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SEPTEMBER 2017 A publication of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians All Rights Reserved Š

JIINGTAMOK 2017

Photo by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

The GTB Annual Powwow was held Saturday and Sunday August 19th and 20th. Veterans and service members (pictured above) carry the flags during the opening Grand Entry ceremony.

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S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

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GTB NEWS

SEPTEMBER

A publication of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians All Rights Reserved ©

FEATURED CONTENT

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FRESH EMPLOYEES PUBLIC NOTICES ELDERS CALENDERS HEALTH CARE ELDERS BIRTHDAYS OBITUARIES 2017 POWWOW ELDERS OPEN FORUM TREE DEDICATION/RETIREMENT PUBLIC SAFETY GTB GOV. FLOAT IDEA BENODJEHN CENTER GRADUATION GTB NRD OTTAWAY TRIP 2017 HEALTH FAIR LANGUAGE CAMP EYAAWING

Grand Traverse Band News

Send submissions in by the 3rd Friday each month.

Editor: Jared Sonderegger

jared.sonderegger@gtbindians. com Phone: (231) 534-7366 Cell: (231) 866-0820

Multi-media: George Antoine george.antoine@gtbindians. com Phone: (231) 534-7008

2605 N West Bay Shore Drive, Peshawbestown, MI 49682-9275 ©, Grand Traverse Band News, all rights

reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the editor is prohibited. The Grand Traverse Band does not assume liability for unsolicited materials. Materials submitted for publication become the property of the Grand Traverse Band. The right to edit or refuse to print is maintained. Subscriptions are $24 per year. Please contact the editor for assistance.

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE 911 PER CAP HOT LINE 231-534-7372 JOB HOT LINE 1-888-2946 TRIBAL GOV 231-534-7000 TRIBAL POLICE 231-534-7777 FIRE DEPARTMENT 231-534-7666 TRIBAL COURT 231-534-7050 GOV SWITCHBOARD 231-534-7750 TOLL FREE 1-866-534-7750

Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Office of the Tribal Chairman: Thurlow “Sam” McClellan Aanii Boozhoo GTB Membership!! For several months now I have been writing to you, the membership, all of the observations, questions, concerns, and some recommendations I have witnessed and developed within the Tribal Government and Gaming enterprises. Some of my colleagues are mispresenting my articles and the intent of the articles by saying they are not truthful or they are just my opinion. I would like to know what part of my articles are not true and if they have answers to some of the questions, or some resolutions to the problems I would gladly take them and share them with you all. I am staying consistent that I believe in FAIRNESS, HONESTY, and TRANSPARENCY in communications with the Tribal Members of GTB. As many of you know I have been reviewing our annual audits and found that the Leelanau Sands Casino is clearly and consistently losing money. This information that I found from the audits is available on the website and at any of our satellite offices. I’ve reviewed the audit years of 2014-2015-2016, and each of these years are of concern to me because of the businesses that are losing money year-after-year. I’ve attached a sheet that shows the comparison of the 2015 audit to the 2016 audit. I am concerned that Turtle Creek Casino and Hotel is paying for all of the businesses that are operating in the red. I have not seen any evidence of a plan to show how these businesses will turn around and make money. We have to stop the bleed of revenues to businesses that are losing money. I have not been provided any evidence to show that these business losses are any benefit to the ‘cost of doing business”. Without this information it can only show that the businesses are failing. Below is a series of questions that I have regarding the audits, the proposal to build a new casino, the new gas station, and the Village Grand Traverse Development that we invested in. We are waiting for answers from EDC on these matters; unfortunately I rarely see information in its entirety and have yet to see a business proposal from EDC that details the return on investment for any of these projects. These are questions that all of the membership should be asking, in return for solid informed responses. 1.

SAVE THE DATES

2017

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EVENTS NRD Fall Feast Arthur Duhamel Marina Sat. September 30th COMMUNITY MEETINGS

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September 13th Benzie office

Why don’t the percap letters to members reflect the same Leelanau Sands Casino (LSC) income as the audits? (20142015-2016) the percap letters to membership present that LSC made money, when the audits clearly showed that it has been running at a loss. Why are not all of intercompany transfers from Turtle Creek included in the RAO? If this is money over and above the net gaming win, how is it decided how much to transfer each year? In the audits the cash transfer before coming to government appears to be paying for all of the losing nongaming businesses. Why aren’t we following the RAO? Are net revenues to include all of the non-gaming business losses? Show the demand for a new LSC and the projections: 1) LSC averages $13 million per year and spends that amount plus the amount over budget; 2) What is the customer count for LSC for the past 5 years, by month, and by day; 3) what are the customers spending their money on at LSC; 4) How much did the LSC cost to build, the showroom, and any renovations; 5)Apply these same questions to the Lodge motel. (If we plan on using any of the Tribe’s long-term (10% funds) or the EDC (15%) funds there is specific language in the ordinance for each of these


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n ) of how and why these investment funds should be spent.) 5. Why isn’t the slot department involved in the LSC development for projections? This is an integral part of net revenues. 6. Is the land proposed for the new LSC gaming identified, how long do we have for the BIA/NEPA to be completed, what is the status of the USDA loan; 7. The original LSC proposal had a potential 1-2% return on investment, why can’t we build within our means; we would be better off leaving the money in the bank to earn interest; 8. Was there a Request for Proposal (RFP) completed for the contract that was awarded to JCJ (design firm/company for proposed LSC) for the new proposed LSC? Were there other responses to the RFP? If there was not an RFP completed, what were the criteria for selecting JCJ? I was told that we spent $3 million already on just the design of the new LSC, where is this money coming from? 9. Where are we in the gas station contracts? Has the land issue been resolved? How are we paying for the new gas station? Do the return on investment for the gas station show that the ‘cash flow’ being proposed 10. Why aren’t we financing the proposed LSC? Has the business plan for the new LSC been reviewed by PNC for assistance in determining that this business plan is the best plan for GTB? 11. When are the revenue transfers occurring from TCCH to the other non-gaming businesses? 12. Are these transfers coming out of a general fund (depreciation)? Because the audit presents it as such. 13. Shouldn’t transfers to non-gaming businesses that are losing money be coming from the 15% Economic Development, so that Tribal Council and Tribal members are made aware that there are businesses losing money? 14. All of the businesses within the two casinos should be accounted for separately in the audit. 15. Do all of the non-gaming businesses have their own checking accounts, how are revenues managed? 16. In 2015, when the $3.035 million was paid from EDC to government for part of the roads costs at VGT, was this out of the EDC general fund or the 15%? If it was the 15% per the EDC motion to do so, then how are we showing that the roads are an asset or of value to the Tribe and Tribal members? If not why are we spending gaming dollars on non-gaming ventures? 17. Since the pay-off of TCCH in 2012, why is there not a significant increase in the net revenues? It only shows that expenses have gone up. We promised Tribal members that paying of TCCH would increase RAO, therefore increasing percap. 18. Recommendation that all transfers from TCCH or gaming revenue to non-gaming businesses be approved, ratified, and paid from the 15% Economic Development and approved by the government: TRIBAL COUNCIL. 19. Recommendation that all expenses paid for projects for the TCCH or LSC be documented as mini programs to show how a business plan was used to portray that the project is anticipating bringing more revenue into the Gaming facilities. (I.e. renovations) 20. Recommendation that all businesses that are losing money must have a business plan to turn around the business to become profitable within 6-months or close down. We’ve been carrying losing businesses for several years. If it is a cost of doing business, we must show our Tribal members the reasonable rate of return. 21. Village Grand Traverse (VGT) investment what did this all entail? a. What did the $4.5 million investment into VGT buy GTB? b. What does 40% partnership mean-40% of what? c. Does GTB own any of the land? d. What was the purchase price of the property? e. Who is paying the property taxes? f. Did the 7.4 million GTB paid for the 72 road improvements have any financial impact on GTB’s investment into the project? Or was this a gift? g. Where did EDC get the funds? h. Were the EDC transactions on VGT-GAAP approved? (Should EDC have $$ and can they be used for this non-gaming purpose) i. What happens once trust status is achieved on the property? j. How does trust status benefit the partnership? It appears the value of the property would be lost with the trust status, and it should be defined as to how we will have a return on investment with potential businesses. k. Where do we stand with potential business leases now—are there any pending?

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l. Is there going to be any development prior to the land going into trust? m. What, if any, is the projected investment for infrastructure? n. Is there a timeline/projection to reach 100% occupancy? o. Did we have the project reviewed by an investment advisor? p. Has the Government CFO and Government legal been included in any of the planning meetings?

The Revenue Allocation Ordinance (RAO) is the governing ordinance regarding the use of net revenues. As many of you know it is broken down into: 50% for percapita, 25% for Government Operations, 15% for Economic Development, and 10% for Long-term investments. There is specific ordinance language that governs how the RAO is determined based on net revenues. I am concerned that not only are we covering the losses of 8 of the 10 businesses but that we are not disbursing according to the RAO that must also follow GAAP. I have taken the following from the Code Book for your consideration: Chapter 16 of the Code Book—RAO Net revenues (3) Any Tribal member shall have standing to raise the question of whether the Tribal Council is following the RAO distribution formula. Such challenges shall be brought in the Tribal Court under a cause of action styled as “RAO Distribution Cause of Action.” The elements of cause of action shall be 1) must be a Tribal member; 2) the standards of the RAO alleged to have been violated; and 3) factual allegations that allege a present violation of the standards. The Tribal Court shall fashion the remedy consistent with Tribal law and generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Next, I would like to discuss the Elder’s Advisory 2% application. The mid-year 2% distribution was delayed due to Tribal Council not having an agreement on the distribution. Four of the Council voted down the 2% distribution based upon a far-fetched, yet-to-be-proved potential that the state will audit GTB as self-funding because some of us strongly believe in funding the Elder’s Advisory Board. What I’ve heard in the community is we can approve cannabis legislation and take a chance with losing not only state but potential federal funding but we can’t approve the 2% for the Elder’s Advisory committee? If we were self-funding we would have been audited long ago and EVERY 501c3 that we approved would be an audit finding. a. The 2% application itself asks for how many GTB members the application is proposing to be impacted—wouldn’t the applications themselves indicate self-funding issues? b. Almost every 2% application identifies the number of GTB members that may be served—aren’t all of these potential audits for self-funding whether it is 1 or 200 members identified?

Regarding the recent recall matter. The Tribal Court has yet to release their determination of the recent recall case with the Election Board. The judicial actions of the Tribal Court must be grounded in the prescribed law, after careful consideration of all of the facts. The petitioners of the recall have a strong likelihood of success in establishing that rights to due process and equal protection, guaranteed by the GTB Constitution have been violated with the decision of the Election Board. I am waiting to see how the Tribal Court will be addressing this matter. Follow-up and follow-through. The Council has been holding open forum meetings with the elders, community meetings in Antrim, Benzie, Charlevoix, Traverse City, and Peshawbestown, and we take the concerns of the membership at our regular and special sessions with the Council. We have staff to document a schedule of issues that go unresolved, month-after-month. I will continue to keep the issues on the list until they are resolved. I have not lost vision or optimism for our Tribe regardless of obstacles. We have many opportunities and potential to grow and manage our Tribe for success of all members. Are we a representative government or a dictatorship? We need the input of the tribal members. Where are the voices of the members who don’t live in the six-county area? Where is their voice in developments for their county and the at-large members? I hope to have a CONSTITUTIONAL COMMITTEE reinstated very soon to help address these issues. Please feel free to call my office any time, 231-534-7129 or email at Thurlow.McClellan@gtbindians.com


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S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

WELCOME NEW EMPLOYEES GTB News would like to acknowledge the employees that were recently hired. Welcome, and the best of luck on your new career paths.

Cheryl Loubert, MD Physician

Stephen Moldenhauer Fire & Rescue Chief/Administrator

Kyle Kilbourne Automotive Apprentice

Leanne Alber Grants & Evaluation Associate

Silvano Southbird Purchasing Clerk

BIRTHDAY SHOUT OUTS HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO OUR SON, JIM PTAK JR., WHOSE BIRTHDAY IS SEPT. 24. - LOVE, MOM & DAD, OLIVIA, KRIS & SAL, MARJIE, CHARLIE, MADDIE & ISSAC Submitted by: Gloria Ptak

HAPPY 9TH BIRTHDAY TO OUR GRANDSON, ISAAC PETOSKEY, ON SEPT. 3. -LOVE, GRANDPA & GRANDMA PTAK, MOM & SAL INGRAO, MARJIE, MADDIE & CHARLIE, UNCLE JIM & OLIVIA Submitted by: Gloria Ptak


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

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FREE ONLINE TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SKILLS TRAINING!

There have been several requests for training in Technology and Computers. For any person who would like to gain new skills and increase their employability or just learn how to use the internet and e-mail, then there is help! For free training on technology, computers, typing, reading, math, work and career and even everyday life skills like grill safety, enter GCFLEARNFREE.ORG into your internet web browser and start today. If you need further assistance, please stop in or call the GTB 477 Program.

TYPING TRAINING

In today’s world, much of the job market requires computer skills. The ability to type has become extremely important. While some jobs may require upwards of 60 words per minute (wpm), many office jobs and employers are satisfied with 40 wpm. This may seem like a daunting task to get up to this speed, but there is help with this too! At Typing.com you can learn proper finger placement and train in the comfort of your own home, making it that much easier to increase your employability! Many labor positions do not require typing skills at all. However, having a skill in more than one field will ensure that you will be able to find a job if you are injured, facing a lay off or simply decide to change careers. Losing your job and having to start over (for any reason) can be extremely scary and difficult. No one wants to be start over, but if you had to… wouldn’t you want to be prepared? If this still isn’t a good enough reason to prepare, how about because it can be fun! For free typing training and GAMES, check out FREETYPINGGAMES.NET or TYPING.COM. The games are fun for children and adults. Parents: don’t forget that your children are growing up in a technology rich world, any training at a young age will have a lifetime of benefits! If you decide to use these programs, then please let me know if these programs have helped or not so I can continue to find additional resources for our community.

YOUR OPINION NEEDED

Many Tribal members beginning a new job need assistance with transportation to and from training and/or work. While the GTB 477 program may help with bus passes or gas, there is still an unmet need of getting to the bus stop. Many people live close enough to work that it wouldn’t be worth taking a bus, but far enough away that walking proves to be a great barrier as well. In order to assist Tribal members, the GTB 477 Program is requesting your opinion about having a Bike Share Program. This program would allow participants of the 477 program to assist with their transportation needs. Participants would sign a contract to take care of the bikes and then return them for the next person to use once they have earned enough money to purchase one of their own. If you would benefit from a program like this or think that this would help Tribal members in need (for training/ employment purposes), then please e-mail or call the GTB 477 Program office and make your opinion heard. Without the input of our community, this program may never come into existence. The GTB 477 Program is here to reduce joblessness among Indian People within our service area and to serve our community. Your opinion matters! Please make it heard! If you have any other ideas about what may help Tribal members obtain and keep employment and/or training, then please call or e-mail your ideas to: 231-534-7767 Aeawosgi.campos@gtbindians.com GTB 477 Program, Human Resources 2605 North West Bay Shore Dr. Peshawbestown, Mi. 49682

PRESS RELEASE Peshawbestown, Michigan, August 14, 2017 – The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) announces that starting, Friday, August 18th, two foreign vessels will dock in Grand Traverse Bay to offer the public access to exhibits on the boats’ above-deck areas. The boats are the property of a private money-making venture, whose company website acknowledges, euphemistically, that Columbus was an “enigmatic and flawed human being . . . who . . . altered the course of Western history.” As an individual, Columbus was indeed a highly flawed person. In the abstract, Columbus represents an ethnocentric account of contact between American and European peoples. In most ways, the boats are no different from any of the various tourist activities offered throughout the area by representing the past in present replica physical form. But in several critical ways, they are uniquely damaging, because the replica ships represent the narrative of “discovery” of the “new world” by European claimants and the devastating consequences of the “discovery” for indigenous people. The Nina and Pinta are symbols of a standard and system of thought that should be repugnant to the American ideals of equality and property rights for all people. Indeed, Traverse City, along with other local and state governments, now recognizes “Indigenous Peoples Day” on Columbus Day to support this paradigm shift. GTB’s ancestors, under the threat of incarceration and removal to the west, signed the Treaty of 1836 granting most of the Lower Peninsula to the United States. The Treaty of 1855 subsequently created permanent reservations in Michigan for our ancestors. While the implementation of the Treaty of 1855 was fundamentally flawed, the Treaty of 1855 did recognize the rights of our ancestors to remain and prosper in Michigan. GTB still seeks to hold the United States accountable for the terms of the 1855 Treaty. GTB invites anyone interested in our history or culture, along with anyone interested in different perspectives, Native American culture, or regional history, to visit GTB’s Eyaawing Museum on M-22 located in Peshawbestown.


S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

PUBLIC NOTICES

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DECEMBER 2017 PER CAPITA

PER CAPITA ADDRESS CHANGE DEADLINE IS NOVEMBER 14TH. PLEASE CONTACT MEMBERSHIP OFFICE (231) 534-7101 REGARDING ANY ADDRESS CHANGES.

PER CAPITA DIRECT DEPOSIT • If you have not already signed up for direct deposit of your per capita checks, Friday, November 3rd is the deadline to sign up for a direct deposit of your DECEMBER 2017 per capita and all future per capita checks. The form must be received in our office by November 3rd. • This deadline (November 3rd) also applies to those that are currently signed up for direct deposit and wish to change the bank information. • Please Note: If you do not have a valid address on file with the membership office, your per capita direct deposit will be suspended until a valid address is received in the Membership Office. • If you need to change the information for your direct deposit, please submit a new Direct Deposit Agreement form. To request one, you may contact Christina Loucks at (231)534-7131. This form is also available on www.gtbindians.org. • Once completed, the Direct Deposit Agreement form must be mailed in or dropped off at the Government Accounting building. FAXES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. • If you wish to cancel your direct deposit, you need to submit this request in writing to the Per Capita Office or fill out the Direct Deposit Cancellation form. If not using the form, please write that you wish to cancel your per capita direct deposit, sign, date, and include tribal id number and/or social security number. The deadline to cancel your current direct deposit is Wednesday, November 15th. SORNA: Zones of Restriction The GTB Code pertaining to registered sex offenders has identified certain areas on Tribal Lands that are restricted zones as follows: “…any school building, on real property comprising any school, or in any conveyance owned, leased, or contracted by a school to transport students to or from school or a schoolrelated activity when persons under the age of eighteen (18) are present in the building, on the grounds or in the conveyance…” Registered sex offenders are prohibited from being present in, loitering, working or taking up residence within 300 feet of these areas, which have been identified as follows: • • • • • •

Benodjenh Center Benzie Satellite Office Camp Alden Charlevoix Satellite Office M-22 Building Youth Opportunities Building

Maps for referencing these restricted zones are available for viewing on the SORNA page of the GTB website and will be posted in buildings throughout the area. The SORNA page can be accessed on the GTB website by clicking on the link for the Public Safety page. The SORNA page will be updated with current information related to the GTB Sex Offender Registry Code, links to community notification websites, and links to community resources. Please contact Denise Johnson, SORNA Coordinator, at 231-534-7370 with any questions. SORNA: Who needs to register with GTB? The GTB Code pertaining to Sex Offender Registration has designated who must register with the Grand Traverse Band Tribal Police Department. The following individuals are required to register with GTB Tribal Police:  A sex offender who has been convicted by GTB Tribal Court, regardless of whether or not that person is or will be residing on Tribal Lands.  A sex offender who is incarcerated by the Tribe while completing any sentence for a covered sex offense, regardless of their location.  A sex offender who resides within Tribal Lands, is homeless within Tribal Lands, or is transient within Tribal Lands.  A sex offender who is employed by the Tribe in any capacity or otherwise employed within Tribal Lands.  A sex offender who is a student in any capacity within Tribal Lands.  A sex offender who is visiting Tribal Lands. Registration requirements pertain to ALL convicted sex offenders, regardless of the court or location they were convicted in. Registered sex offenders who are visiting Tribal Lands are now required to register their presence with Tribal Police PRIOR to entry onto Tribal Lands, and may register up to 72 hours prior to their visit. This includes entering onto Tribal Lands for ANY PURPOSE with the exclusion of patronizing gaming establishments or Eagletown Market, and visiting Tribal Court for a valid purpose. You are strongly encouraged to contact the Tribal Police Department at 231-534-7777 prior to arriving in order to ensure that someone is available to assist you with registration. If you are unsure if you are required to register with GTB Police Department, please contact Denise Johnson in the SORNA Office at 231-534-7370. You can also contact GTB Tribal Police Department: 231-534-7777.


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

Scholarship Money Available

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The Peter Olson Scholarship is available to any Native American living in the Diocese of Gaylord Peshawbestown, Petoskey, and Manistee - who is in college or graduate school. Applications are available by contacting Sister Susan Gardner, Director of the Native American Apostolate and Pastoral Administrator of St. Kateri Parish. Call 231-271-6651 to request an application. The applications are presented to the board who decides the amount of money each applicant will receive

Public Notification Notice to Torrie Blevins and Raven Mitchell. Please take notice that a Notice of Petition has been filed in Tribal Court , Regarding Conservator and Guardianship for Susannah Mitchell–Warrington, under Tribal Court Case #: 2017-2804-CV-GD. Torrie Blevins and Raven Mitchell, please contact the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Tribal Court at: 231-534-7050 or email Tribal Court at: tribalcourt@gtbindians.com.

Important Membership Announcement The Compensation Committee currently has three (3) committee vacancies: • •

one (1) appointment to be filled by the Tribal Chair for a 4-year term; two (2) appointments to be filled by the Compensation Committee for a 3-year term.

Interested registered voters of the GTB membership who are not currently employed by the GTB government, EDC gaming enterprises, or the Grand Traverse Resort are encouraged to submit a letter of interest to the Tribal Chairman’s office. Please note: you must reside in GTB’s six-county service area to serve on this committee. The Tribal Councilors’ Salary Ordinance states that the establishment of the Compensation Committee is to address the questions of compensation, allowances and benefits for Tribal Council positions. The open committee positions will be filled according to 1 GTBC § 404(d) of the GTB Code: The Compensation Committee shall be composed of seven registered voters of the Tribe. (1) Two shall be selected by the Tribal Chair and have a term of offices for four (4) years. Three shall be selected by the Tribal Council by a majority vote and have a term of office for two (2) years. The other two committee members shall be selected by majority vote of the five selected members and have a term of office for three (3) years. (2) Vacancies shall be selected in the same manner as the position which was vacated by term of office, resignations or death. Please send your letter of interest to: Office of Thurlow “Sam” McClellan, Tribal Chairman GTB of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians 2605 NW Bayshore Drive Peshawbestown, MI 49682


S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

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September 2017 Planning Leelanau Sun

Mon

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Tue

Wed

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Fri

Sat

1 TC Staff Meeting 9:30am

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7 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45 TC Euchre 1pm

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13 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

14 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

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Pool Tournament TC 11:30am

Farm Market 9am

20 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

21 No Dex’s Lunch

22 GTB Gov. Closed

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Greg Bailey 231-492-4976 Wa’Sinade 231-866-1013

All Activities are Subject to CHANGE call your coordinator To Confirm Activities

All Activities are Alcohol and Drug Free

4 Offices Closed

5 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45 TC Store Run 9am

6 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

12Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45 Elders Advisory / Tribal Council open Form 10am 19 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

NO DEX’S LUNCH 10

11 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45 Bargain Store 9am

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18 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

All Site Bingo TC 1pm TC Store Run 9am

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Tribal Council Meeting 9:30am

25 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

26 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

27 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

28 Lunch at Dex’s 11:30—12:45

All Site Craft TC 1:30

Leelanau Bingo 1:30

Birthday Bash TC 1pm

Euchre 1pm

September 2017.BENZIE/ MANISTEE ELDER’S 1. Su n

M on

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BENZIE ELDER COORDINATOR GLORIA PTAK OFFICE: 534-7824 CELL: 492-4358

ALL ACTIVITIES ARE DRUG & ALCOHOL FREE. PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM ACTIVITY.

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HOME VISITS

ALL SITE EUCHRE T.C. 1-4 (LV. @ 11)

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ELDER STAFF MEETING T.C. 9:30

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ALL GOVT. OFFICES CLOSED LABOR DAY

LUNCH 11:30 MANISTEE SHOP 1-3 (LV. @ 12:30)

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LUNCH 11:30 TRIBAL COUNCIL/ CRAFT DAY 12:30-2 ELDER’S ADVIS. T.C. 10-3 (LV. @ 9)

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ALL SITE POOL KALKASKA FARM TOURN./PIZZA MKT./YARD SALES T.C. 11:30-3 10-3 (LV. @ 9) LV. @ 10:30)

BREAKFAST MANISTEE SHOP 9-12 (LV. @ 8:30)

LUNCH 11:30 MINI BINGO/ LANGUAGE CLASS 12:30-1:30 NURSE KATHY HERE

HOME VISITS

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LUNCH 11:30 CRAFT DAY 12:30-2

Fri

LUNCH 11:30 MINI BINGO 12:30-1:30

BIRTHDAY BASH T.C. 1-2 (LV. @ 11)

ALL SITE LUNCH/ ALL GOVT. OFFICES BINGO T.C. CLOSED 11:30-4 STATE INDIAN (LV. @ 10) DAY

ALL SITE EUCHRE T.C. 1-4 (LV. @ 11)


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S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

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SEPTEMBER 2017 CHARLEVOIX ELDER’S Activity Calendar

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Staff Meeting 3-M 9:30 am 4

LABOR DAY GOVERNMENT OFFICES CLOSED

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10 HAPPY GRANDPARENTS DAY!

11 Language w/Isadore & Pat, CHX 11:30-2:00 pm

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18 Lunch/Mini Bingo Chx 11:30-1:30 pm

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Sat 2

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Virginia Fields (Gene) Elder Dept. (O) 231.534.7066 © 231.492.4351

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Crafts CHX

10-12:00 pm Raphael, Robbin Sonderegger, Jared; Raphael, Tanya Putney, Pat Elders September Calendar 2017 Wednesday, August 16, 2017 12:48:36 PM

Farm Market Kalkaska 10-1:00 pm TC Open Forum,10-11:30 Elders Advisory/Lunch 3-M 11:30-2:30 pm

Sewing Chx 10:00-12:00 pm

Puzzle Day CHX 10-12:00 pm

6

Home Visits

7

Crafts Cvx 10-12:00 pm

13 All Sites Pool Tournament/Lunch TC, 11:30-2:30 pm

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20 Tribal Council Peshawbestown 9:30 am

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27 Birthday Bash 3-M 1-2:00 pm

28

Exercise Cvx 10-12:00 pm

All Sites Lunch/Bingo, 3-M 11:30-2:30 pm

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9

15

16

22 State Indian Day

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Gov’t Offices CLOSED

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All Activities are Alcohol & Drug Free Events.

Meal Site is Charlevoix Senior Center, Serves Monday—Thursday From 12-12:30 pm

Shopping Petoskey 10:00-2:00 pm

to CHANGE. Please call ahead to confirm activities. Calendar subject

September 2017 Antrim/Traverse City


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S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

HEALTH CARE

$$ DOUBLE UP FOOD BUCKS $$

Eat Healthy and be Rewarded Are you getting the most from your SNAP/Bridge Card Benefits? Earn a healthy reward yourself and your family by increasing your consumption of fruits and vegetables. The Double Up Food Bucks programs provides SNAP recipients/Bridge Cardholders with an extra incentive to use their benefits at farmers markets and participating grocery stores. For every dollar you spend on fruits and vege-tables the Double Up Bucks program will give you up to benefit credit to spend on more fruits and vegetables. For example, if you spend $10 from your Bridge Card at a participating farmers market, you receive another $10 to buy fresh fruits and veggies. This same program is available when shopping at Oryana Community Co-op on Lake Street in Traverse City. Use your SNAP Bridge Card to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at the Oryana Community Co-op and get FREE matching Double Up Dollars, up to $20 per day. Credits earned at Oryana must be spent on any fresh fruits or vegetables at the Oryana Co-op store.

How it works at the Farmers Market: Bring your SNAP Bridge Card to the farmer’s market office or info booth before you shop. Farmers Market staffs are there to help. Buy any SNAP-eligible foods at the market with your Bridge Card dollars. After you shop check back with the farmers market info booth and the farmers market representative match what you spend with FREE Double Up Food Bucks – up to $20, every market day. Use them right away or later on to buy Michigan grown fruits & vegetables. Participating Farmers Markets as of August 1, 2017: Benzie County: Elberta Farmers’ Market - Grow Benzie Farmers Market Marvin’s Garden Spot Charlevoix County: Boyne City Farmers Market Charlevoix Farmer’s Market Grand Traverse: Sara Hardy Downtown Farmers Market Leelanau County: Glen Arbor Farmers Market Lake Leelanau Farmers Market Leland Farmers Market Northport Farmers Market Suttons Bay Farmers Market For additional information go to www. doubleupfoodbucks.org Submitted by Beth Sieloff.

Tribal Members Diabetic Shoes When: If you have diabetes, you know how challenging it can be to manage your disease. Healthy eating, physical activity, monitoring your condition, taking medication and reducing your risk for complications are perhaps part of your daily routine. At times, all of this might seem overwhelming.

1st Fitting: September 5th and 6th

As a member of your healthcare team, a diabetes educator makes managing your diabetes easier. They work with you to develop a plan to stay healthy, and give you the tools and ongoing support to make that plan a regular part of your life.

(2nd Pick up October 25th and 26th)

Diabetes may not have a cure, but you can control it and live well. Please schedule an appointment with your diabetes educator Kathy Bowers RN, MSN, CDE to learn how to better manage your disease, so it doesn’t manage you. For appointments call 231-534-7200 and schedule your appointment today.

Munson Community Health Center –Pharmacy

(1st Pick up September 27th and 28th) 2nd Fitting: October 11th and 12th Where: 550 Munson Ave Suite G-100 Traverse City, MI. 49686 Telephone: 231-9358730


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For Immediate Release

Early Cervical Cancer Detection in Native Americans For Immediate Release

MARIE, Mich. – The Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan and the American Indian Cancer SAULT STE. SAULT MARIE,STE. Mich. – The Inter-Tribal Council of Michi The Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. (ITCM) is a Foundation are urging Native American women in Michigan to get screened for the human papillomavirus Early Cervical Cancer Detection in Native Americans gan and the(HPV) American Indian Cancer Foundation are urging 501(c)3 non-profit corporation duly organized under a State cervical cancer. Native American women in Michigan to get screened for the Charter April 16,Indian 1968.Cancer The Inter-Tribal Council of MichiSAULT STE. MARIE, Mich. – The Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan and filed the American Cervical cancer is a disease where abnormal cells grow on the cervix. According to the American Indian Foundation are urging Native American women in Michigan to get screened for the human papillomavirus human papillomavirus (HPV) cervical cancer. gan, Inc. is located at 2956 Ashmun Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Cancer Foundation, “American Indian and Alaska Native women are 1.5 times as likely to develop cervical (HPV) cervical cancer. Michigan. It represents eleven of the twelve federally recogcancer and two times more likely to die from the disease compared to white women. Northern Plains Cervical cancer is a disease where abnormal cells grow on the nized in Michigan. ThoseIndian being; American Indian womenwhere are seeing alarming arecervix. nearly tribes two times as to develop cervicalBay Mills Indian ComCervical cancer is a disease abnormal cellsrates; growthey on the According tolikely the American cervix. According to the American Indian Cancer Foundation, cancer and four times more likely to die from it when compared to white women.” munity, Hannahville Indian Community, Cancer Foundation, “American Indian and Alaska Native women are 1.5 times as likely to develop cervical Keweenaw Bay Indian “Americancancer Indian and Alaska Native women 1.5should times as compared Community, Saginaw Chippewa Inidan Tribe, Grand Traverse and two timesbegin more around likely toage dieare from disease to white women. Northern Plains Screenings should 21 and the be performed every three years until age 29. At age 30, likely to develop cervical cancer and two times more likely to American women arepap seeing rates; they arefive nearly two times likely toChippewa develop cervical Band of Ottawa and Indians, women Indian can begin regular andalarming HPV screenings every years until ageas65. After age 65; keep in touchLittle Traverse Bay cancer and times more likelyfor to die from it when compared to white die from the disease compared to white women. Northern with yourfour health care provider direct recommendations. Bands of women.” Odawa Indians, Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Plains American Indian women are seeing alarming rates; Indians, Lac Vieux Desert BandAtof Lake Superior Chippewa InThe best should methods to prevent cancer andbe HPV are to get vaccinated, practice quit Screenings begin aroundcervical age 21 and should performed every three years until smart age 29.sex, age 30, they are nearly two times as likely to develop cervical cancer dians, Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish (Gun Lake Tribe), Pokagon smoking, and toregular get screened. HPV vaccine every is recommended for everyone agesage 9-26 tokeep protect against women can begin pap andThe HPV screenings five years until age 65. After 65; in touch HPV cases thatcare lead to 9from out for of cervical cancers. to Use protection talk with yourIndians, sexual partners: and four times more likely to provider die it 10 when compared Bandand of Potawatomi and the Nottawaseppi Huron with your health direct recommendations. anyone who has ever had anal, vaginal, or oral sex can get HPV. Smoking weakens the immune system, white women.” Band of the Potawatomi. making it harder the body to fight HPVand infection. cancer is highly curable when detected and The best methods tofor prevent cervical cancer HPV areCervical to get vaccinated, practice smart sex, quit treated and early. smoking, to get screened. The HPV vaccine is recommended for everyone ages 9-26 to protect Screenings should begin around age 21 and should be perOur Agency is divided into severalagainst different divisions, which HPV cases that lead to 9 out of 10 cervical cancers. Use protection and talk with your sexual partners: If there is an abnormal pap, don’t panic. An abnormal pap test is not a diagnosis of cervical cancer. Follow Environmental formed every three years until age 29. At age 30, women can include Health Services, Behavioral Health, anyone who hashealth ever had anal, vaginal, or oral sex can get HPV. Smoking weakens the immune system, up with your care provider to discuss your screening results and recommendations. begin regular pap and HPV screenings every five years until Child, curable Family,when and Education Services, and Adminismaking it harder for the body to fight HPV infection. CervicalServices, cancer is highly detected and age 65. After age 65; keep in touch with your health care For a full list of tribal health care providers, visit http://www.itcmi.org/healthcenters to find the tribal tration. The Agency employs approximately 160 employees, treated early. closest to you. provider for health direct center recommendations.

35 of these employees are based in the Agency’s central office offices and staff The best on site. The Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. (ITCM) is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation duly organized under get vaccinated, practice smart sex, quit smoking, and to get Fora aState full list of tribal providers, visit http://www.itcmi.org/healthcenters to find tribal Charter filedhealth April care 16, 1968. The Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. is located atthe 2956 Ashmun Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. It represents eleven of the twelve federally recognized tribes in screened. health The HPV vaccine is for everyone Media Contact: center closest to recommended you. ages 9-26 to protect against HPV cases that lead to 9 out of ### 10 cervical cancers. Use protection and talk with your sexual Mike Willette partners: The anyone who has ever of had anal, vaginal, or oral Inter-Tribal Council Michigan, Inc. (ITCM) is a sex 501(c)3 non-profit corporation duly organized under a State Charter weakens filed Aprilthe 16, 1968. The system, Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. is located at 2956 Ashmun Communications Specialist can get HPV. Smoking immune making Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. It represents eleven of the twelve federally recognized tribes in it harder for the body to fight HPV infection. Cervical cancer Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan is highly curable when detected and treated early. If there is an abnormal pap, don’t panic. An abnormal pap test is not a diagnosis of cervical cancer. Follow in Sault Ste. Marie, while member tribes have ### up with your health care provider to discuss methods to prevent cervical cancer and your HPV screening are to results and recommendations.

If there is an abnormal pap, don’t panic. An abnormal pap test is not a diagnosis of cervical cancer. Follow up with your health care provider to discuss your screening results and recommendations. For a full list of tribal health care providers, visit http://www. itcmi.org/healthcenters to find the tribal health center closest to you.

906-632-6896 x.110 mwillette@itcmi.org


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S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

SEPTEMBER ELDERS BIRTHDAYS GTB News would like to acknowledge this months Elders birthdays! We hope you all had joyous and memorable birthdays filled with friends, family, love, peace and happiness.

“Mino-Dibishkaan!” - HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

Sincerely, GTB News Staff & The Membership Department.

Last Name

First Name

Birth Day

Kewaygoshkum Robert John Gary Carlson Robert Lewis Anita Willis Terrie Koon Steven Waukazoo Ronald Molina Bryan John Phyllis Fuller Nancy Anderson Jacob Blackmer Judith DeVerney Gloria Fox Michael Conner Elizabeth Mattson Wilfred Schocko Roseanne Tighe Carolyn Ghering Perry Norton Thomas Seeley George Wabsey Daniel Raphael Shirley Wayashe Michael Tubergen Vonda Blanchard Betty Mattson Robert Miller Roger Wabanimkee Tracy Menefee Ernest Wright Robert Dashner Gerald Beckman Betty

1-Sep 1-Sep 1-Sep 3-Sep 4-Sep 5-Sep 6-Sep 6-Sep 7-Sep 7-Sep 7-Sep 8-Sep 8-Sep 9-Sep 9-Sep 10-Sep 10-Sep 11-Sep 11-Sep 11-Sep 11-Sep 11-Sep 11-Sep 12-Sep 12-Sep 13-Sep 14-Sep 14-Sep 15-Sep 15-Sep 16-Sep 17-Sep 17-Sep

Last Name

First Name

Birth Day

Avery Donna Chippewa Helen Running Deborah Cobb Keith Wallk Laura Paepke Wilson Harris Nancy Ance Kay Schaub Lawrence Menefee Kenneth Wilson William Maniteau Walter Alker Bessie Williams Keith Pikaar Pamela Curtis Melissa Van Paris Dean Martell William LeGault Mary Beckham Elizabeth Bailey Gregory Bussey Ruth Burgess Mary John Debra Niewiadomski Jeffery Crowley Catherine Lachniet Bruce Stevens Allen Anderson Nora Keway Edward Sams Patricia Ogemagegedo Ruby

17-Sep 17-Sep 18-Sep 18-Sep 19-Sep 20-Sep 21-Sep 21-Sep 21-Sep 21-Sep 21-Sep 23-Sep 23-Sep 23-Sep 23-Sep 24-Sep 24-Sep 24-Sep 25-Sep 25-Sep 25-Sep 26-Sep 26-Sep 27-Sep 27-Sep 27-Sep 27-Sep 28-Sep 29-Sep 30-Sep 30-Sep 30-Sep

2017 ELDERS DISTRIBUTION

ELDERS DISTRIBUTION ADDRESS CHANGE DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 20th. PLEASE CONTACT MEMBERSHIP OFFICE (231) 534-7101 REGARDING ANY ADDRESS CHANGES.

2016 Elders Distribution Checks As of July 24th, the following members have unclaimed elders checks from 2016 distribution at the Accounting Office. JERRY CHUPP, VIRGINIA LOFGREN, FRANCIS J SHOMIN Please contact Christina Loucks, Senior Accountant, at the Government Accounting Department (231) 534-7131 for further information.

ELDERS TRUST FUND DIRECT DEPOSIT • If you have not already signed up for direct deposit of your elders distribution checks, Friday SEPTEMBER 1st is the deadline to sign up for a direct deposit of your 2017 elders distribution and all future elders distribution checks. The form must be received in our office by September 1. • This deadline (September 1) also applies to those that are currently signed up for direct deposit and wish to change the bank information. • Please Note: If you do not have a valid address on file with the membership office, your elders distribution direct deposit will be suspended until a valid address is received in the Membership Office. • If you need to change the information for your current direct deposit, please submit a new Direct Deposit Agreement form. To request one, you may call Christina Loucks at (231)534-7131. This form is also available on www.gtbindians.org. • Once completed, the Direct Deposit Agreement form must be mailed in or dropped off at the Government Accounting building. Faxes will not be accepted. • If you wish to cancel your direct deposit, you need to submit this request in writing to the Government Accounting office or fill out the Direct Deposit Cancellation form. If not using the form, please write that you wish to cancel your elders distribution direct deposit, sign, date, and include tribal id number and/or social security number. The deadline to cancel your current direct deposit is Wednesday, September 20th. • Mailing address: Grand Traverse Band Attn: Accounting 2605 N West Bay Shore Dr Peshawbestown MI 49682


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

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OBITUARIES

Yvonne Renea Sims Beverly Ann Grossman Wanda Sue Raphael Traverse City, MI GTB Tribal Elder

East Jordan, MI GTB Tribal Elder

Peshawbestown, MI.

10/15/1960 – 8/17/2017

06/06/1959 – 08/08/2017

GTB Tribal Elder 02/03/1954 – 8/28/2017

Respectfully Acknowledging Our Los 12TH ANNUAL MOBY REUNION

Respectfully Acknowledging Our LossRespectfully Acknowledging Our Loss Visitation

The 12th Annual Moby Reunion will be held September 30th at Noon.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 This event 11:00 A.M.-12:00 P.M. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 746 Veterans Drive, Traverse City, MI 49684

Sacred Fire

the home of Wanda Raphael willFuneral be heldService at the and GTBMass Benzie satelliteAt office 11220 E O De To Min Mikun Thursday, August 24 2017 on 7282 Hoadley Rd. Peshawbestown, MI 1:00 P.M. St. Ignatius Church

Bring new Lamkin dolloarRoad, gift Good for buddy bingo 101 North Hart, MI 49737table. Bring a dish to pass. Bring new dollar gift for the buddy bingo table. Visitation Luncheon

- Submitted by Cathy Philo Information to follow

Funeral Service Thursday, August 24 2017 Tuesday, August 22 2:00 P.M. Funeral Service 12:00 P.M. Holy Childhood of Jesus Church Information to follow Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 150 W Main St. Harbor Springs, MI 49740 ForMIdirections/questions, please call Linda Francis 231-350-1395 746 Veterans Drive, Traverse City, 49684

Angus DeVerney celebrating his 81st birthday.

Ladies first place winner: Sandy Raphael, Gloria Ptak 2nd & Philomena King 3rd.

Cousins William Palmer & Angus DeVerney celebrating Angus’s 81st birthday.

Men’s 1st place winner: Greg Bailey, Rudy Bailey 2nd & Lavern Scott 3rd.


S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

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Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Elders Emergency Services Program Aanii GTB Tribal Elders: This letter is intended to provide you with information regarding the “NEW” Emergency Services Assistance Program that was awarded through the Mid-Year appropriations for all elders living within the six county service area. The amount for each elder is based in age categories from $300 to $500. This emergency program is to serve any life emergency that the elder may have and is not limited to any situation. Some examples would be for: Food, Heating, cooling, snow removal, lawn maintenance, clothing other emergency. There is no income requirement. This program is different than the LIHEAP or HUMAN SERVICES program and cannot be used as a REIMBURSEMENT. Each Elder is required to complete an application. In order for the application to be processed in a timely manner, it is important that the directions for this program be followed and completed properly. Age Category and amounts: • 55-64 years $300 • 65-70 years $400 • 71-older $500 Directions for program are as follows: • Application must be completely filled out, signed and dated by the applicant • Supporting documentation must be submitted with application • Assistance request must be for primary residence This is an exciting services made available for you and we are pleased to announce. If you have questions about the application process, please contact either the Elders Site Coordinator in your area or The Elders Program main number at (231) 534-7762 Megwetch! GTB Elders Department

Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Elders Program Elders Emergency Services Name_______________________________________________ Tribal Id#_________________________ Address______________________________________________Birthdate_________________________ City_________________________________________Michigan Zip_________Phone_______________ VENDOR Information:___________________________________________________________________ Complete mailing address________________________________________________________________ Account Number_______________________________________________________________________ • I understand that I can apply for assistance towards food, heat, cooling, snow removal, lawn maintenance, clothing, other emergency • I hereby certify that all information in this application is true, correct and complete to the best of my knowledge • I understand that failure to provide all necessary information and documentation can result in delay of my application • I understand that there is no guaranteed payment towards my bill until application has been approved and processed. • Please include a copy of your Tribal Id and vendor statement.

Application’s Signature ___________________________________________Date___________________ Elders Program Signature_________________________________________Date___________________


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GRAND TRAVERSE BAND OF OTTAWA AND CHIPPEWA INDIANS ELDERS AND CULTURAL DEPARTMENT SENIOR FARMERS’ MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM APPLICATION TO RECEIVE BENEFITS PSA ____________

DATE OF APPLICATION: ____/____/____ PARTICIPANT INFORMATION

FIRST NAME: _________________ LAST NAME: _________________________ ADDRESS __________________________________________________________ STREET CITY STATE ZIP HOME PHONE: _(____)_________________ SEX:

____ M ____ F

HOUSEHOLD SIZE: _______ TOTAL HOUSEHOLD INCOME _____________ The collection of race and ethnicity is requested solely for the purpose of determining the State agency’s compliance with Federal civil rights laws, and ensures that the program is administered in a non-discriminatory manner. Your responses to these questions will not affect consideration of your application. If you choose not to self-identify race and ethnicity, the person taking the application must record the participant’s race and ethnicity based on visual observation. ETHNICITY CATEGORY: _____ HISPANIC OR LATINO _____ NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO RACE CATEGORY (select one or more): _____ AMERICAN INDIAN OR ALASKA NATIVE _____ ASIAN _____ BLACK OR AFRICAN AMERICAN _____ NATIVE HAWAIIAN OR OTHER PACIFIC ISLANDER _____ WHITE To be eligible to receive SFMNP coupons, you must be 55 years of age and meet the income guidelines, which are based on 185% of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines during the current fiscal year. You have been given a copy of the current income guidelines for this fiscal year. You must provide a copy of the acceptance letter that you are a participant in SSI or a member of a family/economic unit participating with the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) or on a waiting list for WIC. A copy of your Tribal ID will be needed, proof of residency, copy of driver license, State ID, or household bill in your name. PROXY A proxy is a person only authorized to receive and/or redeem SFMNP coupons. A proxy should be a least 18 years of age and dependable for the duration of the program months of operation. In order for the coupons to be issued to a proxy, the proxy must present identification as well as written approval from the participant. Proxies must sign a designated line on the coupon log sheet prior to receiving the coupons. Proxies have the same obligations to follow program guidelines when purchasing fruits and vegetables from an authorized farmer. I, _______________________ authorize the following individual(s) to act as my proxy. Participant signature Assigned proxies: _________________________ __________________________ 1st proxy named 2nd proxy names ____ Check here if no proxy was assigned CERTIFICATION BY PARTICIPANT I have been advised of my rights and obligations under the SFMNP. I certify that the information I have provided for my eligibility determination is correct, to the best of my knowledge. I am aware that I cannot receive farmers’ market benefits from more than one state, more than one local agency or program model (check, coupon or CSA). This certification form is being submitted in connection with the receipt of Federal assistance. Program officials may verify information on this form. I understand that intentionally making a false or misleading statement or intentionally misrepresenting, concealing, or withholding facts may result in paying the State agency, in cash, the value of the food benefits improperly issued to me and may subject me to civil or criminal prosecution under State and Federal law. Standards for eligibility and participation in the SFMNP are the same for everyone, regardless of race, color, national origin, age, disability or sex. I understand that I may appeal any decision made by the local agency regarding my eligibility for the SFMNP. I certify I meet the 2017 household size and income guidelines provided by the state and that I am eligible to receive SFMNP benefits. _____________________________________ _________________________ Signature of Participant Date ______________________________________ Signature of Certifier Issued SFMNP booklet # _______thru_______

_________________________ Date

_________________________ Date “In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, and disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.’


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S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

2017 GTB JIINGTAMOK

The annual Peshawbestown Jiingtamok was held August 19th and 20th at the beautiful GTB POWWOW grounds. This years annual Jiingtamok was themed to reconnect the youth with the Elders. This was done through the combined celebration in shared cultural interaction. Both the youth and elders had an opportunity to learn from one another. The elders presented the traditional dance styles for and the youth. As they took pointers from their expertise, the youth placed their own individual interpretations into their learned movements.

and breathtakingly beautiful Regalia were the roots of the event. Indigenous people from all over the country attended the two day celebration. On Saturday a member from the crowd, originally from Germany, was brought to the circle to lead a dance. This showed all onlookers they were welcome to join in on the celebration. The dancing talent was incredible among elders, adults and the youth. The powerful indigenous drum brought everyone the sound of the native heartbeat.

It was a perfect day, as to not prove too hot for the dancers participating in the event. The forested hills provided a calm and shaded, natural stadium for onlookers to appreciate the vibrant colors swarming before them in rhythmic dance. This simultaneously allowed onlookers to stay amerced in the natural beauty of the environment.

The intention was to reconnect the youth with the elders. One could easily notice the achievement of this objective. The young watched with open eyes, taking in the detailed vintage regalia, and the perfected dance, as the Elders glanced back with endearing hope for the future of the Native American culture. Each group realizing the importance of this celebration and the need to sustain it. As long as the Elders continue to reach out to the juvenile, and they are willing to learn their traditions making them habitual, the Native American culture will remain and blossom for many generations to come.

The Powwow Committee, headed by Tanya Raphael, put forth a great quantity of time and effort in order to arrange the occasion. The events Host Drum was Chippewa Travellers with emcee Chris Pheasant, Arena Director Gerard Sagassige and Head Veteran Clarence Syrette. As always delicious vendor foods, amazing hand crafted items

- by Jared Sonderegger, Editor


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

- Photos by George Antoine and Jared Sonderegger, Editor

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S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

ELDERS OPEN FORUM Elders Open Forum

Tuesday, August 8 2017 10:00 am- 12:00 pm

*Note: In the minutes from July’s Elders Open Forum meeting, GTB Elder Mary Roberts was misquoted on several points. She asked that this be corrected. Following is the original misquote from the July Elders Open Forum minutes, and following that is what Ms. Roberts had actually said. -“Mary Roberts said this is not on the letter we receive with percap. Accounting needs to explain why we are not getting 50% of slot revenue.” What Mary said was, Percap comes out of 50% of the slots earnings-the letter that comes with percap explanation explains how the revenue from slots is dispensed. -“Mary Roberts-the Constitution governs the Tribe but Robert’s Rules of Order needs to follow the Constitution. What Mary said was, Robert’s Rules is used, in business meetings as is proper, however our Constitution governs. We have to follow the Constitution when there is a conflict. Discussion began with GTB Elder Pat Castaneda asking why some Council members did not attend the recent community meeting in Charlevoix on August 2nd. Tribal Council Treasurer Arroyo stated that he could not make it. Tribal Council Member Shomin replied that he had to drive his father to a doctor appointment. Tribal Council Member Bird stated that he was meeting with a delegation from a tribe in Wisconsin. Pat stated that these meetings are very important. GTB Elder Ernie Gablow stated that the meetings are always on the second Tuesday of every month and are posted in the newsletter; all Council should be able to make either the Community Meetings or the Elders Open Forum. Ernie then asked what is being done about the issues brought up at Elders Open forum meetings. There has been no follow up for many of the questions asked and issues that are raised during Elders Open Forum. Treasurer Arroyo replied that if any GTB member has questions, they can come and talk to Councilors in the office or to give them a call. Members do not have to wait for a meeting to ask questions as Council has an open door policy. Treasurer Arroyo spoke about working together to reduce negativity and arguing, don’t believe everything in the newsletter articles being written, you might not be getting the truth. Councilor Shomin urged those in attendance to call any time they have a question or issue. Ernie then spoke about the bike/ATV/snow mobile safety classes he proposed before. The Strongheart Center was offering kayak safety classes recently and it was suggested they could also offer these safety training classes. Another option Ernie had suggested was to have the police department help out, as well as coming to give talks to GTB youth. Bike safety is especially important for younger people. GTB Elder Mary Roberts spoke, stating that the Tribal Clinic provides excellent services, and that she disagrees with the opinions expressed in the newsletter about being dissatisfied with the clinic. Regarding Ernie’s question about bike safety, Mary suggested he go directly to the police captain and ask for help. Treasurer Arroyo stated that Council will contact the TMO about Ernie’s questions and concerns. He said that at one time the clinic lacked consistency but now there is more stability. GTB Elder Leonard Corey spoke next, asking if Council voted to approve a new marina project. Treasurer Arroyo replied that the casino/hotel project was voted on, but not the marina. Leonard asked what the agenda is for building the hotel and casino. Treasurer Arroyo

stated that this project has been voted on and approved but is still in the preliminary stages. There was a Motion passed for the CEO to gather all preliminary documents to go ahead with this project. The only action that has been taken is to start this process. Councilor Shomin stated that there was another Motion passed at that EDC meeting to direct staff to set up a series of meetings to discuss funding and to look over concepts. He stated that changes have been made from the original plans to cut costs. One of these changes was eliminating an underground parking structure. Councilor Shomin explained further, stating that initially the casino will be paid for with cash, so it will not affect the RAO. Leonard asked whether Leelanau Sands Casino will be torn down. Councilor Shomin replied that that building has not fully depreciated yet, and that more can be done to increase revenue. As an example, Councilor Shomin mentioned having UFC fights in the LSC showroom.

GTB Elder Pat Putney spoke up to address the rumor that LSC is sinking. Treasurer Arroyo replied that the Double Eagle building was sinking and was removed. The rest of the area is not in danger. Councilor Bird added that LSC is an old building and is poorly insulated. This new casino will be much more efficient. GTB Elder Jim Petoskey asked questions as to why the Elders Advisory did not receive 2% funding. Treasurer Arroyo replied, discussing the potential for this to be seen as self-funding. He mentioned an occasion in 2010-11 when the tribe got cited over a 2% distribution to Chestonia Township. He stated that the tribe is currently in compact negotiations with the State and right now, it is not worth the risk of getting cited again. Pat Putney asked what the difference was when it comes to formula grants for the youth. Treasurer Arroyo stated that the State does not consider that to be self-funding. Tribal Council Vice-Chair Vargo stated that she voted in favor of funding the Elders Advisory through 2%. She stated that GTB funds a lot of 501c3’s and that on the 2% application; it asks how many members will be impacted by the distribution. Vice Chair Vargo wants to give 2% distributions to programs that will impact as many GTB members as possible. She stated that it is our right as a tribe to decide who gets 2% funding. Councilor Shomin stated that it was added into this year’s budget to provide $300, $400, or $500 to Elders for things like snow removal service, purchasing a lawnmower, and home repairs. The amount received is based on age. It was mentioned that some Elders have had problems getting reimbursed through this program if the bill has already been paid, especially when working with Tri-Gas. Councilor Shomin stated that Council will talk to the TMO about this. Further issues with this program were discussed at length, specifically regarding Tri-Gas. Council stated that they will talk to Accounting department about these issues. GTB Elder Bonnie Inman spoke, stating that she has been looking for grants specifically for Elders; she has several in mind but has not been able to discuss them with the Elders yet. Treasurer Arroyo mentioned that Councilor Mark Wilson had made a recommendation for the Elders to have a point person/executive director who could look for grants and contact vendors. Mary Roberts spoke again to ask if a copy of the 2% requirements could be given out, so that everyone may understand why 2% distribution goes to certain places. She spoke to problems with LSC being inefficient. Pat Putney stated that there are a lot of older Elders who have trouble getting around and more volunteers are needed. She then stated that the elders program would like to formally ask for Eagles Ridge. She suggested it could be used for a lunch/meeting space, a resale shop, or a bakery. There are many options. Councilor Shomin stated that this

matter will be on the next EDC agenda. GTB Elder Joyce Wilson discussed the need for more youth and family activities in Antrim County. Elder’s lunch and crafts are offered in Antrim County but there needs to be something for young people to do as well. She asked if something could be put in the budget for this. She then asked if anything could be done to help pre-K youth. Pat Putney stated that language classes are going very well, and they are thinking about requesting the use of the community building in Kewadin for an additional day for language classes. Mary Roberts discussed issues with the Elders Advisory board, and how some elders’ spouses are not tribal members, and some children are also ineligible. She stated her disagreement with not all members of a family receiving benefits and discussed the hard feelings this could cause. Vice Chair Vargo said this could be looked into and discussed. Councilor Bird stated that we are excluding more people than we are including with this policy. Pat Putney said they should try to get the Title VII program back again; that program covers non-tribal. GTB Elder Pat Castaneda spoke again, asking what is being done to help alcoholics achieve sobriety and then maintain a sober lifestyle. Councilor Shomin stated that the Behavioral Health department is currently working on plans to set up a transition/halfway house. It was suggested that the current Alcoholics Anonymous meetings should be longer, or more meetings offered. Pat stated that more opportunities should be offered, to get people interested in other activities. Vice Chair Vargo stated she hopes to see a building at the Herkner development where AA classes as well as Narcotics Anonymous classes could be offered. Pat stated there used to be a separate off-site office for substance abuse counseling. This needs to be brought back. The Behavioral Health office at the Traverse City satellite office on 3 Mile is not soundproof. A separate office not within any of the existing offices needs to be provided for substance abuse counseling. Councilor Bird proposed the idea of a “wet house,” where people who are not yet sober can go to have a safe place to stay in the event that they cannot stay with their families due to their drinking. Bonnie Inman discussed the need for more communication between the 6-Counties. Pat Putney asked how the money received from tobacco and gas tax is being used. Councilor Shomin replied that it gets integrated into the budget. Pat suggested that these funds could be used to help set up a wet house. Discussion drew to a close at 12:00 pm.


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

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Caregiver Program WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR FAMILY CARE GIVER SUPPORT SERVICES? • Informal, unpaid family Caregivers of older adults. An older adult is the age used on your Title VI Part A application that was determined by the tribe to be an elder. . • Grandparents and relative caregivers, age 55 and older, who are the primary caregivers of a child not more than 18 years old because the biological or adaptive parents are unable or unwilling to serve as the primary caregiver of the child. They must be related to the child by blood, marriage, or adoption and live with the child. The OAA requires that the Family Caregiver Support Program give priority to: • Caregivers who are older individuals with the greatest social need. • Older individuals with the greatest economic need, particularly low income individuals. • Older individuals providing care to individuals with severe disabilities, including children with severe disabilities. 1. Must be a federally recognized tribal member Must have two or more impairments in their activities of daily living (must be documented and submitted along with application) Completed application and submit along with your supporting documents to Tanya Raphael. Contact information: Tanya,Raphael2@gtbindians.com and/or 231·534·7762

2.

CAREGIVER GRANDPARENT SUPPORT APPLICATION CAREGIVER PROVIDER INFORMATION Name: Current Address:

City:

ZIP:

Cell:

Tribal Id:

Email Address: Phone:

ELDER RECEIVING CARE INFORMATION Elder’s Name:

Tribal Id:

Address:

Notes

City:

Michigan

Zip:

CHILDREN RECEIVING CARE Name

Tribal Id

Name

Tribal Id

Name

Tribal Id

Name

Tribal id

SECOND CHOICE AND/OR RESPITE CAREGIVER PROVIDER Name: Email :

Tribal Id:

Address:

City:

Mich.

ZIP:

PROGRAM PROVIDES ASSISTANT TO PROVIDERS THAT CARE FOR ELDERS THAT ARE “FRAIL” FUNCTIONALLY IMPAIRED DUE TO COGNITIVE OR OTHER IMPAIRMENT ELDER MUST HAVE A MEDICAL DOCUMENT INDICATING IMPAIRMENT List two Activities of Daily Living ⃣ None ⃣ All ⃣ feeding bathing

dressing

hygiene-

Instrumental activities of daily Living ⃣ None ⃣ All

What type of illness does client take medication for or been diagnosed with

⃣ shopping Finances

⃣ Dementia Cancer

⃣ toileting - bladder and/or bowel function ⃣ appearance ⃣ mobility / transferring ⃣

walking – stair climbing

⃣ ⃣ ⃣

cleaning

cooking meals ⃣ taking medication yard work

using phone

⃣ ⃣

Mental Illness Alzheimer’s

ALS ⃣

MS

Parkinson’s

transportation

Once identified - Services offered to Provider: ⃣ ⃣

Resources, Information & Training Respite

⃣ Support Assistance

Fuel

Food

Counseling

Support group

TEMPORARY OR PERMANENT DISABILITY Length of providing care:

Temporary

Permanent

Extended temporary

Brief description of assistance requested:

Phone:

SIGNATURES Signature to release information (Name) on Purchase Order: _____________________________________________________ Signature of applicant: DOCUMENTATION CHECK LIST: _____ APPLICATION

Date: ______MEDICAL VERIFICATION

_____TRIBAL ID


S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

20

2017 TRIBAL COUNCIL SESSIONS 2017 Tribal Council Meetings

Tribal Council Meetings are held twice a month: Tribal Council Regular Session - The third Wednesday of each month. Tribal Council Special Session - The last Wednesday of each month. Deadline to TMO by 10:00 a.m. on:

January

TCRS 01/18/17 TCSS O 1/25/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

01/10/17 01/17/17

February

TCRS 02/15/17 TCSS 02/22/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

02/07/17 02/14/17

March

TCRS 03/15/17 TCSS 03/29/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

03/07/17 03/21/17

TCRS04/19/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

04/11/17 04/18/17

TCRS 05/17/17 TCSS 05/31 /15

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

05/09/17 05/23/17

June

TCRS 06/21/17 TCSS 06/28/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

06/13/17 06/20/17

July

TCRS 07/19/17 TCSS 07/26/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

07/11/17 07/18/17

August

TCRS 08/16/17 TCSS 08/30/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

08/08/17 08/22/17

September

TCRS 09/20/17 TCSS 09/27/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

09/12/17 09/19/17

October

TCRS 10/18/17 TCSS 10/25/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

10/10/17 10/17/17

November

TCRS 11/15/17 TCSS 11/29/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

11/07/17 11 /21/17

December

TCRS 12/20/17 TCSS 12/27/17

Wednesday Wednesday

9:30 AM 9:30 AM

12/12/17 12/19/17

April May

Moved to April 5th

TCSS 04/26/17 Moved to May 3rd


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

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UNCASHED PER CAPITA DISTRIBUTION CHECKS As of July 24th, the following members have uncashed/ unclaimed per capita checks from December 2016 or earlier distributions:

Aaron Armiga William Beaver Travis Bemis Kara Brunk Summer Case Brian Fairley Augustine Floyd Dwayne Jarman Justin Johnson Lorraine Livingston Ashley Millron Alfonso Morales Amy Naghtin McKenzie Raphael John Reed Sherri Ridge Robynn Rueckert Francis J. Shomin Jeffrey Stapleton Please contact Christina Loucks, Senior Accountant, at the Government Accounting Department (231) 534-7131 for further information on how to obtain a new check.

As of July 24th, the following members have unclaimed per capita distributions from June 2017 distribution at the per capita office. The member has until five business days before the next per capita distribution to claim this distribution. Joseph Bertoia Jr Felecia Bradford Benjamin Calkins Kachina Carpenter Renee Durrance McKenzie Fansler Justin Frahm Aiden Gaston Avree Gaston Anna Marie Goodman Ernest Grose III Luis Hernandez Jessica John Jesse Kewagshken Alfonso Morales Santana Perez Elizabeth Peters Christine Schocko Gerald Schwanke Francis J. Shomin

Please contact Christina Loucks, Senior Accountant, at the Government Accounting Department (231) 534-7131 for further information.

UPDATED ADDRESSES NEEDED

Below is a list of tribal members (as of July 24th) that do not have current addresses with the Membership Office and Per Capita Office. Please contact Membership at (231) 534-7101 to request an Address Change Form. This form is also located on our website www.gtbindians.org. Laken Brook Anderson Michael David Anderson ShahBaht Charles Anderson Jr. Alec George Anthony Levi Lucius Antoine Pieter James Antoine Stanley Joseph Antoine Jr. Derek Joseph Bailey Tara Renae Bailey Rita Lynn Bailey Joseph Andrew Bertoia Jr. Felecia Sue Bradford Angela Maxine Brooks Angela Marie Burgoyne Dakota MaeMarie Burnett Ashley Lynn Burns Patrick Morgan Burris Kelly Michelle Bush Paul Alan Harris Bussey Donovan Joseph Butkovich Benjamin Richard Calkins Robert Joseph Calkins Kachina Nasnan Carpenter Jacob Kenneth Chambers John Henry Chippewa Yolanda Marie Chippewa William Joe Christensen Jerry Lee Chupp Julye Ann Cooper Henry Lamar Daniels Octavias Jarome Daniels Patrick Charles DeVerney

Dalton Joseph Digby Cheyanna Spring Rose Digby Corey Michael Duncan Renee Richelle Durrance Steven Allen Evans McKenzie Sharon Fansler Augustine Lee Floyd Shyshonee Faith Fowler Justin Lee Frahm Aiden Quinn Gaston Avree Quinn Gaston Anna Marie Lynn Goodman Thomas Hawk Gould Ernest William Grose III Justin Gage Hachey Luis Everardo Hernandez Hailey Rose Himebauch Marie Hulka Wesley Dewayne Huth Mary Ellen Huth John Eugene Isbell Jessica Rose John Sarah Danielle John Thomas Harold John Jr. Dorothy May Johnson Cletus George Kewagshken Jesse Allen Kewagshken Jessica Lee Kitchen Laci Yvonne Rose Kline Virginia Hermine Lofgren Joseph Alexander Maldonado Sherman James Mashka Robert Joseph Mattson

Leroy Joseph Mattson Levi Clifford McClellan II Eric Francis McDonald Jr. Michelle Lee McGrath Laura Labonte Medina Christopher Louis Meier Daniel Dale Metcalf Charles Cornelius Miller Richard Parker Miller Dennis Eliot Miller Evan Patrick Mohn Alfonso Morales Eliseo Martine' Moreno Jr. Cheyenne Nicole Mosher Heath Allen Mosher Ambrose Paul Mosher Kenneth Harris Mosher Jr. Natasha Lynn Olivares Esequiel Gabriel Olivares Ronald Scot Oom Santana Lynda Perez Elizabeth Joyce Peters Isaiah Xavier Preston Simone Crystal Raphael Wyman Lawrence Raphael Arieh Fernando Raphael Carl Lee Raphael Jr. Mildred Rebecca Rinehart Margaret Ann Rodriguez Bianca Maria Rodriguez Jason James Romitti Sabrina Nichole Romitti Lloyd Jason Rose

David Ronald Russell II Andrew Scott Sawmick Christine Marie Schocko Cameron Vicente Joseph Schocko Gerald Adam Schwanke Robert Lee Sells Casey Jay Shawnoskey Tonya Melisa Sheahan Francis John Shomin Karrie Ann Shostak Victor Lee Sineway Samuel Shaw Smith Klaurianna Anita Clara Smith Evelyn Elizabeth Mae Smith Torreanno Shawn Smith Jr. Carolan Sonderegger Francis Paul St Germaine Austin Michael Steeby Justin Joseph Stevens Patricia Rae TwoCrow Battiest Nichol Amber Van Riper Johan James Vander Vegte Daniel Joseph Wabsey Gerald Francis Wasageshik Kelly Lynn Washegesic Lee David Wilks Nelson George Williams Coral Lynn Wilson Donovan James Wilson Thomas Allen Wright


S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

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Heatstroke Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from heatstroke.

Babies and young kids can sometimes sleep so peacefully that we forget they are even there. It can also be tempting to leave a baby alone in a car while we quickly run into the store. The problem is that leaving a child alone in a car can lead to serious injury or death from heatstroke. Young children are particularly at risk, as their bodies heat up three to five times faster than an adult’s. These tragedies are completely preventable. Here’s how we can all work together to keep kids safe from heatstroke.

Reduce the Number of Deaths from Heatstroke by Remembering to ACT • A: Avoid heatstrokerelated injury and death by never leaving your child alone in a car, not even for a minute. And make sure to keep your car locked when you’re not in it so kids don’t get in on their own. • C: Create reminders by putting something in the back of your car next to your child such as a briefcase, a purse or a cell phone that is needed at your final destination. This is especially important if you’re not following your normal routine. • T: Take action. If you see a child alone in a car, call 911. Emergency personnel want you to call. They are trained to respond to these situations. One call could save a life.

Go a Step Further: Create Extra Reminders and Communicate with Daycare

Teach Kids Not to Play in Cars • Make sure to lock your vehicle, including doors and trunk, when you’re not using it. Keep keys and remote entry devices away from children. • Teach kids that trunks are for transporting cargo and are not safe places to play. • If your child is missing, get help and check swimming pools, vehicles and trunks. If your children are locked in a car, get them out as quickly as possible and dial 911 immediately. Emergency personnel are trained to evaluate and check for signs of heatstroke.

Heatstroke is the leading cause of noncrash, vehicle-related deaths for children. On average, every 10 days a child dies from heatstroke in a vehicle.

• Create a calendar reminder for your electronic devices to make sure you dropped your child off at daycare. • Develop a plan with your daycare so that if your child is late, you’ll be called within a few minutes. Be especially careful if you change your routine for dropping off children at daycare.

For more information visit safekids.org.

© 2016 Safe Kids Worldwide®

- Submitted by Uncle Arnold Fluette


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

TWOCROW RETIREMENT

Long time employee Karmen Twocrow was recognized for retiring after a successful career with the Grand Traverse Band. Karmen worked for the Grand Traverse Band for over 30 years. A celebration was held for him on August 23rd, in Tribal Council chambers. Many GTB employees, friends and family were present to wish Karmen TwoCrow a great and much deserved retirement. The Department 4 Team hosted the retirement party for Karmen. The SBR team provided pizza, fruit, veggies and chips to everyone who arrived to show their appreciation for Karmens dedicated service. Karmen was given a plaque and a pendleton blanket for his dedication. Be sure to congratulate Karmen and thank him for his long years of work.

23

Photos by George Antoine

TREE DEDICATION

A Tree dedication ceremony was held for GTB Gaming employees Jim Broome and Danny Hughes on august 9th, at the Leelenaue Sands Casino. Friends and relatives were present to observe the dedication of the natural monument. These men spent many years in support of the Grand Traverse Band. The following words were submitted by Gary John the LSC Security Manager in memorandum. “Jim Broome started working for the Tribe in 1993, becoming the Head of Security, and working for 23 years before retiring in 2016. He was also a member of the GTB Fire and Rescue with an EMT license as well.

- by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

- Photos by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

Danny Hughes hired on as Maintenance Supervisor in 1997, and one year later became the Maintenance Manager. He spent almost 19 years with the company, before his passing in 2016. Both men brought a lot of experience to LSC, and both enjoyed what they were doing. It showed in their work, and in the friends they made, not just with co-workers, but with customers as well. They are greatly missed by everyone, and we hope that these tree’s that were dedicated to their memory, will grow a strong foundation, just as Jim and Danny did. Both of these men will forever be in our hearts.” - Submited by Gary A. John LSC Security Manager Edited by Jared Sonderegger


S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

PUBLIC SAFETY UPDATES

24

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS

Are you

SEPTEMBER 2017 Emergency Preparedness Month Listed below are reminders as we prepare for fall and kids going back to School

Nearly half of U.S. adults do NOT have the resources and plans in place in the event of an emergency.

Children & Youth + Back to School Ensure children are included in preparedness conversations. Know the emergency plan for your child’s school, college and childcare facility. Practice evacuation plans and other emergency procedures with children on a regular basis. Make sure children have emergency contacts memorized or written down in a secure place. General Preparedness • Make a family emergency communication plan and include pets. • Identify an out of town emergency contact to coordinate information with family/friends. • Check on neighbors. • Keep an emergency kit wherever you spend time: home, car, work, etc. • Download the FEMA App and set up local alerts. • Listen to local officials by radio, TV, or social media and take action. • Practice your preparedness plans with a drill or exercise. • Take a first aid class so you can help until first responders arrive. FALL • Hurricane If ordered to evacuate, know the route and plan where to go. Never drive or walk through flooded streets; Turn Around, Don’t Drown. • Fire Safety Identify a meeting place for your family or anyone you live with. Don’t Wait, Check the Date – Replace Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years. • Earthquake Practice “Drop, Cover and Hold On.” Anchor loose items to a secure wall in your home. Text, don’t call.

Are you prepared? Nearly half of U.S. adults do NOT have the resources and plans in place in the event of an Store a 3-day : emergency. ater Store a 3-day supply of water: one gallon person, per day.

Store at lea st at least a 3-day supply Store a 3-day su pply of non peeasy to prepare food. ri easy to preshable, p a re food.

• Toolkits and hazard related content are most engaging prior to and right after disasters and emergencies. EMERGENCY KIT CH EC KLIST An emergency kit is a collection of items that you may need in an emergency. Below are some items to help get you started.

□ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □ □

Water–one gallon per person, per day Food (enough to last 3 days) Flashlight Radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible) Extra batteries First aid kit Medications Family and emergency contact information Extra set of car keys and house keys

44% of Americans do not have first aid kits. 20% of Americans get emergency info from mobile apps. Keep a charger handy in an emergency.

44%

20% of Americans use social media for alerts 48% and warnings. Make sure to keep a charger ns erica ve in an emergency. of AmOThandy ha do N gency r e em lies. supp52% of Americans do not

personal documents.

have copies of crucial

20%

of Amer icans Prepare supplies for home work in and fo frvehicles. om mob get emergenc y a charg ile apps Emergencies can happen anywhere. emerge er handy in an . Keep ncy. cial soinformation Fornsmore visit: emergency.cdc.gov use nd rica lerts a ure e m of A ia for aMake s handy med nings. harger war eep a c gency. to k n emer in a

20%

52%

Don’t forget your pets! You need a 3-day supply of food and water per pet.

have o NOT sonal d s n r erica al pe of Am s of cruci e i p co ments. docu

Prepare supplies for home, work, and vehicles. Emergencies can happen anywhere. For more information visit:

emergency.cdc.gov

BAC KPAC K EM ERGENCY CARD It is important to have your emergency contact information with you in case of an emergency. Complete the cards below and keep one in your wallet and one in your child's backpack. Cut Here

Fold Here

BACKPACK EMERGENCY CARD

Parent/Guardian/Caregiver

Child’s Name:

Cell Phone:

Date of Birth:

Text Okay: Yes

Home Phone:

Name:

Cell Phone:

Alternate Phone: Employer: E-mail:

School Name:

Cell Phone:

Alternate Phone:

School Phone Number:

Text Okay: Yes

□ No □

Employer:

Out of Town Contact Name:

E-mail:

Cell Phone:

Alternate Phone:

DIAL 911 FOR EMERGENCIES

Cut Here

DIAL 911 FOR EMERGENCIES

Fold Here

BACKPACK EMERGENCY CARD

Parent/Guardian/Caregiver Name:

Child’s Name:

Cell Phone:

Date of Birth:

Text Okay: Yes

Home Phone:

Cell Phone:

E-mail:

□ No □

Alternate Phone: Employer:

Name:

E-mail:

School Name:

Cell Phone:

Alternate Phone:

School Phone Number:

Text Okay: Yes

Special needs, medical conditions, allergies, important information:

Cell Phone: DIAL 911 FOR EMERGENCIES

□ No □

Employer:

Out of Town Contact Name:

Manual Can Opener

E-mail:

□ No □

Name:

Cell phone with chargers

Extra cash

of Am do NO ericans first a T have id kits .

Don’t forget your pets! You need a 3-day supply of food and water per pet.

Special needs, medical conditions, allergies, important information:

Personal documents

of non perishable

48% of Americans do not have emergency supplies.

For additional information check out website: www.ready.gov For links to social media toolkits and key messaging for seasons & topics please visit: www.ready.gov/calendar

supply of w one gallon per y. per person, per da

E-mail: Alternate Phone: DIAL 911 FOR EMERGENCIES

Maps Emergency blanket Chargers

CS259306-D


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

25

Security and Privacy

How It Works

You Decide What to Include Provide as much or as little information as you want. Smart911 only asks for information that is relevant to aid emergency response. Sign Up for Smart911 and create a secure Safety Profile for your household.

Only Seen If You Call 9-1-1 Your information is only available to 9-1-1 call takers and first responders if you have an emergency.

If you ever call 9-1-1, the call taker can see the emergency information you want them to see.

Industry Leading Security Your information is housed in top-tier secure facilities complete with 24/7 physical security, video surveillance, and alarms. We utilize the same SSL certifcate authority and encryption technologies used by leading financial institutions.

Keep Your Loved Ones Safe. Smart911 is the only way to provide

As Seen On...

lifesaving information directly to 9-1-1 and first responders in an emergency. Smart911 is free, private, secure, and protects over 31 million people nationwide.

Emergency Responders can then use this key information to help you faster and more efficiently.

99

Because every second counts. Sign up today.

Because every second counts. Sign up today.

What Can My Smart911 Safety Profile Include? %

of Smart911 users would recommend Smart911 as an essential tool for personal safety.

Address Details Let responders know how to access your home, bedrooms, utility shut offs, and if you live in a multi-unit building. Family Include all members of your household, including their photos. You can also add all landlines and mobile numbers and who they belong to.

11

Medical Information EMS can be aware of medical conditions, medications, and if special equipment will be needed in an emergency.

minutes

The amount of time saved by Smart911 in response to a house re in Michigan, saving the homeowner’s life.

31.1

million

The number of residents protected by Smart911 nationwide.

Animals Add your pets, service animals, and livestock, including their names and vet information so responders are aware of them if they need to enter your home.

Vehicles Add details such as make, model, and license plate number in the event of an accident.

Emergency Contacts Include family members, friends, or neighbors who should be contacted in the event of an emergency.


26

S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

GTB GOV FLOAT IDEA 2018 GTB Government Float Idea

The GTB Government Float, ‘Water Is Life’, Float theme was decided by the Float Team. The Float Team, was made up of Delores Wonegeshik, Arlene Kashata, Todd Brewer and Doris Winslow. Dee and Arlene were the main organizer of this float. Miigwech to Dee and her helpers for sewing the skirts that the women wore.

Name Phone number Suggestion/Theme:

Chi-Miigwetch for Dee’s, Arlene’s and Todd’s support on the GTB Government Float this year. I could not have done this for our Nation without their help. ~Doris Suggestions are being taken for the FY2018 float. All suggestions should be sent to Doris Winslow at the Tribal Manager’s Office. Your suggestion should be based on a Native Story, or issue that can be depicted on a float for all families to see and be proud of. With your suggestion, drawings are encouraged.

Tribal ID#

Drawing:

Axel and wheel

Guidelines:

Must have easy access on/off for riders Safety is a must use of 1 axel on trailor

Cannot be negative or derogetory Must show all Clans on Float

Size of Flat Bed Trailor is approx 10' Wide X 20' Long

Serve Your Community and the Nation

Deadline Date:

Return this form to the Tribal Manager's Office Attn: Doris Winslow

12/29/2017

2605 N. West Bayshore Drive, Peshawbestown, MI 49682

Become a Selective Service System Local Board Member The Selective Service System wants to hear from Native men and women around the State of Michigan. We are looking for individuals who might be willing to serve as members of local draft boards in your county of residence. We have current openings in Marquette, Luce, Iron and Roscommon Counties. We are always looking for alternate Board Members from all over Michigan. A Prospective Board Member must be citizen of the United States, at least 18 years old, registered with the Selective Service (if male), and not be an employee in any law enforcement occupation, not be an active or retired member of the Armed Forces, and not have been convicted for any criminal offense. Once identified as qualified candidates for appointment, they are recommended by the governor and appointed by the Director of Selective Service, who acts on behalf of the President in making the appointments. Each new member receives five hours of initial training after appointment, followed by two hours of annual training for as long as he or she remains in the position. They may serve in Board Member positions up to a total of 20 years, if desired. Local Board Members are uncompensated volunteers who play an important community role closely connected with our Nation’s defense. If a military draft becomes necessary, approximately 2,000 Local and Appeal Boards throughout America would decide which young men in each community receive deferments, postponements or exemptions from military service, based on federal guidelines. If you believe you meet the standards for Selective Service Board Membership, and wish to be considered for appointment, please contact: Major Robert LaPoint: rlapoint@harborps.org or 231-838-0776.

This is not a complete list of guidelines.

ATTENTION FELLOW BEADERS If you know to do beadwork however find yourself needing help with coloring and shading

CONTINUE READING!!! There will be a five (5) week class offered by Krystina John that will include: Design Drawing Color Selection Color Coordination

WEDNESDAYS

This class has a maximum of 8 students. If you are interested HOUSING DEPARTMENT in taking this class, please 5:45 p.m. - 7:45 p.m. contact Dee Wonegeshik by August 29th to be entered into August 30, 2017 the drawing. The first 8 names September 6, 2017 drawn will be the participants. September 13, 2017 September 20, 2017 September 27, 2017 All supplies will be provided as well as a light dinner but you are more than welcome to bring other projects.

Email: Delores.wonegeshik@gtbindians.com

Phone: 231-866-1912

**REQUIREMENTS** Must commit to all five (5) classes Must already know how to bead *an introductory class may be coming soon*


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

BENODJEHN CENTER GRADUATION

The Benodjehn Center graduation took place on Wednesday, July 26th. Proud parents and relatives watched as the youth were recognized for their completion of the Initial entry into their long paths toward education.

27

- Photos by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

The children were acknowledged by Tribal Chairman Sam McClellan. They were then honored individually by the Benodjehn staff for their performances throughout the year. Kind words were shared to the audience explaining each childs vivid imagination and vibrant personalities. In a concluding finale, the entire graduating class performed in several cute songs and dances for those in attendance. - by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

310 S. Elm St./P.O. Box 838 Suttons Bay, Michigan 49682 (231) 271-8609 leelanaumontessori.org email: info@leelanaumontessori.org

2017-2018 Toddler/Primary/Elementary Application Form

Free Preschool!

Child’s First Name: ____________________________ Middle Name:__________________Last Name:_________________________ Date of Birth: _________________________________Today’s Date:_____________________________________________________ Mother’s Name: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Street Address: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip:________________________________________________________________________________________________ _ Home phone: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Cell phone: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Father’s Name: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Street Address: _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Home phone: __________________________________________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip:__________________________________________________________________________________________________ Cell phone: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Siblings Names & Ages:___________________________________________________________________________________________ Email address to send school information:___________________________________________________________________________

Grand Traverse Band Early Head Start/Head Start/GSRP  0-5 year old center based child development  Comprehensive health and developmental programs

 0-3 year old home-based program  Incorporation of the Native American culture  Hours of operation are Monday-Thursday  Services to children with special needs from 9:00am-3:00pm  Services to pregnant women  Programs are family focused with plenty of  Call 534-7650 for more information opportunities for family involvement

Primary Community (3-6 year olds) (Tuition for 3-4 Year Olds)

(15Months-3 Years Old) ___ 3 Mornings ___ 3 School Days ___ 4 Mornings ___ 4 School Days ___ 5 Mornings ___ 5 School Days

$2916 $4671 $3888 $6228 $4860 $7785

___3 Mornings (M-W) $2916 ___3 School Days (M-W) $4671 ___4 Mornings (M-Th) $3888 ___4 School Days (M-Th) $6228 ___5 Mornings (M-F) $4860 Child Care ___5 School Days (M-F) $7785 ___Before School Care (7:30-8:15) $3.25/day

Preferred Toddler Days: M T W Th F (not guaranteed)

Young Fives/Kindergarten/Montessori Master Year ( Five Years Old by September 1, 2017)

___5 School Days

No Cost

___After School Care (3:15-5:30)

$7.00/day

___Lunch Care (11:15-12:15)

$5.00/day

Elementary Community

___6-9 Elementary Community

No Cost

___1st Grade ___2nd Grade ___3rd Grade ___9-12 Elementary Community No Cost ___4th Grade ___5th Grade ___6th Grade

Eligibility criteria include (but are not limited to): Income level, make-up of family, age of child, program, limited area; including for children Tribal Member status, and special needs of child. Low income families who are not affiliated with the with special needs) Grand Traverse Band are also eligible to participate in this program. Nutritious meals

 Transportation provided (for center based

Is this a commitment to Montessori through the 6th grade or age 12? Circle one: Y N unknown

Toddler Community

services

Center based services are located at the Benodjenh Center at 2600 N. Strongheart Way, Peshawbestown, MI. Home based services are available in Grand Traverse, Leelanau, Benzie, Charlevoix, and Antrim Counties.

WE HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF OPENINGS...STOP BY, CALL OR GO ONLINE TO DOWNLOAD AN APPLICATION TODAY!


28

S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

GTB NRD OTTAWAY FLOAT TRIP

Photos by George Antoine

On August 29th and August 30 the Natural Resources Department invited Tribal Members to float the newly restored Boardman River for their Annual Ottaway float. For over 90 years, this section of the river had been trapped behind the Brown Bridge Dam, now it is free. This leisurely guided canoe trip is held to showcase the amount of amazing wildlife restoration that the Grand Traverse Band has participated in the last several years. Two excursions were arranged with RSVP obligations for tribal members to reserve a provided canoe for the float. th

an early morning fog threatened canoers with the possibility of precipitation. Luckily the rain remained absent throughout the trip as the clouds cleared the temperatures increased and the beauty of the Boardman became more apparent as the day progressed.

Participants parked at the former Brown Bridge parking area and NRD Biologist Frank Dituri shuttled canoers to “Shecks Campground”, where the canoe launch site was located. On the 29th The three hour trip was colder than the year prior as - by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

Lunchtime Yoga for Every Body

Traditional Healer

and Helper

Strongheart Center

No Experience Necessary Gentle yoga classes designed to ease stress, increase flexibility and build strength from within. Each class concludes with guided meditation and relaxation.

Noon on Wednesdays Classes Begin Wednesday July 26, 2017

 Bring enough Tobacco for a Pipe bowl full.

 Women on their moontime cannot attend this session.

 Please refrain from Alcohol/Drugs 4 days prior.  A gift is your choice to bring along with your request for assistance but is not mandatory.

The 1 hour class begins at 12 pm in the Strongheart center.

 Requests for names, colors, clans, doctoring for illness,

Yoga mats are available for use. Please wear comfortable clothing that allows you to move freely.

Keith Smith and Valerie Smith Will be here on: September 7th and 8th, 2017 Location: Medicine Lodge – Behavioral Health Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

dreams spiritual guidance, etc. are appropriate requests.

Contact BHS at 534-7090 [Hours]

(xxx) yyy-yyyy


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

29

HEALTH FAIR

The 2017 Grand Traverse Band Health Fair was held the day before the Annual Powwow on August 18th. It was a fantastic turnout this year, as 45 vendors showed up to provided support and services for all who attended. All vendors had one common objective, promoting a healthy and happy lifestyle. The Health fair was facilitated by the Strongheart Center. The event was emcee’d by Tribal Councilor Mark Wilson, who provided a whimsical and informative tone to event. Most GTB Government departments had booths present to promote their various programs and demonstrate the various types of support offered by the Grand Traverse Band. The elders also held a stand alone fund raiser selling whitefish lunches to all. Hotdogs were also provided by the Strongheart Center staff.

- Photos by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

Each attendee was given a punch card to which they would receive stickers from the vendor booths they had visited. Once the card was filled they could enter in the for the prizes drawings. Many prizes were awarded. Most prizes focused on the promise of physical activity as bicycles and kayaks were among the lot.

- by Jared Sonderegger, Editor

June 17,2017 8am-8pm at the

Kid’s Pond

Low Cost Spay & Neuter Program

in Elk Rapids

The Cherryland Humane Society is offering financial assistance to low-income families and individuals for low cost spaying and neutering of pets. After completing an application for a voucher, your copay will be determined, however a $20 payment is required by everyone towards this service. One low cost spay/neuter is available per household. This program is only for residents of Grand Traverse and Leelanau Counties. Pets must meet the Our Sponsors: vaccination requirements of participating clinics before arrangements for surgery are made. Once Cherryland Humane Society approves and confirms your co-pay amount, you will then contact the approved veterinary clinic to make arrangements.

Elk Rapids Bible Church Rapid City Area Food Pantry Torch Lake Assembly of God Amvets Post 114 Grand Traverse Band Cone Corral Applications for assistance are available on the GTB website or by contacting of Ottawa/Chippewa Indians Cherryland Humane Society at 231-946-5116.

This program is funded through a 2% grant provided by GTB.

Hunter Safety Gun and Bow Certification

September 2-3/November 4-5 Sessions: Saturday 9-6/ Sunday 1-6 Free class by certified instructors Torch Lake Assembly of God - Submitted by AA Member

9456 Valley Rd, Rapid City


30

S E P T E M BE R 2017 / Waababagaa Giiz is (Ch angi ng Leaves Moon)

ANISHINAABEMOWIN BIBEZHIK KIDWINAN (One Word at a Time)

Tkamaadage. S/He swims across.    [ T ka maa da ge ] Pskaabaadige.  S/He swims back.    [ P skaa baa di ge ] Ntaawaadige.    S/He is a good swimmer.    [ Ni taa waa da ge ] Bgizo.  S/He is swimming.    [ B gi zo ]

Kaagegoo.   Nothing/zero.    [ Kaa  ge  goo ] Gichi’gegoo.    a big deal, something big/ important/major     [ Gi  chi   ge  goo ] Jiingtamok na kiizhaa?    Did you go to the powwow?    [Jiing ta mok    na    kii zhaa]

Kina.   All    [ Ki   na ]

Gaji. S/he is shy.    [ ga  ji ]

Kina ngoji.    Everywhere.    [ Ki na   ngo  ji ]

Mbiigizi.    S/he is loud.    [ m bii gi zi ]

Kina gegoo.   Everything.    [ Ki na    ge  goo ]

2017 LANGUAGE CAMP

Many fluent presenters were available outside of the course schedule for questions and revelations on the ever changing Language. Meals were provided and visitors were encouraged to share their personal stories and insights into their perceived learning. Each instructor had their own style and encouraged the exclusive use of the language at all times if possible.

Anishinaabemowin is a language on the verge of resurrection. It is imperative that generations to come continue to learn and teach this language that was once forbidden and on the brink of Photos by George Antoine deletion. It is every generations obligation to propel this indigenous language forward to the next, The 2017 Family Anishinaabemowin Language maintaining the importance of Anishnaabe cultural camp was held August 21st through the 23rd after the annual POWWOW. Families camped through the history. week to stay close to the event. There were many workshops to challenge children and adults alike in a variety of learning techniques to assist with reclaiming the Anishinaabemowin language. Language camp assists with the re-connection of Anishnaabe culture and traditions. Examples of some of the presentations included this year were; Traditional Wild Rice and Bannock cooking classes, story telling, Anishnaabe painting, forecasting the weather using natural surroundings, water ceremonies, medicinal plants, bead work, sweetgrass pins, traditional dream catchers, quill work, and many others. - by Jared Sonderegger, Editor


S E P TE MBE R 2017 / Wa a b a b a gaa Giiz is (Ch an gin g Leav es M o o n )

31


SEPTEMBER

2017

A publication of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians All Rights Reserved ©

Gtb news september 2017  

GTB News September 2017

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