Page 1


THANK YOU

Since the first issue of So Good.. magazine was launched, we have had the chance to travel to different countries all over the world, visit trade fairs, schools, pastry stores, restaurants, suppliers and dealers… In all of our visits, with no exception, we have found professionals everywhere proud to belong to this trade and enormously eager to share their knowledge with everybody in the sector, and they all have received the launch of So God.. so enthusiastically. Also, a great number of chefs have contacted our publishing house to Carlos Barrachina, editor-in-chief voice their positive opinion about the magazine. Many of them have also agreed that a magazine with such characteristics was so necessary in the sector; something like: “It was about the time. Finally there’s a magazine which places confectionery in the position it deserves – the summit of gastronomy”. And that was our aim at the end of the day.We claimed that ‘the sweet products’ should have the same status and consideration as ‘the savory’ ones do, and the best way to do it was showing the countless creative possibilities of confectionery at its best. We need to say that this project, exciting since its very beginning, would not have come true if it had not been for the indispensable participation of the sector. Obviously, So Good.. magazine would not exist today without the help of all those professionals who appear in it showing their skills and sharing their recipes and their work philosophy with everyone, and neither would this magazine survive without the participation of suppliers, dealers and manufacturers, as well as our advertisers, who have trusted this project even before the first issue had seen the light. I would like to especially acknowledge the task which our dealers are carrying out, who are doing their best for So Good.. to reach professionals all over the world. We are sincerely grateful to all of them, and we are happy to show our absolute commitment to continue this task which we believe is interesting for everybody in the sector. Finally, and once again, we would like to reiterate our philosophy: keeping our pages open to all those who have something to show and share with other professionals. For that reason, we encourage our readers, wherever they are, to send us their creations and recipes so that we can include them in upcoming issues. We remind you that our website is at your disposal, www.sogoodmagazine.com, to keep you up-to-date with the different forthcoming issues, where and how to obtain the magazine, the contents in each issue, list of collaborators, and so on. We also hope that you continue to use our website to send us your suggestions and contributions that will definitely help us improve in the future. Thank you very much


CONTENTS

yann duytsche , ... and gastronomic confectioner y 8 alex stupack, creative control 20 car les mampel, effer vescent 32 christoph lindpointner, a constant challenge 42 sébastien bouillet, the emperor from lyon 52

stéphane glacier, commitment and professionalism at its best 60 michel willaume , “it’s not always a matter of creating new desser ts , ...” 70 christophe michalak, “I have a sweet tooth and I’m generous , ...” 78 dominique ansel, balance as a vir tue 86 ewald notter, how sweet it is 96 koichi izumi, unlimited passion for chocolate 104 michel bras, “my personal luxur y is nature , silence , time…” 114 joan baixas, renovation 122 flavio federico, the revitalizer of brazilian pâtisserie 130 stef aer ts, visual strength 140 josé romero, the value of authenticity 146 tidbits 158 école lenôtre , the temple of gastronomic savoir faire 184

4


5

so good..


… AND GASTRONOMIC CONFECTIONERY


YANN DUYTSCHE

At the early age of eight he already loved seeing how some raw and flat material turned into magnificent puff pastry in his uncle’s workshop. And now, after twenty years’ experience and renowned reputation worldwide, that magical feature of confectionery still fascinates him.

DOLÇ, YANN DUYTSCHE’S LATEST SUCCESS, IS A VERY PERSONAL THING THAT HE C ALLS “GASTRONOMIC CONFECTIONERY” AND WHICH IS HIS DREAM COME TRUE. Dolç / Sant Cugat. Barcelona / www.yannduytsche .com

9

so good..


YANN DUYTSCHE

10

Mr. Duytsche is going through a very special moment

times there weren’t any confectionery training school

in his career right now. After devoting over twenty

offering a comprehensive course of studies. However,

years to the training sector, first as a student and then

this proved to be extremely enriching for him as he

as a teacher,Yann Duytsche has focused all his efforts

had to opportunity to learn more about the different

in consolidating his own business, which was opened

métiers de bouche.

barely two years ago.

During his stay at the school, he never lost sight of

He had a first glimpse of the pastry business at an

confectionery for pastry stores and he had the chan-

early age: he used to visit his uncle, a pastry chef who

ce to visit the workshop of Baixas in Barcelona as well

owned his own business in the north of France, his

as Daniel Giraud’s in Valence (France), among others.

homeland. “I loved stepping into the workshop and

That was when he met Frédéric Bau, who asked him

seeing what was going on there. But what struck me

to join his team at the school in Valrhona.“When I first

the most, was the transformation that the products

arrived, I was planning to spend two or three only.

underwent rather than the decorations themselves. It

Well, it’s been twelve years learning and teaching here

was completely surprising and magical”.

since then! I think you have to let yourself be seduced

As his interest in the craft increased, Yann Duytsche

by the opportunities that are presented to you and

decided to attend a catering school since in those

take advantage of them”.


“We want people to see that there is an author, a career, a gastronomic idea behind these products, and that it isn’t just the standard, quite the opposite, it’s different and exclusive” Patisserie d’auteur. It is precisely all the expertise

king in the workshop and two others in the shop. It is

and knowledge acquired through so many years of

a cohesive team that works in perfect synchrony in

learning which constitute his greatest strength and

order to put across a common idea. According to

now allow him to offer his customers a personalized

Yann himself, “it’s a kind of patisserie that needs to be

confectionery, a patisserie d’auteur, which he himself

explained because everything is particular and unique.

calls “gastronomic confectionery”. In this sense, Yann

For example, we make a millefeuille filled with vanilla

Duytsche points out an interesting difference betwe-

cream instead of crème pâtissière. Thus, we do our

en pastry stores or bakeries and restaurants: “there

best to explain the customer what it is and what is

are many restaurant categories and so the consumer

special about it. Eventually, the customer realizes that

can choose beforehand whether to go to a fast-food

there are different ways of approaching the world of

place, a pizzeria, an à la carte restaurant or a high stan-

confectionery, and this is how we do it”.

dard restaurant. However, in confectionery no distinc-

Dolç is a small shop, well-lit and clear with an almost

tions are made beforehand”.

total absence of decoration and yet it displays a ratio-

The same approach is followed at Dolç, Yann

nal and well-planned layout. As Duytsche says, “we

Duytsche’s shop-business in Sant Cugat del Vallès

weren’t seeking an elaborate style. Finally, we’ve ended

(Barcelona), where gastronomic confectionery or

up with a practically empty area but then that’s when

patisserie d’auteur is common practice. The word

you can truly say there is design… when it isn’t

confectionery or patisserie isn’t actually used because,

obvious to our eyes. Anyway, that

as its author explains, “Dolç (Catalan for ‘sweet’) best

is what we wanted.” And in

embodies what we’re trying to do here: to work with

this area, it’s easy to spot

sweet ingredients in a gastronomic sense. It’s a term

Yann, wearing an impeccable

which, in my opinion, puts across sensitivity, emotions.

white uniform serving his

It’s a word that comprises a number of things and, at

customers, explaining his gas-

the same time, defines my professional identity as

tronomic idea and enjoying

well.”

his dream come true.

Elaborating on this idea, Duytsche details the sections of his offer: “we make cookies, snacks, pastries, icecream and bonbons. Clearly, nothing new! What we want is for our customers to realize that behind these products there is an author, a career, a gastronomic idea, and that they are not standard products but different and exclusive”. Yann has found great support in his wife, Cristina López, who is responsible for running the shop. The rest of the Dolç team is made up of five people wor-

11

so good..


YANN DUYTSCHE cocoa streusel with griottes 100 100 70 30 100 150

g g g g g g

butter sugar type 55 flour cocoa powder almond powder frozen griottes

Dice the butter while still cold. Combine the flour and the powdered ingredients, add the butter and gently knead the dough with the help of a paddle. Give the shape of tubes and store in the freezer. Process with the meat grinder. Store the mise en place in the freezer. Baking temperature: 150ºC.

tender almond sponge cake 450 250 220 220 100 150 50

g g g g g g g

egg whites sugar confectioners’ sugar almond powder type 55 flour egg whites cream

Combine the 450g egg whites with the sugar and whisk to soft peaks. With the help of a spatula, mix the cream, the 150g egg whites, the almond powder, the flour and the confectioners’ sugar. Fold in the whisked egg whites, first a small amount and then the rest. Bake at 190ºC for 25 minutes.

violet light Ivoire mousse 180 370 340 7

g g g g

milk cream, 35% fat content Ivoire white chocolate gelatin sheets

Soak the gelatin in plenty of water. Weigh and grind the chocolate. Boil the milk and add the gelatin, previously drained. Pour approximately 1/3 hot liquid over the chocolate and beat with a mixer in order to obtain a smooth, elastic, glossy texture, which will mean that the emulsifying process has started. Add the remainder of the milk, keeping the texture unaltered. When the chocolate mixture is at 37ºC, pour over the spongy whipped cream. Freeze.

MONTAGE SPREAD THE COCOA STREUSEL IN A 16 CM FRAME AND SCATTER SOME QUARTERS OF GRIOTTES. BAKE AT 150ºC.

Ivoire white glaze 225 600 375 150 q.s.

g g g g

cream, 35% fat content Absolu Cristal neutral gelatin Ivoire white chocolate mineral water water-coloring white coloring

MAKE THE VIOLET IVOIRE MOUSSE AND POUR INTO A FRAME, 14CM X 3CM HIGH, ON A BASE OF TENDER ALMOND SPONGE CAKE. FREEZE. MAKE THE WHITE GLAZE AND USE AT 40ºC ON THE FROZEN MOUSSE FRAME. PLACE ON A BASE OF STREUSEL, GARNISH WITH FRESH VIOLET FLOWERS AND SOME GRIOTTE JUICE MIXED WITH SOME NEUTRAL GELA-

Boil the cream. Heat the neutral gelatin to 70/80ºC. Steadily pour the cream over the couverture, previously melted, and start to emulsify. Finish by pouring the hot gelatin in. Process with the mixer in order to complete the emulsion. Use at 35/40ºC.

12

TIN.


ESSENTIAL


YANN DUYTSCHE

14


YANN DUYTSCHE gianduja sablé breton 160 320 450 15 4 320 300

g g g g g g g

egg yolks sugar type 55 flour baking powder salt softened butter gianduja noissette lait

Beat the egg yolks together with the sugar. Meanwhile, sift the flour, the baking powder and the salt. Once the egg yolks have been whipped, add the softened butter, and then the flour and baking powder together. Spread on a sheet pan to a thickness of 5mm and leave to set before baking. Bake in a very slow oven at 150/160ºC, vents open. When cold, process to a relatively fine powder in the food processor. Add the Gianduja noisette lait melted at 40ºC. Arrange into 0.5cm thick rings. Store in refrigerator.

crème brûlée with cinnamon and lemon 250 700 200 175

g g g g

q.s.

milk cream, 35% fat content egg yolks sugar lemon zest stick cinnamon

Boil the milk, add the lemon zest and the stick cinnamon, and allow to infuse for 10 minutes. Strain and pour over the cream, then add the egg yolks combined with the sugar. Pour into hemisphere molds. Bake in oven at 90ºC for 30 to 35 minutes. Leave to cool down and freeze.

neutral vegetable jelly 50 500 50

g g g

vegetable gelatin mineral water sugar

Combine all the ingredients and heat to 90ºC. Use at 65ºC.

raspberry ‘yolks’ / liquidized lemon 300 100 50

g g g

raspberry purée liquidized lemon Absolu Cristal neutral gelatin

Process a whole lemon with a liquidizer (peel included), weigh to obtain 100g, add the raspberry purée and the neutral gelatin, then process with a blender. Freeze in hemisphere molds. Make the neutral vegetable jelly and coat the hemispheres while pricking them with a pin.

16


SC O B


YANN DUYTSCHE

SERVING ARRANGE HEMISPHERES OF CRÈME BRÛLÉE WITH CINNAMON AND LEMON ON THE RECONSTRUCTED SABLÉ BRETON. CARAMELIZE. TOP THE CAKE WITH SOME STRAWBERRIES AND RASPBERRIES AND WITH THE RASPBERRY-LEMON ‘YOLKS’.

18


ALEX STUPACK

He is not even 30 and has already been considered to be one of the best pastry chefs in America for the last few years. His stunning career has allowed him to receive a complete training and a solid professional experience after collaborating with some of the best restaurants all over the country. He is proud to collect prizes and praise. BEST PASTRY CHEF IN 2003 OR IRON CHEF IN 2008

ARE JUST SOME OF HIS ACHIEVEMENTS. IN 2004, HE WAS ALREADY CONSIDERED TO BE A VISIONARY.TODAY, AND ACCORDING TO JEFFREY STEINGARTEN – A CRITIC OF VOGUE – HE IS ‘AN UNSTOPPABLE FONT OF NEW IDEAS’.

HOWEVER, ALEX STUPAK DOES NOT SEEM IMPRESSED BY SUCCESS. NOWADAYS, HE CONTINUES WITH HIS CONSTANT OWN RESEARCH TOGETHER WITH WYLIE DUFRESNE IN NEW YORK: ‘MY HOPE IS THAT EVERY DISH I MAKE IS AESTHETIC ALLY STRIKING IN A NON-TRADITIONAL WAY BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY I HOPE THERE IS ALWAYS A TECHNIQUE ABOUT IT THAT IS SUBTLE, INNOVATIVE, AND UNIQUE’. WD-50 / New Yor k / www.wd-50.com / photos: Takahiko Mar umoto

20


CREATIVE CONTROL


ALEX STUPACK

‘I am fascinated by everything in cuisine but as a pastry chef the opportunity to manipulate is much more profound and radical’ ‘Becoming a pastry chef was a premeditated shift

Wylie Dufresne’s call in 2007, offering him the respon-

from the savory world. I love desserts but not neces-

sibility for the desserts at the WD-50, gave him the

sarily more than I love savory cuisine.As a young cook,

opportunity to cook in New York and to make his first

I remember realizing that – other than the chef in a

steps into the creative universe of one of the most

restaurant – the only other position that truly has cre-

innovative chefs within the international cooking

ative control is the pastry chef. Being young and impa-

scene.

tient, I wanted that creative

‘I think my desserts fit in with Wylie's philosophy well.

control immediately. The

Wylie is obsessed with finding his own path. He is

restaurant I was working at

aware of everything that’s new and exciting around

was in dire need of a pastry

him. He is inspired by it all, but he remains uninfluen-

chef and I somehow convin-

ced. He is constantly pushing me to focus on the

ced them that I was the

unexplored. He won’t allow me to repeat old dishes

best candidate even though

or fall into a format of any sort. I owe a great deal of

I had no training. I’m still not

my personal evolution to the last three years by his

sure how I accomplished

side’, Stupak states.

that’.

In such context of an only language and complete

This way Alex Stupak recalls

understanding, Stupak exercises his creative control

his initial contact with the

with absolute freedom. He can create, convert and

‘creative control’ to which

manipulate in an almost unlimited way:‘I am fascinated

he so much aspired. With

by everything in cuisine, but as a pastry chef the

such attitude and talent, this

opportunity to manipulate is much more profound

young chef started a stun-

and radical. It is the closest thing a human can come

ning career which allowed

to actually creating new foods. What is exciting is to

him to receive a complete

conceptualize an idea and see it through until it beco-

training and a solid profes-

mes real. What is even more exciting then that is ins-

sional experience in restau-

piring a team to actually want to express themselves

rants such as Clio and The

and help you improve upon everything consistently’.

Federalist in Boston, or Tru and Alinea – together with Grant Achatz – in Chicago.

22


ALEX STUPACK

1, 2, 3

4, 5, 6

7, 8

24


CARAMELIZED BRIOCHE, GALA APPLE, SAGE, BROWN BUTTER SORBET 25

so good..


ALEX STUPACK

SERVERS 10

base mixtures Brown Butter and Brown Butter Solids Caramel centers

composition Brioche Pudding Thin caramel sheets Apple Paste Smoked pecan nougatine Brown butter sorbet Celery tuile Sage foam

garnishes Thin slices of celery heart Thin slivers of gala apple Micro celery leaves

for the brown butter and brown butter solids 1000 250

g g

butter non-fat milk powder

In a saucepan, melt the butter. Add the milk powder and whisk constantly until the butter and the added milk powder brown. Strain the solids from the butter and reserve both.

for the caramel centers for the brioche 900 9 450 675 13.5 8

g g g g g

milk low acyl gellan gum caramelized sugar brown butter sheets of gelatin (previously rehydrated) salt

Bring the milk to a boil. Pour the milk into the vase of a blender and turn on the lowest speed setting. Add the gellan gum and shear at highest speed setting for one minute. Add the caramelized sugar and continue to blend until dissolved. Slowly add the brown butter followed by the gelatin and the salt. Pour the mixture onto a sheet pan and allow to gel at room temperature for five minutes. Return the mixture back to the blender and puree until smooth.Transfer the mixture into a greased 8x17� plastic tray and refrigerate until the gelatin has set (at least twelve hours). Unmold the gel and slice into 1/2�x2� batons and return to the refrigerator until needed.You will yield many more than you need to produce ten, but this mixture is difficult to produce in a small batch size.

26


27

so good..


ALEX STUPACK

for the brioche pudding 400 100 2.5 5 500

g g g g

milk egg yolk each gelatin sheets transglutaminase (TI) brioche (crust removed, diced and dehydrated)

Heat the milk to 100º F. Add the egg yolk, gelatin, and transglutaminase and mix with a hand-held blender. Add the milk mixture to the brioche and mix with your hands until the brioche has soaked up all the liquid. Place a small amount of the mixture in the bottom of 1”x3” flex molds and push the mixture into all the corners. Place a baton of caramel gel in the center of each mold and top off with more of the brioche mixture. Make sure to pack the brioche in tightly around all sides of the caramel center to ensure proper encapsulation. Place the mold under refrigeration for 24 hours to allow the enzyme to work within the system.

for the thin caramel sheets 500 500 250

g g g

sugar glucose water

Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan and cook to 160ºC. Pour the caramel onto a Silpat and allow to cool at room temperature for at least two hours. Grind the caramel in a spice grinder to a fine powder. Place a 3”x5” template over a Silpat and sift the caramel powder evenly over it. Remove the template and place the Silpat in a 300ºF oven until the powder becomes transparent. Allow the sheets to cool before carefully removing them from the Silpat. Store in an airtight container with desiccant.

for the apple paste 500 100 7.5 5

g g g g

gala apple flesh honey low acyl gellan gum salt

Place the apple flesh in sous vide and cook at 90ºC for 30 minutes. While still hot remove from the bag and transfer to the vase of a blender. Puree the apples until smooth. Add the gellan gum and continue to puree for another 2 minutes. Add the honey and salt and transfer the mixture to an ice bath. Once chilled, process the apple mixture in a food processor and pass through a tamis. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag fitted with a 006 size petal tip. Refrigerate until needed.

28


for the smoked pecan nougatine 400 200 5 100 400

g g g g g

sugar glucose salt water of ground, smoked pecans

Combine the sugar, glucose, salt and water in a saucepan and cook to 163ยบC. Immediately add the pecans and stir to combine.Turn the mixture out onto a Silpat. Invert another Silpat over the mixture and flatten with a rolling pin. Allow the mixture to cool for at least two hours. Break the nougatine apart and convert it into a coarse powder using a food processor. Store in an airtight container until needed.

for the brown butter sorbet 657 4 80 40 194 50 4

g g g g g g g

water xanthan gum brown butter solids dextrose powder sugar invert sugar salt

Bring the water to a boil and place in the vase of a blender. Add the xanthan gum and blend on the highest speed setting for one minute. Add the brown butter solids and continue to blend until dissolved. Add the remaining ingredients and transfer to an ice bath. Once chilled, spin in an ice cream machine. Reserve the sorbet in a freezer until needed.

for the celery tuile 420 90 90 6 2

g g g g g

celery (roughly chopped) sugar glucose powder pga salt

Combine all the ingredients in a blender and puree until very smooth. Pass the mixture through a chinois. Spread the mixture thinly on acetate sheets (the dimensions of the acetate are not important, whatever best fits into your chosen dehydrator) and dehydrate at 140ยบF for twelve hours. Check the tuile to insure it is crispy and peel away the acetate. Break the tuile into rough shards and store in an airtight container with desiccant until needed.

29

so good..


ALEX STUPACK

for the sage foam 250 250 50 10 75 2

g g g g g g

milk cream sugar sage iota carrageenan salt

Bring the milk and cream to a boil. Add the sugar and sage and cover the pot. Allow the mixture to infuse for 20 minutes. Strain the liquid and discard the sage. Return the mixture to a boil and transfer to the vase of a blender. Add the carrageenan and the salt and blend on the highest speed setting for one minute.Transfer the mixture to an ice bath to chill. Hold the mixture in a refrigerator until needed.

MONTAGE PLACE THE BRIOCHE PUDDINGS ON A PARCHMENT-LINED TRAY AND BAKE AT 300ยบF FOR SIX MINUTES. PLACE A CARAMEL SHEET ON TOP OF EACH ONE AND RETURN TO THE OVEN FOR ONE MINUTE LONGER. REMOVE FROM THE OVEN AND ALLOW TO REST. ON EACH PLATE PIPE A LONG IRREGULAR LINE OF APPLE PUREE. PLACE A MOUND OF SMOKED PECAN NOUGATINE BESIDE EACH LINE. GARNISH THE APPLE PUREE WITH THE CELERY HEART, APPLE SLIVERS, MICRO CELERY LEAVES AND SHARDS OF CELERY TUILE. IN A SMALL POT HEAT UP SOME OF THE SAGE FOAM MIXTURE JUST UNTIL IT IS STEAMING. FROTH UP THE MIXTURE WITH A HAND BLENDER AND PLACE SOME OF THE FOAM ON EACH PLATE. PLACE THE BRIOCHE BREAD PUDDINGS ON EACH PLATE. PLACE A QUENELLE OF BROWN BUTTER SORBET ON TOP OF EACH MOUND OF NOUGATINE.

30


EFFERVESCENT


CARLES MAMPEL

He has proved that work, effort and an indomitable will to learn always end up bearing fruit. CARLES

MAMPEL IS TODAY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ICONS IN THE SO-CALLED NEW PÂTISSERIE IN BARCELONA AND SPAIN. In his restaurant, Bubó, recently admitted as a member of the Relais Dessert Association, Mampel develops a modern offer, which leans on other disciplines such as the cuisine itself or the catering, which gives a major importance to packaging and which is constantly

AND IN BUBÓ, IN THE VERY HEART OF EL BORN –ONE THE MOST LIVELY AND BOHEMIAN AREAS IN BARCELONA–, IT IS ALWAYS POSSIBLE TO FIND SOMETHING NEW, DIFFERENT AND SURPRISING AT THE SAME TIME. IT IS THE CONTINUOUS, CREATIVE EFFERVESCENCE.

updated and reinvented.

Bubó / Barcelona / www.bubo.ws

33

so good..


CARLES MAMPEL

34

His natural state is a permanent state of alert. Always

When a new season starts, an 80 or 90% of the cre-

prepared to teach and learn, and especially to partici-

ations are changed. As their creator states: ‘the pro-

pate. His answer is never ‘no’ to anybody in the trade

ducts have to evolve, and their trajectory is conditio-

who wants to consult or propose him something.

ned by the seasons, as it normally happens in other

New things can always be created. There is always

types of establishments’.

space for innovation, to turn things upside down.

El Born (in the Ciutat Vella quarter, Barcelona) gathers

Everything can be shaken and everything can modify

a gastronomic offer both varied and rich. Besides, ‘this

its state. He is restless, and lives in a state of efferves-

area has lots of advantages: it is mostly inhabited by

cence caused by himself.

young people, which allows us to offer riskier tastes

Visiting Bubó, the restaurant that Carles Mampel runs

–actually these ones succeed the most–; there is a

in El Born, Barcelona, is to walk into a surprising world

constant flow of people; and on top of everything, it is

regarding the form and content, the presentations and

very often visited by lots of foreigners looking for new

the flavor and texture combinations. And visiting it for

things’, Mampel affirms.‘The original idea was to set up

a second time after a brief time means to witness a

a store that broke with the traditional bakery prototy-

new scene, in which surprise will surely show up again.

pe, with the typical shop windows and counters, and


The salted pipas cake, the cheese lollipops, or the chupachups made with goat’s cheese and white wine and raspberry jelly are now celebrated specialties at Mampel’s world especially to offer new things with which we could surprise our customers’. The integration of Bubó in the area is absolute. Only a few places can boast of staying open until one o’clock at night. In this context, Carles Mampel’s hectic, creative and productive activity settles down comfortably. Not all the artists can get a positive response from their public; otherwise they would not be in the vanguard and would not set a trend as this master chef from Barcelona does. The salted pipas cake, the cheese lollipops, or the chupachups made with goat’s cheese and white wine and raspberry jelly are now celebrated specialties at Mampel’s world. His products reflect the technical innovations in the investigation tasks which he carries out together with his team in the workshop located on the outskirts of Barcelona. Despite being so young, Carles Mampel’s professional career is long and glittering. In 1999, he became Spain’s ‘Mejor Maestro Artesano Pastelero’ (Best Master Pastry Chef, MMAPE). The latest success that this energetic master chef has achieved is to be admitted in the prestigious international association Relais Dessert. Undoubtedly, this was like a breath of fresh air for his business, to which Mampel managed to pass on his uncontrollable effervescence.

35

so good..


LONG MAISROJO

36


CARLES MAMPEL crispy corn with 3 paprikas 600 360 4 8 8

g g g g g

6 400 500 200 200

g g g g g

Mr. Corn fried corn light color cooked caramel hot paprika paprika sweet smoked paprika ‘pimentón de la Vera’ CDO smoked salt Bitter Lactée couverture eclats d’or fried corn in pieces clarified butter

Place the whole fried corn, the caramel in pieces, the paprikas and the smoked salt in the Robot Coupe and refine to the maximum without allowing the mixture to exceed 70ºC. Add the couverture, melted at 50ºC, and the clarified butter. Pour into a 58x36-cm frame.

alpaco mousse with salt flower 580 770 800 4

g g g g

liquid cream Alpaco couverture, 66% foamy cream salt flower

Make a ganache with the liquid cream boiled and the couverture melted at 50ºC, emulsify. Add in the foamy cream and the salt flower. Finish mixing and pour into a frame, insert the crispy corn and freeze. Once frozen, remove from the frame, allow to thaw out slightly and cut into 12x2-cm pieces.

intense vanilla sablée 260 100 40 35 90 470 1 1 4

g g g g g g g

butter confectioners’ sugar vanilla sugar almond powder egg flour vanilla bean crystallized vanillin drops of vanilla extract

Knead as usual and allow to set for 24 hours under refrigeration. Roll out to a thickness of 2 mm, cut into 13x3 pieces and bake. Top the sablée with the mousse and crispy corn.

FINISH AND PRESENTATION PLACE A CHOCOLATE SHEET ON TOP OF THE MOUSSE SO AS TO ADD ANOTHER CRUNCHY LAYER AND GARNISH WITH TOASTED MAIZE SUGARED WITH PAPRIKA.

37

so good..


CARLES MAMPEL mousse of Tanariva-basil-lemon 250 12 620 50 300 650

g g g g g g

basil-lemon infusion gelatin sheets Tanariva couverture cocoa butter Italian meringue semi-whipped cream

Combine the infusion and the couverture. Add in the gelatin, then the meringue and finally the semi-whipped cream.

basil-lemon infusion 500 15 2

g g

water basil lemon peels

Boil the water and infuse.

genoese bread with Keva and raspberries 500 500 300 80

g g g g

20 4

g

butter almond paste, 60/40 eggs corn starch salt Keva lemon liquor lemon peels

Mix the almond paste into the eggs, heat the mixture and whisk. Add in the corn starch and the butter, and finally the lemon liquor. Place in the rings and sprinkle with raspberry breakings. Bake at 180ºC.

raspberry sponge 200 300 100 15 4 2

g g g g g g

fresh raspberries Garnier raspberry purée sugar egg white powder gelatin sheets carob flour

Hydrate the gelatin sheets. Process the rest of the ingredients with the mixer until very fine. Melt the gelatin, mix into the other ingredients and whisk.

MONTAGE PLACE THE GENOESE BREAD ON THE BOTTOM OF THE MOLD, FILL WITH THE MOUSSE, THEN POSITION THE RASPBERRY FOAM AND FINISH FILLING WITH THE MOUSSE. SMOOTH OUT, FREEZE AND SPRAY WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE COUVERTURE.

38


H P I IL

C

E K A


A CONSTANT CHALLENGE


CHRISTOPH LINDPOINTNER

Care in the presentation must be a constant concern in the world of confectionery, and especially if the sweet creations are presented in an outstanding, modern, incomparable setting such as Hangar-7. CHRISTOPH LINDPOINTNER, PASTRY CHEF AT RES-

TAURANT IKARUS AND AWARDED AS AUSTRIA’S BEST PASTRY CHEF, HAS CHOSEN ELEGANCE AND GEOMETRIC LINES TO GIVE SHAPE TO SOME DESSERTS WHICH COMBINE TRADITIONAL INGREDIENTS AND EXPLORE NEW HARMONIES IN TEXTURES, TEMPERATURES AND FLAVORS. NEVERTHELESS, CHRISTOPH LINDPOINTNER

ENTHUSIASTIC ALLY POINTS OUT: ‘THIS DOES NOT MEAN THAT I AM CLOSED TO THE IDEA OF MODERN INFLUENCES, QUITE THE OPPOSITE’. Salzburgo. Austria / www.hangar-7.com / photos: Helge Kirchberger

43

so good..


CHRISTOPH LINDPOINTNER

44

Lindpointner’s basis has its origin in his non-conformist

great things and will encounter fewer boundaries

passion for finding new creation paths. In fact, his voca-

when it comes to implementing their ideas’.

tion for pastry making came after finding out the great

Regardless of all this, and in order to understand

creative freedom that the world of restaurant des-

Christoph Lindpointner’s work, it is necessary to loca-

serts provides. However, not everything is valid. As he

te his dishes in the place for which they are created –

explains, nowadays the role of a pastry chef has achie-

the restaurant Ikarus. The restaurant is located in the

ved a dimension in which almost everything is possi-

Hangar-7, at Salzburg airport (Austria), an architectu-

ble, in which one’s imagination can run wild, someti-

rally innovative setting, as well as different, modern – a

mes even excessively. In contrast to this creative whirl,

place which, to some extent, determines the food it

Christoph Lindpointner opts for the ‘alchemy of basic

offers.

products’, such as flour, eggs, butter, sugar, milk, cream,

This Hangar was opened in 2003 with the intention of

chocolate and fruit.

breaking visual stereotypes and establishing a connec-

This ‘alchemy’ should be preceded by a high theoreti-

tion to the origins of aviation. Not for nothing is this

cal and practical knowledge which helps us unders-

the place where the Flying Bulls rest before flying all

tand not only what happens inside ovens, saucepans

over the world performing spectacular aerobatics.The

or freezers, but also why it happens. ‘I think anyone

building stands out due to its brightness and its orien-

who works towards this understanding can achieve

tation towards the sky, crowned by a big crystal dome


Restaurant Ikarus works as a showroom in which creations designed by different guests chefs who are currently setting the trend worldwide are presented every month and a complex girder framework. All this was promoted by the firm Red Bull, which intended to create a meeting point for aviation, art exhibitions and international high cuisine. In that respect, and besides offering a modern cuisine directed by the chef Roland Trettl, the restaurant works as a showroom in which creations designed by different guests chefs who are currently setting the trend worldwide are presented every month. As the pastry chef states: ‘Hangar-7 is an unrivalled gastronomic concept which is given an impressive new slant by the team each month. For me, it is a place of work which offers me a great deal of variety, freedom and the opportunity to develop while at the same time presenting a constant challenge’.

45

so good..


CHRISTOPH LINDPOINTNER

sponge cake 130 270

g g

280 80 110

g g g

chocolate spray butter Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa egg whites sugar egg yolks

Combine the butter and the chocolate and melt. Separately beat the egg whites together with the sugar until stiff. Emulsify the egg yolks with the chocolate and a bit of the beaten egg whites, then fold in the remaining stiffened egg whites. Pour on a 60 x 40 cm baking sheet and bake at 180°C for approximately 10 minutes.

700

g

300

g

Combine and melt, then spray onto the chocolate ice cream cylinders.

chocolate cream 400 600 1 250 120 540

g g g g g

mousse Araguani 250 3 290

g g g

500

g

milk gelatin Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa heavy cream

Bring the milk to a boil and stir in the gelatin. Gradually emulsify the chocolate and heat to 50ºC. Whisk the cream until stiff and fold into the liquid. Spread over the sponge cake and leave to set.

chocolate glaze 225 295

g g

600 260

g g

heavy cream Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa Absolu cristal Wolfberger cocoa cream

Bring the cream to a boil and gradually emulsify the Araguani. Heat the Absolu Cristal to 70ºC and emulsify as well. Stir in the cocoa cream and glaze chocolate mousse with the mixture, then cut into 7 x 7 cm squares.

Araguani chocolate ice cream 2000 55 144 200 100 40 10 550

g g g g g g g g

milk skimmed milk powder sugar glucose powder trimoline sugar Pectagel rose Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa

Heat up the milk. Add the skimmed milk powder at 25ºC. Combine the 144g sugar with the glucose powder and the trimoline and add at 35ºC. When at 45ºC, add the 40 g sugar and the Pectagel rose. Finally add the Araguani at 50°C and then heat up to 85°C. Quickly cool down to 4°C and leave to set. Blend and freeze in an ice cream machine. Line PVC pipes with non-stick paper and chocolate wrap. With the help of a decorating bag (smooth tip), fill Araguani ice cream into the pipes and shock freeze to -35°C. Remove from molds and cut into 5.5-cm portions.

46

Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa cocoa butter

milk heavy cream vanilla bean, seeds scraped egg yolks sugar Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa

Combine the milk, the cream and the vanilla and bring to a boil. Separately combine the egg yolks and the sugar and pasteurize by an average heat of 82ºC. Gradually emulsify the Araguani with the just prepared crème anglaise and pour into small cone molds (Demarle). Shock freeze and remove from the molds.Temper some Araguani, thinly spread onto neutral chocolate wrap and leave to set. Cut out small disks and use these as bottom layers for the cream cones (to prepare the thawed out chocolate cream for serving).

ganache Araguani 300 300 60 60 440

g g g g g

milk heavy cream trimoline glucose syrup Araguani dark chocolate couverture, 72% cocoa

Combine the milk, the cream, the trimoline and the glucose syrup and bring to a boil. Gradually emulsify the chocolate. Pour half of the mixture into mini hemisphere molds and shock freeze. When frozen, remove from the molds, pour the second half of the mixture into the molds and then place the frozen hemispheres on top to make balls. Finally shock freeze again. Remove the balls from the molds and roll in cocoa powder.


GEOMETRY IN ARAGUANI

47

so good..


MASAPRA 48

(MANGO – SAFFRON – PRALINÉ)


CHRISTOPH LINDPOINTNER

praliné cream 400 100 1 125 60 600 13 380 400

g g g g g g g g

milk heavy cream vanilla bean, seeds scraped egg yolks sugar crème anglaise (see above) gelatine praliné noisette 50% heavy cream

Combine the milk, the cream and the vanilla and bring to a boil. Separately combine the egg yolk and the sugar and stir it until it gets creamy. Put it back in the pot of the boiling milk and pasteurize by average heat of 82ºC. Soak and drain the gelatin and add to the 600 g crème anglaise. Stir in the Praliné noisette gradually and warm up to 35ºC. Whip the cream until stiff and fold into the mixture. Place 450 g of the mixture onto a 60x40-cm baking sheet, lined with chocolate wrap. Smooth out and freeze, then cut into 9x6-cm rectangles.

praliné – financier 150 100 100 10 230 200 320

g g g g g g g

TpT noisette powdered sugar flour baking powder praliné noisette 50% nut butter egg whites

Sift the TpT noisette, the powdered sugar, the flour and the baking powder together. Combine the Praliné noisette and the nut butter, add the sifted ingredients and stir until smooth. Slightly stir the egg whites and fold into the previous mixture. Pour on a 60x40-cm baking sheet and bake at 190ºC for approximately 10 minutes. Leave to cool and cut about 1/3 of the cake into small 4x2-cm rectangles. Freeze the remainder in liquid nitrogen and grind to a fine powder with the help of a cutter. Freeze to store.

saffron ice cream 2500 g milk 90 g milk powder 200 g dextrose 150 g glucose powder 400 g sugar 9 g salt 1 tsp saffron threads 50 g sugar 10 g Pectagel rose 500 g heavy cream 300 g crème fraîche Heat up the milk. Mix in the milk powder at 25ºC. Combine the dextrose, the glucose, the 400g sugar, the salt and the saffron threads and add at 35ºC. At 40ºC, add the 50g sugar and the Pectagel rose. Finally add the cream and the crème fraîche at 45ºC and heat to 85ºC. Rapidly cool down to 4ºC and leave to set. Briefly blend and freeze.

warm mango agar 500 30 8 4

g g g g

puréed mango sugar agar-agar gelatin

Warm up the mango. Combine the sugar and the agar-agar and add to the mango. Continue to heat up to 85ºC. Add the gelatin, previously soaked and drained, to the mixture. Pour into a mold and leave to cool. Cut into small 1x1-cm cubes. Briefly warm up in the microwave oven before serving.

saffron jelly 150 2 2 10 300 50

g g g g g g

sirop 30° saffron threads salt Pernod Absolu cristal puréed mango

pralinè saffron dust 350 140 6 3

g g g g

praliné noisette 50% Malto saffron powder fine salt

Combine and blend all the ingredients to a fine powder with the help of a Thermomix.

Combine all the ingredients and briefly blend. Use as a sauce.

hazelnut brittle 140 100

g g

ground hazelnuts sirop 30°

Combine the ingredients and slightly stir. Place on a 60x40-cm Silpat mat. Cover with chocolate wrap and roll to a thin sheet. Freeze. Remove wrap and bake at 160ºC until golden brown.

mango confit 1 mango 50 g mango purée 1 pinch piment d’espelette Peel the mango, remove the seed and cut into small cubes. Use the purée and the Piment d’espelette to marinate the mango cubes.

49

so good..


THE EMPEROR FROM LYON


SÉBASTIEN BOUILLET

In the last five years, the Maison Bouillet has grown from a small shop in the famous La Croix-Rousse square in Lyon into a small empire made up of four stores (one of them in Tokyo), a tearoom which also works as a chocolaterie and a restaurant, a pastry school and a staff of over forty people. All these achievements received unanimous recognition by professionals both in France and abroad. Recently, the Maison Bouillet

THE PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS SUDDEN GROWTH IS SÉBASTIEN BOUILLET, WHO JOINED THE FAMILY BUSINESS IN THE YEAR 2000 AND THEN STARTED PLANNING HIS MAGNIFICENT C AREER. He is the new and brilliant has become a member of the prestigious Relais Dessert association.

emperor of confectionery in Lyon. Maison Bouillet / Lyon. France / www.chocolatier-bouillet.com

53

so good..


SÉBASTIEN BOUILLET

Sébastien Bouillet’s career might seem to be developing fast, almost at a frantic pace: three new stores, one of them in Japan, a tearoom-restaurant, a pastry school, admission into Relais Dessert, a completely renovated workshop. And all this was achieved in only five years. Hence, the question: why has this happened so fast? The truth is that such a sky-rocketing career is anything but unplanned. Clearly, it didn’t really get started only five years ago. Sébastien acquired his training working in different French pastry shops, where he learned how the different workshops and production systems worked. In those times he became aware of the reality of the confectionery business and its untapped potential. When he joined the family business in the year 2000, he started to introduce deep changes, which affected production and the workshop in the first place. That is, he started building the Maison Bouillet from its very foundations. Then, in 2005, he carried out a comprehensive renovation of the workshop at the main store, in La Croix-Rousse square, by expanding the area to 250m_, and opened a new shop, called Macarons & Chocolats. Later, in 2007, the Tokyo shop was opened, in the prestigious Isetan department store, in the Shinjuku neighbourhood. In the very same year, together with Eric Bergon, pastry chef from Bouillet, he opened a tearoom, chocolaterie and restaurant in St. Jean, in the old Lyon, as well as a store devoted to chocolate macaroons. In January 2009, Bouillet began yet another adventure, but this time it was training-oriented: he opened his own school, the ‘Gâuteau Ecole’, where chefs from the Maison taught a whole program of courses oriented to both novices and experienced chefs in need of an update.

54


Sébastien has updated the ‘recipe’ created by his parents in 1977: making good products, respecting the raw materials and being innovative without attempting a revolution in confectionery

55

so good..


SÉBASTIEN BOUILLET

The new Bouillet empire has a staff of 40 professio-

permanent and opened a store at the well-known

nals plus other 15 in the Tokyo store.The new concept

Isetan department store, in the area of Shinjuku,

is not particularly innovative, though. It was a question

Tokyo. Since then, he has increased his trips to Japan

of updating the ‘recipe’ created by his parents in 1977,

mainly to control his staff of fifteen people, who have

that is to say, making good products, respecting the

the reputation of the store in their hands, and to ensu-

raw materials and innovating without attempting a

re that the product is up to the expectations of the

revolution in confectionery.

demanding Japanese market. Just like other French

Talent and management skills, workshop and office

pastry chefs, Sébastien has been in love with the Asian

work, and, of course, a bit of ambition.These

culture from the very beginning. Not only has he

are the ingredients that Sébastien has

brought his company to Japan, but he has also incor-

brilliantly combined. If we had to cho-

porated some of this country’s influences to his crea-

ose a product as the flagship of the

tions and to the way he understands the trade.

Bouillet stores, it would be the maca-

Bouillet’s main workshop is a hive of activity. Young

roon without any question. In his

pastry chefs from all over world choose it knowing

workshop, there is a station of about

that it is the place to learn the craft. The reasons for

twenty pastry chefs responsible for

that: open doors, no secrets and an on-going exchan-

making almost 12,000 macaroons a

ge of knowledge, know-how and learning, which are

week. It’s a total of 18 types of sweet

enriching to everyone.

macaroons and 6 types of savory

It’s been 15 years since Madame and Monsieur

ones, the latter especially developed

Bouillet opened their shop on the delicious La Croix-

as appetizers. And their great spe-

Rousse square. And all those years have helped young

cialty, the Maca’Lyon®, a salted butter

Sébastien become one of the greatest ambassadors

and caramel macaroon coated in

of confectionery from Lyon and France.

70% cocoa dark chocolate. Apart from that, Bouillet offers a wide range of own brand cakes, small pies, chocolates, muffins, confectionery products, individual cakes, and jams, among others. Japanese

adventure.

Sébastien

Bouillet traveled to Japan at the beginning of the decade to provide consulting services to companies and professionals. Finally, he decided to make his presence somewhat more

56


Bouillet’s main workshop is a hive of activity.Young pastry chefs from all over the world choose it knowing that it is the place to learn the craft

57

so good..


SÉBASTIEN BOUILLET

CHUPATOMIC ‘PETILLANT’ CHOCOLATE MOUSSE AND INTENSE CHOCOLATE CREAM OVER AN EXPLOSIVE SPONGE CAKE

chocolate sponge cake 152 172 250 60 50 92 184 84

g g g g g g g g

almond paste 50% butter egg yolk coconut purée cocoa carupano chocolate couverture egg whites icing sugar

chocolate mousse 63

g

28.70

g

28 39.20 47.20 15 98

g g g g g

Ibaria chocolate couverture, 67% cocoa Capurano dark chocolate couverture, 70% cocoa cream egg yolks syrup at 30º Peta Zetas® whipped cream

chocolate cream 382 382 153 68 321

g g g g g

cream milk egg yolks sugar Brio couverture

Coating: Carupano dark chocolate couverture

PETAZETA

CHOCOLATE CREAM

CHOCOLATE SPONGE CAKE DARK CHOCOLATE COUVERTURE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

58


STÉPHANE GLACIER

When he was only 12, he was taken to the Europain fair in Paris.There, after spending several hours amazed at seeing how the pastry chefs made all sorts of desserts, he understood that soon his life would inevitably be bound to the world of the sweet. Ever since, he has made a solid, successful career for himself, not only in the field of daily work in the workshop, but also in the sphere of training. In the year 2000, he became a MOF Pâtissier.

NOWADAYS, STÉPHAN GLACIER IS ONE OF THE MOST RESPECTED AND ADMIRED PROFESSIONALS WORLDWIDE. His courses, exhibitions, books and participation in all kind of events all over the world have helped this pastry chef, committed to the trade and with a sense of professionalism at its best, reach popularity. Not surprisingly, today he runs his own training and consulting center, owns a pastry shop in Colombes and is writing his umpteenth book. He even found some spare time in 2006 to train the French team that finally won the World Championship held in Phoenix.

ONLY HE KNOWS THE FORMULA TO BE ABLE TO DO SO MANY THINGS AT THE SAME TIME AND SUCCEED IN ALL THEM. ON THESE PAGES, HE TELLS US WHAT THE CLUE IS: “NOT TO BE AFRAID OF WORKING LONG HOURS”. Patisseries & gourmandises / Colombes. France / www.stephaneglacier.com

60


COMMITMENT AND PROFESSIONALISM AT ITS BEST


STÉPHANE GLACIER interview

“I consider myself a pastry chef, not an artist !” Why did you decide to become a pastry chef? When I was 12 years old, one of my dad’s best friends took me to «Europain». I spent hours and hours watching the chefs doing demonstrations. I was amazed. When I came back home, I told my parents that I wanted to become a pastry chef. By that time, my dad was running a nice barber shop where we lived and he knew everybody in town. When I was 16 years old, he found me a job ‘as an apprentice’ in the best pastry shop in town. That’s how the story started… What do you find most fascinating about your job? The most fascinating thing is for me all that we can create from a piece of sugar, or a little bit of flour, some butter, a few eggs and a piece of chocolate. The transformation of ingredients fascinates me, also the combination of beauty and flavors. I consider myself a pastry chef, not an artist! I am more concerned about the flavors! Nice is beautiful, good is even better!.

“The future of artisan-pastry making is to offer quality, quality, quality…”

62

Can you describe your professional path? I started when I was 16 years old. For three years, I worked with Mr Alain Jeanne in a small town, 60 km away from Paris. Then, I went to work in Paris for 3 years more: Les Caprices de Paris, with chef André Heslebeuf for one year; after that, I worked for Noura traiteur, a big Lebanese catering company, there I was in charge of French pastries and wedding cakes. In 1993, I went to work in New-York, Jacques Torres found me a job in a French restaurant. I stayed there for 2 years. In 1995, I started to work as a teacher at Bellouet Conseil, together with Joël Bellouet and Jean-Michel Perruchon. I stayed with them for almost 5 years. From 1999 to 2002, I taught at Lenôtre school. I competed and was awarded M.O.F. Pâtissier in 2000. In 2002, I started my own business “Glacier formation et Conseil” as a freelance consultant. I have taught and consulted all over the world. I have taught at E.N.S.P. Yssingeaux (France), Lenôtre (France), French Pastry School in Chicago (USA), Notter school in Orlando (USA), Savour chocolate and patisserie school in Melbourne

(Australia) and many other schools. In 2005, I created “SGP Saveurs et création”, my book publishing company, together with my partner Gaëtan Paris. In 2006, I coached the French pastry team who became World Champion in Phoenix at the WPTC Wold Pastry Team Championship. In 2008, I opened my shop “Patisseries et Gourmandises” par Stéphane Glacier in Colombes (15 km from Paris). What is your current occupation? I run together “Glacier formation et conseil”, we deal with consulting and teaching. I have two teachers and myself travelling to teach and help people to do better every day. I do a lot of demonstrations for “Boiron” fruit purée and “Felchlin” chocolate. I’m also working on new books. The latest and most recent one coming out in March 2009:“tendance croquembouche”, where with my friend Jean-Philippe Walser, we share our experience in “Croquembouche” and our new ideas. The shop “Pâtisseries et gourmandises” takes most of our time. We opened in May 2008. There are already 7 of us working in the shop. We sell tea cakes, macaroons and chocolates and the “Fresh pastries” only on orders!. What is the most important thing for anyone starting in the pastry trade? The pastry trade requires a few qualities: you have to be passionate, to be curious, to be epicurean, and not to be afraid of working long hours. If you have all of this, the road will be long and nice over the world!. What do you think about the future of artisan pastrymaking? The future of artisan-pastry making is to offer quality, quality, quality… I think it is time to do different, taking into consideration that people are changing; they do not live the same way they used to 20 years ago. We therefore have to adapt our products to their way of living and eating. We also have to do all that industrials and supermarkets cannot do… Quality, high quality and good service are the keys of success!.


STÉPHANE GLACIER

Yield: 30 small charlottes, 60 mm in diameter and 45 mm high.

joconde sponge cake 175 175 50 250 325 3 80 40

g g g g g g g g

almond powder confectioners’ sugar flour eggs egg whites cream of tartar sugar melted butter

Whip the almond powder, the confectioners’ sugar, the flour and the eggs in a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Separately whisk the egg whites together with the cream of tartar and half the amount of sugar. Gently fold into the first mixture with the help of a rubber spatula, and then add in the melted butter. Spread over a silicone mat and bake at 220ºC if using a ventilated oven or at 270ºC if using a floor heating oven for approximately 8 minutes.

vanilla punch 400 100

g g

syrup at 30ºBè water half vanilla bean

Combine the water, the syrup and the split vanilla bean and bring to a boil. Leave to cool, scrape the vanilla bean and dispose the bean.

vanilla bavaroise 250 250 1 120 140 14 500

g g g g g g

milk liquid cream vanilla bean egg yolks sugar gelatin sheets whipped cream

Combine the milk, the liquid cream and the split vanilla bean and bring to a boil. Scrape the vanilla bean and dispose the bean. Mix the egg yolks and the sugar in a mixer and pour 1/3 of the boiling milk over them. Add all the mixture into the remainder of the milk and cook to 85ºC. Strain and add the gelatin, previously soaked in cold water and drained. Store under refrigeration and gently mix with the whipped cream at the time of assembling the cake.

chocolate mousse 100 30 90 60 240 320

g g g g g g

sugar water whole eggs egg yolks Maracaïbo 65% dark chocolate (Felchlin) whipped cream

Cook the sugar together with the water to 118ºC and pour over the eggs and the egg yolks –whisked to au fouet– in a blender fitted whith the whisk attachment to make a pâte à bombe. Beat until completely cool. Melt the couverture to 36ºC and add 1/5 of the whipped cream to it. Add the pâte à bombe and then the remainder of the whipped cream.

MONTAGE AND DECORATION LINE THE INSIDE FACE OF THE SIDES OF THE RINGS OR MOLDS WITH A STRIP OF JOCONDE SPONGE CAKE. PLACE A DISK OF THE SPONGE CAKE ON THE BOTTOM AND SOAK IT IN THE VANILLA PUNCH. FILL TO ONE CENTIMETER WITH THE VANILLA BAVAROISE AND TOP WITH ANOTHER DISK OF JOCONDE SPONGE CAKE, ALSO SOAKED IN PUNCH. LEAVE TO COOL AND MAKE A BEAUTIFUL ROSETTE OF CHOCOLATE MOUSSE WITH THE HELP OF A PIPING BAG FITTED WITH A WIDE, GROOVED TIP. FREEZE THE CAKE AND COAT IT ALL WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE COUVERTURE SPRAY BY USING A SPRAY GUN. GARNISH WITH A DARK CHOCOLATE THREAD AND A GOLD LEAF.

64


CHOCOLATE AND VANILLA CHARLOTTE

65

so good..


LE PETIT ANTOINE

66


STÉPHANE GLACIER

Yield: 36 individual cakes

crunchy praliné 180 70 170

g g g

praliné paste 1/1 (Felchlin) Maracaïbo 65% dark chocolate croquantine (Felchlin)

Mix the melted couverture with the praliné and then add the pailleté. With the help of a spatula, spread over a 30x40-cm and 3mm-thick frame. Freeze.

hazelnut dacquoise 200 200 250 2 60 100

g g g g g g

confectioners’ sugar hazelnut powder egg whites cream of tartar sugar crushed hazelnut

Sift the confectioners’ sugar and the hazelnut powder together. Combine the egg whites, the cream of tartar and half the amount of sugar and whisk in a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, and then add the remainder of the sugar. Gently fold the sifted powder and sugar into the egg whites. Spread the dacquoise over a silicone mat and in a 30x40-cm frame, 1 cm thick. Remove the frame and scatter with the crushed hazelnut. Sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar in two batches at a 5minute interval and bake at 170ºC if using a ventilated oven, or at 230ºC if using a floor heating oven for approximately 20 minutes.

chocolate cream 550 120 60 200 200

g g g g g

liquid cream egg yolks sugar Criolait 38% milk chocolate (Felchlin) Maracaïbo 65% dark chocolate

Bring the cream to a boil. Whisk the egg yolks together with the sugar, pour 1/3 of the cream over the egg yolks and add all the mixture to the remainder of the cream. Cook to 85ºC. Strain over the couvertures cut into pieces, and gently mix.

MONTAGE AND DECORATION SPREAD A THIN LAYER OF CHOCOLATE CREAM WITH THE HELP OF A SPATULA OVER THE PREVIOUSLY FROZEN CRUNCHY PRALINÉ. PLACE THE DACQUOISE ON TOP AND SPREAD THE CHOCOLATE CREAM OVER ALL THE SURFACE OF THE FRAME. GENTLY TAP THE FRAME ON

milk chocolate chantilly 500 180

g g

liquid cream Criolait 38% milk chocolate

THE TABLE IN ORDER TO ACQUIRE A VERY FLAT AND STRAIGHT SURFACE. FREEZE. REMOVE THE FRAME AND CUT INTO 3X9.5-CM RECTANGLES. GET THE MILK CHOCOLATE COUVERTURE READY, SPREAD OVER A 3-

Boil the cream and pour over the couverture cut into pieces, mix and store in the refrigerator for at least 24 hours. Whip with a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment like a chantilly.

MM-THICK RHODOID SHEET, LEAVE TO CRYSTALLIZE SLIGHTLY, CUT INTO 3X9.5-CM RECTANGLES AND FREEZE. PLACE A MILK COUVERTURE RECTANGLE ON TOP OF EACH SMALL CAKE AND PIPE BUTTONS OF MILK CHANTILLY WITH THE HELP OF A PIPING BAG FITTED WITH A 6-MM-WIDE NOZZLE. PLACE ANOTHER CHOCOLATE RECTANGLE, GARNISH WITH A CHANTILLY ROSE AND A DARK CHOCOLATE THREAD WITH A GOLD BUTTON.

67

so good..


MICHEL WILLAUME

MICHEL WILLAUME, WORLD PASTRY CHAMPION, APPEARS IN THESE PAGES AS A PRIVILEGED WITNESS OF THE EVOLUTION OF SWEET GASTRONOMY AROUND THE WORLD. His work as a consultant to all kinds of workshops and patisserie businesses has allowed him to have a global vision that he shares today with the readers of So Good Magazine. Michel Willaume Consulting / www.mwpastr y.com

Please, introduce yourself

ces to professionals of the confectionery industry

My name is Michel Willaume, I’m an internationally

(small shops, production centers), catering (patisserie

renowned French master pastry chef and I live in

shops, restaurants and banquets), restaurants (crea-

Barcelona, where I provide consulting services to

tion and à la carte menu), cooking schools (theoreti-

pastry chefs and cooks from Spain as well as from

cal and practical classes, teaching training) taking into

abroad.

account their own specific needs and requirements.

I usually say “I’m a pastry chef in a white jacket just like

It is the strength of this consulting concept that provi-

the rest of you! So, don’t be shy because the more

des a truly customized consulting service, which

you participate, the more fun we’ll have”. My com-

allows the businessman to quickly profit from his

pany, Mconsulting, was created in September 2005

investment as well as put in place almost all of the

with the aim of providing tailor-made consulting servi-

developed ideas and products.

“It’s not always a matter of creating new desserts, but of improving the already existing ones”

71

so good..


MICHEL WILLAUME

Which are the main demands of pastry busines-

fect manufacturing and regularity of the production

ses?

because this has a direct impact in our organization

It depends on the business. Generally, most demands

within the workshop, product quality and customer

have to do with developing new products and staff

satisfaction as well.

training. But, according to my experience, I’d say that product development is not the only way to improve

Which are the latest trends in the sector? Where

production or sales. It is by changing our practices and

are we headed to?

the way we organize ourselves that the business can

You could say that we’re going back to our childhoo-

really take a step forward, and this is even more so in

d’s desserts but updating taste and appearance using

the case of SMEs.

today’s cooking techniques. In my case, I usually resort to crystallized natural flowers, which are very attracti-

Generally speaking, would you say that there is

ve and add a special touch in terms of decoration and

a lack of professional knowled-

taste. Portions are becoming smaller and individual

ge or business mentality?

cakes are preferred as well.

It largely depends on the sector and the country I’m visiting. There

Is diet confectionery possible? Can you have

are great cultural differences and

good low-fat or low-sugar confectionery?

that already means a lot. But I do

Of course it is. As long as you keep formulas balanced

find it very enriching.

and use noble substitutes.

As a rule, professional knowledge or know-how is good.The problem

What does it take to succeed in an elite pastry

lies in that there is a lack of theore-

competition?

tical knowledge of the products

Full-time dedication and a lot of training in order to

themselves, and of why and how

develop potential. And also seeking the help of profes-

they are used. In my opinion, all that

sionals who have participated in that sort of compe-

is essential in order to ensure per-

titions. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us?

“We can improve production and sales not only by developing new products. We can do that simply by improving our already existing products. We can truly take a step forward by changing our practices and the way we organize ourselves.”

72

Yes, I’d like to thank all the people who trusted me from the very beginning of this amazing adventure and who help me every day to provide a better service.


RASPBERRY ÉCLAIR WITH ROSE PERFUME

73

so good..


MICHEL WILLAUME pastry dough 250 250 200 10 5 305 30 420

g g g g g g g g

whole milk mineral water butter inverted sugar salt flour T45 cocoa powder whole eggs

In a saucepan, bring to a boil the water with the milk, the salt and the butter. In a same time, sift the flour with the cocoa powder. Take the saucepan out the flame and mix the powders into the boiling mixture. Bring back to the heat to cook and dried the forming dough. Pour into the mixing machine and add gradually the whole eggs until right consistency. Pipe directly the pastry dough making éclairs, choux and freeze. Bake directly the frozen pastry dough in the oven at 230ºC, stop the oven and push on again when the temperature dumps to 160ºC. Finish the cooking.

raspberry cream with rose perfume 250 140 160 150 150 4 1

g g g g g g u

raspberry pure egg yolks whole eggs granulated sugar soft butter gelatine drop of natural rose extract

Soak the gelatine in a large amount of cold water and squeeze dry. Mix together all the ingredients except the butter. Bring to the boil, stirring all the time, until the texture jellifies. Leave to cool to 35-40°C, then add the butter and the rose extract and form an emulsion by mixing with an electric mixer. Refrigerate until use.

red raspberry glaze 12 100 250 200 100 780

g g g g g g

gelatine granulated sugar whole milk heavy cream 35% fat glucose white chocolate red color

Make a caramel with the sugar. Stop the cooking with the hot milk mixed with the glucose. Bring to a boil. Pour into the melted chocolate to obtain a good emulsion. Pass through the mixer to give some more consistency. Let cool down and use at 28ºC.

74


CHOCOLATE ORANGE ECLAIR WITH FRUITY PRALINE SABLÉ DOUGH

75

so good..


MICHEL WILLAUME pastry dough 250 250 200 10 5 305 30 420

g g g g g g g g

whole milk mineral water butter inverted sugar salt flour T45 cocoa powder whole eggs

In a saucepan, bring to a boil the water with the milk, the salt and the butter. In a same time, sift the flour with the cocoa powder. Take the saucepan out the flame and mix the powders into the boiling mixture. Bring back to the heat to cook and dried the forming dough. Pour into the mixing machine and add gradually the whole eggs until right consistency. Pipe directly the pastry dough making éclairs, choux and freeze. Bake directly the frozen pastry dough in the oven at 230ºC, stop the oven and push on again when the temperature dumps to 160ºC. Finish the cooking.

orange marmalade 920 1.130 750 18 40

g g g g g

oranges mineral water granulated sugar yellow pectin granulated sugar

Wash the skin of the oranges and drop them to cold water. Bring slowly to a boil and let poach around 20 minutes.Take out the water, cut the oranges in quarters and cover with the clean mineral water. Bring back to a boil, add the 750g of sugar, drop down the flame and reduce slowly until the skin become tender. Add the mixture sugar/pectin, bring to a boil and pass through the blender. Cool down rapidly and reserve to the refrigerator.

whipped araguani ganache 450 50 50 400 900

g g g g g

heavy cream 35% fat glucose inverted sugar Dark chocolate Araguani 72% heavy cream 35% fat

Pour slowly and gradually the hot mixture (cream, glucose and inverted sugar) into the melted chocolate to create a good emulsion. Pass through the blender and add the cold liquid heavy cream. Let crystallized overnight. Whip the cream until sufficient consistency to pipe onto the éclairs.

fruity praline sable dough 580 230 155 235 775

g g g g g

butter granulated sugar whole milk almond praline 50% flour T55

Soften the butter and mix it with the sugar. In the mixer with the paddle attachment, beat gently the mixture. Warm the milk and mix hardly with the praline to obtain a good emulsion. Add the whitening butter and the sifted flour. Pipe the sable in parallel lines and bake at 155ºC.Take out the oven before ending the baking to cut in rectangles and then, finish the baking.

ASSEMBLY CUT THE TOP OF EACH ÉCLAIRS. FILL THEM WITH THE MARMALADE AND THE ARAGUANI GANACHE. DECORATE WITH A STRUCTURED ARAGUANI “PLAQUETTE”.

76


CHRISTOPHE MICHALAK Plaza Athénée Hotel / Paris. France / www.plaza-athenee-paris.com

His desire to better himself, his non-conformism, his eagerness to reach the top, but specially to stay in it, are the qualities that made a young apprentice from a small, provincial bakery become not only the World Champion, but also one of the greatest pastry chefs worldwide. He was going to be a draftsman, but he soon realized that that artistic component that he already possessed in his youth could find another way, another path to show up. In his own words,“as I had a sweet tooth and I also was very generous (essential qualities to be a pastry chef), I finally decided to become a pastry chef ”. It is true that, compared to other creative or artistic disciplines, pastry-making provided him with an additional satisfaction – the possibility to offer pleasure to

the others, “pleasure for their eyes, and the possibility to arouse their deeper emotions”, states Michalak, who, in that line, defines his activity as that of a “creator of chocolate and sweet emotions”. In 1995, he reaches a culminating moment in his glittering career. He succeeds in winning the Coupe du Monde de la Pâtisserie, together with Philippe Rigollot and Frédéric Deville. Christophe Michalak himself refers to his success as “a great honor for him and a personal achievement. And the most important thing is that it is a title for life”. But it is also an additional responsibility, because, for this young chef, reaching the top is not the only important thing – the real challenge is to stay in it. He is the current pastry chef at the Hotel Plaza Athénée in Paris.

“I have a sweet tooth and I’m generous. That’s why I became a pastry chef ”

79

so good..


CHRISTOPHE MICHALAK

A major professional recipe of his, and therefore the message he passes on to all those who get interested in this trade is “to learn the basis of pastry-making properly, to have the maximum control over everything you do and, above all, to be absolutely passionate about your daily work”. As the creator of his own style and designer of new trends in the world of the sweet, Michalak quotes Robert Kennedy to explain the necessary non-conformism that one has to show in life in general and particularly in pastry-making: “There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why... I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?”

His vital mind, together with his desire to better himself lead him to optimism despite the current economic situation – “I am positive that the future of the artisan pastry chef will be very good. Even during this time of crisis, I am sure this will be the only sector that will continue to expand. People will keep on eating cakes”. Michalak’s work is multidisciplinary, although his reinterpretation of classic pastry-making stands out, and very especially some hidden messages to the world of kids, with the recreation of some cartoon characters and some memorable candy. As follows are some samples of his creations.

ECLAIR PARIS-BREST

praliné mousseline cream 80 8 100

g g

450 350 50

g g g

liquid cream gelatin sheets hazelnut paste a pinch of fine salt liquid cream, 55% fat content hazelnut praliné roasted hazelnut

Mix the praliné, the hazelnut paste and the salt in a bowl. Separately boil the cream and add the gelatin, previously soaked. Pour the boiled cream over the mixed praliné in three batches with the help of a spatula. Whip the second amount of cream until well firm and fold into the previous mixture. Leave to set in an airtight container for approximately two hours. FINISH PIPE THE CREAM ON THE ÉCLAIR AND SCATTER SOME PIECES OF ROASTED HAZELNUT.

80


WILD-STRAWBERRY-BUBBLE-GUM MILK SHAKE

ingredients 250 4 800 150 20

g g g g g

crème anglaise Malabars semi-skimmed milk fresh wild strawberries grenadine syrup

Boil the milk and dissolve the Malabars previously cut into slices. Leave to cool. Place the Malabars preparation, the crème anglaise and the wild strawberries in the blender. Mix for 1 minute. Separately heat 30 cl milk and thoroughly beat the surface of the milk together with the grenadine with the help of a mixer fitted with round paddles to a very frothy texture.

81

so good..


CHRISTOPHE MICHALAK

DELICIOUS MEMORIES

SPRING/SUMMER 2009 CAKE COLLECTION

HE PLAYS WITH THE FLAVORS AND MEMORIES FROM OUR CHILDHOOD AND CREATES A WHOLE UNIVERSE OF BRIGHT COLORS, MAGIC AND IMAGINATION. CHRISTOPHE MICHALAK PRESENTS HIS SPRING/SUMMER 2009 CAKE COLLECTION. FUN IS ON THE TABLE‌

my plaza teddy My almond paste Plaza Teddy clambers up onto a dome of chocolate covering a combination of strawberry, violet and nougatine that will dazzle children of all ages.

plaza strawberry tart Sweet shortcrust pastry flavored with lemon and decorated with strawberry jam and fresh strawberries topped with small iced strawberry and lemon balls and deliciously seasoned with a sweet vinaigrette.

82


CHRISTOPHE MICHALAK

red power A financier sponge cake covered with strawberry Bavarian cream, strawberry coulis and lychee chantilly cream blossoming in front of your very eyes - Ah, that's what I call flower power!

mac freesbee A cherry and orange flower macaroon topped with a chocolate frisbee - flavors of childhood that come back to you like a boomerang!

84


BALANCE AS A VIRTUE


DOMINIQUE ANSEL

He is the pastry chef at Daniel, one of the most exclusive restaurants in New York. In February 2009, the North American specialized press

DOMINIQUE ANSEL HAS FOUND THE APPROPRIATE BALANCE TO FREELY DEPLOY HIS TALENT AND CREATIVITY IN THE CONTEXT OF AN IMPORTANT HAUTE-CUISINE RESTAURANT OF FRENCH STYLE; a balance which he does chose him as one of the ten best pastry chefs in the United States.

not abandon when designing his desserts, all of them well studied, measured, neat, in which nothing is more or less necessary, and with ‘never more than three or four tastes in the same dish’. Restaurant Daniel / New Yor k / www.danielnyc.com

87

so good..


DOMINIQUE ANSEL

88

Dominique Ansel is a professional in methodology,

very little when you think of it: butter, sugar, flower,

who aspires to perfection and who knows that rea-

nuts chocolate, fruit. We so completely transform

ching it is only possible after mastering absolutely all

their texture and taste.There is a degree of chemistry,

facets of his job. Talent is not enough, and neither is

art and even alchemy to our work. We must unders-

creativity. Besides them, it is necessary to add rigor,

tand how each ingredient will react to the other and

control, technical discipline and work, a lot of work.

then apply our artistry on top of that technical kno-

He started in the kitchen of a restaurant in Beauvais,

wledge’.

north of Paris, in his homeland. Whenever he had the

Daniel Boulud invited Dominique to work in New

chance, he tried his own ideas in pastry. ‘I occasionally

York with him and designated him chef pâtissier at his

delved into pastry and found out that there I was

exclusive restaurant in the summer of 2006. In such

really inspired. I was attracted to the combination of

new scene, very different from a bakery or a pastry

precision and creativity that goes in to baking and des-

store, he shows his best weapon: his ability to adapt to

serts’, the chef remembers.

a new place quickly and to impose his style. And

Once he was certain that his near future was bound

always sticking to balance, he starts to create neat

to the sweetest side of the gastronomic arts, Ansel

desserts, with elegant shapes and very precise flavors,

moved to Paris where, after spending one year at the

‘never more than three or four in the same dish’.

Pâtisserie Peltier, he joined the well-known Maison

These are perfectly designed recipes and effectively

Fouchon. There, commanded by Christophe Adan,

put into practice, in which there is no place for chan-

quickly learned the disciplines of the trade for over

ce and nothing is more or less necessary. These are

seven years, first in the viennoiserie and then with the

fresh desserts, seasonal, in perfect harmony with

cakes. And he also learned one of the secrets of

Daniel’s gastronomic offer. All this has earned him

pastry: the necessary compensation between flavor,

recognition from Daniel’s customers and from the

texture and appearance.Thanks to his talent and abi-

press, to such an extent that he soon found himself

lity, he would soon assume respon-

among the ten best pastry chefs in the United States.

sibilities which led him to travel

As he states, the connection between his sweet crea-

around the world visiting the diffe-

tions and Daniel Boulud’s gastronomic offer is based

rent stores that Fouchon had, cre-

on confidence and freedom: ‘I can do just about any-

ating new recipes and training all

thing I like on the dessert menu, as long as it does not

those young professionals who joi-

involve white chocolate or bananas. All joking aside,

ned the firm.

Daniel is directly involved in everything at his restau-

He passes on everything he expe-

rant, every aspect of the guest’s experience, but he

riences, the passion and the fasci-

trusts my expertise and gives me great freedom to

nation that his job provides him

create and execute.That does not mean he does not

with.‘It is magical to start with such

offer input on refining our desserts or suggesting ideas

simple, pure ingredients, really so

for new ones’.


DANIEL, AN

HAUTE CUISINE PALACE IN

MANHATTAN

DANIEL BOULUD IS NOT JUST A MERE CHEF. HE IS AN EXCELLENT HOST WHOSE AIM IS THAT HIS GUESTS,THOSE WHO DECIDE TO VISIT HIM, FIND AT LEAST EVERYTHING THEY EXPECT TO FIND. ‘MY DREAM,’ SAYS BOULUD ‘IS TO GIVE MY GUESTS A DINING EXPERIENCE THAT AWAKENS ALL THE SENSES. AT DANIEL, I WANT THEM TO LEAVE THE OUTSIDE WORLD BEHIND AND INDULGE IN THE FINE CUISINE,THE BEAUTY OF THE SETTING, AND THE COMFORT AND PERSONALIZED SERVICE THEY HAVE COME TO EXPECT FROM US.’ DANIEL OFFERS AN ELEGANT, REFINED, SEASONAL COOKING BY ALWAYS CHOOSING THE BEST PRODUCTS FOR EACH SEASON AND RESPECTING THE FRENCH CUISINE’S LONG TRADITION, BUT ALSO IN CONSTANT REVIEW. IT IS THE ART OF GASTRONOMY TO ITS HIGHEST

POINT

OF

SPLENDOR,

TAKING CARE OF ABSOLUTELY ALL THE DETAILS. IN THE CENTRAL HALL OF HIS MAGNIFICENT PREMISES IN MANHATTAN (60 EAST 65TH STREET, NEW YORK), DRESSED WITH BOTH MODERNITY AND ORNAMENTAL NEOCLASSICISM, A SPECTACULAR AND WELL-STUDIED STAGING IS PERFORMED IN WHICH LUXURY AND COMFORT DO NOT COLLIDE.THE STAFF IS FRIENDLY,THE SERVICE IS IMPECCABLE, AND BOULUD’S CUISINE, TOGETHER WITH HIS TEAM OF OVER 40 PROFESSIONALS, STAND OUT ON THEIR OWN IN THIS REAL PALACE FOR THE SENSES IN THE VERY HEART OF NEW YORK.

89

so good..


RASPERRY VACHERIN WITH FROMAGE BLANC SORBET LEMON-OLIVE OIL EMULSION, RASPBERRY MERINGUE

90


91

so good..


DOMINIQUE ANSEL moist chocolate biscuit 150 123 214 243 55

g g g g g

Melt the chocolate. Add the soft butter into the melted chocolate to fully combine. Combine the sugar and flour, add slowly into the chocolate mixture. Add the eggs and mix. Finally add the chocolate chips. Scale 4 kilos per sheet pan frame and bake at 165˚C for 2024 minutes. Cut the biscuit into 4.5cm diameter.

chocolate caramel tuile 429 286 286

g g g

chocolate sable

milk chocolate flour sugar butter milk chocolate chips

fondant glucose caraïbe chocolate

Boil the glucose and fondant in a pot to 165˚C. Add the chocolate into the sugar and stir together until fully combined. Spread into a thin layer on a silpat and let cool. Break into small pieces. Place in a robot coupe until it becomes a fine powder. Using a fine sieve, sift a sold layer of caramel dust over stencils. Bake at 180˚C for approximately 3 minutes until dust is melted and shiny.

51 95 334 2 163 258 96

g g g g g g

café brulot ice cream 72 516 155 31 134 41 36 2 10 1 1 1 1/2 1

egg yolk caster sugar gelée bavaroise water mascarpone heavy cream

Mix the gelée bavaroise with water and set aside. Whip egg yolks on high speed. Cook the sugar to 121˚C. Slowly pour into egg yolks while whisking to create a pâte à bomb. At the same time, whip cream to very soft peaks.Temper the mascarpone cheese, add the melted gelatin and mix into the pâte à bombe. Fold in the whipped cream. Freeze, and then cut some square 4x4 cm for large, roll the sides into feuilletine crumbs. Allow to completely thaw for plating.

almond powder cocoa powder flour fleur de sel icing sugar butter whole eggs

Cream the butter and icing sugar with a paddle. Sift together almond flour, flour and cocoa powder. Add to butter. Scrape down the side of the bowl to make sure all ingredients are fully combined. Add fleur de sel. Slowly add in eggs, making sure they are incorporated well. Spread dough onto sheet pan and chill. Sheet the dough the thinnest size possible on the sheeter. Freeze sheets of dough. Use stencil to cut pieces while the dough is frozen. Bake at 160˚C for 12 minutes.

mascarpone mousse 50 71 18 20 171 171

g g g g g g g

g g g g g g g g g g g g g

coffee milk cream egg yolks sugar milk powder dry glucose IC Stabilizer cognac vanilla pod lemon zest orange zest clove powder cinnamon powder

Boil the milk and the cream. Crush the coffee beans, add lemon and orange zest, vanilla clove and cinnamon, and infuse in hot milk for 15 minutes. Whisk sugar, dry milk, dry glucose and ice cream stabilizer into the egg yolks. Slowly pour the hot milk into the yolk mixture. Pour all milk and yolks back into the pot and cook on a low heat to create a crème anglaise, add cognac. Keep overnight in the refrigerator. Spin the following day.

dark chocolate feuilletine 571 429

g g

feuilletine caraïbe chocolate MONTAGE

Put the feuilletine into mixer with a paddle attachement. Melt chocolate, pour into the feuilletine and mix everything together until the feuilletine is in small pieces. Spread feuilletine onto a sheet pan and let the chocolate fully set. Separate into small pieces for plating.

PLACE THE MOIST CHOCOLATE BISCUIT ON TOP OF A ROUND PLATE. LAY THE LONG PIECE OF CHOCOLATE SABLE ACROSS THE TOP OF BROWNIE, WITH THE POINTED END CIRCLING AROUND THE LEFT SIDE OF THE PLATE. PLACE THE MASCARPONE MOUSSE ON TOP OF THE BISCUIT. PUT THE CHOCOLATE SQUARE ON TOP OF THE MOUSSE HANGING OFF THE LEFT CORNER. PIPE GANACHE ACROSS THE TOP OF THE CHOCOLATE SQUARE USING TIP. STAND THE SHORT PIECE OF SABLE ACROSS THE TOP OF THE GANACHE WITH THE CARAMEL TUILE ON THE FRONT OF THE GANACHE. PIPE A SMALL DOT OF GANACHE ON THE FRONT OF THE PLATE TO HOLD THE FEUILLETINE CRUMBS. QUENELLE THE CAFÉ BRULOT ICE CREAM ON TOP OF THE FEUILLETINE.

92


MOIST CHOCOLATE BISCUIT WITH MASCARPONE CREAM. CRISPY FEUILLETINE. CAFÉ BRULOT ICE CREAM

93

so good..


DOMINIQUE ANSEL RASPERRY VACHERIN WITH FROMAGE BLANC SORBET LEMON-OLIVE OIL EMULSION, RASPBERRY MERINGUE

raspberry sorbet 533 44 20 240 137 5

g g g g g g

raspberry puree dry glucose invert sugar water sugar stabilizer

Raspberry Sorbet: Make a syrup with the water, sugar, stabilizer and dry glucose and then pour over the raspberry puree. Hold overnight and spin the following day.

fromage blanc sorbet 434 56 170 1 28 310

g g g g g g

water dry glucose sugar sorbet stabilizer lemon juice fromage blanc

Make a syrup with the water, sugar, stabilizer and dry glucose and then pour over the fromage blanc and lemon juice . Hold overnight and spin the following day.

olive oil foam 226 451 226 45 7 45

g g g g g g

water sugar olive oil lemon juice gelatin egg whites

Make a syrup with the water and sugar. Add the olive oil and the lemon juice. Cool and add gelatin at 45°C. Mix the egg whites until they are cooled to 20-25°C. Place in a Co2 foamer and charge twice.

raspberry gelée 962 19 39

g g g

raspberry puree gelatin sheets raspberry aroma

Bloom the gelatin in cold water. Bring the raspberry puree to a boil, and add the gelatin and aroma; chill.

raspberry crumble 248 6 248 248 248

g g g g g

1

flour fleur de sel sugar butter almond powder Amoretti Raspberry extract drop of red coloring

Combine the sugar, the almond powder, the flour and fleur de sel, Add the butter and mix to make small chunks. Finish with raspberry extract, and red coloring. Pass through a rack. Bake at 130°C for 20 minutes.

raspberry Swiss meringue 673 306 1

g g g

powdered sugar egg whites red food coloring raspberry extract

Whisk the powdered sugar and egg whites together in the bowl of a mixer. Place the bowl over a bain marie and cook, whisking until it reaches 45˚C. Remove the bowl from the bain marie and place it on the mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Whip until warm; mix in the food coloring and the raspberry extract. Spread with a comb onto a silpat-lined sheet pan and bake the meringue at 140˚C for 10 to 12 minutes.

MONTAGE COMBINE BOTH SORBETS TOGETHER IN A PIPING BAG, AND THEN PIPE INTO THE SQUARE MOLDS. FREEZE, AND THEN UNMOLD.

94


96


EWALD NOTTER

WINNING MAJOR COMPETITIONS ALL OVER THE WORLD IS ONLY PART OF CHEF EWALD NOTTER’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE CONFECTIONARY ARTS. HIS DEDIC ATION TO SHARING HIS KNOWLEDGE THROUGH HIS PASTRY SCHOOLS IS THE OTHER. The Notter School of Pastr y Ar ts / Or lando. Florida / www.notter school.com

How Sweet It Is 97

so good..


EWALD NOTTER

By Lisa Shames

It’s not a far stretch to think that a native of Zurich, Switzerland, with its reputation of producing some of the world’s best chocolate and pastries, could become an award-winning confectionary artist. But to hear chef Ewald Notter tell it, his very successful career happened almost by accident. “When I was growing up it was normal when you were 14 or 15 to do an apprenticeship for three to four years. I had to make a choice and I chose pastry. But I could just as easily have chosen carpentry, window decorating or anything else,” says Notter. “I was lucky to choose the right path.” And he’s not the only fortunate one. Known worldwide for this exquisite craftsmanship, especially in pulling and blowing sugar (Notter has authored two well-respected books on the topic,“The Textbook for Sugar Pulling & Sugar Blowing” and “Das Ist Zucker—That’s Sugar”), Notter has worked and competed in over 10 countries. He has won 15 gold medals, including one with distinction at the 1984 Culinary Olympics in Frankfurt and another that same year at the International World Cake Fair in Tokyo. In 2001, Notter was part of the U.S. Coupe du Monde team at Lyons, France, where he scored 699 out of 700 points for sugar, helping the team win its first gold medal in the history of the competition. But Notter’s contribution to pastry goes beyond awards and impressive medals. Since 1982, he has used his talents to help others get started in the confectionary business at his schools in both Europe and the United States.

98

For Notter, his reason for getting into pastry was simple: “I wanted to do something where I could use my hands,” he says. Combine that desire with a talent for painting and decorating and it’s easy to see how Notter has managed to stay passionate about pastry all these years. “I still get very excited and emotional about the little things, like something new or someone doing a new trick,” he admits. “For me it doesn’t matter your age but your interest.” It was while working at Confisserie Spruengli in Zurich that Notter’s curiosity really took hold. There, he had the opportunity to work with pastry chef Willy Pfund, renowned for his sugar-pulling skills, who took the young Notter under his wing.“I really bloomed during this time and absorbed whatever I could,” says Notter, who often spent his free time helping Pfund and, in the process, developed his own talent for sugar blowing and pulling. In 1982, Notter decided he wanted to be self-employed. Lacking the means to have his own pastry shop, a then 27-year-old Notter, opted to open his first school, the International School of Confectionary Arts (ISCA), in Zurich. It was also at this same time that he began to compete. “At the beginning when I had the school, it was very essential to go out and show people what I could do,” he says. “You can be successful without competing, but it gives you an outlet for creativity and a way for you to show your skills.” And show them he did, as his numerous awards demonstrate. But just because he was successful at it doesn’t mean competing came easy to him. To overcome his nerves, Notter would spend hours preparing, studying the rules of each competition and backgrounds of the judges. He would also analyze the last two winners to figure out what made them win and determine what he could do to top them. Plus, Notter would go over all the possibilities of what could go wrong and figure out how he would fix it. “The better prepared you are the less nervous you will be and the better you will perform,” says Notter.


Since 1982, he has used his talents to help others get started in the confectionary business at his schools in both Europe and the But despite how well he has done at competitions, it’s still pure work, says Notter, often becoming more of a business—and a very expensive one at that. “Competing is no fun,” he says. “If I want to have fun I go to the beach.” And no matter how many wins he has had, Notter is quick to give credit to his family, chefs and friends who have played a role in his success: “I’m thankful for everybody who helped me during my career and I’m not shy to mention all these people in my classes.” After 10 years of teaching full-time in Switzerland, Notter decided to move his school to America. Over the years, he had taught several guests lessons in the U.S.—as well as all over the world—where he was impressed with the freedom pastry chefs had there.“I could see doing things in America that I was not able to do in Switzerland creativity-wise,” he says. “If you make a style they [Americans] like, they stand behind you. At home, sometimes it can be too traditional.” Notter first established ISCA in Maryland, specializing in chocolate and pastillage decorations and candy making. He also starred in four videos in chocolate and sugar decoration for the Culinary Institute of America. In 2002, Notter teamed up with business partner Beverly Karshner and moved the school to its present location in Orlando, Florida, expanding the curriculum and eventually changing the name to the Notter School of Pastry Arts. At the small school, Notter and his staff of qualified pastry instructors, along with a varied selection of guest teachers, train their students in modern-day confectionary and the fundamentals of pastry arts. “If you understand the science behind it, it’s easier to learn,” says Notter.The 24-week European Baking and Pastry Program takes place Monday-Thursday, with two time slots available to accommodate the schedules of working students. Classes are small, with no more than 16 students in each, with course curriculum in ten different areas, including artisan breads, candies and pralines, classical cakes and tarts, and basic

production and cost efficiency. In addition, Notter recognizes the place of convenience products in the world of busy pastry chefs today and often works closely with ingredient distributors.“Of course, I want my students to know how to make things from scratch, but I also want them to know how to use convenience products and to be able to see the difference price-wise and quality-wise between the two,” he says. Once students graduate, the school uses their industry contacts to help them find employment. “So far we have found a job for almost everybody,” Notter says proudly. “There is no other profession today, where you can study for six months and have a job right away.” And while in these tough times, he admits the economy does have an effect on the industry, he’s not worried. “People always want to see something special and unique in pastry,” says Notter. “People always want to have dessert.”

United States

For more information on the Notter School of Pastry Arts, visit www.notterschool.com or call 407.240.9057.

99

so good..


EWALD NOTTER

ingredients 100 100 100 60 175 175

g g g g g g

cream kumquat puree passion fruit puree invert sugar milk chocolate 37% cacao dark chocolate 63% cacao

In a medium pot, bring the cream and puree to a boil. Pour it over the invert sugar and chocolate. Mix with an immersion blender to create a smooth, shiny ganache. Fill the truffle shells when the mixture comes to 86째F.

SUGGESTED MOLD SPRAY THE MOLD WITH YELLOW COCOA BUTTER. LIGHTLY SPRAY THE MOLDS AGAIN WITH RED COCOA BUTTER. USING WHITE COCOA BUTTER, LIGHTLY SPRAY AN ADDITIONAL LAYER INTO THE MOLDS. CAST IN 37% MILK CHOCOLATE.

100

KUMQUAT-PASSION FRUIT PRALINE Yield: 88 Truffles


ingredients 130 50 50 20 10 15 25 40 130 130 60

g g g g g g g g g g g

cream passion fruit puree mango puree lemon juice lime juice coconut rum banana invert sugar dark chocolate 63% milk chocolate 37% butter

TROPICAL CHOCOLATE PRALINES Yield: 81 Molded Pralines

Yield: 81 Molded Pralines In a medium pot, bring the cream, passion fruit puree and mango puree to a boil. Combine the lemon juice, lime juice, and coconut rum. In a separate container, mash the banana and add the lemon juice mixture to it. Pour the hot cream and puree over the chocolate and invert sugar. Stir to form a smooth, shiny, ganache. Stir in the banana and juice. Cool to 96째F. Using an immersion blender, add in the butter. When the ganache cools to 88째F pipe into prepared molds.

SUGGESTED MOLD USING YOUR FINGER, SWIRL THE MOLDS WITH TEMPERED RED, YELLOW, AND WHITE COCOA BUTTER. CAST THE MOLDS IN 63% DARK CHOCOLATE.

101

so good..


EWALD NOTTER

ingredients 200 30 30 8 300 25 50 200 20 2

g g g g g g g g g g

cream glucose butter mint leaves white chocolate cocoa butter raspberry puree strawberry puree lemon juice citric acid

In a pot, bring cream, puree and mint leaves to a boil. Once the cream has come to a boil, remove from heat and immediately cover it with plastic wrap. Let it steep for 10 minutes then strain. Whisk in lemon juice, pectin, and sugar. Bring the mixture to a second boil. Pour over chocolate and stir to a smooth, shiny consistency. Cool ganache to 90째F and then add butter. Mix with an immersion blender. Fill the molds when the mixture comes to 86째F.

102

STRAWBERRY-MINT PRALINE Yield: 108 Truffles

SUGGESTED MOLD USE A HEART SHAPED MOLD. SPRAY RED COCOA BUTTER AT AN ANGLE, GIVING THE TOP OF THE HEART A LIGHT SHADE OF RED COLOR. CAST THE MOLDS IN WHITE CHOCOLATE.


UNLIMITED PASSION FOR CHOCOLATE


KOICHI IZUMI

He is the first Japanese prize winner of the World Chocolate Masters and led the Japanese team to win the second prize of WPTC 2008 as a team leader. Koichi Izumi always gets attentions from participants in contests. How did he surprise them this time? What kind of tools did

HE THINKS THAT HIS SENSE OF COLOR IS PERHAPS INFLUENCED BY NATURE IN EHIME, HIS HOMETOWN. he bring for chocolate-making? And they see his creation and admire his distinct sense of color.

Salon de the Cerisier. Tokyo / photos: Yukari Nagase

By Reiko Matsuno

After graduating at the college, he started working at one of the most famous pastry shops in Tokyo. He got

Ehime is a part of Shikoku, the smallest island in the

the opportunity to meet and learn from renowned

Japanese archipelago. Located between Seto inland

pastry chefs including Frédéric Bau who was a consul-

sea and the Pacific Ocean, Ehime has a mild climate

tant to the shop.

and is known for various citrus and chestnut. “Unlike

Izumi said, “Chocolate makes you happy with just one

urban areas with forests of buildings, I was born and

bite. It is real pleasure to figure out the delicate balan-

raised in the heart of nature’s bounty. Nature taught

ce of tastes in a little bonbon au chocolat. I don’t have

me the real colors of the sea, the mountains or twi-

much experience in chocolate-making, but in other

light and how to express them in confection”. Japan

words, no stereotype ties me down. I use unconven-

has four clear-cut seasons and the Japanese are sensi-

tional tools which I found at an art supply store, DIY

tive to changes in seasons. His sense of seasons seems

store or hundred-yen store”.

keener. That is because he is a son and grandson of

He never hesitates to expand his world. So far, he has

‘Wagashi shokunin’, Japanese-style confectioners.

collaborated with some designers and architects, and

Japanese-style confectioners make sweets inspired by

this fall he plans to present an ‘edible hat’ made of

nature representing each of the 12 months, such as

chocolate together with a hat designer. And a bigger

hydrangea in June or maple in October. He used to

challenge awaits him this year. He left ‘Cerisier’, a

help his father and grandfather until he left home and

pastry shop in a suburb of Tokyo, after being emplo-

moved to Tokyo, where he joined the Confectionery

yed there for nine years, to set up his own pastry shop

College. He was not sure in his first year which way to

next year. “In my shop, I want to install a showcase for

follow, whether Japanese-style or European confec-

chocolate, which I didn’t have at Cerisier. I want to

tion. In his second year, he sensed that European

bake breads, too”. His list of wishes is unlimited.

pastry would become much more fun in the future.

105

so good..


KOICHI IZUMI

NAIL ART CHOCOLATES shell Valrhona Pure Cara誰be Glittering red-colored cocoa butter Orange-colored cocoa butter Put a flower, clover or snow crystal-shaped silicone sheet on an egg-shaped mold. Spray orange-colored cocoa butter and then red-colored cocoa butter. Leave to dry and pour the melted Pure Cara誰be thinly and evenly. After pour filling, seal with the melted Pure Cara誰be.

UNCONVENTIONAL TOOLS TOOLS WHICH IZUMI USES FOR MAKING CHOCOLATE PRODUCTS INCLUDE A SCRAPER BOUGHT AT A CARPENTER SHOP, A LEEK SHREDDER FROM A ONECOIN SHOP,TOOLS FOR CLAY WORK, ETC. HE RARELY BUYS TOOLS AT CONFECTIONERY SUPPLIERS FOR PROFESSIONALS.

106


apricot jelly 125 125 25 18 2.5 3.5

g g g g g g

apricot puree granulated sugar invert sugar granulated sugar pectin citric acid (dissolve 3.5g of water)

Combine the apricot puree, 125 g granulated sugar and invert sugar, and heat to 50ยบC. Pour mix of 18 g granulated sugar and pectin and boil to 106ยบC. Pour the citric acid in and mix. Leave to cool.

APRICOT JASMIN apricot jasmine ganache 108 28 78 16 26 348 18 14

g g g g g g g g

apricot puree granulated sugar fresh cream jasmine tea leaves invert sugar milk chocolate unsalted butter (heat up to 25ยบC) apricot liqueur

Boil the fresh cream, add the jasmine tea leaves and set aside for three minutes to infuse. Strain it. Combine the apricot puree and the granulated sugar and boil. Add the chopped chocolate and the invert sugar into the fresh cream mixture, and add the apricot puree. Allow to cool down to 32ยบC and finally add the butter and the apricot liqueur.

MONTAGE POUR THE GANACHE INTO THE PREPARED SHELL AND INJECT THE APRICOT JELLY INTO THE CENTER OF THE GANACHE. SEAL WITH PURE CARAรBE AND LET IT SET FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS.

107

so good..


KOICHI IZUMI caramel chocolate 175 100 3 110 110 45 0.8 0.2 1.5 30 30

g g g g g g g g g g g

granulated sugar starch syrup vanilla bean unsalted butter fresh cream milk cinnamon nutmeg cocoa butter milk chocolate dark chocolate

Boil the granulated sugar and starch syrup to 180ยบC, add the vanilla bean and the butter, and emulsify. Combine the fresh cream, the milk, the cinnamon and the nutmeg and heat up.Then pour over the emulsified mixture. Add the cocoa butter, the milk chocolate and the dark chocolate and emulsify. Leave to cool down to 30ยบC.

walnut nougat 40 100 120 2 20 40

g g g g g g

starch syrup unsalted butter granulated sugar pectin milk walnut

Combine the starch syrup and the butter and boil. Add the granulated sugar and the pectin and emulsify. Add the milk. Roast walnuts by 150ยบC for a few minutes. Let cool and divide into quarters lengthwise. Add the walnuts into the milk mixture to make a walnut cream. Pour the walnut cream into a Flexipan mold (no. 2266) and bake at 180ยบC until caramelized. Unmold the nougat and roll up to oval shape.

MONTAGE POUR THE CARAMEL CHOCOLATE INTO THE PREPARED SHELL AND PRESS WALNUT NOUGAT ON IT. SEAL WITH PURE CARAรBE AND LET IT SET FOR 24 HOURS.

108

CARAMEL NOIX


vanilla and Tonka bean ganache

DROPS

152 16 2 12 2 12 108 60

g g g g g g

fresh cream unsalted butter vanilla beans starch syrup tonka beans invert sugar milk chocolate dark chocolate

Combine the fresh cream, the vanilla beans and the grated tonka beans and boil, and then strain. Add the starch syrup and bring to a second boil. Add the invert sugar, the milk chocolate and the dark chocolate and dissolve. Leave to cool down to 32ยบC, add the butter and emulsify.

speculoos 54 26 26 2 7 0.26 0.8 2 0.5

g g g g g g g g

flour unsalted butter cassonade milk egg fleur de sel baking powder speculoos spice orange zest

Place everything in a food processor in order to make a dough. Roll out 1mm thick and cut out into small oval shape. Bake at 150ยบC for 10 to 12 minutes. Leave to cool down and coat with chocolate.

orange confit 50 8 10 17

g g g g

sliced orange granulated sugar orange concentrate orange liqueur

Chop the sliced orange finely and combine with the rest of ingredients. Boil down until caramelized for about 5 minutes.

MONTAGE POUR THE GANACHE INTO THE PREPARED SHELL AND LAYER THE ORANGE CONFIT AND SPECULOOS. SEAL WITH PURE CARAรBE AND LET IT SET FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS.

109

so good..


KOICHI IZUMI strawberry jelly 125 125 25 18 2.5 3.5

g g g g g g

strawberry puree granulated sugar invert sugar granulated sugar pectin citric acid (dissolve 3.5g of water)

Heat the strawberry puree, 125 g granulated sugar and the invert sugar to 50ยบC. Pour over the mix of 18g granulated sugar and pectin and boil down to 106ยบC. Pour over the citric acid and mix. Leave to cool.

lime ganache 42 10

g g

13 80 3

g g g

lime puree granulated sugar one sixth of lime zest fresh cream milk chocolate invert sugar

Combine the lime puree, the granulated sugar and the lime zest, and boil down to 102ยบC. Pour the boiled fresh cream to the mixture of chopped milk chocolate and invert sugar and emulsify. Finally add the lime puree mixture into the chocolate mixture and emulsify. Leave to cool down to 32ยบC.

MONTAGE POUR THE GANACHE INTO THE PREPARED SHELL AND INJECT THE STRAWBERRY JELLY INTO THE CENTER OF THE GANACHE. SEAL WITH PURE CARAรBE AND LET IT SET FOR AT LEAST 24 HOURS.

HORTENSIA

110


“MY PERSONAL LUXURY IS NATURE, SILENCE,TIME…”


MICHEL BRAS

Michel Bras brings his cuisine from the land to the world. Not only because the coulant is probably the most plagiarized dessert in gastronomical history, but because he has been able to submerge himself in the natural surroundings of his county in France and in the traditions which

WITH THE PASSING OF TIME HE HAS BECOME A GURU AND AN UNDISPUTABLE REFERENCE IN CONTEMPORARY CUISINE.

his mother showed him from an early age.

Bras transmits his passion for cooking, but he also transmits a passion for his environment and other components that, economically speaking, are impossible to measure. Nature, silence, light, time…¨I cook the way I live¨.

Restaurant Bras / Laguiole . France / www.michel-bras.com / photos: Palis - Trébosc

115

so good..


MICHEL BRAS

Since the 80’s, in the family-run hotel/restaurant, but

me the guardians of a different way of understanding

especially since 1992 in the new location on the outs-

what we know as luxury.

kirts of Laguiole, in the Aubrac plateau, the French

Michel Bras is now able to incorporate in his cooking

chef plays his cards with expertise. On one hand a

the brilliant contributions of his disciple and son

symbiotic environment between nature and architec-

Sebastien, travel to Laguiole, and freeze time in the

ture, light, stone, and vegetation are transmitted in

Aubrac plateau, which can result in a spiritual and,

each and every one of the spaces and creations of

above all, emotional experience in every single sense

Chez Bras, including the new apartment that is direc-

of the word. From his anthological vegetable Gargillou

ted towards the setting sun. On the other hand, his

to his multi-flavored coulant, the parade of his dishes

family, mother, sister-in-law, and son all play an equally

where minimalism serves as a base for the flavors best

important role in the house’s service.Those in charge

defines the spirit of the area. In Bras’s own words, the

of every station have become, in the most pure reli-

NIAC: which are only ¨a combination of elements, of

gious sense, the best transmitters of a deep philo-

textures and flavors, visions and aromas that stimulate

sophy that, following the current trends in contempo-

our senses and are a preview of stronger, sensitive

rary abstractions, keeps the essentials of light, silence,

revelations to come. Provocative, a ¨niac¨ enlightens,

or a taste for nature without filters or masks…these,

excites and questions our senses. The ¨niacs¨are pro-

as Michel tells us in the following interview, have beco-

ducts which I use to cook with every day, to season or to bring together¨. Among these there are condiments (orange peel s, green anise seed, pepper…), oils (elder, oregano…), drinks (ratafia…), doughs (macaroons, cookies, savarins) and vinegars (Banyuls). What does cuisine mean to you? Everything. It’s my life. Which way is contemporary cuisine headed? Since I have always cooked the way I live, I’ve never worried about trends. I’ve always followed my intuition. How important is the quality of a product? It’s essential, the foundation of cooking. There’s no doubt that cuisine wouldn’t exist without quality products. I go to the market with my son four times a

MICHEL AND SÉBASTIEN BRAS

116

week, in Rodez (about 60 km kilometers away). I


The NIACs enlighten, excite and question our senses. The NIACs are products which I use to cook with every day, to season, to mix, to blend… meet up with the local farmers in an environment that

and the products are first class. Having said this, there-

exudes trust, complicity, and a sense of collaboration

’s a tendency that’s becoming more popular: one part

that has grown with time.They are my friends.

of the clients that come to the restaurant are not rich, but they make an economical effort, they do what

Are products like foie, caviar, or seafood an obli-

they can, to make a small dream come true. Anyway,

gation to serve in a high standing restaurant?

nowadays the service in general is less pompous and

How do popular products fit in this type of envi-

all clients feel at ease and more comfortable. It makes

ronment?

us happy that, in this way, our doors are open to peo-

The inspiration for my cuisine comes from my child-

ple who wouldn’t have come into the restaurant in

hood, products called “not noble”, like bacon, bread,

the past.

milk skin, and orange peels (which are typical during Christmas time).These ingredients always reappear in

Is the quality and exclusivity of products secured

my dishes. I like the idea of using these small “insignifi-

for the future?

cant things” to cause excitement in a cuisine that allu-

Yes. Chefs have to realize that it is their responsibility.

des to the essentials rather than just looking like them.

We need to know how to recognize the efforts of the suppliers and motivate them by buying their products

Has the concept of luxury changed in terms of

at a fair price.They need to be heard, to be cared for.

your clients’ demands in the last few years? The clients’ demands have completely evolved. Above

What are you working on at the

all, clients look for a place, refuges that have an air of

moment?

truth to them. Places where a “Good morning” and a

In everything and nothing. I try to live my

handshake feel sincere, where the bread tastes like

daily life intensely: my garden, my kitchen,

bread, where a zucchini looks like a zucchini. Here,

my collaborators, our guests…

among us, clients feel as if they were at home. If there is luxury, it’s characterized by elements such as nature,

What are your projects for the near

silence, time…because of the behavior. It’s not about

future?

an ostentatious luxury, but of those people who are

To continue cooking and always with my

attracted to what we feel is important.

son. And on a more concrete level, we are going to build rooms which face the

Is excellence in cuisine synonymous to wealth?

west, founded on a totally contemporary

What do you think of the tendency to develop

focus.

new, quality gastronomical formulas at a lower price? The prices in menus are higher because the work in the kitchen demands a certain amount of employees

117

so good..


CRUNCHY TART OF FROMAGE BLANC, CRYSTALLIZED PUMPKIN AND CHIVE

118


119

so good..


MICHEL BRAS pâte brisée Spread 200g pâte brissé , 3mm thick. Cut into four 7x11-cm rectangles. Store under refrigeration for 20 minutes and then bake in a slow oven . Remove when they start to brown.

fromage blanc 300 60 2

g g

fromage blanc double cream gelatin sheets

Rehydrate the gelatin sheets in cold water. Mix the white cheese and the cream with a spatula. Extract 1/4 mixture and cool down. Add in the gelatin sheets and mix with the remainder. Spread over a parchment sheet. Cover with another sheet and roll out to a thickness of 8mm with the help of a rolling pin. Store in refrigerator. Once the cheese has curdled, cut into 7x11cm rectangles. Store in refrigerator.

crystallized pumpkin 1 1000 1000

g g

big pumpkin sugar water

Peel the pumpkin with a proper knife. Cut in two halves lengthwise, and then slice each half in two – use the flesh only. Blanch in boiling water for three to four minutes. Prepare a syrup with 1 kg sugar and 1 l water. Bring to a boil and immerse the scalded pumpkin. Remove from the heat, cover with plastic wrap and leave to set outside. In order to check the density of sugar, use a refractometer, which can be purchased at any store specializing in pastry making.The following day, strain the syrup and reduce to 1.25. Add 10% glucose. Immerse the pumpkin in it and keep aside for 24 more hours. Reduce the syrup to a density of 1.29 and this time leave the pumpkin in it for two days at room temperature. Repeat this process again, bringing the syrup to a density of 1.34, and keep the pumpkin this last time inside the syrup for three days. In this phase, it can be preserved at room temperature for a few days.

chive oil 8 50

cl

grape seed oil chive leaves

Cut the chive into 2-cm pieces. Place in the mixer together with the oil and mix. Pass through a strainer to remove impurities. Allow to macerate for three to four hours.This oil can be stored in refrigerator for a few days.

AT THE LAST MOMENT

12

chive leaves

With the help of a knife, cut the crystallized pumpkin into a thin slice of a thickness of 3 mm. Place on top of the pâte brisée. With the help of some parchment paper, put a rectangle of fromage blanc. Place three chive leaves along the surface and finally dribble the plate with some chive oil.

120


RENOVATION


JOAN BAIXAS

It is not easy for a family-run business to stand for over 50 years without losing its essence and prestige. In order to reach that, it is essential to know how to adapt to the inexorable passing of time, to new tastes and habits. Not only has Joan Baixas been able to maintain the tradition and the identifying marks of a firm, but he has also brought in the necessary business criteria to strengthen an establishment and grow, as proved with the opening of two new stores in the last years. Baixas is the history of confectionery from Barcelona, Catalonia and Spain, and

AS JOAN BAIXAS HIMSELF STATES: ‘IT WAS ABOUT TURNING A FAMILY BUSINESS INTO A COMPANY, NOT A BIG ONE, BUT A COMPANY AT THE END OF THE DAY’. A COMPANY PREPARED TO STAND FOR AT LEAST 50 YEARS MORE.

also represents the vigorous present thanks to both renovation and boost carried out since the year 2000.

Pasisseria Baixas / Barcelona / www.baixas.es / photos: j. m. fabregà

In the pastry shop opened last year, the first boxes of

expansion. Nowadays, the company employs over 60

bonbons Baixas launched in 1970 are exposed. It is

people who cover a wide offer in the fields of pastry

surprising to see how its esthetics and its concept are

and chocolate making, as well as catering. In his

still in force four decades later. And this is because

current owner’s words, Joan Baixas: ‘it was about tur-

Francesc Baixas, who had founded his shop in 1958,

ning a family business into a company, not a big one,

was, among other things, the precursor in the presen-

but a company at the end of the day; and that deman-

tation of the bonbon as a desired object, as a very

ded applying new criteria regarding the internal orga-

special gift that had to be dressed properly. As well as

nization and the optimization of the resources,

other contributions, this made Baixas gain a place of

although we had to remain faithful to our style and

honor in the history of Barcelona’s pastry industry.

our identity’.

After introducing new criteria in the management and

In that sense, Baixas defines his offer as ‘universal

organization of the company in the year 2000, Baixas

pastry, since not only traditional specialties can be

took a new path that resulted in the aforementioned

found, updated and renovated, but also more modern

123

so good..


JOAN BAIXAS

and avant-garde proposals. Certainly, this involves a big

customers are grateful to see we still make them.This

effort as far as production is concerned, since we have

does not prevent us from offering some other more

to make traditional recipes compatible with other

modern proposals in mousse or chocolate’.

new ones we are continuously adding. But this is the

Chocolate actually has a privileged place in Baixas’s

way we have always done it, and which defines us’.

offer since its very beginning, as the aforementioned

That philosophy and a commitment to the good pâtis-

package of the 70s proves. This identification is per-

serie completely meet the objectives of the exclusive

fectly clear, for example, after the recent opening of a

international association of pâtissiers Relais Dessert, of

store in Sant Cugat del Vallès, where a specific and

which Baixas has been a member since 1985. In that

perfectly delimited section called ‘chocolate works-

context, Baixas reaffirms his idea of a necessary res-

hop’ has been created. Here, all kind of flavors, designs

pect for tradition, which is our heritage: ‘a croissant

and formats can be found, based on high-quality cou-

might not be very glamorous, but if it is properly

vertures and select ingredients.

At a certain

made, it is simply unsurpassable. We keep on making

All in all, classic and modern pâtisserie, traditional and

moment, we

saras, and I have to say that we sell a good bunch of

creative, but above all a good-quality one, founded on

them, big and individual ones. We modified the origi-

a profound respect for the artisan trade and with a

modified the original nal recipe, softened the butter cream and changed the

renovated management criterion: these are Baixas’s

recipe, softened the

type of almond, but it is still a sara in essence, and the

butter cream and changed the type of almond, but it is still a sara in essence, and the customers are grateful to see we still make them

124

arguments to confront the next half century.


TO ATHYNA Athyna is the tree that protects cocoa. During the season in which cocoa is still tender, the tree protects it from excessive sun and storms, and regulates the humidity of the soil. Thanks to Athyna, the cocoa tree gives an excellent fruit, worshipped throughout the ages, revered and linked to several legends… Its gift is a present which, once transformed, becomes delicious chocolate. This product leads us to Moctezuma’s court through the most original and authentic flavors of ‘tchocolatl’.

125

so good..


JOAN BAIXAS

With this suggestive name, Flama (Catalan for ‘flame’), Joan Baixas has created a celebration cake. Four carrés which meet in an only piece, but which allow the customer to choose individual flavors and exchange them if desired. Besides, the cake is presented in an elegant package, which makes it turn into an attractive gift.

MILK AND RASPBERRY CREAM milk chocolate truffle cream 280 240

g g

milk chocolate couverture UHT liquid cream

290

g

UHT cream

Boil the liquid cream and gently mix it with the previously melted couverture until a texture similar to that of mayonnaise is obtained. Finally fold in the whipped cream. Homogenize with the help of a blender.

WHITE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE WITH COCONUT AND YUZU 80 16 24 80

g g g g

2 160 200 5 25

milk sugar egg yolks raw coconut flesh gelatin sheets

g g g g

white chocolate whipped cream, unsugared yuzu flesh natural lime zest

raspberry-chocolate gelée 600 360 3

g g

raspberry purée milk chocolate couverture gelatin sheets

Heat up the raspberry purée just before it reaches the boiling point. Add the gelatin, previously soaked and drained, and slowly pour over the melted couverture.

Prepare the cream by combining the milk, the sugar, the coconut and the egg yolks and heating them to 86ºC. Add in the gelatin sheets, previously soaked and drained. Pour the mixture over the white chocolate, melted to 35º/40ºC. Finally fold in the whipped cream, the yuzu flesh and the lime zest.

MONTAGE TURN THE MOLD UPSIDE DOWN AND LINE WITH A THIN LAYER OF MONTAGE

CHOCOLATE. FILL WITH THE WHITE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE AND

TURN THE MOLD UPSIDE DOWN AND LINE IT WITH A THIN LAYER OF

FINALLY SEAL WITH A SPONGE CAKE BASE.

CHOCOLATE. FILL WITH THE TRUFFLE CREAM AND THEN ADD THE RASPBERRY-CHOCOLATE GELÉE. FINALLY SEAL WITH A SPONGE CAKE BASE.

126


FLAMA

127

so good..


THE REVITALIZER OF BRAZILIAN PÂTISSERIE


FLAVIO FEDERICO

He knows the flavors of his country as nobody else does, also the aromas, and the ingredients of an under-exported gastronomy. And he handles them by using the modern techniques he learned while receiving his training at l’École Lenôtre (in Paris, France) and while working together with other professionals acclaimed in their countries and overseas. That was a really beneficial combination and with surprising results.

HIS CREATIONS, MADE WITH PRODUCTS SUCH AS CUPUAÇU, CAJÁ, CACHAÇA, CORNMEAL, ETC., HAVE THEIR OWN IDENTITY AND PERSONALITY AND LINK MODERNITY TO TRADITION. Flavio Federico is one of the most refined and renowned chefs in Brazil. He was born to an Italian family settled in São Paulo, and when he was only six years old he made his own desserts. Nowadays, he runs Sódoces, an innovative and exclusive firm from which he offers his 100% artisan sweets and his natural bonbons and ice cream. Federico performs his duties in an active and selfless way. He has been chosen to update the traditional Brazilian recipes with a contemporary mind and with the responsibility to respect his people’s essence and gastronomic heritage. Sódoces. Sao Paulo. Brasil / www.flaviofederico.blogspot.com

Why did you decide to become a pastry chef? I’m from an Italian family and grew up next to the stove alongside my grandmother, who was a fantastic cook. Not surprisingly, as a child, I always preferred sweets and pastries instead of savory dishes. I can remember always asking to exchange my salted dishes for chocolates and dulce de leche each meal. At the age of 17, my friends began asking me to make cakes and pastries for their birthdays. After making and selling many cakes for parties, I knew I didn’t want to stop. From then on, I was in love with seeing how happy people were when they were eating good pastries. What do you find most fascinating in your job? To me, I am fascinated to find new flavorful ways that bring smiles to people’s faces. It’s amazing how powerful this sensation is. I can’t think of a better job than one which creates happiness and smiles when people gather together to eat. How do you define your desserts? My desserts are sophisticated, contemporary and express creative, new combinations of traditional Brazilian recipes focusing on the use of our local tropical ingredients. After more than 16 years of developing these unique combinations, our business has become recognized as a creative leader in Brazil. Each day, we continue to reach people from other countries and they always tell us how amazed they

are at the amount of original flavors available only locally to those in South America. What is the most important thing in the pastry trade? I believe a chef ’s main purpose is to make people happy and provide wonderful food to the customer. This is the main reason that should motivate you. We are not movie stars. If your primary ambition is to look for TV appearances or magazine coverage, you will lose your focus of making good food. What do you think about the future of artisan pastrymaking? My opinion is that artisan pastry still has a lot of room to grow because nobody has made a machine to create perfect pastries. Of course, you can find automatic gadgets to pipe macaroons and other things but you still need someone to create the combination of flavors and colors. I’m the one who thinks the creative spirit is our engine and nobody can reproduce this with computers and steel, at least not yet. At the same time, I am not saying you should ignore technical improvements.Those improvements are being created to help reduce our manual work in the kitchen.This in turn gives us more time to think about creative ideas.There is still a massive universe of unexplored flavors and ingredients no one has tried before.

131

so good..


CAIPIRINHA MACAROONS Yield: 70 pieces

caipirinha ganache 180 30 70 500 180 70

g g g g g g

heavy cream 35% fat zest from 1 lime glucose syrup freshly squeezed lime juice white chocolate unsalted butter at room temperature cachaça liquor

Boil the cream with the zest, the glucose and the lime juice. Allow to infuse for 30 minutes. Sieve the cream and boil again. Pour the cream over the chocolate and mix well. At 40ºC, add the butter and emulsify with the hand mixer. Fold in the cachaça and let it cool until firm and ready to use.

macaroons 250 250 200 200 50 1 2 2 1

g g g g g g g g g

almond flour icing sugar confectioners’ sugar aged egg whites refined sugar salt yellow coloring for the yellow macaroon green coloring yellow coloring for the green macaroon

Sift the almond flour with the icing sugar and the confectioners’ sugar. Whisk the egg whites with the salt and add the refined sugar at the end to stiff the meringue. Fold the dry ingredients into the meringue, divide in two parts and mix in the colorings. Mix each color until the mixture becomes shiny. On a Silpat, pipe disks with 4 centimeters in diameter and let rest for 20 minutes to form a crust. Bake in a convection oven for 12 minutes at 150ºC, vents open. Let it cool and fill with the caipirinha ganache.


SWEET SAMBA BUTTER SQUASH CONFIT,YUKA FLOUR WITH PALM OIL, JABUTICABA COMPOTE, SWEET CORN CREAM


FLAVIO FEDERICO Yield: 10 servings

butter squash confit 400 4 800 500 2 2 1/2 4 1

g g g g

butter squash burnt lime (calcium oxide) sugar water cloves cardamom seeds cinnamon stick black pepper corns bay leaf peel of half lime peel of half orange

Peel the butter squash and cut into regular and even pieces. Cover with fresh water, add the calcium oxide and let it rest for 3 hours. Wash the squash pieces very well and set aside. Boil the water with sugar, spices, peels and bay leaf. Add the squash and cook for about 25 minutes. Remove from heat and let it cool in the pan.

yuka flour with palm oil 50 50 100

g g g

palm oil sugar coarse yuka flour

Heat the oil in a frying pan, add the yucca flour and toss to cover. Fry it for two minutes, add the sugar and cook for another one minute, just until the sugar starts to caramelize. Let it cool completely.

jabuticaba confit 500

g

300 250 5

g g g

fresh jabuticabas without seed (peel and pulp only) water sugar citric acid (1:1)

Mix the pulp with the peel, the sugar, the water and the citric acid. Let it cook in a cooper pan in a very low heat until it reaches 55ºBrix (about one hour). Refrigerate.

sweet corn cream 250 50 40 50 1,5

g g g g u

heavy cream (35% fat) coconut cream (35% fat) canned sweet corn steam cooked superfine sugar gelatin leaves (3 grams)

Put the gelatin in cold water to soften. Heat the cream with the coconut milk and the corn; blend it and pass through a fine mesh. Boil the mixture add the sugar to dissolve. Remove from the heat and add the gelatin. Cool it for 6 hours and whip to soft peaks.

cashew nut tuiles 200 60

g g

corn syrup toasted and salted cashew nuts

Dissolve the corn syrup in the microwave. Brush it on a Silpat and sprinkle with the nuts. Bake in a 180°C oven (160°C convection) until it stops to bubble. Cool completely and keep in an airtight container.

TO ASSEMBLE AND SERVE DIVIDE THE INGREDIENTS AS SHOWN IN THE PICTURE; GARNISH WITH A PEPPERMINT FLOWER AND THE TUILE.

136


VISUAL STRENGTH


STEF AERTS

The Belgian Stef Aerts, ‘Chocolate Center Supervisor’ of Belcolade Chocolates, is a symbol of maturity and creativity, as proved in his bonbons with which he explores new presentations.

ON THE ONE HAND,THE UPSIDE-DOWN BONBON LOOKS LIKE A BOWL CONTAINING A TYPICAL CRÈME BRÛLÉE TOPPED WITH CARAMEL OR CINNAMON. ON THE OTHER HAND,THE ‘DOMED’ BONBON COMBINES TWO VERY DIFFERENT FLAVORS AND TEXTURES, AND AT THE SAME TIME IT IS ATTRACTIVE DUE TO ITS UNUSUAL FORMAT. Closely bound to his country’s pastry jewel, Belgian chocolate, Stef Aerts knows in depth about a product which is absolutely popular and is present in some of the most prestigious chocolate manufacturers worldwide. This is the reason why it is so interesting to value these innovations in the very heart of the Belgian chocolate industry. In an interview, he tells us about his personal vision of bonbons.

Which is the secret of a really good bonbon? The balance between its coating and its filling – the latter should be a 75 or 80% of it.The precise harmony between the typical chocolate taste and an acid, sweet or bitter flavor. The use of the traditional ingredients must be very subtle, in order to preserve the original flavor of the chosen couverture. Nowadays there is a wide range of couvertures at our disposal, of different origins, in which any chef can find an inspiration to make exquisite bonbons. Shape is not as important as visual strength – the finish has to be glossy.

what the best combinations for that chocolate are, according to different analyses. This strongly helps the chocolatier find the best combinations, not to mention the textures.

Which are the limits as for innovation in the flavor and format of bonbons? (He laughs) There are no such limits – even now we still try to be innovative, because chocolate can be combined with more things than one can normally imagine. In Belcolade, we work with Creax to obtain a Matrix with the type of chocolate in the center and then find out

New opportunities are arising in which people offer bonbons in situations different from the usual ones (as a present, as a take-away in a shop…) In Belgium today, it is becoming a habit to serve a dessert together with bonbons married to different wines. This way, after the meal you get a nice three-bonbon assortment along with the wine that marries them.

What is the Belgian customer a better fan of – classic and traditional bonbons or more innovative ones? I am afraid that traditional products will always be more accepted than innovations. But if we look back to 5-7 years ago, you realize that nobody wanted chocolate to which lemon grass or passion fruit had been added. But now they are part of the ‘ballotin’ (assortment).

141

so good..


STEF AERTS

MANGO PRALINÉ

142


E ÈM CR ÉE ÛL BR 143

so good..


STEF AERTS

passion mango 300 200 50 380 10

g g g g g

mango purée (10% sugar) passion fruit purée (10% sugar) glucose sugar yellow pectin

Combine both purées, the sugar and the glucose and boil to 102.5ºC. Leave to cool and cover with plastic wrap. Make balls and store in refrigerator at 15-18ºC for 15 minutes. Place the balls in a stainless steel bowl and add some tempered chocolate over them. Move the balls with gloved hands. When the chocolate starts to temper, put back to refrigeration at 15-18ºC for 15 extra minutes. Repeat the same process once more. When the chocolate crystallizes again, add red coloring powder and then gold powder. Spin the container in circles until coated.This is a manual ‘panning’ method (for coating).

2nd ganache uganda 550 60 55 540 40

g g g g g

cream milk glucose dark couverture Noir Collection Equador butter

Boil the cream together with the milk and add the glucose. Pour the mixture over the chocolate and keep the ganache under 34ºC. Finally mix in the butter. Blend with the help of an electric mixer until an ideal mixture is obtained.

ingredients 80 30 300 35 365 2 50

g g g g g g

sugar glucose white couverture cocoa butter fresh cream vanilla beans butter

Make a light caramel with the sugar. Heat up the cream and pour it over the caramel together with the vanilla and the glucose. Leave the vanilla bean for at least 15 minutes in order to obtain a good vanilla flavor. Strain the cream and pour it over the white chocolate and the cocoa butter. Be careful not to allow the temperature to exceed 32ºC. Finally add the butter and emulsify properly with the mixer. Pour this filling into a chocolate capsule, previously made, and leave to crystallize for 12 hours at 18ºC. Seal with tempered white chocolate and sprinkle with some brown cane sugar.

144


JOSÉ ROMERO

WHY SHOULD WE LOOK FOR A SUBSTITUTE IF THE ORIGINAL IS AT OUR DISPOSAL? Such is the philosophy that José Romero, teacher at the Pastry School of Barcelona’s Pastry Trade, conveys to the public. Oysters, caviar and foie are three noble ingredients which one can find in the finest food aristocracy. It is true that their price is fairly high, but it is also true that there will always be a customer who will not renounce the pleasure of authenticity and exclusiveness. Besides, certain products have a reputation for being prohibitively expensive, but when it comes to purchasing them, they happen to be less expensive than expected or their profitability turns out to be clearly favorable.

A VERY INTERESTING SPECIAL FEATURE TYPICAL OF ROMERO’S CREATIONS IS THEIR PASTRY-LIKE APPEARANCE DESPITE BEING SAVORY PRODUCTS. AN OYSTER WRAPPED IN A ‘TOASTED’ MERINGUE, A TURRÓN OF FOIE WITH CHOCOLATE OR A PETIT-FOUR-SHAPED CAVIAR BLINI ARE SOME EXAMPLES OF CREATIONS WHICH ARE ‘DRESSED’ WITH WORDS THAT BELONG TO THE WORLD OF PASTRY AND WHICH STAND AT THE BORDER BETWEEN CUISINE AND CONFECTIONERY. Escuela de Pastelería de Barcelona / www.pastisseria.com

146


THE VALUE OF AUTHENTICITY


JOSÉ ROMERO

ingredients 1 1 1 1

teaspoon of beluga caviar tablespoon of mascarpone cream portion of sautéed corn blini chive stick

mascarpone cream 75 250 15

g g g

1 20

g

semi-whipped cream Mascarpone cheese lemon juice zest of a lemon gelatin sheet hot cream

Beat the Mascarpone together with the lemon juice and the zest with a whisk until a homogeneous paste is obtained. Separately, hydrate the gelatin sheet and drain it. Heat up 20 grams of cream and melt the gelatin sheet in it. Add to the Mascarpone and mix well. Finally, stir in the semi-whipped cream with the help of a spatula so that it acquires an airy texture like that of a mousse. Let cool down and serve.

blinis 200 200 300 2 750 20 60 10

g g g g g g g

corn meal all-purpose flour whisked egg whites egg yolks UHT milk salt sugar baking powder

Sift the flour together with the cornstarch and mix with the baking powder, the salt and the sugar. Separately mix the milk and the two egg yolks and add to the dry ingredients. Mix with the whisked egg whites in two times. Heat a non-stick pan with some butter over a moderate heat. With the help of a dispenser, pipe small doses onto the pan. Cook on both sides until they acquire a golden brown color.

CORN BLINIS WITH MASCARPONE AND CAVIAR

ingredients Crushed ice to keep the cold, a 30g tin of beluga caviar, Mascarpone cream, 10 sautéed corn blinis, chopped chive, chopped boiled egg yolk, chopped egg white, chopped gherkin, five cucumber cylinders.

cucumber cylinders

148

Cut the cucumber into 4-cm cylinders. With the help of a melon baller, scoop out the seeds and hollow them without reaching the ends.Thinly slice them by using a mandoline or a meat slicer and fan them out on the top.


C

H RNIS A G H WIT R A I AV


OYSTER TARTAR WITH LIME MERINGUE


JOSÉ ROMERO

ingredients ‘0000’ Oysters from Galicia, the water used to open 4 oysters and 4 leaves of salsify.

crunchy vegetables Spring onion rings, spring onion stem cut into julienne strips, diced red pepper, diced carrot, diced celery, diced red radish, 5 drops of Tabasco and q.s. of olive oil.

oyster water To each 50 grams of oyster water, add 50 grams of mineral water, 5 grams of sea salt and 1 gram of Gellan gum. Heat and allow to cool down.

oyster tartar Dice the oyster’s flesh and combine with the vegetables. Add some of the oyster water and season with Tabasco and oil.

steamed meringue 300 600 210

g g g

egg whites sugar water zest of one lime juice of one lime

Make an Italian meringue and, at the end of the process, add the lime and its zest. Pipe two portions of meringue into little cups with the help of a piping bag. Cover with plastic wrap. Steam to 90º for 8 minutes and remove the wrap. Cool down and assemble together with the oyster tartar and the salsify.

burnt oyster Place the Italian meringue directly on the open oyster. Slightly burn with a blowtorch.

151

so good..


JOSÉ ROMERO

ingredients Turrón of foie Spice bread Red fruits Orange strips Orange powder Decorative chocolate sheet

turrón of foie 1 1 200

kg g

q.s.

lobe of foie coarse salt sugar half tonka bean, grated ground pepper

Combine all the ingredients, cover and allow to marinate in the refrigerator for 4 hours.Then clean the salt off and remove the veins from the lobe. Following this, use 400 g foie cut into big dice and add salt and pepper. Store under refrigeration. Mix with the ganache and place into a frame so that it can be cut the desired size later on.

ganache 86 270 50 170

g g g g

2 q.s.

g

butter uht cream 35% invert sugar Araguani chocolate 72% zest of half an orange ground black pepper Maldon salt

Boil the cream, the invert sugar, the orange zest and the pepper and allow to infuse for approximately 5 minutes. Emulsify with the chocolate couverture at 35ºC and slowly add in the butter in order to achieve the correct texture. Mix with the diced foie and place into molds or frames.

TURRÓN OF FOIE WITH SWEET AND SOUR RED FRUITS

152


JOSร‰ ROMERO

red fruit compote 2 150 150 120 55 20 15 2 10 q.s.

g g g g g g

orange peels good quality red wine forum vinegar honey sugar sugar NH pectin cloves pepper balls red fruits

Combine the liquid ingredients, the honey, 55 g sugar, the aromatic ingredients, the orange peel and the clove. Bring to a boil.Then carefully dribble in the pectin, previously combined with 20 g sugar, preventing it to form lumps. Allow to boil for approximately 2 minutes and remove from the heat. Add the red fruits and serve.

spice bread 250 175 50 1 250 20 2 5 3 130

g g g g g g g g g

honey milk brown sugar stiffened egg high gluten flour baking powder anise powder nutmeg cinnamon sliced almond

Heat the honey to 60ยบC and mix in the rest of ingredients. Pour into a rectangular mold previously greased with butter and bake at 170ยบC for one hour.

154


JOSÉ ROMERO

OLIVE FINANCIER

ingredients 200 435 15 200 10

g g g g g

Espuma flour (Ylla) confectioners’ sugar salt almond powder baking powder

125 565

g g

black or green olive purée egg whites

280 50 q.s.

g g

brown butter olive oil coloring

Combine the first group of ingredients and sift together. Mix well with the olive purée and the egg whites at room temperature. Separately, melt the butter and combine with the olive oil and the coloring. While hot, add into the first mixture. Bake at 190ºC for 10 to 12 minutes, vents open.

156


coupe du monde de patisserie 2009

FRANCE ADVANCES AND CONTINUES Once again, France reigned for the sixth time in

team won, formed by Jérôme de Oliveira, Jérôme Langillier,

the Pastisserie World Cup, which took place in

and Marc Riviere. This victory makes it a total of six World

Lyon on January 23 and 24.They were able to

Cups won.Their work kept the same level of excellence as

impose their style, and this same style was jud-

seen in previous editions of the competition, with a very

ged in the competition. It is true that they com-

“French” aesthetic. As always, the presentation of their labor

peted on home turf and the judges could have

was impeccable.

been biased, but it’s also true that France

Italy deserves a special mention. One can always count on

No matter who participates,

Italy to keep the stakes high.They achieved a well-deserved

France always finishes and always accomplis-

second place. Belgium, another country which usually has a

hes what it sets out to do. They never, well,

good level, came in third.

doesn’t fail.

hardly ever, have accidents or complications, pro-

Fourth place in the competition surprisingly went to Japan,

bably because they have never had to improvise. It

whose team seemed to be the favorite to win. However,

doesn’t matte who the participants are. It doesn’t

despite of the fact that they received a very high score in

matter that 20 years have passed since the first edi-

the artistic pieces, they had worse luck when it came time

tion of this competition, where the now mythical

to score the tasting.

Mickäel Azouz, Serge Billet, and Thierry Froissard

Pierre Hermé, as the jury’s president of honor, and the great

imposed themselves as champions.

Gabriel Paillasson gave life to what is, without a doubt, the

In 2009,

France seems to be invincible and reign supreme

most spectacular patisserie world championship ever.

again. Why does this country always win? That is the question that numerous other countries constantly ask themselves.The answer lies in a number of factors: France’s patisseries, their supplying companies, their professional organizations, its pastry schools, its love and pride of the profession, and the expert attitude they imprint on everything they do. France’s experience in this sector is reflected in the renowned competition that is the Patisserie World Cup. Then, the real question should be: What do the other countries lack that keeps them from winning? Every country taking part in this competition must answer this question in order to better themselves. As we have stated before, the French

TIDBITS 158

www.cmpatisserie.com


FROM BROADWAY TO THE OLYMPIC GAMES The 20th edition of the US Pastry took place in the Jacob

competition in the United States. Not in vain, the competi-

K. Javits convention center. Every year, this North American

tion has been won by some of the most internationally dis-

competition chooses the Pastry Chef of the Year in that

tinguished pastry chefs: Michel Willaume, Sebastien

country, organized by a company called Paris Gourmet.The

Canonne, Eric Bedoucha or En-Ming Hsu, to name a few.

chosen theme for this occasion was the legendary New

This is also proven by the jury, made up of some of the most

York musical, “Give My Regards to Broadway”.

famous pastry professionals in the country, a lot of them

The pastry chef of New York’s Russo’s on the

winners in previous editions of the competition. The 21st

Bay, AJ Saputhanthri, born in Sri Lanka, was the

edition of the US Pastry will take place next year as part of

absolute winner of the competition. He recei-

the International Food Service Show in New York. The date

ved the gold medal, a silver plaque, 4,000 dollars, and

for this event will be on February 28, 2010, with the always

the title of Pastry Chef of the Year.

suggestive theme: the Olympic Games.

The champion, who imposed himself on the other 14 participants from different states, achieved the maximum score after adding the results received in the artistic piece, the chocolate cake, and the bonbons.The piece, called “Curtain Call”, was made of solid chocolate carved by hand and metaphorically represented the intricate pleats in a theater curtain, in which the classical faces of comedy and tragedy were inlaid. The cake combined some provocative flavors such as chocolate mousse and Earl Grey tea, pomegranate ganache or raspberry coulis. The winner chose a lime ganache with a sesame nougatine for the bonbon. Second place, which was rewarded with a silver medal and 2,500 dollars, went to Salvatore Settepani, pastry chef of Pasticcerie Bruno Bakery and Restaurant in New York. His work, inspired by the infamous Phantom of the Opera, deserved this high placing in the competition. Third place and the bronze medal went to Andrew Chlebana, from Joliet Lunior College in Joliet, Illinois, whose work was called “A Tribute to Broadway”. Naomi Gallego, from the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, Texas, received an honorable mention for her tribute to the musical, Wicked. The US Pastry has become the most anticipated and popular pastry

TIDBITS 160

www.parisgourmet.com


SPECIAL SPICED BONBONS,

patrick roger

Patrick Roger, MOF 2000 (Meilleur Ouvrier de France), is an unusual soloist in the Parisian scene. He displays a good dose of creative genius and a vanguard’s imagination in the windows of his four chocolateries in the French capital. This has got every one talking about him and now he’s at the front lines of gourmet pastry making in his country. Two of his most creative and preferred products, coming from his passion for chocolate, are the Couleurs bonbons and the ‘Ouefs surprise!’ chocolate eggs. The Couleurs bonbons are spiced and special. It is a combination of exotic spices from the four corners of the world to create bonbons with flavors such as Brazilian lime, lemon verbena from South East Asia, and the Japanese yuzu. Also present is the ever classic caramel. Another strong point for these bonbons is the presentation, which look like small pieces of marble in different colors. A constant in Roger’s life is to always search for the best ingredients to offer excellence in each and every one of his elaborations. And so he uses ingredients such as oranges brought in from Corsica, the best tropical vanillas, the finest Ethiopian coffee, the most fragrant passion fruit, chestnuts preserved according to standards in Torino, and the best whiskeys in Scotland. The ‘Oeufs surprise!’ set up a game where the chocolate eggs become real ones and are presented in an egg carton. In reality it’s a way of going back to the origins of the Easter egg, since traditionally hens’ eggs were given away. In this case the inside of the egg is formed by almond pralines and hazelnuts encased in a fine layer of dark chocolate and covered in a crunchy praline which forms the egg shell. www.patrickroger.com

TIDBITS 162


ramon morató

ON TOUR IN AUSTRALIA The participation of the master pastry chef, Ramon Morató,

Ramon Morató was the guest of honor in different events

director of Aula Chocovic, at the Melbourne Food and

in this festival, which programmed over 220 gastronomy and

Wine 2009 festival celebrated from March 7th to the 23rd,

wine activities for 16 days, aimed at both the professional

is one of the most important things the Chocovic company

public and the final customers. Experts from all over the

can do to strengthen its globalization process. This initiative

world were brought together for this festival. One of the

is trying to fortify the Oceania market, in which it has been

first activities Morató was involved in was the Wicked

present for the past 3 years through a distributor called

Sunday/Chocolate playground. In this event the participants

Cocoa Alliance. Moreover, Morató came into contact with

discovered the chocolate elaboration secrets of the most

Australian chefs and others of a more internationally recog-

famous restaurants in Asutralia, like the Press Club, Circa,

nized prestige like Thierry Marx, Heston Blumenthal, Rene

The Prince, Cutler & Co., and Sweet Source Café. On this

Redzepi, and Antonio Carluccio.

occasion, Morató made a chocolate hamburger. The following day, the Aula Chocovic director was in charge of working step by step through the elaboration of the desserts Lychee Delight and Balsamic Nut Crumble with Forest Fruits, from the prestigious Half Moon Restaurant, where the chef, Paul Wilson, made Spanish dishes. However, Morató’s main work took place on the 21st and 22nd of March with a masterly session in the event titled Theater of Ideas in the Melbourne Recital Center. During the course of the two sessions, he explained which are his main sources of inspiration and the techniques he uses before working on his new creations. Once class was dismissed, Morató made the long-awaited Trikki Trikky Truffle, a chocolate truffle with Kendari Chocovic 60%, elaborated from true black truffle from the Osona county in Barcelona. On the night of the 22nd he also participated in a live cooking session which took place at the Press Club, one of the most prominent restaurants in Melbourne. Morató created a dessert exclusively for the occasion, Springtime, which he made live. Morató’s stay in Australia came to an end in Sydney, on the 24th, with dinner in a restaurant called The Marque, where he also presented a dessert from the menu prepared by the famous Australian chef, Mark Best. www.ramonmorato.com

TIDBITS 164


christian escribĂ

PASTRY AS A GIFT, WRAPPED IN SATINY CARAMEL Christian EscribĂ has passed the ludic side of gourmet pastry making to limits never before crossed.The marketing of a cake as the selling of an illusion has been forged with strength in the last phase of this historic bakery in the city of Barcelona, from the spectacular cakes, the famous Easter chocolate figures, the giant masterpieces made for great social events, to the Candy Glam rings, rings made of caramel sold in some of the most luxurious shopping centers in the world.True pieces of ephemeral art can be found Inside the world of pastries as gifts, full of the eccentric magic of a place with class. Both the pamela and the garden made with satiny caramel garden are good examples of exclusive gifts with the purpose of surprising the most sophisticated. The pamela is decorated with satiny caramel and its delicate montage requires great concentration and ability. In contrast, the caramel garden was created to be an attractive center piece to decorate buffets and presentation tables. www.escriba.es

TIDBITS 166


fashion designers

FOR A DAY The finalists of the new edition of the World Chocolate Masters are intensely working on the theme for this competition: haute couture. The World Chocolate Masters will take place from October 14th to the 16th at the grand Salon du Chocolat Professionnel in Paris. On this occasion, taking advantage of the multiple possibilities that this theme offers, the organizers of the competition -Cacao Barry, Callebaut, and Carma- have announced that the 20 finalists will have to use chocolate to decorate a hat designed originally by the prestigious designer, Mademoiselle Slassi. Her designs, which can be found in the Parisian shop Mira Belle, perfectly fit in with the creative spirit of chocolate. This part of the competition will put the finalists’ aesthetic and technical abilities to the test. Each one of them will also have to complete their displays with a big artistic piece, bonbons, a cake, and a dessert. The embellishments used on the hat must be chocolate or products derived from cocoa. All other elements are prohibited. www.worldchocolatemasters.com

COFFEE WILL BE THE STAR AT THE SECOND EDITION OF THE best dessert of restaurant After the great reception that the first edition of the international championship Best Dessert of Restaurant, the EspaiSucre School in Barcelona, Spain, is working hard to boost this restaurant dessert competition. The organizers have joined with the Nespresso firm to give the green light to a second edition in which coffee will be the protagonist, result of the hard work done. Firstly, this second edition incorporates changes in its rules and regulations. It is expected that eight finalists will face each other on October 26th with the intention of winning two prizes: The Best Restaurant Patissier Award 2009 and the Nespresso Best Restaurant Dessert Award.The latter must include coffee in its ingredients. According to the rules of the competition, the contenders are provided with five hours to prepare both dishes at the School’s facilities. Before this, the finalists will have had to pass the first phase of the selection. The selection is made by means of photographs, files, and résumés that are to be sent in before July 31st. Once in the finals, things such as taste, techniques used, the integration of flavors, aesthetics, and the idea behind the dishes will be valued by a panel of judges made up of important names such as Paco Torreblanca, Michel Bras, Martín Berasategui, Oriol Balaguer, Jordi Roca, and Jordi Butron, among others.The winner of the competition will receive 9,000 Euros in prize money, a place for the annual restaurant desserts course at EspaiSucre, and different items.

TIDBITS 168

www.espaisucre.com


europain 2010

DOES NOT RUN OUT OF STEAM

After its latest success in 2008, Europain aims to continue to be a dynamic center of attraction for the participating sectors, those related to the trade and manufacture of flour, sugar and chocolate. The latest figures are quite optimistic: 80,000 square meters, 85,637 visitors and 642 exhibitors. The objective is to keep these figures at least at the same level for next year’s fair. Although the majority of visitors (60%) came all around France, a total of 150 other nationalities also took part in the last edition, especially coming from other European countries, but also from the Maghreb and, with a lower representation, from America. Next time, the different programmed activities will attract a lot of visitors and exhibitors again. Masters de la Boulangerie, a world championship of individual bread making, will be held for the first time this year, and a total amount of 24 finalists are expected to take part in it. Schools Street, the Sweet Crafts World Championship and the Europain and Intersuc Trophies to Innovation will be also some of the attractions included in the activity program parallel to the fair. www.europain.com

gulfood

EPICENTER FOR THE SECTOR IN THE MIDDLE EAST Dubai, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates, has become, in just very short time, one of the most lively and prosperous cities in the world, with enormous luxury hotels and spectacular architectural projects. This boom has also spread to other sectors such as tourism, hotels, the food and catering industry, and so on. It was therefore no surprise that the latest Gulfood fair achieved such success.The exhibition focused on the food industry and the different equipment for hotels and restaurants, and managed to stand out as an indispensable meeting point between the Middle East and the Western countries. This is what the figures of the last fair, held from 23rd to 26th February, show, with the participation of over 3,300 firms coming from 75 different countries, in an exhibition site as large as 80,000 square meters. In fact, and contrary to any pessimistic results that the current economic situation could have led to expect, the total participation in the event increased by 20%. The success of some of its spaces must be highlighted, such as the Salon Culinaire, which included some seminars and high-standard food and pastry demonstrations, as well as a spectacular competition of artistic pieces made with ice and frozen cakes. www.gulfood.com

TIDBITS 170


the

EUGÈNE WEISS

international trophy is born As a tribute to the innovative mind of its founder, Eugène Weiss, the chocolate firm that is named after him has presented a new and interesting professional championship, an international chocolate and confectionery competition: the Eugène Weiss Trophy. During the last edition of Sirha Trade Exhibition, Weiss Chocolate’s President, Yannick Naël, and its Managing Director, Patrcik Marché, together with Nasserdine Mendi, Meilleur Ouvrier of France and President of the competition, officially presented this championship to the press and the professionals. Two of the sponsors, Pascal Brunstein, MOF Chocolatier 1990 and E. Hirsinger, MOF Pâtissier 1997, also took part in the presentation. This competition is a real challenge for all the artisan chocolatiers from all over the world. In 2010, two candidates from each country will be selected after different national contests to compete in the great final to be held in Lyon in 2011. The jury, made up of representatives from each country –together with some journalists and Meilleurs Ouvriers of France as commissioners– will evaluate each contestant’s works according to flavor, innovation and presentation parameters. The participants will have to create an assortment of different types of bonbons, a chocolate dessert on plate and an artistic piece also made with chocolate. The winner will be awarded with the Eugène Weiss Trophy, which was sculpted by Gabrielle Eglinger. This inspirational artwork representing a cacao pod set in a metallic lattice epitomizes quality and elegance. Since 1882, Weiss has set the standard for quality French chocolate-making, continuing to follow the recipes and expertise of its founder, Eugene Weiss, and which remain a closely-guarded secret to this day. Registration: contact Mr Nasserdine Mendi Phone: 00 33 0617971557 - nasserdine.mendi@weiss.fr

TIDBITS 172


the salon du chocolat

WILL MAKE A STOP IN MADRID

THE 2009 PARIS EDITION WILL RECEIVE THE II PROFESSIONAL SALON The prestigious Salon du Chocolat, born in Paris 14 editions ago and celebrated on a regular basis in other important cities around the world such as New York, Tokyo, Beijing, Moscow, and Shanghai, will include Madrid in its circuit in 2010.This emblematic event organized by Sylvie Douce and François Jeantet, and in Spain by Grupo Courments/Event International, will be reiterated once again as a meeting point between culture, fashion, art, and chocolate. The event will take place from the 16th to the 18th of April at the IFEMA trade fair. The 23rd edition of the Salon du Chocolat will summon the best master chocolatiers, some of which will elaborate different objects with this product: dresses, handbags, hats, shoes and other fashion accessories, paintings, tapestries, sculptures, containers, and drinking glasses. By means of different simultaneous activities, visitors will have the opportunity to discover the secrets of cocoa and taste new sensations that this product incites in a harmonious relationship with wines and coffee. The next Salon du Chocolat will take place from the 14th to the 18th of October in Paris, which in its 15th edition has music as its central theme. The third finals of the World Chocolate Masters will also take place here in the space dedicate to professionals. The Salon du Chocolat Professionnel will be held from the 14th to the 16th of October. Also, the Chocolate Show New York will open its doors from October 30th to the first of November at the Metropolitan. It will be Russia’s turn in 2010 with its third edition of the Moscow’s Salon du Chocolat. The Salon du Chocolat in Tokyo, Japan, will also enter this circuit during the first half of February. Other Salons with dates to be confirmed during 2010 are the Salon du Chocolat in Shanghai, China, and the one being held in Cairo, Egypt. www.salonduchocolat.fr

TIDBITS 174


THE GREAT AMBASSADRESS OF MEXICAN CONFECTIONERY

paulina abascal,

The Mexican chef Paulina Abascal has been a true media star all across South America for more than three years. Her television program Postres para Regalar in gourmet.com TV channel is followed by over 18 million people three times a week in 24 countries. She is sweet and friendly in front of a camera, as she is in her daily life.This is what everyone who claims to know her well state, and this is also one of the reasons of her spectacular success. Her professional career first started in Mexico, where she did her studies, and then in France, Belgium and Spain, where she deeply got started in European confectionery, learned its techniques and polished her style. Back to her homeland, she started setting new trends which would have a decisive influence on Mexican confectionery. The media began to focus on her professional career and evolution, as proved by a countless amount of articles and interviews. In 2008, the ‘Larousse de los postres con el toque mexicano de Paulina Abascal’ (Larousse of desserts with Paulina Abascal’s Mexican touch) is published, an ambitious book with 250 recipes and over 400 pages which meant the recognition of this chef ’s savoir faire. Her fabulous communication skills, her knowledge and her naturalness when preparing and showing her desserts and cakes on TV are the key to her popularity. Her commitment to a quality confectionery, her defense of best raw materials and her constant claim for the sake of the recognition of pastry chefs within the gastronomy sector speak highly of Paulina Abascal’s labor, great ambassadress of Mexican confectionery. www.paulinaabascal.com

TIDBITS 176


SIGEP 2010

www.sigep.it

internationalization is the key The organizers of the Italian exhibition fair Sigep have fairly good reasons to be proud. Only a few events at an international level combine so successfully offer and demand in the pastry, bread and ice cream industry.This is what the figures proved the last time the exhibition was held, which, despite the complicated economic context, recorded 92,732 visitors and over 750 exhibitors. This consolidated position has allowed the organizers to think of ambitious objectives with an eye on the 31st edition, which is expected to fill the exhibition site of Rimini again from 23rd to 27th January 2010. These objectives mainly focus on offering solutions to the delicate global situation and on becoming a reference salon worldwide, by attracting a greater number of professionals from all over the world, bearing into account that over 16,000 professionals from 150 different countries attended the latest edition. With the aim of reaching those figures, the organizers of the fair have centered on promoting it around different countries and on offering an attractive activity program, out of which the Ice Cream World Championship will stand again – several national teams like France, Italy, USA, Australia, Japan, Spain or Argentina have already shown their interest in taking part in it.

CANDIDACY RECEPTION FOR THE Mondial des Arts Sucrés The second edition of the Mondial des Arts Sucrés will take place from March 6th to the 10th of 2010. This event will be held within the framework of Europain, the Parisian Salon dedicated to bakery, patisserie, and ice cream making.The Mondial des Arts Sucrés is the patisserie world championship for pairs, organized by the ingredients firm, DGF.The competition tries to vindicate women’s role in this area by making it compulsory to have both men and women on each team. The competition is also attempting to lure in the creativity, talent, and innovation of the best artisans. Each country has until September 30th to send in their candidates, only one pair per country.These candidates will be submitted to the evaluation of the organization. Some modifications to the rules and regulations have already taken place and it is emphasizing that the female constituent of each team has to make a minimum of one of the three artistic pieces. The Japanese team participating in the following edition has been confirmed since November. After excelling in a qualifying competition with more than 20 participants formed in pairs, Kenji Katsuma and Rie Tianimichi became the national team thanks to their “aquatic garden”. The pair is confident that they will surpass the stakes raised by Japan in the first edition and take the championship. The prizes, aside from a trophy, will be accompanied with a sum of 8,000 Euros for the winning team, 4,000 Euros for second place, and 3,000 Euros for third place. www.dgf.fr

TIDBITS 178


184


ÉCOLE LENÔTRE the temple of gastronomic savoir faire

THE SCHOOL KEEPS ALIVE THE MAIN OBJECTIVES TO WHICH ITS FOUNDER, GASTON LENÔTRE, ALWAYS STUCK TO: A TASTE FOR THE THINGS WELL DONE, THE RESEARCH FOR EXCELLENCE AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO SHARE EXPERIENCES.

185

so good..


ÉCOLE LENÔTRE

In the most gourmet and gourmand heart of France, there is a name that stands out over some others as a synonym for school and an unquestionable reference in high pâtisserie, as well as for the traiteur art in the reception of events and banquets. Gaston Lenôtre, who recently passed away, boosted a bakery with his own effort which delighted many customers and which soon became a leading business among the finest bakeries in Paris. Since as far back as 1947 until today, his trajectory – bound to his own ensign – has not ceased from growing in size, implementation, offer and prestige. For over twenty years since that date when the Second World War had just finished, his name, Gaston Lenôtre, has become more and more important. His standards found a place not only in his customers’ hearts and palates, but also in the minds of an increasing number of professionals: passion for his trade, a taste for the things well done, research for excellence and luxury, and a vocation for sharing his knowledge and experience with a team. He soon extended the sphere of his skills not only to the world of confectionery but also to the service of different kinds of banquets. His promising career led him first to centralize production in a very big building on the outskirts of Paris, in Plaisir (1968), and soon, after that, to found his school there as well, in the year 1971. A school for great chefs. Nowadays, and every year, École Lenôtre gathers 3,000 trainees from the five continents. During their stay in the school, these students can take advantage of a wide range of training and perfection courses based on the main professions related to the food industry and gastronomy. Cuisine, traiteurs, pastry

186

making, chocolate, ice cream and artistic sugar are the main disciplines, which are taught in the school from all possible perspectives, from theory to practice, bearing in mind that the powerful head laboratory is nearby, always working all-out and ready to supply the wide variety of products which are launched to market under the brand of Lenôtre. The MOF (Meilleur Ouvrier de France) Philippe Gobet runs the École Lenôtre and is in charge of supervising the approximately 50 courses that cover the broad gastronomic spectrum mentioned above. Gobet works together with a team of great chefs, among whom a good number of professionals hold the title of MOF as well. In the sphere of pastry, chocolate and ice cream making, some names stand out: Christophe Rhedon (pastry chef), Gérard Taurin (glacier), Olivier Vidal (chocolatier) y Thierry Atlan (chocolatier). For those who are interested in the world of cooking and catering, there is a team of exceptional teachers, such as Joël Robuchon, with the largest amount of stars, Frédéric Anton (MOF and holder of three stars at the restaurant Pré Catelan), Jean-Marie Gautier (MOF and chef at the Hôtel du Palais in Biarritz, awarded with one star) or Sergio Mei, chef at the Four Seasons in Milan. Training à la carte. Within the so mentioned Training à la carte, Lenôtre develops a broad program of short courses which last for 3 to 5 days. In these courses, different options are given, referring to Lenôtre typical confectionery, sweet and savory pastry, ice cream, artistic sugar, chocolate and bonbons, and desserts on plate. Concerning savory cuisine, courses on creative cooking are given by some of the great chefs linked to the school, the traiteur and banquet cuisine and also the traiteur charcuterie. Another type of course available is the Master Class, an intensive training course which allows trainees to start out as cooks or pastry chefs in a short period.


“Each year, Ecole Lenôtre receives over 3000 students coming from the 5 continents. Each of them finds a tailor-made training For over six months, the trainees acquire the necessary knowledge to succeed in the two-day test they must do to obtain the Diploma in École Lenôtre. Finally, the school also gives both occasional and regular advice to hundreds of big hotel and restaurant groups. This is a customized training course in which the chefs from the school perfectly meet each customer’s needs and even a contract is reached in order to establish a compromise for the training of the respective teams. Stores, restaurants and licenses. Along with its powerful role as a training center, Lenôtre has never left behind its aim to establish worldwide through different personalities. In this sense, it is relevant to mention the important boost that the introduction of the hotel group Accor in its assets meant, in a process that concluded in 1992.This did nothing but strengthen the trajectory of luxury and prestige that Lenôtre had gained creating pastry products, organizing events, and thanks to its role as a training center as well as an exclusive establishment. Nowadays, the brand owes 16 stores in France, 15 of them in Paris and one in Cannes. Haute pâtisserie to take away, menus for special events, a wine list selected by the well-known sumiller Oliver Poussier, and all kind of sweet and savory select products, bonbons, macaroons, petit fours, and so on. In the year 2002, they boosted a new concept of store that allowed them to franchise worldwide, and ever since they have opened 31 establishments in 12 countries (Germany, Spain, Saudi Arabia, Dubai, Qatar, Kuwait, Korea, Japan, Thailand, Morocco,Tunisia and the United States). To finish with this establishing process of Lenôtre, three Parisian restaurants were placed in some of the most emblematic locations: Le Pré Catelan, the Pavillon Elysée (where

the first Café Lenôtre was placed and whose light food model spread to eight other stores) and finally the Panoramic Lenôtre in Stade de France, with a stunning view of the stadium and a menu inspired by the Café Lenôtre. From Le Plaisir, Lenôtre has also developed a series of licenses for a wide range of products under the label ‘une recette lenôtre’ (a recipe by Lenôtre). Wellknown brands such as Brossard (specialized in pastry), Gersica (specialized in foie gras) or Frigo-MikoCogesal (Unilever group, specialized in ice cream) have a range of products Lenôtre.This brand has also developed specific products for the professional sphere. All in all, a real temple of gastronomic savoir faire which not only offers a countless variety of services, establishments, stores and top-quality products, but also shares its knowledge and experience through one of the major training institutions which have made France become a world reference in terms of gastronomic teaching.

course”

187

so good..


ÉCOLE LENÔTRE interview

‘My main concern is to continue the important training policy Gaston Lenôtre used to apply’ Approximately 40% of your trainees are not French, what is the profile of those students who come from abroad? All of them are passionate! We welcome trainees from all parts of the world. Countries from Asia and Middle-East are very present, as well as America, mostly South America. Eastern Europe is beginning to emerge. Which are the main differences between École Lenôtre and other training centers? We can see two main differences: Firstly, the high quality of our team.The Maison Lenôtre is unique indeed. 11 professionals of the teams hold the prestigious title of MOF (Meilleur Ouvrier de France). Most of them teach at the École Lenôtre and pass on their knowhow to the trainees.The other major factor is the proximity of Lenôtre's laboratory. It means that everyone is able to frequent more than 1000 professionals on a day-to-day basis coming. It is very stimulating for the students to have the daily opportunity to compare experiences and professionals ideas with the staff of Lenôtre. PHILIPPE GOBET DIRECTOR

188

Which is the latest course program that you have recently updated? We provide several new courses, such as: The art of macaroons, (École Lenôtre won an award at Europain exhibition, for this very innovative course), with classical macaroons but also some new original flavors and textures; Savory and sweet Viennese pastries, with diversified sweet or salted fillings; New range of flavors and techniques for cakes and entremets;The plate and the dessert, fine tuning; Cooking for receptions, for catering services. On the other hand, the catering and charcuterie courses have been renewed with the arrival of Arnaud Nicolas, new MOF in Catering Charcuterie.

What initiatives have you launched as the Director of l’École? I created ‘Signatures de Chefs’, a special course where great and recognized chefs reveal their techniques and secrets. Sergio Mei (the Four Seasons’ Chef, Milan), Didier Corlou (Sofitel Hanoï’s Chef, Vietnam), JeanMarie Gautier (Hôtel du Palais’s Chef, Biarritz), Régis Marcon (Restaurant Régis et Jacques Marcon’s Chef, Saint-Bonnet-le-Froid) and even more famous names animated these brand new courses with great pleasure. You can also find techniques and recipes by Joël Robuchon. I widened our activities through international consulting. I developed the number of the intensive professional trainings (6 months). Today, 3 sessions are open: January, April and September. It means recognition in the gastronomic world.This part of our activity is a real success. You are head of a school with immense prestige, such as Lenôtre is.What does that mean for you? I started at the École Lenôtre as a trainee, then I joined the teaching team and I have been finally been moved up to Director. After having worked with great Chefs, it was obvious for me to carry on my career by transmitting all I had learnt during those years, and to share my gained know-how with other people whose passion is the same. In the gastronomic world, to be head of a school means to pay attention every day to the preoccupations that training involves. Teaching accompanied by the best professionals became my strong point. That is why today I am very proud of managing this prestigious school in the forefront of innovation. My main concern is to continue the important training policy Gaston Lenôtre used to apply.


ÉCOLE LENÔTRE capucine sponge 300 40 250 150

g g g g

almond tant-pour-tant flour egg whites granulated sugar

Sift the tant-pour-tant. Whisk the egg whites and mix with the sugar until stiff. Add the sifted powder to the egg whites followed by the flour, delicately, without causing the mousse to lose volume. Use to fill a stencil 1 cm deep. Sprinkle twice over with confectioner’s sugar, and cook at 170°C for 25 min. Once out of the oven, put on a rack to cool.

apricot mousse 800 25 22 450 500

g g g g g

apricot pulp lemon juice gelatin sheets Italian meringue liquid cream

Warm half the apricot pulp to 65°C. Soften the gelatin in cold water, drain and melt. Lower the temperature of the apricot pulp to 40°C, mix in the melted gelatin then the remainder of the pulp, and cool to 22°C. Whisk the liquid cream, mix with the Italian meringue then incorporate this mixture into the thickened pulp.

pain de genes 325 250 80 3 15 115

g g g g g g

50 % almond paste whole eggs flour baking powder kirsch butter

In the mixer, on low speed setting, gradually mix the whole eggs into the almond paste.The mixture should be smooth. Heat the vase of the mixer for 30 seconds using a blowtorch, so that the mixture increases in volume. Increase speed and beat for 10 minutes. Divide the preparation in two. Incorporate the melted butter into one half, and then combine the two mixtures. Delicately add the flour and baking powder, previously sifted together, and then the kirsch. Pour into pre-greased and floured round baking pans and fill to 3/4 of the way up. Place in the oven at 170 °C for 35 min. Once out of the oven, remove from the mold and cool to a core temperature of 70°C on a rack, then cover in food wrap. Keep in the refrigerator. Tip: the pain de genes will cut better if it is made the previous day.

pan-fried apricot with rosemary 700 60 50 q.s. 20

g g g g

apricots in syrup butter granulated sugar fresh rosemary dessert jelly

Drain the apricot halves and cut in two. Melt the butter in a nonstick frying pan, add the sugar then the apricots. Leave to simmer for 2 minutes over a low heat. Sprinkle with sprigs of fresh rosemary. Cook for 10 minutes to a compote texture, stirring gently so as to coat the apricots in their cooking juice. Remove the sprigs of rosemary then caramelize. Pour this into a container. Delicately add the dessert jelly. Pour into round silicone molds 16 cm in diameter and fill. Freeze.

190


PROVENÇAL APRICOT 191

so good..


ÉCOLE LENÔTRE

basic caramel 125 100 20 200

g g g g

granulated sugar glucose syrup butter liquid cream

In a saucepan, over a low heat, pour on a part of the granulated sugar, leave to dissolve and brown, then repeat with the rest of the sugar to produce a caramel. Incorporate the hot glucose syrup. Cook everything for 2 to 3 minutes. Whisk in softened butter to dilute. Gradually pour in the hot liquid cream. Strain through a cheesecloth, then keep at room temperature. Remove 375 g for the recipe.

caramel mousse 50 35 6 185 200

g g g g g

egg yolks basic syrup gelatin sheets basic caramel liquid cream

Heat the basic syrup, and then pour onto the egg yolks. Whisk together. Poach in the microwave until the temperature reaches 90°C (while poaching, whisk the mixture frequently). Pour into a mixer vase and, using a hand whisk, increase in volume and cool to 30-35°C. Introduce the basic caramel, and the softened and melted gelatin. At 28°C, delicately mix in the whipped cream. Pour into silicone round circles, 15 cm in diameter, fill to top and freeze. Set aside.

gelled apricot coulis flavored with rosemary 200 250 30 200 40

g g g g g

apricot pulp granulated sugar gelatin sheets spring water fresh rosemary

ASSEMBLY ATTACH A STRIP OF RHODOID TO THE SIDES OF A CAKE RING. PLACE THE RINGS ON A SPECIAL ROUND SILICON SHEET. FILL WITH APRICOT MOUSSE, LINE THE SIDES USING A BRUSH AND LEAVE TO SET FOR A FEW MINUTES IN THE REFRIGERATOR. POSITION THE FROZEN APRICOT INSERT. FILL WITH A LITTLE APRICOT MOUSSE. PUT DOWN THE CAPUCINE SPONGE. FILL AGAIN WITH A THIN LAYER OF APRICOT

Boil the water with the sugar and pour on the apricot pulp, previously warmed to 65°C. Add the chopped rosemary and leave to infuse with a lid on for 20 minutes.Then strain through a chinois. Soften the gelatin in cold water, drain then mix in the flavored fruit puree. Set aside at room temperature.

MOUSSE. ATTACH THE INSERT USING FROZEN CARAMEL MOUSSE. FILL AGAIN WITH A THIN LAYER OF APRICOT MOUSSE, THEN FINISH ASSEMBLY OF THE DESSERT WITH A BASE OF PAIN DE GENES SPONGE. PLACE A PIECE OF COOKING PAPER AND A SHEET ON THE DESSERT AND FREEZE THE WHOLE THING. DECORATION AND FINISH REMOVE THE SPECIAL SILICONE SHEET. REMOVE THE DESSERT FROM THE RING THEN TAKE OUT THE RHODOID AND PLACE BACK IN THE REFRIGERATOR. CREATE A VELVETY APPEARANCE USING A SPRAY GUN AND AN APRICOT-COLORED MIX. PLACE THE DESSERT ON A PIECE OF GOLD CARDBOARD. POUR THE GELLED, ROSEMARY-FLAVORED COULIS IN THE CENTER OF THE DESSERT. LEAVE TO GEL AND THEN DECORATE. NB: THE WAY A DESSERT IS DECORATED IS PURELY A MATTER OF PERSONAL TASTE. DECORATIONS CAN VARY ACCORDING TO THE CUSTOMER’S WISHES.

192


SO GOOD.. STAFF Editor-in-Chief, Carlos Barrachina car los@vilbo.com

Contents Director, Alber to Ruiz alber to@vilbo.com

General Coordinator, Esther Vilà esther@vilbo.com

Mar keting Director, Jordi Seguí jordi@vilbo.com

Layout and Design Director, Xavier Vilà vilbo@vilbo.com

Cor respondant in the USA, Lisa Shames lisashames@ sogoodmagazine.com

Cor respondant in Japan, Reiko Matsuno reikomatsuno@ sogoodmagazine.com

Adver tising Director, Montse Crusat Editor ial Staff, Jaume Cot, Lluís Concepción, Fernando Toda, Eva Carrasco Layout and Design, Cristina Méndez, Lourdes Mar tínez Adver tising Assistants , Maite Abril, Teresa Galiana Finance Depar tment, Josefina González Administration Staff, Lluisa Tomás , Roser Griñó, Marisa Cruz Pr inted by Prisma Ar tes Gráficas , s .l. Legal deposit B-52273-2008 ISSN 2013-2034 Translated by Joan Mar tín, Sandra Romero so good.. it’s a biannual magazine published by grupoVilbo; Car men, 4-6 - 08172 Sant Cugat del Valles . Barcelona. Spain - tel. 0034-935902666 www.vilbo.com. We cur rently publish three magazines , leading in their respective sector s: ‘Dulcypas’, aimed at pastr y professionals; ‘Saber y Sabor’, aimed at professionals of the cater ing, restaurant and hotel industr y; and ‘Ar te Heladero’, aimed at professionals of the ice cream and horchata industr y. We edit the four most impor tant and visited Inter net theme websites in Spanish: pasteler ia.com; panader ia.com; helader ia.com and e-restauracion.com. This magazine has been pr inted using 100% TCF paper

Price: 20 euros

194

www.sogoodmagazine .com


So Good..Magazine #2  

'so good' is a biannual publication in english aimed at professionals of sweet and savory pastry, the chocolate and ice cream industry, as w...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you