You can draw, doodle, illustrate, collage, and/or mind-map the shit out of it. Tell us a story, give us some pointers, write a little profile review of your facourite local shop, or visually represent what Bradford looks like in 2013. Once you’re done, please scan it & email: mrjohnston@howdomagazine.co.uk or pop in to meet the HowDo?! team at the gallery, Mon-Fri 12pm-5pm. Our cloaks of mystery will be lifted and you are invited to share with us your ideas, thoughts and expressions. Have fun & be nice!

fill yer’ boots luv! THURSDAY 9TH MAY > FRIDAY 31ST MAY

HOWDO?! OFF-THE-PAGE APPRAISAL & CELEBRATION @ GALLERY II, CHESHAM BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRADFORD

WE WILL BE ANALYSING THE MAGAZINE‘S OUTPUT, EXPLORING IDEAS FOR NEW CREATIVE MEDIA AND MAPPING THE CULTURAL SCENE THROUGH SOCIAL DOCUMENTATION, SOCIAL AUDITING & INTERVENTION.

Find out more by visiting: www.brad.ac.uk/gallery or join our facebook working group: “HowDo?! off-the-page; Appraisal & celebration” or follow our Twitter for news, memes & live project updates: @howdobradford

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JENNIFER BANKS

TOM WOOD: ‘PHOTOGRAPHS 1973-2013’ TOM WOOD DOESN’T DRIVE. HE GETS ABOUT BY BUS AND TRAIN. “THEY SAY THAT MARGARET THATCHER ONCE SAID SOMETHING LIKE, ‘ANY YOUNG MAN WHO FINDS HIMSELF TRAVELLING BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT BY THE AGE OF TWENTY-SIX CAN CONSIDER HIMSELF A FAILURE IN LIFE,’” LAUGHS THE SIXTY-TWO YEAR OLD PHOTOGRAPHER. IF HE’S A FAILURE IN LIFE THEN THE LATE MARGARET THATCHER SHOULD HAVE BEEN KNIGHTED FOR HER SERVICES TO COAL MINING. For the past forty years, Tom has spent the best part of every week (the hours that most of the rest of us spend counting down to the weekend) doing what he loves – taking photographs of people and landscapes. He has published books, had solo and group exhibitions worldwide and his work is represented in the collections of major international museums. So stick that in your exhaust pipe and smoke it, ‘successful’ motorists. In fact, if Tom Wood had ever become a motorist, the chances are the impressive body of work he’s produced would not exist. The way he works is the complete antithesis of the way a motorist travels cocooned in a metal box, separate from everyone else. For Tom, there is no sense of separation between himself and the people he shoots. He lived on Merseyside for twenty-five years, most of which he spent immersing himself in the places he photographed; returning regularly for years on end to capture images of people in locations that he soon became part of.

You take people’s pictures and send them copies, and they’re really made up you bothered to do it,” he says of the relationships that grew out of his work. “When you’re shooting somewhere, there’s that one person who comes over. He knows you and he says to the others, ‘He’s sound’ and then people may accept you more easily.” His presence on the streets of Merseyside earned Tom the moniker ‘Photie Man’, which he used as the title for his 2005 book of portraits taken in and around his former home of New

Brighton, just across the river from Liverpool. Years spent riding buses from New Brighton to the city resulted in his acclaimed 1998 book All Zones Off Peak, which comprised just sixty-seven of the one-hundred-thousand shots he took on public transport in Merseyside. “I spent a lot of time on the bus, so I started taking pictures for something to do, through the window. Then I’d see a good bus stop approaching with a lot of people, so I’d run downstairs and be ready to photograph them as it stopped,”

The Pier Head, Great Homer Street market, the shipyard, Everton and Liverpool football matches and the Chelsea Reach nightclub in New Brighton were some of the places he frequented to photograph people, each series becoming a major body of work, some of which later became exhibitions and published in a number of acclaimed books.

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“I was just there all the time, photographing all the time. Because you are there all the time, you bump into people. I’m friendly, I talk to people and you get to know people.

Birkenhead, 1979 © Tom Wood, courtesy of the artist


Tom recalls. “If I got on at the Pier Head, that was easy because there was no-one on the bus – I’d speak to the driver and tell him about the project, and he might have seen me before because I’d done it so much. And then it was my bus because I was on it. They got onto my bus. They could see me wondering around, upstairs and downstairs. People tolerated me generally. I really think people could sense what I was up to.”

It’s the images of people captured during Tom’s years on Merseyside that form the mainstay of the National Media Museum’s retrospective Tom Wood: Photographs 1973-2013. Over one-hundred of his photos are on show now until 16th June, including ten previously not exhibited or published images. The exhibition follows the museum’s acquisition of eighty of Tom’s prints, one of its largest single acquisitions of work by a living photographer. “There are key images that have been reproduced in magazines, reflecting the consensus of what my important pictures are,” Tom explains. “On the other hand, the museum was also very interested in several pictures that no-one had ever seen before. It was just a coincidence that they thought the images were very good but they hadn’t gone anywhere, so that made it a bonus, more special to the museum,” he says. “My best pictures have nothing to do with me, they have a life of their own,” says Tom. “You’re looking for some kind of recognition that seems meaningful. Whether it’s a humorous thing, it might be purely visual or maybe serious, you don’t know, but it’s something that seems significant. I photograph what interests me. I’m not going out trying to make good pictures; I’m going out to photograph what’s interesting. But then you’ve got to deal with this piece of paper that isn’t the subject – it’s a photograph, and that’s where the art comes in. So I take a photograph around a situation – perhaps I take eight pictures, two or three are okay, four or five don’t work and one’s really good for some reason. It’s the same subject in all of them but one is

more interesting, one works as a picture.” It’s a mixture of technical skill and an intuitive knack of capturing significant moments that combine to create Tom’s images. “You’re after pictures of life. If it expresses some bit of life’s meaning, that’s part of the picture,” Tom says when I ask him about one of the photos in the exhibition – the portrait of a toilet attendant. “It also has to work formally as a picture. There are details like the colour in that photo. You can just see a bit of the ‘Ladies’ sign in the background; the cigarette she’s holding has got about half an inch long of ash on it and it’s the way the picture is composed.” Because of the way he works – immersing himself in the life he photographs and using a mixture of images taken with and without the permission – Tom is wary of exploiting his subjects. He has always avoided selling his shots to advertisers for huge sums. “I’ve never made money. I never courted any fame or attention. I couldn’t do it. I’d feel guilty about it. It’s a two way process. They are giving it to me,” he says of his subjects. So Tom has adopted a lifestyle that has enabled him to create prolifically while also remaining true to his ethos (which is surely a greater mark of success than driving around in a hatchback). “My wife works, and since 1998 up until the last two years I’ve had just enough money from print sales to not need to teach. We’ve lived simply and I had twelve years or more just photographing,” he says. Lucky man. North Wales is Tom’s current home, where he has spent the last ten years taking pictures of landscapes. And with the passage of time, he’s a little less wary of showing his photos of the people he shot around Liverpool. “Now, after all these years, because it’s such a long time afterwards, it seems fairer really to try and get the work out,” he says. But Tom still remains loyal to those he met and photographed on Merseyside. “My wife still works there. She’s been delivering babies at Liverpool Women’s Hospital for thirty-five years. Imagine how close you get to people if you are doing that. And when you live somewhere you become part of the fabric, don’t you?”

Ladies’ Toilet Attendant, 1985 © Tom Wood, courtesy of the artist

THE EXHIBITION TOM WOOD: PHOTOGRAPHS 1973–2013 RUNS AT THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM UNTIL JUNE 16TH


JENNIFER BANKS

LEG OVER THIS SHOT, APTLY ENTITLED LEG OVER, IS ONE OF EIGHTY IMAGES RECENTLY ACQUIRED BY THE NATIONAL MEDIA MUSEUM FROM TOM WOOD, AND IT FEATURES IN THE RETROSPECTIVE OF HIS WORK CURRENTLY ON DISPLAY AT THE MUSEUM. THE PHOTOGRAPHER’S MEMORIES OF HOW THE PHOTOGRAPH CAME ABOUT ARE SOMEWHAT SKETCHY. “IT WAS PRETTY DARK IN THAT SITUATION. I SAT DOWN, THESE PEOPLE SAW ME AND I THINK HE RESPONDED TO THE CAMERA BY PUTTING HIS LEG OVER HER – ‘TAKE A PICTURE OF THIS’ – BUT IT MAY NOT HAVE BEEN. I CAN’T REMEMBER,” HE SAYS. “HIS MATE KISSING THE GIRL ON THE LEFT IS HELPING THE COMPOSITION A LOT, AND THE FACT THEY HAD THAT ONE RED AGAINST ANOTHER RED. IT’S A FUN PICTURE.” Tom can be forgiven for the holes in his memory; the shot was taken in 1985 after all. Even the faces are too indistinguishable to be memorable – but that’s exactly why he’s given up the image for public consumption. “I’ve allowed that one to be used because no-one’s recognisable,” says Tom, who is keen not to exploit his subjects, even over 30 years on. The venue, the era and the body of work this picture forms part of are much less forgettable for the photographer. This was the Chelsea Reach nightclub in New Brighton, Merseyside, a short walk from his then home and a regular hangout where he shot revellers several nights a week from 1982-1985. The photographs were later turned into a book and exhibition entitled Looking for Love.

“I’d go to parties at the club and take pictures of my mates,” Tom recalls. “The bar would be downstairs in the main club and I’d have to go through this throng of bodies. I’d see people there and think it would be great to

34

photograph them. It seemed like I was the right kind of person to do that. I don’t think anyone else had really done it before, as far as I know. People had done some clever party pictures but Looking for Love is pretty raw and real.” Tom’s knack for capturing raw and real images is no doubt rooted in the way he engages with his subjects. As with all of his projects, the Chelsea Reach wasn’t just a click and run job – Tom spent three years regularly photographing at the club. He became a well-known figure there, making friends with the people he shot and forming part of the world he was documenting. “Most of the time I was wondering around with the camera and it was really dark and noisy with the music. I had to shout in people’s ears to explain what I was doing,” he says. “All the other pictures I’d done, the projects were just so big and sprawling I would never finish them, whereas I couldn’t keep doing the nightclub forever because it was too intense, too noisy and there were too many drunk people,” explains Tom. With a

finished project in the bag, his mind soon turned to showing his work. “It was fun and it was young people so I thought it could go out into the public. I was just going to have a little exhibition with it originally because everyone was asking me what was going to happen with the pictures.” Soon a publisher got on board too, and it was through the process of selecting images to go on the pages of a book that the title came about. “What’s happening inside the club is that everybody is looking at each other. It’s that eye contact thing, and I’m looking at them,” Tom says. “There’s a poem by a 12th century knight that goes, ‘So through the eyes love attains the heart, for the eyes are the scouts of the heart, and the eyes go reconnoitring for what it would please the heart to possess,’ which is more elegant than Looking for Love, but that’s what it’s all about.” And it was the last song of the night that usually offered up the opportunity to photograph the fruits of the search for love. “They only had one slow-ey in the Chelsea Reach. Right at the end, they had one really long, slow song. That’s when people could actually get up close,” says Tom. “But there’s always a dilemma of do you have the right to take

this picture? Yet at the same time you know you have to take it straight away, it’s a decisive moment.” Any worries Tom may have had about his subjects feeling exploited in his book and exhibition were soon dispelled – the night clubbers of Merseyside responded warmly to Looking for Love. “The guy on the cover of the book, I thought he’d want some money off me but he was just really pleased that I’d got it published after he’d seen me work so hard for so long,” smiles Tom. “And we had a show at the Bluecoat Gallery in Liverpool. One Saturday while it was on, they had over 1,000 people going, which is a lot for a small-ish gallery in Liverpool.” The Looking for Love book originally went on sale at £10 a copy. These days it’s a collectors’ item that’s likely to set you back about £200, and it was hot property in Liverpool at the time of its publication too. “It was on the desk of every hairdresser’s on Merseyside. So many people told me that in the end they all got stolen,” says Tom. Also a part-time teacher of photography, Tom recently showed some of the Chelsea Reach images to his students. “One of them said that the photos looked like they were taken yesterday. That’s because a lot of the people were dead ordinary. You’d go to certain clubs in Liverpool and there were the new romantics around at that time. So there was this type and that type; they would be cool to be photographed and people might understand why someone would take those pictures – but the Chelsea Reach was just ordinary people, and I guess I like ordinary people.”


Leg over, 1985 Š Tom Wood, courtesy of the artist.


On 11th May you are invited to BALANGA BAR where we will be celebrating the 4th anniversary of our opening in 2009. Since then we have been serving traditional homemade Polish food such as ham shanks, pierogi, bigos, breaded pork cutlets, along with a wide selection of Polish beers and over forty varieties of vodka. We have a function room available for hire which has been used for numerous events including concerts, discos, presentations, birthday parties and wedding receptions. There is also a big screen (3m x 2m) for viewing sporting events. We provide catering for external events, for anyone requiring 'a taste of Poland'.

“The best full English breakfast in Bradford” Nosheen

LOVE FOOD. LOVE COFFEE.

COME & TASTE THE BEST IN BRADFORD.

Come and help us celebrate our birthday from 7pm, and enjoy some free refreshments Other events include: Sun 5th May > Funky Sensation

Open every day from 12 noon until the last customer calls it a day!

78 Godwin Street, Bradford, BD1 3PT

(In the Kirkgate Shopping Centre between WHSmiths and the car park entrance) Find us on Facebook for events, updates & special offers:

www.facebook.com/BalangaBar

WWW.SMORGASBORDCOFFEEBAR.COM SMORGASCOFFEE @SMORGASCOFFEE

ORDER NOW:01274 218 066

2/4 RAWSON PLACE, BRADFORD CITY CENTRE, BD1 3QQ


JENNIFER BANKS

HALIFAX RUGBY LEAGUE CLUB GROUND GO TO SEE A HALIFAX RUGBY LEAGUE HOME GAME TODAY, AND YOU’LL BE TAKING A TRIP TO THE CITY’S ELEVENTHOUSAND SEAT SHAY STADIUM. THERE’LL BE TWO HOURS OF PRE-MATCH ENTERTAINMENT WITH CHEERLEADERS, SINGING AND MUSIC. YOU’LL BE ABLE TO BUY TEAM BRANDED HOODIES, POLO SHIRTS AND MORE IN THE CLUB SHOP; ENJOY A DRINK IN ONE OF THE TWO SUPPORTERS’ BARS OR EVEN VIEW THE GAME FROM AN EXECUTIVE BOX, WHICH INCLUDES A FOUR COURSE MEAL, SERVICE FROM A PRIVATE HOSTESS AND THE USE OF A PRIVATE ‘RESTROOM’. Rewind to 1975, the year that Martin Parr took this photograph, and the experience of a Halifax RLFC supporter was a somewhat different affair. “I went to a lot of rugby league grounds in the North, all of which, in fact, were quite derelict and therefore utterly charming,” he recalls. “It’s a world away from now, where everything is so much more organised. There was a lot more character and atmosphere then.” Although it may be hard to believe – from what Martin can recall of taking this shot – there was actually a game on. “Yes, I can’t remember who was playing of course. I’m not particularly a rugby fan,” he says. “You don’t get permission from the ground. You just buy a ticket and go in. I must have taken a few shots, I can’t remember precisely, and this was the one I selected.” This was early in Martin’s career. He’d not long graduated from Manchester Polytechnic, where he studied photography from 1970 to 1973. He was living in Hebden Bridge at the time, while he photographed around the Calderdale area, from 1975 to 1980. “The people and the economy of Hebden Bridge were very different then, it was a declining mill town. There was no tourism or anything like that in those days. At that point, I was interested in the whole idea of photographing the traditional

38

lifestyle that was found in this small town. I wanted to capture an aspect of Northern towns,” he recalls. The result of Martin’s work around Hebden Bridge was a series of photos called The Non-Conformists – but why the title? “Because the biggest subject that I photographed was the non-conformist churches and chapels. Half of it is probably that,” he says. Non-conformist churches are those that don’t adhere to the doctrine of the Church of England, such as Baptist, Moravian, Methodist, Quaker and Presbyterian – and many of Martin’s images from this period depict their congregations and the nuances of church life. The Non-Conformists exhibited in London in the early 1980s. And locally in Hebden Bridge too, as Martin recalls, but the response wasn’t exactly overwhelming. “It was just a photography show, no-one’s going to get that excited,” he says. But the National Media Museum got excited, and a number of images from the Calderdale series have made their way into its archive. “They bought some prints quite recently,” says Martin. “But of course it’s all in the vicinity so it all makes sense.”

“Unsurprisingly, he describes the people he encountered during his time living in Hebden Bridge as “very friendly” and he still has ties with the area. “I go back every year

to Calderdale. I’ve got friends in Hebden Bridge and I come up to Bradford as well,” he says. He even keeps in touch with some of the people he shot in the late seventies. “There’s a farmer, and a game keeper I saw the other day who I’d photographed.” Martin, who was born in Epsom in Surrey, even credits trips to this part of the country as the catalyst for his photographic career. “I first got interested in photography when I was a teenager and went to visit my Grandfather near Bradford. He was a keen amateur photographer and he lent me a camera and we would go out together shooting. We would come back, process the films and make prints and ever since this time I have always wanted to be a photographer.” With the advent of colour photography, Martin stopped shooting in black and white – not long after his project documenting the congregations of Calderdale. This was when his approach to his art took a new direction. “I was much more gentle as a photographer then,” he says of his shots of the Hebden Bridge area. “You change, you grow, you do different things. It’s more a critique now than a celebration. When I moved to colour in the 80s I started to take photographs with a slightly different

mentality, where I was trying to show not what’s wrong with society, but trying to be critical and affectionate at the same time, whereas previously I was entirely affectionate.” It’s this critical and humorous approach to documentary photography that has earned Martin international renown and a reputation for his innovative imagery. With bright, saturated colours, his photographs have been described as “garish” or seemingly “grotesque”, yet they are celebrated for their ability to engage and entertain whilst showing us a reflection of ourselves, our values and modern society. His first body of work in colour The Last Resort, depicting holidaymakers in the seaside resort of New Brighton, was published and exhibited in 1986. It immediately divided opinion. Some saw it as cruel and voyeuristic but for others it was a stunning satire and the finest achievement to date of colour photography in Britain. It placed Martin Parr amongst the world’s leading photographers. Considered a chronicler of our age, Martin has been awarded over a dozen prizes for his work. He has produced more than seventy books and his images have been exhibited globally, with major exhibitions and retrospectives touring Europe for years at a time. He’s been commissioned to photograph life in the USA, Australia and Spain, and has travelled extensively, capturing images in countries such as Japan and Peru. So enjoy this photograph of the former Halifax Rugby League Club ground, because it represents not only a lost era when life was much gentler, but a time when the gaze of this acclaimed photographer was too.


Martin Parr (born 1952) ‘England. West Yorkshire. Halifax Rugby League Club ground’, c. 1977 © Martin Parr / Magnum


A RELAXED 'BIER CAFE'

Another year rolls on, meaning that membership renewals are now due! The price has been fixed again at £3 low/unwaged, £5 waged and free for refugees without the means to support themselves, so apart from the library, veggie cafe, gig floor, members bar, recording/rehearsal studio, 19th century printing press, cycling club, climbing club, allotment and more, what upcoming audible highlights does this meagre annual fee give you access to?

BFD CAMRA PUB OF THE YEAR 2012

IN BRADFORD CITY CENTRE

As featured in The Guardian’s Top Ten UK Craft Beer Bars

OVER 80 DIFFERENT BEERS

OPENING TIMES

FEATURED IN CAMRA’S

GOOD BEER GUIDE 2013 @thesparrowbd1

Mon Tues Weds Thurs Fri Sat Sun

*11pm on Bank Holidays

32 NORTH PARADE, BRADFORD, BD1 3HZ (01274) 270 772

www.thesparrowbradford.co.uk

11am – 8pm 11am – 11pm 11am – 11pm 11am – 11pm 11am – 12am 11am – 12am 12pm – 6pm*

Find us on Facebook

Donation entry gig featuring Crywank, Hotknives, James Choice (AU), Joe Tilston, Perkie, James Hull, Mickey Dey and Greg Rekus (CA).

A day of presentations, workshops, films and discussion about DIY culture and its social, political and economic resonances. As always, events are open to all members and guests of the 1in12 club. To join, see our website or pop in Thursday-Saturday from 7pm to fill in an application form.

Legendary 90's anarcho-dub band AOS3 return to the club for a special one off gig. Tickets £7 advance from losingthethread.co.uk/events This is just a highlight of the joys to be found nestling at the bottom of Albion Street. For full details of all 1in12 happenings, visit:


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Opening The Beehive in 1901, James Geoghegan probably didn’t imagine that his influence would still be felt today, in the architecture, the decor, or the mounted photos of Edwardian church outings to the Dales. These aren’t the only links to the past however. While you enjoy a fine pint of real ale under the original gaslights you will be hosted by a man who’s history is deeply intertwined with that of the pub: at a postrenovations party held almost a century after opening, it was revealed to the current co-owner William Wagstaff that he is in fact the great great nephew of Mr. Geoghegan. By Robert Thompson

A NEW ADVENTURE PLAYGROUND IN ECCLESHILL, OFF HARROGATE ROAD, BD10 0EU

www.bcep.org.uk A great place for parents and those who work with children to get cheap arts and craft materials, suitable for all ages. We’re open Tuesday to Thursday from 10am-1pm. Visit our website for further details.

20th-26th May, National Vegetarian Week 2013.

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It’s here!! Sign-up to our What’s On Bulletin:

I’ve eaten here on a wet Monday morning and on a sunny, bustling Saturday afternoon, and both times the sevice was friendly and efficient. The food is well priced - extremely reasonable for the quality. The menu has items to cater for everyone’s tastes, without giving the feeling that they have overstretched themselves, including a range of pastas, nachos and open sandwiches. The décor is uncluttered and tidy, and the atmosphere is a comfortable and happy one – I would recommend checking it out. By Chemaine Cooke

NOPE!

NO HANDS, THE POLISH CLUB 31ST MAY 2013

BY SAM MUSGRAVE Nope! are super ace. They have got two drummers. Their music sounds like nothing else I’ve ever heard. It’s an amazing massive sound built on bad-ass repetitive rhythms that layer up and keep on building. Seeing and hearing them live is really exhilarating.


12 Legrams Lane BD7 1ND City of Bradford 01274 733971

14 VICTORIA RD, SALTAIRE

BY EMMA PENNY A perfect blend of comfortable café and spacious art gallery, Massarella’s style is really in keeping with the rest of the street. The menu includes classic light bites and homemade sweet treats, and both are affordable and delicious. The fresh, warming carrot and parsnip soup with orange, ginger and cream is the perfect cure for a grey day. I will definitely eat there again and recommend you join me!

THE WILD WILD BERRY Stephanie Hladowski & C Joynes

Songs of bankrupcy, loss, sadness and war: universal themes. The Wild Wild Berry is an enchantingly sorrowful collection of traditional material and a collaboration between Cambridgeshire guitarist C Joynes and local singer Stephanie Hladowski. Their readings, of songs sourced from the Cecil Sharp Archive, are subtly dramatic; slight alterations in vocal timbre and instrumentation help to create the unique sound-worlds into which the narrative of each song unfolds. My personal favourites from the set are the rich and mossy drones “George Collings”, “The Wild Wild Berry” and “The Bitter Withy”. By Michael Metcalfe

HUGGY’S BOXING GYM

Monach House, Spring Mill St, Bradford, BD5 7DU

BY MICHAEL METCALFE The sounds of irrhythmically whacked heavy bags, barked instructions (“Keep your hands up!”), and squeaking, shuffling footwork drills are unmistakable: Huggy’s Gym is a place for children and adults to learn the Sweet Science of boxing. Nobody is expected to run before they can walk; newcomers are always encouraged whatever their age and prior experience. It is open Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday evenings (and Sunday mornings), and is charged at £2 per session.

www.huggysgym.co.uk

SPEAKABILITY, BRADFORD www.speakability.org.uk

BY SAM FISH Every first Monday of the month, in one of the rooms looking out of the CVS building on Sunbridge Road, Bradford members of Speakability, a charity for survivors of strokes and head injuries who live with Aphasia, meet up to play games, share hobbies, plan events and most importantly just chat, because speech therapy actually isn’t the most abundant NHS provision, and ‘cos chatting is just so damn good.

LA LA AND THE BOO YA - ‘LIONESS’  www.lalabooya.com www.facebook.com/La.La.Boo.Ya

The Bradfordian sibling duo - with husky vocals from Marf and delicate, tasty beats from Eddie - have delivered again, with their official debut single, ‘Lioness’. While it took a few listens to properly get into it, soon enough I’d be cycling round Bradford with ‘I’m a lioness, I fiercely protect my pride’ as an earworm. ‘Lioness’ is out on Congo Natty’s new label Congo Natty Bass, as a double A-side with a Congo Natty/Vital Elements remix featuring Lady Chann and is available as mp3 download or 12″ vinyl. Check out Congo Natty Records on YouTube, you’re in for a rite treat! By Tess Conner-Kavanagh

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Daley’s

20%

est.1946

With this W tthhhi voucher o

discount on purchases of 3 or more Pip Seymour Acrylic Paints & other selected items (*not to be used in conjunction with any other discount)

FInd us on Facebook for regular offers & prize 3 Grove Terrace (opposite Bradford College)

01274 727800


from owDo?! k you to H A big than ur Yo support. for all your missed! ly re so e b ill magazine w

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Daley’s

We are a local independent family run bookshop & artstore. We offer great year round discounts on books, stationery, cards and art materials incl. locally made Pip Seymour acrylic paints. Our services include colour & b/w copy & print, fax & scan, 3 types of thesis binding and an economical secure UK parcel service. Please don’t hesitate to contact us for more information and friendly advice. We look forward to seeing you.

Don, Liz, Tracey & Dianne ps. Call in or like us on facebook to enter our free prize draw; £20 store voucher. “Daleys Bookshop”

est.1946

es: Opening Tim -5.30pm Mon-Fri 9am 2pm

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00 01274 7278

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MAY / JUNE 2013 - DAY EXCURSIONS DEPARTING FROM BRADFORD INTERCHANGE Adult Concessions Wed 29th May CHESTER SHOPPER OR CHESTER ZOO £12.00 £11.00 Thu 30th May RHYL £12.00 £11.00 ALTON TOWERS £13.00 £12.00 Thu 30th May Fri 31st May LIVERPOOL & SOUTHPORT £12.00 £11.00 Sat 1st Jun BRIDLINGTON / COASTAL SERVICE £13.00 £12.00 Sun 2nd Jun SKEGNESS £13.00 £12.00 Sun 2nd Jun HORNSEA MARKET & SCARBOROUGH £13.00 £12.00 GRANGE-OVER-SANDS... £13.00 £12.00 Sat 8th Jun Sat 8th Jun BRIDLINGTON / COASTAL SERVICE £13.00 £12.00 Sun 9th Jun HEMSWELL MARKET & LINCOLN £13.00 £12.00 BRIDLINGTON / COASTAL SERVICE £13.00 £12.00 Sat 15th Jun Sun 16th Jun SOUTHPORT...Fathers Day £13.00 £12.00 LICHFIELD’S HISTORIC MARKET £13.00 £12.00 Tue 18th Jun Fri 21st Jun LIVERPOOL OPPER SH £13.00 £12.00 Sat 22nd Jun BRIDLINGTON / COASTAL SERVICE £13.00 £12.00 Sun 23rd Jun WHITBY £13.00 £12.00 Wed 26th Jun KENDAL MARKET & WINDERMERE £13.00 £12.00 BRIDLINGTON / COASTAL SERVICE £13.00 £12.00 Sat 29th Jun Sun 30th Jun BLACKPOOL £13.00 £12.00

15 James Street, Bradford, BD1 3PZ

|

01274 737322


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Hidden Bradford is a people-led way to discover the city you live in. Through our Twitter account, Facebook page and website, we’re collecting the pictures, memories, opinions and ideas of clued-up Bradfordians, and it’s a constant surprise. If you’re not following us yet, here’s a taster….

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@hiddenbradford 3 Sep First video from #AfricaExpress in Bradford today: @RizzleKicks and Maximo Park at @culture_fusion http://ow.ly/dqmXe Africa Express in Bradford - Rizzle Kicks and Maximo Park Africa Express visited Bradford on Monday 3rd September. Rizzle Kicks and Maximo Park played at Culture Fusion in the city...

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@ChallengerCliff Good cake at Koffie&Cake Manningham Lane Pls RT, support local business @hiddenbradford

29 Mar

@FKB_Photo 3 Apr Gorgeous evening over Bingley Moors tonight - looked like spring but felt like winter! @hiddenbradford

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14 Apr

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@psudonymatic 17 Apr @hiddenbradford bradford law centre now provides free housing advice. Phone for appointments but they can help with problems. 100ObjectsSpecCollBD 18 Apr The notebook that founded UNESCO world heritage site #Saltaire#worldheritageday #bradford #hiddenbd #alpacas


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WHAT’S ON? MAY/JUNE EXHIBITIONS HowDo?! Off-The-Page; appraisal, celebration & the future?! Inviting its readership to the space to come and talk about their creative projects and ideas, to map and profile artists, venues, projects, promoters and organisations currently active in the city. 06/05/13 – 31/05/13, Gallery II Fieldworks: Co-researching Self-organised Culture: ‘Fieldworks’ draw’s together Andy Abbott and Caroline Hick’s off-site projects as an exhibition to explore their resonances and reflect on their method and content. 10/06/13 – 19/06/13, Gallery II Rena Effendi – Liquid Land: Legacies Of Oil And Power: Opening on the anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster, this exhibition reveals the struggles and resilience of people living in some of the world’s most polluted areas in the former Soviet Union. 26/04/13 – 22/06/13, Impressions Gallery WED 8 MAY. Philosophy Taster Session: 7.15PM-8.30PM, Delius Arts & Cultural Centre Billy Oceon: 7.30PM, St George’s Hall THU 9 MAY. Howdo?! Exhibition Launch Event: Activities, zines, workshops, stalls, cultural mapping Mik Artistik Gelosophy and Biroistism. 3PM-8PM, Gallery II Topic Folk Club Double Bill: Kyle Carey (USA), Josienne Clarke and Ben Walker. 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club Seamus McLoughlin: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 10 MAY. Carnival @ The New Bradford Playhouse: A night of festival flavoured fun with Slamboree, China Shop Bull, Drum Machine + 9PM – 6AM, The New Bradford Playhouse Tim Moon 8PM, The Castle Noche Latina: Live Cuban Salsa from Tarantismo and dance class from Theo & Kasia plus DJ Theo. 8PM, Caroline Social Club SAT 11 MAY. Just Do(ing) It, Again: The Politics Of DIY And Self-Organised Culture: Presentations, workshops, film and

discussions,10.30AM-6PM Vegan and vegetarian food, musical entertainment, drinking and conversation Til Late, The 1 in 12 Club The Red Room In Residence: Live music from Bradford’s best known cowboy-doom-funkquintet with special guests, djs and visuals 8PM – Late The New Beehive Inn Live Reggae Extravaganza Live music from RockToArt & African Hip-Hop outfit RDC Soldier. Selectors include Major Stone & DJ Ravers 8PM til late, Late Newby Sq. Community Pub Aggravation: Delius Lived Next Door WED 15 MAY. Live Room Presents Hamilton Loomis Band Featuring 2 x Grammy winner Fabian Hernandez 8PM, The Caroline Social Club THU 16 MAY. Topic Folk Club Presents Steve and Ruth Smith: Hammered dulcimer and old-time banjo from North Carolina. 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club Angelo Palladino: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 17 MAY. Jon Palmer Band: 8PM, The Castle It’s a Mean Old Scene: Hosted by Simon Mansfield & Richard Marriott 7.30PM, The New Inn, Thornton SUN 19 MAY. 15 Minutes Live: Made by Slung Low: Original new radio plays performed live in front of you with a band and foley sounds. 2PM, Handmade In Bradford National Vegetarian Week (20th-26th) Meateating Yorkshire folk are invited to #tryveggie at Prashad’s new restaurant (see voucher on pg46) THU 23 MAY. Topic Folk Club Present Reg Meuross 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club Fat Henry: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 24 MAY. BOSH! Ft. Featurecast 10PM–6AM, The Mill

FRI 24TH MAYSUN 26TH MAY

2013 Threadfest Opening: Crow Vs Crow Peter J Taylor, Jer Reid and Stevie Jones and Friends 6PM-9PM, Delius Arts and Cultural Centre.

Threadfest: No Hands VS Rockers & Rollers: Cut Yourself in Half, Super Luxury, NGOD 8PM - Late, The New Bradford Playhouse Threadfest: Keystone Acoustic Blues, Jazz, Folk and Country acoustic duo. 8PM-11PM, The Castle Hotel, Threadfest: Soundshack Records Reggae & Ska all vinyl DJ night: with DJ DreaDRock plus support. 8PM-11PM, The Black Swan SAT 25 MAY. Threadfest: M@BU Matinee 1PM – 6PM Delius Arts and Cultural Centre Threadfest: Voltage Studios 25th Anniversary: 5PM-11PM, The Black Swan Threadfest: Cafe Despard Caberet International: 7PM-Late, The New Bradford Playhouse Threadfest: Bare Plume VS DIY or Die 8PM-Late, The 1 in 12 Club SUN 26 MAY. Threadfest: What The Folk? acoustic session 3PM – 6PM The Sparrow Threadfest: Oriental Arts Showcase 2PM – 4PM Malik House Threadfest: The Family Elan and guests 7PM – 10PM The New Beehive Inn Threadfest: This Obscene Baby Auction presents: Hawk Eyes, Blacklisters + Many More 4PM – 11PM The 1 in 12 Club Threadfest Wind Down Party: Supper Club DJs playing all types of soulful house. 6PM - Late Malik House TUE 28 MAY. Jam Night: Proceeds towards the Piece Project 7PM – 10PM, Factory St. Studios THU 30 MAY. Topic Folk Club Present James Hickman and Dan Cassidy: 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club The Bradford Catholic Players Present Minus The Intention: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 31 MAY. The Ukelele Orchestra of Great Britain 7.30PM, St.George’s Concert Hall No Hands and This Obscene Baby Auction Present NOPE! 8PM – 2AM, The Polish Club. Jim Jarat: 8PM The Castle Friday Night Lights + Some Rabbits: Delius Lived Next Door SAT 1 JUN. Bradford LGBT Pride: A family friendly event. 12PM – 7PM, City Park Monkeyheads: Silly improvisation for a bit of a laugh. Two teams lines up against one another

8PM, New Bradford Playhouse Illusory Centre: Delius Lived Next Door SUN 2 JUN. The Live Room Presents The Kennedys + Pip Mountjoy: 8PM, The Caroline Social Club TUE 4 JUN. Open Mic Night – T’Foot Of Ahr Stairs 7PM, Factory St. Studios THU 6 JUN. Hifi Presents Eglo Takeover: Eglo live band featuring Fatima, ARP 101 live, Alexander Nut 10PM – 4AM The Hifi Club, Leeds Topic Folk Club: 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club FRI 7 JUN. Yer Don’t Stop – Hip Hop Night 9PM-4AM, The New Bradford Playhouse Nigel Broadbent, 8PM The Castle SAT 8 JUN. The Red Room In Residence: Live music 8PM – Late, The New Beehive Inn Plastic Letters: Delius Lived Next Door THU 13 JUN. The Enough Project - Emma Adams: Brimming & Cathy Crabb: Something Right: Devised to respond to one simple question – What is Enough? One simple question, and two very distinct 45-minute plays by two outstanding writing talents 7.30PM Theatre In The Mill (also FRI 14 JUN and SAT 15 JUN) Topic Folk Club Presents Bob Fox: Legendary performer of the North east’s musical heritage since 1975. 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club Aiden Sea Monster: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 14 JUN. Noche Latina: Llive Salsa from Salsa Como Loco with DJ Lubi. 8PM, Caroline Social Club Paula Ryan: 8PM The Castle SAT 15 JUN. Vinyl DJ Workshop for Families: 12PM-3PM Delius Arts Centre Pre Shuttle Shuffle Festival Event: with Kelter + Kascarade + The Sentimentalists + One Stop Railway. 18.30PM, Factory St Studios Topic Folk Club Special: Singing workshop 3PM. Concert by Soundsphere, all female a capella group. 7PM, Bradford Irish Club Blue Star Tattoo: Delius Lived Next Door THU 20 JUN. Topic Folk Club Present The Hut People: 8.30PM, Bradford Irish Club Tom Nova: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 21 JUN. The Live Room Presents Martyn Joseph +

COMING SOON...A NEW WHAT’S ON LISTINGS PAPER FOR BRADFORD

SIGN UP TO OUR NEW MONTHLY WHAT’S ON E-BULLETIN NOW: WWW.HOWDOMAGAZINE.CO.UK

Luke Jackson: 8PM The Caroline Social Club Martin Francis: 8PM The Castle It’s a Mean Old Scene: Musician Joe Solo from Scarborough & poet Andy Wilson from Hull 7.30PM The New Inn, Thornton THU 27 JUN. Topic Folk Club Present Andy Hill: 8.30PM Bradford Irish Centre Cieran Miller & Dave McKinley: Delius Lived Next Door FRI 28 JUN. No Hands and This Obscene Baby Auction: 8PM – 2AM, The Polish Club. FRI 12 JUL. Carnival @ The New Bradford Playhouse Festival flavoured fun with La La & The Boo Ya, G.O.D. Djs, Lkewis, Bosh Djs + more 9PM – 6AM The New Bradford Playhouse

WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAY: Music club for young people with autism Starts 13 May Factory St. Studios TUESDAY: Stroke Survivors Arts Group 10.30AM Delius Arts & Cultural Centre Arts for Wellbeing, A free programme for over 60s. 12.30PM Delius Arts & Cultural Centre How to grow your own veg FREE Adult sessions, 12:45 pm to 3:30pm, Cafe West Healthy Living Centre, BD15 7PA WEDNESDAY: Organ recital preceded by buffet lunch (until 10 JUL) 1.05PM Bradford Cathedral Introductory Philosophy Course (until 17 JUL) 7.15PM Delius Arts & Cultural Centre How to grow your own veg FREE Adult sessions 10.30 AM to 12.30PM, Cafe West Healthy Living Centre, BD15 7PA SATURDAY: 1in12 Café Open from 12pm every Saturday, Homemade lunch in an inspiring space. Saturday Stop Free creative activities for children, comfy sofas and weekend papers 12.00PM to 4.30PM Impressions Gallery

If you would like your event to appear in our new monthly What’sOn e-bulletin & printed listings paper please send information to:

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whatson@howdomagazine.co.uk


WE BELIEVE IN THE POWER OF PRINT. TO GET YOUR BRAND, YOUR WORD, YOUR INFORMATION - TO THE CONCIOUSNESS OF THE GENERAL PUBLIC.

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CREATIVE MARKETING SOLUTIONS, PRODUCTION, IMPLEMENTATION & LOGISTICS. > Example Flyer Distribution Report

Music Venue Theatre

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Service:

Bespoke run to category locations: Art Studio, Business Centre, Cafe, Education Further, Gallery, Hotel, Leisure, Library, Local Gov, Media Org, Pub, Takeaway, Music Venue.

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Bradford City Centre, Little Germany & University Area

Est. No. Of Drops:

Approx. 1800 Flyers to 101 locations (15 per location)

Quantity:

x1 Print (Each additional print comes with 25% discount, Posters cost an additional 50p per location)

Price:

£170 -- [eg1. with 2x Print £297.50] [eg2. with 101 posters £255]

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Price per Flyer:

£0.08

Bradford City Centre: Kirkgate Shopping Centre Info Desk, CBGB's, Oastler Centre, Waterstones, Sinkee Oriental Supermarket, Safin Restaurant (Upstairs Cafe), Bradford Mechanics Institute Library, Balanga Bar, Fitness First, Checkpoint - BWICC, Jamie's Ministry of Food, Feroni's Cafe, Le Café Bleu, BCB Radio, Fountains Cafe, Noodle Rice, Tourist Information Bradford, Bradford City Hall, Impressions Gallery, In the Place Fish & Chips, Starbucks, Victoria Hotel, Exchange Bar, Woodspean Training Centre Head Office Canteen, Hilton Hotel, Midland Hotel, Midland Hotel Bar, Deli Chez, Café Intouch, Coffee Bianco, In Communities City House , Shoulder of Mutton, City Vaults, Pannini Shack, The Red Room Coffee House, Supreme Fitness, Courtroom Bar, Malik House, Registery Office, The Sparrow Bier Café, Forsters Bistro, The Castle Hotel, 2 in 1Takeaway, Westgate Fisheries, Harp of Erin, The Sun, The New Beehive Inn, Irish Centre. Little Germany: The Sandwich Bar, Sunrise Radio, City Training Services, Christopher Paul Training Centre, Napoleons Casino, Forster Community College, Council Building next to Kala Sangam, Daisy's Cafe - Kala Sangam, New Bradford Playhouse, Arts and Community Resource Centre, Bradford Cathedral, Kala Sangam Bradford Student Area: Delius Arts Centre, Culture Fusion - Connextions, Bombay Stores, University of Bradford: GALLERY II , University of Bradford: International Student Office / Room 101, University of Bradford: Library, University of Bradford: Peace Studies Communal Area, University of Bradford: SCIM Student Support Office, University of Bradford: Student Central, University of Bradford: Theatre in The Mill, Dunkers Delight, Wetherspoons Sir Titus, Jacobs Well Bradford Council Office Reception, Bradford Central Library, Dixey Chicken, Mystic Pizza, Polish Parish Club, Bradford College Students' Union, Bradford Art College (Yorkshire Craft Centre), Westleigh Hotel, Treehouse Café, Parmesan House, Delius Lived Next Door, Cafe East, Gumption Business Centre, Jury Inn Hotel, Lord Clyde,

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RODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRO

©HowDo?! Magazine

40 Print Plus UK 41 Spice Lounge & Rest. 41 Sunrise Radio 103.2fm 42 New Bradford Playhouse 43 Arts & Resource Centre 44 The Design Exchange; Northern Lines, Oriental Arts

45 Kala Sangam 45 Daisy’s Cafe 46 Napoleons Casino & Rest 47 Cafe Intouch 48 City Vaults 48 Peace Museum 49 Pizza Pieces 49 Exchange Bar 49 Hand Made in Bradford 49 Fabric’s PopUp Shop 50 Kroustie Sandwich Bar 51 Arena Sports Bar 52 Gasworks 53 Bradford CVS 54 Balanga Bar 55 Oakleaf Coaches 56 Smorgasbord Coffee Bar 56 I Wear Opticians 57 Ashley Simone Hair&Beauty 57 Oxfam Bookshop 58 Studio Bijoux 58 Le Cafe Bleu 58 Blues Hair Workshop 59 Table Decor 60 Malik House 61 The Sparrow Bier Cafe 62 Singkee Oriental Supermarket 63 BCB Radio 106.6fm 64 Oastler Centre 65 Sweet Centre Restaurant 66 SHIPLEY / SALTAIRE; Kirkgate Centre, Shipley Pride, Saltaire Bookshop, Saltaire Brewery, Masserella’s Cafe


HowDo?! Magazine Issue 11; Collectors Edition