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+StL

GROW I AN U NG RB MOSA AN IC

TLS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE + OBJECT TERRITORIES + [dhd] DEREK HOEFERLIN DESIGN + KRISTIN FLEISCHMANN BREWER + BRYAN CAVE LLP + AMANDA COLÓN-SMITH + ECONSULT SOLUTIONS + eDESIGN DYNAMICS + EDSI + JEREMY GOSS + LANGAN + JAMES LIMA PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT + SAL MARTINEZ + PRESERVATION RESEARCH OFFICE + PROJECT CONTROLS GROUP + PROSPERITY LABS + JASON PURNELL + RAMBOLL + LINDA SAMUELS + PAOLA AGUIRRE SERRANO + SILMAN + TERRA TECHNOLOGIES

1


TLS Landscape Architecture 1015 Camelia Street Berkeley, CA 94710 www.tlslandarch.com OBJECT TERRITORIES 49 Withers Street, 3rd Floor Brooklyn, NY 11211 www.object-territories.com [dhd] Derek Hoeferlin Design 1807 Park 270 Drive Suite 450 St. Louis, MO 63146

April 04, 2018 Great Rivers Greenway 6178 Delmar Blvd St. Louis, MO 63112 Re: Chouteau Greenway Design Competition Dear Project Partners, Jury Members, and Competition Managers: We are pleased to submit our Exhibit Boards and Design Report for the Chouteau Greenway Design Competition. From the outset, we assembled a team with strong design abilities, a desire for true public engagement, and robust technical skills for this competition. As you will see in the report, we have added several new members to the team with expertise in areas such as equitable development, local neighborhood representation, urban health issues, and food insecure areas. At the same time, we have attempted to further diversify our team with new additions. Importantly, a good portion of our team either lives in St. Louis or is from the area which has truly given the work extra meaning. Throughout the competition we have adhered to the Competition Regulations as set out in the Competition Manual and subsequent memoranda issued by the Competition Managers. We value the input provided by the Community Advisory Committee, The Resource Group, and the Technical Advisory Group, taking the diverse comments into consideration when developing this design proposal. This project really has the potential to catalyze positive development along the Chouteau Greenway Corridor between Washington University and the soon to be completed CityArchRiver project on the riverfront. A robust band of revitalized under-utilized urban space can also reach north and south to provide a stimulating effect on adjoining neighborhoods in North City and South City. We firmly believe that economic growth and equitable development must go hand in hand to make the region strong and competitive. Our proposal outlines an ambitious, yet implementable vision for reframing the St. Louis we know. Yet, this design proposal is only the starting point. If selected, we will eagerly engage with the various stakeholders, the Project Partners, local agencies, and, most importantly, the community to refine the design. In the end, this project is for the residents of St. Louis. Please do not hesitate to contact Marcus Carter at 347-526-1050 or marcus.carter@object-territories.com with any questions or response to the documents. Yours Sincerely,

Tom Leader Marcus Carter Derek Hoeferlin Principal Partner Principal TLS Landscape Architecture OBJECT TERRITORIES [dhd] Derek Hoeferlin Design


ST. LOUIS: A PREAMBLE + 1849

+ 1849

+ 1874

+ 1874

+ 1849

+ 1849

+ 1876

+ 1876 1993 +

Chouteau’s Pond drained

Cholera epidemic

ULATION

POPULATION

00,000

+ 1804

Louisiana Purchase

1,000,000 + 1789

Tower Grove Park opens

Louisiana Purchase

+ 1789

Tower Grove Park opens

Great Flood Forest Park opens

Forest Park opens

+ 1851

+ 1818

+ 1877

+ 1818

+ 1853

+ 1853

+ 1821

+ 1853

+ 1853

Missouri admitted as a slave state Missouri admitted as a slave state Streetcars begin running

+ 1780

+ 1780

Battle of St. Louis

+ 1954

+ 1956

+ +1972 1956

+ 1928

+ 1928

+ 1904

+ 1904

+ 1929

+ 1929 + 1947

St. Louis Zoo opens

+ 1892

+ 1876

+ 1857

+ 1861

+ 1894

Union Station opens

+ 1917

+ 1764

ST. LOUIS WAS FOUNDED

+ 1941

+ 2000

+ 2000

+ 1993

+ 1963

+ 1964

+ 1941

+ 1908

+ 1933

++ 1933 1949

Fairground Park opens Nut Pickers Strike

+ 1917

+ 1896

+ 1917

1993 ++ 2009

+ 1964

+ 1942

+ 1968

+ 1968

+ 2017

ST.

First female mayor of St. Louis First elected. female mayor o

+ 2001

+ 1965

+ 2001

+ 1965

+ 1935

+ 2018 + 2014 + 2002

+ 1957

+ 1959

+ 1959

New city charter rejected

+ 1983

City Arch Riv

+ 2014

Ferguson Protest Cortext founded

Cortext founded

+ 1957

+ 2018

City Arch River opens

+ 2002

Federal Government authorizesFederal Jefferson Government authorizes Jefferson National Expansion Memorial National Expansion Memorial

ST. LOUIS WAS FOUNDED

Citygarden opens

ST. LOUIS COUNTY + 2017

Fairground Park MLKRiot march from Arch to ForestMLK Parkmarch from Arch to Forest Park Great Rivers Greenway District Great incorporated Rivers Greenway District incorporated

+ 1942

+ 1876

+ 2009

Metrolink opens Citygarden opens

Completion Completion of the Gateway Arch Laboropens march Tandy Park to Carter Labor march Tandy Park to Carter of the Gateway Arch MacArthur Bridge Carburator Carburator

+ 1935

St. Louis - East St. Louis tornado St. Louis - East St. Louis tornado

+ 1949

Nut Pickers Strike Fairground Park Riot

+ 1764

400,000

+ 1972

Bosnian refugees begin to settle Bosnian refugees begin to settle Pruitt-Igoe Pruitt-Igoe demolition completed begins (1972-1977) Pruitt-Igoe demolition begins (1972-1977)

+ 1947 + 1963

St. Louis secedes from St. LouisSt. County Louis secedes from St. Louis County

0,000

+ 1990

Washington Ave Loft District Washington Ave Loft District

East St. Louis Massacre Riverfront land clearance begins Riverfront land clearance Percy begins Green and Richard DaleyPercy scale Green the Arch and Richard Daley scale the Arch

Union Station opens MacArthur Bridge opens

+ 1896

+ 1990

Fox Theater Comprehensive opens Plan adopted Comprehensive Jefferson Bank Plan &adopted Trust Co protest Jefferson Bank & Trust CoMetrolink protest opens

Fox Theater opens

+ 1917

+ 1908

+ 1894

Missouri secedes from United States Missouri secedes from United States

+ 1876

+ 1954

Wainwright Building completedWainwright Building completed East St. Louis Massacre

+ 1876

+ 1861

Battle of St. Louis

+ 1927

+ 1904

+ 1892

Harris-Stowe State University was Harris-Stowe founded. State University was founded.

600,000

+ 1927

+ 1904 1993 +

Streetcars begin running Budweiser introduced Carl Conrad Budweiser & CoT introduced Carl Conrad Fairground & CoT Park opens

+ 1857

0,000

+ 1901

World’sGreat Fair &Flood Summer Olympics World’s Fair & SummerSt. Olympics Louis American begins publication St. Louis American begins publication Pruitt-Igoe completed

+ 1877

Washington University was founded Washington University was founded Saint Louis University was founded Saintas Louis SaintUniversity Louis Academy was founded as Saint Louis Academy

800,000

+ 1901

Eades Bridge completed Scott Joplin in St. Louis (1901-1907) Scott Joplin in St. Louis (1901-1907) Financing for Spirit of St. Louis Financing flight for Spirit of St. LouisMetropolitan flight Sewer District created Metropolitan Sewer District created

Lucas Place, St. Louis; first private Lucas neighborhood Place, St. Louis; first privateSt. neighborhood Louis Great Railroad & General St. Louis StrikeGreat St. Railroad Louis & Zoo General opensStrike

+ 1821

0,000

Cholera epidemic

+ 1851

+ 1804

Chouteau’s Pond drained Eades Bridge completed

Ferguson Protest

+ 1983

New city charter St. rejected Louis Student Transfer Program St. Louis (1983-2019) Student Transfer Program (1983-2019)

Mill Creek Valley demolitiion begins Mill Creek Valley demolitiion begins

ST. LOUIS CITY 200,000

+ 1880 + 1880 ST. LOUIS COUNTY: 31,888 ST. LOUIS COUNTY: 31,888

In and around Forest Park, the Metropolitan Zoological Park and Museum District funds a variety of celebrated cultural destinations for the region: the Missouri Botanical Gardens (1859), the St. Louis Art Museum (1904), the St. Louis Zoo (1904), the Missouri History Museum (1913), The St. Louis Science Center (1963). Also, in the park, the Municipal Opera (The Muny, 1917) and the Jewel Box-St. Louis Floral Conservancy (1937) are important amenities. Forest Park

consolidates many of these amenities, yet they remain difficult to reach except by car. The city and county have an impressive number of parks, some of significant size with various recreational facilities and many other smaller neighborhood parks. Through a connected system, one can envision park matrix whereby the sum is greater than the whole, tying these parks together in a meaningful way for those walking, running, or biking. Residents often cite Forest Park as the crown jewel, but in the same breath, comment that it is difficult to reach. A robust greenway network will more easily funnel people from surrounding neighborhoods near and far, offering an alternate means to reach these destinations. A family in North City could take their bikes on a day trip to the zoo and a picnic in Forest Park. A young couple residing in the Grove will run the loops as they train for their first marathon race. The region benefits from several higher education institutions, many in the project area such as Washington University, Wash U Med Center, St. Louis University, SLU Med Center, and Harris-Stowe State University, and SLU Law School. They are major employers in the region but also bring residential life to the area with their student populations. To retain talent, these institutions will benefit from improved adjoining

neighborhoods and multi-modal transportation options. For example, the greenway will enable a Washington University student to bike from the Danforth campus to the Botanical Garden to research plant species for a project. A St. Louis University student will find new routes between the main campus and the south campus. A Harris-Stowe student will easily connect to the refurbished Arch grounds and the Mississippi Greenway.

Iraq War (2003-2011)

+ 2003

Iraq War (2003-2011)

Federal Highway Act

+ 1965

in underutilized areas between BJC and Vandeventer Avenue. The new MetroLink stop and greenway access will help cement this as a vital emerging economic hub in the region. Transit oriented development and greenway connections can help do the same in other underutilized areas like around Union Station and Chouteau’s Landing.

Grand Arts District with historic facilities like the Fox Theatre (1929) and Powell Symphony Hall (1925) along with newer additions like the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (2001) and the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (1980, 2004), can contribute as an anchor to a blossoming arts scene. Complementary art programs and installations – formal and informal – can infect the greenway both in concentrated zones and along the greenway.

St. Louis’ two major professional sports teams serve as major regional attractions drawing fans in from surrounding counties. Busch Stadium, home of the Cardinals, and the Blues’ Scott Trade Center Arena reside within the greenway corridor and will continue to be anchors for surrounding investment. Ballpark Village is a recent example with entertainment programs that will soon add residential program to the mix. At the same time, in linking these to other amenities via the greenway, visitors from the counties can be encouraged to linger longer in the city before or after events.

Employment centers – the BJC hospital complex, civic institutions, and corporate offices – need bolstering as they compete with Clayton and office parks in St. Louis County as well as with other cities. The Cortex technology district is a recent success story that continues to grow and evolve, filling

The ingredients already exist. Programmatic relationships, pooled resources, neighborhood investment, and improved physical connections will only continue to amplify these assets creating complimentary contrasting synergies between different areas.

2020

2010

2020

2000

2010

1990

Vietnam War (1965-1973)

2000

Vietnam Brown v.War Board (1965-1973) of Ed.

1980

++ 1965 1954

1990

1930

1940

1920

1930

1900

1910

1890

1900

1880

1890

1850

1860

1840

1850

1830

1840

1820

1830

1810

1820

1800

1810

1790

1800

1780

1790

1770

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1760

1770

St. Louis is home to world class institutions, many reaching back to the city’s early formative years when St. Louis was one of the largest cities in the United States and flush with commerce facilitated by the rivers and railroad. Today, the city and county continue to benefit from these early investments in rich cultural assets. Many of the institutions reside within architecturally significant structures from the early 20th Century or earlier. Though many of these assets are located within the central east-west corridor of the city, they remain disconnected due under-development of areas in between, relegating them as islands easiest reached by car. The +StL Greenway project, coupled with improved multimodal connectivity, will play a significant role in closing the gaps between and amplifying the existing assets.

Brown v. Board of Ed.

1st Gulf War (1990-1991)

+ 1956

Federal Highway Act

+ 1954

+ 1990

+ 2003

Federal Housing Act

+ 1956

+ 1870

+ 1990

Civil Rights Act 1st Gulf War (1990-1991)

+ 1954

Nineteenth Amendment: Women’s Nineteenth Right toAmendment: Vote Women’s Right Federal to Vote Housing Act

+ 1868

+ 1964

Korean Civil Rights War (1950-1953) Act

+ 1954

Fifteenth Amendment: African-American Fifteenth Amendment: Men Right toAfrican-American Vote Men Right to Vote

Declaration of Independence Declaration of Independence

1760

+ 1920

Fourteenth Amendment: Citizenship Fourteenth to Former Amendment: Slaves Citizenship to Former Slaves Dred Scott v. Sandford

+ 1870

++1950 1964

World Korean War War II (1939-1945) (1950-1953)

1950

+ 1868

+ 1846

1870

+ 1776

Dred Scott v. Sandford

1880

+ 1776

+ 1846

1860

+ 1775

American Revolution (1775-1783) American Revolution (1775-1783)

1870

+ 1775

+ 1939 + 1950

1970

+ 1920

Thirteenth Amendment: AbolishThirteenth Slavery Amendment: Abolish Slavery

+ 1939

World War I World (1914-1918) War II (1939-1945)

1980

+ 1865

+ 1914

1960

+ 1865

World War I (1914-1918)

1960

+ 1914

1970

+ 1861

American Civil War (1861-1865)American Civil War (1861-1865)

1940

+ 1861

1950

+ 1787

The Constitution was Written The Constitution was Written

1910

+ 1787

1920

0,000

ST.


CONTENTS

Letter of Submittal Concept

1

Response to Community and Design Goals

27

Exhibit Boards

66

Implementation Strategies

68

Program Recommendations

78

Team Composition

96

Appendix

01 Multimodal Connections 02 Structural Analysis 03 Hydrology, Ecology, and Environmental Design


+ StL: GROWING AN URBAN MOSAIC Infrastructure is a part of the new public realm. The challenges facing cities and urbanized regions in the twenty-first century are complex and contested but far from abstract—impacting us as individuals, as communities, as societies. Efforts to improve our urban environment, to build a more just and healthy city, to extend the public realm must be strategic but also tactical. The outcomes of these efforts must be multifunctional, inclusive, and resilient. A contradiction is facing the urban space situated between Forest Park and the Mississippi River at the proposed Greenway. Running east-west in a shallow valley at the center of the city: A 20th century infrastructure connects the city to its region and to the nation via I-64, the freight rail, and Amtrak rail. At the same time, this infrastructure forms a dominant physical and psychological barrier between the Central West End, Midtown, Downtown, and North City and neighborhoods to the South. This irregular condition a thickened band of movement and industry - sliced into the gridiron of St. Louis can now only be crossed at major arteries. Only a radical re-conception of this infrastructural band can bridge the north-south divide and become the primary artery of the Greenways system. A bold investment in public space is required to unite divisions, remediate industry, add new amenities, incentivize development, and provide alternate means of movement in a multi-modal city.

+StL proposes a network of public routes and strategic investments

throughout the city as a landscaped system both distinct from and cohabit-able with the existing street network. Our proposal is designed to amplify St. Louis’s existing assets, to build on the unique projects underway in the city, and to empower its people. Working as a diverse, locally engaged and internationally experienced team, we propose concrete measures to address challenges of equity, public health, and mobility that the city is facing. To do this, we propose a layered strategy of three primary components: Economic Assets, Ecological Loops, and Equitable Extensions : we call them the three E’s. Combined, these 3 E’s will create opportunities for distributed economic development, for landscapes that are beautiful but hard-working, for equitable access to jobs, institutions, and public space.

+

+ +

+

+

is about joining; is about building up; is about inclusion; is about positivity. StL proposes to visibly and physically join North and South at the central East West corridor. Our team firmly believes that the greenway must extend at least as far North and South as it does East and West. This figure builds on connectivity and investment planning already underway by local partners, but also provides an multidimensional armature for future projects by Great Rivers Greenway, Trailnet, and others to plug into to further connect the project to the communities of St. Louis and beyond. Through this armature we intend to grow a new urban mosaic for St. Louis, built on unique cultural identities, histories revealed, shared ambitions, and a new connective and productive greenway for St. Louis.

+StL


THREE E’S ECOLOGY, EQUITY, ECONOMY

FAIRGROUND PARK

NORTH CITY FOOD HUB

DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

OASIS RESIDENTIAL MCCB Inc CARE FACILITY OASIS RESIDENTIAL MISSION: CARE FACILITY ST LOUIS

RESPOND INC GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MAT SOCIAL MINISTRY CENTER

FOREST PARK (FOREST PARK FOREVER)

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

NGA

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT

CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER

THE SPOT YOUTH CENER

CORTEX

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY

FOUNDRY (LAWRENCE GROUP) ARMORY (GREEN STREET ST. LOUIS)

YOUTH IN NEED

UNION STATION

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT. CITY OF ST. LOUIS

CASA DE SALUD

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

THE SOCIAL AFFAIRS BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE PETER&PAUL COMMUNITY SERVICES

THE LUMINARY GRAVOIS PLAZA

GRAVOIS PARK

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

1 ECOLOGICAL LOOPS

2

2 EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS

3 ECONOMIC ASSETS

INTERSECT ARTS

ST ALEXIUS HOSPITAL

MARQUETTE PARK

JEFFERSON NATIONAL EXPANSION & GATEWAY ARCH

BUSCH STADIUM

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER


1

2

3

ECOLOGICAL LOOPS

EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS

ECONOMIC ASSETS

The first “E” establishes a series of performative “Ecological Loops” that connects all four major parks in St. Louis. The loops allow +StL Greenway users to choose their own adventure. Following the lines on the loops, one can choose a fast commuter route, a leisurely stroll through nature, a quiet neighborhood walk, an encounter with art, industry, or cultural heritage, or a combination of all of the above experiences. The loops allow linear, circular, figure eight, or circuitous pathways that amplify and create new experiences in the city while constantly opening up to the greater urban fabric. While all loops are located primarily on quieter secondary routes for cyclists, various segments of the loops offer different experiences.

The second “E” expands the Ecological Loops with three primary “Equitable Extensions”. The +StL Greenway must bridge not only the North-South Divide, but also make an effort to cross the river to East St. Louis. A city that works together and bridges its divisions will create a stronger more robust city that more and more people will believe in, invest in, and live in. The +StL Greenway extends into some of the most financially, infrastructurally, and socially challenged neighborhoods in St. Louis. In so doing, we create a Greenway that invites and welcomes a multitude of users to the city, its jobs, affordable housing, culture, and educational institutions - a new Greenway that not only provides safety and security, but accessibility and opportunity.

The third “E” builds on existing “Economic Assets.” Investment capital follows talent. And talent increasingly is following place - quality of life places - that embrace diversity and inclusion, a mix of uses, and offer places for connection and fun. Therefore, parks, institutions, cultural venues, social facilities, and small, medium, and large businesses are all considered “Economic Assets.”

The East-West urban route from the Gateway Arch at Chestnut and Market aligns on axis with Laclede , a quiet and nearly pedestrianized street that runs through heart of St Louis’ premier educational institutions and districts. The West-East route from Forest Park at Clayton Avenue and the MetroLink line along the Union Pacific Railyard to Chouteau’s Landing allows a new experience completely unique to St. Louis integrating ecology, woodlands, streams, and wetland ecologies with St. Louis’ industrial railroad.

The extensions to the North along Newstead and to the South along Compton will grow the neighborhoods such as The Ville, Penrose, and O’Fallon in the North and Gravois Park, Tower Grove South, and Dutchtown in the South. Improving bus transit frequency and reliability, sidewalks, roads, and street lighting, and introducing protected vegetated bike lanes will have a major impact on the quality of life and amplify ongoing efforts and investment in these neighborhoods.

The North-South loops connect Fairground Park, Tower Grove Park, the Missouri Botanical Garden, and the neighborhoods in between them with the central East-West Greenway providing vital neighborhood access and habitat corridors for improved environmental health and biodiversity. All of the Ecological Loops bundle water infrastructure in the form of temporal rain gardens, streams, and wetlands while creating new and varied habitats for people, flora, and fauna.

Many plans have been made to connect across the Mississippi River. This project has the opportunity to finally bridge this long standing divide between Missouri and Illinois. Utilizing existing bridge infrastructure by building a lightweight bicycle pathway on the MacArthur Bridge and pedestrianizing the rarely used Eads Bridge would bring more equitable opportunities for East St. Louis and St. Louis residents alike.

From Washington University and Forest Park, through Cortex, Grand Center, Saint Louis University and Harris-Stowe University, and Downtown, the Greenway will connect, strengthen, and build from St. Louis’ existing assets that are either strong or under-performing in their capacity to catalyze economic growth due an underwhelming public realm - and provide a framework to expand economic opportunities throughout the city. Despite some systemic challenges, connecting these assets with a network of high-quality Greenway infrastructure can leverage placemaking as a key component of an economic development strategy. Strategically building on proximity to transit, parks, and culture is a powerful and proven strategy for expanding economic opportunity. Enhancing access to these assets with a new, well-programmed greenway network can support the real estate market of their surrounding areas and attract new residents, companies, and investment as proven by research from around the country. This network can also help to fill voids in the existing fabric by creating a framework for where public and private investment should be directed.

3


+StL: ST. LOUIS AMPLIFIED Combined, the three “E’s” of the +StL Greenway will build from strength, diversify, and amplify existing assets with new experiences embedded in St. Louisian life. FAIRGROUND PARK

The +StL Greenway will be a Cultureway, where everything about the DNA of the Greenway relates to diverse and inclusive expressions of arts and culture, becoming a beloved place in the city for its many diverse arts and cultural groups, individuals, and the broader creative community to work, present, delight, and inspire all visitors to visit the Greenway.

NORTH CITY FOOD HUB

DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

OASIS RESIDENTIAL MCCB Inc CARE FACILITY OASIS RESIDENTIAL MISSION: CARE FACILITY ST LOUIS

RESPOND INC GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MAT SOCIAL MINISTRY CENTER

The Greenway will serve to support the critical value of inclusive growth. Enhancing connections throughout the city can create new access to economic opportunities by creating safe routes to tens of thousands of jobs from neighborhoods with limited auto ownership and transit access. The most successful, dynamic urban districts have an eclectic mix of businesses, residents, and institutions that promote vibrancy throughout the day. Greenway networks and adjacent spaces can provide spaces for intentionally curated programming that supports a greater diversity of uses and activities — increasing safety, supporting businesses, and attracting new investment in a reinforcing cycle. The +StL Greenway will create a framework for focusing efforts to build on St. Louis’ existing strengths through high quality placemaking, complete streets, ecological growth, infrastructural integration, cultural experience and improved quality of life.

CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER FOREST PARK (FOREST PARK FOREVER)

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

NGA

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT THE SPOT YOUTH CENTER

CORTEX

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY

FOUNDRY (LAWRENCE GROUP) ARMORY (GREEN STREET ST. LOUIS)

YOUTH IN NEED

UNION STATION

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT. CITY OF ST. LOUIS

CASA DE SALUD

JEFFERSON NATIONAL EXPANSION & GATEWAY ARCH

BUSCH STADIUM

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

THE SOCIAL AFFAIRS BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE PETER&PAUL COMMUNITY SERVICES

THE LUMINARY GRAVOIS PLAZA

GRAVOIS PARK

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

INTERSECT ARTS

ST ALEXIUS HOSPITAL

MARQUETTE PARK

The North/South and East/West Loop, the critical first Extensions, and the Assets upon which the systems is built here combine. +StL: a figure of positivity for the city to come.

4


FAIRGROUND PARK

NORTH CITY FOOD HUB

OASIS RESIDENTIAL CARE FACILITY

DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

MCCB INC OASIS RESIDENTIAL CARE FACILITY

MISSION: ST LOUIS

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

GRIOT MUSEUM OF BLACK HISTORY

NATIONAL GEOSPATIAL AGENCY

FOREST PARK DEBALIVIERE METROLINK STATION

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

THE TRESTLE

MAT SOCIAL MINISTRY CENTER CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER PULITZER ARTS FOUNDATION GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT

THE SPOT YOUTH CENTER

FOREST PARK

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY CORTEX METROLINK STATION

CWE METROLINK STATION

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDRY (LAWRENCE GROUP)

CORTEX

CONVENTION CENTER METROLINK STATION

ARMORY (GREEN STREET ST. LOUIS) YOUTH IN NEED 8TH & PINE METROLINK STATION

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

GRAND METROLINK STATION PROSPECT YARDS

UNION STATION

ST LOUIS AMTRAK STATION

EAST RIVERFRONT METROLINK STATION

WAINWRIGHT BUILDING

SCOTT TRADE CENTER CIVIC CENTER METROLINK STATION

CASA DE SALUD

ARCH LACLEDES LANDING METROLINK STATION

CITY OF ST. LOUIS STADIUM METROLINK STATION

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT.

BUSCH STADIUM

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

GATEWAY ARCH NATIONAL PARK MALCOM W. MARTIN MEMORIAL PARK

NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

LAFAYETTE PARK

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER THE SOCIAL AFFAIR

BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE

5 PETER & PAUL COMMUNITY SERVICES


1. FUNDAMENTAL EAST WEST ECOLOGICAL LOOPS

LED

E

KET

IVAN

STN U

MAR

T

GATEWAY ARCH NATIONAL PARK

LEO

NOR

UN I ON P ACIFIC / TRRA / M ETRO

CHE

ULL

COM P

CLAYTON

LAC

K. S

FOUNDRY

KER

RO

TUC

MET

21 ST

CLAYTON

TON

FOREST PARK

ING

WY D OWN

SPR

BIG BE

ND

FORSYTH

6


EAST - WEST CONNECTIONS RE-IMAGINING AN INFRASTRUCTURAL VOID Between Kingshighway and Vandeventer, the greenway will include an art park under the freeway, pass by the grain silos leading into Cortex, and eventually snake through he medical campus to cross a new pedestrian bridge into Forest Park at Children’s Place. Clayton Road will remain as a gradeseparated crossing for automobiles, bike, and pedestrians at Kingshighway, serving as a key entrance into Forest Park. From North Ewing Avenue heading west, Laclede Avenue will provide a greenway route through Harris Stowe State University and Saint Louis University, connecting their student populations to the greater area greenway network. West of SLU, the route will pass through residential streets of the Central West End. Several parts of this section are already pedestrianized, and others are relatively free of development obstacles, so we see this as an early intervention. At Kingshighway, an at-grade crossing, with new traffic calming measures, will connect to the northeast corner of Forest Park. At the Gateway Mall, connecting existing islands of green space into a more cohesive linear park between Memorial Drive and

22nd Street should be an important priority in revitalization efforts downtown. Bookended by the redevelopment of historic Union Station and the newly renovated Arch grounds, the Mall contains many civic assets such as City Hall, the Municipal Courts, Circuit Courts, the Opera House, the Soldier’s Memorial Military Museum, and the Old Courthouse. The Mall should remain a space of civic presence, that will capitalize on recent investments at City Garden, Kiener Plaza and the new Gateway Arch Park. Rather than treating the rail yard valley as “back” of St. Louis, we propose making it a new “front” for engagement and experience. In contrast to the Mall’s formality,a prairie and wetland is located at the base of the local watershed between MetroLink and Amtrak alignments. The low-lying landscape relieves storm-water infrastructure and offsets surges by diverting water into interconnected basins. This biologically productive corridor anchors the southern end of the greenway and provides opportunities for environmental education and unique recreational programs for emerging Ballpark and Chouteau’s Landing neighborhoods.

A view along the greenway at night next to the new Spring Street Connector

ECOLOGY OF THE SHALLOW VALLEY The East/West loops run through a variety of physical conditions that affect its ecological potential. In the urbanized portions near the BJC hospital, we propose a tree line and planting strip at a minimum as a way of articulating the bike and pedestrian way, but also as a minimum responsibility to provide shade for users, enough un-compacted soil to promote healthy plant growth and a localized water filtration/ storage. In many areas, development planning is underway, and in these areas, the greenway provides an anchor for separately developed open spaces and mobility plans to ‘plug-in’ to. Even in the relatively robust 50’ to 60’ available in existing corridors and easements, the greenway can hold bike and walking lanes, continuous tree cover, and a linear water collection and filtration feature that doubles as a safety buffer preventing unsafe access to the trains. The lands between and around the MetroLink and the Amtrak provide opportunities to extend the visual and amenity impact of the designed greenway. Our proposal suggest finding ways to incentivize the railway companies to allot 20% of their non-track land area to be regraded and seeded with native grassland species to serve as a native plant bio-bank and to increase ecological services such as water infiltration and reduced local heat gain.

PROPOSED

EXISTING

PROPOSED

EXISTING

Typical sections along the greenway south of the Central West End, where a narrow bike and pedestrian trail system is part of a larger landscape reclamation project focused on reducing the vast amounts of impervious surface around the rail-yards and corporate campuses.

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2. NORTH / SOUTH CONNECTIONS ECOLOGICAL LOOPS + EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS

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NORTH - SOUTH CONNECTIONS CONNECTING PARKS NORTH AND SOUTH

Fairground Park with new amenities and upgrades related to the greenway

We see branches into north city and south city as equal in importance to and complementary to the obvious eastwest connection between the Arch and Forest Park. In fact, the first of the Community Goals is a straightforward request for meaningful north and south connections of equal importance to the east-west route. This coincides with Great Rivers Greenway’s ambition to create “a dynamic network of connecting rivers, parks and communities, strengthening the social, economic and environmental well-being of our region.” While significant investment has been made in St. Louis County and St. Charles County, this project provides GRG with an opportunity to put a real, meaningful mark where people reside in the city.

Fairground Park and Tower Grove Park will serve as anchors of a north-south loop forming the vertical leg of the +. Though unequal in funding and maintenance, each park exists as an important public space asset to several neighborhoods. Vandeventer Avenue and North Spring Avenue jogging to North Grand Boulevard connect Fairground Park to the central east-west corridor. Bounded by the neighborhoods of Fairground, O’Fallon, Greater Ville, and Vandeventer, Fairground Park was once the site of the city’s fairground and the original zoo and today contains a swimming pool, sports fields, a pond, and recreation areas. St. Louis University, Grand Center Arts District and a variety of social/community facilities will be connected by the northern loop.

The notion of the central corridor is generally articulated from a particular point of view focused on existing bundling of freeway, light rail, and freight rail infrastructure prioritizing east-west movement coupled with a series of institutional and civic entities. The aggregation of these entities have formed an equatorial line between primarily residential neighborhoods to the north and south. Historically, the streetcar infrastructure of the city did not prioritize a particular direction, instead forming a dense matrix of both east-west and north-south running lines. The city’s geography is taller than wider so most residents in the city often have to travel along the longer axis to get to jobs and amenities strung along the minor axis. Extensions into neighborhoods where people live is critical to invite city residents to the central east-west corridor.

Tower Grove Park, gifted by Henry Shaw in 1868, adjoins the neighborhoods of Shaw, Southwest Garden, Tower Grove South, and Tower Grove East. South Spring Avenue to 39th Street and Vandeventer Avenue to Tower Grove Avenue provide connection between Tower Grove Park and the eastwest corridor. A privately funded park, it is considered an important example of 19th Century Victorian park design. Along Tower Grove Avenue, the southern loop also borders the Missouri Botanical Garden, one of the oldest and most important botanical gardens in the world and important cultural destination. St. Louis University/SSM Medical Center, Compton Hill Reservoir Park with its spectacular water tower, the International Institute and several social/community services lie on or near the southern loop.

ECOLOGY OF NORTH + SOUTH LOOPS Northward extensions of the greenway include improved physical conditions that create a more pleasant public realm for pedestrians and cyclists while increasing the performative capacity of the street itself. A continuous tree canopy at the sidewalk and new buffer planting strips between traffic and cycling lanes filter and capture runoff, reduce summer heat gain and break winter winds, and generally contribute to increased biodiversity in the streetscape and adjacent open space network. While neighborhood investment should be prioritized to rebuilding housing and strengthening commercial and community assets, there are opportunities along the greenway extensions to link culturally and historically valuable cultural assets. Around and between these preserved areas, greenway enhancements might expand to include adjacent sites where native woodlands and prairie habitats may be reintroduced to provide additional ecosystem services.

PROPOSED

EXISTING

PROPOSED

EXISTING Fairground Park

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W OR FL

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EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS

PROMOTING ACCESS TO OPEN SPACE, THE ARTS, COMMUNITY, AND HEALTHY LIVING THROUGH GREENWAY EXTENSIONS Several key extensions to the + diagram can link more parks into the greenway network while providing equitable extensions into neighborhoods the most in need of investment. On the north side, O’Fallon Park, bordering the neighborhoods of North Riverfront, Penrose, Near North Riverfront, O’Fallon, and College Hill, is within easy reach of Fairground Park. This park is also near the riverfront and could provide a link to the Mississippi Greenway. Northern neighborhoods are home to the other two remaining water towers: the Bissell and Grand Water Towers, both important heritage landmarks. A number of events and happenings already occur in North St. Louis. From street dinners to festivals, these events, happenings, and neighborhood communities would benefit from further investments in street infrastructure. Protected vegetated bike lanes, street lighting, sidewalk and road repairs would make a major difference in improving the quality of life in North St. Louis. Bike lanes would increase mobility of residents and accessibility to the various parts of the +StL Greenway and jobs in the central corridor.

A block party along a section of N. Vandeventer Avenue in North St. Louis.

Southern extensions from Tower Grove Park down Gustine Avenue and down Compton Avenue/Louisiana Avenue will bring the greenway into the Gravois Park and Dutchtown neighborhoods. This extended loop will encapsulate Compton Hill Reservoir Park and adjoin Gravois Park and Marquette Park. Future extensions south of Meramec can link to Carondelet Park and existing spurs of River Des Peres Greenway. These improvements North and South of the central East West corridor will go a long way to making all people feel invited and welcome in the Greenway and have a powerful impact on the city and its accessibility. The addition of a pedestrian and bikeway deck on the MacArthur Bridge could extend the east-west axis across the river to Illinois. This would connect the Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park with its postcard views of St. Louis from the Mississippi River Overlook. North of the Arch, the Eads Bridge is extremely underutilized Eads Bridge since most commuters make use of the Martin Luther King Bridge immediately to the north due to freeway connections. One or two of the four lanes of the Eads Bridge could be converted into a bicycle and pedestrian track to return the eastern loop to St. Louis.

Marquette Park with new outdoor picnic and performance spaces and renovated entrances

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+ FOREST PARK / WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY GATEWAY FORSYTH BOULEVARD

+ INFORMAL ART & CULTURE I-64/HWY 40 UNDERPASS AT VANDEVENTER

+ AMPLIFYING COMMUNITY AND CULTURE CORTEX & GRAIN SILO PARK

+ FOREST PARK CROSSING LACLEDE AT KINGSHIGHWAY

LACLEDE AVENUE

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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY & HARRIS STOWE UNIVERSITY

CONNECTIONS + CROSSINGS

+ CATALYZING DOWNTOWN THE GATEWAY MALL

+ CONNECTING THE MALL TO THE GATEWAY ARCH

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COMPTON AVE

21ST STREET

SPRING AVE

MARKET STREET

UNION PACIFIC RAIL LINE

MACARTHUR BR

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SOUTH COMPTON AVENUE

IDGE

+ PROSPECT YARDS OVERLOOK SPRING AVENUE

+ REVEALING HISTORY AND CULTURE

+ENGAGING THE MISSISSIPPI CHOUTEAU’S LANDING

COMPTON INTERCHANGE

+ PATHWAYS BETWEEN NATURE AND INDUSTRY SOUTH RAILYARD

+ RAILYARD BRIDGE 22ND STREET

+ DEVELOPING HABITATS AND HYDROLOGY PRAIRIE WETLAND AND BIRD PARK

1000’

+ MACARTHUR OVERLOOK CHOUTEAU’S LANDING

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SKINKER CROSSING A NEW ENTRANCE INTO THE PARK AT WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY Along the western border between the city and St. Louis County, Skinker Boulevard serves as a major north-south connector extending north to the Delmar Loop, Interstate 70 (after transitioning into Kienlen Avenue), and beyond and heading south (transitioning into McCausland Avenue) toward Interstate 44. Skinker serves as a primary feeder for automobile to both Washington University’s Danforth Campus and Forest Park yet remains a formidable obstacle for pedestrians and bicyclists trying to cross between the campus and park due to its width (7 lanes) and the velocity of traffic. Though visible markings of the at-grade the crossing at the Centennial Greenway along Forsyth Boulevard, this remains a challenging connection.

We propose to strengthen Forest Park’s connection to the Centennial Greenway and the campus by creating an underpass under Skinker Boulevard. This grade separated crossing will segregate automobiles from bicycles and pedestrians, providing a safer means of crossing the thoroughfare. Multipronged ramps will be graded to allow continuous travel on bicycle without the need to stop for crossing signals at grade or to dismount and carry bikes up and down steps. Located adjacent to Bixby Hall, generous steps will provide a spot for gathering and the underpass could be activated by a welcome center, café and art installations since this will be a primary portal into the park.

500’

An underpass between Forest Park and the Centennial Greenway would create a grade separated crossing segregating automobiles from bicycles and pedestrians. Three ramps are graded from different directions to allow continuous travel on a bicycle. Adjacent to Bixby Hall, a series of terraced steps form a gathering space while spaces under the road are activated by a visitor center, security booth, café, and sculpture.

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The pedestrian bridge at Children’s Place

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CHILDREN’S PLACE CROSSING AN ENTRY LANDSCAPE

The greenway here extends new public realm investments and strengthens multi-modal, equal access to the MetroLink. A new bridge at Children’s Place will carry pedestrians and bicyclists safely over Kingshighway into the park. Along the west side of the BJC hospital complex, Kingshighway is 9 lanes wide with a central planted median. Long crossing signal wait times and excessive speed of automobiles make crossing Kingshighway and unpleasant experience. Forest Park must be more than a visual amenity for patients and employees of the medical center. It should be a place for respite during lunch or family visits.

The Children’s Place crossing is an multi-path bridge that is both a spectacular overlook for Forest Park and a Canopy walk through the trees. The bridge gradually ramps up to an L-shaped overlook while the lower part of the bridge crosses Kingshighway and then begins gradually ramping down and switching back and forth between the trees and woodland habitats of Forest Park until it lands near the ice rink.

The bridge will allow immediate crossing to the west side of Kingshighway but also extends farther west into the park. Into the park, it meanders through the trees down the hill towards the Steinberg Rink. This bridge will also provide a route for visitors and commuters exiting Metrolink at the Central West End Stop to enter Forest Park. Deciduous, spreading street trees such as Chinese Elm (favored by the Missouri Botanical Garden) build an identity and a favorable micro-climate throughout the year.

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CHOUTEAU - CLAYTON CONNECTOR A NEW ENTRANCE INTO THE PARK AT THE MEDICAL CENTER

A SAFER CROSSING OVER I-64

The current underpass at Clayton as it slides under Kingshighway provides and important portal into the east side of Forest Park. Unfortunately, there is not enough width to accommodate multiple modes of movement in a safe manner and an awkward connection exists to the Chouteau Avenue pedestrian/bicycle bridge crossing Interstate 64. It is expected that Hudin Park will become a future site for the BJC medical complex which will put additional pressure on Clayton Road.

The current bridge connecting Forest Park to Chouteau Avenue is inadequately sized to allow safe bike-to-bike or bike-to-pedestrian passing. With the implementation of the greenway, continued densification of the BJC complex, improved reinvestment in neighborhoods south of the hospital, and a new portal at the southeast corner of Forest Park, this bridge requires replacement with a new one of sufficient capacity to allow safe passage across the highway. The north end will fork, one side heading into the underpass under Kingshighway, the other directing traffic toward Euclid and the Central West End MetroLink stop. The south landing connects to Chouteau Avenue and South Kingshighway.

Rather than attempting to squeeze bicyclists and pedestrians through the narrow portal that exists now at Clayton Road, we propose a new underpass immediately south of it that will allow these to be separated from the automobile traffic. This will also enable an easier connection to the existing or a new, wider bridge across Interstate 64 so that the southeast corner of the park becomes a primary entrance point feeding people in from areas south of the highway and railroad lines. A visitors center and cafĂŠ could be located at this portal.

The narrow bridge crossing I-64/Highway 40 to the growing Grove neighborhood should be replaced with a much more generous space for pedestrians and cyclists. As an underpass, the gateway can be a source of security and safety for the park and immediate vicinity. The underpass should cross beneath Kingshighway to allow for seamless gradual crossings safe for cyclists and wheelchair users alike.

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The Spring Avenue Connector crossing the railroad tracks between the Armory and Gratiot Street

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RE-LINKING SPRING AVENUE RECONNECTING SPRING AVENUE AND ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY At Spring Avenue, we see an opportunity to thread between the eastbound lower level and westbound upper deck of Interstate 64/Highway 40 with a pedestrian and bicycle link. The connector will continue as an elevated line along the two-block segment of Spring Street between I-64 and the railroad lines before bridging over to the bluff at the sound side of the tracks. A ramp down to street will provide another access route to the Grand MetroLink stop. This will establish a car-free north-south connector adjacent to Grand Boulevard which is difficult to navigate on bike or foot due to freeway access points. Saint Louis University is investing in a significant master plan that seeks to better connect its north and south campuses. The development zone is weighted south of the tracks but extends across to Laclede Avenue. The plan calls for an

Reconnecting Spring Street creates not only a pedestrian and bicycle route between St. Louis University’s North and South Campuses under and over I-64, but a spectacular overlook that celebrates the presence of the railyard with a view of the Gateway Arch beyond. The Spring Street bridge also allows the Greenway to extend South through the Shaw neighborhood to loop together all four parks with Tower Grove Park as its largest Southern anchor

expanded SLU/SSM medical center at Grand Boulevard and Chouteau Avenue, residential buildings, and space for offices, dining, and retail. The new link at Spring Street will be crucial to help close the spatial and psychological gap between campuses caused by the freeway and rail lines. Most immediately, the Spring Avenue Connector will link two new exciting mixed-use redevelopment projects within the SLU development area, located on opposite sides of the highway: City Foundry STL and the Armory District. Scheduled to come online in 2019, both developments will renovate historic buildings into contemporary use while preserving the architectural heritage of each project. These two developments will become important anchors for office, residential and entertainment uses in the area that will likely spur additional development on adjacent underutilized land.

500’ 21


View toward the trestle leading into City Foundry STL. Billboard structure appropriated as a bird perch and lookout tower.

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TRESTLE AT THE FOUNDRY CORTEX CAMPUS

GRAND ARTS EXTENSION

The greenway through the Cortex Innovation District is slender and direct, following the right-of-way on the North side of the MetroLink between City Foundry STL and the BJC Medical Center. Two other spurs bound Cortex: along Clayton Road between Vandeventer and Forest Park, and on Laclede to the north.

The space found under the Interstate 64/Highway 40 viaduct and behind Ikea near Vandeventer Avenue remains unutilized because it does not work as developable land. Density and economic pressure from developing Cortex to the west, Ikea, and the City Foundry STL, which will come online soon,, along with the greenway, will begin to activate this area.

As envisioned in the 2016 Planning Charrette Summary , the strategic vision aims to continue growth in Cortex and expand its physical footprint. As available sites fill in, the area will take the character of a campus or district. Greater density offers the possibility to shape public space. At the east end, a park will provide leisure space, the opportunity for performances, become an extension of the adjacent Art Park, and celebrate the industrial heritage of the silos.

Rather than shy away from the infrastructure that exists, a radical public space could emerge in this location. An Art Park complimenting the art and performance institutions to the north can programmatically tie the greenway at this CortexFoundry junction to the Grand Arts District. Temporary and permanent art installations can populate the park. Spaces for performance or events will activate the area.

Linking to an existing section of GRG’s path network and connecting a number of planned and built green spaces throughout the area, the greenway will strengthen the system’s overall hydrological and ecological functionality.

The silo, a still-functioning icon of the St. Louis’s 20th century economy will eventually anchor a gritty new arts and cultural center and public open space. The greenway here organizes circulation, directs storm-water, and carries program through a complex intersection of old infrastructure and a new pedestrian-oriented public landscape.

Eastern Eastern White White Pine Pine Pinus Pinus strobus strobus Areas under the Interstate 64 will becomes spaces for art and performance

RedRed Cedar Cedar Juniperus Juniperus virginiana virginiana

650’ 650’

Sugar Sugar Maple Maple AcerAcer saccharum saccharum

600’ 600’

Ginkgo Ginkgo Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba biloba

550’ 550’

Chinese Chinese ElmElm Ulmus Ulmus parvifolia parvifolia

500’ 500’

OSED ED

GNG

White White OakOak Quercus Quercus albaalba DUNCAN DUNCANINFILTRATION INFILTRATION AVEAVE MEADOW MEADOW 85’ 85’

TILTED TILTED LAWN LAWN 150’150’

HISTORIC HISTORIC SILO SILO STRUCTURE STRUCTURE height height 150’150’

UNDEVELOPED UNDEVELOPED LAND LAND A section through the silo shows the relationship between the new open space and the greenway as it follows the MetroLink.

EVENT EVENT LAWN LAWN SUNKEN METRO METRO SUNKEN LINK PATH PATH LINK 130’130’ NETWORK NETWORK UNDEVELOPED UNDEVELOPED LAND LAND

OPEN OPEN WOODLAND WOODLAND WITH WITH SUNKEN SUNKEN INFILTRATION CLAYTON CLAYTON CONIFEROUS CONIFEROUS I-64I-64 INFILTRATION AMPHITHEATER AMPHITHEATER BUFFER BUFFER MEADOW MEADOW AVEAVE GREENWAYPLANTING PLANTING 60’ 60’ GREENWAY 230’230’ 75’ 75’ VACANT VACANT LOTLOT

HIGHWAY HIGHWAY SHOULDER SHOULDER

Bald Bald Cypress Cypress Taxodium Taxodium distichum distichum

River River Birch Birch Betula Betula nigra nigra

Streamside Streamside wetland wetland mixmix

Include Include sedges, sedges, rushes, rushes, irises, irises, and and swamp swamp milkweed milkweed

Infiltration Infiltration Planting Planting Strip Strip

500’ 23


A revitalized Gateway Mall links the Arch to a new development hub west of Union Station

24


EXTENDING THE GATEWAY MALL

Chestnut Street becomes a promenade for pedestrians, and cafe/restaurant seating. A bike track connects the Arch to Union Station. A lane of automobile traffic allows access to addresses along Chestnut Street.

LINKING TO A LINEAR PARK

A NEW DEVELOPMENT HUB

At the Gateway Mall, the new greenway connects existing islands of park space into a more cohesive linear park between Memorial Drive and 22nd Street. Bookended by the redevelopment of historic Union Station and the newly renovated Arch grounds, the Mall contains many assets such as City Hall, the Municipal Courts, Circuit Courts, the Opera House, the Soldier’s Memorial Military Museum, and the Old Courthouse. The Mall should remain a space of civic presence, but it can be emboldened by increased activity.

At the western end of this axis, between 19th and 22nd Streets, this area was part of the tragic Mill Creek Valley slum clearance of the 1950s that eliminated a cohesive part of the urban fabric. The current access ramps to and from Interstate 64/Highway 40 are spatially inefficient and leave significant landlocked area inaccessible due to the traffic. When the new Jefferson interchange is completed in conjunction to the opening of the NGA site in North City, these ramps can then be decommissioned. The available area, in addition to several vacant lots between Chestnut and Olive Street will be available as a sizable transit oriented new development hub adjacent to the greenway and the Union Station MetroLink station. Select ramps can be reused for greenway access through the new development. A pedestrian bicycle bridge is proposed and can spring from one of these elevated ramps across the railroad line toward Lafayette Square. Along with residential development, we believe the area should host the Maya Angelou Center for Social Equity as a living museum dedicated to inclusion and equity, looking to the past and to the future. These investments, along with current plans for reprogramming Union Station, can create density and the variety of uses that can inject vibrancy to the area.

The existing Gateway Mall does not have a pedestrian friendly presence on Market Street which is an overly wide thoroughfare favoring automobile traffic. To address this, we propose a dedicated bicycle pathway on the north side of Market Street separated from a parking lane with a vegetated buffer. The parking lane will have planted curb extensions at intersections to reduce crossing distances and effectively reduce the width of the street. On the north side, with its redundant capacity to Market Street, we propose re-purposing part of Chestnut Street for promenade, café seating, bike-way, and expanded art and recreational programming, leaving a lane of traffic to access local addresses. Connecting across north-south streets can be done by calming traffic that crosses the line of the aggregated linear park. Curb extensions at intersections, elimination of parking on these blocks, will serve to slow traffic when crossing this zone. These efforts will capitalize on recent investments at CityGarden, Kiener Plaza and the new Gateway Arch Park.

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DESIGN AND COMMUNITY GOALS

ESTABLISH A TRANSFORMATIVE FRAMEWORK CATALYZE COMMUNITY BUILDING CONTRIBUTE TO THE REGIONAL SYSTEM CHOREOGRAPH URBAN LIFE CREATE DIVERSE AND ACCESSIBLE EXPERIENCES PROVIDE A SAFE AND SECURE ENVIRONMENT GENERATE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES INTEGRATE ART AND CULTURE IMPROVE MOBILITY AND CONNECTIVITY SHAPE A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE PROMOTE DESIGN EXCELLENCE BE ASPIRATIONAL AND ACHIEVABLE

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+ StL REGIONAL FRAMEWORK To date, the majority of Great Rivers Greenway’s trail and bicycling projects have been in the greater St. Louis region, while the majority of Trailnet’s work has been in developing bicycle networks inside the city center. With the +StL Greenway project, we can galvanize both organizations’ ambitious efforts to transform the city and its regional fabric, providing an armature for transformation and growth in both the regional context and city center.

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ESTABLISH A TRANSFORMATIVE FRAMEWORK DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Build on existing resources to create an armature connecting communities and institutions, enhance existing public and private development, and organize future development within the greenway corridor.

Provide many points of access and opportunities for meaningful north/south connections that are high quality and done with extensive engagement. These are equally important to the main east-west greenway. All facilities should encourage further exploration of both the greenway and the communities it connects.

REORIENTING THE CITY TO THE RIVER

BUILDING ON AN EXISTING FRAMEWORK

Establishing a transformative framework means studying both the regional and local context. When developing the figure for our armature, we considered its projective impact in the greater region. Parks and Greenways can bring people together, but they can also be used to divide. If only an East-West corridor was envisioned, the project might only reinforce existing divisions. It was clear from the outset of the project that the ambition of this project that one of the most important goals for this project is bridging the North South divide in the city. While our overall + diagram loops in North and South City with equitable extensions, there is a greater transformative potential that this diagram could enact.

A lot of work and study has been done in the city and region of St. Louis with respect to future greenways, complete streets, and bicycle networks in the city. Our proposal is intended to amplify this pre-existing work while providing a clear and stable armature for future efforts by Great Rivers Greenway, Trailnet, and others to grow from. We selectively chose the routes of the +StL Greenway based on their potential to:

Utilizing the figure of our diagram, we imagine a series of future Greenways in the form of radial arcs. These arcs, would reorient the city and its neighborhoods in a series of North South bands that connect back to the origin of the city at the Mississippi River. Following the +StL diagram, and much like the 1909 Burnham plan of Chicago, the arcs would connect to parks, complete streets, cultural buildings, and waterfront parks and harbors and be loose enough to follow streams, greenways, and other natural or topographical features in the landscape. The result could gradually transform what is currently both a physical and psychological divide in the city to one that is unified and oriented with a purpose.

• • • • • • • • •

Amplify economic development and growth in areas that have strong anchor businesses and institutions, but whose influence could spread and instigate growth in new areas. Improve equitable access between neighborhoods and the central corridor.

residential

Utilize secondary streets with lower traffic volumes in order to create complete streets that are safe and enjoyable to families. Create a Greenway that is also a “Cultureway,” connecting to exciting institutions, developments, and landscapes for St. Louisans and visitors alike to visit and enjoy. Develop performative landscape, water, and ecological strategies that relieve expenditure on infrastructure, develop natural habitats, and increase environmental health in the city. 29


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CATALYZE COMMUNITY BUILDING DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Utilize the greenway as common ground to enrich lives, strengthen relationships and bridge communities. Encourage individual communities to embrace the greenway as integral infrastructure and incorporate elements in or near the greenway that celebrate the individual character of each community and neighborhood.

Design the greenway to be meaningful to St. Louisans. Listen to a variety of perspectives and needs across many demographics and design projects to be representative and reflective of neighborhoods.

ACCESS + OPPORTUNITY

REFLECTION + CELEBRATION

RESILIENCY + INNOVATION

LOCAL + GLOBAL

These two aspects are a priority of +StL proposal – how might we provide access and opportunity to both physically and non-physical components of the Greenway? As inequality has made its profound mark in the City enabled by segregation and power status quo, our team believes in the capacity of visible and invisible connections to balance systems of power in the City. Increasing representation and understanding projects as multi-layered components addressing multiple systems, the aim is that the +StL Greenway becomes a platform to invest both in outcome (the high quality and multi-performative infrastructure and public spaces), and process (the collaborative decision making with the people they intent to impact of benefit).

The contested past and divided history of St. Louis makes challenging to imagine a collective vision, especially from the perspective of those who have been overlooked and whose neighborhoods have been under served for decades – how might the Greenway serve both as a healing platform and pro actively build a path towards social reparations? The scale and scope of +StL proposal seeks to strongly position the need for both North-South and East-West connectivity. By looking at culture, heritage, innovation, education, housing, finance, health and food with expanded programmatic palettes that provide opportunities for experiential learning, job creation, community building, financial stability, and healthy lifestyle, the Greenway will become this commons that invites to join both reflective and celebratory actions.

+StL seeks to advance both project and city-wide goals related to resilience and innovation leveraging ongoing efforts led by national institutions such as Rockefeller’s 100 RESILIENT CITIES initiative which St. Louis is a member and local organizations such as FOR THE SAKE OF ALL initiative. Their approaches coincide in many ways, but the fundamental one is the urgency to consider economics, education, and health in an integrated framework to address systemic racial, economic, & social inequities. How might the Greenway support social, ecological and economic resiliency goals that empower a broader range of stakeholders while fostering economic prosperity for all? +StL proposes to expand the scope of community resiliency and innovation through the lenses of quality of life, life cycles, and life expectancies that are determined in great measure by neighborhood resources.

St. Louis has a relevant history of putting itself on the national and global map. Sometimes with great pride hosting international events such as the World Fair, the Summer Olympics or National Conventions to Political Parties; some others with painful and stressful civil unrest such as the Civil Rights movement spearheaded by Ferguson which has had ripple effects nationwide. The City is also home to a very sophisticated cultural and political landscape often times overlooked by business as usual forces of city development. +StL proposes to leverage both local and global, tensions and aspirations, conflict and resolution, to reveal and shape landscapes and infrastructures that integrate and express these dual conditions.

INCLUSIVE GROUND

21st century cities are building and adapting their grounds for inclusiveness and expanded integration. Building the system of values that will guide the future of St. Louis in terms of investment, both in people and the built environment, requires a broader inclusion of multiple perspectives - gender, race, ability, age, income level, immigration status, among others. +StL acknowledges the importance of this aspect, and the challenge that this represents in current divided St. Louis; therefore this proposal includes community participation frameworks that are intended to strengthen advocacy and balance representation.

ECONOMIC ENABLER In addition to capturing a significant amount of investment for infrastructure and public space, the +StL Greenway inevitably will become a catalyzing force of real estate and business development. Learning from recent national examples such as the Highline in New York City, the 606 trail in Chicago, and the BeltLine in Atlanta, we acknowledge both the capacity of these types of projects to boost local economy, but also their danger in displacing long-time residents if the required mechanisms to support affordability are not in place. +StL proposes an approach leveraging social entrepreneurship as an emerging economic enabler in the City that can bring unique identity and resources to the Greenway both at the city and neighborhood scales.

EXTENSIVE ENGAGEMENT +StL proposes a Greenway that has multiple access points (physical and programmatic), that allows for diverse forms of public expression (from performance to protest), that connects with existing or emerging plans and initiatives (from grassroots to institutional), and that continuously seeks to challenge the well-established barriers in St. Louis. Extensive in geographic reach and scaffolding across North, South, East and West neighborhoods, the +StL Greenway has the potential to become a unifying element that connects, engages and inspires collective action across and along the City.

Although St. Louis has an existing great pool of resources, assets and opportunities, such an innovative and entrepreneurial spirit, world class architecture and institutions, extensive access to a park system, expanding transit infrastructure, and significant flow of capital, there is still an important effort to be made in order to prioritize equity & inclusion in the future economy and to create more cohesive economies. +StL proposes an approach where this abundance and wealth is designed with a more balanced and inclusive distribution.

MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES

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RESOURCE CONFLICT

EC O AC NO C E MI SS C

AFFORDABILITY LIFECYCLE EDUCATION JOBS + TRAINING ALTERNATIVE FINANCING COMMUNITY BENEFIT PRIORITIES COUNCILS OF LOCAL EXPERTS ARTS SUPPORT + VISIBILITY

EEC CO ON A AC OM CCNO CE ESMIIC SSS C

PR CO OP NF ER LI TY CT

PR CO OP NF ER LI TY CT

ECONOMY

EQUITABLE EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS EXTENSIONS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMIC ASSETS

PHYSICAL ACCESS

ENVIRONMENT

ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ASSETS ASSETS

PHYSICAL PHYSICAL ACCESS ACCESS

INCLUSIVE PROGRAMMING BROAD DISTRIBUTION OF AMENITIES CULTURAL PRESERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL REPARATIONS INVESTMENTS WITH/IN COMMUNITY PUBLIC HEALTH PRIORITIZATION FOOD LIFECYCLE ACCESS

ALL CIIA SSSS OC E CE SSOCC AC A

RESOURCE CONFLICT

AL CI SS S O CE AC

ECONOMY

T T EN EN PM T PM T LO LIC LO LIC VE NF VE NF DE CO DE CO

EQUITY

ECOLOGICAL LOOPS

ECOLOGICAL ECOLOGICAL LOOPS LOOPS

MOBILITY AT MULTIPLE SCALES/SPEEDS INTEGRATED UNIVERSAL ACCESSIBILITY RICH VARIETY OF PUBLIC LIFE / PUBLIC SPACE

CONFLICT FROM CONFLICT TO SYNERGY

ECOLOGICAL LOOPS

The common definition of sustainable development -“development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (Brundtland Commission, 1987) -- is based on the idea that growth is inevitable and desirable and the best we can do for the planet and our fellow inhabitants is not overspend our ecological allotment while trying to grow our economic wealth. Scott Campbell, when he sketched up The Planner’s Triangle (far left) insisted on incorporating the third “E” of sustainability - Equity - to the set of forces already tugging against each other between environmental preservation and economic growth. The equity lens identifies two additional conflicts, the property conflict (between private development and public amenities) and the development conflict (between environmental preservation and expansion of resource use for job growth). Historically, the triangle encouraged a balance of compromises in an effort to do the least damage while still promoting the most growth.

Ecological loops operate as green infrastructure, multimodal transportation routes, public space and productive landscapes. They contain both direct -- high speed -- and indirect -- exploratory -- routes for the variety of user groups who might utilize the greenway daily for commuting, running errands, or going to school or once a decade as tourists exploring the various habitats and landscapes of the urban Midwest. They operate as both a framework and a network, supporting infill between and along their extents, but also connecting species, hydrological systems, data and people. The loops are carefully designed to connect significant sites and assets, areas of population and job growth, and locations of both natural and historical beauty and value. They support existing plans to capture excess road capacity for expanded bike and pedestrian networks as well as complement and connect key investments.

OUR EQUATION IS DIFFERENT. The +StL proposal emerges from the strength of existing assets already along both the strong and growing East/West corridor and the historically and culturally rich North/South axis. Rather than working in opposition for limited resources, ECOLOGICAL LOOPS, EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS, and ECONOMIC ASSETS work together synergistically and symbiotically to provide physical, social, and economic access for all.

Though local assets are widely spread throughout the City of St Louis, economic assets -- including those previously provided by agencies and institutions -- are concentrated along the East/West corridor. The lowest car ownership, highest poverty rates, worst health indicators and largest concentrations of children in the city live in the areas north and south of the space between Forest Park and the arch. Like the Northside / Southside proposed MetroLink alignment, which would also tie into the ecological loops at the northern

CONFLICT

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EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS

SYNERGY and southern ends, the alignment of the equitable extensions represent commitments by the city to invest in greater access -- social, economic, and physical -- for some of the city’s least served neighborhoods. Rather than “Park to Arch” alone the +STL proposal is both Park to Arch + Park to Park, with the intention of creating a more broadly and equally distributed network of high quality, well-maintained, well-utilized parks and public space from Forest Park to the Arch Grounds; from Tower Grove to Fairground Parks, and beyond, from O’Fallon to Marquette Parks.

SYNERGY

ECONOMIC ASSETS The greatest intensity of opportunity occurs at the intersection of innovation and need. St Louis is growing into an innovation and entrepreneurial hub, supporting start-ups and biomed with break-out employees able to venture into their own businesses due to affordable space, supportive partners and a highly educated workforce. Economic catalysts build off of existing assets, successes and sparks of good ideas to create a jumping off point for the next generation of entrepreneurs. But not all residents fall neatly into those slots. In addition to biomed and tech, new educational facilities, productive landscape opportunities, artists and teacher support, and small local non-profits all benefit from an enhanced education lifecycle that promotes fluidity from early childhood to old age.

SYNERGY In the traditional “planner’s triangle”, the legs are defined by the conflict between the priority of the lenses identified at each point -- economic growth, environmental preservation, or social justice. In +StL, there are no points to the triangle, only fluid systems, or what we call “ADVOCACY LOOPS”. Advocacy loops are the interconnectivity of the equitable extensions, ecological loops, and economic assets -- all stronger because of the contribution of the other two. Between them are ways into the system -- social access, economic access, and physical access. SOCIAL ACCESS means inclusive programming, investments in neighborhood cohesivity and rootedness. Providing social access happens through partnerships with organizations, spatial distribution of services and functions, a range of housing types and costs, and a rich array of public amenities. But social access happens also through neighborhood empowerment, by localizing governance, control of funds, and agency of decision-making in the neighborhoods most in need and most impacted. Buy-in is critical. PHYSICAL ACCESS means affordable, timely, reliable mobility as well as universal access as integrated into the design vision. The “8 and 80” rule guides universal design -- can a child and a grandmother fully enjoy this space together, interact with friends and interesting strangers, and access the +StL offerings through numerous modalities.


CATALYZE COMMUNITY BUILDING Community Engagement Strategy: Systems of Advocacy

ECONOMIC ACCESS includes affordable places to live and play, access to quality education, and entryways into work. Education of all sorts, from early childhood to later life job retraining, and financial mechanisms particularly dedicated to disinvested neighborhoods are critical. “Greenlining” is emerging in St. Louis as a strategy to combat long-term disinvestment and repair the damage done by generations of overt and cover redlining practices. Economic access is not only about necessities, though, but about the ability to maintain a satisfying quality of life including arts, culture, and leisure.

Our Community Engagement Strategy is organized along these same systems of advocacy, incorporating neighborhood experts who advise development and programming from the bottom up in cooperation with the full range of project organizers, defined as a Neighborhood Council comprised of neighborhoods in North and South City. In each category, our proposal aims to leverage the large scale infrastructural investment of the greenway for environmental and social as well as economic gain for the communities surrounding the greenway and the city and region at large.

Community Engagement: Systems of Advocacy

1) EDUCATION & INNOVATION

+StL incorporates four Systems of Advocacy within our ecological loops, economic extensions, and economic assets. The four topics -- education and innovation, culture and heritage, health and food, housing and economy -- were chosen because we see them both as existing areas of emergence or strength in St. Louis and as critical components of any successful city. They are systems specifically because we see them as complex networks with vast and interconnected spatial and temporal implications. Education, for example, is not just about schools but begins at prenatal care and extends through old age. In addition, education can’t best exist in isolation, but should work symbiotically with health, arts, and work. They are systems of advocacy because we see any investment of this scale as an opportunity to project a more equitable future for the city of St. Louis.

Provoke Engagement. Inspire Curiosity. Create Education Catalysts. Education begins at birth and lasts a lifetime. One of our four advocacy loops, education combined with innovation is intended to encourage the view of the city as a learning and creating laboratory, and schools as simply one of the indoor opportunities to concentrate peak collective moments of shared knowledge. We expect each node along the loops and extensions to highlight contextually-appropriate education and innovation as catalysts for human as well as architectural development.

DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Utilize the greenway as common ground to enrich lives, strengthen relationships and bridge communities. Encourage individual communities to embrace the greenway as integral infrastructure and incorporate elements in or near the greenway that celebrate the individual character of each community and neighborhood.

Design the greenway to be meaningful to St. Louisans. Listen to a variety of perspectives and needs across many demographics and design projects to be representative and reflective of neighborhoods.

2) CULTURE & HERITAGE

recreational use could change the health profile of thousands of St. Louisans. Connecting physical activity with access to healthy food and nutrition education can change lives, and change cities.

Increase heritage visibility. Inspire cultural awareness. Improve access to public art. Creativity is a language that crosses barriers and time periods. Culture is its preservation. St. Louis has an interesting relationship with the two -- a history of erase and replace, but also a dedication to major museums, important institutions, and prominent patrons, in the midst of a wealth of significant historical narratives and preserved building fabric. How do those come together in public space? The Greenway is a knitting network, intended to connect disparate places, pieces and people across space and time. In that way, it reweaves culture and heritage, and punctuates the experience with new visions, interpretation, and inspiration.

3) HEALTH & FOOD Use green infrastructure as a catalyst. Support positive health behaviors. Improve access to fresh and quality food. For the Sake of All reminds us that health is fundamental to human well-being, yet is not evenly distributed across the St. Louis region. The Greenway as we’ve designed it has the unique opportunity to provide direct access to space for walking, biking, access to nature, fresh air, healthy food, and other activities that support a healthy lifestyle within walking distance of 44% the city’s residents. The ability to walk or bike to work, daily necessities like childcare or grocery stores, or for

4) HOUSING & ECONOMY Improve financial resiliency. Promote wealth equity. Increase neighborhood capital. A public investment at the scale of the Greenway will contribute drastically to the future of the city, including attracting large numbers of new residents to our walkably scaled neighborhoods and beautiful natural amenities. That means we must work in advance to create affordable housing opportunities for renting and home ownership while keeping current residents, particularly multi-generational residents, in place. The same is true for new businesses and commercial development. Our proposal leverages current economic initiatives and innovative financial mechanisms and expands their reach to support context- and culturally-sensitive growth and local support.

SEE “PROGRAM RECOMMENDATIONS” SECTION FOR MORE DETAIL ON THE FOUR SYSTEMS OF ADVOCACY 33


ILLINOIS RIVER

ST. CHARLES COUNTY

MISSISSIPPI RIVER

KATY TRAIL MISSOURI RIVER

JONES-CONFLUENCE POINT STATE PARK

ST. LOUIS LAMBERT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

MALINE GREENWAY

MISSISSIPPI GREENWAY

ST. LOUIS COUNTY

OLD CHAIN OF ROCKS BRIDGE

FOREST PARK FAIRGROUND PARK

MISSO U RI

O’FALLON PARK

STL

RIVER DES PERES GREENWAY

ILLINOIS

TOWER GROVE PARK

GATEWAY ARCH CARONDELET PARK

MARQUETTE PARK

ST. LOUIS CITY

MALCOLM W. MARTIN MEMORIAL PARK

CAHOKIA MOUNDS STATE HISTORIC SITE

EAST ST. LOUIS

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METROLINK


CONTRIBUTE TO THE REGIONAL SYSTEM DESIGN

COMMUNITY

The Chouteau Greenway plays a role as a primary connector of two major city treasures, Forest Park and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. As the regional greenway system continues to evolve within the vision portrayed in the Great Rivers Greenway Plan, each greenway segment needs to both support the overall plan and contribute to a regional greenway experience.

Adding this missing link in the center of the city will provide critical connections in the project area, as well as invite people into the regional system to explore. Design projects to become a common ground where all feel welcome; this is an opportunity to be a launch point for people to connect with each other across previously insurmountable socioeconomic, transportation and perceived barriers to venture further from their routine routes, discover the region and connect with each other.

emerge to radically reconnect citizens of the city to the region and back to the Mississippi River (the main reason why St. Louis is here!). This will occur at multiple locations, up and down the riverfront, not just as currently reached via select moments such as the Gateway Arch, Bellerive Park, Jefferson Baracks, North Riverfront Park or Columbia Bottom Conservation Area. The radials will loop to tie together to the existing Mississippi Riverfront trail that runs between North Riverfront and Chain of Rocks Bridge, along with the future south extension from Chouteau’s Landing to River Des Peres Greenway, and beyond. +StL sees this as a tremendous opportunity to re-connect its citizens, its neighborhoods and its counties much more holistically to its ecologies, to its industries and to its communities that are normally outside one’s everyday routine.

INTERSECTING GREENWAYS WITH INFRASTRUCTURE, ECONOMIES AND HIDDEN HISTORIES

The St. Louis “River Ring” is strategically located within the confluence of three great rivers -- the Mississippi, the Missouri, the Illinois -- centered within the Mississippi watershed, the 4th largest river basin in the world, which drains 41% of the United States landmass, or all or portions of 31 states.

HOW CAN OUR +StL PROPOSAL CONTRIBUTE TO THE REGIONAL SYSTEM, ONE WHICH IS SET WITHIN SUCH AN AMBITIOUS SCALE? First, +StL must understand GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY’s AMBITIOUS MISSION: “Connecting the St. Louis region with greenways so people can explore their rivers, parks and communities, making it a vibrant place to live, work, and play.” Second, understand GRG’s History: “Great Rivers Greenway is the public agency connecting the St. Louis region with greenways. In 2000, a vote of the people created a sales tax to leave a legacy for future generations by investing in and connecting together some of our region’s best assets – rivers & parks. Those funds allow us to collaborate with partners and communities to build, care for and bring to life your network of greenways, creating healthy habitats and watersheds along the way. We serve the 2 million people throughout our 1,200 square mile district of St. Louis City, St. Louis County and St. Charles County. We collaborate with municipalities, public agencies, businesses and nonprofit organizations across the region to deliver on the community’s vision for a vibrant, connected region.” Third, understand GRG’s Citizen’s Vision: “Residents of the St. Louis region voted for and invested in a clear, bold vision – a dynamic network of connecting rivers, parks and communities, strengthening the social, economic and environmental well-being of our region. Community

members proudly invest in, care for and champion greenways for years to come. There are 45 greenways identified in the overall “River Ring” plan. GRG is actively working on 16 of those 45...117 miles (and counting!) built so far, with another almost 200 miles in planning.” In other words, citizens endorse GRG’s regional mission.

RADIAL CONNECTIVITY But within such a robust regional network of trails that beautifully connect to ecological and historical treasures such as the Confluence Point State Park, the Katy Trail, and the Old Chain of Rocks Bridge, there remain significant gaps, with substantial obstacles. A primary absence obviously is the given scope of the Chouteau Greenway. But this is not just limited to the missing link between the Gateway Arch and Forest Park via a potential East-West spine. This spine eventually should reach further to East St. Louis and significant sites such as Cahokia Mounds, connecting mutual assets across the river. Additionally, and just as importantly, an equally missing link exists North-South within the City limits. When one looks at the existing greenway network map, the absence within the City limits is striking, to say the least. +StL proposes to connect regionally with our “+” by establishing an armature that reaches beyond its economic assets, beyond its ecological loops, and beyond its equitable extensions. +StL proposes a regional design strategy of radiating bands that stretch both to and from the Mississippi river. These bands build upon the historic North-South thoroughfares of the City, and from the newly established loops and extensions. If these trails and thoroughfares are continued, fantastic opportunities

Inversely, we see this radial design as welcoming ecologies, industries and communities to come into the +StL armature’s “common ground.” For instance, the St. Louis region is set within a massive trans-continental bird and fishery migratory route. 292 species of birds (1/2 of North American birds) migrate through the region, and stop off at important sites along the river and re-established ecologies such as Audubon Center at Riverlands. With our ecological and sustainable ethos central to our proposal, we propose to re-connect natural systems and hidden hydrologies that are latent within the Chouteau Greenway to regional ecological systems. In doing so, we see this as an opportunity to invite species, not just humans, into the City. Citizens not only will have a common ground to interact with one another, but also can learn and exist within healthy ecological , yet urban, habitats. Imagine picnicking along the greenway and a bald eagle flies overhead!

Just as important to connecting regional citizens to one another and to ecologies, the +StL design builds upon the region’s existing infrastructural networks. It will amplify the MetroLink system, current and proposed, in turn connecting multiple neighborhoods and counties in the Bi-State region in a multi-modal manner. We also understand this is a big industrial, working riverfront city, and will not return to a “natural” state. For example, 16 rail lines pass through St. Louis and 32,000,000 tons of freight are handled by the St. Louis port annually. So continued greenway connectivity must respect such. However, we do not see this as obstacle, rather as potential. +StL proposes to embrace such bigscale infrastructure, by providing compelling interactions for people along the regional greenway to interact with such unique intersections and experiences of industry, agriculture, infrastructure and of course Midwest culture. We want people to connect in a contemporary way to hidden histories, such as the Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing or Native American mound sites to reach a better appreciation of our complex history in St. Louis...and robustly engage it!

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FAIRGROUND PARK

NORTH CITY FOOD HUB

DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

OASIS RESIDENTIAL MCCB Inc CARE FACILITY OASIS RESIDENTIAL MISSION: CARE FACILITY ST LOUIS

RESPOND INC GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION MAT SOCIAL MINISTRY CENTER

CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

NGA

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT FOREST PARK

THE SPOT YOUTH CENTER

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY

FOUNDRY CORTEX

ARMORY

YOUTH IN NEED

UNION STATION

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROSPECT YARDS CASA DE SALUD SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

THE SOCIAL AFFAIRS BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE PETER&PAUL COMMUNITY SERVICES

THE LUMINARY GRAVOIS PARK

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

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INTERSECT ARTS

ST ALEXIUS HOSPITAL

MARQUETTE PARK

GATEWAY ARCH NATIONAL PARK

BUSCH STADIUM

NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER

GRAVOIS PLAZA

CITY OF ST. LOUIS

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT.

MALCOLM W MARTIN MEMORIAL PARK


CHOREOGRAPH URBAN LIFE

WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR A DESIGN TO CHOREOGRAPH URBAN LIFE? IT REQUIRES A PERFORMANCE To most of us, to choreograph is to compose a sequence of steps or moves, most often resulting in a performance. The +StL Greenway envisions the project choreographed on many different levels. Its inhabitants will comprise a diversity of participants. They will all be the main actors, all contributing on many different levels and in many different productive, meaningful ways. Taken as a whole, the choreography of the +StL Greenway “performance” will far outweigh the sum of its parts. To do so, we fundamentally believe that the +StL Greenway concept of the 3 “E’s” comprise the underlying infrastructure to enable the “moves” for the choreography to truly and uniquely perform.

DESIGN

COMMUNITY

Create opportunities for uses along the greenway corridor to interact with the pathway through providing a “front porch” or “civic room” that might add to the activity along the corridor. Within the greenway framework, provide for design interventions from neighboring institutions and communities that create integrated and sequential experiences. Define the corridor as a sequence of spaces and activities, not just a pathway. Determine how existing and future communities, buildings, and spaces will interact with the greenway.

Innovate by adding value to existing amenities, infrastructure, institutions, service providers and with new elements that make sense in context, building upon what exists.

CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

EQUITY

FORM

The “Ecological Loops” provide the thickened series of bands, not just single pathways, that tie the varied designs and activities fo the +StL Greenway design together. These are meant to operate at various speeds, experiences and intensities. Some are permanent. Some are ephemeral. All are “front porches.” Taken as a whole, the loops promote a wide array of ways for the inhabitants to occupy, throughout the day and night, and across the four seasons. One can traverse the loops from east to west, or north to south, in one large swoop. Or, given the physical design of the loop structure, one can literally “loop” within one or a few of the segments. By doing this, people can either experience a multitude of amplified existing conditions and neighborhoods across the city and region, or intimately experience one or two neighborhoods on a leisurely basis. The options will be multiplied, endless, yet coherent and safe. Ecological loops choreograph a healthy cohabitation of spaces for people to experience holistically with other environments species - a “performative landscape.”

Equitable Extensions both reach out to neighborhoods beyond the +StL Greenway, and just as importantly, invite people into the corridor to be part of the performance. We have designed a series of spaces and activities that embrace many requested needs of the nearby communities. These range in providing equitable access points to integrated systems of innovation, education, arts, culture, heritage, health, food, finance and housing -- what we define as “Advocacy Systems.” These integrated systems will vary in scope and physical design at many nodes and conditions withing the +StL Greenway.

Physically, the +StL Greenway includes many exciting design features for such an elaborate urban choreography. These range from large landscape gestures that result in public underpasses safely and smoothly allowing people to cross major thoroughfares, to highly visible architectural features such as multi-use bridges across major boulevards, highways, and bridges, to a phased network of re-designed “Great Streets” which promote an integrated multi-modal vision for the future of the City and Region.

ENGAGE IN URBAN EXPERIENCE The “Economic Assets” comprise the existing institutions and communities that range from universities, CORTEX corridor, Grand Arts Center, stadiums, downtown, Gateway Arch, park systems, the arts network, an aggregation of neighborhoods, and a robust non-profit network actively engaged across the city and region. These assets, importantly varied in forms, scales and uses, perform as the anchor points for varied spaces and activities in our design. As a result, these will no longer be islands of development or just places to pass through or by quickly. Rather, they will become highly welcoming civic and public spaces that invite people to work, to live and to play.

INFORMALITY + FORMALITY Within our +StL Greenway, we have identified a wide array of both formal and informal assets. Formal ones include such assets as museums, stadiums, community centers, historic sites and neighborhood music venues. But equally important to interact with the design are St. Louis’ exciting network of informal assets. These include marathons, marches, protests, parades and even the “World Naked Bike Ride.” We also envision everyday spaces being used for events and pop-up activities, such as block parties and communal tables. The rich combination of both the formal and the informal only serve to enliven an inclusive urban experience.

COMPLETE STREETS Building Complete Streets means investing in mobility and access throughout the city. North and South extensions of the greenway include improved physical conditions that create a more pleasant public realm for pedestrians and cyclists while increasing the performative capacity of the street itself. A continuous tree canopy at the sidewalk and new buffer planting strips between traffic and cycling lanes filter and capture runoff, reduce summer heat gain and break winter winds, and generally contribute to increased biodiversity in the streetscape and adjacent open space network.

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A Friday Food Truck event, street dinners and festivals, Vandeventer and Maffit could compliment the annual Summer Whitaker Concert Series at St. Louis Place and Ivory Perry Parks and attract investment in North St. Louis

Improved paving, street furniture, food trucks, temporary installations, exhibitions, and a two-way bike lane along the Southern side of Laclede through Saint Louis University and Harris Stowe would enhance campus life and improve safety with greater pedestrian and bicycle traffic

Introducing traffic calming measures and a one-way bicycle lane at the North side of Market Street will connect the Gateway Mall with the Arch and improve access to Kiener Plaza Park while activating downtown life and business

A forest canopy walk from Children’s Hospital Bridge to Forest Park allows one to experience wildlife at various levels of the forest canopy on their way to the ice skating rink during all four seasons

Utilizing the existing upper deck of the MacArthur bridge will create a dramatic overlook and a thrilling bicycle and walking extension across the river, realizing Eero Saarinen’s 1947 vision to connect the Gateway Arch with East St. Louis and Illinois

Building a levee at the waterfront will attract investment at Chouteau’s Landing, creating a space for live / work housing downtown, hidden kitchens, an urban beach, and access to adventures in the Mississippi River


CREATE DIVERSE AND ACCESSIBLE EXPERIENCES DESIGN

COMMUNITY

Provide an urban experience with ranges of intense and passive activity. Honor principles of universal design as determinants of form. Explore day/night and seasonal variations to ensure the greenway is a year-round, all day experience for all. Provide pathways and spaces that encourage diverse programming opportunities that celebrate the unique history and culture of St. Louis and welcome all possible visitors through intentional inclusionary practices.

Consider access and comfort in all seasons, especially availability of shade, seating and water. Think about design for activities beyond walking, running and biking, such as skateboarding, food trucks, public discourse, outdoor classrooms and education, public and private events and programs.

INTENTIONALLY INCLUSIVE

CULTURALLY MEANINGFUL

SEASONALLY ACTIVE

PURPOSEFULLY CONNECTED

St. Louis has tremendous cultural and organizational richness. The geography of the proposed greenway touches multiple neighborhoods with distinct identities that are yet to be represented in their new landscapes – shifting demographics and ethnic groups in the City contribute with new layers of dynamism and integration.

The culture and heritage of the +STL Greenway is best understood by its embedded experts – current and former residents, cultural and social workers, artists, educators, historians, community leaders and social entrepreneurs, among many others, as well as their institutions, organizations and business currently invested in these neighborhoods.

By learning simultaneously from St. Louis and multiple cities in the region and the country on how their are reclaiming and redefining their new public landscapes and infrastructures, the +StL proposal integrates design strategies that elevate inclusion and intentionality. +StL recognizes both the conflicted histories related to erasure and displacement that have impacted the surrounding territory of the corridor, but also imagines how design can make the case for reparations and offer more healing and connective landscapes.

+StL proposes an approach that is values-based and processbased – where the investment in defining values and enabling processes for cultural production is as relevant as the outcome they generate. With a valued-based arts, culture and heritage approach, +StL prioritizes the identification of built and intangible resources with stakeholders through collaborative and inclusive processes. This approach suggests a highly participatory organizational dynamic that not only integrates the voices of those who have been underrepresented, but builds ownership and strengthens capacities while advancing access and equity goals within this project.

The beauty of the Midwest landscape is highly amplified by its different seasonal conditions – the change of colors, vegetation palette, biodiversity and water cycles; additionally, people’s activities and engagement with their urban and natural landscapes have the capacity to elevate the presence of the +StL Greenway from their daily commutes to more recreational and enjoyments activities.

The greenway is located along a corridor that has already received a great amount of investment, and much more is either ongoing or planned. This corridor also benefits from the presence of major institutions. With all this wealth being concentrated along, the greenway project has a significant responsibility on ensuring the stimulation of new and fostering equitable development. While it’s important that this continued series of investments occur, it’s also fundamental to leveraging accessibility and affordability to existing and proposed assets – both publicly and privately developed.

+StL proposes the integration of multiple programs and spaces that embrace diverse social dynamics (individuals, groups, masses), support multiple activities (leisure, sports, relaxation, entertainment, wellness, gathering), and resonate with different public agendas (environment, health, social justice). A public space that can be both more reflective of the existing communities and enable different and new forms of expression.

By using simultaneously concepts of reflection and celebration that address ecological and urban habitats, civic and political movements, and industrial heritage, +StL proposes a greenway as a platform for engagement, collaboration and learning experiences to imagine a collective future.

+StL seeks to build on the seasonal success of great public spaces in the City through their public activities – especially Forest Park year-round calendar. By strategically locating points of interest and connecting with existing assets, the +StL Greenway stimulates movement along and across, and connects visitors and residents alike to the already existing rich calendar of activities from its surrounding neighborhoods. The +StL Greenway has the opportunity to become a yearround catalyst of environmental, civic and health stewardship. +StL proposes to inspire new forms of active involvement and citizenship for St. Louisans by showcasing ecological and archaeological processes, restored habitats and productive landscapes, revealed and repurposed layers of infrastructure and industry, political and historically significant events and places, reclaimed underpasses and spaces along the railway right-of-way, and connections designed for fast and slow speeds.

+StL proposes both connections that are physical and nonphysical by looking beyond the East-West boundaries of the corridor, and purposefully identifying opportunities to amplify the social impact of the greenway to the North and South sides of the City. To enhance physical connectivity, this proposal explores multiple elements for mobility infrastructure and public spaces that expand the reach and accessibility of this corridor to the most under served neighborhoods in the North and South of the city. To support non-physical connectivity, this proposal identifies existing investments, local initiatives and organizational efforts related to affordable housing, healthy food, innovative education and training, among others, to be elevated by the future development of the greenway.

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+A typical afternoon in the StL Greenway along the Union Pacific Railroad between 39th Street and 21st Street

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The Greenway as we’ve designed it provides direct access within WALKING DISTANCE for 44% of St. Louis City residents to nature, fresh air, healthy food, walking, biking and other outdoor activities that support a healthy lifestyle. With the addition of the Greenway, and the new housing it will attract, this number will only GROW.

Protected bicycle lane and street improvements at Natural Bridge and Fairground Park

The +StL proposal works to enhance existing cultural, social, historical and economic assets while adding a 21st century infrastructural component that increases the environmental and social health of the city. Our greenway, while reinforcing the inchoate successes of the East / West corridor, also contributes to the city we hope to build for current and future generations by supporting a more equitable vision. +StL accomplishes this in three ways: The project provides universal, affordable, safe and enjoyable ACCESS TO the greenway and its amenities. The greenway is A PLACE FOR EVERYONE, providing spaces and places for people of a vast range of ages, abilities, interests, and cultural, social, and economic backgrounds. Thirdly, the project CONTRIBUTES TO the current residents of the city by generating social, economic, and environmental opportunities for, planned with, and partially controlled by those who already call the neighborhoods adjacent to the project home.

EQUAL ACCESS TO THE GREENWAY Equal access includes social, economic, and physical access. The most tangible -- physical access -- assures that the project integrates universal design within its physical boundaries. Additionally, it must be easy, affordable, safe, and enjoyable to get to all portions of the greenway. This is accomplished

with an emphasis on multi-modality, creating north/south networks of connectivity that provide a full range of speed, cost, and experience options including biking, walking, smart and efficient buses, and future smart transit. The Greenway is more than just green space, though, so the types of businesses, variety of housing options and cultural opportunities must cover a range of price points. St. Louis is famous for its free parks, zoo, and museum; we see that tradition of cultural and arts access continuing in the greenway. It also must welcome all cultures, all races, all genders, and all age groups through its design, programming, and spirit.

A GREENWAY FOR ALL A Greenway for all incorporates magnetic and meaningful public spaces that support a diversity of cultures, a range of programmatic functions, and a variety of scales and types of spaces. It must provide basic services and amenities -bathrooms, water fountains, places to relax, eat, and drink -but also productive spaces, those that reduce the heat island of the summer for humans and non-humans, productively channel rainwater, and support habitats of all types. The Greenway should allow for informal functions (vending, pop-ups, street art, poetry slams, neighborhood theater, demonstrations) as well as formal ones (musical performances, organized races, exhibitions). The large scale means that a full range of recreational opportunities, generated by community preference, can be incorporated, from the extremely popular

pickle ball and roller skating to swimming and basketball. Incorporating community voices in the decision-making is critical; making a greenway for all means buy-in from all first.

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE GREENWAY An investment this large in a city with so much need must fundamentally give more to the community than it takes in addition to its contribution as a public green space. Our proposal unearths history, culture, arts, and environment that has been erased or modified over generations and attempts to recognize and honor its presence. Our attention to existing assets, particularly in the north and south sides of the city, points to the beauty and richness of what already exists, the inherent value in place and people. Additionally, we imagine three other strategies for the greenway to contribute: - Curation of greenway development. In some arts districts, a percentage of businesses and residents must have a direct arts affiliation. +StL could focus efforts around our key themes -- arts, history, culture, education, health, food and environment. The non-percentage development could support more common purposes of other live, work, and commerce needs. An “eco-zone” would require development to live up to certain environmental standards, contributing to necessary repair of the city’s environmental condition.

- Neighborhood agency. Historically major infrastructure projects were done “to” communities not “with” communities. We still suffer from those urban renewal projects. This one should be different. Our proposal literally touches over twenty neighborhoods in the city, and our team very intentionally includes a range of experts from north to south, including those working in-depth with communities of color and communities in poverty. Neighborhood agency gives a seat at the table to the impacted communities with real decisionmaking power and real access to funding. A greenway for the people is by the people. - Return on investment for communities. High demand locations often require a higher ticket to entry. The Greenway will become like a riverfront, trail, and transit station combined -- extremely desirable. Not everyone can afford adjacency. Our economic advocacy plan encourages most access for the least able, as both a way to level the playing field and a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to offer wealth-building opportunities to those left out of the historical wealthbuilding scenarios -- a mega-Greenlining. Additionally, those who do get access should contribute accordingly. Mechanisms might include Community Benefits Agreements; environmental requirements; or incentives limited to nonprofit and/or locally embedded investors who support local businesses and local hiring and training. The Greenway also serves as a community-wide resource center and should support education, recreation, and health to the level it does museums and parks like Forest Park currently. 41


Night lighting and moon-gazing activities at the +StL Greenway at the Spring Street Bridge in Prospect Yards

Integration of new street lighting , signage, and ecology in Marquette Park

Security Can Promote Equitable Access to Information French designer Mathieu Lehanneur has created a series of Wi-Fi stations in Paris where people can sit down to use their laptops or access local information via a large screen. Named Digital Break, the street furniture links with the underground fiber-optic network so residents and visitors without mobile internet access can connect on the move. Concrete swivel chairs with attached tables for laptops sit underneath a foliage-covered shelter and a large digital billboard provides city information and news for those who don’t have a laptop or smartphone with them. Designed as a protective shelter with a plant covered roof, like ‘A garden placed on a few tree trunks’ and designed to be as attractive when viewed from the ground as from a balcony. Security and emergency call boxes can be integrated into the wifi stations.

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Programmed underpass at Washington University with below grade visitor center, cafe, and security station


PROVIDE A SAFE AND SECURE ENVIRONMENT

HOW CAN DESIGN ENABLE SAFE, SECURE ENVIRONMENTS? +StL Greenway prioritizes safe and secure environments in multiple aspects throughout the project. Safety and security should not be considered as separate elements, and definitely not an afterthought in design. We all understand the security and safety issues manifest themselves in many complex, inequitable ways in St. Louis and the region. But this should not be an obstacle. Rather, compelling and thoughtful design solutions must pro actively integrate safety and security, and by doing so will enhance accessible, equitable and beautiful designs. Safety and security are defined in varied ways in our design, through various forms of engagement.

24 HOURS-A-DAY ENGAGEMENT It is imperative that all aspects of +StL Greenway provide spaces that make everyone feel comfortable, welcome and above all treated equally, in addition to providing universal access to all aspects of the project. Our first objective with achieving such is +StL Greenway’s aspiration to activate the project 24 hours a day. Rather than seeing night time as a dangerous time for empty uses, +StL Greenway programs spaces across the project for night time activities. We will integrate intelligent lighting and monitoring strategies

throughout the project; and deploy networks of information, wifi, and digital access points integrated with emergency call boxes and notification systems that adapt with contemporary smart phone app. and future technologies. We propose 24 hour “security stations” at multiple spots along the loops and extensions of the project. These stations not only will serve security and “eyes on the street purposes,” they also will provide innovative employment and education opportunities. We see these stations integrally designed into key crossing points and parks, such as Skinker underpass at Washington University/Forest Park, Kingshighway over/ underpasses at Forest Park, Spring Street crossing, the Trestle, the Gateway Mall, Fairground Park, Tower Grove Park and Marquette Parks, among several others. These ranger stations will be part of equitable programming strategies at each node, such as visitor centers, bike sharing stations, food and health stations and cafes. Many spots along the project are designed to incorporate evening and public art events, thereby “lighting up” currently underused spaces such as underneath highways and within empty lots.

SAFE STREETS, CROSSINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURAL ENGAGEMENT +StL Greenway proposes a variety of safe crossings at current major thoroughfares and infrastructural knots. We propose to separate modalities of walking, cycling and driving where currently most conflict exists, through different types of

DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Through “defensible space” and “eyes on the street” principles, engender a sense that users of the greenway enjoy a safe environment. Provide the vehicle for a coordinated and collaborative security system that ties together programs and institutions.

Create a greenway and connections that include lighting, emergency phones for immediate connections with security or emergency personnel, published and enforced rules and no hiding spots. Consider ambassador or ranger programs (and necessary facilities for them) that populate the greenway 24 hours per day. Remember all ages and abilities for safety considerations.

underpasses, overpasses or a combination of both. Key points of such safe crossings are Skinker Crossing (underpass), Children’s Place crossing (bridge), Chouteau-Clayton Connector (underpass and bridge), Spring Street (bridge), among others. We are not dictating which path pedestrians or cyclists take per se. We are offering safer options at each condition, coupled with multiple uses as well. Additionally, along rail corridors we design mitigating gabion wall buffers and under highways and rail lines netting and buffers to repel falling debris.

Louisans, different neighborhoods, and visitors.

Throughout our ecological loops and equitable extensions, we propose a series of much safer “Great Streets’, based on particular conditions and neighborhoods. One consistent feature is dedicated bike lanes (either one- or two-way depending on street type), protected by a vegetated “raingarden” buffer strip. Not only will these separate vehicles, cars and pedestrians, the buffers will provide ecological and stormwater benefits.

ALL SEASONS, ALL AGES ENGAGEMENT St. Louis is known for its extreme climate, for better or for worse. Recent years have seen increased volatility between hot and cold, flood and drought. +StL Greenway will embrace the extreme climate events in a more sustainable, ecological manner throughout the project with all-season, programming such as swimming pools and ice rinks, tree-lined streets and multiple areas for shade and respite. These spaces will encourage multi-generational interactions between St.

HEALTHY ENGAGEMENT Finally, we see healthy lifestyles as best promoting safe and secure environments, for current and future generations. +StL achieves this with its innovative “Advocacy Systems” programming strategy that promotes integrated programming strategies that promote access to education, health and food. We see these “programs of access” as both building upon permanent assets in areas, along with temporary pop-up’s and mobile distribution networks, such as Jeremy Goss’s LinkMarket. Particular design elements along the corridor promote healthier and safer environments such as the before-mentioned rain gardens, in addition to tree plantings integral to the “Great Streets.” At key interfaces with large-scale infrastructure such as railroads and highways, we will encourage people to experience such, but also mitigate pollution such as diesel fumes or water contaminates with trees, native plantings, and boo-remediation wetlands.

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Forest Park, home to many of the city’s historic cultural institutions, attracts more than 12 million visitors a year.

Grand Center Arts District is home to numerous arts and performance venues in Midtown.

Mockup Projections by artist Raven Fox for the Ray-Carroll Grain Elevators in St. Louis

business improvement districts. Across the country, these investments are making impactful contributions to significantly enhance the center city public realm experience.

St. Louis has successfully implemented impressive transit investments and has ambitious plans for north-south Metrolink service that would drive further growth and unlock the economic potential of its existing assets. Notably, Metrolink provides important accessibility and connectedness among the many great institutions and public places described above that form much of the center city’s — in fact the entire city’s — economic foundation.

Artist Katharina Grosse creates otherworldly industrial environments

NEW LEGACY INVESTMENT: BUILDING FROM STRENGTH In the 19th and 20th centuries, the people of St. Louis built many august institutions of higher education, public health and culture, as well as extraordinary parks and civic places. These great institutions and public places still serve as important economic and social engines for St. Louis’ center city neighborhoods and are sustained through the commitments of public and private sectors, including the city’s sizable philanthropic community. These enduring community assets form a strong foundation upon which to envision and implement transformative new legacy investments in St. Louis’ future. Like many cities, St. Louis’ residential and worker populations have shifted away from the center city in recent decades to more car-centric suburban locations. That trend has been successfully reversed in many cities through a multi-pronged approach which the Great Rivers Greenway and its partners are wisely embracing through this greenway design challenge. Increasingly, people want to live, work, study and play in vibrant, walkable places that provide community connection and a high quality of life. The places that are attracting and retaining people are the ones that have made investments that provide transit options between residential neighborhoods and central business districts, a range of housing choices that address affordability, public safety, decent schools, parks and green spaces for recreation and leisure, neighborhood amenities and services including restaurant and vibrant entertainment districts, and coordinated municipal service delivery and supplemental 44

Investment capital follows talent. And talent increasingly is following place — quality of life places that embrace diversity and inclusion, a mix of uses, and offer places for connection and fun. From Washington University and Forest Park, through Cortex, Grand Center, Saint Louis University and Harris-Stowe, and Downtown — the Greenway will connect, strengthen, and build from St. Louis’ existing assets that are either strong or underperforming in their capacity to catalyze economic growth due an underwhelming public realm — and provide a framework to expand economic opportunities throughout the city. Despite some systemic challenges, connecting these assets with a network of high-quality greenway infrastructure can leverage placemaking as a key component of an economic development strategy. Strategically building on proximity to transit, parks, and culture is a powerful and proven strategy for expanding economic opportunity. Enhancing access to these assets with a new, well-programmed greenway network can support the real estate market of their surrounding areas and attract new residents, companies, and investment as proven by research from around the country. This network can also help to fill voids in the existing fabric by creating a framework for where and how public and private investment should be directed.

This Greenway initiative is an opportunity to further leverage those strategic transit investments and expand the City’s economic development strategy with not one but two things authentically St. Louisan: parks and culture. New parks and expanded cultural amenities, like proximity to transit, are proven drivers of value creation. Transit, parks and culture drive center city growth.

A GREENWAY. A CULTUREWAY. We envision the Chouteau Greenway as the Cultureway, where everything about the DNA of the Greenway relates to diverse and inclusive expressions of arts and culture, becoming a beloved place in the city for its many diverse arts and cultural groups, individuals, and the broader creative community to work, present, delight, and inspire all visitors to the Greenway. Enhanced cultural amenities and programs along the Greenway can amplify opportunities to generate positive, unique experiences that people value, want to share with friends and family on social media, and come back to experience again and again.

Economic vitality is supported by this type of cultural infrastructure. Research by the Brookings Institution, for example, confirms that innovation districts are more likely to succeed if they become places where people want to live, work, and play, with a physical concentration of amenities. Arts and culture play an important role in creating a density of activities that attracts top talent, supports property values, retains existing residents and attracts new ones, and attracts visitors throughout the year. Beginning with Phase 1, the Greenway will support the economic vitality of neighborhoods, institutions, and businesses along its path by helping to fill gaps in cultural and social infrastructure, and better connecting districts like Cortex to cultural assets in Grand Center, Forest Park, and elsewhere along the way will create a more desirable and amenity rich district. For example, creating low-cost art and presentation spaces in partnership with a local institution alongside new Greenway investments could create a permanent cultural presence along the corridor. This culture-focused approach is a proven armature for positive change. Projects like Silo City in Buffalo and The Bentway in Toronto have drawn from the unique fabric of their cities to create exciting new social and cultural assets that generate excitement and media attention, showcase a city’s unique identity and vibrancy, and attract cultural tourists who spend their money locally.


GENERATE ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES W OR FL

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DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Utilize the greenway to support and create economic vitality while maintaining economic stability. Explore how the greenway can contribute to job growth and equitable economic opportunities for all. Make the greenway a canvas for future generations to circulate, play, work, and learn.

Take into account design elements that encourage and support small businesses, vendors, musicians, artists. Make it easy to use the greenway to extend business opportunities or create new ones.

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It’s a fact, parks drive economic growth. Our plan redirects value for maximum public benefit. Near Houston’s Buffalo Bayou Promenade the number of businesses increased fourfold, and retail sales rose almost 600%.

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Alongside the Indianapolis Cultural Trail, property values rose 148%.

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After the opening of Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park, nearby condo sales prices rose nearly 120%.

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In Dallas, property values rose 80% in the neighborhood surrounding the new Katy Trail. RA

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The greenway will attract investment and increased property values in surrounding neighborhoods.

PROXIMITY TO TRANSIT, PARKS AND CULTURE DRIVES MARKET DEMAND Transit, parks, and cultural corridors offer the amenities that residents and companies with choice seek — and developers and private investment interest organizes around these assets. 55% of Americans say access to green space is a top or high priority when deciding where to live , demonstrating why neighborhood and community parks and open spaces can lift residential values over 30% — extending up to one third of a mile away . Individual projects have been shown to have even more powerful effects. In Indianapolis, property assessments within one block of the eight-mile Indianapolis Cultural Trail rose 148%, an increase of $1 billion in property value and 95% of Trail users surveyed felt safe while on the Trail . Since the opening of Dallas’ Katy Trail, property values rose 80% in the surrounding neighborhood . Houston’s Buffalo Bayou Promenade led the number of businesses in the area to expand fourfold . Strengthening connections throughout the urban core to existing transit and parks can attract new real estate market demand that helps raise achievable rents and sales prices to levels that would support financing new private development. These improved economic conditions can make creative, highquality development like the adaptive reuse of underutilized warehouse spaces and new live/work loft buildings possible — bringing more people to live, work, and play in more areas of the urban core proximate to major employers and the city’s other existing amenities. Zoning and other regulatory controls

should be addressed in tandem with the Greenway to allow St. Louis to capture private market interest in real estate development on shovel-ready parcels along the corridor. Along the entire +StL Greenway, but particularly near Cortex, Midtown, and Downtown, the elevated viaduct of the freeway historically has been a barrier between neighborhoods and the castaway spaces below the viaduct have literally repelled pedestrians from it. But numerous successful design and programming interventions around the U.S. and elsewhere have proven that placemaking can reframe how people think about these previously neglected spaces, turning them into neighborhood assets and in some cases, must-see destination attractions for locals and visitors alike. The Art Park under the freeway near Grand Avenue will take cues from The Bentway in Toronto, which offers year-round artistic, cultural, and recreational activities and events, including gardens, a skate trail, art installations, exhibitions, performances, festivals, markets, and more — and has attracted considerable international media attention. Of course, Buffalo Bayou in Houston offers another great example of the power of design and stewardship to transform and repurpose such infrastructure in the public realm. The +StL plan treats this overhead viaduct condition as an exciting design and programming opportunity that will produce outsized economic and social benefits for the surrounding neighborhoods and the community as a whole.

One threat to economic investment in the city center is the lack of well-designed “complete streets” that feel safe and welcoming for pedestrians, are accessible, well-lit and activated by programmed ground floors built close to the street edge. Achieving a more vibrant pedestrian realm along the greenway that enhances feelings of safety will take time and will require concerted effort by all the major property owners and institutions who can reshape their university, medical, and business campuses to be more open and connected to the public street network. The City of St. Louis has taken initial steps toward implementing “Complete Streets” through its updated Complete Streets Ordinance. The Greenway network will further this effort by offering a new urban design condition for buildings and campuses throughout the center city to recommit to complete streets and identify priority areas for increased activation and other interventions. Strengthening north-south connections in St. Louis is of great economic importance. The urban core has significant economic assets — but these assets need to be better connected to each other to achieve the city’s greater economic potential and equitable economic development. For example, Fairground Park is just a mile and a half from Grand Center, but feels worlds apart. A greenway running north-south can better connect The Ville and other neighborhoods to job centers. New connections over Kingshighway Boulevard can make the road less of an intimidating barrier between the Washington University Medical Center and Forest Park. A better-connected Cortex can nourish itself on the city’s cultural infrastructure

and in doing so better compete for new companies and talent. Exciting developments like The Armory and the Foundry can draw from and reinforce the vibrancy of SLU and Grand Center. Students from Harris-Stowe State University could have better access to downtown job opportunities.

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY + FOREST PARK The west end of the Greenway will connect to two significant economic drivers in the region: Washington University and Forest Park. Annually, Washington University has more than $2 billion in directed spending, supporting more than 43,000 jobs in the region. The university’s main campus is undergoing a $240 million expansion. The adjacent Forest Park is a worldclass urban park, home to five major cultural institutions and attracting over fifteen million visitors a year. But many of those visitors visit just the park, taking their spending dollars with them after they leave, and intimidating road barriers prevent comfortable pedestrian access to surrounding neighborhoods like those around the Washington University Medical Center. Creating even stronger connections with high-quality greenway networks between these two assets and neighborhoods to the east can help to leverage these world-class assets to support the economic vibrancy of the entire urban core.

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Washington University if undertaking a major east end transformation of the Danforth Campus

Cambridge Innovation Center recently opened a location in Cortex.

St. Louis University is undertaking a major expansion of their south campus and medical center with the Prospect Yards development.

Underutilized areas in Downtown West are ripe for development and could go hand in hand with efforts to revitalize the historic Union Station.

CORTEX AND WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

enviable cultural hub by international standards. Significant gaps in the urban fabric, however, mean that there remains untapped potential for this cultural district to help attract amenities and investment to surrounding districts. The +StL Greenway can help strengthen these connections along Spring Street so that this density of cultural infrastructure at Grand Center helps support economic growth through more of the urban core.

Plans to remove existing highway infrastructure that detracts from creating a more pedestrian-friendly environment will create the potential for new sites for multi-family, mixeduse development that could introduce as many as one thousand market rate and affordable residential units to the area over time. As the western edge of Memorial Park and an increasingly important center of civic and visitor activity, these reclaimed lands offer an opportunity to designate a site for a new highly-visible civic or cultural institution that pays homage to the history of the Mill Creek Valley neighborhood clearance in the 1950s, and to one of St Louis’ most renowned residents. Perhaps one or more institutions would co-sponsor the establishment of the Maya Angelou Center for Social Equity, which might explore local and national history through the lens of equity, inclusion, agency, and leadership. It would be another impactful and distinctly St. Louis experience for the local community and visitors along the Greenway.

population has tripled in ten years and new commercial and hotel investments are helping to repurpose underutilized sites, but announced projects over the next five years are expected to deliver less units than were delivered in the last five years and the office market is weaker than peer markets in the region . Busch Stadium and Ballpark Village represent hundreds of millions of dollars in new investment that regularly draw thousands of visitors that, if better connected, could be leveraged to support redevelopment of underutilized warehouses and vacant land south of I-64. Downtown needs help continuing to build momentum for positive change, and the Downtown STL, Inc.’s placemaking initiative for the Garment District is a good example. Connecting the Greenway through the CBD, in close coordination with multiple ongoing planning and development initiatives, will help create a more highly-amenitized downtown — attracting new investment and uses that support safety and activity during more hours of the day — and boost the district’s ability to compete as a neighborhood of choice for residents, workers and visitors.

The Washington University Medical Center has over $6.3 billion in economic impacts in the region and hosts over 21,000 jobs in the combined medical center institutions. A $1 billion renovation is underway at the Washington University School of Medicine. To the east, the Cortex district has already made tremendous strides in attracting over $350 million in physical investments, with hundreds of millions more invested directly in companies that call the district home. The new Cambridge Innovation Center and new retail and residential investment are statements of confidence in the future of the area. A Greenway network can serve as an additional amenity in the district while also connecting Cortex to amenities in adjoining neighborhoods like the cultural hub of Grand Center. These placemaking investments that help raise real estate market demand to make new projects economically feasible can help support new mixed-use development that expands the range of housing, workspace, retail, and amenities for people working at Cortex, helping the district thrive in a highly competitive national market for growing firms and top talent.

GRAND CENTER Cultural infrastructure is a critical piece of the urban vibrancy that attracts investments, residents, and companies. Grand Center is home to 50 arts organizations, a dozen art museums, two performing arts parks, and 12,000 theater seats — an 46

MIDTOWN The Greenway will enhance connectivity to two important social centers and drivers of the economy in Midtown: Saint Louis University and Harris-Stowe State University. Combined, these institutions represent nearly $800 million in positive economic impacts in the region and nearly 8,000 jobs, yet much of their campuses remain disconnected from surrounding neighborhoods. Enhancing connections between these universities and surrounding districts can harness some of those positive economic impacts to support revitalization in the urban core.

DOWNTOWN WEST Downtown West is home to assets that draw thousands of visitors on a regular basis including City Museum, Scottrade Center, the Peabody Opera House, and the Washington Avenue Historic District. Redevelopment plans at Union Station and a new aquarium will soon attract thousands more.

DOWNTOWN Hundreds of millions of dollars in public investment has helped Downtown St. Louis attract over $1 billion in planned private development . The Gateway Arch National Park is an internationally recognized icon of the city, projected to attract over three million annual visitors after completion of the CityArchRiver redevelopment project that makes a highquality, direct connection between the Arch and downtown, but visitors need more reasons to cross the bridge and visit more of the city for longer. The neighborhood’s residential

INCLUSIVE GROWTH. FOR US. BY US. The Greenway can also serve to support the critical value of inclusive growth. Enhancing connections throughout the city can create new access to economic opportunities by creating safe routes to tens of thousands of jobs from neighborhoods with limited auto ownership and transit access. Inclusion is important not only as a shared value, but also because it contributes to economic vitality. Research


Washington University

Forest Park

Washington University Medical Center MVVA’s recently completed renovation of the Arch grounds reconnects the downtown to the riverfront.

shows that not only are inclusion, growth, and prosperity mutually reinforcing — inclusion is a key to economic success . Supporting growth that incorporates people of all backgrounds also supports the economic vitality of businesses, especially in innovation-focused fields. Teams with higher diversity outperform those from homogenous groups on innovation-related metrics and supporting more inclusive regional economies can help to maximize both talent and entrepreneur bases .

DIVERSIFY. AMPLIFY. DON’T GENTRIFY. The most successful, dynamic urban districts have an eclectic mix of businesses, residents, and institutions that promote vibrancy at multiple times of day. Greenway networks and adjacent spaces can provide spaces for intentionally curated programming that supports a greater diversity of uses and activities — increasing safety, supporting businesses, and attracting new investment in a reinforcing cycle. Importantly, the Greenway can create a framework for focusing efforts to build on St. Louis’ existing strengths. At Cortex, institutions and private businesses can partner for programming activities that grow skills, strengthen firms, and build networks to support the vibrancy of the innovation district. High-quality placemaking can help unlock the potential of existing underutilized real estate to create relatively affordable workspace and residential stock — crucial for attracting young businesses with limited resources and

• Over $2 billion in direct spending • Supporting more than 43,000 jobs in the region • In the midst of a $240 million campus expansion

• Over 15 million annual visitors a year • Two thirds visiting from over ten miles away

• • • •

164-acre medical campus $6.3 billion annual economic impact Over 21,000 jobs in combined medical center institutions $1 billion renovation of Wash U School of Medicine campus

Microbrewing has taken hold in St. Louis, building off the city’s legacy. The city was named the top beer scene in the country this year.

changing needs and potential workers enticed by affordable residential options with historic character. St. Louis’ brewing heritage presents another unique opportunity. Communities across the nation are working to attract and support craft breweries, recognizing their potential to help revitalize industrial and commercial spaces while creating new jobs — but very few have as strong a legacy and cultural connection to beer brewing as St. Louis. Intentional planning, partnerships, and individual projects can help St. Louis’ existing craft brewing community tie into a broader urban network, providing an amenity that supports the economic competitiveness of the city as a whole. While placemaking investments can increase real estate market demand and achievable prices, St. Louis has an opportunity to embed programs and policies that address displacement and gentrification into planning policy from the beginning to ensure that efforts to encourage new private investment do not do so at the cost of existing community members. Public policy strategies like investing in affordable housing alongside new development, non-profit partnerships, leveraging publicly-owned assets to support projects that generate public benefit, and creating new maker spaces, coworking spaces, and other affordable work space programs can help the city address long-term affordability in targeted areas while simultaneously increasing real estate demand to create new economic opportunities.

Cortex

• 200-acre innovation district • 350 high-tech companies providing 4,300 jobs • Over $350 million in physical investments

Grand Center

• • • •

50 arts organizations A dozen art museums 12,000 theater seats Two hotels

• Two performing arts parks • 20 restaurants and bars • Hosts more than 1,500 arts and festival events annually

Saint Louis University SLU School of Medicine and SLU Hospital

• $715 million in annual economic impacts • Nearly 7,000 jobs

Harris-Stowe State University

• $65 million in annual economic impacts • Nearly 700 jobs

Downtown West

Home to assets that draw thousands of visitors, including: • City Museum • Union Station • Scottrade Center • St. Louis Aquarium (planned) • Peabody Opera House • Washington Ave. Historic District • $1 billion in planned development

Downtown

• Three million annual visitors to Gateway Arch • Three million annual visitors to Busch Stadium • Over 600,000 visitors to America’s Center 47


An urban terrace under the highway near the Foundry with a Mary Mattingly installation

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INTEGRATE ART AND CULTURE

Archaeological Site, Chouteau Corridor

Chouteau’s Landing

The arts, culture, and heritage strategy centers around valuesbased listening with our community, understanding our rich culture, and enacting our goals for the future. The plan builds upon current successes within the arts and culture community and privileges significant heritage sites and stories along the +StL Greenway. How might arts and heritage planning play a role in the health of the community, and provide opportunities for experiential learning, job creation, spaces of creative action, community building, and delight in the daily lives of citizens? We believe that arts, culture and heritage programming can form a new commons parallel to the greenway infrastructure itself.

Our plan takes the central spine as a binder. We will capitalize on the greenway’s landscape urbanism to formulate a narrative that unearths layers of urban history and includes multiple narratives grounded in the values of St. Louisans today. The story of the city may be buried beneath excess interstate infrastructure, and blocked from view by flood walls, but it sings forth everywhere in this corridor and is alive in cultural institutions and the palimpsest of the urban environment.

SETTING THE STAGE - THE HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXTS ALONG THE StL CORRIDOR Contour Rivalry: The Accumulation of History in the Center of St. Louis The path of the +StL Greenway runs through an area of profound spatial contradiction in St. Louis, testifying both to historic development patterns of urban renewal and infrastructural expansion. History has composed a turbulent central corridor in St. Louis, where there is more void than cohesive development. The result is that the center of the city seems like a historic byproduct of depletion and accumulation. Contour rivalry is the result, with areas of density allowing us to envision a cohesive and connected core. Islands of development driven by arts and innovation districts and institutions need connecting. The pathway offers rich opportunities to create access points for neighborhoods, celebrate cultural heritage and important institutions, and capitalize on the entrepreneurial spirit of the region to enact arts and culture along the greenway.

A path that leads from the river, very reason for the city to be itself, to the main campus of Washington University, a mainstay of 21st century growth and activity, has the power to show us the St. Louis that rose, the St. Louis that thrived in the older economy, the St. Louis that tore itself apart in fits of urban renewal and the St. Louis that is working to nurture a new optimistic urbanism. In the center of the city is a rebus of development, starting with indigenous settlement that has been identified through documents as well as archaeological surveys. Surviving traces are buried, such as the mound site beneath Forest Park, but important information likely remains. The corridor sheds light on the colonial beginnings of St. Louis under French and Spanish rule. Modern urban heritage begins at the edge of the original village platted in 1764. The narrative’s built manifestation can be witnessed moving through the site of Chouteau’s Pond and emergent 19th century railyards, connected to Gilded Age urban park landscapes, inclusive of the build-up of the city’s museums and universities, home to massive industrial build-up and today the site of emergent economies at CORTEX and other locations. There are elements of historic infrastructure speaking to development in transportation, from the railyards and MacArthur Bridge to Interstate 64. Warehouses at Chouteau’s Landing and factories in Prospect Yards show how the city utilized new rail infrastructure. The interstate and buildings

DESIGN

COMMUNITY

Incorporate art that provides an interpretive layer of individual and collective expression. Consider the interactive relationship of the art to the various age groups and diverse cultures that activate the greenway. Connect to, and celebrate, existing cultural institutions within and adjacent to the corridor.

Showcase the past, present and future of this region and reflect the spirit and ideals of many different residents. Provide experiences to help visitors visualize and explore key regional themes such as music, industry, race relations, green space and architecture. Art and programs should be locallyfocused but internationally relevant, in conjunction with and inclusive of the community – diversity of artists and mediums.

along it even reveal the later adaptation of the city to truck transportation. Dense neighborhoods north and south speak to streetcar urbanism, while infill in the Grove and Botanical Heights shows the resurgence of older patterns of development. MetroLink and bike lanes show recent efforts to undo the overbuilt automobile infrastructure.

urbanization are found in the drained pond and creek tracks as well as the city’s water towers, reservoirs and flood walls. Alongside this, the center of the city records the expansion of the city’s street grid, historic nomenclature and by-now historic reorganization of the city under the city plans of 1907 and 1947. Later efforts to retard the city’s decline include both clearance programs downtown, in Mill Creek Valley, on Compton Hill and elsewhere, as well as preservation and heritage projects like the designation of historic districts south of the central corridor and the interpretive projects of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, Field House Museum, The National Blues Museum, Campbell House Museum and Griot Museum. The number of designated National Register of Historic Places buildings with single or district listings exceeds that of any other major US city, showing that the havoc wreaked by wanton application of urban renewal tools met a swift abeyance and policies designed to protect the city’s historic density and built systems.

Downtown and the Central West End store records of capital power and social clout, with resplendent architecture built by the leaders who foresaw the city being a national power. Other histories can be found in factories, and traces of lost neighborhoods like Mill Creek Valley, the Harlem of St. Louis, and the vestiges of European immigrant neighborhoods along the center. Black history in the central corridor was the product of both willful settlement and political organization and racist restrictive covenants and real estate tools. The erasure and replacement of so much of the black history in the city can show why the center is empty is certain places. Political struggle is embodied throughout the corridor, from civil rights sites dating back to freedom crossings before the Civil War to demonstrations in recent years against police brutality. Labor history echoes from the sidewalks downtown where the 1877 general strike, the 1900 streetcar strike and the 1930s poor people’s marches unfolded, as well as in the numerous addresses where unions had offices and meetings of local and national import. Suffrage organizations operated downtown and marched across the city. Queer history lies in unexpected places, and is alive and visible today in the Grove with a monument to trans lives and support organizations like the Metro Trans Umbrella Group. High art in museums and low art in bohemian enclaves intersect with the struggles. The fissure of the railyards unearths the legacy of hydrology and the story of the Mill Creek, its damming and the creation of Chouteau’s Pond and the later ordeal of the city’s lack of sanitary sewers. Modern responses to the needs of

Today the Greenway corridor includes many successful urban conservation areas, including the restored Forest Park, many neighborhoods protected by national and local designations, landmarks in downtown St. Louis, the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial and other locations. A large number of cultural institutions dedicated to identifying, preserving and interpreting cultural heritage exist in the corridor today, ranging from the Missouri History Museum to the Griot Museum and its small neighboring black heritage institutions on St. Louis Avenue. Some of the city’s most significant works of architecture, including the Gateway Arch,, the Old Courthouse, the Wainwright Building, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Union Station, the old and “new” cathedrals, the Washington and St. Louis University campuses, the Jefferson Bank and Trust Company Building, the Planetarium, and more are within the extended corridor. The equitable extensions are anchored by historic water towers and parks north and south. 49


Protests at St. Louis City Hall

Wainright Building

Grand Avenue Water Tower

Check Berry

The Saint Louis Art Museum, World Chess Hall of Fame, The Sheldon, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Jazz St. Louis, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Contemporary Art Museum, The City Museum, and other world class arts institutions dot the greenway from Forest Park to the riverfront. These institutions celebrate the cities rich music legacy of jazz, blues, and hip hop, and visual arts collections. In addition to major institutions, several granting agencies including the Regional Arts Commission, the Gateway Foundation, The Kranzberg Arts Foundation, and The Arts and Education Council support regional artists and smaller institutions that extend north and south of the corridor. Together with larger cultural organizations, these foundations and the work they support are the backbone of arts innovation and social impact in the region.

equitable extensions north and south of the central corridor— Tower Grove and Marquette Park to the south and Fairground Park to the north respectively, important assets to city residents. Fairground Park originated in the 19th century as a region civic gathering space, the Agricultural and Mechanical Fair. After the fair’s end the land served as a private fairgrounds for horse racing among other leisure games and activities. In 1908, the City purchased the 131-acre site and commissioned George Kessler and Henry Wright to design a picturesque urban park landscape, including a lake and recreational fields. Central to the original design was the city’s first public pool, which opened in 1913. The pool also was the city’s first explicitly whites-only parks amenity, although more would follow in the new Jim Crow era. The pool became the scene of the only racial riot within city limits in 1949. The result of the riot was a federal court order integrating all city parks facilities once and for all. Fairground Park sits in a historically significant area of the city considering civil rights and African American entrepreneurship, and neighborhood residents are investing in surrounding businesses and institutions. The parks current amenities include a lake, playground, a newer pool, and sports fields.

summer arts programming for youth in the neighborhood. It is the only public city park managed by an independent board of commissioners, who have recently restored several of the pavilions, roads, and pathways for park-users. Private funding has allowed the park to flourish, and the densely populated neighborhood is one of the most economically diverse in the City of St. Louis.

Perennial, Flood Plain, and youth programming like Cherokee Street Reach. It is essential to connect these neighborhoods as part of the greenway to provide accessibility to residents. Investment in these particular neighborhoods means job creation, safer transportation, and health opportunities for lower-income, often disenfranchised communities.

St. Louis has been the home to world-renowned performers, including jazz and blues legacies like Josephine Baker, Miles Davis, Chuck Berry, Tina Turner, and Scott Joplin, and contemporary artists like Nelly, who started a school of music to support young musicians and music producers in St. Louis. The Black Artists Group (1968-72), a multidisciplinary collective of artists and organizers in St. Louis did innovative neighborhood performances and creative social justice initiatives. Organizations like Prison Performing Arts inspire youth in the Juvenile Detention Center in the Grand Center Arts District, and contemporary local artist-activists have created neighborhood Art Houses. The Artivists work has been collected by the Missouri History Museum and the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture. The rich legacy of arts and culture in the city is continued by innovative thinkers and makers that creatively reuse space, experiment, and push the boundaries of art-making that deeply impact local and national arts communities.. Extending north and south of the central corridor are historically distinct and significant parks that anchor or 50

To the south, Tower Grove Park, which opened in 1872, was a gift from Henry Shaw, a merchant, slave owner, and major philanthropist who also opened the world-class Missouri Botanical Garden with its world-renowned Climatron, which sits just north of the park. Tower Grove Park has become a staple of the neighborhood and is known for its follies, pavilions, and faux ruins, which were designed by architects Francis Tunica, Eugene L. Greenleaf, and Henry ThieleIt. In addition to the pavilions, which are rented out for events, the park is home to a the popular brunch and wedding venue, the Piper Palm House, a summer farmers market, a wading pool open on summer weekends, three playgrounds, neighborhood sporting events, and the annual Festival of Nations. The park is also home to ArtScope, which hosts afterschool and

Marquette Park, located in South St. Louis’ Dutchtown neighborhood is home to the Thomas Dunn Learning Center, which provides low-cost educational and cultural programming for residents in the neighborhood. The Dunn Center is the city’s only such parks facility, and serves also as a “town hall” for public life in Dutchtown. In addition to Thomas Dunn, the park includes one of two public city pools recently reopened and free to city residents and renovated field house, a recreation center with basketball courts, and underutilized amenities including tennis and volleyball courts The Dutchtown South Community Corporation has been working closely with the alderperson, Cara Spencer, to invest funds into the neighborhood, including housing and transportation initiatives. The surrounding neighborhood has engaged residents that are investing in the future of the park and neighborhood assets, including historic commercial corridors on Meramec, Chippewa, Broadway and Jefferson avenues. The park additionally lies on the north-south line of Louisiana Avenue, selected as the inaugural pilot street for the city of St. Louis’ Calm Streets Concept program. The parks offer opportunities to invest in important cultural history and capitalize on current investments happening the surrounding neighborhoods, including a food innovation hub and a new YMCA facility in the north, and important organizations like the International Institute, South Grand international food district, housing and business rehabilitation projects, and artist-run organizations in the Cherokee district, including Blank Space, 2720, Intersect Arts, The Luminary,

The Greenway corridor offers a meta-narrative of the city’s urban history and the equitable extensions north and south provide specific local histories of late nineteenth and early twentieth century mass development. Together, these cultural landscapes tell the full story of the city as it was while pointing to what it will become. A new greenway system will provide the physical armature for making a coherent image and a narrative that fills in the city’s long-ignored gaps and celebrates its rich cultural heritage.

ENACTING ARTS, CULTURE, AND HERITAGE: VALUES-BASED COLLABORATION WITH ST. LOUISANS The culture and heritage of the +StL Greenway is best understood by its embedded experts – current and former residents, cultural workers, artists, and historians who have worked and researched the area and people with associations to its institutions, businesses and churches. Our team will pursue a values-based arts, culture, and heritage strategy, where we prioritize the identification of built and intangible resources with stakeholders. We will attenuate this collaborative process with stakeholders in the identification of built and archaeological resources identified by artists, historians, and regulatory processes including local and federal historic designation. The values of inhabitants, professionals and regulators will be given equal consideration for a comprehensive survey of resources.


Tower Grove Park, “Festival of Nations”

Cherokee Street Arts District

Graffiti Wall

Freeman Word, poet

A stakeholder group would include invitations to these entities, among others, to participate:

All sites and resources eligible to be or already listed under the St. Louis City Landmarks and National Register of Historic Places programs will be identified for protection. The two lists will be joined into a master list of sites and resources that should be preserved as the greenway project commences. The list may necessitate additional official local and federal designations. To give real weight to the heritage work, the team will recommend that no ordinances related to the greenway suspend the jurisdiction of the Cultural Resources Office of the City of St. Louis to evaluate demolition or erasure of resources in the greenway area.

Our strategy focuses on a series of arts and culture interventions along the entire greenway that consider heritage, place, and seasonal programming. The introduction of a tri- annual city-wide arts festival can be used as a strategy to build permanent installations and support over time and generate economic development.

The second big influencer will be the Regional Arts Commission’s new cultural plan for the region, Evoke, which analyzes how art can solve community challenges and be more meaningful to the lives of St. Louisans. The Evoke plan will be released in the summer of 2018. We will align our efforts with the city-wide plan, which has involved the leadership and input from hundreds in the arts and culture community. Arts, culture, and heritage planning, when done in concert with community, can create sustainable community relationships and ownership of public spaces, whereby communities of the greenway can enjoy a rich set of creative interventions including public sculpture, sound installation, or pop-up civic and performance programming that shifts with the seasons and needs of the community.

All Neighborhood Associations Artists of Color Advisory Council Intergenerational regional artists, musicians, poets, architects, artist-activists, and the tech community Staff from institutions of the Zoo Museum District The Regional Arts Commission Katherine Dunham Museum Pulitzer Arts Foundation Contemporary Art Museum The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art Cherokee Street arts and culture institutions 14th-Street arts and culture institutions Missouri History Museum Griot Museum Vashon Museum Landmarks Association of St. Louis Osage Nation Mound City Archaeological Society National Blues Museum City Garden Faculty and students from schools, colleges, and universities along the greenway Stakeholders will identify resources that should be protected, marked and celebrated as cultural assets, and make recommendations on curatorial projects and public art locations and artists. This group will also participate in the creation of community benefit agreements. The goal of these agreements are to integrate community voice, ownership, access, and equity into the process, whereby the stakeholders have legal options for holding the design team accountable. Our team will lead a survey of the greenway, which will include a formal report identifying all resources evaluated.

PUBLIC ARTS AND CULTURE STRATEGY Curatorial topics to address in our public arts plan are ecology and urban habitats, and social, political, and industrial heritage. The resulting plan will stitch together current important public art sites including the emerging East End Transformation at Washington University’s Danforth Campus, Forest Park, the Maya Lin/MVVA work on the Washington University medical campus, works in the City Garden and Richard Serra’s “Twain”, the graffiti wall along the riverfront trail, the African American Walk of Fame, local artist Bob Cassily’s work stretching from Forest Park to the riverfront, the midtown arts district in Grand Center, and architecture of interest, among others. In addition, we imagine a combination of invited international and local artists commissions of various scales, open requests for proposals, common spaces for ephemeral programming, impromptu civic and recreational spaces, and innovative public-private partnerships radiating from the central corridor into neighborhoods and across the river. We understand that the curatorial framework must adapt to the shifting cultural landscape, while maintaining adherence to timelines, execution, feasibility, and fundraising.

While our plan presents specific curatorial topics and artists of interest, we believe it is important to engage local stakeholders to inform and narrow the curatorial aims and locations for projects. The first big influencer will be the Artists of Color Advisory Council. Our local arts, culture, and heritage experts on the team (Allen, Colon-Smith, Fleischmann Brewer, Martinez) have deep ties to St. Louisbased artists of color across discipline and generation. We welcome the addition of the Artists of Color Advisory Council and would look forward to developing plans alongside them as advisors and colleagues. We are delighted that a council will be created to assist with accountability, relationshipbuilding with residents and businesses, and ensure that artists of color are represented in the projects selected to be implemented along the greenway. Historically, artists of color have been leaders of innovation in St. Louis, from the rich jazz and blues history, in the Civil Rights movement, to the Black Artists Group, and contemporary artists flourishing today as activists, filmmakers, poets, musicians, educators, and visual artists. There is significant intergenerational leadership in the African American creative community, including elders like Lois Connley of the Griot Museum, Robert Powell, who has been advocating for an African American arts district, East St. Louis poet Laureate Eugene B. Redmond, and Renee Franklin, head of engagement at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Younger creative leaders like educators and poets Freeman Word and Pacia Anderson, social impact designers like DeAndrea Nichols, and visual artist and educator, Lyndon Barrois, have experiences and leadership that would be able to hold the design team accountable through the process.

The arts, culture, and heritage strategy for the greenway is integrally connected to economic development, equity distribution, accessibility, and environmental preservation. The greater systems within our +STL design—including health, education, jobs, and housing—intersect with arts and culture to create a dynamic ecosystem of experimentation and delight. Each system is intertwined for optimal impact.

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Decommissioned ramps become infrastructure repurposed for the greenway. A new Archeology and History Museum is nestled into the landscape.

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REVEALING HISTORY & CULTURE We propose integrating Market Street and Forest Park Boulevard as a continuous Great Street. Rather than treating these two streets as separate on and off ramps for Interstate 64/Highway 40 we propose integrating them as a grand boulevard in the city. Connecting these two streets will have a profound effect on generating a culture of urban street life.

The Forest Park Parkway and Market Street ramps at Compton Avenue as they exist today. Significant areas of open space are landlocked and unused due to the attenuated ramp configurations.

Slum Clearance of the Mill Creek Valley

Three of the on/off ramps can be decommissioned with minimal impacts to traffic and converted into bicycle lanes and pedestrian walkways that connect to the greenways North and South. In the space between these pieces of infrastructure, we propose a one-of-a-kind Archeology and History Museum. There could not be a more powerful site to explore the deep history of St. Louis than at the Highway and the Mill Creek Valley Urban Removal Project. Artifacts and building remains could be collected, studied, and displayed together with work by contemporary artists and writers in St. Louis. Located adjacent to Saint Louis and HarrisStowe Universities, we imagine temporary and permanent exhibitions. The work of Damon Davis, a black St. Louis based artist, is currently shown in one of the courtyards, and Hiwa K an Iraqi immigrant working in St. Louis is shown in the other. Rather than infrastructure that divides, we propose a space that brings people and ideas together for display and debate.

The obliterated urban landscape becomes strictly defined by expressway logic.

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Even the narrowest right of way adjacent to the Union Pacific railyard will create a beautiful, biodiverse environment that will stimulate growth South of the railyard and transforming a space that was once the “back” of St. Louis into a new “front” as both a thoroughfare and a destination.

Transforming Laclede Avenue, which is already partially pedestrianized, into a Complete Street will create an important easy win for the +StL Greenway and will have a transformative affect on the city extending growth and development from the Central West End.

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IMPROVE MOBILITY AND CONNECTIVITY DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Recognize the role mobility plays as a physical and functional determinant of the greenway—providing opportunities for multiple modes and reducing conflicts between modes. Provide junctures where future connectivity to the regional system is facilitated, especially to ensure equity in transportation options.

Create compelling places that will encourage use and that are clearly delineated for walking, bicycling and driving. Direct, seamless connections to transit and parking resources for all ages and abilities are very important, as are bridges and underpasses over/under major streets.

MULTIMODAL STRATEGY

COMPLETE STREETS

BICYCLE TRENDS ACROSS THE COUNTRY

BUS TRANSIT

The transportation and multimodal aspects of the +StL Greenway plan were developed keeping in perspective the connectivity, accessibility, safety, health, economic, recreational and quality-of-life needs of St. Louis communities. As such, the strategy for developing the multimodal plan accounted for the following key parameters:

Reclaiming the underutilized Right-of-Way (ROW) on major roadways and streets and using the space for pedestrian and bicycle friendly streets was the major focus in the development of a multimodal transportation plan. Such streets are designed to be more efficient in accommodating pedestrian and bicycle traffic than conventionally designed streets which primarily serve vehicular traffic. Given the changes in demographics and commuting patterns, and a renewed focus on “healthier” lifestyles, conventional streets in certain cases are no longer compatible with modern community needs. Bikeways in particular are a great benefit to the public as they provide opportunities to incorporate physical activity in the daily routine and reduce air-quality and noise pollution. In terms of costs, installation of bikeways on existing ROW is relatively inexpensive since it doesn’t require major construction and can be achieved by restriping the pavement to delineate exclusive bicycle lanes. The City of St. Louis passed an ordinance in November 2014 adopting an updated “Complete Street” policy promoting safe and convenient access and travel for all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, transit riders, and people of all abilities. The City of St. Louis is currently working on the Downtown Multimodal Study, developing recommendations for a robust transportation network, as well as a protected bike network plan. Trailnet’s Connect STL plan has numerous community engagement activities in March and April 2018. The Chouteau Greenway Plan is complementing and building upon these on-going efforts.

The bicycle is becoming more pronounced as a sustainable mode of transportation, both throughout the United States and the world. In major cities, bike-sharing is becoming more prevalent, increasing at a rate of approximately 25% in each of the last three years nationwide. The results of this trend were 28 million bike-share trips taken throughout the United States in 2016, and this total will likely continue to increase as other mid-size cities such as St. Louis begin providing bikeshare programs. The City of St. Louis is currently considering several agreements bike share providers. Because of these factors, St. Louisans and visitors would benefit from more bicycle infrastructure in the future than what currently exists. In response to increasing demand for bicycle infrastructure, there’s been an upward trend in the construction of bicycle facilities throughout many U.S. cities. Over the last decade, approximately 360 miles of protected bike lane have been incorporated into the nation’s roadway and greenway network. St. Louis has contributed to this trend with the recent addition of protected bike lanes on Chestnut Street. Going forward, the city has expressed interest to further enhance its bicycle and pedestrian network through projects such as the Chouteau Greenway. While larger cities such as New York and Chicago have implemented significantly more protected bike lanes than other smaller U.S. cities, mid-size cities such as Minneapolis and Portland are also outpacing St. Louis in constructing protected bicycle facilities.

Bus transit is a convenient way for providing mass transit options for both city dwellers and suburban residents. Based on American Public Transportation Association (APTA), bus service comprises the majority of U.S. Public transportation fleet. Building upon and improving the existing MetroBus service in the St. Louis metro area will be a key in improving the mass transit options to serve the multimodal vision. Depending on the demand, three different types of bus service can be introduced into the system including:

1. Leveraging the existing systems; 2. Taking advantage of previous investments in transportation infrastructure; 3. Realignment of existing transportation infrastructure to gain efficiencies; 4. Implementation of new ideas to improve the overall transportation experience; 5. Identification of ways in which the new improved multimodal systems can spur economic, cultural and recreational activities In essence, the transportation multimodal plan was developed with the goal of providing the much-desired connectivity between the north and south neighborhoods of St. Louis while fostering better connections between institutions in the East/ West corridor. Such a plan should serve as a “guide” for future development in support of local community, governmental, institutional and recreational uses.

1. Local—for areas where service currently doesn’t exist. This can serve short routes with stops every couple of blocks. Can be used seasonally to provide transit options between economic and cultural loops. 2. Express Service—for connecting both the north and south neighborhoods with CBD, employment centers, institutions and the Greenway. During the typical rush hour, it will serve commuters and on weekends it will serve patrons using the Greenway or destined for events/festivals. 3. Bus Rapid Transit—it is a limited stop service which operates in dedicated “exclusive bus lanes” which enables it to provide high speed service irrespective of the traffic conditions. It provides advantages of a rail system with a lower cost of implementation and operation. At major intersections, BRT can use traffic signal priority (TSP), whereby traffic signals turn green when they detect an oncoming bus, to minimize delays. Metro Transit began a study last year called Metro Reimagined to ensure the St. Louis transit system is positioned to meet the changing needs of the region. Their proposed improvements include enhanced frequency, commute express and community mobility zones. Their specific recommendations are being presented through informational meetings and public hearings in April 2018 giving Metro the opportunity to coordinate with the +StL Greenway plan. 55


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One-way Protected Cycle Track (One Side Only) One-way Protected Cycle Track (Both Sides) Two-way Cycle Track Shared Bike Lane Independent Bicycle & Pedestrian

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ECOLOGICAL APPROACH: NATIVE AND LOCAL Native habitats and species will be the inspiration and foundation for the vegetative design of the greenway. As a result, the Chouteau Greenway will use species that are already well adapted to the local climate and will need less watering and maintenance than exotic cultivars. Please refer to the Ecology appendix for many additional details regarding the habitats and design elements planned. Our team’s approach will be to integrate native ecosystems and a diverse assemblage of native species into this project to the maximum extent possible. By incorporating natural habitats into the essence of the site design, the Chouteau Greenway has a wonderful opportunity to create landscapes that are ideal for local wildlife, will increase urban biodiversity, and will improve residents’ access and exposure to the region’s ecology and habitats. The Chouteau Greenway will bring more nature deep into the City, addressing a OneSTL regional plan Green Goal: Provide Increased Access to Nature for All Citizens. Our plan will expand the amount of natural habitat within the City for the benefit of native plants and animals, but more importantly we will build upon and connect to St. Louis’ existing and future natural highlights, including but not limited to Forest Park, Tower Grove Park, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the St. Louis Aquarium at Union Station, the St. Louis Zoo, and the Mississippi River.

A City By Nature: Interaction & Experience The native habitats along the Chouteau Greenway will provide important ecosystem services to the St. Louis area. But the most important benefit will be to enhance the experience of visitors. Public interaction with the habitats and species that will be established can be facilitated through the incorporation of boardwalks and bridges over wetlands and water features, interpretive signs, and locations that optimize activities like birdwatching and outdoor painting. Our vision is for this project to help bring wildlife and nature into the heart of St. Louis, reducing the barriers that keep many residents from being able to enjoy and experience the outdoors. By fostering interactions among people, the Chouteau Greenway will strengthen the links between different communities. By bringing more nature into the City it will also create and reinforce the connections between people and nature. Additionally, the numerous loops and extensions that stretch far in all directions will help increase connections among different parts of the city and help equalize disparities in air quality, water quality, exposure to nature, and opportunities for exercise and healthy lifestyles.

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Habitat types arrayed along the greenway and the terrain are organized along drainage ways , with urban area primarily dry, upland habitat and low-lying lands seasonal wetlands


SHAPE A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

A seasonal water line along the railway alignment. Water, grading, and walls keep visitors safely separated from this unique working landscape.

INTEGRATING INFRASTRUCTURE & ECOLOGY St. Louis was built on industry, much of which is still operating today. Rather than relocating or removing this industrial heritage, we propose embracing it and integrating ecological habitats, pathways, and recreational experiences with artifacts of industry. Not only is this pragmatic and cost effective, it is also healthier for the surrounding city. Increased tree canopy will buffer the diesel emissions from train engines, improve air quality, and create shaded environments for recreation. Activating and illuminating these spaces at night will create safe routes for walking, cycling, commuting, community groups, and local neighborhood residents. Rather than treating the railyard valley as “back” of St. Louis, we propose making it a new “front” for engagement and experience. In this space, we propose a bridge overlooking the railyard at Spring Street, connecting St. Louis University’s North and South Campuses as well as the greenway from the Cortex MetroLink Station to the Grand MetroLink Station.

DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Incorporate technology and opportunities for programming that create environmental, economic, and cultural sustainability for the greenway. Adopt best practices to improve watershed health, air and water quality and urban biodiversity. Ensure the greenway corridor is sustainable operationally through a coordinated program between Great Rivers Greenway, the City of St. Louis, and other partners.

Address the health of the natural environment throughout the project and consider wildlife. Use sustainable practices to reduce maintenance and replacement needs such as native plantings, locally-sourced, recycled materials, thoughtful water use and renewable energy.

Even in narrow 50 to 60’ development corridors, the greenway can hold bike and walking lanes, continuous tree cover, and a linear water collection and filtration feature that doubles as a safety buffer preventing unsafe access to the trains.

Working Landscapes The habitats and vegetation along the Chouteau Greenway will enhance the visual experience and provide aesthetic beauty for all visitors. But just under the surface, this designed landscape will also be performing important ecological and environmental functions. The landscapes of the Chouteau Greenway will be examples of innovative 21stcentury bioengineering, harnessing the natural abilities of plants, soils, and landforms to provide needed ecological benefits. First among these is water quality, helping to meet a OneSTL regional plan Green Goal to Guarantee Clean Water for All Citizens. An important environmental and aesthetic aspect of the Chouteau Greenway will be the restoration of former storm sewer pipes to attractive open waterways. This will reduce the amount of storm water entering combined sewers and therefore lower the frequency and magnitude of combined sewer overflows which are one of the primary threats to water quality in the area. In addition, our team’s design incorporates many other habitat features that will improve local water quality. First, the plants and soils in rain gardens and bioswales in the neighborhoods and upland portions of the project area will absorb and process a portion of the urban pollutants and runoff that they receive, reducing downstream contamination levels and flooding. Along the edge of any waterways or

Choose Your Own Adventure ponds, wetland fringes will also trap and filter water pollution and detain water which will reduce peak flood flows. Our Chouteau Greenway design harnesses the natural abilities of wetlands to improve water quality and provide significant wildlife habitat benefits in numerous locations, such as along the edges of stream channels, off-channel wetland areas, along the fringes of ponds, as floating islands, and in larger storm water features such as the Birding and Biodiversity Park. Wetland floating islands are another great way to increase the amount of beneficial soil-water contact through naturallooking habitat features that are pleasing to the eye, clean the water, and provide habita t for fish, insects, and birds. Our vision is for the Chouteau Greenway to both evolve beyond its industrial past and to simultaneously celebrate that history. For example, areas of mild petroleum hydrocarbon contamination are planned to be dealt with using phytoremediation whenever possible (public safety is our number one priority and more traditional methods of containing or removing contamination will be used whenever is necessary). As a result, the plants in these areas will be performing extra duty: cleaning the environment while also providing aesthetic benefit and wildlife habitat.

In addition to improving walking and biking between the great natural amenities in our area, our intention is to have the ecological loops that make up the Chouteau Greenway be biodiverse and interesting natural destinations in themselves. The greenway’s layout as a series of ecological loops means that visitors will have a wide diversity of options for their visit. They can choose any number of different lengths or paths as they travel from one place to another or eventually circle back to their original starting point. The different loops will each have their own character and the neighborhoods, streets, and other surroundings will impress their own signature onto each portion of a loop. For example, some loops will have distinct water features like open channels or wetland storm water basins while others will have greater amounts of prairie plantings, especially vibrant fall foliage, or fruit trees. Similarly, certain loops will have more of a residential street nature while others are situated in industrial areas. As a result, the greenway can provide a wide range of experiences to suit the interests of a diverse community.

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500’ Typical Sections along the greenway at the rail corridor showing hydrological and babitat approaches

Birding And Biodiversity Park: A Greenway In The Heart Of A Flyway Described by the Audubon Society as a “River of Birds”, the Mississippi River flyway is a crucial migratory path for more than 325 bird species. As a result, Chouteau Greenway visitors could have the opportunity to view a great diversity of bird life, from species that inhabit the area year-round to those that migrate through seasonally. Because of their high degree of species richness and abundance of animal life, wetlands will be the dominant habitat in the most prominent natural feature within the greenway: a birding and biodiversity park. This park would be located along the southern eastwest greenway path between Union Station and the baseball stadium at the position of a planned storm water management practice where existing piped storm water would be intercepted and conveyed to this location, keeping it from entering the combined storm water system. Instead of a typical engineered detention basin featuring concrete and turf grass, this area will be an urban bird oasis with shallow marsh conditions, a contoured natural water’s edge, and extensive native plantings. Scattered

Hydrology trees adapted to wet conditions like bald cypress, river birch, and black willow would be present for shade and roosting. A few areas of higher elevation would allow prairie plantings to provide habitat for upland birds and other species to inhabit. Those higher areas would feature bat houses and birdhouses to support those species which would provide additional sights to visitors and would feed on the insects that would inhabit the area. Creating a birding and biodiversity hotspot near the new St. Louis Aquarium at Union Station would provide an even bigger draw to the area for nature lovers. Also, in order to fit in with the adjacent sporting atmosphere, significant groupings of red and white flowering species would emphasize the colors of the Redbirds. Some examples that are well adapted to moist or wet conditions include the brilliant red cardinal flower, white-flowering buttonbush shrubs (loved by butterflies), and beautiful hibiscus with its large white flowers. Also, the bright red flowers of royal catchfly and the prolific white of foxglove beardtongue could be planted in clumps along the borders of this area.

The Chouteau Greenway will not replicate historic conditions at the site, but will restore some of the functions and much of the atmosphere lost when Mill Creek was buried in culverts and Chouteau Lake was drained to prevent the spread of disease. Water quality in the lake was thought to be the source of a cholera epidemic in 1849, after having become a waste site for industrial and municipal wastewater. When restoring water to the area, promotional materials will stress the connection with the city’s history and the history of water quality management, and will describe the natural processes that sustain the quality of urban ecosystems. Both localized flooding and basement backups typically occur when the capacity of combined sewers is exceeded and the sewers surcharge through low-lying inlets. Areas most vulnerable to flooding lie along trunk sewer lines that further extend up into the catchment. Through disconnection – closing street inlets and disconnecting downspouts stormwater can be diverted from the sewers for management elsewhere. In many cases it is possible to retrofit properties with rain barrels, green roofs or rain gardens which have the capacity to detain a portion of the runoff volume. When these capacities are exceeded, or in areas where management sites are not available, the diverted runoff has to be directed toward swales, channels or other conveyance methods to

reach discharge points downstream within the Greenway. These conveyance pathways can themselves become green amenities, irrigating and sustaining planted swales or other modified channels within the right of way. Phasing implementation of the system, prioritizing the construction of the core Greenway and receiving areas, will permit gradual expansion of the contributing catchment over time as communities come to understand the function and beauty of green systems and respond to incentives for downspout disconnection. Green infrastructure costs vary with location, methods and local conditions, but in most cases have been demonstrated to be price competitive with conventional “gray” methods. The benefits of green systems, however, extend well beyond CSO abatement. Though it is difficult to quantify the extent of these benefits with respect to individual projects, research is showing that green stormwater infrastructure provides measurable improvements to air quality, job creation, reductions in street crime, reductions in urban heat island effect, creation of natural habitat, recreational and educational amenities and increased property values. Furthermore, the cost of operating deep tunnels or other store-and-treat type systems includes substantial energy inputs for pumping and treating. Natural systems primarily operate by gravity alone, representing reduced dependence on energy resources and a more sustainable path for urban systems management. 61


DESIGN PRINCIPLES:

Amplifying industrial heritage by re-purposing

Create new institutions / experiences that celebrate the culture and history of St. Louis (i.e. Archeology Museum)

Improve connectivity and promote a sense of place between urban assets through the use of above ground pedestrian bridges

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Adding new 24/7 programing to promote economic growth

Building intimacy and safety of neighborhoods through layering of soft and hardscapes


LOC AL

PROMOTE DESIGN EXCELLENCE DESIGN

COMMUNITY

Set a standard for future greenway improvements through fundamental urban design methodologies and place making techniques. Recognize that the sum of the increments defines the whole. Determine design guidelines that set the standard for future and evolving greenway improvements.

Use evidence-based professional expertise to show St. Louisans what a world-class project looks like and demonstrate why design choices were made.

GLOB

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HOW TO BUILD AND AMPLIFY CHARACTER FOR THE CITY WHILE FORTIFYING LOCAL COMMUNITIES METHODOLOGY: I N C U B A T I O N

1. MAPPING OF URBAN ASSETS

3. BUILDING CONNECTIVITY

Urban assets, whether historic, natural, institutional, financial, or cultural, are key resources which are a part of the critical infrastructure of the city. Together they define a sense of place as well as the quality of life for the city’s inhabitants. Proper identification of these assets at the initial stage will ensure a more precise placement of the Greenway routes to better connect and utilize them for the overall Greenway experience.

Two loops, connecting the city N-S and E-W, will connect the identified urban assets into a cohesive urban experience. These loops will become a new platform for people, commerce, an culture to meet. The loops will be synergistic - new relationships between N-S-E-W neighborhoods will be drawn and boundaries redefined.

Implement new ecologies

2. PRESCRIBE NEW PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

4. IMPLEMENT NEW ECOLOGY

Building Connectivity

Part of the ambition of the Greenway is to surgically prescribe specific programs and activities that will act as urban acupuncture - bringing new life to otherwise lack luster neighborhoods and area. These programs and activities come in a variety of scales - from the introduction of new large institutions to small urban furniture, their application are carefully placed after analysis of existing urban conditions.

New ecological layers will further add to the flora and fauna diversity along the corridor, creating a more live-able, healthy and resilient St. Louis that can support the challenges of a growing economy. Prescribe new programs and activities

Mapping existing assets

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BE ASPIRATIONAL AND ACHIEVABLE

THE StL GREENWAY WILL ACHIEVE ITS ASPIRATION, WITH GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY, THE PARTNERS AND THE COMMUNITY The aspiration of the +StL Greenway proposal is big. To achieve such aspiration will require just as big a commitment from Great Rivers Greenway, its project partners and most importantly the collective support of the St. Louis city and regional community. As already stated, these are goals well set in motion, proven over and over by the willing support from the community and public and private partners. +StL Greenway is ambitious, to say the least, but it is not unattainable. If fact, for St. Louis to succeed with this project, if must be expansive; it must be accessible; and, it must be inclusive. Our proposal unabashedly believes that both the scope and scale of the initial brief be not limited to just the central corridor to connect “the Arch to the Park,” but should expand to connect the North and the South side neighborhoods and its parks. In fact, the community has requested such, so this project must deliver on such ask, or it will fail. Our belief of connecting the city in multiple directions -“growing an urban mosaic” -- has been our team philosophy since day 1, and we are committed to achieving the aspiration of the “+” framework, and not just “in our lifetimes,” but

DESIGN GOAL

COMMUNITY GOAL

Design a greenway that answers to functional and programmatic needs but has elements that celebrate its uniqueness and its importance as a fundamental element of infrastructure for the continuing evolution of the city.

Create a unique, compelling and dynamic experience that connects people to St. Louis that can be built “in my lifetime” and created to last for future generations.

designing the adaptable framework for generations to follow, with the multiple generations that inhabit the area today.

are already there, or will not allow residents to live, work and play there.

St. Louis is a unique city and region, its histories run deep, and with such histories of course come intense challenges, sometimes intense pain. These should not remain hidden, nor should they be romanticized. They should be made contemporary, through the design of the +StL Greenway, for all its residents and visitors to share in a place like no other, and aspire for a greater, equitable, future.

To do so, the pieces are here. They do not need to be reinvented. They certainly do not need to be erased. Currently, they are just not connected. They need to be nurtured, and built upon. We propose an integrated concept of Economic Assets (build upon what is here), Ecological Loops (connect with thickened, diverse bands), and Equitable Extensions (reach beyond to neighborhoods in need). Taken together, and with the ultimate support of the client, its partners, and the community, this ambitious project is indeed achievable.

We propose the +StL Greenway only for St. Louis. Selfish as it may sound, this will set the +StL Greenway apart from other cities and places that have attempted, some more successful than others, ambitious designs on such a large scale. But other places do not have the Gateway Arch, Forest Park, or the ecologies that emerge from the confluence of the Mississippi, Missouri and Illinois Rivers. Other places do not have the St. Louis Cardinals or lay claim to incredible figures like Maya Angelou, and too many others to list here. And just as importantly, other places may not have such an unique opportunity to connect such an incredible aggregate of neighborhoods, from the east to the west, from the north and south. With these amazing assets re-connected in an urban mosaic, we will be successful. But we must be mindful of such success, and not allow our ambitious project to fall into the trap of flashy design that only caters to a certain demographic, or by the unintended consequences of its own success, displaces the residents that

On a final note, we have built our team on such an aspiration. We are an ambitious, big team, comprised of a wide array of disciplines, backgrounds diversities and from locations around the globe. We have come together on a shared platform to promote +StL Greenway design. Many of our team members our locals, deeply embedded in the communities across the region. We are not going anywhere. We believe this especially sets ourselves apart to be here “for the long haul.” And to design the +StL Greenway, with the St. Louis community!

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FAIRGROUND PARK

NORTH CITY FOOD HUB

+ ENHANCING CAMPUS LIFE

BO UL EV AR D AN

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MISSION: ST LOUIS

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THE GATEWAY MALL

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The Gateway Mall is the spine of Downtown St. Louis. Multifamily residential and retail development around an extension of the Gateway mall would promote 24 hour life in St. Louis. The sunken plaza would create a pedestrian friendly environment for downtown dining, retail, cultural, and arts events. Imagine a St. Louis version of Rockefeller Center Plaza that integrates pedestrian and bicycle paths from Downtown while connecting Downtown West with Midtown. The one-way bike lanes on either side of Chestnut and Market Streets seamlessly transition to a two-way bike lane on the South side of Market Street through midtown toward Spring Street and the Foundry while also connecting to a bicycle route coming from the Jefferson interchange and railyard in the South.

Laclede is ideally positioned both visually on axis with the Arch and is already pedestrianized or gated off along significant stretches of its length. The street is relatively quiet and well nearly a Greenway already. Improved paving, street furniture, food trucks, temporary installations, exhibitions and a two-way bike lane along the Southern side of Laclede through Saint Louis University and Harris Stowe would enhance campus life and increase their safety with greater pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Event programming and additional campus buildings would go even further to make Laclede a vibrant pedestrian street for showcasing the strengths of these two Universities.

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+ CATALYZING DOWNTOWN

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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY & HARRIS STOWE UNIVERSITY

MCCB INC OASIS RESIDENTIAL CARE FACILITY

The Fairground Park area is a critical node in North City, an historic and contemporary nexus of several neighborhoods with active neighborhood associations. The park is an ideal anchor in creating a North to South, park to park loop to better equalize investment in public infrastructure. The proposal includes improvements to the basic necessities identified by the community, including reducing vacancies and improving infrastructure, such as repairing roads, better street lighting, and traffic calming along Natural Bridge and neighboring streets of Vandeventer and North Grand. Improving life in North St. Louis will improve life in the city and region as a whole.

H

To compliment the annual Summer Whitaker Concert Series at St. Louis Place and Ivory Perry parks we propose additional happenings, a Friday Food Truck event, street dinners and festivals. These events, concerts, and neighborhoods in the North would benefit from further investments in street infrastucture. Protected vegetated bike lanes, street lighting, sidewalk and road repairs would make a major difference in improving the quality of life in North St. Louis. Bike lanes would increase mobility of residents and accessibility to the various parts of the +StL Greenway and jobs in the central corridor. These improvements North and South of the central East West corridor will go a long way to making all people feel invited and welcome in the Greenway and have a powerful impact on the city and its accessibility.

DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

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NATURAL BRIDGE AND FAIRGROUND PARK

NO RT

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AV E

Several safe pedestrian crossings separate from vehicular traffic are needed across Kingshighway Boulevard. Children’s place is a North South midpoint directly connected to our Greenway proposal at the MetroLink line. The Hospital density at this crossing requires a bridge with stairs and elevators. But a bridge doesn’t need to only be a bridge, in this case, the bridge is both a spectacular overlook for Forest Park and a Canopy walk through the trees. The bridge gradually ramps up to an L-shaped overlook while the lower part of the bridge crosses Kingshighway and then begins gradually ramping down and switching back and forth between the trees and woodland habitats of Forest Park until it lands near the ice rink.

VANDEVENTER & MAFFITT

VA N

Forest Park deserves a grand and dramatic entrance from the city, at the same time, the narrow bridge crossing I-64/Highway 40 to the growing Grove neighborhood should be replaced with a much more generous space for pedestrians and cyclists. As an underpass, the gateway can be a source of security and safety for the park and immediate vicinity. The underpass should cross beneath Kingshighway to allow for seamless gradual crossings safe for cyclists and wheelchair users alike. The underground spaces adjacent to the underpass are large enough to incorporate a visitor’s center, a ranger station, a first aid clinic, and a refreshment shop for use and public safety within the underpass and at the South East corner of the park and Clayton Avenue at all hours.

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OASIS RESIDENTIAL CARE FACILITY

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CHILDREN’S PLACE BRIDGE

+ GROWING THE NORTH

NT

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+ NORTHERN HAPPENINGS

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CLAYTON AVENUE

+ FOREST PARK OVERLOOK

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+ FOREST PARK GATEWAY

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

GRIOT MUSEUM OF BLACK HISTORY

NATIONAL GEOSPATIAL AGENCY

FOREST PARK DEBALIVIERE METROLINK STATION

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION

8 ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

THE TRESTLE

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CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER

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PULITZER ARTS FOUNDATION LACL ED

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT

THE SPOT YOUTH ENUE CENTER

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CHILDRENS PLACE

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LACL ED

17 FOUNDRY (LAWRENCE GROUP)

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HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY

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CLAYTON AVENUE

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RIVER GREE

CORTEX METROLINK STATION

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YOUTH IN NEED

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VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

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CIVIC CENTER METROLINK STATION N PA CIFIC

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CASA DE SALUD

ST LOUIS AMTRAK STATION

EADS BRI DGE

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EAST RIVERFRONT METROLINK STATION

WAINWRIGHT BUILDING

SCOTT TRADE CENTER

UNION STATION

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UNIO

CITY OF ST. LOUIS STADIUM METROLINK STATION

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GATEWAY ARCH NATIONAL PARK

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT.

MALCOM W. MARTIN MEMORIAL PARK

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

COM

BUSCH STADIUM

SOUT H

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

8TH & PINE METROLINK STATION

REET

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21ST

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PROSPECT YARDS

ARCH LACLEDES LANDING METROLINK STATION

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CHO

ARMORY (GREEN STREET ST. LOUIS)

AVE

Cortex is the Midwest’s premier innovation hub of bioscience and technology research, development, and commercialization, serving as the anchor of St. Louis’ growing ecosystem for innovative startup programs and established companies. The future labs, offices, and residential developments need their own community spaces. A park with an amphitheater and short underpasses for bicycle paths connected to underground parking would create a venue for open air product launches and casual outdoor lunches with cafes and communal open space. Outdoor innovation fairs could occur during the week and local residents could picnic or use playground spaces. Of course the silos should project art, such as the Jenny Holzer pictured.

To compliment the Grand Arts District a number of informal art installations and happenings are proposed within and around the Greenway. Highway underpasses can be exciting and unconventional spaces to create in situ art and culture projects transforming what might otherwise be a derelict space into an exciting a creative one. With the new development coming to Cortex and Midtown, it is important that the Greenway underpasses are activated and utilized. Local and International artists can be commissioned for temporary work in these spaces to create spaces of continuous renewal, surprise, delight, and activity.

CONVENTION CENTER METROLINK STATION

2

17

RING

Forest Park and Washington University need a safer crossing for pedestrians and cyclists due to the width of Skinker Boulevard and the speed of vehicles. An underpass between Forest Park and the Centennial Greenway would create a grade separated crossing segregating automobiles from bicycles and pedestrians. Three ramps are graded from different directions to allow continuous travel on a bicycle. Adjacent to Bixby Hall, a series of terraced steps form a gathering space while spaces under the road are activated by a visitor center, security booth, and café. Given the proximity to the School of Art, sculpture installations are proposed, such as the Mary Miss sculpture in the foreground below.

I-64/HWY 40 UNDERPASS AT VANDEVENTER

H SP

CORTEX & GRAIN SILO PARK

FORSYTH BOULEVARD

+ INFORMAL ART & CULTURE

SOUT

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+ AMPLIFYING COMMUNITY & CULTURE

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+ FOREST PARK / WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY GATEWAY

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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY CWE METROLINK STATION

TUC

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FOREST PARK

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

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As the counterpoint to Fairground Park in the North, we envision Marquette Park as an amplified asset for the surrounding neighborhoods, and greater St. Louis. The Compton Avenue loop extension will be a central feature to better reconnect the divided sides of Marquette park. In addition to a protected bike lane with vegetated raingarden buffer, additional traffic calming bump-out measures are made at the north and south ends of the park. A new outdoor picnic and performance landscape will better connect the street and two sides of the park to the recently renovated Field House on the west side, and to the already robust Thomas Dunn Learning Center and recently reopened swimming pool on the east side.

+ FOREST PARK CROSSING LACLEDE AT KINGSHIGHWAY

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Crossing improvements are made at Laclede and Kingshighway to facilitate access to Forest Park from the Central West End. Additional trails are added in Forest Park creating a North South bicycling route along Kingshighway.

+ RAILYARD BRIDGE 22ND STREET

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SOUTH RAILYARD

THE SOCIAL AFFAIR

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A pedestrian and cycling bridge at 22nd Street facilitates an important North - South Greenway connection between the adjoining neighborhoods and Union Station.

+ DEVELOPING HABITATS & HYDROLOGY

BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK

A prairie and wetland is located at the base of the local watershed on the site of a former parking lot between the MetroLink and Amtrak alignments. The large, low-lying landscape relieves loading on nearby storm-water infrastructure and offsets surges from adjacent parking areas by diverting water into a series of interconnected basins. The tall grass prairie habitat supports the biodiversity of local flora and fauna while providing a rich habitat for migrating birds. This biologically productive site anchors the southern end of the greenway and provides opportunities for environmental education, bird, frog, and bat watching, short nature hikes and prairie picnics-unique recreational programs for the emerging Ballpark and Chouteau’s Landing neighborhoods.

SOUTH

GUSTINE AVENU

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INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE

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PETER & PAUL COMMUNITY SERVICES

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13

PRAIRIE WETLAND AND BIRD PARK

The +StL Greenway along the Union Pacific railyard is one of the most exciting opportunities in all of St. Louis. By utilizing adjacent right-ofways, parking lots, and underutilized or derelict warehouses the space along the railyard allows for two independent walking and cycling pathways between newly established natural systems and the industrial railyard. The benefits are multiple for the city: a completely new and exciting experience in the form of a linear park, passive air filtration through increased tree canopy around the railyard, hydrological water treatment and stormwater retention, and increased real estate values between the railyard and Chouteau Avenue all while celebrating the industry of the Railroad.

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MARQUETTE PARK DUTCHTOWN

+ PATHWAYS BETWEEN NATURE & INDUSTRY

COMPTO

The Spring Street bridge and railyard overlook creates a vital connection between the EastWest Greenway adjacent to the MetroLink line between Cortex and Grand stations and the Greenway running adjacent to the Union Pacific Freight Rail line that ends at Chouteau’s Landing. Reconnecting Spring Street creates not only a pedestrian and bicycle route between St. Louis University’s North and South Campuses under and over I-64, but a spectacular overlook that celebrates the presence of the railyard with a view of the Gateway Arch beyond. The Spring Street bridge also allows the Greenway to extend South through the Shaw neighborhood to loop together all four parks with Tower Grove Park as its largest Southern anchor.

+ GROWING THE SOUTH

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER

N AVENU

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SPRING STREET

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39TH STREET

+ PROSPECT YARDS BRIDGE & OVERLOOK

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MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

GROVE AVE NUE

LAFAYETTE PARK

+ MACARTHUR OVERLOOK CHOUTEAU’S LANDING

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The MacArthur Bridge used to have an upper deck with a roadway. While most of this roadway structure has been removed, a significant amount still exists. The road gradually slopes up from 7th Street at Gratiot Street near the Wetland Bird Park and the Eastern end of the Southern East West Greenway along the railyard. The gradual slope is ideal for a bicycle and pedestrian pathway leading to a dramatic Mississippi River overlook. The existing warehouse buildings can be reused for housing and galleries as well as new residential buildings and development. The overlook can host festivals and events while providing access to a lightweight bicycle and pedestrian crossing over the Mississippi River to the Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park.

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+ REVEALING HISTORY AND CULTURE

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COMPTON INTERCHANGE

We propose integrating Market Street and Forest Park Boulevard as a continuous Great Street. Rather than treating these two streets as separate on and off ramps for I-64/Highway 40 we propose integrating them as a grand boulevard in the city. Connecting these two streets will have a profound affect on generating a culture of urban street life. Three of the on/ off ramps can be decommissioned with minimal impacts to traffic and converted into bicycle lanes and pedestrian walkways that connect to the Greenways North and South. In the space between these pieces of infrastructure, we propose a one-of-a-kind Archeology and History Museum. There could not be a more powerful site to explore the deep history of St. Louis than at the Highway and the Mill Creek Valley Urban Removal Project. Artifacts and building remains could be collected, studied, and displayed together with work by contemporary artists and writers in St. Louis. Located adjacent to Saint Louis and Harris-Stowe Universities, we imagine temporary and permanent exhibitions. The work of Damon Davis, a black St. Louis based artist, is currently shown in one of the courtyards, and Hiwa K an Iraqi immigrant working in St. Louis is shown in the other. Rather than infrastructure that divides, we propose a space that brings people and ideas together for display and debate.

+ CONNECTING THE MALL TO THE GATEWAY ARCH

StL

6

CHESTNUT & MARKET STREETS Chestnut Street could be repaved with traffic calming pedestrian friendly materials and repurposed in order to create a strong connection between the city and the Gateway Arch bridge. The street, together with improvements on Market Street, should serve as a primarily pedestrian and cycling pathway. Currently the street functions as little more than a linear parking lot with access to adjacent parking structures. Sidewalk area can be increased for streetside cafes and improved retail development with little impact on traffic or parking demand while enhancing the recently renovated Kiener Plaza. We propose a one-way East bound bicycle lane on Chestnut Street and one-way West bound lane on Market Street.

+StL: GROWING AN URBAN MOSAIC Infrastructure is a part of our new public realm. The challenges facing cities and urbanized regions in the twenty-first century are complex and contested, but far from abstract—impacting us as individuals, communities, and societies. Efforts to improve our urban environment, to build a more just and healthy city, to extend the public realm must be strategic but also tactical. The outcomes of these efforts must be multi-functional, inclusive, and resilient. A contradiction is facing the urban space situated between Forest Park and the Mississippi River at the proposed Greenway. Running East-West in a shallow valley at the center of the city, 20th century infrastructure connects people and goods locally, regionally, nationally, via I-64, freight rail and the MetroLink light rail. At the same time, this infrastructure serves as a physical and psychological barrier between the Central West End, Midtown, Downtown, and North City and neighborhoods to the South. This irregular condition - a thickened band of movement and industry - sliced into the gridiron of St. Louis can now only be crossed at major arteries.

+ CONNECTING ILLINOIS EAST ST. LOUIS

The aspiration of Greenways exists in the idea of creating a network of public routes through the city in a landscaped system both distinct from and cohabit-able with the existing street network. Only a radical re-conception of this infrastructural band can bridge the north-south divide and become the primary artery of the Greenways system. A bold investment in public space is required to unite divisions, remediate industry, add new amenities, incentivize development, and provide alternate means of movement in a multi-modal city.

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CONCEPT: 3 E’s

It is well known that Eero Saarinen’s original 1947 vision for the Gateway Arch National Park was intended to encompass both sides of the river. The Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park remains disconnected and so do the neighborhoods of East St. Louis. Utilizing existing infrastructure at the MacArthur and Eads Bridges will create a bicycle and pedestrian route connecting the two sides of the river and the two parks. Doing so would give residents in both states access to the +StL Greenway and the jobs and recreational opportunities it amplifies. Marathons, bike races, and other events could loop across the bridges, capitalizing on what is one of the most spectacular views in America.

+ INTEGRATING INFRASTRUCTURE & ECOLOGY

+ TRANSFORMING INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE & INFRASTRUCTURE

3

GREENWAY AT THE RAILYARD

+ FUTURE GREENWAYS

The +StL Greenway is a primary armature for future growth and future Greenways in St. Louis. A number of future projects by Great Rivers Greenway, Trailnet, and others should stem from the +StL Greenway in the future. The future Greenways shown here align with pre-existing studies and are not exhaustive.

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FOUNDRY TRESTLE

St. Louis was built on industry, much of which is still operating today. Rather than relocating or removing this industrial heritage, we propose embracing it and integrating ecological habitats, pathways, and recreational experiences with artifacts of industry. Not only is this pragmatic and cost effective, it is also healthier for the surrounding city. Increased tree canopy will buffer the diesel emissions from train engines, improve air quality, and create shaded environments for recreation. Activating and illuminating these spaces at night will create safe routes for walking, cycling, commuting, community groups, and local neighborhood residents. Rather than treating the railyard valley as “back” of St. Louis, we propose making it a new “front” for engagement and experience. In this space, recently named “Prospect Yards”, a new pedestrian bridge overlooks the railyard at Spring Street and connects St. Louis University’s North and South Campuses, the Foundry, Armory, and the Greenway from the Cortex MetroLink Station to the Grand MetroLink Station.

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The +StL Greenway project is designed to amplify the existing assets of St. Louis while taking powerful measures to address the multitude of challenges the city is facing. To do this, we propose a layered strategy with three primary components: Economic Assets, Ecological Loops, and Equitable Extensions : we call them the three E’s. Combined, these 3 E’s address opportunities for economic development and access, performative landscape ecology, and equitable access to jobs, institutions, education, and public space. The overall project seeks to reinforce what is already strong in St. Louis while bridging divisions and stimulating new seeds of growth in areas that need further investment. The resultant + figure boldly joins North and South at the central East West corridor - we firmly believe that the greenway must extend at least as far North and South as it does East and West while providing an armature for future projects by Great Rivers Greenway, Trailnet, and others to plug into to further connect the project to the communities of St. Louis and beyond. Through this armature we intend to grow a new urban mosaic for St. Louis, built on unique cultural identities, histories revealed, shared ambitions, and a new connective and productive Greenway for St. Louis.

The trestle and rail tracks leading to the Foundry provide not only an exciting means for crossing Vandeventer and connecting to the Cortex MetroLink Station, but it is also an opportunity to show how industrial infrastructure can be reappropriated with environmental performance. The green areas surrounding the pathways are permeable surfaces meant to absorb storm water runoff and treat pollutants with biofilitration. Given the site’s iconic visual appeal we also think it can be the perfect signboard for Great Rivers Greenway’s environmental, adaptive reuse, and ecological initiatives. The existing billboard on the site can be “recycled” as a habitat for high flying birds of prey. The billboard’s high visibility will project the environmental mission of the project on a monumental scale - without a single word. Historic photos of the site could be studied and rail tracks could be restored as partial cast in place sculptures. A stair to ground level is integrated with a bridge over the trestle leading to a stair that climbs the billboard to scenic overlook at the new + StL Greenway.

TLS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE - OBJECT TERRITORIES - [dhd] DEREK HOEFERLIN DESIGN KRISTIN FLEISCHMANN BREWER - BRYAN CAVE LLP - AMANDA COLON-SMITH - ECONSULT SOLUTIONS - eDESIGN DYNAMICS - EDSI - JEREMEY GOSS LANGAN – JAMES LIMA PLANNING + DEVELOPMENT - SAL MARTINEZ - PRESERVATION RESEARCH OFFICE - PROJECT CONTROLS GROUP - PROSPERITY LABS JASON PURNELL - RAMBOLL - LINDA SAMUELS - PAOLA AGUIRRE SERRANO – SILMAN - TERRA TECHNOLOGIES

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The East-West urban route from the Gateway Arch at Chestnut and Market aligns on axis with Laclede , a quiet and nearly pedestrianized street that runs through heart of St Louis’ premier educational institutions and districts. The WestEast route from Forest Park at Clayton Avenue and the MetroLink line along the Union Pacific Railyard to Chouteau’s Landing allows a new experience completely unique to St. Louis integrating ecology, woodlands, streams, and wetland ecologies with St. Louis’ industrial railroad. The North-South loops connect Fairground Park, Tower Grove Park, the Missouri Botanical Garden, and the neighborhoods in between them with the central East-West Greenway providing vital neighborhood access and habitat corridors for improved environmental health and biodiversity. All of the Ecological Loops bundle water infrastucture in the form of temporal rain gardens, streams, and wetlands while creating new and varied habitats for people, flora, and fauna.

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DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MAT SOCIAL MINISTRY CENTER

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

NGA

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT

CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER FOREST PARK (FOREST PARK FOREVER)

THE SPOT YOUTH CENTER

CORTEX

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY

FOUNDRY (LAWRENCE GROUP) ARMORY (GREEN STREET ST. LOUIS)

UNION STATION

YOUTH IN NEED VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT. CITY OF ST. LOUIS

CASA DE SALUD

JEFFERSON NATIONAL EXPANSION & GATEWAY ARCH

BUSCH STADIUM

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI

Strategically building on proximity to transit, parks, and culture is a powerful and proven strategy for expanding economic opportunity. Enhancing access to these assets with a new, wellprogrammed greenway network can support the real estate market of their surrounding areas and attract new residents, companies, and investment as proven by research from around the country. This network can also help to fill voids in the existing fabric by creating a framework for where public and private investment should be directed.

FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

THE SOCIAL AFFAIRS BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE PETER&PAUL COMMUNITY SERVICES

THE LUMINARY GRAVOIS PLAZA

GRAVOIS PARK

INTERSECT ARTS

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

ST ALEXIUS HOSPITAL

MARQUETTE PARK

EQUITABLE EXTENSIONS

AMPLIFYING StL

Many plans have been made to connect across the Mississippi River. This project has the opportunity to finally bridge this long standing divide between Missouri and Illinois. Utilizing existing bridge infrastructure by building a lightweight bicycle pathway on the MacArthur Bridge and pedestrianizing the rarely used Eads Bridge would bring more equitable opportunities for East St. Louis and St. Louis residents alike.

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The +StL Greenway will be a Cultureway, where everything about the DNA of the Greenway relates to diverse and inclusive expressions of arts and culture, becoming a beloved place in the city for its many diverse arts and cultural groups, individuals, and the broader creative community to work, present, delight, and inspire all visitors to visit the Greenway.

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The Greenway will serve to support the critical value of inclusive growth. Enhancing connections throughout the city can create new access to economic opportunities by creating safe routes to tens of thousands of jobs from neighborhoods with limited auto ownership and transit access. The most successful, dynamic urban districts have an eclectic mix of businesses, residents, and institutions that promote vibrancy at multiple times of day. Greenway networks and adjacent spaces can provide spaces for intentionally curated programming that supports a greater diversity of uses and activities — increasing safety, supporting businesses, and attracting new investment in a reinforcing cycle.

DIVERSE HEALTH SERVICES LLC

OASIS RESIDENTIAL MCCB Inc CARE FACILITY OASIS RESIDENTIAL MISSION: CARE FACILITY ST LOUIS

RESPOND INC GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

COMMUNITY HEALTH IN PARTNERSHIP

HUMAN RIGHTS ACTION SERVICES

GUARDIAN ANGEL SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MAT SOCIAL MINISTRY CENTER

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The extensions to the North along Newstead and to the South along Compton will grow the neighborhoods such as The Ville, Penrose, and O’Fallon in the North and Gravois Park, Tower Grove South, and Dutchtown in the South. Improving bus transit frequency and reliability, sidewalks, roads, and street lighting, and introducing protected vegetated bike lanes will have a major impact on the quality of life and amplify ongoing efforts and investment in these neighborhoods.

Combined, the three “E’s” of the +StL Greenway will build from strength, diversify, and amplify existing assets with new experiences embedded in St. Louisian life.

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The second “E” expands the Ecological Loops with three primary “Equitable Extensions”. The +StL Greenway must bridge not only the NorthSouth Divide, but also make an effort to cross the river to East St. Louis. A city that works together and bridges its divisions will create a stronger more robust city that more and more people will believe in, invest in, and live in. The +StL Greenway extends into some of the most financially, infrastructurally, and socially challenged neighborhoods in St. Louis. In so doing, we create a Greenway that invites and welcomes a multitude of users to the city, its jobs, affordable housing, culture, and educational institutions - a new Greenway that not only provides safety and security, but accessibility and opportunity.

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Within the city, the +StL Greenway’s performative landscape systems continue with vegetated rain gardens located in protected bike lanes, in between sets of parallel parking spaces, or adjacent pocket parks. These passive water collection, retention, and treatment systems are all interconnected and where topography permits, deliver pretreated storm water to larger wetland treatment systems in along the Greenway at the central railyard. The rain gardens create micro habitats for native flora and amphibians while additional street trees create shade for hot summer days, improve air quality and environmental health, and habitats for birds and pollinating insects.

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As cities throughout America realign themselves with their waterfronts, the Mississippi River continues to remain underutilized in St. Louis. By changing the flood wall into a terraced levee, the historic waterfront warehouse district at Chouteau’s Landing adjacent to the Gateway Arch could become a new live/work and affordable housing district in St. Louis. The result could stimulate a return to downtown living and grow the downtown economy. We imagine hidden kitchens, artist in residence housing, hotels, parks, gardens, barbecues, an urban beach, and eventually, a public swimming pool overlooking the river all connecting to Great Rivers Greenway’s new riverfront trail while encouraging new adventures in the Mississippi.

+ PERFORMATIVE LANDSCAPE SYSTEMS

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OASIS RESIDENTIAL MCCB Inc CARE FACILITY OASIS RESIDENTIAL MISSION: CARE FACILITY ST LOUIS

RESPOND INC GREAT RIVERS GREENWAY

From Washington University and Forest Park, through Cortex, Grand Center, Saint Louis University and Harris-Stowe University, and Downtown, the Greenway will connect, strengthen, and build from St. Louis’ existing assets that are either strong or under-performing in their capacity to catalyze economic growth due an underwhelming public realm - and provide a framework to expand economic opportunities throughout the city. Despite some systemic challenges, connecting these assets with a network of high-quality Greenway infrastructure can leverage placemaking as a key component of an economic development strategy.

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The third “E” builds on existing “Economic Assets.” Investment capital follows talent. And talent increasingly is following place - quality of life places - that embrace diversity and inclusion, a mix of uses, and offer places for connection and fun. Therefore, parks, institutions, cultural venues, social facilities, and small, medium, and large businesses are all considered “Economic Assets.”

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The first “E” establishes a series of performative “Ecological Loops” that connects all four major parks in St. Louis. The loops allow +StL Greenway users to choose their own adventure. Following the lines on the loops, one can choose a fast commuter route, a leisurely stroll through nature, a quiet neighborhood walk, an encounter with art, industry, or cultural heritage, or a combination of all of the above experiences. The loops allow linear, circular, figure eight, or circuitous pathways that amplify and create new experiences in the city while constantly opening up to the greater urban fabric. While all loops are located primarily on quieter secondary routes for cyclists, various segments of the loops offer different experiences.

FOREST PARK (FOREST PARK FOREVER)

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

NGA

GRAND CENTER ARTS DISTRICT

CHILDRENS ADVOCACY CENTER

THE SPOT YOUTH CENTER

CORTEX

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

HARRIS-STOWE STATE UNIVERSITY

FOUNDRY (LAWRENCE GROUP) ARMORY (GREEN STREET ST. LOUIS)

YOUTH IN NEED

UNION STATION

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

ST. LOUIS HUMAN SERVICES DEPT. CITY OF ST. LOUIS

CASA DE SALUD

JEFFERSON NATIONAL EXPANSION & GATEWAY ARCH

BUSCH STADIUM

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

ST. LOUIS COMMUNITY COLLEGE NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

MENTAL HEALTH AMERICA OF EASTERN MISSOURI FOSTER FAMILY SUPPORT CENTER MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

THE SOCIAL AFFAIRS BLIND REHABILITATION SERVICES

TOWER GROVE PARK

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE

The +StL Greenway will create a framework for focusing efforts to build on St. Louis’ existing strengths through high quality placemaking, complete streets, ecological growth, infrastructural integration, cultural experience and improved quality of life.

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Locating the +StL Greenway in right-of-ways and underutilized spaces adjacent to the railyard offers St. Louis the opportunity to build a Greenway totally unique to St. Louis. By building on the topography, celebrating the railroad, and the history of Mill Creek and Chouteau Lake a totally unique and performative landscape ecology is formed. Stormwater runoff from the railyard, adjacent parking lots, and rooftops is collected and treated in temporary wetlands and streams relieving St. Louis’ combined sewer system and dramatically reducing pollution levels in the Mississippi in peak storm and rainfall events. This hydro-ecological system drastically reduces the cases when MSD must pump untreated water into the river. New prairie, streamside woodland, and wetland habitats allow attract native Missouri flora and fauna to the Greenway and create a performative habitat conduit and trail system from Forest Park to the Mississippi.

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HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

INTERSECT ARTS

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MARQUETTE PARK

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IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES PHASING

PHASE 1: CONNECTIONS

Since the +STL project is built upon amplifying existing assets and developments in St. Louis, it follows that the phasing plan should also build on on-going redevelopment projects in the city and pre-existing street network analysis by Great Rivers Greenway and Trailnet. In our proposal we have prioritized routes in both of these networks to create an armature that enhances neighborhood connectivity, improve accessibility and equity, develop ecologies, habitats, and performative environmental and hydrological systems.

Downtown St. Louis is engaging in a placemaking initiative, Washington University is building their East End Transformation Project, Tower Grove Park is embarking on renovation and masterplan for the next century, Fairground Park is opening its swimming pool this summer, Marquette Park has renovated its fieldhouse. At the center of it all is Great Rivers Greenway’s Cortex Metrolink Station and St. Louis University’s midtown redevelopment project.

While these phases have been written and described here sequentially (1-5), there is also the possibility that some of these phases could occur simultaneously or in another order.

Combined with the Gateway Arch National Park project, Phase 1 recognizes these efforts as opportunities for building momentum for the greenway project. In the first phase, we propose building the critical connections and infrastructural crossings at a number of these projects and allowing subsequent linear phases to follow quickly. Transformations from East to West: 1) Market and Chestnut protected bicycle lanes, traffic calming, and paving changes along the gateway mall, connecting pedestrians and cyclists to the bridge crossing and Arch Grounds. 2) Spring Street bridge crossing over and under 64 and the rail yard to the south, connecting SLU’s North and South Campuses along a quiet pedestrian friendly route. 3) At grade crossing improvements at Laclede and connective pathways in Forest Park. 4) Continuing the Cortext Metrolink station pathways East to the Foundry and West to Children’s Hospital. At Children’s Hospital, a dramatic gateway bridge is proposed with an overlook into Forest Park and a ramped walkway bringing pedestrians through the tree canopy of Forest Park and down to the soon to be renovated Ice Rink. 5) A two way cycling path along the South Side of Clayton Avenue seamlessly bringing cyclists under King’s Highway with a wide underpass gateway and visitor’s center to Forest Park. 6) A three-way underpass at Forsyth Boulevard. The underpass allow cyclists arriving from Lindell or Forest Park to ride below North Skinker Boulevard without an at grade crossing directly into (or from) Washington University. The underpass doubles as an informal exhibition space for the College of Art and College of Architecture.

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IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES PHASE 2: LACLEDE - FIRST EAST WEST CONNECTION It is important for a multi phased project to have a strong and easy “first win” connecting the Arch Grounds to Forest Park. Laclede Avenue is already one of St. Louis’ great streets and is on axis with the Gateway Arch. Portions of the avenue are already gated or pedestrianized, it is nearly a Greenway already. With minor adjustments and improvements it can become a street that rivals Lincoln Road in Miami or Union Street in San Francisco, placing St. Louis on a greater national platform. Added bicycle lanes, shared bicycle and car lanes, and traffic calming street materials will increase foot and cyclist traffic for families and commuters thereby improving public safety and business in the Central West End while stimulating investment and redevelopment further East toward SLU and Harris-Stowe. With the simple addition of a bike lane and the added traffic it will bring, SLU and Harris-Stowe will become safer campuses with higher visibility and even greater icons of St. Louis. Transformations from East to West: 1. Improvements at Wells Fargo parking lot to allow the Greenway and bicycle lanes to connect to Market Street and Chestnut Street bicycle lanes and pedestrian routes via North Beaumont Street. 2. Two way bicycle lane added on the South side of Laclede, street trees, street furniture, paving, and landscape improvements made at Harris Stowe and SLU. 3. Two-way protected bicycle Lane added on the South side of Laclede between N Grand and South Boyle. Street tree, street furniture, and paving improvements. Diagonal parking on the South side of Laclede changed to parallel parking. 4. Paving improvements and entry points for bicycles made in gates between S Boyle and N Taylor. 5. Two-way protected bicycle lane* added on the South side of Laclede between N Taylor and Euclid. Street tree, street furniture, and paving improvements. Diagonal parking on the South side of Laclede changed to parallel parking. Limited vehicle access measures at Euclid to allow periodic pedestrianization along Laclede to enhance business activity. 6. Two-way protected bicycle lane added on the South side of Laclede between Euclid and S Kingshighway Boulevard. At grade crossing improvements at Kingshighway with pathway connections into Forest park. 71


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IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES PHASE 3: EAST WEST LOOP COMPLETION Phase 3 completes the first East West loop system and bridges the two largest infrastructural elements in the city: Interstate 64 and the railyard. Rather than turning the back of the city to these obstacles, we propose reimagining them as amenities to be celebrated (railyard) or mitigating their impacts (highway) on the surrounding city. The South Eastern line of these loops along the railyard between Spring Street and the Mississippi waterfront is especially important from an economic, hydrological, ecological, and experiential point of view. It is more challenging to realize using railroad and property right of ways but also offers one of the most dramatic sections of the Greenway combining independent bicycle and pedestrian pathways with performative streams and wetlands to treat storm water. In reversing the railway’s position as a “back” to the city with an occupied ecological Greenway, the properties adjacent and will have new value, use, and accessibility. Transformations from East to West: 1. Existing Great Rivers Greenway bicycle path looped through the proposed Live Work Industrial Warehouse district to Great Rivers Greenway parking lot, now reimagined as a biodiverse wetland and bird bark. 2. Right of ways at railyard and adjacent properties utilized to create pathways for cyclists, pedestrians, and various species of fauna from Tucker to Spring Street. 3. The 21st Street Bridge over railyard to allow pedestrians and cyclists to cross from North to South. 4. Tucker, 21st Street, and Compton crossings improved with protected bicycle lanes in order to allow future North South phases and projects by Great Rivers Greenway or Trailnet to “plug-in” to the series of East West Loops. 5. Compton interchange improvements made to allow Market Street and Forest Park Boulevard to connect directly as a Grand Boulevard for the city. A number of freeway lanes will be converted to bicycle lanes to connect to the Armory, Spring Street, and Foundry. A new Archeological / History Museum is proposed at the confluence of these new paths to active the center of the city. 6. West of Forest Park, Forsyth, Wydown, Clayton, and Big Bend are envisioned as Greenways with protected bicycle lanes to allow greater circulation and access to Washington University and its surroundings. 73


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IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES PHASE 4: NORTH SOUTH LOOP EXTENSIONS TO CONNECT ALL FOUR PARKS In addition to the Arch Grounds and Forest Park; Tower Grove Park, Missouri Botanical Garden, and Fairground Parks are also key park assets. Moreover, Tower Grove Park and Fairground Park are embedded in neighborhoods; neighborhoods that could not be more different. With the ambition of the Chouteau Greenway, we simply cannot imagine not bridging the North South divide of St. Louis and connecting the neighborhoods between these parks. Doing so will make enormous strides toward making people feel both invited and welcome to the central East-West Greenway. It will also form a vital economic and ecological bridge between the great streets and street trees between the four largest parks in central St. Louis. Imagine multiple days out that include trips by bicycle not only from the Gateway Arch to Forest Park but from the Gateway Arch to Fairground Park swimming pool or fishing ponds. Imagine waking up near Fairground Park and cycling with your family to the Missouri Botanic Garden or vice versa. North South Transformations: 1. North Grand, Vandeventer, Martin Luther King Boulevard, North Spring, Tower Grove Street, and 39th Streets all receive street tree improvements, road and sidewalk repairs, street lighting improvements, and protected bicycle lanes.

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IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES PHASE 5: FURTHER NORTH SOUTH LOOP EXTENSIONS TO GREATER N/S NEIGHBORHOODS AND EAST ST. LOUIS Bridging the North South divide in St. Louis means going beyond the four main parks. We need to reach deeper into the neighborhoods of the Ville and O’Fallon further West and North and the neighborhoods of Gravois Park and Dutchtown further South and East. These neighborhoods are less than 4 miles from the central Greenway corridor, but at the moment, they feel 20 miles away. Connecting these neighborhoods and bringing investment their way will only support the further growth and development of St. Louis as a whole. Many residents who work in the central corridor live and work in these neighborhoods. Bringing greater access and connecting these neighborhoods with their local parks and central businesses will go a long way for people who’s car ownership is less than 20%. East St. Louis has been imagined in many potential futures and joint ventures between Missouri and Illinois. Bringing a cycling and running route to East St Louis would allow for better access to opportunity by East St. Louis residents, an amenity for recreation enthusiasts in St. Louis, and could finally stimulate greater economic developments across the river. North South Transformations: 1. North Newstead, West Florissant, South Compton, Mermac, and Gustine all receive street tree improvements, road and sidewalk repairs, street lighting improvements, and protected bicycle lanes. Transformations to the East: 1. Suspend a lightweight bicycle lane above the MacArthur Bridge where the roadway used to be and continue the bicycle route adjacent to the rail line toward the Eads bridge. 2. Pedestrianize the upper deck of the Eads bridge to form a cross river loop with dramatic views of the Gateway Arch from across the Mississippi.

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PROGRAMMING RECOMMENDATIONS COMMUNITY EQUITY PROGRAMMING: 4 SYSTEMS OF ADVOCACY INNOVATION & EDUCATION

CULTURE & HERITAGE

HEALTH & FOOD

FINANCE & HOUSING

CATALYST NETWORK

Center for Neighborhood Technology

Ecological Arts & Science Lab

Mill Creek Greens

St. Louis Affordable Housing Collaborative

Food & Agrotech Lab

Urban Archeology Incubator

Greenway Market

United Kitchens Entrepreneurship Center

Chouteau Water & Energy Lab

Arts & Culture Media Lab

Slow Food Headquarters

Chouteau Community Finance Center

Urban Explorations Inc.

Mississippi River Commons

Organic Waste & Composting Center

Youth & Adults Training Center

Youth Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology

Public Art

Mobile Clinic & Market

Small & Micro-Business Incubator

Hackathon & Tutoring House

Installation

Bike Rental & Station

Co-working Space

Community Resource Center

Pavilion

Food Outreach Hotspot

Co-op Resource Center

Early Learning Center

Festival

Wellness Station

Neighborhood Toolbank

LEVERAGE EXISTING ASSETS

INSERT NEW CATALYSTS & SUPPORT

AMPLIFY NETWORK OF ASSETS

St. Louis has a robust network of assets both at the city and neighborhood scale. What is less clear is how their areas of work interact and complement each other – which limits their potential impact. Although redundancy of assets is important to support diversity, it is also key that communities have a balanced representation of social, economic, education and cultural assets. By identifying an extensive amount of assets along the proposed greenway and its extensions, +STL proposes to leverage this network of existing assets by inserting catalysts that create broader synergies and amplify their connectivity.

The proposed greenway loops and extensions use a combination of existing road infrastructure and reclaimed right-of-ways to enable North/South and East/West nonmotorized connectivity. +StL identifies strategic conditions such as intersections, crossings, vacant or underutilized land, sites with redevelopment potential and proximity to existing assets to insert new catalysts responding to systems of advocacy: innovation and education, culture and heritage, health and food, and finance and housing. These catalyst are also strategic programs that perform as platforms – connectors and enablers – of equitable community development.

By identifying existing and emerging assets and proposing new catalysts and support ones, +StL seeks to strengthen these assets as a NETWORK. Thinking as a network entails both creating new assets were there might be location and programmatic gaps, and amplifying what existing groups of assets are doing with additional resources, expertise, and new forms of access to the surrounding communities.

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Flance Early Learning Center, St. Louis

West Hollywood Public Library + Park, Los Angeles

Greystone Bakery, Yonkers

Integration of early childhood, housing, health clinic, garden, nutrition, food preparation education programs. The center provides innovative, quality care and education to a racially, culturally, developmentally, and socio-economically diverse population of children between 6 weeks and 6 years through a nurturing environment that provides supportive services to families.

Expanded and integrated programming with adjacent public park including library, bookstore, recreation center, swimming pool, dog park, playground, memorial, and coffee shop. This project was among the first products in 2011 of the Los Angeles County Library system’s decade-long construction campaign to really grapple with more urban and multi-use library models.

A pioneering social enterprise, Greyston has been providing jobs and resources to individuals who face barriers to employment, no questions asked, since 1982. Greyston practices Open Hiring™ in a world-class commercial bakery and advances the Open Hiring Model at the Center for Open Hiring.

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INNOVATION + EDUCATION PROGRAMMING According to For the Sake of All, the definitive report on the health and well-being of AfricanAmericans in St. Louis led by Jason Purnell, “In one year alone, the loss of life associated with low levels of education and poverty among African Americans [in St. Louis] was estimated at $4.0 billion.” The question isn’t how can we afford to build a greenway that improves the education, access, and health of our most disadvantaged residents, but how can we afford not to? “Invest in early childhood development for all children. Every $1 invested in early childhood returns between $7 and $17 of benefits for society.” -first recommendation in For the Sake of All

CREATE EDUCATION CATALYSTS

INSPIRE CURIOSITY

PROVOKE ENGAGEMENT

RECOMMENDATIONS

One of the most important catalysts for growth in the city of St. Louis is to provide safe, accessible high quality education for every child, family, and adult who wants to live in the city. It’s no secret that population loss started with urban renewal, white flight, and disinvestment, but it continues due to the inability of families to find adequate education mixed with affordable high quality housing and safe neighborhoods. An education catalyst -- which is more than any single school as it supports learning and health across ages, community functions, seasons and times of day -- should be at the center of any community. In our city, the good bones are there. St Louis is rich with historical fabric for quality housing and landmark schools waiting for new life. Key investments, like Flance Early Childhood Center or the new MERS Goodwill Excel Centers, provide alternative models for the specific context of St. Louis’s population. MERS Goodwill will allow some of the tens of thousands of adults without high school diplomas to reach that goal and continue on with job training. Flance Early Learning includes arts enrichment and health and wellness (with gardening, nutrition, and cooking) as well as an expanded complex of support for single moms and families in the area, from pre-natal to housing. We see Flance, and the many early childhood educators they have trained, as a model for early ed at Marquette Park in collaboration with Thomas Dunn Learning Center. The Dutchtown South Community has the largest population of youth under 18 in the entire city. Starting early drastically increases opportunities for success. Being connected to the Greenway in STL+ would connect those stronger youth to a full range of education opportunities.

Next generation infrastructure must be multi-functional, adaptable, symbiotic and public. The Greenway IS a learning environment, where science, botany, biology, ecology, math, and physics come alive -- and that’s just a start. Walkers and bikers are exposed to arts and cultural loops, reconnecting with the history of place and the inspiration of visionary works by local, national and international artists. Systems, gardens, and spaces will be curated for their multiple ecological and educational value; like our great museums or the amazing Missouri Botanical Garden, nature rangers and ecological docents can work with schools to help them utilize the biomes, habitats, systems and exhibitions of the Greenway as integral to an interdisciplinary, interactive curriculum. Manzo Elementary School in Tucson, Arizona is an amazing example. Their award-winning school garden began as a small experiment by their frustrated counselor. Moses Thompson took a troubled youth to a small plot in the yard and they started digging together, which led to talking, which ultimately led to healing. Their school now grows traditional and aquaponic food for their cafeteria and for a weekly school-based (and profit making!) farmer’s market. They raise chickens and collect and sell eggs; they compost and tend to turtles. All water needs come from water harvesting and condensate collection. Every course -- math, science, English, arts, and of course biology, ecology, and nutrition -- utilize the garden, which is nearly entirely maintained, planted, harvested and loved by children, many from low income or troubled families -- who still get counseled while digging with Moses.

Education starts at the pre-natal phase and ideally lasts a lifetime. The most “rooted” communities -- those where houses pass from generation to generation, or where neighbors connect and look out for each other -- are often the most resilient, the safest, and the happiest. But the full “education cycle” does not always happen in a single place over the course of a lifetime, which is why it is important for people of different generations to interact, and for the wisdom of age to meet the energy of youth. This is also true across cultures, where diversity breeds empathy and empathy breeds justice.

- Education first. Formal and informal learning, from youth through old age, is at the core of every successful community.

Peer-to-peer education can happen anywhere and works in support of peer-to-expert and informal learning opportunities. Good public spaces support opportunities for engagement with people and with place. Civic buildings such as libraries, community centers, post offices, should provide expansive access to resources and informal learning opportunities across ages and at a full range of times. Additionally, we encourage alternative housing models, where seniors are intentionally connected to college students to generate symbiotic learning and life expanding opportunities, or where libraries incorporate health facilities or seed libraries and sustainability training.

- Invest in multi-functionality across age groups, across the full day and across the full calendar year. - Grow innovative partnership around health, education, job training, and skill building initiatives. - Recognize that learning happens everywhere, particularly in the greenway. Build and support a space for curiosity and engagement that incorporates the full SHTEAM realm: Science, Humanities, Technology, Education, Art and Math. - Capitalize on the power of nature to nurture.

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Gas Works Park, Seattle

Turtle Park, St. Louis

Impulse at Luminothérapie Festival, Montreal

Adaptation of 20 acres and 1,900 feet of shoreline in former industrial site (Seattle Light Gas Company) into a contemporary park - one of the first post-industrial landscapes to be transformed into a public place in the United States (1972). Its landscape integrates a combination of rehabilitated industrial structures and new contemporary public art.

The late St. Louis artist Bob Cassilly’s large-scale sculptural work spans across the +StL Greenway, from the Mississippi River, to the City Museum, to Turtle Park. The works actively engage the public with various St. Louis specific aspects of landscape, urbanism, heritage, architecture and infrastructure.

Annual light installation festival becomes a vast playground during the winter season. In this instance, Impulse installation is a series of 30 interactive seesaws with light and sound that changes when in motion. The seesaws form units of light and sound that can be activated by the public to create an ever-changing composition.

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ARTS, CULTURE + HERITAGE PROGRAMMING

The greenway offers opportunities to create access points for neighborhoods, celebrate cultural heritage and important institutions, and capitalize on the entrepreneurial spirit of the region to celebrate the city’s heritage. Pierre Huyghe

Nick Cave and Jeanne Gang

INSPIRE CULTURAL AWARENESS

PROMOTE VALUES-BASED PUBLIC ART

INCREASE HERITAGE VISIBILITY

RECOMMENDATIONS

Our plan inspires cultural awareness by focusing on a series of arts and culture interventions along the entire greenway that consider heritage, place, and community support. Seasonal programming, invited local and international artists commissions, open requests for proposals, and common spaces for music, poetic, and civic programming will enliven the greenway with the expression of St. Louisans.

What happens when listening is prioritized? The success of our greenway plan relies on the support and advocacy of St. Louisans. The arts, culture, and heritage strategy centers around values-based listening with the community, understanding the rich culture and values set forth with residents.

The greenway offers opportunities to create access points for neighborhoods, celebrate cultural heritage and important institutions, and capitalize on the entrepreneurial spirit of the region to celebrate the city’s heritage. Our plan not only illuminates the assets found in the central corridor, but also build active mechanism of values-based heritage identification, protection and celebration. We will listen to residents and stakeholders, rather than tell them what is important. Their vision of a shared past will define our work.

-Pursue a values-based arts, culture, and heritage strategy, where we prioritize the identification of built and intangible resources with stakeholders.

Curatorial topics to address in our public arts plan are ecology and urban habitats, and social, political, and industrial heritage. The resulting plan will stitch together new and current important public art sites and beloved institutions along the greenway and extend north and south into neighborhoods to create accessibility for residents. Our plan stitches together the unique narrative of St. Louis culture—from jazz and blues to poetry and visual arts. We believe that arts, culture and heritage programming can form a new commons parallel to the greenway infrastructure itself. In addition to enriching the lives of citizens, cultural advocacy can be used a tool for marketing the region. The introduction of a tri- annual city-wide arts festival and innovative publicprivate partnerships in building reuse and health systems can be used as a strategy to build permanent projects and new businesses over time, generating jobs and future economic development.

Our team will pursue a values-based arts, culture, and heritage strategy, where we prioritize the identification of various histories and arts interests with stakeholders. Stakeholders include intergeneration neighborhood residents and business owners, artists, activists, the Artists of Color Advisory Council, transportation experts, historians, and leaders in cultural institutions. These embedded experts will provide the priorities of what and how projects are implemented. Our plan seeks to answer how inclusive arts and heritage planning might play a role in the health of the community, and provide opportunities for experiential learning, job creation, spaces of creative action, community building, and delight in the daily lives of citizens? Focusing on the process of what and how will allow for community ownership and pride for projects enacted along the greenway that truly grow from citizen values.

Active heritage work will include story collection, guided experiences, visible archaeology, place marking, historic designation of unprotected resources and artistic intervention. Mill Creek Valley is central to this work, but so is refining the narratives around well-known places like Forest Park and downtown St. Louis. Alongside this public dimension we will work on the private dimension of strengthening opportunities for adaptive reuse of heritage, especially in areas like Chouteau’s Landing where vacancy needs to be transformed into vitality. The Greenway corridor offers a meta-narrative of the city’s urban history and the equitable extensions north and south provide specific local histories of late nineteenth and early twentieth century mass development. Together, these cultural landscapes tell the full story of the city as it was while pointing to what it will become. A new greenway system will provide the physical armature for making a coherent image and a narrative that fills in the city’s gaps and celebrates its rich cultural heritage.

-Create access points for neighborhoods, celebrate cultural heritage and important institutions, and capitalize on the entrepreneurial spirit of the region to enact arts and culture along the greenway. -Invite local and international artist commissions of various scales, open requests for proposals, common spaces for ephemeral programming, impromptu civic and recreational spaces, and innovative public-private partnerships radiating from the central corridor into neighborhoods and across the river. -Produce participatory heritage works that could include evolutionary elements, like the evolving history of St. Louis. The team encourages long-term interaction with heritage assets, so that history is experienced as a living thing. -Focus on equity and economic development, where artists from neighborhoods would be the leaders of long-term projects and would be given resources to support the vision of the community.

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Juan William Chavez

Mary Mattingly

Joyce Hwang

Jenny Kendler

1. Arts, Culture, and Heritage Topics, Possible Projects, and Locations of Interest

architecture to reintroduce native prairie habitats, bees, and engage topics around climate change, genetic engineering, and plant morphology. Local artists, Juan William Chavez, Christopher Carl, and Alana Ross, all engage ecological systems in the creation of their work. For example, Carl breaks up existing brownfields to install rain gardens and play spaces, while Chavez brings together community arts with beekeeping and gardening in education initiatives. National artists, Mary Mattingly organizes projects on barges that engage river systems, and architect Joyce Hwang builds structures for native animals, including bats and birds.

attractions. Ranger program could provide academic credit and earned income.

evolutionary elements. The team encourages long-term interaction with heritage assets, so that history is experienced as a living thing and not an entombed subject.

Ecology and Archaeology The greenway showcases aspects of the ecological past of the city, and research on the waterways, agricultural uses, and open lands that were once present will guide future rewilding. St. Louis is a city of water and a hub for migrating animals and birds. We sit at the intersection of on the largest watersheds in the country where three major rivers come together, providing opportunities for agriculture and habitat and challenges with seasonal flooding. The reintroduction of native plants, waterways and animal species could be used to teach the public environmental history, and showcase ways in which restoration of certain ecological conditions are present even in the modern city. The history of Chouteau’s Pond and the old Common Fields are key subjects of heritage investigation. The stakeholders will identify sites where archaeology might yield significant information, including Mississippian settlement and presence; colonial settlement by French and Spanish settlers; ethnic settlement; industrial sites; and more. As land is acquired for a new commons, these sites may be able to be excavated by professional or academic teams, with the excavations open to the public during digs. A set of these sites could draw visits to the greenway to watch the process of discovery, and show the layers of human history recorded on the land. Artists are working with the sciences and in landscape 84

Health and Education Access to the arts is not just a source or of creative expression or reflection of a community, but can be used as a tool to build critical thinking, entrepreneurship, and overall health of a community. Schools and businesses along the greenway will have the opportunity to work with artists and be with public art to build upon various curriculum. For example, artist Jenny Kendler from Chicago works on projects that focus on native species and environmental activism. She has one project where she walks the city with a food cart that distributes milkweed-filled balloons to educate the public on butterfly habitats. There is also a great opportunity to work with Harris-Stowe and St. Louis University students as well as high school students at Metro, Grand Center Arts Academy, and Cardinal Ritter, among others, to serve as rangers along the greenway who could voice site histories and guide people to adjacent

Social and Political Heritage The social and political history of St. Louis are important to understanding the city and its values. The region was one of the largest Native American mound cities in the country, was the center of commerce for French and Spanish settlers, and was the hub for jazz and blues musicians beloved across the world. St. Louis has been home to landmark civil rights movements and legislation including Brown v. Board of Education and Shelley vs. Kraemer. Unfortunately, generations of institutionalized racism has caused inequity and division between residents, resulting in mistrust and incidents like the death of Michael Brown, Jr., in 2014 by a police officer. Many artists engage this dynamic history and presence in the city. Local artist Damon Davis is one of many artists who have organized several public art installations on social justice topics. Davis’ images of pairs of hands that have been installed on the outside of vacant buildings. Amber Johnston’s Justice Fleet, a mobile unit that focuses on play, art, and dialogue could be available for pop-up projects, and national artists, including poet Claudia Rankine, sound artist, Susan Philipsz, or landscape architect, Walter Hood, could engage meaningfully in unique commissions with local residents along the greenway that mine history and meaningfully engage St. Louis’ social and political heritage. Like the evolving history of St. Louis, heritage planning for the greenway will produce participatory works that could include

Heritage Sites of Interest Civil Rights Heritage Trail: The +StL Greenway area contains many significant sites related to the struggle for civil rights, including: the Old Courthouse and Field House associated with Dred and Harriet Scott’s quest for freedom; the site of the city’s first lynching in 1836 (the Wainwright Building); the city’s first Chinatown; the Jefferson Bank building where the 1963 sit-ins occurred; the Black Artists Group headquarters; the first site of Sumner High School, the first black high school west of the Mississippi; sites related to labor unions and political organizations in Mill Creek Valley; the site of the city’s only Civil War skirmish, where the Confederacy was defeated; the historic Compton Hill neighborhood and its churches; and Harris-Stowe State University, a historically black college. These sites could form a heritage trail with interpretive guiding through apps, tours, markers and other means stitching together a narrative spanning 200 years of history. Mill Creek Valley: The “Harlem of St. Louis” is one of the most important erased parts of St. Louis. The area could be enlivened with commemorative markers, story mapping and other activities that would draw people back to an incredible cultural legacy.


Damon Davis

Amber Johnston

Susan Philipsz

Walter Hood

Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing: Mary Meachum’s rescue of merchant Henry Shaw’s slaves crossed the +StL Greenway, and sites related to Meachum and her husband John Berry Meachum’s abolitionist activities are within the greenway. The greenway should develop a program tracing the route and connecting to the marked site on the North Riverfront Trail, drawing a link between two greenways and showcasing the liberatory Underground Railroad history of antebellum St. Louis.

of labor and ownership, the intersection of industry and ethnic histories, and the architectural accomplishments of industrial design. Buildings can be repurposed, while ruins or subsurface elements could be woven into new open spaces for both education and recreational opportunities.

be used on large-scale installations or temporary pop-up exhibitions.

rehabilitation of existing buildings to create jobs and possible training opportunities for educational anchors in and around greenway.

Forest Park/Washington University Danforth Campus: A western terminus of the greenway could land at the existing Centennial Greenway at the Washington University campus. As the new greenway moves from Washington University through Forest Park, there is a tremendous opportunity to narrate the landscape urbanism of Gilded Age St. Louis -- the way in which development of the western park of the city was enabled by the creation of Forest Park, and the way in which the Washington University campus is the product of a new green urbanism emergent at the turn of the twentieth century. As the East Campus project at the Danforth campus concludes, and +StL Greenway commences, a new era in this landscape urbanism is set. Industrial and Architectural Heritage Industrial facilities in the greenway exist in built, ruinous and subsurface forms. All could be harnessed into a program where creative engagement would interpret the city’s industrial past – the modes of production, power relations

The history of freight and passenger rail, including the presence of the Union Station and Gateway Station, continue a heritage of land use and spatial arrangements. Retention of rail-served facilities within the greenway could become a key aspect of maintaining a heritage network of rail and industry. While previous proposals have considered eliminating the rail infrastructure in whole or part, our team embraces it not just as a transportation asset but also as a significant living heritage element. St. Louis is the northernmost port city along the Mississippi river before the locks and dams moving north towards its headwaters. The intersection of three major rivers, the rail system, its central location in the country, and its rich history as a brick city have created important industrial and architectural heritage. Artists engage the palimpsest of the built environment in the city’s transformation over its storied history. Materials used in the unbuilding and building of the greenway could be donated to artists to use in unique installations. International artist, Hiwa K, has used ceramic water pipes to create installations commenting on the refugee crisis and homelessness. Local artists Jesse Vogler and Jennifer Colten have also done important work documenting fringe industrial sites and the American Bottom, collecting stories and images that could

Stakeholders may assemble individuated “trails” through the area related to labor history, blues music, suffrage activism and famous writers (Maya Angelou and T.S. Eliot’s birthplaces are within the area, for instance). Trails may be inscribed for self-guided activities, or temporarily created in relation to events or significant historical dates, and they may overlap. There could be a Public History Festival where historians are invited to create tours and other activities coordinated to show people how the different heritage areas relate to each other. Heritage Sites of Interest Chouteau’s Landing: Working class French then later polyglot European neighborhood, mostly industrial by 20th century. Possibly mound sites in area. Assets: Building stock, MacArthur Bridge, St. Mary of Victories Church (second oldest in city, and a Hungarian National Parish), Field House, blues bars. Activities: Civil Rights Heritage Trail linking Old Courthouse, Field House, MacArthur and Eads Bridges and Gateway Arch (a trail telling the full story of civil rights in St. Louis, from 1764 to the present); archaeological reveals of lost neighborhood vernacular architecture and indigenous history; branding based on industrial building stock; historic

Water Towers: Three 19th century standpipe water towers along the Grand Avenue corridor. Assets: Towers, connections to historic water system, the “whole city” (north/south). Activities: Introduce an annual water tower celebration where public art installations be commissioned for all three towers and the Chain of Rocks Bridge, which overlooks the water intake system for the city’s water. This could coincide with and annual beloved Paint Louis graffiti event on the flood wall— celebrating hydrology and infrastructure through the arts. This annual event could help build St. Louisans connection to the river and drive fundraising, which is desperately needed to save the crumbling infrastructure of Grand Avenue and Bissell Street Water Towers. Adaptive Reuse The team will also produce an adaptive reuse study of the area, not limited to buildings but also inclusive of infrastructural assets. The study will identify buildings suitable for new uses, and identify those eligible for historic incentives, in addition to infrastructure suitable for reuse or repurposing. The study might evaluate the undersides and top sides of viaducts, vacated or underused streets and alleys, railroad sidings 85


Civil Rights Tour, Old Courthouse, site of Dred Scott Case

Mill Creek Valley Slum Clearance

Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing

Hiwa K

and other elements that exist that may generate new active or passive uses. The study will identify productive uses with economic returns as well as non-productive public uses that will enhance greenway planning.

Heritage Sites of Interest

skate and parkour elements. Hills can be turned into natural open amphitheaters (Art Hill in Forest Park), and vegetative landscapes can create more intimate setting for performances and conversations (Cartier Foundation, Paris, France). Several artists can be invited to install temporary projects to draw attention to sites in transformation. For example, Katharina Grosse, uses paint and color to mark the landscape or sites in transformation to call attention to their shifting form.

1953, architecturally significant).

Adaptive reuse planning will include education and technical assistance for property owners in the greenway. Infrastructural reuse would relate to arts and cultural programs, and could include temporary uses such as movie theaters under bridges, streets closed for festivals, bridge decks turned over to outdoor concerts, urban exploration walks where “off limits” areas are open for behind-the-scenes programming. We also hope to create opportunities for artists to transform vacant properties into sites for art education and installations. St. Louis has the oldest land bank in the country, whereby the city takes ownership of tax delinquent properties and buildings to be sold at auction. Properties that aren’t sold back to the community remain the responsibility of the city. Inspired by global projects where art is used as a tool to address high vacancy rates, poverty, and poor policy and planning—including Write-A-House in Detroit, where houses are given to writers, and the Pink House and Art House in St. Louis, neighborhood art spaces—we would like to facilitate a process with the city to get properties back into the hands of the community. The driver for these partnerships should be focused on equity and economic development, where artists from neighborhoods would be the leaders of long-term projects and would be given resources to support the vision of the community. In addition to addressing vacancy. 86

North-South Distributor Ramps: Pre-urbanization site for indigenous inhabitation and common land allotment for early colonial settlers. Industrialization through Tayon mill and creation of Chouteau’s Pond from Mill Creek followed by pond’s role in cholera epidemic. Drainage of pond brought railroads, and industrial development as well as tenement housing development. After 1900, grew into St. Louis’ largest black neighborhood before clearance and replacement with low-density modernist urbanism. The ramps are vestiges of the later North-South Distributor (1975) blocked by neighborhood opposition north and south.

2. Innovative Public-Private Partnerships

Grand Cultural Node Edge of Mill Creek Valley neighborhood, Grand also was the high point at edge of common fields. Here the emergent city systems of the 19th century can be encountered: the modern street system, the sanitary and water systems (the water towers are at each end), streetcar system remnants, subdivision and privatization of land and freight rail. The modernist freeway and divided roadway systems are also present alongside superblock housing developments, showing urban evolution. All of these systems enabled the urbanization of the city. Also today the immediate area concentrates cultural institutions that are now a historic presence in Grand Center. The CORTEX development is a historic rail-served industrial area reinvented as high-tech production space. CORTEX continues historic land use patterns, with different modes, methods and products. This is a space of productive labor.

Ephemeral Programming/ Commons Along the greenway there will be focused locations to create space for ephemeral arts programming, formal and impromptu points for civic discourse, and recreation like

Assets: City systems infrastructure; modernist urban renewal housing and ramps; adjacent cultural sites in Grand Center; Mill Creek Valley sites like the St. Louis Stars field site, warehouses, and Grain elevator (continuous operation since

Assets: Union Station, building stock, highway ramps, street grid, mapped black history sites, caves used by breweries for lagering. Activities: Commemorative marking throughout Mill Creek Valley (possibly along loop), celebratory events based on area history (such as ), active archaeology or reveal of urban layers (something such as a set of small pavilion-like versions of Montreal’s Museum of Urban Archaeology)

Activities: Interpretive programming on infrastructural and urban renewal history, possible archaeological reveals of urban layers or even streetcar rails and old water and sanitary systems, events-driven arts programming that makes use of historic freeway and ramp system, arts festival that may include an open call for experimental preservation projects aimed at the conditions around Grand and the MetroLink station, Labor heritage tours (guided perhaps with access to remaining historic buildings like 4240 Duncan), programming the elevator (projection art, branding based on iconic image). Tri- Annual Arts Festival The introduction of an annual arts festival would help build the arts strategy sustainably over time. Cities all over the world have used arts festival to develop unique economic strategies and connect themselves to global dialogue. The Setouchi Triennale, which takes place on several islands in Japan, and Skulpturproject in Munster, Germany (occurs every ten years) are good examples of how the arts can generate economic development and build important, dynamic cultural sites. Both locations struggled with vacancy and failing architecture and decided to work with artists and cultural institutions to do both temporary and permanent installations. Over time, both cities have drawn attention from around the world, where hundreds of thousands of visitors travel to visit the artist projects.


Jesse Vogler and Jennifer Colton

Grand Water Tower

Pink House, St. Louis

Museum of Archeology, Montreal

Cartier Foundation, Paris

Katharina Gross

Raven Fox, St. Louis

Setouchi Triennale, Japan

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Jenny Kendler @Railyard

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Damon Davis @Compton Ave

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Hiwa K @Compton Ave

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Adrian Villar Rojas @ SLU

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Pierre Huyghe @Compton Ave

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Adrian Villar Rojas @Foundry

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Nicole Eisenman @Under I-40, Grand

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Hiwa K @Cortex

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Adrian Villar Rojas @Cortex

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Damon Davis @Cortex

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Mary Mattingly @Post Office

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Hiwa K @Empty lot, Chouteau

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Urban Harvest STL, St. Louis, MO

Casa de Salud, St. Louis, MO

Gotham Greens, Chicago & New York

Organization focused on access to quality and healthy food through a cluster-based approach to create an inclusive and resilient food system. In collaboration with St. Louis MetroMarket and The Fit and Food Connection, they have created FOOD ACCESS CLUSTER, an innovative approach to closedloop local food systems.

Casa de Salud is the premier healthcare resource for the foreign born community of metropolitan St. Louis, and part of the infrastructure that welcomes people of all origins to the region. Driven by values of diversity and inclusion, Casa de Salud provides with quality healthcare services to immigrant communities.

Rehabilitation and repurposing of former industrial buildings into year-round, locally supplied, pesticide-free urban greenhouses with focus on fresh greens and herbs growth and distribution.

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HEALTH + FOOD USE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE AS A CATALYST Health is far more than visits to the doctor. A healthy city, one with clean water, clean air, healthy food and abundant opportunities for access to nature and recreation, help support a healthy lifestyle. The easier it is to make good choices, the more often we will do so. +StL utilizes an infrastructural urbanism strategy so that each segment serves social, environmental, and economic goals by supporting community needs, enhancing environmental attributes, and incorporating green jobs in productive landscapes. The greenway provides an unprecedented opportunity to help shift the unhealthy behavioral patterns that are contributing to drastic health disparities in the region and to an overall population less physically active than those in peer cities such as Denver, Minneapolis, and Chicago. There are obvious opportunities in the greenway for improved nutrition and increased physical activity. Research on physical activity has suggested that African American women in particular benefit from combinations of physical activity with social support. Walking groups, therefore, have been a successful intervention, but so are interventions that address neighborhood safety and other behavioral barriers to physical activity. The fast lane / slow lane concept incorporated into our design provides for physical activity at all speeds and levels; the incorporation of social nodes, such as community centers, libraries, or gardens, provide places for gathering integrated into the greenway around which groups can coalesce and enhance the safety of the greenway by populating it throughout all hours of the day. Green jobs are a positive externality of the greenway construction itself. Agreements for local labor training could transform a generation of current middle and high schoolers into future botanists, arborists, landscape architects, horticulturists, green energy and water experts. Localizing other kinds of green infrastructure, such as the full food cycle from seed harvesting to compost, can also train a new work force in healthy food practices within the greater foodshed. Innovative models in St. Louis like The Link markets that bring transit and healthy food together or the Corner Store initiative which aims to help provide better produce to all neighborhoods, can connect through expansion in the greenway to emerging initiatives like the North City Food Hub in the Greater Ville. These initiatives could create culinary and food related jobs, stimulate small business growth, help residents gain access to vacant land to grow food and package and distribute food and food based products to market. SLU, centrally located in the greenway, is an existing partner for the Food Hub and a potential source for resources around health and food.

SUPPORT POSITIVE HEALTH BEHAVIORS We will work with existing community organizations to determine community demand for features of the built environment that will support physical activity and nutrition. Based on research, we anticipate that these will include safety, accessibility, attractiveness, diversity, and opportunities for group-based exercise and recreation. However, we recognize that the specific neighborhoods for which we hope to improve access will likely have very specific needs and preferences that must be incorporated into planning in an iterative process that continues even beyond any construction or development. It will also be important to pair physical assets with programmatic interventions such as walking groups (an intervention that has had particular success with African American women, for example), groupbased exercise classes, team sports, dietary advice and consultation, and other evidence-based interventions to support positive health behaviors. We also know that there are significant physical and mental health effects of the type of community connection and social support we envision as a result of the multiple opportunities for gathering presented in our proposal. Environmental psychology also suggests that access to the natural environment alone will have positive health effects. Rather than a disjointed set of health-related interventions, we envision an ecosystem that support multiple aspects of health; not simply connecting communities to doctors and hospitals, but providing a supportive context that equitably distributes the resources needed to maintain health.

IMPROVE ACCESS TO FRESH & QUALITY FOOD Food inequity is a complex, multi-layered issue and it is unlikely that any number of traditional grocery stores can overcome the many challenges that neighborhoods in food deserts currently face. The primary barriers are that of access, affordability, and education. Access: communities often struggle with poor physical access to grocery stores in their immediate neighborhood and have considerable difficulty reaching stores in surrounding areas. Affordability: many families find it challenging to afford the few healthy options that are currently available to them due to constrained household budgets and reductions in government-sponsored programs such as EBT and WIC. Ability: Over time, there is a lack of familiarity with a variety of different healthy food options, meal preparation techniques, and even practical vocabulary. Grocery stores have divested from these communities and working to reopen stores or build new ones in all likelihood will prove unsustainable and difficult to scale. Instead we should focus our efforts at developing a centralized facility in the in the Fairgrounds neighborhood equipped with an outdoor, large-scale farm, indoor growing facilities (aquaponics and hydroponics), a commercial production/packaging and instructional kitchen, formal classrooms, and office space for food entrepreneurs. From this central facility food can be grown, washed, prepared, packaged and distributed to and through the dozens of corner stores which already have a foothold in these communities. Concurrently, we should develop a coalition among the dozens of community-based corner store owners to have them serve as the retail locations for healthy food in order to avoid displacing these multigeneration owned stores. In doing so, we improve access and convenience of good food, considerably lower the cost of production and distribution, each of which in turn contributes to more affordable food for all. Collaborations should be built with Saint Louis University Department for Nutrition and Dietetics and University Missouri Extension in St. Louis to host and promote nutrition education and cooking both at the central facility, but also within the neighborhoods at participating stores. Excess food should be recovered from the farm and stores to be shared at pantries or if appropriate, used as compost. Additionally, considerable emphasis should be placed on hiring from within the Fairgrounds and surrounding neighborhoods (College Hill, Hyde Park, Ville, and Jeff-Vander-Lou).

RECOMMENDATIONS - Create infrastructure that serves social, environmental and economic goals simultaneously. - Consider every opportunity to increase the health of people and of the air, water, and soil of the greenway and its surroundings. - Provide options for healthy eating and healthy living that are as easy and affordable to choose as non-healthy options are now. - Make infrastructure local and flexible to adapt to a changing city. - Consider the greenway’s unprecedented opportunity to train a generation of youth in environmental and culinary fields such as wellness and nutrition, horticulture, botany, urban agriculture, landscape design and maintenance. - Utilize the greenway to connect food, health and education initiatives geographically and logistically. - Create grocery stores as health hubs for one-stop opportunities to buy healthy foods and learn how to prepare them, provide gathering spaces and resources for neighborwith-neighbor fitness programs, like walking groups; incorporate easy health professional access.

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Inner City Arts + Arts District, Los Angeles, CA

ATX atwater village, Los Angeles, CA

Dorchester Arts + Housing Collaborative, Chicago, IL

Inner City Arts was founded in the late 1980s by artist and educator Bob Bates and businessman Iriwn Jaeger to fill a gap left by the Los Angeles School District budget cuts. In the heart of Skid Row, it is a safe, creative space for kids and teachers from all over the city to learn visual, performing and media arts. The Inner City Arts Professional Development Institute also trains educators, university students and administrators in arts fields.

ATX Atwater Village is an arts and innovation complex housed in six formerly vacant industrial buildings near the Los Angeles River. In addition to an experimental restaurant, ATX has spaces for film shoots and photo studios, small arts manufacturing, performance space, creative offices, art studios and public programming. Twenty-seven housing units were built in conjunction with ATX.

Rehabilitation of former Chicago Public Housing complex and integration with community-led cultural & family center; programming is supported by nonprofit Rebuild Foundation that offers artists residencies, workshops, classes, and multiple events for both complex residents and the neighborhood at large.

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FINANCE + HOUSING IMPROVE FINANCIAL RESILIENCY

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Redundancy is the key to resiliency, and in areas of financial uncertainty that often means the ability to get to a wider range of work and educational opportunities. Greater mobility also brings more commerce to existing and new commercial districts. Places like the Central West End, Forest Park Southeast, Grand Center, the Locust Street Business District, Cherokee Arts District, Tower Grove Business District, Downtown Dutchtown Business District, The Grove, Old North and the downtown Central Business District all benefit from being more interconnected, moving people and ideas more fluidly between them, and encouraging that movement to be as healthy as possible, both for the individuals and for the environment.

In a city where disparity is evidenced in homeownership, job access, and educational attainment, the Greenway is a great opportunity to begin to reverse the trend. People of all economic levels, ages, races, and gender should be able to live, work, and play within easy access of the new asset of the Greenway. Utilizing a version of transit oriented development, greenway oriented development should assure the ecological, social, and economic benefits of greenway adjacency, like growth in property value over time and access to customers, are distributed to locals and those most in need in higher than average numbers.

St. Louis’s Preliminary Resilience Assessment from the 100 Resilient Cities Initiative highlights nine existing efforts: the City’s hazard mitigation plan, National Geospatial Agency (NGA)/ Project Connect, Choice Neighborhoods, Promise Zone, Urban Greening, Cortex Innovation Community, Climate Action & Adaptation Plan, Better Together, and Forward Through Ferguson. Together, they are stronger than the sum of their parts. The greenway should leverage these initiatives for greater financial and environmental resiliency along the full +STL greenway, with the idea of a green network better connecting the city’s people and its initiatives for change.

In St. Louis, increasing real estate ownership through homeownership or business property ownership is a tangible way to decrease the existing wealth gaps. Models across the country are demonstrating success with concepts such as creating rent equity, co-living spaces and “greenlining” to increase homeownership access and rent stability. Significant attention must be given to the creation of financial incentives that encourage a diversity of people to move into the area (down payment assistance, tax abatements, housing diversity, etc.) while protecting those who already live there. There should be opportunities for non-profit agencies and philanthropic investors to work with neighborhood associations to create matching funds for rental equity programs and overall building preservation and improvements. Programs such as the NYC Acquisition Fund have helped create over 11,000 affordable units in New York City by providing bridge loans to developers committed to affordable housing. Alternative housing typologies such as co-living or live/work space for a range of business models provides a diversity of affordable options. Neighborhood investors -- those who live within the communities, employee locally, and invest locally in support of local businesses -- should be prioritized for incentives. While increasing homeownership as a stabilization tactic is a well-established strategy, North and South City residents repeatedly hit blockades when trying to access loans and mortgages. St. Louis is beginning to tackle these problems through its Equality Indicators program out of the Mayor’s office, where director Cristina Garmendia is working with banks to identify how lending hurdles might be rectified, particularly with a focus on our North and South side hubs -- Fairground Park and Marquette Park -- where the park and the greenway together, and later the MetroLink expansion, become assets off which homeowners can build wealth.

INCREASE NEIGHBORHOOD ACCESS TO CAPITAL St. Louis is full of locals who are excited about living here and whose families have lived here for generations. There is no substitute for multi-generational rootedness. It builds community capital and creates strong cohesivity. Yet, change is inevitable, and often much needed. As St. Louis evolves, it is important to recognize generational capital and the value of rootedness by keeping long-term residents in place and supporting grassroots vitality. At the same time, we must add new residents to the mix and build the infrastructure that makes them life-long St. Louisans. Many areas around the Greenway are ripe for housing development. Given that St.Louis ranks in the top 10 metros for millenials as homeowners and the desire to activate the area, providing affordable home ownership opportunities for young professionals is critical. Turning large spaces and vacant buildings into large co-living and co-owning spaces by private developers for local artists (near Grand Arts District), entrepreneurs (near Cortex technology district) or young professionals (near Central Business District) offers an exciting way to engage with these segments and create users of the Greenway. Places that have been consistently disinvested over the last several years are attracting new residents interested in a more dense, walkable lifestyle. “Greenlining,” where banks cover the equity shortfall when individuals purchase houses and rehab the houses until the market rises to meet the potential property values, is just emerging in South city as a strategy to help existing and new low-income homeowners be part of the recovery of those neighborhoods. Expanded greenway adjacent neighborhoods like Benton Park, Gravois Park, and Dutchtown are perfect candidates for concentrated efforts led by local financial institutions and housing agencies. Building off of the 161-unit apartment project planned for Delmar and Euclid is an idea from the Cincinnati Union Coop. Their project creates pathways for rent stability and a transition to home ownership where renters have a portion of their rental costs matched by foundations and local investors once they have successfully paid their rent on time and attended financial literacy classes. The matched rent can be placed in reserve for future rent or household emergencies or used as down payment for a home. Locally, Equifax has also piloted a collective land ownership program to bring together teams of neighbors for cooperative investment that helps build credit scores -- a notorious home ownership barrier. These have been tested in their focus areas of Jeff-Vanderlou and Old North neighborhoods.

RECOMMENDATIONS - Provide housing diversity throughout the greenway access zone. - Incentivize housing tied to greenway development that support efforts around historic building adaptation, affordable housing, alternative live/work models, and co-housing (across generations, across professions, across economic levels). - Create local banking and financial education as integral to all neighborhood hubs. - Allow prime access to equity-building opportunities along the route given to those most historically disenfranchised. - Support new efforts like “Greenlining” and the Mayor’s “Equality Indicators Project” by partnering with them in development initiatives along the route. - Leverage emerging and established local investors, particularly those personally embedded in the neighborhoods with proven track records to support local businesses, provide local training and jobs, and build diversity and community amenities into projects. - Partner with local organizations and agencies already doing work with neighborhoods such as Rise and InvestSTL, among others. - Provide inclusive neighborhood agency.

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Exemplify Citizen Engagement St. Louis suffers from a history of fracture and divide, erase and replace. It is time to heal the chasms in the city. Though our proposal cannot reduce the number of municipalities or spark a new marriage that solves the great divorce of city and county, it does suggest that the +StL Greenway takes a leadership role in exemplifying regional cooperation and citizen inclusivity. We see our expansive team as both instigators and facilitators for the greater engagement process. We plan to continue to work with the Community Advisory Committee, the Technical Advisory Group, the Artists of Color Advisory Council, and, one we feel is critical to a successful project, a Neighborhood Council Advisory team made up of leaders and local experts from the neighborhoods along the equitable extensions. This council would work directly with experts from our team in health and race (Jason Purnell), food justice (Jeremy Goss), equity development (Crystal German) and north and south city partnerships (Sal Martinez and Amanda Colon-Smith, respectively). Additional members would be added as needed to meet the needs of the neighborhoods, including expertise in education. This multi-layered collaboration is intended to facilitate shared ownership of the Greenway between the organizational and institutional formal stakeholders and the invested residents who call St. Louis neighborhoods their homes.

Attending to the long arc of neighborhood transformation The scale of this project is multi-year, as is the typical pace of neighborhood transformation. South east city neighborhoods, for example, have faced some of the biggest transformations in racial composition in the last 25-30 years of any neighborhoods in the city of St. Louis. We must be intentional about the 10, 15 and 20 year impacts of this project and how it re-imagines who will be accessing it and how it is a part of the fabric of the residential future in the City of St. Louis. The North side has basic priorities, such as improvements in basic infrastructure like street lights and sidewalks, that should be planned in conjunction with a future greenway but can begin now as part of an engage and commit strategy. Planning and implementing with a Racial Equity lens is a key aspect that should be addressed to ensure equitable development. We must protect those who currently live in the Greenway impact area, support and enhance their own life objectives, while welcoming new residents. A long arc of agency building, buy-in and collaboration is critical. Project champions and project shepherds from within the neighborhoods as both formal and informal partners are key to the success of a positive transformation.

PLANNING Two priorities are key to equitable planning: expanding and deepening the levels of participation; and creating new networks, relationships and capacity for equitable implementation. For example, south side neighborhood associations often have membership that is not representative of wider neighborhood demographics, both racially and economically, so exploring ways to better represent the diverse grain of sub-needs and desires is crucial to the “equity first” lens. Smaller groups that meet based on social interests or common needs, such as the parent associations at local SLPS schools will be invaluable communities with which to connect. On the North side, a robust collection of service

providers from the St. Louis Dream Center to the Boys and Girls Club are already a foundation for engagement with thousands of residents across a range of ages and desires. Cultivating inclusive engagement of underrepresented groups in traditional civic decision-making spaces is necessary. Planning and public engagement should create new networks, relationships and capacity for equitable implementation. Seek out opportunities for North side and South side residents who have ties to central corridor assets and institutions to become more involved in discussions of those affected neighborhoods. Youth, particularly those from multi-generational St. Louis city families, are a key constituency in long-term projects. For example, students at Harris Stowe or SLU High from The Ville or Dutchtown may bring unique voices as bridges from the past to a future St. Louis where they want to stay and build their own families. Recently elected Alderpeople from the north side, John Collins-Muhamad and Brandon Bosley, are two of the youngest members of the Board of Aldermen; their fresh approach to public service and energy would infuse a leadership council with a new vision for large infrastructure planning. Organizational capacity can be built by connecting smaller, localized groups to larger companies, philanthropies, nonprofits and others who can build connections for mutual growth. For example, linkages to Southside parks such as Marquette Park or North side parks such as Fairground and O’Fallon can be encouraged by cultivating a “Friends Of” group that can learn lessons from Forest Park Forever’s successes. Revitalization in these parks can take on an “active living” strategy where the parks become part of the health, education, and sustainability solution for recovering neighborhoods. Working with communities from inception through the full life-cycle of a public amenity is critical, as stated in the GRG Engagement Strategy. Buy-in, ownership, and longterm champions build project stewardship and use. But there must also be ways to build real agency and decisionmaking power from the neighborhood up. STL + supports a

structure that creates special funding pools from increased revenues into resident directed and selected action projects. This self-determination and democracy is part of agency and equity building. The STL+ Greenway is far more than a mobility network, it is also an empowerment opportunity for neighborhoods to imagine and implement their better future.

IMPLEMENTATION Resident involvement should activate power and oversight to shift from passive recipients of benefits to co-creators of desired outcomes. Sub-committees and advisory boards should be open to dialogue about the role and responsibilities they can take on in various phases of implementation. Robust planning and monitoring of W/MBE participation with advanced outreach and ongoing training should be a priority to ensure contractors are from diverse backgrounds and represent businesses located in economically distressed communities, especially in South East City and North City. A generation of job skills, from construction to horticulture, can be gained from a project of this magnitude and can impact the future exponentially.

STEWARDSHIP Stewardship of a project, from inception to implementation and operation, from its youngest new user to its oldest champion, is what turns a project from operable to irreplaceable. If the +StL Greenway is to transform the city of St. Louis in the bold way we imagine, it must unite and inspire current residents and attract and retain new ones. This stewardship, we believe, grows in two ways: a design that is unexpected, reflecting a future once thought impossible. That future is inclusive of the vitality, culture and potential of the existing population, while showing ourselves and others what the city is capable of through this shared commitment.

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Ivan Valin TLS Landscape Architecture

Derek Hoeferlin [dhd]

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Tom Leader TLS Landscape Architecture

Michael Allen Preservation Research Office

Linda Samuels

Jeremy Goss, MD Link Market

Marcus Carter OBJECT TERRITORIES

Christopher Lee OBJECT TERRITORIES

Sal Martinez North Newstead Association

Miranda Lee OBJECT TERRITORIES

Michael Kokora OBJECT TERRITORIES

Kristin Fleischmann Brewer

Paola Aguirre Serrano

Crystal German Prosperity Labs

Amanda Colon-Smith Dutchtown South Community Corporation

Stephen P. Mullin Econsult Solutions

Jason Purnell, PHD Washington University, Brown School

Eric Rothstein eDesign Dynamics

Steven Poplawski Bryan Cave LLP

Michael Ellis Ramboll

James Lima James Lima Planning + Development

Marvin Woods Project Controls Group

Adnan Pasha Langan

Josephine Emerick EDSI.

Theo Barbagianis eDesign Dynamics

Shane Staten Terra Technologies

DJ Hodson Langan

Scott Hughes Silman


PROJECT TEAM

TLS Landscape Architecture’s Railroad Park spurred economic regeneration in this part of Birmingham, Alabama.

Railroad Park skate and bike ramps.

1. DESIGN & PLANNING The team we have assembled for the +StL Greenway is designed to combine the ideas a fresh perspective from the outside can bring with local knowledge and experience from St. Louis. In the course of the design process, we will work together with the communities of St. Louis, Great Rivers Greenway, and our collaborators to develop an intelligent design that reveals the opportunities the +StL Greenway can bring to St. Louis. In order to address the complexity of the +StL Greenway site, we have organized the team into four intersecting spheres of influence and practice: DESIGN & PLANNING, CULTURE & ADVOCACY, ENGINEERING & ECOLOGY, and ECONOMICS & LAND USE. Each of these spheres contains team members from outside of and within St. Louis, thereby forming a team with global, national, and local expertise.

we work in to learn their priorities and gain their trust. Linda Samuels and Paola Aguirre Serrano (community engagement) Kristin Fleischmann Brewer (public arts), and PRO (heritage), Sal Martinez (community advocate, North St. Louis), Amanda Colón-Smith (community advocate, South St. Louis), Dr. Jason Purnell (health equity advocate), and Dr. Jeremy Goss (food equity advocate) will coordinate with the Design Team and Great Rivers Greenway team to arrange public engagement efforts and assist in moderating listening sessions with the communities of the StL Greenway.

1. DESIGN & PLANNING Open space planning, landscape, and urban design will be co led by TLS Landscape Architecture, OBJECT TERRITORIES, and [dhd] derek hoeferlin design. The three offices will work as one team to develop the design and coordinate the various disciplines. Expertise in environmentally innovative urban design, landscape, and architecture lie at the heart of each firm’s continued investment in the creation of public space.

3. ENGINEERING & ECOLOGY The nature of the +StL Greenway means an intensive investigation into civil engineering, multi-modal transportation networks, new hydrological conditions, habitats, and ecologies. Langan (site, civil, traffic, and multi-modal transportation engineering and technical management), EDSI (local traffic, and multi-modal transportation engineering), Ramboll (environmental design, microclimate analysis, and climateresponsive engineering, and pollution remediation), eDesign Dynamics (hydrological engineering, green infrastructure, water resources planning, and habitat restoration), Terra Technologies (horticulture, biotechnical engineering) and Silman (structural engineering) will provide analysis for our design team.

2. CULTURE & ADVOCACY Central to our team’s philosophy is listening and learning from the communities of a specific project, its culture, and about unique site conditions. We believe in joining the communities

4. ECONOMICS & LAND USE One of the most significant ways the +StL Greenway can improve quality of life in St. Louis is by improving its economic base and stimulating growth and development. In order to

demonstrate our intentions, Econsult Solutions (economic analysis), James Lima Planning + Development (development economics), Prosperity Labs (equitable economic development) and Bryan Cave LLP (environmental, zoning and land use legal analysis) will evaluate the economic potential of the +StL Greenway within legal constraints. Project Controls Group (cost estimating) will analyze investment costs for the project. During the course of the project, our team will work from our Team Office at: 1807 Park 270 Drive Suite 450. St. Louis, Missouri. Stakeholder and community listen / learn sessions and internal team workshops will occur in local St. Louis community venues. 1. DESIGN & PLANNING TLS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE [LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE & URBAN PLANNING] TLS Landscape Architecture (TLS) is a critical landscape architecture and urban design practice rooted in the craft of material, respect for communities, and the spirit of collaboration. Founded in Berkeley, California in 2001, TLS is now an international practice and an active, experimental design studio that liaises between emerging ideas and their concrete realization in space and place through time. With experience in a range of scales and types of work, TLS always seeks what is personal and original while in pursuit of the pragmatic.

TLS’ process is based on an open engagement with communities and deep research on site as a way of developing sensitivity to a landscape’s cultural and natural heritage and ultimately to its potential. The studio works collaboratively with municipalities, foundations, planners, architects, engineers, and artists to create spatial ensembles strongly rooted in each city’s very specific place and time. Working with diverse communities, we have learned the importance of open communication and respect. We know how to fairly and critically listen; and then propose ideas in response. We have a keen understanding of promoting an invigorating and productive collaboration in every project; one that creates meaningful connections between communities and their physical surroundings resulting in a unique synergy for urban spaces that is greater than the sum of its parts. People trust TLS, and no successful project can really be made without trust. TLS has several projects in construction globally, including an 8-acre urban creek park in Boulder, Colorado; a US Consulate General in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia; and a 5-hectare centerpiece park in Shanghai. Since 2014, TLS has become a leader in coastal resilience planning and leads a city-wide pro bono planning effort for the City of Richmond, California, looking at the intersection of sea level rise and shoreline seismic instability. TLS has been acknowledged with several ASLA Honor Awards and as a finalist for Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum Award for Landscape Architecture. Railroad 97


Community Renewal and Development, Inc.’s (now part of North Newstead Association) Annual Community Dinner at Fresh Starts Community Garden in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood [dhd] study of the St. Louis region: yellow is topography, red is developed land, blue are floodplains. Object Territories proposed a greenway park between Syracuse and the town of DeWitt in New York along the site of the old Erie Canal..

Object Territories proposal for uncovering the old Erie Canal which is currently buried under Erie Boulevard in Syracuse, New York.

2. CULTURE & ADVOCACY Park, a 19 acre downtown urban living room in downtown Birmingham, Alabama won the 2012 the ULI Urban Open Space Award for community development as well as design, and the Stanford University School of Medicine Campus and Narrative Art Walk which won the SCUP Excellence in Open Space Award in 2013.

frequently deploy project staff to site locations for in depth engagement with the context, stakeholders, community members, collaborators, and clients to learn and bring fresh perspectives. We work intensively through physical models and mockups to test, develop, and represent ideas that everyone can understand and engage with.

OBJECT TERRITORIES [URBAN PLANNING & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE]

Environmental innovation begins from the onset of each project developing integrated strategies at all project scales. Whether buildings or regional plans, we endeavor to create projects that are socially engaged and performative in nature. We believe the details and execution of the project are of critical importance to the project’s success, therefore every project team is led by a Partner who is intensely involved in each phase of the project from inception to completion.

OBJECT TERRITORIES is an international critical design practice with extensive experience in architecture, landscape design, and urbanism. Our work engages the built environment at scales ranging from architectural projects to strategic interventions and regional masterplans. With a commitment to creating meaningful public space, we explore the spatial conditions between objects (buildings) and territories (landscapes) to develop intelligent forms and activate fields of organization. Through spatial, programmatic, and material innovation we design to enrich experience and cultivate social relationships. When collaborating with communities, clients, experts, and design partners across multiple disciplines we believe in working as one team to develop unique projects informed by content, expertise, and close analysis of context. This enables intelligent designs that reveal the latent potentials within a project brief, the site, and the broader cultural framework. While we often work in cities outside our home offices, we 98

With offices in New York and Hong Kong, our experience with government planning includes a masterplan for the largest missing gap in the Erie Canal park network in upstate New York; an urban masterplan for the City of Oakland, California; a public park in the city of Da Nang, Vietnam; a cultural district and museum in South Korea; and other projects including a science museum in Lithuania; a large urban mixed-use development in Surabaya, Indonesia, and a winery, residential, and a vineyard complex under construction in Ningxia, China. [dhd] DEREK HOEFERLIN DESIGN [LOCAL URBAN PLANNING & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE] [dhd] derek hoeferlin design is a professional office and

research entity based in St. Louis that manages the design disciplines’ important roles in complicated, multi-disciplinary projects. Its particular expertise focuses on the integration of complex water and infrastructure based design dilemmas across architectural, urban, regional and river basin scales. [dhd] helps lead community-centered workshops, leading past projects and workshops in St. Louis, New Orleans, Brisbane, Rotterdam, and Ho Chi Minh City. Derek Hoeferlin is an Associate Professor at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, where he leads community-engaged research and coursework focused on multi-scaled and multi-disciplinary design challenges in the St. Louis region. He is the principal investigator of “Way Beyond Bigness: A Watershed Architecture Manifesto and Methodology.” He is co-lead of “MISI-ZIIBI: Living with the Great Rivers,” a collaboration between Washington University and the Royal Netherlands Embassy, Washington D.C. that promotes adaptive land-use futures in the St. Louis region in response to climate extremes posed by floods and droughts; and, of “Gutter to Gulf: Legible Water Infrastructure for New Orleans,” an award-winning collaboration between Washington University and the University of Toronto that advocates for integrated water management strategies for the New Orleans region. [dhd] is currently synthesizing the collaborative work about the Mississippi, Mekong, and Rhine river basins into a book publication (Applied Research + Design Publishers, forthcoming 2019).

LINDA SAMUELS & PAOLA AGUIRRE SERRANO [COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT] Dr. Linda C. Samuels and Paola Aguirre Serrano will be responsible for engaging the communities North and South of the +StL Greenway in order to enhance the connections between communities on either side of the infrastructure that divides them. For our team, it is important that the community outreach team consists of urban designers that have experience in community engagement and understand the social and spatial implications of the project. Dr. Linda C. Samuels is an Associate Professor in Urban Design at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University and is co-principal investigator of a Divided Cities grant for the 2017-2018 academic year entitled Mobility For All By All which will help build citizen representation through creative community engagement around the future Northside/ Southside Metro-link expansion in St. Louis. Dr. Samuels has a history of community engagement, architecture as a form of activism (through design/build and other formats), as well as previous participation in Structures for Inclusion events. Paola Aguirre Serrano Paola Aguirre Serrano founded “Borderless” an urban design studio as a platform not only for interdisciplinary collaboration in the design of cities, but also for thinking across scales, geographies, communities


Kristin Fleischmann Brewer leads a community discussion about art outside of the Pulitzer Arts Foundation.

Amanda Colón-Smith led the design of Community Engagement efforts for the GravoisJefferson Historic Neighborhoods planning process.

Dr. Jeremy Goss founded the Link Markets in St. Louis. Michael Allen of Preservation Research Offic leads a walking tour of the Pruitt Igoe site in North St. Louis

and stakeholders. Her practice consistently looks for ways to connect communities to design with emphasis on research and communication across disciplines and fields of practice. Paola Aguirre Serrano is currently teaching a studio together with Dr. Linda C. Samuels at Washington University that engages the +StL Greenway. KRISTIN FLEISCHMANN BREWER [PUBLIC ARTS] Kristin Fleischmann Brewer will engage communities, business owners, stakeholders, cultural leaders to generate an arts and culture program of (not for) the +StL Greenway that celebrates local culture, art, and history. Kristin Fleischmann Brewer is a painter and sculptor working and living in St. Louis, MO. She is the Director of Public Programs and Engagement at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation where she collaborates with local and national artists and thinkers to curate public programs. Fleischmann co-founded and directed Enamel Art Space in St. Louis, MO, from 2012-2014 with artist Katie McCullough, which exhibited the work of local and national visual artists and poets. PRESERVATION RESEARCH OFFICE [HERITAGE] Michael Allen directs the Preservation Research Office (PRO), an independent, research-based heritage consultancy based in St. Louis. PRO’s projects not only better stewardship and appreciation of historic places, but also increase the recognition

of the inherent social capital of places and buildings. PRO combines technical expertise in building and landscape preservation with innovative approaches to public policy and value driven heritage identification. Since 2009, PRO has aided city governments, homeowners, neighborhood associations, museums, and developers in St. Louis, Missouri; Illinois; Iowa; Kansas; North Dakota; Oklahoma; and Pennsylvania. PRO offers a full range of preservation services that can suit single buildings or entire neighborhoods. Among its larger projects have been surveys, historic district designations and public history projects in distressed neighborhoods that often have more vacant lots than buildings, but still tell important stories. SAL MARTINEZ [COMMUNITY ADVOCATE - NORTH ST. LOUIS] Sal Martinez serves as the Executive Director of the North Newstead Association (NNA), a Missouri not-for-profit corporation designated by the City of St. Louis as a Community Based Development Organization, or “CBDO” for purposes of the Community Development Block Grant Program and designated by the City of St. Louis as a Community Housing Development Organization, or “CHDO” for purposes of Home Investment Partnerships Program. The organization has been active since its incorporation in 1993 and currently serves the St. Louis City neighborhoods of Penrose, O’Fallon, Fairground, Carr Square, Jeff Vander Lou, St. Louis Place, Old North, Columbus Square, and the Gate District. Mr. Martinez advises on issues and needs of North St. Louis and how its residents can engage and benefit from the +StL Greenway project.

AMANDA COLÓN-SMITH [COMMUNITY ADVOCATE - SOUTH ST. LOUIS]

DR. JASON PURNELL [HEALTH EQUITY ADVOCATE]

Amanda Colón-Smith is the Executive Director of the Dutchtown South Community Corporation which advances neighborhood vitality through community empowerment, housing stabilization and real estate development. DSCC is funded in part by a Housing and Urban Development grant via the St. Louis City Community Development Administration. Her expertise is in equitable community development, social justice, and grassroots organizing. Ms. Colón-Smith speaks to issues important to South St. Louis, and in particular to Dutchtown, and advises on how residents can engage and benefit from the +StL Greenway project.

Dr. Purnell is an Associate Professor at Washington University in the Brown School where he is a health equity and social determinants of health expert. He was the principal investigator and project director of For the Sake of All focused on awareness and mobilization for community health. His work has resulted in cross-sector collaborations to improve health in multiple domains (e.g., schools, housing, health care, etc.). Dr. Purnell advises the team on studies, priorities, and initiatives with urban health as it relates to the greenway project and communities it intersects.

DR. JEREMY GOSS [FOOD EQUITY ADVOCATE] Dr. Goss addresses issues in food insecure areas that lack grocery stores and convenient places to pick up healthy food, which presents a variety of challenges for community members. He developed the Link Market which partners with local farms and community gardens to source quality produce, meat, and fish. It brings together fresh food, kitchen staples and pre-prepared meals at our stores. Their affordable groceries are ready for convenient pick-up at one of two MetroLink station grocery stores. Dr. Goss advises on issues of food equity which are of direct relevance in several communities that will engage the greenway.

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Langan provided site and remedian services for the Battery East Vista in San Francisco, California. Langan provided civil engineering and remediation services; Silman provided structural engineering on the Bushwick Inlet Park in Brooklyn, New York.

EDSI supported the project team and Great Rivers Greenway in developing the planning/design/engineering process, developed the project goals and objectives, and participated in public outreach and engagement.

MVVA in association with eDesign Dynamics designed a state-of-the-art stormwater capture and reuse system, a restored stream corridor, and new water garden at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden in Brooklyn, New York.

3. ENGINEERING & ECOLOGY LANGAN [SITE, CIVIL, TRAFFIC, MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING, AND TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT] Langan will provide site, civil, traffic, and multi-modal transportation engineering and technical management for the +StL Greenway project. Langan’s site and civil engineering team will develop site plans and a road map to lead the team through complex regulatory processes. Langan’s transportation team has developed innovative solutions for prominent corridors, transit terminals, highways, and stadiums, as well as large and small scale developments of all types. Langan provides comprehensive system solutions that balance the needs of all users including vehicles, transit, and pedestrians/bicyclists. Langan is at the forefront of newly emerging fields in transportation, including: simulation models, traffic and revenue forecasts, intelligent transportation systems, complete streets, traffic calming, context sensitive design, multi-modal systems, smart growth and transit oriented development (TOD), progressive parking strategies, and environmental metrics. EDSI [LOCAL TRAFFIC & MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING] EDSI will provide local traffic and multi-modal transportation engineering in collaboration with Langan’s national 100

transportation experts. In the St. Louis metropolitan area, our project experience includes multiple projects for Great Rivers Greenway, Forest Park Forever, East-West Gateway Council of Governments, Bi-State Development Agency (Metro), City of St. Louis and Missouri Department of Transportation. EDSI is a MBE and DBE-certified transportation, civil engineering, and surveying firm with over 30 engineering and survey professionals. They have been providing quality civil design and surveying services for more than 20 years and have completed over 1,500 projects in the Missouri / Illinois bi-state region. RAMBOLL [ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN, MICRO CLIMATE ANALYSIS, AND CLIMATE-RESPONSIVE ENGINEERING, POLLUTION REMEDIATION] Ramboll will provide environmental design, microclimate analysis, and climate-responsive engineering, and pollution remediation for the +StL Greenway. With an office in St. Louis, Ramboll will apply local insight about the region and climate while tapping into the reservoir of knowledge gained through its global operations of more than 13,000 experts across 300 offices in 35 countries. Ramboll’s Environment and Health practice in St. Louis has provided expertise in environmental due diligence, site remediation, and environmental compliance consulting services for all media. Staff in the St. Louis office have more than 20 years of experience with achieving regulatory closure for contaminated sites in the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR)

Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP) including sites within the +StL Greenway. Ramboll’s St. Louis office will also utilize their expertise with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling to model outdoor thermal and wind conditions for the project team. Ramboll’s US, Copenhagen, and Singapore offices have collaborated frequently with the team at OBJECT TERRITORIES over the past several years, including most recently, a masterplan and public park for Da Nang, Vietnam. eDESIGN DYNAMICS [HYDROLOGICAL ENGINEERING, GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE, WATER RESOURCES PLANNING, AND HABITAT RESTORATION] eDesign Dynamics (EDD) will provide hydrological engineering, green infrastructure, water resources planning, and habitat restoration. EDD distinguishes itself by emphasizing ecologically, socially, and economically sensible solutions to conventional engineering and infrastructure challenges at all phases of projects. At the watershed and landscape scales, EDD helps clients conceptualize and plan cost-effective water resource programs using hydrological and hydraulic modeling tools, and participatory methods. Since EDD’s founding in 2002, we have worked with public agencies, non-profit organizations, major colleges and universities, homeowners, consulting firms, architects, landscape architects, and community groups in developed and developing countries around the world.

SILMAN [STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING] Silman will provide structural engineering advice for the +StL Greenway project. Silman can summon deep expertise in renovating historic structures while bringing their innovative design approach to realize new structures in the built urban context of the +StL Greenway. Projects range in scale from the PXSTL-LOTS pavilion in St. Louis to large cultural and corporate buildings and urban scale projects like the Highline in New York City. Since its inception in 1966, Silman has served as a structural engineering consultant on more than 23,000 projects. The firm’s engineers are trained to be effective listeners, creative problem solvers, and knowledgeable about all facets of the construction process with offices in New York City, Washington, DC, and Boston. TERRA TECHNOLOGIES [HORTICULTURALIST, BIOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING] Terra Technologies is a consulting firm with expertise in Clean Water Act Section 404 and 401 wetland and stream permitting and mitigation, wetland delineation, biotechnical stream stabilization engineering, mitigation banking, and other environmental compliance permitting. Terra Technologies will provide horticultural and biotechnical engineering consultation to the greenway project in support of creating a biodiverse landscape with a wide variety of flora and fauna. With offices in St. Louis and Kansas City, Terra Technologies primarily operates in the Midwest and has considerable


Silman provided structural engineering on the PXSTL-LOTS temporary pavilion for the Pulitzer Foundation and the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts.

Jame Lima Development + Planning is consulting with the Bjarke Ingels Group on the Big U flood protection plan in lower Manhattan, New York.

4. ECONOMICS & LAND USE expertise in the regions species and climate. The office has extensive experience with wetland mitigation, having completed over 600 such projects. The company combines the talents of licensed professional engineers with experts in the fields of horticulture, wetland ecology, geomorphology, habitat restoration, soil bioengineering, agrohistology, botany, and agronomy.

ECONSULT SOLUTIONS [ECONOMIC ANALYSIS] In order for the +StL Greenway to be an economic catalyst for greater St. Louis, Econsult Solutions will provide the project team with insights into economic opportunities, policy questions, strategic thinking, and an evaluation of the economic potential of our design proposal. Econsult Solutions’ work focuses on providing customized economic expert services in Government, Private Real Estate, Transportation, Economic Development, and Public Policy and Finance. Stephen Mullin and his team prepared the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy 2017-2022 for St. Louis and St. Louis County. He was Budget Director for the City of St. Louis (82-88), and served as Deputy Director of the St. Louis Development Corporation (90-92), where he was responsible for commercial and industrial development programs in St. Louis. BRYAN CAVE LLP [ZONING AND LAND USE LEGAL ANALYSIS] The +StL Greenway project has the potential to make zoning and land use changes as well as uncover social, environmental and economic opportunities and limitations arising out of changes of use. Bryan Cave’s Land Use, Development, and Environmental Teams, consisting of lawyers, urban planners and a registered architect, provides a full range of legal services in all areas of land use law, including advice on development enhancement strategies. They regularly

represent government and private clients seeking to obtain a variety of municipal and state approvals related to zoning, construction, building codes, historic preservation and related issues. Their vast environmental, conservation, land use and zoning advisory capacities will ensure realistic proposals driven by opportunity for growth. JAMES LIMA PLANNING + DEVELOPMENT [DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS] JLP+D provides planning, policy, real estate, and economic advisory services for downtown revitalization, real estate value creation, great placemaking, and shaping impactful public policy. Through its focus on the economics of placemaking, JLP+D helps develop innovative approaches that leverage public-private partnerships to address economic, social, and environmental imperatives and generate maximum public benefit. JLP+D’s aim is to ensure the long-term success of urban regeneration investments—from planning and development of former industrial waterfronts and downtown district growth strategies to cultural arts facilities development, adaptive reuse of historic properties, and increasing access to economic opportunity and affordable housing. PROJECT CONTROLS GROUP [COST CONSULTING] Project Controls Group, Inc. (PCG) is headquartered in St. Louis, MO. Incorporated in 2003, PCG is a certified Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE). PCG provides construction

project services in planning, analysis and controls in the areas of cost estimating, project budgeting, cost reporting, project cost analysis and forecasting, critical path method scheduling, document controls, change management, contract administration, claims avoidance, claims analysis, negotiations, schedule analysis and project management. With their local construction industry knowledge, PCG will provide cost analysis for the competition and then provide cost control and scheduling recommendations in future phases. PROSPERITY LABS [EQUITABLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT] The +StL Greenway project can make significant contributions to economic development for the city and the region. At the same time, equitable development in under served communities is a key tenet for our proposal. Prosperity Labs provide strategic planning to increase competitiveness for minority businesses, entrepreneurs, and workforce. They believe that economic development provides the best results when it creates an environment for attracting and growing businesses that recognizes the unique challenges faced by minority businesses and historically dis invested communities. Prosperity Labs will explore ways to diversify investment and opportunity for businesses around the greenway.

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TLS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 2013

Nicollet Mall Design Competition - Minneapolis, MN

2012

NVIDIA Campus Headquarters - Santa Clara, CA

2011

Minneapolis Riverfront, Riverfirst - Minneapolis, MN

2010

Stanford Academic Art Walk - Palo Alto, CA

2010

Stanford University Medical School Campus - Palo Alto, CA

2010

Railroad Park - Birmingham, AL

2009

Calexico International Port of Entry - California/Mexico Border

Tom Leader Principal, Landscape Architect

2009

Jaypee Cities - Delhi, India

2009

Denver VA Hospital - Denver, CO

Tom Leader is founder and principal of TLS Landscape Architecture in Berkeley, CA and Shanghai, China. For nearly 35 years, Tom has grounded his practice in an authentic understanding and appreciation of culture, ecology, craftsmanship and design. Sincere in his exploration of the creative process, Tom has remained on the cutting edge of design innovation, his work widely recognized for excellence. Since founding TLS in 2001, Tom has sought to create “original, tangible experiences” of place in such awardwinning projects as Railroad Park in Birmingham, Alabama, and RIVERFIRST in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and through his provocative site works and art installations. A former partner at Peter Walker + Partners, Tom received a BA in landscape architecture from UC Berkeley and MLA from Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

2009

Park Merced - San Francisco, CA

2008

San Bernadino Courthouse - San Bernadino, CA

2008

Rice University Collaborative Research Center - Houston,TX

2007

Pool Pavilion Forest - Napa, CA

He received the Rome Prize in Landscape Architecture at the American Academy in Rome in 1998/99 and was a finalist for the Smithsonian National Design Award in 2011. The work of TLS has been featured in various museum exhibitions including “Shanghai Carpet”, in MoMA New York’s 2007 “Groundswell”, concerning international landscape design. Tom lectures widely and the work of TLS is published frequently. Tom serves the Bay Area community as a member of the Bay Conservation and Development Commission Design Review Board as well as the City of Richmond Design Review Board. A Richmond resident, Tom leads the firm’s pro bono planning work for the future of the 35 mile Richmond shoreline looking at the intersection of sea level rise and seismic stability planning. This year he was elected to the College of Fellows of the ASLA.

SELECTED PROJECTS 2015

Dhahran US Consulate - Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

2015

Berkeley Global Campus Competition - Richmond, CA

2014

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business - Palo Alto, CA

2014

Bank of Beijing Science and Technology Center - Beijing, China

2013

5MSF - San Francisco, CA

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EDUCATION Harvard University Graduate School of Design Masters in Landscape Architecture University of California at Berkeley BA in Landscape Architecture, Departmental Citation

TLS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2012-present Tom Leader Studio, Berkeley, CA Associate Landscape Designer 2010-2012 AECOM Design and Planning Senior Associate & Project Director 2008-2010 Tom Leader Studio, Berkeley, CA Associate Landscape Designer 2006-2008 Hood Design Studio - Oakland, CA 2006 Iwamoto Scott Architecture & Process San Francisco, CA 2004 Interstice Architects, San Francisco, CA 2000-2001 VMDO & Associates, Charlottesville, VA Architectural Designer

Ivan Valin Associate, Landscape/Urban Designer Ivan Valin joined TLS in 2008 and brings more than 12 years of experience in the fields of landscape architecture, architecture, and urban design. He has been involved in projects involving complex structural requirements, strategic planning, and ecologically sensitive design. Having worked on projects around the world, Ivan is well versed in engaging local experts to build smart and appropriate solutions, and has developed a wide-ranging knowledge of construction practices. His work for TLS includes recently completed San Bernardino Courthouse (with SOM Architects); a masterplan and streetscape study for a new town in New Delhi, India; and the Richmond Bayway, a long-term planning study for an altered shoreline along the City of Richmond. As director of TLS’s China office, Ivan has recently been involved in competition-winning large park schemes in Suzhou and Shanghai.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2001-Present TLS Landscape Architecture Principal 1985-2001 Peter Walker and Partners Partner

Ivan is also an assistant professor of landscape architecture and director or the Master of Landscape Architecture program at the University of Hong Kong. His research examines alternative paradigms for nature in the city, specifically looking at the histories, forms and impacts of landscape systems in post-industrial and developing cities. Ivan holds a Masters of Architecture and Masters of Landscape Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley.

SELECTED AWARDS 2013 SCUP Open Space and Planning Award for

SELECTED PROJECTS

Stanford University, School of Medicine 2012 ULI Amanda Burden Open Space Award for Railroad Park 2009 ASLA Award for Napa Pool Pavilion 2009 ASLA Award for Stabiae Archaeological Park 2009 ASLA NCC-Merit Award for Park Merced 1998-1999 Rome Prize in Landscape Architecture 1996 San Francisco Prize PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS ASLA College of Fellows

Richmond Bayway - Richmond, California Vision Plan incorporating landscape strategies Zhuhai Resort Masterplan - Zhuhai, China 40 ha landscape masterplan and site restoration, SOM Green City / Sports City - New Delhi, India Landscape masterplan, water and road infrastructure, public realm San Bernardino Justice Center - San Bernardino, CA Urban public realm, water sensitive design Railroad Park - Birmingham, AL Urban public realm, water sensitive design

EDUCATION 2004-2007 Master of Landscape Architecture Master of Architecture University of California, Berkeley 1995-1999 Bachelor of Arts, University of Virginia with distinction AWARDS 2016 2008 2007

Coastal Reservoir, selected submission LAGI: Santa Monica. Prestel Publishing G. Hoshi Prize, UC Berkeley JK Branner Travelling Fellowship

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2012-Present Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture MLA Program Director (since 2014) Division on Landscape, Department of Architecture, The University of Hong 2010-2012 Adjunct Assistant Professor of Urban Design Masters of Urban Design, Department of Urban Planning and Design 2008 Lecturer University of California, Berkeley, Department of Landscape Architecture 2010 Guest Instructor Louisiana State University, School of Landscape Architecture SELECTED PUBLICATIONS/EXHIBITIONS 2017 VALIN I.A. and Echeverri N., “Cities within the City, Density in the Territory: Public Housing Estates and the Transformation of Hong Kong.” MONU 26 (Decentralized Urbanism):96–103. 2017 LU X., VALIN I.A. and TRUMPF S. “Interstitial Hong Kong.” Landscape Architecture Frontiers 5 (3):121–131. 2016 Valin I.A. and Echeverri N., Coastal Reservoir: Gathering water, energy, and biodiversity, In: Monoian, E.; Ferry, R., Powering Places: Land Art Generator Initiative, Santa Monica. Prestel 2015 Du J., Echeverri N., Jones P., Tang D.S.W. and Valin I.A., Low Carbon City Users’ Manual, Shenzhen Centre for Design. 2014 Edge Effects: Enmeshed Landscapes In: Urban by Nature: Intl. Architecture Biennale,


OBJECT TERRITORIES

OBJECT TERRITORIES Ningxia Winery - Yinchuan, China Winery, Clubhouse, Spa: 8,900 sqm / 96,000 sqft (buildings); 66,660 sqm / 718,000 sqft (landscape)

Lam Tin Rehabilitation Centre - Hong Kong, China Rehabilitation Hospital: 42,000 sqm / 452,000 sqft The Sommerset - Toronto, Canada Residence: 1580 sqm / 17,000 sqft

Erie Canal Masterplan - Syracuse, New York USA Urban Masterplan and Public Park: 6.4 km / 4 mi

Lehmann Maupin Gallery - Hong Kong, China Art Gallery: 105 sqm / 1,150 sqft

Laminate Housing - San Francisco, California Residential, Retail: 1,338 sqm / 14,400 sqft

Maison Ullens - Paris, France Retail Flagship: 200 sqm / 2,150 sqft

Williams College Museum of Art - Williamstown, Massachusetts Masterplan; Museum: 5,600 sqm / 60,000 sqft

Shenzhen Stock Exchange - Shenzhen, China Corporate Headquarters: 250,000 sqm / 2,690,000 sqft

Copenhagen Gate Towers - Copenhagen, Denmark Hotel, Office: 58,000 sqm / 624,500 sqft

Marcus Carter Partner, Architect/Urban Designer As a native of St. Louis, Marcus Carter is passionate about the future of the city. He brings over 15 years expereince leading complex, large scale multi disciplinary projects is a founding partner of OBJECT TERRITORIES where he leads the office together with Miranda Lee and Michael Kokora. As a senior associate at Steven Holl Architects, he led the Copenhagen Gate mixed-use development, the new Williams College Museum of Art and several private residences in New York State. He was also project architect for the Highline Hybrid Tower in New York City and was on the project teams of the Campbell Sports Center at Columbia University, the Daeyang Gallery & House in Seoul, Loisium Alsace Hotel & Spa in Colmar, France and the Shenzhen 4 Towers in 1 master plan competition. Prior to SHA, Marcus worked on a variety of project types at KPF and RAMSA including high-rise office towers, hotels, courthouses and university buildings. Marcus holds a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Kansas, studying in Rome during that time, and a Master of Architecture degree from the Yale School of Architecture where he studied with Michael Kokora. While at Yale, Marcus was editor of Perspecta, the Yale Architectural Journal. His writings focus on urbanism, postmodern design culture and the sublime in architecture. SELECTED PROJECTS Projecting The Waterfront - Da Nang, Vietnam Public Park and Market, 4.4 hectares / 10.7 acres Oakland Understories - Oakland, California USA Urban Masterplan and public park Kaunas Science Platform - Kaunas, Lithuania Exhibition Spaces, Planetarium, Offices: 14,000 sqm / 150,000 sqft National Museum Complex - Sejong Administrative City, South Korea Museums, Operation Center, Central Art Storage Facility: 3,300 sqm / 35,000 sqft (buildings); 10,500 sqm / 113,000 sqft (landscape) Suncheon Art Forum - Suncheon, South Korea Art Galleries, Urban Plaza, and Visitor Center: 3,300 sqm / 35,000 sqft (buildings); 10,500 sqm / 113,000 sqft (landscape)

Campbell Sports Center - New York, New York Institutional: 4,500 sqm / 48,000 sqft Shenzhen 4+1 Masterplan - Shenzhen, China Masterplan: 355,000 sqm / 3,800,000 sqft PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2015-Present OBJECT TERRITORIES, Hong Kong & New York Founding Partner 2007-2015 STEVEN HOLL ARCHITECTS, New York, NY Senior Associate 2004-2007 KOHN PEDERSEN FOX, New York, NY Architect 2000-2002 ROBERT A. M. STERN ARCHITECTS, New York, NY Architect EDUCATION 2002-2004 1994-2000 1998

Master of Architecture, Yale University Bachelor of Architecture, University of Kansas Univerity of Arkansas Rome Program

PUBLICATIONS 2012 2010 2010 2007 2006

”Patent Pending” essay in CLOG:Apple ”Drawing on the Sublime” essay in Pidgin 9: The Princeton Architectural Magazine ”Architectural Proof,” essay in the 20|20: Editorial Takes on Architectural Discourse ”Obituary,” essay in Batture: The Louisiana State University Architecture Journal Perspecta: The Yale Architectural Journal, No. 38 | Architecture After All - Editor

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Registered Architect: New York State NCARB Certified LEED Accredited Professional PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS The American Institute of Architects The Architectural League of New York Society of Architectural Historians

Miranda Lee Partner, Urban Designer Miranda Lee brings over 12 years expereince leading architectural and urban design projects in the United States, Europe, and Asia. She is a founding partner of OBJECT TERRITORIES where she leads the office together with Marcus Carter and Michael Kokora. Miranda was an architect in the offices of OMA and Shigeru Ban, in Rotterdam, Tokyo, New York, and Hong Kong. She has been involved with projects across Asia and North America, across disciplines of master planning, architecture, and interior design. She was one of the leading architects at OMA for the West Kowloon Cultural District competition between 2008-2010, the Lehmann Maupin Gallery in Hong Kong, the flagship store of Maison Ullens in Paris, and was one of the leading designers on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange, which was completed in 2013 and was the project through which Miranda met Michael Kokora. She is the honorary design architect and a member of the project committee with the Hong Kong Society for Rehabilitation for their Lam Tin redevelopment project. She continues to expand her language in design through research and experiments in materials and production methodology. She holds a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Cornell University and a Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design from Columbia University in New York. SELECTED PROJECTS Kaunas Science Platform - Kaunas, Lithuania Exhibition Spaces, Planetarium, Offices: 14,000 sqm / 150,000 sqft National Museum Complex - Sejong Administrative City, South Korea Museums, Operation Center, Central Art Storage Facility: 3,300 sqm / 35,000 sqft (buildings); 10,500 sqm / 113,000 sqft (landscape) Suncheon Art Forum - Suncheon, South Korea Art Galleries, Urban Plaza, and Visitor Center: 3,300 sqm / 35,000 sqft (buildings); 10,500 sqm / 113,000 sqft (landscape) Ningxia Winery - Yinchuan, China Winery, Clubhouse, Spa: 8,900 sqm / 96,000 sqft (buildings); 66,660 sqm / 718,000 sqft (landscape) Erie Canal Masterplan - Syracuse, New York USA Urban Masterplan and Public Park: 6.4 km / 4 mi

West Kowloon Cultural District - Hong Kong, China Masterplan: 726,000 sqm / 7,815,000 sqft N.G. Hayek Center - Swatch Group Headquarters - Tokyo, Japan Office: 475 sqm / 5,100 sqft Metal Shutter House - New York, New York USA Residential, Gallery: 3,250 sqm / 35,000 sqft Forest Park Pavilion - St Louis, Missouri USA Recreation: 470 sqm / 5,000 sqft SC Johnson Visitor Center - Racine, Wisconsin Visitor Center: 3,700 sqm / 40,000 sqft Orange County Museum of Art - Costa Mesa, California Museum: 6,600 sqm / 71,000 sqft PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2015-Present OBJECT TERRITORIES, Hong Kong & New York Founding Partner 2008-2012 OMA, Rotterdam & Hong Kong Project Architect 2006-2007 Shigeru Ban Architects, Tokyo & New York Architect 2005 AVROKO, New York, NY Architect EDUCATION 2004-2005 Master of Science in Architecture, Columbia University 1995-2000 Bachelor of Architecture, Cornell University EXHIBITIONS 2011 Venice Biennale Response Exhibition, Hong Kong LANGUAGES English Native Cantonese Native Mandarin Fluent Japanese Basic French Basic

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OBJECT TERRITORIES

OBJECT TERRITORIES Guangzhou City Museum Guangzhou, China Museum: 80,000sqm / 860,00 sqft

Ningxia Winery - Yinchuan, China Winery, Clubhouse, Spa: 8,900 sqm / 96,000 sqft (buildings); 66,660 sqm / 718,000 sqft (landscape)

Prince George’s African American Museum North Brentwood, MD USA Museum, Multi-Purpose Auditorium: 7,000 sqm / 76,000 sqft

Erie Canal Masterplan - Syracuse, New York USA Urban Masterplan and Public Park: 6.4 km / 4 mi

Sheikh Zayed Museum Abu Dhabi, UAE Museum: 14,000 sqm / 150,000 sqft

Singapore Rail Corridor - Singapore Landscape Masterplan and Public Park:: 24 km / 15 mi

Michael Kokora Partner, Urban Designer Michael Kokora is from Minneapolis, Minnesota where he grew up in constant connection with with Mississippi River, its tributaries, and surrounding lakes. He brings over 15 years expereince in complex, large scale multi disciplinary projects and is a partner at OBJECT TERRITORIES where he leads the office together with Marcus Carter and Miranda Lee. Recent projects include a park and market in Da Nang, Vietnam, a masterplan for revitalizing the Erie Canal in New York, a landscape masterplan for downtown Oakland, a Museum and Masterplan in South Korea, a Museum in Lithuania, and a winery in northern China. He is an assistant professor at the University of Hong Kong and teaches in the Master of Architecture and Landscape Architecture programs where he has been working to develop alternative landscape development visions in Myanmar. Prior to founding OBJECT TERRITORIES Michael was a partner at OMA and led the office’s work in Asia. Michael’s past projects include a number of masterplanning, landscape, high-rise, residential, and cultural projects in Hong Kong, China, Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Qatar, France, and the United States. Michael holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Minnesota and a Master of Architecture degree from the Yale School of Architecture where he recieved the Eero Saarinen Memorial Scholarship for Design.

Xiang’an Airport - Xiamen, China Airport Masterplan: 500,000 sqm / 5,380,000 sqft

National Bank of Greece Athens, Greece Museum: 25,000 sqm / 270,000 sqft

Broadcasting Center Headquarters - Jakarta, Indonesia Broadcasting Studios and Office: 120,000 sqm / 1,300,000 sq ft

Dubai Opera House Dubai, UAE Museum: 33,000 sqm / 355,000 sqft

Kota Tua Masterplan and Conservation - Jakarta, Indonesia Masterplan: 70 ha / 172 acres Seunsangga Masterplan - Seoul, South Korea Masterplan: 47,300 sqm / 510,000 sqft Shenzhen Stock Exchange - Shenzhen, China Corporate Headquarters: 250,000 sqm / 2,690,000 sqft West Kowloon Cultural District - Hong Kong, China Masterplan: 726,000 sqm / 7,815,000 sqft

SELECTED PROJECTS Projecting The Waterfront - Da Nang, Vietnam Public Park and Market, 4.4 hectares / 10.7 acres

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2015-Present OBJECT TERRITORIES, Hong Kong & New York Founding Partner 2007-2015 OMA, Hong Kong & Rotterdam Partner, Associate, Project Architect 2004-2006 KOHN PEDERSON FOX, New York, NY Architect 2003 KILO ARCHITECTURES, Paris, France Architect 2000-2001 SB ARCHITECTS, San Francisco, CA Architect 1999-2000 t/BP ARCHITECTURE, Oakland, CA Architect 1998-1999 SALA ARCHITECTS, Minneapolis, MN

Oakland Understories - Oakland, California USA Urban Masterplan and public park

Architect 1992-1998 DR CONSTRUCTION, Minneapolis, MN Architectural Designer

Kaunas Science Platform - Kaunas, Lithuania Exhibition Spaces, Planetarium, Offices: 14,000 sqm / 150,000 sqft National Museum Complex - Sejong Administrative City, South Korea Museums, Operation Center, Central Art Storage Facility: 3,300 sqm / 35,000 sqft (buildings); 10,500 sqm / 113,000 sqft (landscape) Suncheon Art Forum - Suncheon, South Korea Art Galleries, Urban Plaza, and Visitor Center: 3,300 sqm / 35,000 sqft (buildings); 10,500 sqm / 113,000 sqft (landscape)

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EDUCATION 2001-2004 Master of Architecture, Yale University 2003 Certificat, Ecoles d’Arts Americains, Fountainebleau, France 1995-1999 Bachelor of Arts, University of Minnesota ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2009-Present Assistant Professor. The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR 2006 Assistant Professor. New York Institute of Technology. New York, NY USA

Christopher Lee Associate, Architect/Urban Designer Christopher Lee is an associate working with OBJECT TERRITORIES. As a senior architect and director at Bernard Tschumi Architects he led the ANIMA Cultural Center, the De Passage, and several cultural and instituitional projects throughout Europe. He was also project architect for the Le Rosey Concert Hall in Rolle Switzerland, the Tianjin Exploratorium in Tianjin China, Sheikh Zayed Museum in Abu Dubai UAE, Prince George’s African American Museum in North Brentwood, Maryland, and was on the project teams of the Acropolis Museum in Athens, the LAIFEX Office Tower in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and a number of master planning projects ranging from office parks to media zones. Prior to BTA, Christopher worked as a researcher in Detroit for the Shrinking Cities Project and as an architect on a variety of project types at LEFT, and EEK including the design of besoke furniture, museums, middle schools, and university buildings. Christopher holds a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Kansas where he studied with Marcus Carter and a Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design with honors from Columbia University in New York. While at Columbia Univeristy Christopher was also the receipant of the William Kinne Fellows Prize for his research proposal on the abismal working conditions of migrants in Dubai entitled, “At What Cost”. Christopher currently resides in Oakland, California. SELECTED PROJECTS Oakland Understories - Oakland, California USA Urban Masterplan and public park ANIMA Cultural Center - Grottammare, Italy 1,500 Seat Multi-Purpose Auditorium, Educational, Exhibition Spaces, Restaurant, and Garden: 10,000 sqm / 108,000 sqft Le Rosey Concert Hall - Rolle, Switzerland 900 Seat Concert Hall, Black Box Theater, Rehearsal and Practice Rooms, Artist Studios, Library and Learning Center, and Restaurant: 10,000 sqm / 108,000 sqft De Passage - The Hague, The Netherlands Urban Passage, Shopping Center, and Hotel: 19,000 sqm / 200,000 sqft Interface Flon - Lausanne, Switzerland Intermodal Transit Center, Offices, and Public Plaza: 1,000 sqm / 11,000 sqft Tianjin Exploratorium Tianjin, China Exploratorium, Restaurant, Retail: 37,000 sqm / 400,000 sqft

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2015-Present OBJECT TERRITORIES, Hong Kong & New York Associate 2005-2015 BERNARD TSCHUMI ARCHITECTS, New York, NY Director / Senior Associate 2005 LEFT, New York, NY Architect 2002-2004 DETROIT COLLABORATIVE DESIGN CENTER, Detroit, MI Architect 2000-2002 EHRENKRANTZ ECKSTUT & KUHN, New York, NY Architect / Urban Designer EDUCATION 2004-2005 1995-2000 1996

Columbia University Master of Science (AAD) University of Kansas Bachelor of Architecture University of Arkansas Rome Program

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2010-2013 Assistant Professor, Columbia Univeristy 2006 Teaching Assistant, Columbia University 2003-2004 Adjunct Professor, Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI EXHIBITIONS 2006 2006 2000 2005 2000

Elliptic City - Swiss Pavilllion La Biennale di Venezia, in Venice, Italy “Moving Data” with Shrinking Cities exhibited at La Biennale di Venezia, in Venice, Italy “Transconnector” project as part of the “Suburbia as a National Park” show at The Pearl Gallery in Kansas City, MO ”Parks in the Tower” project exhibited at the 3rd International Architecture Biennale in Ljubljana, Slovenia Parkurbia: Suburbia as a National Park exhibitd at The Art & Design Gallery Lawrence, KS

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Registered Architect, New York State


[dhd] DEREK HOEFERLIN DESIGN

B R YA N C A V E L L P PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR) & AIA San Francisco Chapter

1990-Present Bryan Cave LLP Partner St. Louis, MO 1988-1990 Gallop Johnson & Neuman Attorney St. Louis, MO 1986-1988 Latham & Watkins Attorney Chicago, IL

The Continental Compact - California Water management proposal for California and the North American Continent, Co-design lead with Ian Caine. The proposal received Honorable Mention in the Dry Futures Competition sponsored by Archinect

Derek Hoeferlin Principal, Architect/Urban Designer Derek Hoeferlin is a native St. Louisan, a registered architect, and principal of [dhd] derek hoeferlin design, based in St. Louis. He is an associate professor at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis. Derek’s professional and teaching efforts are internationally recognized, and prioritize the design disciplines’ important roles in complex, multi-disciplinary projects. His particular expertise synthesizes water and infrastructure based design dilemmas across architectural, urbanistic, regional and river basin scales. Central to such, Derek helps lead community-centered workshops, with past locations including St. Louis, New Orleans, Brisbane, Rotterdam, and Ho Chi Minh City. Derek held leadership or prominent design team roles on a broad range of projects including: “Designing Resilience in Asia International Competition” (first place), “MISI-ZIIBI: Living with the Great Rivers in St. Louis (with John Hoal & Dutch Embassy),” “Changing Course: Navigating the Future of the Lower Mississippi River Delta” (first place, with STUDIO MISI-ZIIBI), “Dutch Dialogues/Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan” (with Waggonner & Ball), “Unified New Orleans Plan” (with H3 Studio), and “Rising Tides” (first place, with Ian Caine). From 1997-2003, Derek was lead project designer for Waggonner & Ball Architects on AIA award-winning architecture and urban design projects in New Orleans and China. Derek holds Bachelor and Master of Architecture degrees from Tulane and a postprofessional Master of Architecture degree from Yale (where he studied with Marcus Carter and Michael Korkora). SELECTED PROJECTS from the Third Pole to the Nine Dragons - Mekong River Basin Design Lead for a trans-boundary resiliency proposal for the Designing Resilience in Asia International Research Programme. The project received First Place, Designing Resilience International Open Competition. from the Blighty Mississippi to the Mighty Mississippi - Mississippi River Basin Design Lead for a Trans-boundary resiliency proposal for the Mississippi River Basin. The design-research project was published in New Urban Configurations/TU Delft, among others. The 100 Year Plan: Rising Tides Are a Catalyst to Solve Water Crisis - San Francisco, CA Integrated watershed design for California Co-designed with Ian Caine. The project received First Prize, Rising Tides Competition, sponsored by the San

The New MISI-ZIIBI Living Delta (2015) - Louisiana Core design team member with STUDIO MISI-ZIIBI in integrating 100-year visions for Louisiana delta coastal restoration and river management for the Environmental Defence Fund & State of Louisiana. The project received the following honors: Winner, 1 of 3, Changing Course: Navigating the Future of the Lower Mississippi River Delta Competition (2015); Best Conceptual Design Project, S.ARCH International Awards Program (2017); Honor Award, Unbuilt Category, American Institute of Architects (AIA) St. Louis (2016) MISI-ZIIBI: Living with the Great Rivers, Climate Adaptation Strategies for the Midwest River Basins (2013-present) - St. Louis, MO Research on integrated land-use strategies for St. Louis, Missouri region, as a Co-principal investigator with John Hoal. The project was a research project funded by the Royal Netherlands Embassy, Washington D.C & Washington University in St. Louis. It was published in River Flow, among other publications. Dutch Dialogues (2009) - New Orleans, LA Core design team member for integrated water management strategies advocacy efforts for New Orleans region. The project was Citizen-led Advocacy Design, funded by Royal Netherlands Embassy, Washington D.C.. It received the following honors: Honor Award, American Institute of Architects (AIA) Louisiana Chapter; Honor Award, American Institute of Architects (AIA) New Orleans Chapter and was published in Dutch Dialogues: New Orleans/ Netherlands, Common Challenges in Urbanized Deltas and other media outlets.

EDUCATION

Steven Poplawski Partner, Lawyer Steven Poplawski is a partner with Bryan Cave LLP and former leader of the firm’s Environmental group. He provides compliance counseling regarding a wide range of regulatory issues in all major environmental areas, including air, waste, and water. He has also represented corporations on enforcement matters, and has handled environmental litigation matters throughout the U.S., and has represented clients with regard to environmental liabilities in bankruptcy and cost recovery actions. Mr. Poplawski has also provided counseling and advice on brownfields and public/private development projects in St. Louis. In addition, Mr. Poplawski has advised publicly-traded clients on their environmental disclosures and both private and public companies on their sustainability policies. Mr. Poplawski served as the chair of the Environmental Committee of the St. Louis Regional Chamber where he worked on enhancing business development consistent with sustainability goals for the St. Louis Region. He also led the development of Bryan Cave’s Sustainability policy.

1986 1983

University of Chicago, J.D. Yale University, B.A.

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Admission Missouri, 1988 Admission in Illinois, 1986 United States District Courts for the Eastern District of Missouri and Northern and Southern Districts of Illinois PUBLICATIONS Co-author - Air Chapter, Missouri Environmental Law Deskbook Author - Using Socially Responsible Investing to Enable Local Action for Meeting of the Minds Blog SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS “Strategies for Achieving Impact Without Compromising the Bottom Line: Addressing the Challenges Facing Mature Companies,” Responsible and Impact Investing Symposium, November 2016 – Addressing Public Disclosure Regulations and Guidance on Sustainability Issues

Resilient Bridgeport (2014) - Bridgeport, CT Post-Sandy rebuilding and resiliency planning as part of design team affiliate for WB unabridged YALE+ARCADIS team. The project was sponsored by President Obama’s Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force and received the following honors: Finalist & Funded Project, Rebuild by Design Competition; Honorable Mention, American Institute of Architects (AIA) New Orleans.

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE Led negotiations on New Source Review enforcement matters involving single and multiple facilities, including preparation of historic analysis of modifications and emission changes convincing agency that no further action was required.

AWARDS 2018 The Best Lawyers in America© 2017

Chambers USA

EDUCATION 2003-2005 1992-1997

Led environmental audit teams organized to identify and correct environmental issues at facilities nationwide in response to criminal investigation begun at one facility.

2017

The Best Lawyers in America©

2016

Chambers USA

Master of Architecture, Yale University Bachelor & Master of Architecture, Tulane

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2005-Present Associate Professor. Washington University. St. Louis, MO 2004 Teaching Fellow. Yale University. New Haven, CT.

Successfully defended aircraft maintenance company against two count felony indictment in federal court. Case settled for misdemeanor plea and no conviction for individual defendants after Company prevailed on a motion to dismiss the Clean Water count of the indictment.

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Registered Architect: Missouri

PRACTICE AREAS

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS The American Institute of Architects

Environmental, Toxic Tort, Energy and Natural Resources, Agribusiness and Food Practice, Real Estate Private Equity & REITs, Higher Education, Data Center and Cloud Infrastructure

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D R . L I N DA C . SA M U E L S

PAO L A AG U I R R E S E R R A N O EDUCATION 2007–2012 Ph.D. in Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles 1990–1992 Master Of Architecture, Princeton University 1986–1990 Bachelor of Design in Architecture, University of Florida

Dorchester Arts & Culture District Strategic Plan - Chicago, Illinois Neighborhood redevelopment, strategic planning and visioning for University of Chicago’s Place Lab as part of their staff as Urban Design Fellow, to create an ethical redevelopment and placemaking strategy for over 150 acres in Greater Grand Crossing and South Shore neighborhoods in the Southside of Chicago.

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2015 – present Associate Professor, Washington University in St. Louis 2012 – 2015 Project Director, Sustainable City Project; Assistant Professor Of Practice, University of Arizona 1998–2007 Assistant Professor University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Dr. Linda C. Samuels Community Engagement Dr. Linda C. Samuels is an Associate Professor in Urban Design at the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University. Previously, she was the Director of the Sustainable City Project, a multi-disciplinary research, teaching, and outreach initiative of the University of Arizona. Samuels received her doctorate in Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her Master’s in Architecture from Princeton University. While at UCLA, she was a Senior Research Associate at cityLAB, an urban think tank in UCLA’s Department of Architecture and Urban Design, where she helped develop and lead the WPA 2.0 (Working Public Architecture) international competition, symposium, and exhibition focused on next generation infrastructure. Dr. Samuels’ work focuses on the reinvention of infrastructure through an interdisciplinary design lens to play a critical and productive role in a new urban public realm. Dr. Samuels is co-PI on a Mellon Humanities Divided Cities grant for the 20172018 academic year entitled Mobility For All By All. The goal of the grant is to increase the social and environmental benefits of the multi-billiondollar proposed Metrolink expansion for those residents now living along the alignment. The three-prong grant includes 1) a study of alternative metrics focused on opportunity and quality of life; 2) design-based work incorporated into existing curriculum that engages students in real-world problems and opportunities; and 3) site-specific collaborative community projects directed by local artists/activists that engage residents in an effort to build local agency and vision. Her publications include “Top/Up Urbanism” (2017) in Amplified Urbanism, “Stitches and Insertions” in Dana Cuff and Roger Sherman’s Fast-Forward Urbanism: Rethinking Architecture’s Engagement with the City (2011), “Infrastructural Optimism” (2009) and “Working Public Architecture” (2010) both published in Places journal. Her latest essay, “Resistance at the Trench: Why Efforts to Reinvent the 101 Freeway in Downtown Los Angeles Continue to Fail” (2017), was recently published in the Journal of Planning History. She is currently writing a book with Routledge Press entitled Infrastructural Optimism. Dr. Samuels’ work has been widely supported including grants from the John Randolph and Dora Haynes Foundation, the Getty Research Institute, UCLA, the Graham Foundation, ACSA and the LEF Foundation.

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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2009– 2012 Senior Research Associate, cityLAB, University of California Los Angeles 2003–2004 ROOM, Charlotte, NC, independent practice, small renovations and design interventions 1993–1998 Cherry Huffman Architects, Raleigh, NC. Architect, Project Manager PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS 1996 – present Licensed architect in the state of North Carolina 1996 – 2011 NCARB certificate SELECTED PUBLICATIONS Samuels, L. (2017) “Top I Up Urbanism: Testing Agency in the Changing City” in Amplified Urbanism Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, Los Angeles. Samuels, L. (2017) “Resistance at the Trench: Why Efforts to Reinvent the 101 Freeway in Downtown Los Angeles Continue to Fail” Journal of Planning History. I-29, Samuels, L. (2016) book review: “The City that Never Was” by Christopher Marcinkoski Journal of Architectural Education (JAE) available http://www. jaeonline.org/articles/reviews-books/city-never-was#/ (June 2016) Samuels, L. (2015) “Next Generation Infrastructure” Michael Kuby and Aaron Golub, eds. Transportation & Arizona: Arizona Town Hall Background Report. Arizona State University (p 97). ONGOING RESEARCH MOBILITY FOR ALL BY ALL / DIVIDED CITIES GRANT Washington University, Mellon Humanities Divided Cities Grant, co-PI ($20,000) for the development of top up infrastructural planning with the aim of increased quality of life and well-being I11 SUPERCORRIDOR / A NEXT GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT, research and design studio project across three universities in conjunction with ADOT and the Sonoran institute, proposing sustainable solutions for a new interstate corridor; supported by the Walton Sustainable Solutions Initiative, UA Renewable Energy Network and Sustainable City Project INFRASTRUCTURAL OPTIMSIM / Routledge, book project in process studying current and projective models of next generation infrastructure

Michael Reese Hospital Redevelopment - Chicago, Illinois Property redevelopment, strategic planning and consulting services for City of Chicago while working with City Design Practice at SOM , to create a long-term vision for the 50-acre site of the former Michael Reese Hospital.

Paola Aguirre Serrano Community Engagement Paola Aguirre Serrano is an architectural and urban designer, and founder of Borderless Studio, Chicago-based urban design practice focused on collaborative and interdisciplinary city projects. Her practice consistently looks for ways to connect communities to design with emphasis on research and communication across disciplines and fields of practice. Borderless explores comprehensive city design solutions that address complex urban systems and equitable development by looking at intersections between architecture, urban design, infrastructure, landscape and participatory processes. Paola’s professional experience includes working with government agencies, nonprofit organizations, Universities and architecture/urban design offices in Mexico and the United States in projects at various scales—from regional to neighborhood. As a promoter of collaboration, Paola constantly explores processes and platforms that connect people and enable collective reflection and ideas exchange related to their built environment such as MAPEO Workshops (Chihuahua) and City Open Workshop (Chicago). She is also an educator and current instructor at Archeworks, multidisciplinary design research and think tank focused on social impact and public interest design projects, part-time faculty at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and visiting faculty at Wasington University Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. Paola received a Masters of Architecture in Urban Design from the Harvard School of Design. RELEVANT EXPERIENCE Buena Vida Choice Neighborhood Plan - Brownsville, Texas Ongoing 2-year neighborhood planning and community participatory planning process consulting services for Camiros Ltd. and the Housing Authority of the City of Brownsville, to redevelop existing 13-acre public housing site and urban strategies for 360-acre neighborhood in the context of downtown Brownsville and U.S.-Mexico border. Habitat for Humanity Affordable Housing Plan - Chicago, Illinois Site selection, community outreach, strategic planning and community participatory planning processes services for Habitat for Humanity Chicago , to create an affordable housing plan in diverse neighborhoods in the South Side of Chicago for the next decade.

Downtown Brooklyn Urban Study Report - New York City, New York Property, land use, transportation, and neighborhood studies as part of the staff of Strategic Assessment, Planning and Design Campus Office of New York University, to assess and identify site opportunities in downtown Brooklyn for university residential and academic facilities after the merger with Poly Institute. 2040 Comprehensive Plan – City of Chihuahua - Chihuahua, Mexico Two-year long-term visioning, zoning review, strategic and urban planning coordination as part of the staff of the Instituto Municipal de Planeación de Chihuahua, to update former plan and prepare submission for City Council approval. Plan was approved in August of 2009. EDUCATION 2011 Harvard Graduate School of Design Master of Architecture in Urban Design 2006 Instituto Superior de Arquitectura y Diseño, Chihuahua, Mexico. Bachelor in Architecture, honorable mention 2005 Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Spain. Study abroad. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2016-Present Borderless Studio, Chicago, IL Founder 2015-2016 The University of Chicago, Arts + Public Life Urban Design Fellow, Reseach Analyst 2011-2015 Skidmore Owings & Merrill, City Design Senior Urban Designer 2011 Utile, Boston, MA Urban Designer 2010 New York University Urban Planner 2006-2009 Municipal Planning Institute, Chihuahua City, Mexico Project Manager 2005-2006 E+B Arquitectura, Chihuahua, Mexico Project Coordinator ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2017-Present Visiting Assistant Professor, Washington University 2016-Present Adjucnt Critic, School of the Art Institute in Chicago 2015-Present Facilitator/Instructor, Archeworks 2012-2013 Director/Instructor, MAPEO Workshops, Chihuahua, Mexico 2010-2011 Design Instructor, Harvard Graduate School of Design


SAL MARTINEZ

Sal Martinez North Newstead Association, Executive Director Sal Martinez serves as the Executive Director of the North Newstead Association. Prior to serving as the Executive Director of the North Newstead Association, Sal received a Bachelor of Science in Urban Education from Harris-Stowe State College while serving as a liaison to many local social service and non-profit agencies. Mr. Martinez has held leadership positions with the Grand Rock Community Economic Development Corporation, the St. Louis Housing Authority–the agency’s youngest chairman ever, the Vashon/Jeff-Vander-Lou Initiative, Community Renewal and Development, Inc. (CRD), and the Minority Contractor Initiative (MCI). In his impressive years working to rebuild St. Louis’s many disinvested neighborhoods, Sal has successfully planned, led, and implemented grants for revitalizing areas of St. Louis totaling over $60,000,000. RELEVANT EXPERIENCE Vashon/Jeff-Vander-Lou Master Plan - St. Louis, MO Led a major portion of the community outreach and engagement necessary for the development of the Vashon/Jeff-Vander-Lou Master Plan. North Central Master Plan - St. Louis, MO Led community outreach and engagement efforts which resulted in the creation of the North Central Master Plan. St. Louis Place - St. Louis, MO Led a community engagement process which resulted in placing a designated portion of the St. Louis Place neighborhood on the National Register of Historic Places. NOM - St. Louis, MO Coordinated the formation of the Neighborhood Ownership Model (NOM) program in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood. NOM is a public safety initiative that requires the collaboration of residents and local law enforcement agencies. Fresh Starts Community Garden - St. Louis, MO Adopted the Fresh Starts Community Garden in the Jeff-Vander-Lou

A M A N DA CO LÓ N - S M I T H neighborhood to sustain its mission of providing healthy eating options to local low/moderate income families who reside in an identified food dessert. Serve as the primary fundraiser for the community garden and assist in volunteer recruitment and retention.

EDUCATION 2019

Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL MS Geography

Covenant-Blumeyer Housing - St. Louis, MO Identified, vetted and successfully partnered with a real estate developer to build new, in-fill, for-sale housing in the Covenant-Blumeyer neighborhood.

2012

The City College of New York, CUNY, New York NY MS Special Education, Honors New York City Teaching Fellow

EDUCATION 1994 Harris-Stowe State College Bachelor of Science degree in Urban Education with emphasis in Urban Studies and Public Administration

2008

Cornell University, College of Arts and Sciences, Ithaca, NY BA African Studies, BA Film Studies Mellon Mays Undergraduate Research Fellow, Quill and Dagger Senior Honor Society

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2017-Present North Newstead Association, St. Lous, MO Executive Director 2004-2016 Community Renewal & Development, Inc., St. Louis, MO Executive Director 2002-2004 Vashon/Jeff-Vander-Lou Initiative, St. Louis, MO Executive Director 1998-2002 Grand Rock Community Economic Development Corporation, St. Louis, MO Executive Director 1996-1998 Harris-Stowe State College Neighborhood Services Coordinator PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Hispanic Chamber of Commerce CIVIC EXPERIENCE Board Member, St. Louis Housing Authority (1998-2010), Chairman, (2001 2006, 2009-2010) Board Member (Current President), Community Builder’s Network (2011-Present) Board Member, City of St. Louis Civil Rights Enforcement Agency (2014-Present) Board Member, St. Louis County Library Foundation (2014-2016) Board Member, City of St. Louis Community Jobs Board (2013-Present) Advisory Board Member, Gateway 180 Homelessness Reversed (2012-Present) Board Member, Employment Connection, Inc. (2006-2008) President, Friends of Julia Davis Library (1998-2002) Board Member, Grand Center, Inc. (2001-2004) President, Monsanto Family YMCA (2007-2008) AWARDS Distinguished Alumni Award, Harris-Stowe State University Distinguished Community Service Award, Harris-Stowe State University Community Service Award, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Community Service Award, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Community Leadership Award, Martin Luther King Celebration Commission Community Service Award, Better Family Life, Inc. Legacy in Leadership Award, St. Louis Housing Award Local Leader Award, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Outstanding Regional Collaboration Award, East -West Gateway Council

Amanda Colón-Smith Dutchtown South Community Corporation, Executive Director Amanda Colón-Smith is the Executive Director at Dutchtown South Community Corporation in South St. Louis City. She works with a range of residents, partners and stakeholders in the Dutchtown, Gravois Park, Marine Villa and Mt. Pleasant neighborhoods which comprise nearly 10% of the city’s population. The organization focuses on Housing Development and Stabilization as well as Community Planning and Facilitation. Through activities such as long-term planning and implementation of improvements for green space to tenant rights education, the organization seeks to advance neighborhood vitality through resident-led activities. As the Program Director at the organization over the last 3 years, she engaged residents and supported them in building the neighborhoods they want and deserve. She is also motivated by the possibilities in integrating the arts into community development initiatives and is a graduate of Regional Arts Commission’s Community Arts Training Program.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2014-Present Dutchtown South Community Corporation, St. Louis, MO Executive Director 2013-2014 St. Louis Public Library, Julia Davis Branch Youth Services Provider 2012-2013 Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School, NYDOE, NY NY Teacher 2008-2012 Bronx Guild High School, NYDOE, NY NY Crew Leader (Teacher)

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Community Arts Training, Regional Arts Commission, Fellow January 2016 - May 2016 Participant in five-month curriculum on collaborations with artists for community development

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE Dutchtown South Community Corporation - South St. Louis City, MO Implemented and monitored strategic plan, fund development plan and cultivated community partnerships; Designed, managed and completed CDBG programs in safety, energy conservation, beautification and public art; Actively engaged and energized DSCC members, volunteers, board members, event committees, planning teams, partnering organizations and funders in organization’s community work. Saint Louis Public Library, Julia Davis Branch - St. Louis, MO Initiated a successful proposal to bring Mini Maker Faire, a large international craft and tech festival, to St. Louis by securing endorsements from local business and organizations. Created and developed relationships with 19 neighborhood schools and community organizations to provide literacy resources, from deposit collections to database and reference presentations. Developed and executed, on average, 8 monthly in-branch programs from youth and families on a variety of literacy based topics.

Affordable Housing Asset Management Certificate, NeighborWorks America, Participant February 2016 Completed 3 part course at Washington University’s Brown School of Social work and additional testing for certification National Leadership Training, Gamaliel , Participant August 2014 Attended seven day residential training on core concepts and tools for community organizing

AWARDS Christopher Harris Youth Advocacy Award, Missouri State Representative Bruce Franks, June 2017 Rising Star in Community Building Award, Community Builders Network of Metropolitan St. Louis, April 2018

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DR. JASON PURNELL

Dr. Jason Purnell Washington University Brown School Jason Purnell’s research focuses on how socioeconomic and sociocultural factors influence health behaviors and health outcomes and on mobilizing community action to address the social determinants of health. He currently leads the For the Sake of All project, which focuses on improving the health of all people by eliminating racial inequities in the St. Louis region through the implementation of strategies related to the six areas of recommendation in the For the Sake of All report. Purnell is trained in both applied psychology and public health. He is a faculty affiliate with the Prevention Research Center and the Center for Public Health Systems Science at the Brown School, a faculty scholar in the Institute for Public Health, and faculty director for Thriving Communities in the Center for Social Development. Purnell is very active in the St. Louis community, including service on the boards of Beyond Housing, Inc., the American Youth Foundation, and the Peace and Justice Commission of the Archdiocese of St. Louis. He is also a licensed psychologist in the state of Missouri and a former director of community engagement with the United Way of Greater St. Louis. ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2017 - Present Associate Professor, The Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis 2015–Present Faculty Affiliate, Prevention Research Center, Washington University in St. Louis 2014 – Present Faculty Director, Thriving Communities, Center for Social Development, The Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis 2014 – Present Faculty Affiliate, Center for Public Health Systems Science, The Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis 2011 – 2017 Assistant Professor, The Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis 2009 – Present Faculty Scholar, Institute for Public Health, Washington University in St. Louis 2009 – Present Research Associate Member, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine 2009 – 2011 Research Assistant Professor, Health Communication

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DR. JEREMY GOSS Research Laboratory, The Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis 2006 – 2007 Health Psychology Intern, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Audie L. Murphy Veterans Memorial Hospital 2004 – 2006 Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Fellow, Minority Fellowship Program, American Psychological Association 2003 – 2004 Graduate Associate and Instructor, Introduction to Psychology, Department of Psychology, Ohio State University 2002 – 2004 Dean’s Graduate Enrichment Fellow, Ohio State University 2001 – 2002 Director of Community Engagement, United Way of Greater St. Louis 2000 Education Product Coordinator/Partnerships Coordinator, HighWired.com EDUCATION 2009 Master of Public Health University of Rochester – Rochester, NY School of Medicine & Dentistry, Dept. of Community & Preventive Medicine 2009 Postdoctoral University of Rochester – Rochester, NY Fellow National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention & Control Training Program School of Medicine & Dentistry James P. Wilmot Cancer Center 2007 PhD Ohio State University – Columbus, OH Counseling Psychology 1999 BA Harvard University – Cambridge, MA Government and Philosophy, magna cum laude SELECT PUBLICATIONS Purnell, J.Q., Camberos, G., Fields, R., Tate, W.F., Goodman, M., Harris, K.M., Jones, B.D., Drake, B., Elder, K., Gilbert, K., Hudson, D.L. (in press). For the Sake of All: Civic education on the social determinants of health and health disparities in St. Louis. Urban Education. Woolf, S.H., & Purnell, J.Q. (2016). The good life: Working together to promote opportunity and improve population health and well-being. JAMA, 315, 17061708. Purnell, J.Q. (2016). The geography of inequality: A public health context for Ferguson and the St. Louis region. In K.J. Norwood (Ed.), Ferguson faultlines: Legal and social reverberations. Washington, DC: American Bar Association. Purnell, J.Q., Simon, S., Zimmerman, E.B., Camberos, G.J., & Fields, R.F. (2016). Policy implications of social determinants of health. In A. Eyler, R. Brownson, & S. Moreland Russell (Eds.), Prevention policy and public health. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. RESEARCH INTERESTS Health equity Social determinants of health Research translation for population health improvement Health behavior

Goss, Jeremy A. “Food Insecurity and the Urban Underserved.” 15th Annual St. Louis Earth Day Symposium – Livable Communities. St. Louis. June 3, 2015. Invited speaker. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS New England Society for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery American College of Surgeons Plastic Surgery Research Council American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association Arnold P. Gold Humanism Honor Society

Dr. Jeremy Goss Link Market ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2017-Present Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer The Link Market, St. Louis, MO 2012-2016 Co-founder and President The St. Louis MetroMarket, St. Louis, MO 2012-2013 Chairman, Global Health Learning Community, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 2010-2011 Texas State Senate Lobbyist Baylor Ambassadors, Baylow University, Waco, TX 2014-2016 Lecturer, Adventures in Medicine & Science (AIMS), Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 2008-2011 Senior Community Leader (Resident Assistant) Honors Residential College, Baylor University, Waco, TX EDUCATION 2016 2011

Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO Doctor of Medicine Baylor University, Waco, TX Bachelor of Arts, Political Science Honors Program Scholar with Distinction

FELLOWSHIPS 2016-Present

Post-doctoral Fellowship Department of Plastic Surgery and Oral Surgery, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA

2014-2015

Cleft-craniofacial Research Fellowship Division of Plastic Surgery, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

SELECT PUBLICATIONS & PRESENTATIONS Goss, Jeremy A. “Food is Medicine” TEDxGatewayArch . St. Louis. April 12, 2018. Goss, Jeremy A. “Food Insecurity and the Urban Underserved.” Eden Theological Seminary Spring Convocation. St. Louis. April 8, 2015. Invited paid speaker with optional honoraium.

ACADEMIC AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS & GRANTS 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University participant, chosen to participate in a Codeathon competition judged by Chelsea Clinton. 2015 Clinton Global Initiative University 2015 Rodney Coe Distinction in Service Awarded by Saint Louis University School of Medicine in recognition of work creating the St. Louis MetroMarket non-profit mobile farmer’s market. 2015 Best Student Presentation, Missouri Chapter of the American College of Surgeons - 48th Annual Meeting – $500 Stipend 2015 Best Student Presentation, Pediatric Science Days Research Symposium - 9th Annual Meeting - $100 and Travel Stipend 2015 YouthBridge Social Enterprise & Innovation Competition, Finalist 2014 Incarnate Word Foundation, Social Enterprise Grant - $75,000 2014 Missouri Department of Agriculture, Local Food Matching Grant $5,000 2014 Microsoft YouthSpark Challenge – Finalist 2013 Clinton Global Initiative University participant, chosen to participate in a press conference alongside Chelsea Clinton 2013 Consumer Bankers Association Foundation & Ashoka’s Youth Venture National Finalist 2013 Banking on Youth Competition, Regional Winner – $1,000 grand prize 2013 Dell Social Innovation Competition, Semi-Finalist 2013 YouthBridge Social Enterprise & Innovation Competition, Semi Finalist COMMUNITY HONORS June 15, 2015 St. Louis Post Dispatch - Koran Addo; Mobile Farmers Market Ready to Roll Soon March 30, 2015 Sauce Magazine - Rima Parikh; The Scoop: Mobile Grocery MetroMarket to Bring Fresh Produce to North City Neighborhoods March 30, 2015 KMOX Radio, Nothing Impossible - Michael Calhoun; Sprouthood & STL MetroMarket March 22, 2015 St. Louis Public Radio – Camille Phillips; Mobile Grocery Store Rolls into St. Louis Food Desert this Summer March 16, 2015 Saint Louis University, NEWSLINK – Maggie Rotermund; St. Louis MetroMarket to Take the Fight to End Hunger on the Road: Saint Louis University receives grant to help combat food deserts in St. Louis April 8, 2015 St. Louis Magazine - Madeline Yochum; St. Louis MetroMarket Owners Take On the SNAP Challenge: What it takes to live on $4 per day April 04, 2013 Saint Louis University, NEWSLINK - Riya V. Anandwala; Peddling Produce: SLU Student Cooks Up Business Idea


KRISTIN FLEISCHMANN BREWER

P R E S E R VAT I O N R E S E A R C H O F F I C E

Raumlaborberlin: 4562 Enright Avenue Commission, neighborhood engagement, multi-institutional collaboration, and public program initiative, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, July 30 – October 15, 2016

Author of 30 historic tax credit applications in Illinois, Iowa and Missouri since 2012.

Ellipsis Group exhibition and commissions, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, April 15 – July 2, 2016

2009-Present Preservation Research Office Director & Architectural Historian St. Louis, MO 2007-2009 Landmarks Association of St. Louis Assistant Director St. Louis, MO 2005-2007 Landmarks Association of St. Louis Research Associate St. Louis, MO 2006-2007 St. Louis Building Arts Foundation Research Assistant St. Louis, MO

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Kota Cloud Room and Lab Interactive, multi-media technology project spaces for Kota: Digital Excavations in African Art, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Oct. 2015 – March 2016

Kristin Fleischmann Brewer Public Arts Kristin Fleischmann Brewer is an artist and curator. As the Director of Public Projects and Engagement at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, where she has worked since 2011, Brewer has mounted ambitious programming and commissions with local and international artists. Projects include A Way, Away (Listen While I Say) (2017) by Chicago-based Amanda Williams and Andres L. Hernandez, a site-specific commission organized with Washington University in St. Louis; 4562 Enright Avenue (2016) by Berlin-based architects, raumlaborberlin, where she worked with a neighborhood and the City of St. Louis on demolition practices; and Crossing the Delmar Divide (2012-14), a collaboration with the Missouri History Museum and the Anti-Defamation League. In addition to her work at the Pulitzer, Brewer co-founded Monaco (2017), a commercial artist co-operative; Citizen Artist St. Louis (2016), a non-partisan initiative of artists, organizers, and civically engaged individuals and organizations working to ensure that arts and culture are considered in policy-making; and is a board member at The Luminary, an incubator for the arts. Brewer also co-founded and directed Enamel Art Space (2012-14), a studio that exhibited work by local and national artists.

Press Play A series of commissions and programs (highlights below), Pulitzer Arts Foundation, May 1 – September 12, 2015 Commonfield Clay Commission by sound and social practice artist Chris Kallmyer When I am Alone Commission by Pulitzer-prize composer, David Lang Lots Public art commission by Freecell Architecture with public program grant initiative in collaboration with Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, May 9 – October 4, 2014 Marfa Dialogues / St. Louis Multi-day program and public program grant initiative with Ballroom Marfa and the Public Concern Foundation, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, July 3 – August 3, 2014 Reset Multi-day program and commission by visual artist David Scanavino, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, January 17 – 25, 2014

SELECTED CURATORIAL PROJECTS A Way, Away (Listen While I Say) Public art commission by Amanda Williams and Andres L. Hernandez in collaboration with the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Fall 2016 - 2017

SELECTED JURIES 2017-18 International Humanities Prize, Center for the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis, selection committee 2016

ArtPrize, Grand Rapids, MI, juror, Fall 2016

Critical Spatial Practices St. Louis Symposium co-organized with Center for Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis and the Divided City Initiative, various locations across St. Louis, May 2017

2016

ArtPlace America, New York, NY, reviewer for National Creative P lacemaking Fund, spring 2016

2016

Visual Art Exchange, Raleigh, NC, juror for Contemporary South 2016 exhibition

Blue Black Library Curated literary and music library installed for the exhibition, Blue Black, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, June 9 – October 7, 2017 Citizen Artist St. Louis Organized city-wide initiative to advocate for arts and culture policy, organized a mayoral town hall, March 2017

EDUCATION 2011 Master of Fine Arts, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 2011. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer T. Olin Fellowship, Magna cum laude 2007

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Art History Minor, University of Denver, Denver, CO, Painting and Drawing, Summa cum laude

Michael R. Allen Director, Historian & Preservationist Architectural historian, cultural geographer and heritage conservationist Michael R. Allen founded the Preservation Research Office in 2009. Allen also is on the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis, where he is Senior Lecturer in Architecture and Landscape Architecture, and Lecturer in American Culture Studies. Through the Office, Allen has led architectural surveys, historic district nominations and rehabilitation planning efforts across the city of St. Louis, East St. Louis and other cities in Missouri and Illinois. Allen’s work emphasizes the social, economic and political dimensions of preservation planning in legacy cities. Allen is frequen speaker on preservation and regional architectural history, and has appeared in settings ranging from the 2014 National Preservation Conference to the St. Louis Art Museum. STUDIES AND REPORTS

EDUCATION 2002

Bachelor of Arts, Literature Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, OH

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 2016-Present

Senior Lecturer Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Art, Washington University in St. Louis

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Meets federal certification 36 CFR 61 qualifications for a historian/architectural historian. Certified as qualified architectural historian by Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Oklahoma.

High-Rise Public Housing Towers in St. Louis, Missouri, St. Louis (Ind. City), MO. March 2014. Action Agenda for Historic Preservation in Legacy Cities. Editor with Cara Bertron and Ned Kaufman. 2015. Economic Development Opportunities from an Illinois Historic Tax Credit. With Dr. Patricia Byrnes. 2013. St. Louis Land Bank Assessment. Team led by Asakura Robinson. 2016. CULTURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Author or co-author of 41 National Register of Historic Places nominations in Illinois, Iowa and Missouri since 2005. Investigator or assistant on 15 Cultural Resources Surveys in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania since 2005. Author of five historic building recordations in Illinois and Missouri since 2009.

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LANGAN

LANGAN Ferry Point Waterfront Park Bronx, New York Civil Engineer Ferry Point Waterfront Park includes the design and construction of a waterfront park on a 19.5 acre site along the edge of the East River, just east of the Whitestone Bridge. Design included grading, drainage, soil erosion and sediment control and utility routing. he stormwater management includes the use of dry swales, wet swales and a bio-retention pond. The wet swales act as conveyance in transporting stormwater downstream without the use of storm piping. The dry swales provide conveyance and water quality pretreatment. The bio-retention pond provides water quality for the pavement parking lot.

DJ Hodson, PE, LEED AP Sr. Principal, Civil Engineer DJ Hodson is a Senior Principal at Langan and manages the Site/Civil Engineering Department in California performing services nationally and internationally. He provides expertise in master-plan engineering, site analysis and design, infrastructure assessment and design, hydrologic and hydraulic analysis and design, stormwater management analysis and design, geotechnical engineering, traffic/parking engineering and environmental engineering and permitting. DJ has valuable experience working with public agencies, owners, developers, architects, construction contractors, design subcontractors, and numerous regulatory agencies and utility service companies

SELECTED PROJECTS Lyon Street Steps San Francisco, California Principal-in-Charge The popular Lyon Street Steps underwent a restoration. Langan developed recommendations and site engineering concept alternatives to ensure stability of the sloping site during and after tree removal and reforestation; slope stability and retaining wall repairs and strengthening; and erosion control and drainage. The project involved extensive coordination among public agencies, regulatory agencies, and citizens since Lyon Street Steps is on federal land and next to private residential property. Queen Plaza Streetscape Queens, New York Principal-in-Charge Provided site/civil services for a bicycle and pedestrian improvement that consists of a new urban plaza with an urban wetland, eight blocks of reconstructed streetscape and a new bikeway. Prepared site engineering drawings that consisted of grading, drainage, utility, Builders Pavement Plans, roadway profiles, signing, striping, traffic signal, and maintenance and protection of traffic. This project was a very complex design and permitting effort, having to coordinate the design and construction with multiple agencies, at a location with significant congestion and networks of overhead utility, roadway and transit structures.

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Hudson Park and Boulevard Master Plan Manhattan, New York Principal QA/QC Hudson Park and Boulevard is the centerpiece of a new mixed-use community for Midtown Manhattan’s far west side. Site/civil engineering design includes the construction of new streets and utility infrastructure to support the new Park.

services included data gathering and evaluating existing conditions to identify traffic, pedestrian, parking, and infrastructure deficiency issues. Langan also assessed pedestrian, bicycle, and transit routes to help future improvements, focusing primarily on routes between major employment centers and transit stops (ferry, subway, and bus).

Adnan Pasha, PE Traffic Engineer

Master Planning of New Orleans following Katrina New Orleans, Louisiana Panel Member As a member of the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Bring Back New Orleans Strategy Expert Teams & Advisory Panel, The expert infrastructure team looked at the planning and future redevelopment of New Orleans.

Adnan Pasha is a senior level traffic engineer and environmental planning consultant with both national and international experience. He has extensive knowledge in the fields of transportation studies, traffic circulation studies, pedestrian assessments, transit studies, real estate development, finance, and project management. Mr. Pasha has directed complex transportation studies in support of major master planning, rezoning and development projects, and has assisted clients in obtaining regulatory agency approvals at both National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and state and local levels.

Treasure Island Redevelopment San Francisco, California Principal-in-Charge Working with the client, Treasure Island Development Authority, to plan for the future land development of the islands and Clipper Cove marina — addressing development design to land use controls, reuse criteria, and regulatory agency coordination

Mr. Pasha’s project management experience spans a wide range of market sectors, and he has worked with public, private, and institutional clients. His portfolio of public sector clients include city and state departments of transportation, economic development corporations, departments of design and construction, and transit authorities. Mr. Pasha has also directed transportation projects for numerous private sector clients, including major developers and Fortune 500 companies.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Langan Engineering (1994-current) EDUCATION B.Sc., Civil Engineering, Union College M.Sc., Civil Engineering, Purdue University PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION Professional Engineer (PE) in CA, NY, NJ, ND, HI, OR, PA LEED Accredited Professional (LEED AP) AFFILIATIONS Urban Land Institute (ULI) American Institute of Architects (AIA) NAIOP Commercial Real Estate Organization California Stormwater Quality Association (CASQA) American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) Land Development Coalition Executive Committee

SELECTED PROJECTS Coney Island Traffic Master Plan - Brooklyn, New York Traffic/Transportation Project Manager To reinvigorate the economic viability of Coney Island, the New York City Economic Development Corporation and the community council approved rezoning for the area. Langan’s traffic planning design services include developing measures to address seasonal-related traffic concerns, a historic review, design team coordination, interaction with the New York City Department of Transportation and New York Police Department, and development of cost-effective strategies to reduce overall cost and duration of the plan. Our team is also developing long-term transportation plans that will provide resiliency to potential extreme flooding, quality assurance and quality control methods, project performance monitoring, and maintenance of the project’s overall schedule. Sunset Park Waterfront District Transportation Study - Brooklyn, New York Traffic/Transportation Project Manager Langan is leading the project team to assist NYCEDC with its $37-million initiative to repair, improve, and develop the Sunset Park waterfront. Our

Transportation Analysis for Al Faisaliah Mall Upgrades - Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Traffic/Transportation Project Manager Langan evaluated the pedestrian walkways and connection throughout the 21,600 square meter site in terms of efficiency and mobility. This included an assessment of streetscaping measures for a connector road to convert it from a vehicular access point to a pedestrian only facility. Internal pedestrian connections within various buildings were also assessed along with the pedestrian and vehicle circulation in the lay-by areas in front of residential, retail and hotel components. New York State Department of Transportation, Bicycle and Pedestrian Path, Bronx River from Soundview Park to East Tremont Ave Bridge - Bronx, NY Transportation Task Leader Provided services for the assessment of existing traffic and pedestrian conditions, as well as the projection of future conditions related to intersection modifications/improvements. Freshkills Park - Staten Island, NY Transportation Project Manager Provided transportation planning and traffic engineering services for this 2,200 acre park. City University of New York, Queens College Traffic Circulation Study Flushing, NY Transportation Project Manager Assessed pre-existing traffic conditions, as well as anticipated future conditions resulting from traffic diversions related to construction of the new college main entrance serving Kiely and Jefferson Halls. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2014-current Langan Engineering Director of Transportation & Traffic Engineering 1995 – 2014 AKRF, Inc. Senior Technical Director EDUCATION M.B.A., Finance, Executive Program Rutgers Business School M.S., Transportation Engineering and Planning, New Jersey Institute of Technology B.E., Civil Engineering, NED Engineering University PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION Professional Engineer (PE): Connecticut AFFILIATIONS American Society of Civil Engineers, member Institute of Transportation Engineers, member Wall Street Journal, member, Young Professionals Forum Transportation and Development Institute of ASCE, Charter Member


ENGINEERING DESIGN SOURCE, INC (EDSI)

RAMBOLL

along Delmar Avenue in University City, MO and along DeBaliviere Avenue leading into Forest Park in the City of St. Louis. Design responsibilities included improvements to the Delmar and DeBaliviere bridges, horizontal and geometric design of a new roundabout at the intersections of Delmar, Trinity, and Princeton and design of ADA compliant pedestrian access at new trolley stations and within intersections affected by the trolley design. [Prior to EDSI]

Josephine L. Emerick, PE Vice-President/COO, Principal Civil Engineer Josephine (Jo) Emerick has over 30 years of transportation related experience including traffic, highway, transit and airport planning and design projects in Missouri, Illinois and Kansas. Jo’s experience is primarily in the St. Louis metropolitan area and her project experience includes multiple projects for Great Rivers Greenway, Forest Park Forever, East-West Gateway Council of Governments, Bi-State Development Agency (Metro), City of St. Louis and Missouri Department of Transportation. Her projects include the on-going Northside-Southside Light Rail Transit (MetroLInk) Corridor Conceptual Design Study which is currently studying an in-street running light rail line that would serve the Chouteau Corridor. The proposed LRT alignment runs along Convention Plaza, 9th and 10th Streets and Clark Avenue in Downtown, crossing the Mill Creek area on the 14th Street bridge, then running west along Chouteau Avenue to Jefferson. Jo was also involved in the Loop Trolley project, which included the extension of the St. Vincent’s Trail into Forest Park along DeBaliviere. She also managed several projects for the Forest Park Dual Pathway System and served as project advisor for the Parkway section (south side of Forest Park) of the Interstate 64 Design Build. Jo has a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of Missouri and is a licensed professional engineer in Missouri, Illinois and Kansas.

SELECTED PROJECTS East-West Gateway Council of Governments, Northside-Southside Light Rail Transit (MetroLink) Corridor Conceptual Design Study - St. Louis, MO Deputy project manager and task lead for this $2 million study with three primary goals: 1) review, refine, reaffirm and revise the technical findings from the prior 2008 study; 2) identify and analyze an alternative to serve the proposed National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and; 3) complete a comparative evaluation, using Federal Transit Administration’s New Starts criteria. The 2008 locally preferred alternative was a 17 mile long corridor, with 28 stations utilizing in-street running. The alternative included portions of St. Louis County but was primarily within the City of St. Louis. East-West Gateway Council of Governments, Loop Trolley Final Design - St. Louis and University City, MO Project manager for this project to construct an in-street trolley system

Forest Park Forever, Phase I of the Dual Pathway System in Forest Park - St. Louis, MO Lead engineer responsible for the preparation of design plans for Phase I of the Dual-Pathway System in Forest Park. This project consists of 6 miles of separated soft surface (Heels) and hard surface (Wheels) paths. Responsibilities included vertical and horizontal design, as well as development of grading, demolition, and site improvement plans. Also responsible for presenting the path at advancing design stages to the Forest Park Advisory Board to ensure conformity with the Forest Park Master Plan, as well as coordination with different public agency stakeholders (City of St. Louis Board of Public Service, City of St. Louis Parks Dept., etc.) to incorporate their feedback and obtain their approval. [Prior to EDSI] Forest Park Forever, Phases II and III of the Dual Pathway System in Forest Park - St. Louis, MO Principal engineer on the team responsible for the preparation of design plans for Phase II of the Dual-Pathway System in Forest Park. This project consists of two miles of separated soft surface (Heels) and hard surface (Wheels) paths from Tamm Avenue, along the south and east edges of Forest Park, to Steinberg Skating Rink. Responsibilities included vertical and horizontal design, as well as development of grading, demolition, and site improvement plans. Also responsible for presenting the path at advancing design stages to the Forest Park Advisory Board to ensure conformity with the Forest Park Master Plan (1995), as well as coordination with different public agency stakeholders (City of St. Louis Board of Public Service, City of St. Louis Parks Dept.) to incorporate their feedback and obtain their approval. [Prior to EDSI] Great Rivers Greenway, Phase IV of the River des Peres Greenway - St. Louis, MO Task manager responsible for Phase IV of the River Des Peres Greenway project in South St. Louis, Missouri is the extension of a greenway/multi-use path along the River Des Peres from Alabama Avenue to the Mississippi River. Led the efforts for new traffic signals, revised intersection geometrics and ADA improvements for two intersections, one maintained by the City of St. Louis and one by St. Louis County. Responsible for coordinating civil and roadway engineering tasks with the designers of the path. [Prior to EDSI] EDUCATION 1978 BS Civil Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2017-present Engineering Design Source, Inc (EDSI), St. Louis 2002-2017 URS, AECOM, St. Louis 2000-2002 HDR, St. Louis 1978-2000 Booker Associates, Parsons Brinckerhoff (now WSP), St. Louis PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Registered Professional Engineer: MO, IL, KS

Michael F. Ellis, PE Principal, Engineer Michael Ellis, PE, has over 20 years of environmental consulting experience, which has included site characterization and remediation within federal and state regulatory frameworks, including Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or other state voluntary programs; due diligence and compliance assessments; and litigation support. Specifically he has focused on site assessments (reclamation and remediation) for mining and ore processing facilities, commercial dry cleaning facilities and electrical transformer re-manufacturing facilities. Michael has extensive project experience regarding due diligence, environmental compliance, site investigation and remediation for multi-national companies at various locations around the world. SELECTED PROJECTS Managed a successful Brownfield re-development project on Chouteau in St. Louis, which received Brownfield Tax Credits and Tax Incremental Financing (TIF). Development included the remediation of diesel fuel in soil and groundwater, asbestos in structures, along with demolition of a former railroad locomotive repair facility, a former plating facility, and various fueling platforms. Activities included agency negotiation of site investigation and remediation requirements, agency negotiations with the Missouri Department of Economic Development for award of Brownfield tax credits from the Missouri Department of Economic Development, assistance with preparation of TIF application, remediation oversight, and negotiation to obtain site closure. Subsequent project activities included discovery and testimony for mediation regarding claims for unknown conditions, and elimination of site restrictive covenants due to modifications of cleanup objectives for petroleum hydrocarbons. Significant economic benefits of the project have continued including achievement of Brownfield economic thresholds for employment and final payment of TIF Bonds is scheduled soon. Managed and provided construction oversight for more than 25 years at a transformer re-manufacturing and repair facility in St. Louis. Site activities included operation of a groundwater pump and treat system to maintain hydraulic control including treatment for removal of PCBs, chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons for discharge to the local publicallyowned treatment works (POTW) on a batch basis; preparation of a site

characterization report and remedial action plan to document existing soil and groundwater impacts to facilitate health and safety procedures and waste management protocols for site improvements projects involving subsurface excavations penetrating exterior pavement or interior floors; contamination migration assessments; building surfaces investigation for 13 buildings on site and cleaning or encapsulation of impacted building surfaces; oversight for the removal and disposal of 3,500 tons of PCB-contaminated soil with transportation via truck and rail; performed various pre-construction investigations to determine worker exposures during subsurface construction regarding dermal contact and inhalation; worker exposure assessments and construction oversight for installation of a new underground electric service for the plant; extensive sewer investigation, cleaning effort including removal of 80 cubic yards of sediments from sewers, and periodic monitoring to assess PCB impacts in onsite sewers; and, periodic rail maintenance and repair projects and subsequent management of wastes generated during rail projects. Managed a former MGP and by-products refinery project in St. Louis, including preparation of a site investigation work plan and implementation to assess soil, groundwater and surface water impacts at the former MGP and by-products refinery. Evaluation was performed to implement a Brownfield redevelopment for the former MGP site and surrounding properties. The project was completed with a Missouri Voluntary Cleanup Program-approved remedial action plan based upon a proposed redevelopment plan. Assessment continues by potential developers, including evaluation of opportunities to secure Brownfield tax credits for site remediation and redevelopment. Provided construction management for a remediation project in Rolla, Missouri. Remediation was conducted on an expedient schedule in conjunction with the extensive renovation of the existing plant. Project responsibilities included construction management, preparation of the site investigation work plan, site investigation and preparation of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) approved remedial action plan. The site is considered one of the first remediation projects completed in the MDNR Voluntary Cleanup Program. Construction projects included installation of an aluminum casting furnace, wastewater treatment system and shipping and receiving docks. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2000-current Ramboll / ENVIRON Principal 1990-2000 Dames & Moore / URS Senior Project Manager EDUCATION B.S., Civil Engineering, University of Missouri Science & Technology PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION Professional Engineer: Missouri

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e D E S I G N DY N A M I C S

e D E S I G N DY N A M I C S Brooklyn Botanic Garden Water Recirculation Design - Brooklyn, NY Mr. Rothstein served as the Project Manager for the planning and construction of renovations to Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s stream corridor and water garden. He guided the team, led by MVVA Landscape Architects, in the development of water quality and quantity models to predict impacts from a proposed recirculation system. The project will reduce potable water consumption by 21 million gallons per year and wet weather discharge to the City’s combined sewer by 5.5 million gallons per year.

Eric Rothstein Partner, Hydrologist Eric Rothstein is a hydrologist with over twenty years of experience working on a variety of sustainability projects. Mr. Rothstein’s career has focused on ecosystem restoration and water resources planning within urban centers. He previously worked as a project manager for the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation for over seven years. In that capacity, he managed ecological restorations including salt marshes, fresh water wetlands, grasslands, and forests and developed naturalized stormwater management structures. Examples of Mr. Rothstein’s built work can be found in all five boroughs of New York City and beyond. Since joining eDesign Dynamics (EDD) in 2007 as its Managing Partner, Mr. Rothstein has managed and provided his expertise on numerous ecological and green infrastructure projects within the New York Metropolitan area.

SELECTED PROJECTS The Trust for Public Land: Public School Playgrounds - Green Infrastructure Design and CA - Brooklyn and Queens, NY. Mr. Rothstein serves as the Project Manager for the generation of designs for the reconstruction of fourteen New York City Public School playgrounds. Green infrastructure components are integrated with playground amenities: rain gardens, augmented tree pits, planters, and an innovative use of synthetic turf fields to filter and infiltrate runoff. After reconstruction, each playground will mitigate the first one inch of rainfall, with zero discharge to the City’s combined sewers. Muscota Marsh – Freshwater Wetland & Salt Marsh Design, Baker Field Waterfront Park - New York, NY. Mr. Rothstein served as the Technical Lead for the design and construction of a tiered freshwater wetland system that manages stormwater from the park’s impervious areas prior to discharging to the Harlem River and a salt marsh at Columbia University’s Bakers Field, on the northern tip of Manhattan. Mr. Rothstein led the team in developing surface and tidal hydrology models, wave energy attenuation structures, a sediment accumulation system, and erosion control and stabilization measures. The project, led by James Corner Field Operations, received a 2012 Design Award from the NYC Public Design Commission.

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Rocking The Boat: WATERWASH ABC - Bronx, NY Mr. Rothstein served as the Project Manager for the design and construction of a treatment wetland along the Bronx River. The treatment wetland receives parking lot runoff that had been previously pumped for direct discharge to the Bronx River. All stormwater is now captured and treated through settling and filtration within a wetland system that also provides niche habitat opportunities to foraging wildlife. EDD has equipped the wetland with hydraulic monitoring instruments that provide on-site continuous and periodic measurements of inflow and outflow. Post construction monitoring of data and analyses are on-going, and allow for measurement of changes in water quality and reduction of direct stormwater discharge to the Bronx River. East River Blueway Natural Resources Assessment - New York, NY Mr. Rothstein served as the Project Manager for the assessment of natural resources for the master planning process for the East River Blueway. Under his guidance, the team, led by WXY Architecture + Urban Design, inventoried opportunities, constraints, and innovations in habitat restoration and creation, water quality improvement, stormwater management, and flood attenuation. Habitat Beneficial Shoreline Design - Governors Island, NY Project Manager. Mr. Rothstein served as the Project Manager to the Trust for Governors Island to review schematic designs for the south section of the island’s Promenade and explore ecologically beneficial alternatives. As part of this work, Mr. Rothstein recommended alternatives including salt marsh creation, riprap material selection, tide pool integration, joint planting of salttolerant species, and associated cost estimates.

EDUCATION MS, Soil and Water Engineering / Hydrogeology, Minor in Soil Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 1995 BS, Agricultural Engineering, Emphasis in Soil and Water Engineering / Hydrology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 1993

PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Certification Training Program, successful completion, 1995

measures can protect the Hunts Point peninsula from inland flooding and storm surge, within an Integrated Flood Protection System (IFPS). This included managing stormwater in a Separate Storm Sewer area and providing options during extreme weather events for either temporary flooding of adjacent parking lots or installing large scale pumping systems to pump stormwater over the IFPS. Meadow Lake Treatment Wetland - Flushing, NY Mr. Barbagianis oversaw the construction process of a treatment wetland adjacent to Meadow Lake in Flushing Meadows Corona Park for the NYCDEP. He worked closely with the contractor, NYCDEP, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to ensure proper protocols were followed for testing and disposal of contaminated soils.

Theo Barbagianis, PE Sr. Project Engineer, Hydrologist Mr. Barbagianis manages multiple Green Infrastructure projects in and around New York City. This includes overseeing planning and feasibility, leading the design, establishing cost estimates and project schedules, and managing the construction phase. He also performs calculations, modeling, and analyses relating to hydraulics and hydrology. His interests include engaging community stakeholders during the planning of Green Infrastructure projects and working on innovative and sustainable solutions to urban drainage challenges. Previously, he worked as an Associate Project Manager for NYC’s Department of Environmental Protection Bureau of Wastewater Treatment, where he managed the design and construction of pumping station upgrades throughout the City. He is a licensed professional engineer in New York. SELECTED EXPERIENCE Green Infrastructure at Flushing International High School and Bronx High School of Science - DEP Environmental Benefits Project, New York City, NY. Mr. Barbagianis serves as the Project Engineer for the design and construction of stormwater planting trenches installed at the Bronx High School of Science and the Flushing International High School. The project, funded through NYCDEP’s Environmental Benefits Projects (EBP) fund, seeks to demonstrate the use of alternative GI practices for managing large volumes of stormwater in locations with limited available surface area, such as parking lots. The GI practices were designed to manage the 90th percentile storm (1.5”) and are monitored through Drexel University, with participation by high school science students. Street-End Stormwater Capture System, Shoelace Park - Bronx, NY. Mr. Barbagianis designed a rain garden and slope erosion control measures in Shoelace Park for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and the Bronx River Alliance (BxRA). The project achieves CSO mitigation by redirecting runoff originating on the street and sidewalk surfaces to a street-end rain garden located inside a NYC public park. He coordinated between all relative stakeholders, including the NYS Office of Attorney General (NYSOAG), NFWF, BxRA, NYCDEP, the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation (NYCDPR), and the NYC Department of Transpiration (NYCDOT). Rebuild by Design: Hunts Point Lifelines - Bronx, NY Mr. Barbagianis led the modeling effort to determine how Green Infrastructure

Green Infrastructure Research and Development - New York City, NY As part of NYCDEP’s Green Infrastructure Research and Development project, Mr. Barbagianis was involved in the microscale modeling effort, which included running two H&H models for Demo Area 2 using EPA’s SWMM software. He also managed all monitoring activities, which involves over two dozen experiments developed by a consultant team and NYCDEP to test the efficacy of the city’s green infrastructure program. Newburgh Green Infrastructure Feasibility Study - Newburgh, NY. Mr. Barbagianis worked closely with Newburgh’s City Engineer and community outreach partners to address local water quality concerns, Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), natural hydrologic systems, and to assess community benefits from potential GI interventions. A GI Feasibility Report evaluated the feasibility and benefits of GI, included conceptual designs for specific interventions, and addressed the first phase of the City’s Long Term Control Plan. 6th Street Green Corridor - Brooklyn, NY Mr. Barbagianis served as the Project Engineer for the design of several connected right-of-way bioswales adjacent to the Gowanus Canal for the NYCDEP. This included producing conceptual designs, design development drawings, and construction documents. He also worked with Drexel University in designing a monitoring plan that measures inflow, outflow, and storage of stormwater in seven (7) bioswales. Allegheny Commons Stormwater Management Plan - Pittsburgh, PA Mr. Barbagianis was the Project Engineer for a Stormwater Management Plan for Pittsburgh’s oldest park, Allegheny Commons. This included “living drains”, a concept which allows for the quick installation of Green Infrastructure practices around existing stormwater inlets. The $7 million stormwater management plan included rerouting stormwater from adjacent parkland areas, rooftops, streets, and sidewalks. EDUCATION 2012 ME, Civil Engineering, City College of New York, New York, NY 2005 BS, Chemical (Environmental) Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA REGISTRATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS Professional Engineer: New York


SILMAN

TERRA TECHNOLOGIES

Bushwick Inlet Park - Brooklyn, NY New public park that includes parkland, a multi-purpose athletic field, and a 12,000 net sf building for community facilities and park operations (offices and maintenance space for Parks vehicles). The building is framed in castin-place concrete and features a green roof that slopes up from the playing fields below, extending the park. It has a goal of LEED Silver certification. with NYCDPR.

quality. Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District Sewer & Channel Design General Services Contract – St. Louis County, MO Project Manager for seven stream bank stabilization and storm sewer design projects located throughout St. Louis County with a combined design budget in excess of $350,000. In addition to client, subcontractor, and staff coordination, Mr. Staten performed quality assurance and quality control supervision and handled all Clean Water Act permitting.

Shane Staten, PWS Senior Wetland Ecologist Shane Staten’s career has been focused on wetland and stream ecosystem restoration. As the head of Terra Technologies’ Wetland and Stream Mitigation Banking Division, he has been a primary or contributing designer for 13 approved and 11 proposed wetland and stream mitigation banks across Missouri and eastern Kansas encompassing more than 3,100 acres of restored wetland, riparian corridor, and stream habitats. He manages the Terra Technologies St. Louis office and is responsible for biotechnical engineering stream stabilization projects, rain gardens, wetland delineations, stream system jurisdictional assessments, and Clean Water Act Section 404 and 401 permits for central and eastern Missouri. SELECTED PROJECTS Wetland and Stream Mitigation Banks – Missouri & Kansas Designer for 14 approved and 10 proposed wetland and stream mitigation banks across Missouri and eastern Kansas encompassing more than 3,100 acres of restored wetland, riparian corridor, and stream habitats. These projects have resulted in significant improvements in water quality and wildlife habitat because of the protection of more than ten miles of stream channels with greatly expanded riparian corridors, restoration of four miles of historical stream channels, and the creation of more than a thousand acres of floodplain wetlands which filter pollutants, store flood waters, and provide high quality habitat for many species of wildlife. Mr. Staten performed the wetland delineations for many of these properties and guided many of these projects through the complicated regulatory approval process. He has also performed construction inspection, monitoring, and group site visits, including hosting two wetland conference field trips and senior EPA officials. 370 Lakeside Park Mitigation Wetland Design & Monitoring - St. Peters, MO Assisted in the design of the mitigation project required for the creation of a levee and protected business park area as well as a large city park within the Mississippi River floodplain. This project included the creation of more than 50 acres of herbaceous, scrub-shrub, and forested wetlands as well as approximately 30 acres of riparian enhancement areas. Mr. Staten also oversaw the construction and monitoring of the mitigation areas and led the intensive five-year habitat monitoring effort of an additional 106 acres of existing forested, scrub-shrub, and herbaceous wetlands, including extensive sampling of the vegetation, soils, surface water, ground water, and water

DePue Zinc Smelter Bluff Area Vegetative Assessment - DePue, IL Performed vegetative ecological assessment within a portion of a Superfund site consisting of a 74-acre bluff adjacent to a former zinc smelter site with the primary objective of identifying any locations with atypical plant communities or vegetative growth and with a secondary objective of categorizing and mapping the vegetation into roughly defined plant communities in order to provide a general description of the vegetation of the assessed area. Missouri River Inner Levee Tract Wetland Delineations - Kansas City, MO Project manager for a series of complex wetland delineations and stream system assessments that encompassed more than 2,600 acres of Missouri River floodplain properties in Clay County. Because the owner was proposing to develop the sites, they desired to know the locations of onsite wetlands and streams as well as possible locations for mitigation projects. Mr. Staten led the intensive field work at all sites and coordinated the production of the project reports between staff at all three Terra Technologies offices. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2005-Present TERRA TECHNOLOGIES, St. Louis, MO Senior Wetland Ecologist 2003-2004 SIERRA CLUB, Maplewood, MO Global Warming Intern 2001 L.C. LEE & ASSOCIATES, Alameda, CA Associate Ecologist 2000-2001 THE NATURE CONSERVANCY, Klamath Falls, OR Wetland Restoration Intern 1999-2000 DUKE FOREST, Durham, NC Forestry and Maintenance Intern EDUCATION 1999-2001 Masters of Environmental Management, Duke University School of the Environment and Earth Sciences 1995-1999 B.A., Integrative Biology with honors, Minor: Conservation Resource Studies, University of California, Berkeley PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Certified Professional Wetland Scientist #1931 Fellow, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Conservation Fellows Program Approved Special Inspector for Major Land Disturbance Projects in St. Louis County PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Past President, Society of Wetland Scientists Central Chapter 2005-2008, Treasurer: 2014-2016 and Webmaster: 2005-2014 Member of International Board of Directors, Society of Wetland Scientists 2006-2007

Chelsea District Health Center - New York, NY Gut renovation of a landmark-quality Art Deco-era public community health center located within a public park. The design features curved wood ceilings and a new glass-enclosed stair. The scope also includes exterior renovations, a new accessible entry, and all new infrastructure. Designed for LEED Gold certification. with NYC DDC.

Scott Hughes Principal, Structural Engineer Scott Hughes has been with Silman since 1997. He was named an associate with the firm in 2003 and a principal in 2012. His experience in design and project management in new construction, adaptive reuse, and renovation projects encompasses a wide range. These include primary, secondary, and higher education buildings, museums, waterfront structures – such as the Whitehall Ferry Terminal and Marine Company 1 in New York City – as well as multi-family residential projects, recreational facilities, and single-family residential projects, among them the occasional townhouse renovation.

SELECTED PROJECTS PXSTL, Temporary Pavilion - St, Louis, MO Organized under the auspices of PXSTL, a community arts and urban incentive created by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, the pavilion, “Lots”, is a site-specific steel and cloth sail structure located in a vacant lot across from the Pulitzer building. “Lots” is the first commissioned installation for the initiative. The airy, temporary structure provides shade for arts and community groups and for the general public who will be using it to stage performances, events, and other activities, both planned and spontaneous. Domino Waterfront Park - Brooklyn, NY Redevelopment of five acres of waterfront open space in conjunction with the development of the Domino Sugar Refinery complex. The park will feature an elevated catwalk abutted on one end by two salvaged 80-foot-tall gantry cranes that were once used to unload raw sugar arriving on ships from Latin America and the Caribbean. The runway, to be known as the Artifact Walk, will run the length of the 505-foot-long sugar warehouse currently housed on the site. The 425-foot long rail tracks that supported the cranes will also be salvaged and incorporated into the park, along with a series of structural columns from the sugar warehouse to serve as a backbone for the catwalk.

National Museum of African American History & Culture - Washington, DC – Foundation and below-grade structural design and construction administration for a new 350,000 sf museum. Silman was also responsible for portions of the superstructure construction administration, as well as structural coordination for exhibit design. Work included structural design for high water table relative to base of building, flood conditions, and sensitivity of site due to location on National Mall. Foundation design is a hybrid system responding to the presence of both rock and poor soils throughout the site. EDUCATION MS, Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 1995 BA, Architecture, University of California, Berkeley, 1993

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS Cornell University, College of Architecture, Art, and Planning (AAP NY), Visiting Lecturer, 2006, 2015 - present Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, & Preservation, Adjunct Assistant Professor, 2011 - 2015 Parsons, The New School, School of Constructed Environments, Adjunct Professor, 2010 - 2013

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Registered Professional Engineer: NY, CT, MD Registered Structural Engineer: IL

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS Structural Engineers Association of New York (SEAoNY), President; Former Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer New York State Council on the Arts, Grant Review Panelist, 2009 - 2011

Julian B. Lane Riverfront Park - Tampa, FL New construction of a 2-story community center with public rooms and office space on the upper floor and a waterfront boathouse on the lower level. The project also includes numerous small pavilion structures.

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JAMES LIMA PLANNING + DEVELOPMENT

PROSPERITY LABS

The Presidio of San Francisco - San Francisco, CA Real estate strategy, creative programming

SELECTED PROJECTS Eastern Bank - Boston, MA Design, implement and support ongoing operation of a cohort based capacity building program (Business Equity Initiative) for high potential minority firms. Launched in summer of 2017, BEI will serve as the foundation for the Bank’s commitment to economic inclusion. https://www.easternbank.com/BEI

Pier 57, Hudson River Park - New York City, NY Creative programming establishes a new waterfront destination and innovation hub Cultural Planning in Old South Baton Rouge - Baton Rouge, LA A cultural placemaking and economic development strategy

Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives - Washington, DC Support the organization’s Diversity and Inclusion and Economic Development divisions in its work with its 1,300 Chamber of Commerce members. Recent efforts include building out of site selector programming for annual convention, expanding diversity and inclusion professional development opportunities and creation of new impact tools.

Water Works Park - Minneapolis, MN Crafting an ambitious park enhancing, revenue-generating program in Minneapolis

James Lima President, Economic Development

Town Branch Commons - Lexington, KY Reviving Town Branch, a 1.5-mile long underground waterway that runs through the heart of downtown Lexington

Crystal German Principal, Economic Inclusion

James Lima has been actively engaged in complex matters of real estate, economic development, and public policy since 1986, with extensive private and public sector experience in the planning and revitalization of urban places at a variety of scales. He founded JLP+D in 2011 after leading redevelopment strategies for numerous large-scale sites as a partner at a major national economic and real estate advisory firm. Previously, he was Senior Director of Development in the New York office of residential REIT AvalonBay Communities, Inc. Additionally, James was appointed by NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg as founding President of the Governors Island Preservation and Education Corporation, overseeing the redevelopment of a 172-acre former military facility in New York Harbor. Lima also served as Senior Vice President for Special Projects at the NYC Economic Development Corporation, where he managed initiatives focused on growth of the city’s central business districts, including Downtown Brooklyn, and increasing public access to the city’s waterfront. His prior work as Assistant Commissioner at the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development and at Forest City Ratner Companies centered on new construction of affordable housing and retail development throughout NYC.

The Connected City: Hyper Density, Hyper Landscape - Dallas, TX Establishing a civic waterfront and expanding the CBD

Crystal German serves as Principal of Prosperity Labs - a consulting firm she founded in 2015 to work with organizations and communities on strategies and solutions to enable individuals to reach their economic potential, chiefly through business ownership and entrepreneurship. Prosperity Labs’ work is based on the belief that the health and well-being of a place is dependent on valuing the contributions of entrepreneurs and communities of color by creating an inclusive environment that recognizes the unique challenges faced by minority businesses and historically disinvested communities. Prosperity Labs develops innovative approaches and tools that enable women and people of color to fully participate in the local economy in building healthy sustainable communities. Equity and wealth creation are at the center of its work.

James has served as Assistant Adjunct Professor in the Columbia University Master of Science in Real Estate Development Program (MSRED), where he has led a course entitled Public-Private Partnerships in Real Estate Development. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Columbia College with a major in architecture and urban studies, and stayed on at Columbia to complete the MSRED Program. At the Harvard Kennedy School, James participated in the Program for Senior Executives in State and Local Government as a Fannie Mae Fellow. He is a frequent speaker at Urban Land Institute and other conferences, has served on advisory panels throughout North America, and has lectured on urban redevelopment at Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Penn, and Syracuse, as well as in Rotterdam, Amsterdam, and Sao Paulo.

Water Institute of the Gulf - Baton Rouge, LA Reaching beyond the institution to create a new knowledge economy district

EDUCATION Harvard University, Harvard Kennedy School, Program for Senior Executives in State & Local Government Columbia University, GSAPP, Master of Science of Real Estate Development Columbia University, Columbia College, BA, Architecture and Urban Studies

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2011-Present James Lima Planning + Development, New York, NY President 2007-2011 HR&A Advisors, New York, NY Partner 2003-2005 Governor’s Island Preservation and Education Corporation, New York, NY President 2000-2003 New York City Economic Development Corporation New York, NY Senior Vice-President, Special Projects Division 1996-2000 NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development - New York, NY Assistant Commissioner, Division of New Construction

SELECTED PROJECTS The BIG U and East Side Coastal Resiliency - New York City, NY Resiliency + social infrastructure. Unlocking Penn’s Potential - New York City, NY Making the case for TOD and a revenue capture district.

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ACADEMIC APPOINTMENT 2005-2013 Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture Planning & Preservation, New York, NY Adjunct Professor

Crystal’s specialty is providing project design and implementation for local governments, foundations, anchor institutions and economic development entities who are seeking to address economic inequities (e.g. lack of economic mobility, low business participation rates and income disparities). Her career spans finance, economic development, and inclusion positions within the private and public sectors. Prior to launching her own consultancy firm, Crystal built the nationally recognized Minority Business Accelerator housed at the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber. Career accomplishments include: • Creation and/or expansion of minority business programs (funded by private and corporate philanthropy, high net worth individuals, and local and federal dollars) in four cities that pump millions of taxable revenue annually into the local market. • Creation and capital raise for a $2 million patient capital fund of debt-like products for growth opportunities for minority owned companies, filling a gap that was being unmet in the local market and providing a financial and social return for the high net worth and institutional investors. • Building, managing and the provision of advisory services to a portfolio of forty African-American and Hispanic owned firms in Cincinnati whose annual financial performance outperformed the market, positively transforming the participation of the minority business community in the local economy. • Building a successful regional supplier diversity procurement program for corporate and institutional buyers that during her tenure recycled over $2 billion within the local market.

Business Alliance for Local Living Economies - Oakland, CA Wrote the 5-year strategic growth plan for the 15-person national organization to outline business priorities and capital investment areas for the enterprise that builds on its 20-year history of equipping people and communities with tools to build equitable local economies. Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce - Grand Rapids, MI Designed and built its capacity building accelerator program for second stage sizable minority firms in traditional industry sectors. http://www.grandrapids.org/business-services/elevate-minority-business/ EDUCATION Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC), Master of Business Administration, Top 10% of class Graduate School Internships: Fifth Avenue Committee, project of JP Morgan Chase, Brooklyn, NY Developed strategic relationships and value proposition for the community development corporation to grow its employment and training programs for hard-to-employ persons. Wells Fargo & Company - San Francisco, CA Created impact reports on the return on investment (economic and social) of lending to and investing in businesses owned by minorities and/ or women, and low-wealth communities. School of Business & Industry, Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, FL) Bachelor of Science, Business Administration / Summa Cum Laude Minor in Public Relations PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2015-Present Prosperity Labs, Kansas City, MO Principal 2008-2015 Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber, Cincinnati, OH Vice President, Minority Business Accelerator & Economic Inclusion 2002-2008 NC Institute of Minority Economic Development, Durham NC Vice President / Director of NC Minority Business Enterprise Center (2007-2008)


E C O N S U LT S O L U T I O N S

PROJECT CONTROLS GROUP CURRENT POSITIONS 2013-Present

Great Rivers Greenway Master Program Scheduling & Reporting St. Louis, MO Development of a project management tool to track the status of the District’s various projects. Provided monthly scheduling reports to the Executive Director.

President and Principal, Econsult Solutions, Inc., Philadelphia, PA

PAST POSITIONS

Stephen P. Mullin President, Economic Analyst Stephen P. Mullin is President of Econsult Solutions and a Lecturer at Drexel University and Temple University. Mr. Mullin is an expert on state and local public finance, urban and regional economics, real estate, economic development, and economic impact analysis. Mr. Mullin served in cabinet level position in the St. Louis and Philadelphia municipal government in the 1980s and 1990s. He is active in Philadelphia corporate and civic activities. He currently serves as an independent trustee of the Optimum Fund Trust Mutual Fund, a Director of the NASDAQOMX Futures Exchange, a co-Chair of the Urban Institute Forum for ULI, and on the advisory boards of the Haverford Trust Company and the Arden Real Estate Fund I. SELECTED PROJECTS City of Philadelphia - Pennsylvania Provided advisory consulting services, such as conduct Fiscal Year Annual Disparity Study, Analysis of Revenue Generation and Cost Reduction Strategies, Impacts of Proposed Philadelphia Tax Reforms, and etc.

2000-2012 1993-2000 1992-1993 1990-1992 1988-1990 1982-1988

Senior Vice President and Principal, Econsult Corporation, Philadelphia, PA City Representative and Director of Commerce, City of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Director of Finance, City of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA Deputy Director, St. Louis Development Corporation, St. Louis, MO Director of Corporate Development, Laclede Gas Company, St. Louis, MO Budget Director, City of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

EDUCATION 1982 1977

M.A. Economics, University of Pennsylvania (ABD) B.A. Economics, Harvard University

AREAS OF EXPERTISE Real Estate Economic Development State and Local Public Finance

EDUCATION 1987 Lindenwood University, MBA 1982 Missouri University of Science & Technology, BS Engineering Management

Marvin Woods Partner, Cost Estimator Marvin Woods is a founding Principal of Project Controls Group, Inc. Over his 35-year career he has been responsible for senior level oversight of multiple capital improvement projects. Some responsibilities have included the implementation of management systems and practices across assigned projects, being accountable for the satisfaction of clients, safety, and financial performance of assigned projects. Marvin also has extensive experience in all phases of project management and control and expertise in the areas of program development, Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) development, critical path method scheduling, cost control, document control and cost/ schedule performance measurement. Additionally, he is proficient in cost estimating, system development, the use of various program management software systems, and management and supervision of resources. Other proficiencies are strong leadership skills, solid experience in both design and construction phases of projects, and the ability to interface with clients. In 2017, Marvin was selected to the Grade of Fellow by the Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International. SELECTED PROJECTS

Roadmap to Growth 2014 - Philadelphia, PA Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, Analyzed publicly available data, including trends in the city’s population, employment base, income growth, enterprise creation and the county’s gross domestic product.

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, Luther Ely Smith Square St. Louis, MO Approximately 2.5 acres of rehabilitation of visitor access to downtown St. Louis, the Old Courthouse, and the Gateway Arch Grounds and Complex.

Montgomery County - Pennsylvania Assisted County officials in developing a cohesive and comprehensive strategic economic development policy.

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, North Gateway Project - St. Louis, MO Replacement of the north gateway parking garage with 4 acres of usable park area, including a Lewis and Clark Explorers’ Garden with a raised walkway that will feature views of Eads Bridge and the Mississippi River.

The Impact of FAA Budget Sequestration - USA Conducted an analysis of the economic impact of sequestration to the civil aviation industry and to the national economy as a whole. Estimated two scenarios of negative impacts generated from the sequestration, looking at employment, earnings, and lost tax revenue. Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy – 2017-2022 - St. Louis and St. Louis County Assisted in development of economic strategy for the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership

South Waterfront Greenway - Portland, OR Reclaimation and landscaping improvements of the South Waterfront Greenway - Central District. This is a linear park and urban walkway along the Willamette River in the South Waterfront district. Forest Park Central Fields Concessions & Pavilion - St.Louis, MO The South Comfort Station + Concessions represent the most significant visual change to Forest Park Central Fields.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2003-Present Project Controls Group, Inc., St. Louis, MO Founding Principal 2003-2003 The Boeing Corporation 2001-2003 ML Johnson & Company 1998-2001 Kwame Building Group, Inc. 1998-1998 Science Application International Corporation 1992-1998 Morrison Knudsen Corporation 1983-1992 McDonnell Douglas Corporation

PUBLICATIONS 1996 Establishing and Managing Contingency on a Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Project

AFFILIATIONS Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering International, (Past VP of Regions, International Board of Directors) Missouri University of Science & Technology, Chancellors’ Advisory Commission for African American Recruitment and Retention Southern Illinois University-Edwards, Construction Management Program Board of Advisors St. Louis Regional Chambers, Board of Directors

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS Certified Cost Professional (CCP), Certification No. 1600 Fellow, Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering Instructor, Associated General Contractors

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APPENDIX 01

M U LT I M O D A L C O N N E C T I O N S


Forest Park Boulevard today is an oversized thoroughfare with excessively high traffic speeds, dangerous to pedestrians and cyclists alike

Forest Park Boulevard in the future, as a “Complete Street� with vegetated protected bike lanes, rain gardens, reduced traffic speeds, and a Grand Boulevard in the City of St. Louis


EXISTING MULTIMODAL CONNECTIONS CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES St. Louis is a rich city with a variety of transportation alternatives available to its residents. Specifically, a few key transportation infrastructure assets have helped shape St. Louis into the city it is today. One is the Interstate System, a system that consists of numerous freeways throughout St. Louis and its suburbs. Notable highways include I-64 that runs east-west and makes up the spine of St. Louis, and I-44 that runs north-south on the west side of the Mississippi River. Just south of I-64 is the main Freight Railroad alignment that carries both passengers and freight to and from the heart of St. Louis. This at-grade alignment is wide and contains numerous train yards that are 10-20 tracks wide, creating a significant obstacle that divides central St. Louis in half. Alongside this track alignment is the St. Louis MetroLink, a light rail transit system that has been built in the last twenty years. Expansion of this system is ongoing, and as of 2015 it is the 11th largest transit system in the United States. These three infrastructure assets, though critical to the city of St. Louis, create obstacles to connectivity for other modes of transportation.

Roadway Network St. Louis has a vast roadway network that consists of a variety of highways, urban arterials, collector and local roads. There are four major highways that are part of the Interstate-Highway System: I-44, I-55, I-64, and I-70, all of which are made up of a combination of at-grade and elevated roadways. This built infrastructure creates significant obstacles to connectivity throughout the city. For example, I-64 in between Compton Avenue and Vandeventer Avenue is stacked such that the westbound roadway lies directly above the eastbound roadway. The only North/South connection that exists throughout this half-mile segment is Grand Boulevard. Otherwise, industrial land uses and underutilized space exists on either side of the interstate. Most notably, the highway ramps in the vicinity of Compton Avenue occupy a large amount of land that remains otherwise unutilized. Principal Arterials are located throughout St. Louis, and provide vehicular access throughout the city. These roadways can vary from 2-8 lanes, and primarily utilize their rights-ofway to provide efficient connectivity for vehicles traveling at higher speeds. Particularly in St. Louis, these arterials have lanes that are approximately 12 feet in width and may have parallel parking on either/both sides of the street. Notable North/South urban arterials include Skinker Boulevard/Mc Causland Avenue, Kingshighway Boulevard, Grand Boulevard, Compton Avenue, Jefferson Avenue, and Tucker Boulevard; and notable East/West urban arterials include Natural Bridge Avenue, Forest Park Avenue, Market Street, Chouteau Avenue, and Gravois Avenue.

Similar to principal arterials, minor arterials make up an important part of the roadway network of St. Louis. These roadways, typically 2-4 lanes, connect local residential and industrial streets to principal arterials and are often defined by the nearby land uses. Lane widths vary from 10-17 feet and angled/parallel parking can exist along either or both sides of the street. Some examples of minor arterials throughout St. Louis include Vandeventer Avenue, North Broadway, St. Louis Avenue, Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, Cass Avenue, Lindell Boulevard, Olive Street, Laclede Avenue, Chestnut Street, Park Avenue, and Meramec Street. Many of these urban arterials and collector roadways have fixed rights-of-way with constraints on both sides of the roads. This limits the ability to expand or narrow these roadways based on the projected demand. This applies particularly to the North/South connections that cross over the railroad tracks via bridges in between the Mississippi River and Forest Park. Modifying these bridges would require substantial investment and coordination with public agencies and private freight rail companies. The variety of built roadway infrastructure that exists throughout the city presents a unique opportunity to repurpose this public space for other use. This applies especially on underutilized roadways that could adequately serve the existing demand with fewer lanes. In these instances, roadways could either be narrowed or re-configured to repurpose available space for public uses such as recreational land uses or right-of-way for sustainable modes of transportation.

Pedestrian Infrastructure Pedestrian connectivity is critical to the daily operations of any city. Any area with a high density of residential, retail, industrial, and office land uses typically provides dedicated pedestrian rights-of-way in the form of ADA compliant sidewalks on either side of a roadway. Sidewalks are typically paved and can vary in width, depending on the land uses and pedestrian volumes they serve, as well as the types of roadways they are constructed on. Throughout St. Louis, sidewalks exist on the majority of its local roads, collector roadways, and urban arterials. In addition to sidewalks, pedestrian connectivity is provided through the various parks and greenways throughout St. Louis. These connections are typically paved to promote easy and efficient accessibility for all individuals, and feature green space and inviting ambiences. Some of St. Louis’ larger parks that provide pedestrian connectivity include Forest Park and Tower Grove Park. Greenways, and in particular the proposed Chouteau Greenway, can provide efficient connectivity between these parks and other points of interest throughout the city of St. Louis and its suburbs. Obstacles to pedestrian connectivity exist in the form of built infrastructure throughout St. Louis. For example, wide

urban arterials obstruct the ability for pedestrians to safely and efficiently travel throughout the city. Tucker Boulevard near the Gateway Mall, for example, is an 8-lane arterial that is approximately 110 feet wide. Pedestrian crossings require a large amount of time, making crossings difficult and unsafe for the many residents and tourists that visit the Gateway Mall. Although obstacles exist, the character of St. Louis presents unique opportunities to foster pedestrian connectivity. The wealth of public space that is already dedicated to parks should be completely utilized. Pedestrian pathways can be constructed through these spaces to connect nearby points of interest, including recreational, cultural, and retail land uses. In certain areas, there are also large amounts of space between roadways’ rights-of-way and building facades, or underutilized shoulders within roadways’ rights-of-way. This space could be repurposed to provide pedestrian amenities, which could provide equitable benefits to the residents and tourists of St. Louis alike.

Bicycle Lanes Currently, St. Louis’ bicycle infrastructure is mostly made up of a combination of shared bike lanes that share the roads with vehicles, and conventional bike lanes that are separated from vehicular traffic flows by a thin painted stripe. These lanes are typically one-way providing bicycles with the ability to travel safely in one direction. Traveling in the opposite direction requires the use of a different bicycle lane on either the opposite side of the road or on an entirely different roadway. These bike lanes have been placed sporadically throughout St. Louis’ collector roadways and urban arterials. Recently, St. Louis has begun to construct parking-protected bicycle lanes, such as the Chestnut Street bike lane near the Gateway Mall that was constructed in 2017. This lane uses a combination of curbs and parking as a buffer to separate bicycle traffic from vehicular traffic. In certain areas, such as Forest Park, twoway cycle tracks exist that provide bi-directional traffic on a dedicated ROW. Challenges that face St. Louis’ Bicycle infrastructure most notably include the obstacles to connectivity that also hinder pedestrian infrastructure. The interstate highway system and rail lines throughout the city have created physical barriers that cannot be crossed efficiently or quickly. Bicycles in particular are susceptible to grade changes that make riding on inclines difficult. However, in certain areas combination of ascending and descending ramps would be required to allow bikes to cross the existing vehicle and railway infrastructure. These obstacles have also contributed to the lack of network continuity, that is, that bicycle lanes are not contiguous throughout the city. In many locations throughout St. Louis, bicycle lanes begin and end where roadway geometries permit, but do not necessarily efficiently connect users to key points of interest throughout the city. Additionally, wide urban arterials and the fast-moving vehicles that use them also create obstacles to connectivity. The many shared and

dedicated bicycle lanes enable a narrow shy distance between bicyclists and vehicles, contributing to safety concerns especially for bicycle users. The opportunities for bicycle infrastructure improvements are widespread. Since a bicycle network containing a variety of shared and dedicated lanes already exists, the infrastructure can simply be expanded or improved upon. An exciting opportunity also exists with regards to the Bike Share program that is coming to St. Louis in April 2018. This program will likely spur demand for bicycle infrastructure after its inception, and could encourage city officials to do more to protect the patrons that decide to use the system. Most notably, increased safety can be attained for bicyclists by separating bicycle traffic from vehicular traffic. On certain wide city roadways, travel lanes and/or parking lanes can be repurposed as dedicated bicycle lanes with painted or physical barriers. The physical barriers, if they are planted, could also lead to ecological and cultural benefits for those that travel along the path’s ROW. These opportunities for bicycle improvements are enhanced through the work that Great Rivers Greenway (GRG) has been doing since their formation in 2000. Over 100 miles of greenway have been constructed, with more planned for 2018. Building on the success of the CityArchRiver (CAR) Project, GRG looks forward to beginning to implement the Chouteau Greenway plan.

Transit St. Louis provides a variety of public transit services throughout the city and its suburbs. Light Rail Transit service is provided along two lines as a part of the MetroLink service: the original red line runs from Shiloh-Scott, in St. Clair County, Illinois, through Downtown St. Louis and to St. Louis Lambert Airport; and the blue line runs between Fairview Heights, in St. Clair County, Illinois through Downtown St. Louis to the Shrewsbury-Lansdowne station. The two lines utilize the same facilities between Fairview Heights and the Forest Park DeBaliviere stations. Bus service is provided throughout the city on over 60 bus lines that run through Missouri and Illinois. Providing public transit services in St. Louis is challenging for a few reasons. First, St. Louis is less dense than many other cities in the United States, which contributes to inefficiencies throughout its public transit system. Notably, this leads to a combination of low ridership and low frequency of transit services throughout the transit network. In addition, congestion is fairly minimal in the St. Louis area and parking costs are reasonable, two factors not supportive of the use of transit to those who have a choice of using their personal vehicle. These two factors are dependent on one another, and can lead to continuous decreases in ridership and frequency. They also can contribute to other negative impacts, such as safety concerns in certain areas. The low frequencies, especially of St. Louis’ bus routes, leads to a prevalent car


culture for many of the cities’ residents. This car culture is not easily changed, since it has become customary for thousands of people that have come to rely on private automobiles for their transportation needs. The St. Louis region is currently studying the NorthsideSouthside light rail extension. The Northside-Southside is a proposed in-street running light rail line running north and south from Downtown. The in-street running system will be new to the St. Louis region, and would better connect people to jobs in the region, provide a safer environment since it is at street level, and encourage reinvestment in local neighborhoods. The concept study, presenting a locally preferred alternative and a suggested first phase of for construction is anticipated to be completed this summer. After that time, additional funding will be required to move the project into preliminary design and ultimately construction. In a city where land is available more readily than other American cities, there are unique opportunities for public transportation improvements. Notably, since frequencies on existing bus lines are low, service can be improved readily by increasing the frequency on certain routes. This is, in comparison to constructing new roads or light rail transit infrastructure, costly alternatives. There are also unique solutions such as transit-signal-priority (TSP) that can be used to give public transportation priority on public roads. Additionally, to address safety concerns of city residents, certain improvements such as increased lighting and/ or increased law enforcement presence can be utilized at transit stops. Collectively, these improvements can help shift demand from private automobiles to public transportation, and thereby utilize the interdependence between ridership and frequency to improve transit service throughout the city.

PROPOSED MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION CONNECTIONS To facilitate efficient and sustainable connectivity, practical and viable transportation alternatives that could connect economic and cultural nodes to the Chouteau Greenway were explored. There are twenty-one key ROW that would benefit from improvements to pedestrian, bicycle, and transit infrastructure. These key areas and the specific improvements are discussed in more detail below.

1. “Spaghetti” Interchange at Compton The land near the Compton/ Market/Forest Park intersection is unutilized, with roadway ramps providing duplicate access. The complex network of ramps that provides access to I-64, Forest Park Avenue, and Market Street could be simplified by eliminating certain ramps and reconstructing them elsewhere, thereby allowing the most of the land to be repurposed to the Chouteau Greenway. Area highlighted in green in the figure below represents existing highway ramps that would be repurposed into a greenway. Area highlighted in red represents proposed roadways that would need to be constructed to ensure that traffic patterns in the area operate at acceptable levels. Since the existing ramps that connect eastbound Forest Park Avenue to I-64, I-64 to eastbound Market Street, and westbound Market Street to I-64 would be eliminated, traffic volumes would likely increase on surrounding highway ramps, Grand Boulevard, and Compton Avenue. A new eastbound I-64 ramp would be constructed for eastbound Forest Park Avenue to eastbound I-64 access, from Spruce Street. This new ramp would eliminate the left lane merge onto I-64, replacing it with a right lane merge, increasing safety. The westbound I-64 ramp to westbound Forest Park Avenue, running under the Compton/Market interchange would remain in place. The improvements proposed by MoDOT to the I-64 and Jefferson Avenue Interchange may reduce the traffic currently using the Compton/Market/Forest Park area, lessening any potential impacts to operations.

of Market Street connecting to the repurposed Chouteau Greenway. A dedicated phase of this new intersection’s signal would be dedicated to the cycle track (Appendix 1), enabling cyclists to cross Compton Avenue at-grade and utilize the existing Market Street ramp that provides access to Bernard Street. East of Compton Avenue, this cycle track would extend to east of 22nd Street, and cross from the south side to the north side of Market Street. This crossing under Market Street just west of Union Station, can be done by utilizing the existing I-64 EB off-ramp to Chestnut. This ramp will be taken out of use with the construction of the new I-64 and Jefferson interchange. This cycle track would then pass through Aloe Plaza West Extension, and connect to the proposed bicycle paths on Market Street and Chestnut Street along the Gateway Mall.

2. Skinker Boulevard Crossing Washington University is located near the northwest corner of Forest Park. Skinker Boulevard, a north-south urban arterial, separates the university from the park. In order to facilitate connectivity at the university, the Centennial Greenway was constructed along the southern border of the campus along Forsyth Boulevard. Currently, this greenway deadends at Skinker Boulevard, at which point users are able to cross into Forest Park via an at-grade signalized intersection.

Connectivity between Washington University and Forest Park can be further encouraged with the construction of a grade-separated extension of the Centennial Greenway at the intersection of Skinker Boulevard and Forsyth Boulevard. The greenway, which currently is made up of a two-way cycle track and a pedestrian path, could pass beneath Skinker Boulevard via a below-grade tunnel along the Centennial Greenway’s existing alignment. Gentle ramps could be constructed in coordination with Forest Park and Washington University to connect to existing bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure owned by each entity. The grade separation could ensure safe and efficient traffic operations for the residents of St. Louis, and particularly the students of Washington University. As a part of the reconfigured intersection at Compton Avenue, a two-way cycle track would be provided on the south side

3. Spring Avenue Crossing Saint Louis University’s main campus is located near Midtown St. Louis at Grand Boulevard in between Forest Park Avenue and Lindell Boulevard. As the school expands and continues to develop its School of Medicine, the railway tracks and I-64 pose significant obstacles to connecting these two separate campuses. Grand Boulevard, the nearest urban arterial that could connect these two campuses, has significant constraints that limit how it can be modified to foster connectivity in the future. Given these challenges, a the existing right-of-way of Spring Avenue can be repurposed as a north-south connection, extending from Laclede Avenue in the north to Chouteau Avenue in the south. Currently, Spring Avenue is divided by I-64 and the railway tracks. At I-64, a grade-separated crossing can be constructed by suspending the greenway from the westbound I-64 roadway above it. This would result in the greenway passing above eastbound I-64 and below westbound I-64. The greenway, now approximately 30 feet above the ground-level roadways, could remain suspended above Spring Avenue until it reaches the MetroLink and railroad tracks. At this point, a bridge could be constructed over these active rail-lines to minimize the impact both during and after its construction. Having crossed both I-64 and the railway tracks, the rights-of-way of Spring Avenue connects to Chouteau Avenue and dedicated bicycle lanes that provide access to SLU’s south campus. Though this aspect of the Chouteau Greenway could be subject to significant challenges, including property acquisition costs, utility relocations, and coordination with public agencies and private corporations, this connection provides many potential opportunities. First, by connecting to the right-of-way of Scott Avenue, the Spring Avenue Bridge could provide an additional connection to the Grand MetroLink Station that does not require traveling on Grand Boulevard. Second, pedestrian and bicycle traffic would likely be shifted from Grand Boulevard (a highly trafficked urban arterial) to the Spring Avenue Bridge. This effect could have many impacts, including improved safety for pedestrians and


bicyclists due to the reduction of potential vehicle conflicts on Grand Boulevard. Many of these opportunities stand to benefit SLU, as well nearby Harris-Stowe State University and other residents that live in Midtown St. Louis.

4. 21st Street Crossing An area that could undergo significant development in the future is the land currently occupied by I-64 Chestnut and Pine Street ramps. As a part of MoDOT’s ongoing efforts to reconfigure the Jefferson Avenue Interchange, the Pine Street and Chestnut Street ramps are set to be decommissioned, thereby making the land they currently occupy available to be repurposed. To facilitate connectivity for this new district of St. Louis, active transportation connections could be constructed utilizing the existing alignment of the ramps. This would tie into other multimodal connections in the area, including the two-way cycle track that extends from Compton Avenue to 22nd Street and the one-way bike paths on Chestnut Street and Market Street that converge at Aloe Plaza West Extension. The decommissioned Pine Street eastbound I-64 ramp could provide the alignment for the bicycle and pedestrian pathway to extend south from Market Street over I-64. Approximately where this ramp crosses over MetroLink’s right-of-way, a new bridge could be constructed south over the railway tracks as an extension of South 21st Street. After passing over the tracks, the bridge could descend to grade and connect with the existing roadway infrastructure and ultimately connect to the proposed bicycle infrastructure along Chouteau Avenue. Some of the potential connections that could be facilitated by this new bridge include Jefferson Avenue via Scott Avenue, and 18th Street via Chouteau Avenue. Notable stakeholders that could benefit from this connection include the electric utility company Ameren Missouri and residential land uses in the Downtown West and Lafayette Square districts.

5. Pedestrian Bridge over Kingshighway Boulevard at Children’s Place A pedestrian bridge is being proposed as part of the greenway plan over Kingshighway Boulevard at Children’s Place. The bridge will be ADA accessible and provide connectivity between Forest Park and the Hospital District. To ensure efficient connectivity, the bridge could tie into existing active transportation infrastructure on either side of the corridor, such as park paths and neighborhood sidewalks. In addition to enhancing connectivity between the hospital and the park, the bridge will provide a safer crossing over Kingshighway Boulevard which currently carries high traffic volumes.

6. MacArthur Bridge - Loop Extension to East St. Louis, Illinois The ability of the Chouteau Greenway Plan to connect not only St. Louis neighborhoods but to make a connection across

the Mississippi River to East St. Louis in St. Clair County, Illinois is an idea that has been considered in past regional proposals including the recent CityArchRiver (CAR) project. The Metro East Park and Recreational District (MEPRD) is the leading agency for parks, recreation and trail facilities in St. Clair and Madison Counties, Illinois. The MEPRD currently operates the Eads Bridge Bikeway and the Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park Trail. The Mississippi River Overlook is in the Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park in East St. Louis, the location of the Gateway Geyser, and offers spectacular views of the Gateway Arch and the Downtown St. Louis skyline. MEPRD’s plans for the Confluence Bikeway South would provide a recreational facility along the east side of the Mississippi River from the Eads Bridge to south of the MacArthur Bridge connecting with the Metro-East Levee Trail. A connection north of the Eads Bridge is planned to the proposed Confluence Bikeway North and connecting to the McKinley Bridge. The Chouteau Greenway Plan proposes using the MacArthur Bridge as the south portion of a loop connection to East St. Louis. The Eads Bridge would be utilized as the north portion of the loop. This loop would include access to the Malcolm W. Martin Park and the spectacular views on the east side of the river and the Chouteau’s Landing area on the west side of the river. The MacArthur Bridge was originally constructed in 1917 with a freight rail lower deck and a roadway upper deck which carried Chouteau Avenue over the Mississippi River. From late 2013 to 2014, the unused roadway deck was removed. The main 3-span truss remains, including the upper deck floorbeams which were left in place to maintain the structural integrity of the truss. The west approach truss for the roadway deck on the St. Louis side has been removed. The current vertical clearance between the freight track and the roadway floorbeams is about 20 feet, less than the 23’-6” that is currently desired. The current freight traffic is limited by the approximately 20-foot clearance to the existing floorbeams. The placement of a lightweight activity corridor/bicycle lanes at the elevation of the old roadway deck will not have an

impact on the existing freight traffic. Coming off the MacArthur Bridge the loop extension will continue to the north through the Malcom W. Martin Memorial Park connecting with the existing Eads Bridge Trail, and to the west to the Chouteau Greenway. A restoration project of the Eads Bridge, a National Historic Landmark, was completed in 2003. The bridge currently supports automobile, MetroLink, bicycle and pedestrian traffic. The bridge can also be closed to vehicular traffic and used as the site for various festivals and celebrations, such as the Grand Reopening Celebration in 2003.

corridor. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Chestnut Street.

This loop truly provides a regional network, connecting both sides of the river.

7. Gateway Mall Roadway Closures The Gateway Mall provides public space along the Market Street corridor in downtown St. Louis. Throughout its length, the Mall is divided by public streets that vary in size and character. In certain locations, full roadway closures can be implemented to connect the Gateway Mall and contribute to the revitalization of downtown St. Louis. Implementation of a full road closure includes restriction of vehicular access, and could be permanent or temporary in nature depending on the access management that is required during special events or by emergency vehicles. Roadway pavement could be modified from typical asphalt surfaces to textured pavements such as brick or cobblestones. Specifically, a partial roadway closure consisting of parking reductions, raised crosswalks, and textured paving could be implemented on11th Street between Market Street and Chestnut Street. Additionally, full roadway closures could be implemented on the following roadway segments: a. 17th Street between Market Street and Chestnut Street, b. 13th Street between Market Street and Pine Street, c. Chestnut Street between 14th Street and Tucker Avenue

8. Chestnut Street near the Gateway Mall Existing Conditions Chestnut Street near the Gateway Mall has parallel parking on the north and south side of the street and one eastbound travel lane. Existing bicycle infrastructure includes an eastbound parking-protected bike lane on the south side of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Chestnut Street. Proposed Conditions Eliminate all parking on Chestnut Street near the Gateway Mall and repurpose the road to accommodate a one-way protected cycle track and a jogging path on the south side of the road. One travel lane will be maintained on Chestnut Street to allow vehicular access to parking lots and garages located along the

9. Market Street near the Gateway Mall Existing Conditions Market Street near the Gateway Mall has five travel lanes, parallel parking on the north and south sides of the street, and no existing bicycle infrastructure. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Market Street near the Gateway Mall. Proposed Conditions Eliminate all parking on Market Street near the Gateway Mall and repurpose the road to accommodate a one-way protected cycle track on the north side of the street, providing connection to the cycle track on Chestnut Street and additional capacity for westbound bicycle traffic. Parking space can be reclaimed and designated for parklets and street furniture. A protected cycle track will provide cyclists with a sense of safety by slowing vehicle speeds and providing a physical barrier between cyclists and vehicles. Maintain four vehicular travel lanes – two eastbound lanes and two westbound lanes. Designate one eastbound lane and one westbound lane as exclusive bus lanes for bus rapid transit. Market Street is a main connection to Downtown Saint Louis with many bus routes operating just north of I-64 near Market Street. Dedicating one lane in each direction to bus traffic would likely decrease travel times for the following twelve bus routes that operate on Market Street: •5 • 40 • 78 • 96 Market Street Shuttle • 99 Downtown Trolley • 1x, 14x, 16x, 40x, 58x, 174x, 410x Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Market Street near the Gateway Mall.


conditions on Clayton Avenue near Forest Park.

10. Chouteau Avenue near South 18th Street Existing Conditions Chouteau Avenue near South 18th Street has parallel parking on the north and south side of the street and three travel lanes. Existing bicycle infrastructure includes conventional bike lanes on the north and south side of the street. Unlike Chestnut Street, bike lanes are adjacent to vehicle travel lanes. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Chouteau Avenue near South 18th Street. Proposed Conditions Eliminate all parking on Chouteau Street near South 18th Street and repurpose the road to accommodate one-way protected cycle tracks on both sides of the street. Parking space can be reclaimed and designated for parklets or other street furniture. A protected cycle track will provide cyclists with a sense of safety by slowing vehicle speeds and providing a physical barrier between cyclists and vehicles. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Chouteau Avenue near South 18th Street.

11. Clayton Avenue near Forest Park

Existing Conditions Clayton Avenue near Forest Park has two travel lanes and no existing bicycle infrastructure. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Clayton Avenue near Forest Park. Proposed Conditions Reduce width of travel lanes and construct a two-way cycle track on the south side of the street. The proposed cycle track will connect to a new pedestrian underpass adjacent to the automobile underpass. Additionally, the existing pedestrian bridge that connects Chouteau Avenue and Clayton Avenue will be replaced with a wider bridge in order to accommodate pedestrians and cyclists and to further enhance connectivity between the two streets and the Forest Park. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed

Near Forest Park, the cycle track would diverge from Clayton Avenue’s ROW and connect to the existing pedestrian and bicycle path that extends over I-64. This bridge could undergo reconstruction and widening to provide north/south connectivity over I-64. Additionally, a below-grade tunnel could be constructed beneath Kingshighway Boulevard to provide dedicated bicycle and pedestrian access to Forest Park. The location for this new connection would repurpose land that is currently underutilized just east of Kingshighway Boulevard.

12. Laclede Avenue near Euclid Avenue Existing Conditions Laclede Avenue near Euclid Avenue has two travel lanes, parallel parking on the south side of the street and angled parking on the north side of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Laclede Avenue near Euclid Avenue. Proposed Conditions Reduce width of travel lanes, convert angled parking on the north side to parallel parking, and construct a two-way cycle track on the north side of the street. This section of Laclede Avenue near Euclid Avenue provides an opportunity to capture an area of high density and high demand. In the 2017 bike counts conducted by Trailnet, Euclid Avenue near Forest Park was in the top 5 average biking destinations. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Laclede Avenue near Euclid Avenue. As a part of the reconfigured Laclede Avenue corridor, the two-way cycle-track would provide access to Saint Louis University at its east and Forest park at its west. The access to Forest Park would be provided via the existing at-grade signalized intersection. A dedicated phase of this new intersection’s signal would be dedicated to the cycle track, enabling cyclists to cross Kingshighway Boulevard safely and efficiently.

13. Dr. Martin Luther King Drive near Spring Avenue Existing Conditions Dr. Martin Luther King Drive near East Prairie Avenue has four travel lanes and wide shoulders. There are existing bike lanes west of East Prairie Avenue, but they do not continue east of East Prairie Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Dr. Martin Luther King Drive near East Prairie Avenue. Proposed Conditions Reduce the number of travel lanes from four lanes to two lanes and repurpose the road to accommodate a one-way

protected cycle track on the north and south side of the street, providing a connection to the existing bike lanes west of East Prairie Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Dr. Martin Luther King Drive near East Prairie Avenue.

14. North Grand Boulevard from Laclede Avenue to Natural Bridge Avenue Existing Conditions North Grand Boulevard near Laclede Avenue has five travel lanes. Existing bicycle infrastructure includes shared lane markings on eastbound lanes and westbound lanes. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on North Grand Boulevard near Laclede. Proposed Conditions Reduce the number of travel lanes from five lanes to two lanes and repurpose the road to accommodate a oneway protected cycle track on the east and west side of the street. The proposed bike lanes will connect to existing bike lanes south of Laclede Avenue. The 2013 St. Louis Streetcar Feasibility Study referenced a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line on Grand Boulevard. While dedicating one lane in each direction to bus traffic would likely decrease travel times for the routes that operate on Grand Boulevard, the existing infrastructure cannot accommodate a cycle track and exclusive bus lanes. Alternatively, a more readily implementable possibility to improve bus service on Grand Boulevard is the increase in frequency of the three existing bus routes. Transit Signal Priority (TSP) could also be implemented independent of the route frequency to change certain signal phases to green to accommodate approaching buses. • 70 • 58X • 410X Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on North Grand Boulevard near Laclede.

15. South 39th Street near Chouteau Avenue Existing Conditions South 39th Street near Chouteau Avenue has two travel lanes and wide shoulders to accommodate parallel parking on the east and west side of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on South 39th Street near Chouteau Avenue. Proposed Conditions Reduce the width of travel lanes to accommodate a one-way protected cycle track on the east and west side of the street. Lane widths will no longer provide space for cars to park along the shoulder. The proposed bike lanes will connect to

existing bike lanes on Chouteau Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on South 39th Street near Chouteau Avenue.

16. Tower Grove Avenue North of South Vandenventer Avenue Existing Conditions Tower Grove Avenue north of South Vandeventer Avenue has two travel lanes and wide shoulders to accommodate parallel parking on the east and west side of the street. Existing bike infrastructure includes shared lane markings on the north and southbound travel lanes, Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Tower Grove Avenue north of South Vandeventer Avenue. Proposed Conditions Reduce the width of travel lanes to accommodate painted buffered bike lanes on the east and west side of the street. Lane widths will no longer provide space for cars to park along the shoulder. The proposed bike lanes will connect to existing bike lanes south of Vandeventer Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Tower Grove Avenue north of South Vandeventer Avenue.

17. Tucker Avenue near Chestnut Street Existing Conditions Tucker Avenue near Chestnut Street has seven travel lanes, four southbound and three northbound, parallel parking on the east and west side of the street, and no existing bicycle infrastructure. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Tucker Avenue near Chestnut Street. Proposed Conditions There are two proposed options for enhancing multimodal connectivity on Tucker Avenue near Chestnut Street. Eliminate parking on the east side of Tucker Avenue and repurpose the road to accommodate a two-way cycle track. All seven travel lanes will be maintained and as well as parallel parking on the west side of Tucker Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Tucker Avenue near Chestnut Street.

18. Vandeventer Avenue near Chouteau Avenue Existing Conditions Vandeventer Avenue near Chouteau Avenue has four travel lanes, two northbound and two southbound and no existing bicycle infrastructure. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Vandeventer Avenue near Chouteau Avenue. Proposed Conditions


Reduce the number of travel lanes from four to two and repurpose the road to accommodate a one-way protected cycle track on the east and west side of the street. The proposed bike lanes will connect to existing bike lanes on Chouteau Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Vandeventer Avenue near Chouteau Avenue.

19. Natural Bridge Avenue near Beaumont High School Existing Conditions Natural Bridge Avenue near Beaumont High School has five travel lanes, two eastbound, two westbound, and a middle turning lane. There is parallel parking on the north and south side of the street. Existing bicycle infrastructure includes conventional bike lanes on the north and south side of the road. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Natural Bridge Avenue near Beaumont High School. Proposed Conditions Remove parallel parking on the north side of the street to accommodate a westbound buffered bike lane. Remove curbside parking and provide floating parking on the south side of the street. Repurpose the road to accommodate parking-protected bike lanes on the south side of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Natural Bridge Avenue near Beaumont High School.

20. South Compton Avenue near Meramec Street Existing Conditions South Compton Avenue near Meramec Street has two travel lanes with wide shoulders, often occupied by parked cars. The existing bicycle infrastructure includes shared lane markings. Refer to FAppendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on South Compton Avenue near Meramec Street. Proposed Conditions Reduce the width of the travel lanes to accommodate conventional bike lanes on the east and west side of the street. The proposed bike lanes will connect to the existing bike lanes on Arsenal Street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Compton Avenue near Meramec Street.

21. North Newstead Avenue near St. Louis Avenue Existing Conditions North Newstead Avenue near St. Louis Avenue has two travel lanes and parallel parking on the east side of the street. The existing bicycle infrastructure includes shared lane markings.

Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on North Newstead Avenue near St. Louis Avenue. Proposed Conditions Reduce the width of the travel lanes to accommodate oneway cycle tracks on the east and west sides of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on North Newstead Avenue near St. Louis Avenue.

22. West Florissant Avenue Near Page Avenue Existing Conditions West Florissant Avenue near East Alice Avenue has three travel lanes and parallel parking on both sides of the street. The existing bicycle infrastructure includes conventional bike lanes on the north and south sides of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on West Florissant Avenue near East Alice Avenue. Proposed Conditions Reduce the width of the travel lanes to accommodate parking protected bike lanes on the north and south sides of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on West Florissant Avenue near East Alice Avenue.

23. North Spring Avenue near Cass Avenue Existing Conditions North Spring Avenue near Cass Avenue has four travel lanes with wide shoulders that can be used for parallel parking on either side of the street. There is no existing bicycle infrastructure at this segment of North Spring Avenue. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on North Spring Avenue near Cass Avenue. Proposed Conditions Eliminate the wide shoulders/parking lanes on either side of the street to accommodate one-way protected cycle tracks on the east and west sides of the street. The proposed bike lanes will extend from Saint Louis University in the south to north of the Delmar Divide. Refer to Figure x in Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on North Spring Avenue near Cass Avenue.

24. Wydown Boulevard near University Lane Existing Conditions Wydown Boulevard near University Lane has two travel lanes with wide shoulders that can be used for parallel parking on either side of the street. There is a wide planted median with trees and grass, and dedicated bike lanes on either side of the street. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Wydown Boulevard near University

Lane. Proposed Conditions Narrow the shoulder/parking lane and travel lane, construct a parking protected bike lane on either side of the street. The proposed bike lanes will extend from Forest Park in the east to residential land uses along Wydown Boulevard and Big Bend Boulevard. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Wydown Boulevard near University Lane.

25. Big Bend Boulevard near Wydown Boulevard Existing Conditions Big Bend Boulevard near Wydown Boulevard has five travel lanes and no parking on either side of the street. There is also no existing bicycle infrastructure along Clayton Road. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Big Bend Boulevard at Wydown Boulevard. Proposed Conditions Eliminate a travel lane and the paved median in the center of the street to accommodate one-way protected cycle tracks on the north and south sides of the street. The proposed bike lanes will extend from Forest Park in the east to residential land uses west of Big Bend Boulevard. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of Big Bend Boulevard at Wydown Boulevard.

26. South 21st Street near Market Street Existing Conditions South 21st Street near Market Street has two travel lanes and wide shoulders that can be used for parallel parking on either side of the street. This section of South 21st Street does not have any bicycle infrastructure. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on South 21st Street near Market Street. Proposed Conditions As a part of the 21st Street Bridge, this area of 21st Street near Market Street will be modified to accommodate oneway protected cycle tracks on either side of the street. The proposed bike lanes will extend from Market Street in the north and connect to the proposed bicycle infrastructure along Market Street and near the Gateway Mall. Via the proposed bridge over the railway tracks, these bike lanes will connect to Chouteau Avenue in the south. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on South 21st Street near Market Street.

27. Clayton Road near Big Bend Boulevard Existing Conditions Clayton Road near Big Bend Boulevard has six travel lanes and

no parking on either side of the street. There is also no existing bicycle infrastructure along Clayton Road. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the existing conditions on Clayton Road near Big Bend Boulevard. Proposed Conditions Eliminate a travel lane and the paved median in the center of the street to accommodate one-way protected cycle tracks on the north and south sides of the street. The proposed bike lanes will extend from Forest Park in the east to residential land uses west of Big Bend Boulevard. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual rendering of the proposed conditions on Clayton Road near Big Bend Boulevard.

28. Crosswalk at Kingshighway Boulevard and Hospital Drive Existing Conditions The crossing distance at Kingshighway Boulevard and Hospital Drive is approximately 120 feet. There are nine travel lanes, four northbound and five southbound, and an existing landscaped median that does not extend into the pedestrian crossing area. Proposed Conditions Modify the existing landscaped median to include a pedestrian refuge island. This will incorporate a nose that extends past the crosswalk so that the crosswalk cuts through the median. Eliminate one travel lane on the east and west side of Kingshighway Boulevard near Hospital Drive to accommodate curb extensions. Implementation of these features will increase the visibility of pedestrians, reduce the crossing distance, and narrow the roadway to produce a traffic calming effect. Refer to Appendix 1 for a conceptual drawing of the proposed crosswalk enhancements at Kingshighway Boulevard and Hospital Drive.

29. Crosswalk at Tucker Avenue and Chestnut Street Existing Conditions The crossing distance at Tucker Avenue and Chestnut Street is approximately 110 feet. There are eight travel lanes, three northbound and four southbound, parallel parking on the east and west side of the street, and an existing raised median that does not extend into the pedestrian crossing area. Proposed Conditions Modify the existing median to include a pedestrian refuge island. This will incorporate a nose that extends past the crosswalk so that the crosswalk cuts through the median. Eliminate parallel parking on the east and west sides of the street near the intersection to accommodate curb extensions. Implementation of these features will increase the visibility of pedestrians, reduce the crossing distance, and narrow the roadway to produce a traffic calming effect.


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FROM

TO

BIKE LANES EXISTING

PROPOSED

ONE-WAY PROTECTED ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK CYCLE TRACK

EXCLUSIVE BUS LANES

PARKING LANES

TRAVEL LANES

EXISTING

PROPOSED

EXISTING

PROPOSED

EXISTING

PROPOSED

N/A

N/A

2

1

3

1

N/A

YES

0

0

7

5

N/A

YES

2

0

5

3

N/A

YES

2

2

4

4

CHESTNUT STREET

NORTH 11TH STREET

NORTH 7TH STREET

MARKET STREET

SOUTH COMPTON AVENUE

SOUTH 21ST STREET

MARKET STREET

SOUTH 21ST STREET

SOUTH TUCKER BOULEVARD

MARKET STREET

SOUTH TUCKER BOULEVARD

THE GATEWAY ARCH

N/A

CHOUTEAU AVENUE

SOUTH VANDEVENTER AVENUE

SOUTH 4TH STREET

CONVENTIONAL BIKE LANE

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

2

0

3

3

CHOUTEAU AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER AVENUE

N/A

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

2

0

2

2

CLAYTON AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER AVENUE

N/A

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

2

LACLEDE AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY BOULEVARD

EUCLID AVENUE

N/A

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

2

2

2

2

LACLEDE AVENUE

EUCLID AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR AVENUE

N/A

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

2

2

2

2

NORTH BOYLE AVENUE

N/A

SHARED BIKE LANE

N/A

N/A

2

2

2

2

LACLEDE AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR

(on one side of the street only)

(on one side of the street only)

N/A

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK (on one side of the street only)

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK (on one side of the street only)


LACLEDE AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY BOULEVARD

EUCLID AVENUE

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

2

2

2

ROADWAY INVENTORY STREET LACLEDE AVENUE

FROM EUCLID AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR TO AVENUE

N/A EXISTING

BIKE LANESTWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK PROPOSED

ONE-WAY PROTECTED ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK CYCLE TRACK NORTH 7TH STREET of the street (on one sideBIKE of the street NORTH BOYLE AVENUE (on one side N/A SHARED LANE

CHESTNUT STREET LACLEDE AVENUE

NORTH 11TH STREET NORTH TAYLOR AVENUE

MARKETAVENUE STREET LACLEDE

SOUTH COMPTON NORTH BOYLE AVENUE AVENUE

SOUTH 21ST STREET MARKET STREET

DR. MARTIN LUTHER MARKET STREET KING DRIVE

NORTH SPRING SOUTH 21ST STREET AVENUE

SOUTH TUCKER NORTH VANDEVENTER BOULEVARD AVENUE

only)

only)

N/A

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

ONE-WAY PROTECTED ONE-WAY CYCLEPROTECTED TRACK CYCLE (on one side TRACK of the street

EXCLUSIVE BUS LANES

PARKING LANES

TRAVEL LANES

N/A EXISTING

N/A PROPOSED

2 EXISTING

2 PROPOSED

2 EXISTING

2 PROPOSED

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

2 2

1 2

3 2

1 2

N/A

YES N/A

02

02

72

52

N/A

YES N/A

20

0

45

23

N/A

YES N/A

20

02

45

43

only)

NORTH GRAND MARKET STREET BOULEVARD

TUCKER DR.SOUTH MARTIN LUTHER BOULEVARD KING DRIVE

NATURAL BRIDGE THE GATEWAY ARCH AVENUE

N/A

ONE-WAY PROTECTED ONE-WAY CYCLEPROTECTED TRACK CYCLE (on one side TRACK of the street only)

CHOUTEAU SOUTH 39THAVENUE STREET

SOUTH VANDEVENTER CHOUTEAU AVENUE AVENUE

SOUTH 4THAVENUE STREET MAGNOLIA

CONVENTIONAL BIKE N/A LANE

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

2

0

23

23

TOWER GROVE CHOUTEAU AVENUE AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY MAGNOLIA AVENUE BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER AVENUE

N/A

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

02

0

2

2

CLAYTON AVENUE TUCKER AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY CHESTNUT STREET BOULEVARD

SOUTH/VANDEVENTER UNION PACIFIC / TRRA /AVENUE METRO

N/A

TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A NO

02

01

27

27

SOUTH VANDEVENTER LACLEDE AVENUE AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY CHOUTEAU AVENUE BOULEVARD

EUCLID AVENUE LACLEDE AVENUE

N/A

TWO-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

02

20

42

2

NORTH VANDEVENTER LACLEDE AVENUE AVENUE

EUCLID AVENUE LACLEDE AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR NATURAL BRIDGE AVENUE

N/A

TWO-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

02

02

42

2

NATURAL BRIDGE LACLEDE AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR GRAND

NORTH BOYLE AVENUE VANDEVENTER AVENUE

N/A

ONE-WAY PROTECTED SHARED BIKE LANE

N/A

N/A

2

21

52

52


SOUTH VANDEVENTER AVENUE

CHOUTEAU AVENUE

NORTHSTREET VANDEVENTER AVENUE

FROM LACLEDE AVENUE

CHESTNUT STREET NATURAL BRIDGE AVENUE

LACLEDE AVENUE

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

2

ROADWAY INVENTORY

NATURAL TOBRIDGE AVENUE

N/A EXISTING

BIKE LANES

ONE-WAY PROTECTED PROPOSED CYCLE TRACK

ONE-WAY PROTECTED ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK CYCLE TRACK NORTH 11TH STREET NORTH 7TH STREET NORTH GRAND (on one side of the street ONE-WAY (on one sidePROTECTED of the street N/A VANDEVENTER AVENUE BOULEVARD CYCLE TRACK only) only)

EXCLUSIVE BUS LANES

PARKING LANES

TRAVEL LANES

N/A EXISTING

N/A PROPOSED

0 EXISTING

0 PROPOSED

4 EXISTING

2 PROPOSED

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

2 2

1 1

3 5

1 5

N/A N/A

YES N/A

02

01

72

52

N/A N/A

YES N/A

22

00

25

32

N/A N/A

YES N/A

22

22

42

24

SOUTH COMPTON MERAMEC STREET AVENUE

UNION / PACIFIC / TRRA SOUTH 21ST STREET / METRO

NORTH NEWSTEAD MARKET STREET AVENUE

WEST FLORISSANT SOUTH 21ST STREET AVENUE

SOUTH TUCKER ST. LOUIS AVE BOULEVARD

NORTH NEWSTEAD MARKET STREET AVENUE

SOUTH TUCKER ST. LOUIS AVE BOULEVARD

THE GATEWAY ARCH LACLEDE AVENUE

N/A N/A

WEST FLORISSANT CHOUTEAU AVENUE AVENUE

SOUTH VANDEVENTER EAST PRAIRIE AVENUE AVENUE

SOUTH 4TH STREET WARNE AVENUE

CONVENTIONAL BIKE SHARED BIKE LANE LANE

ONE-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

22

02

32

32

WEST FLORISSANT CHOUTEAU AVENUE AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY WARNE AVENUE BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER POPE AVENUE AVENUE

CONVENTIONAL BIKE N/A LANE

ONE-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

22

02

23

23

NORTH SPRING CLAYTON AVENUE AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY LINDELL BOULEVARD BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER PAGEAVENUE BOULEVARD

N/A N/A

TWO-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

02

02

24

22

LACLEDEBOULEVARD AVENUE FORSYTH

KINGSHIGHWAY NORTH SKINKER BOULEVARD BOULEVARD

AVENUE BIGEUCLID BEND BOULEVARD

TWO-WAY N/A CYCLE TRACK

TWO-WAY TWO-WAY CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

21

21

24

24

LACLEDEBOULEVARD AVENUE WYDOWN

NORTH EUCLID SKINKER AVENUE BOULEVARD

NORTH TAYLOR BIG BEND BOULEVARD AVENUE

CONVENTIONAL BIKE N/A LANE

TWO-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

22

22

22

22

TWO-WAY N/A CYCLE

TWO-WAY SHARED BIKECYCLE LANE

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

20

20

25

25

SOUTH COMPTON MARKET STREET AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR AVENUE NORTH BOYLE AVENUE BIGLACLEDE BEND BOULEVARD FORSYTH BOULEVARD WYDOWN BOULEVARD

N/A N/A

SHAREDN/A BIKE LANE

TWO-WAY CYCLE CONVENTIONAL BIKE TRACK LANE ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLEPROTECTED TRACK ONE-WAY

(on one side TRACK of the street CYCLE only)

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLEPROTECTED TRACK ONE-WAY

(on one side TRACK of the street CYCLE only)


NORTH SPRING AVENUE

LINDELL BOULEVARD

STREET FORSYTH BOULEVARD

NORTH SKINKER FROM BOULEVARD

PAGE BOULEVARD

N/A

N/A

2

2

4

2

ROADWAY INVENTORY

CHESTNUT STREET NORTH 11TH STREET NORTH SKINKER WYDOWN BOULEVARD BOULEVARD

BIG BENDTO BOULEVARD

STREET SOUTH 21ST STREET BIGMARKET BEND BOULEVARD WYDOWN BOULEVARD

SOUTH TUCKER MARKET STREET BOULEVARD

SOUTH/VANDEVENTER PACIFIC / TRRA SOUTH LEONOR K. UNION CHOUTEAU AVENUE AVENUE / METRO SULLIVAN BOULEVARD

BIKE LANESTWO-WAY

TWO-WAY EXISTING CYCLE TRACK

PROPOSED CYCLE TRACK

ONE-WAY PROTECTED ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK CYCLE TRACK NORTH 7TH STREET CONVENTIONAL BIKE ONE-WAY (on one side of the street (on one sidePROTECTED of the street BIG BEND BOULEVARD LANE CYCLE TRACK only) only)

SOUTH COMPTON STREET SOUTH 21ST STREET BIGMARKET BEND BOULEVARD FORSYTH BOULEVARD WYDOWN BOULEVARD AVENUE

MARKET STREET SOUTH 21ST STREET

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE TRACK

N/A

SOUTH TUCKER CLAYTON ROAD BOULEVARD

TWO-WAY N/A CYCLE TRACK

N/A N/A

TWO-WAY TWO-WAY CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLEPROTECTED TRACK ONE-WAY

(on one side TRACK of the street CYCLE only)

ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLEPROTECTED TRACK ONE-WAY

EXCLUSIVE BUS LANES

PARKING LANES

TRAVEL LANES

N/A EXISTING

N/A PROPOSED

1 EXISTING

1 PROPOSED

4 EXISTING

4 PROPOSED

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

2 2

1 2

3 2

1 2

N/A N/A

YES N/A

00

00

75

55

N/A N/A

YES N/A

20

00

55

33

N/A N/A

YES N/A

22

12

24

24

UNION / PACIFIC ARCH / TRRA THE GATEWAY / METRO

N/A N/A

SOUTH 4THSTREET STREET MARKET

CONVENTIONAL BIKE TWO-WAY CYCLE LANE TRACK

ONE-WAY PROTECTED TWO-WAY CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

20

00

32

32

(on one side TRACK of the street CYCLE only)

CHOUTEAU CLAYTON AVENUE ROAD

KINGSHIGHWAY SOUTH SKINKER BOULEVARD BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER BIG BEND BOULEVARD AVENUE

N/A N/A

ONE-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

21

10

62

52

CLAYTON AVENUE WASHINGTON AVENUE

KINGSHIGHWAY NORTH TUCKER BOULEVARD BOULEVARD

SOUTH VANDEVENTER NORTH 4TH STREET AVENUE

SHAREDN/A BIKE LANES

TWO-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

00

00

24

22

LACLEDE AVENUE MERAMEC STREET

KINGSHIGHWAY SOUTH COMPTON BOULEVARD AVENUE

EUCLID AVENUE GUSTINE AVENUE

SHAREDN/A BIKE LANES

TWO-WAY ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE CYCLE TRACK TRACK

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

22

20

22

22

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

Notes

TWO-WAY TAYLOR 1. ONE-WAY PROTECTED CYCLE located onNORTH both sides of the street unless LACLEDE AVENUE N/A noted otherwise. N/A N/A EUCLIDTRACK AVENUE CYCLE TRACK 2.Parking Lane and Travel Lane quantities in both theAVENUE Existing and Proposed Situations are approximations, and vary along the selected roadway segments.

LACLEDE AVENUE

NORTH TAYLOR

NORTH BOYLE AVENUE

N/A

SHARED BIKE LANE

N/A

N/A


Chestnut Street

Chestnut Street

Near the Gateway Mall

Near the Gateway Mall

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

Jogging Path

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Clayton Avenue

Clayton Avenue

Near Forest Park Existing Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Near Forest Park Proposed Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


Chouteau Avenue

Chouteau Avenue

Near Vandeventer Avenue

Near Vandeventer Avenue

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Laclede Avenue

Laclede Avenue

Near Euclid Avenue

Near Euclid Avenue

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P


Market Street

Market Street

Near Gateway Mall and 21st Street

Near Gateway Mall

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

West Florissant Avenue

West Florissant Avenue

Near East Alice Avenue

Near East Alice Avenue

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

PP


Dr. Martin Luther King Drive Near East Prairie Avenue Existing Conditions

Dr. Martin Luther King Drive Near East Prairie Avenue Proposed Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

North Grand Boulevard

North Grand Boulevard

Near Cass Avenue Existing Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Near Cass Avenue Proposed Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


North Newstead Avenue Near St. Louis Avenue Existing Conditions

North Newstead Avenue Near St. Louis Avenue Proposed Conditions

P

P

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

South 39th Street

South 39th Street

Near Chouteau Avenue

Near Chouteau Avenue

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


North Spring Avenue

North Spring Avenue

Near Page Boulevard

Near Page Boulevard

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

P

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Tower Grove Avenue

Tower Grove Avenue

North of South Vandeventer Avenue Existing Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

P

North of South Vandeventer Avenue Proposed Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


Tucker Avenue

Tucker Avenue

Near Chestnut Street

Near Chestnut Street

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

North Vandeventer Avenue

North Vandeventer Avenue

Near St. Louis Avenue Existing Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Near St. Louis Avenue Proposed Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


South Vandeventer Avenue Near Chouteau Avenue Existing Conditions

South Vandeventer Avenue Near Chouteau Avenue Proposed Conditions

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Natural Bridge Avenue

Natural Bridge Avenue

Near Beaumont High School

Near Beaumont High School

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


South Compton Avenue Near Meramec Street Existing Conditions

South Compton Avenue Near Meramec Street Proposed Conditions

P

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Big Bend Boulevard

Big Bend Boulevard

Near Wydown Boulevard

Near Wydown Boulevard

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


Wydown Boulevard

Wydown Boulevard

Near University Lane

Near University Lane

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

South 21st Street

South 21st Street

Near Market Street

Near Market Street

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


Clayton Road

Clayton Road

Near Big Bend Boulevard

Near Big Bend Boulevard

Existing Conditions

Proposed Conditions

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/

P

P

Note: Sketches were produced with Streetmix Online Tool https://streetmix.net/


Downtown Park Extension - Full Roadway Closures Figure x : Downtown Park Extension - Potential Locations for Street Full Closures

CONCEPTUAL DRAFT

March 23, 2018

1:7,062 0

0.07

0

0.13

0.15 0.25

0.3 mi 0.5 km

Esri, HERE, Garmin, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community, Source: Esri, DigitalGlobe, GeoEye, Earthstar Geographics, CNES/Airbus DS, USDA, USGS, AeroGRID, IGN, and the GIS User Community

Map intended for conversation purposes only. Langan Engineering and Environmental Services, Inc.


Figure x : Downtown Park Extension - Street Full Closures

CONCEPTUAL DRAFT


Curb Extension Pedestrian Refuge Island

Crosswalk Enhancement (i.e. raised crossings, textured crosswalks, brick crosswalk)

Figure x: Kingshighway Boulevard: Proposed Curb and Crosswalk Enhancements


Pedestrian Refuge Island

12 ft

Figure x: Kingshighway Boulevard: Proposed Crosswalk Enhancement


Figure x : Proposed Traffic Calming Measures at Tucker Boulevard and Market Street

Legend : Cobblestone Crosswalk Neckdown


Legend: Proposed 4' Raingarden Proposed 8' Cycle Track Proposed 12' Cycle Track

Laclede Avenue: Proposed Cycle Track and Intersection with Kingshighway Boulevard

CONCEPTUAL DRAFT


Phase 1

Conceptual Intersection 1: Eastbound and Westbound Left-Turns proceed.

Intersection 2: Northbound and Southbound Approaches proceed.

2

1

Legend Active Movements Inactive Movements


Phase 2

Conceptual Intersection 1: Eastbound and Westbound Approaches proceed.

Intersection 2: Northbound and Southbound Approaches proceed.

2

1

Legend Active Movements Inactive Movements


Phase 3

Conceptual Intersection 1: Eastbound and Westbound Through Bicycle Movements proceed. Intersection 2: Northbound and Southbound Approaches proceed.

2

1

Legend Active Movements Inactive Movements


Phase 4A - Lead Phase

Conceptual

Intersection 1: Northbound Approach proceeds.

Intersection 2: Eastbound Approach proceeds.

1

2

Legend Active Movements Inactive Movements


Phase 4B

Conceptual Intersection 1: Northbound and Southbound Approaches proceed.

Intersection 2: Eastbound and Westbound Approaches proceed.

2

1

Legend Active Movements Inactive Movements


Phase 4C - Lag Phase

Conceptual

Intersection 1: Southbound Approach proceeds.

Intersection 2: Westbound Approach proceeds.

2

1

Legend Active Movements Inactive Movements


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CITY TRANSPORTATION OFFICIALS

NACTO URBAN BIKEWAY DESIGN GUIDE

The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) is an association of North American cities and transit agencies of which St. Louis is an Affiliate Member. Its mission is to advocate for and develop guidelines for building “cities as places for people, with safe, sustainable, accessible and equitable transportation choices that support a strong economy and vibrant quality of life.”

Conventional Bike Lanes

NACTO’s Urban Bikeway Design Guide and Urban Street Design Guide were consulted in developing items in the report. Select definitions are provided here for reference.

Buffered Bike Lanes

Bike lanes designate an exclusive space for bicyclists through the use of pavement markings and signage. The bike lane is located adjacent to motor vehicle travel lanes and flows in the same direction as motor vehicle traffic. Bike lanes are typically on the right side of the street, between the adjacent travel lane and curb, road edge, or parking lane.

Buffered bike lanes are conventional bicycle lanes paired with a designated buffer space separating the bicycle lane from the adjacent motor vehicle travel lane and/or parking lane. A buffered bike lane is allowed as per MUTCD guidelines for buffered preferential lanes (section 3D-01).

One-way Protected Cycle Track

One-way protected cycle tracks are bikeways that are at street level and use a variety of methods for physical protection from passing traffic. A one-way protected cycle track may be combined with a parking lane or other barrier between the cycle track and the motor vehicle travel lane.

Two-Way Cycle Track

Two-way cycle tracks are physically separated cycle tracks that allow bicycle movement in both directions on one side of the road. Two-way cycle tracks share some of the same design characteristics as one-way tracks, but may require additional considerations at driveway and side-street crossings. A twoway cycle track may be configured as a protected cycle track—

NACTO URBAN STREET DESIGN GUIDE at street level with a parking lane or other barrier between the cycle track and the motor vehicle travel lane —and/or as a raised cycle track to provide vertical separation from the adjacent motor vehicle lane.

Shared Lane Markings

Shared Lane Markings (SLMs), or “sharrows,” are road markings used to indicate a shared lane environment for bicycles and automobiles. Among other benefits shared lane markings reinforce the legitimacy of bicycle traffic on the street, recommend proper bicyclist positioning, and may be configured to offer directional and wayfinding guidance. The shared lane marking is a pavement marking with a variety of uses to support a complete bikeway network; it is not a facility type and should not be considered a substitute for bike lanes, cycle tracks, or other separation treatments where these types of facilities are otherwise warranted or space permits. The MUTCD outlines guidance for shared lane markings in section 9C.07.

Parklets

Parklets are public seating platforms that convert curbside parking spaces into vibrant community spaces. Also known as street seats or curbside seating, parklets are the product of a partnership between the city and local businesses, residents, or neighborhood associations. Most parklets have a distinctive design that incorporates seating, greenery, and/or bike racks and accommodate unmet demand for public space on thriving neighborhood retail streets or commercial areas.

Interim Public Plazas

Interim public plazas transform underutilized areas of roadway into public spaces for surrounding residents and businesses. Using low-cost materials, such as epoxied gravel, movable planters, and flexible seating, interim public plazas reconfigure and revitalize intersections that might otherwise be unsafe or underutilized.


REFERENCE STANDARDS NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide Conventional Bike Lanes Bike lanes designate an exclusive space for bicyclists through the use of pavement markings and signage. The bike lane is located adjacent to motor vehicle travel lanes and flows in the same direction as motor vehicle traffic. Bike lanes are typically on the right side of the street, between the adjacent travel lane and curb, road edge, or parking lane. Desired width adjacent to curb face: 6’ Desired minimum width adjacent to street edge: 3’

Buffered Bike Lanes Buffered bike lanes are conventional bicycle lanes paired with a designated buffer space separating the bicycle lane from the adjacent motor vehicle travel lane and/or parking lane. A buffered bike lane is allowed as per MUTCD guidelines for buffered preferential lanes (section 3D-01).

Desired minimum width next to street parking: 5’ Buffer area interior diagonal cross hatching, desired minimum: 3’ One-way Protected Cycle Track One-way protected cycle tracks are bikeways that are at street level and use a variety of methods for physical protection from passing traffic. A one-way protected cycle track may be combined with a parking lane or other barrier between the cycle track and the motor vehicle travel lane.

Desired minimum track width: 5’ Desired minimum buffer width: 3’ Two-Way Cycle Track Two-way cycle tracks are physically separated cycle tracks that allow bicycle movement in both directions on one side of the road. Two-way cycle tracks share some of the same design characteristics as one-way tracks, but may require additional considerations at driveway and sidestreet crossings. A two-way cycle track may be configured as a protected cycle track—at street level with a parking lane or other barrier between the cycle track and the motor vehicle travel lane —and/or as a raised cycle track to provide vertical separation from the adjacent motor vehicle lane. Desired minimum track width: 8’ Desired minimum buffer width: 3’

NACTO Urban Street Design Guide Parklets Parklets are public seating platforms that convert curbside parking spaces into vibrant community spaces. Also known as street seats or curbside seating, parklets are the product of a partnership between the city and local businesses, residents, or neighborhood associations. Most parklets have a distinctive design that incorporates seating, greenery, and/or bike racks and accommodate unmet demand for public space on thriving neighborhood retail streets or commercial areas. Interim Public Plazas Interim public plazas transform underutilized areas of roadway into public spaces for surrounding residents and businesses. Using low-cost materials, such as epoxied gravel, movable planters, and flexible seating, interim public plazas reconfigure and revitalize intersections that might otherwise be unsafe or underutilized.


APPENDIX 02

S T R U C T U R A L A N A LY S I S


MACARTHUR BRIDGE PARTIAL PLAN BRIDGE DECK FRAMING

New pedestrian/bicycle deck

Center line

PARTIAL PLAN BRIDGE DECK FRAMING 1 = Existing main floor girders 2 = New “spandrel” girders 3 = New intermediate floor girders Note: Framing is mirrored about truss center line The MacArthur Bridge functions as a primary rail link across the Mississippi River and continues to be used for freight rail. While the rail level is still utilized, the original vehicular traffic deck was removed, and we seek to re-establish that deck as a continuation of the +StL Greenway. The existing “Pennsylvania” trusses are adequate to support a re-constructed second deck, and our proposal seeks to re-build this deck in a manner very similar to the original deck construction, while taking advantage of advances in construction technology over the last century. Original primary girders spanning between the main bridge trusses remain in place. These would be repaired as necessary and new steel plate girders would be installed as “spandrel girders” spanning between these existing primary girders. Secondary girders located halfway between each of the primary girders would span between the new spandrel

girders, thus re-constituting the original primary structural framing for the vehicular bridge deck – i.e. an alternating rhythm of girders at 15’-0” on center consisting of existing primary girders (spanning between the existing truss verticals) and new secondary girders (spanning between new spandrel girders). This is outlined in the included plan view, which indicates this primary framing for one half pf the deck at one of the three main spans.


Roadway base & paving W12/W14 beams and deck could be replaced with precast conc. doubletees + topping

4” N.W. conc. on 2” deck (total slab thickness = 6”)

Main

“Spandrel girders” 60” to 63” deep

Intermediate

51.5” deep plate girder Main floor girder (at truss verticals)

Existing truss

The “secondary” structure for the deck would be comprised of new steel I-beams spanning parallel to the trusses between each of the primary/secondary girders defined above. These beams would be composite – i.e. fitted with headed studs on their top flanges so that they act compositely with the concrete deck – and span approximately 15’-0” while spaced at approximately 5’-0” centers. This closely mimics the original construction of the vehicular deck. Finally, the bridge deck would consist of a concrete-on-metal slab spanning between steel I-beams. Conventional roadway base and paving could be applied to the topside of the deck. This system could easily provide adequate capacity to support pedestrian and bicycle access as well as vehicular access for the occasional maintenance vehicle or emergency vehicle as necessary.

Intermediate floor girder (between truss verts)

Optional bracket if vehicular traffic is re-established at upper platform (occur only at intermediate girders)


BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN CROSSING SYSTEMS

For the numerous pedestrian and bicycle bridges proposed for the Greenway, we are proposing a uniform and well-known technology to span over freeways and other roadways. We are specifying precast, prestressed concrete beams supporting solid precast concrete plank decks with a non-structural topping followed by paving. The beams will serve doubleduty as primary structure as well as guardrails for the bridges. The advantages of this system are that it is a well-known technology employed by transportation departments around the country, including MoDOT. Concrete is a durable material that is ideally suited for exterior exposure while necessitating minimal maintenance. Higher strength concrete mixes as well as prestressing helps to achieve significant span to weight ratios, and precasting elements help to maximize the quality of the concrete work under ideal conditions in the plant. For these reasons we are proposing a precast concrete system for all of the pedestrian/bicycle bridges. We believe this will provide a consistency of design and appearance for all the bridges in the Greenway. We have not addressed foundations for the bridges in our descriptions or diagrams. Obviously site-specific subsurface studies by a geotechnical engineer will be required to determine the most appropriate foundation systems, which may vary from site to site. Given the geology of the region and the modest column loads for all these bridges, we believe that in most cases conventional, shallow spread footing will suffice. Site specific conditions as well as constructability/

phasing issues may necessitate other foundation types, such as mini-piles. Obviously, some cost allowance should be made for foundations for each of these bridges. Until site-specific subsurface explorations can be performed, at this time we believe it is reasonable to assume spread footing at each of the columns indicated in these diagrams.

Counterclockwise from top left: Kingshighway Bridge Chouteau - Clayton Connector Spring Street Bridge


CHILDREN’S PLACE BICYCLE BRIDGE SPAN RANGE 80–110 FT

8” PRECAST PLANKS WITH 2” TOPPING AND WEARING SURFACE

5’-0” PRE-STRESSED PRECAST GIRDER AASHTO TYPE IV - F’c=8ksi, 24 0.6” STRAND REINF.

3’-0” DEEP PRE-STRESSED PRECAST GIRDERS

20” DIA. PRECAST COLUMN

The pedestrian/bicycle bridge across King’s Highway at Children’s place will be constructed as indicated above. The width of the pathway at the bridge is quite reasonable and easily achieved using the “template” system of precast elements. In order to maintain reasonable spans, an intermediate column is required in the median of Kings Highway, and the elevator towers on each end will double as structural supports for the bridge. We believe these elevator towers could also be constructed of precast concrete frames, maintaining a consistency of material language as well as minimizing the number of trades involved in the construction at this site.


21ST STREET BICYCLE BRIDGE SPAN RANGE 80–110 FT

8” PRECAST PLANKS WITH 2” TOPPING AND WEARING SURFACE UTILIZE EXISTING ENTRANCE RAMP

5’-0” PRE-STRESSED PRECAST GIRDER AASHTO TYPE IV - F’c=8ksi, 24 0.6” STRAND REINF.

EXISTING RAMP TO BE DEMOLISHED

3’-0” DEEP PRE-STRESSED PRECAST GIRDERS SPAN OVER EXISTING RAIL TRACKS

20” DIA. PRECAST COLUMN

The 21st Street bridge would connect 21st Street across Interstate 64 and the railroad tracks to the south. The bridge would take off from a point on the existing entrance ramp for eastbound I64 after the ramp has crossed the Interstate. The new construction would start where this existing entrance ramp passes over the exit ramp for the eastbound lanes of I64. Construction after that point would follow the precast template described above. Support columns would be spaced to limit spans to approximately 80 to 110 feet. As such columns will need to be threaded in between some of the tracks in the rail yards.


FOREST PARK BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE SPAN RANGE 100–130 FT

7’-0” PRESTRESSED PRECAST GIRDER AASHTO TYPE IV - F’c=8ksi, 48 0.6” STRAND REINF.

16” THICK PRECAST WALL WITH CORBEL

8” PRECAST PLANKS WITH 2” TOPPING AND WEARING SURFACE

SPAN OVER I-64

PRECAST PLANTER BOX UNDERPASS

1’-6” DEEP PRESTRESSED PRECAST INFILL GIRDERS AT 12FT O.C.

The large bridge across South Kings Highway and leading to the proposed entrance to Forest Park will support pedestrians, bike paths and shallow planting pits for small plants and shrubs. Whereas other bridges noted here range in width between about six and eight feet, the deck at the Forest Park Bridge will be about 16 to 20 feet wide. This added width combined with the added weight from the planter boxes necessitates a more robust structure that the typical pedestrian bridges. However, the systems remain the same – only the sizing of the elements varies. The added depth required to accommodate the planter boxes allows the girders to become deeper (7’-0” as opposed to the typical 5’-0”). In addition, 18” deep precast concrete infill beams spaced at 12’-0” centers will support the precast concrete planter boxes. Given the added width of the deck, the typical single-column support must be modified to a wall (shown) or frame (not

shown) to provide added lateral stability to the supports. An intermediate support will be required in the median of South Kings Highway to maintain reasonable spans, which are in the range of 100 to 130 feet. The underpass North Kings Highway that will act as an entrance to Forest Park will be a cast-in-place concrete tunnel constructed utilizing the cut-an-cover method. Concrete abutments on each side of the underpass will support the concrete roadway deck above. We are proposing precast concrete girders and a precast concrete deck, similar to – though more robust given the span and vehicular loading – the pedestrian and bike bridges proposed elsewhere.


SPRING AVENUE BICYCLE BRIDGE SPAN RANGE 80–110 FT

8” PRECAST PLANKS WITH 2” TOPPING AND WEARING SURFACE

5’-0” PRE-STRESSED PRECAST GIRDER AASHTO TYPE IV - F’c=8ksi, 24 0.6” STRAND REINF.

UNDER EXISTING ELEVATED HIGHWAY

3’-0” DEEP PRE-STRESSED PRECAST GIRDERS

OVER EXISTING RAIL TRACKS

20” DIA. PRECAST COLUMN

Like the 21st Street bridge, the Spring Ave. bridge must reconnect Spring Avenue across the I64 corridor and the railroad tracks immediate south of the Interstate. The bridge will take off from Spring Ave. immediately north of the Interstate and must remain elevated to clear the roadway below while also remaining low enough to stay below the Interstate above. Once south of the Interstate, the bridge will remain elevated over the surface street below and then bridge over the railroad tracks. The system will be identical to the precast template described above with spans in the range of 80 to 110 feet.


SKINKER UNDERPASS

UNDERPASS

The underpass below North Skinker Boulevard will be a castin-place concrete tunnel constructed utilizing the cut-ancover method. The approach ramps from the sidewalks down to the tunnel level will require conventional CIP concrete cantilevered retaining walls on each side. The retaining walls will be approximately 18” thick with a 8’-0” to 9’-0” wide by 16” thick footing (assuming a 5’-6” to 6’-6” heel). The retaining walls will continue through the tunnel and serve as bearing walls for supporting the street deck above. We recommend supporting the street deck with a series of precast, prestressed concrete beams spanning over the tunnel and supporting a deck of precast concrete plank.


APPENDIX 03

H Y D R O L O G Y, E C O L O G Y & E N V I R O N M E N T A L D E S I G N


HYDROLOGY

URBAN PRAIRIE AND WETLAND A prairie and wetland is located at the base of the local watershed on the site of a former parking lot and between the MetroLink and Amtrak alignments. The large, lowlying landscape relieves loading on nearby storm-water infrastructure and offsets surges from adjacent event parking areas by diverting water into a series of interconnected basins. The tall grass prairie habitat supports local floral and faunal biodiversity and provides appropriate habitat for migrating birds. This biologically productive site anchors the southern end of the greenway and provides opportunities for environmental education, bird, frog, and bat watching, short nature hikes and prairie picnics--unique recreational programs for emerging Ballpark and Chouteau’s Landing neighborhoods.

INTEGRATED APPROACH TO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

The St. Louis Development Corporation’s Project Connect Action Plan, released in 2017, contained a stormwater management analysis that discussed three approaches to stormwater management: local, regional, and integrated. Of these three, the integrated approach is the preferred method and forms the basis of our team’s approach to stormwater management throughout the +StL Greenway. Natural hydrologic systems take shape and function in response to local conditions. As conditions are disturbed, through development or otherwise, hydrologic systems also change, introducing new possibilities of erosion, deposition, and flooding. The task of the hydrologist is to find ways to imitate the behavior of natural systems with respect to water quality, groundwater recharge and in-stream flow rates, but within a limited footprint and with a degree of stability and predictability that reduce the risk of wet-weather harm to life and property. Similarly, natural systems are intimately connected and interdependent, providing a high degree of internal flexibility and resilience, and minimizing rapid changes in microclimates, which places stress on the organisms that inhabit them. Constructed systems best operate when features are integrated and interconnected. While this makes performance modeling more difficult, networked systems, along with adaptive management practices, perform better than isolated systems from both water quality and quantity perspectives, and behave more predictably in the long term. In urban retrofit scenarios, green infrastructure designers are opportunists. Limited space and competing interests make it a challenge to incorporate new land uses into the developed landscape. Designers are further constrained by gravity, making low-lying areas more valued locations for water management practices.

The sea of asphalt parking lots in otherwise underutilized land.

In an integrated system, runoff from upstream sources needs to reach the management zones by gravity alone and without causing harm along the way. In order to limit peak flows between source and sink, we employ methods of attenuation, assuring that water captured upstream is released at a controlled rate over an extended period of time. Each of these

strategies – capture, conveyance, and management - will be sized to fully manage the design storm and to safely overflow during peak events. Since no system, natural or constructed, is capable of efficiently managing the most extreme storms, the design goal is to experience speedy recoveries with minimal intervention and cleanup. Networking GI systems also enhances the recovery process, creating added resilience throughout. An integrated approach requires site-specific design, sizing and connection, but also suggests a planning approach that considers the broad range of amenities that green systems provide, and integrates opportunities to meet the needs of communities and individuals. Successful parks/open spaces provide resources that complement the diverse priorities of stakeholders and invite new cultural connections between communities. “Integrated” implies that each of these values and all secondary benefit streams play a role in the design process with minimal disturbance to existing infrastructure and land uses. Our team’s goal is to convert parking lots into wetlands, highway pilings into green pillars, streets into greenways, and rooftops into meadows, with the goal of keeping stormwater out of combined sewers. We have identified multiple opportunities for capture, conveyance and retention, throughout the Greenway, ranging from large scale detention ponds surrounded by treatment wetlands to modestly altering existing infrastructure for beneficial reuse. In 2012, MSD agreed to a Consent Decree requiring that $4.7 billion dollars be spent over the following 23 years on reducing the volume and number of combined sewer overflows. To accomplish this task, MSD introduced Project Clear, which aims to improve water quality, address service issues within the sewer system, and make information and data available to the public in the course of implementing system improvements, repairs and disconnections. MSD and Project Clear have designated $100 million for “rainscaping” practices, which will “redirect stormwater from reaching the combined sewer system by capturing and diverting it to locations where it is detained, infiltrated into the ground, evaporated, taken up by

plants, or reused” (2017 Rainscaping Application). Our team’s proposals for interventions along the +StLGreenway may represent the most ambitious single rainscaping effort in the region, and has the potential to provide a host of secondary amenities that will enrich Saint Louis’ cultural and natural environment. As funds from Project Clear or other sources are allocated to this project, our team will work diligently with MSD to assure that every dollar generates the maximum possible benefit, both with respect to stormwater capture and amenities. While the primary benefit stream from investments in green infrastructure is measured in gallons of overflow mitigated, assessing performance by this measure alone would be narrow-sighted. Overall performance criteria from green investments can be quantified by numerous metrics. Tangible benefits include air quality improvements; habitat offerings; recreational and educational resources, workforce development and job creation and increased property values. The value increase in properties in close proximity to parks or other green resources has also been well documented. Madison and Kovari demonstrate that, when all other circumstances and project costs are normalized, new developments that include green stormwater management features experience annual property value increases two to three times higher than controls. For most of the developments studied, “the model indicates the GI improvements had a strong positive impact on the surrounding properties. Under these circumstances (with no additional infrastructure and no TIF), the GI could be considered a tool for neighborhood improvement” (pg 52 https://www4.uwm.edu/ced/publications/MMSD_ GreenInfrastructure_Final.pdf).


STORMWATER MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Intercept

“speed dip” that also helps in traffic calming. Other options include trench drains and shallow subsurface pipes.

Rain drops reach surfaces in a relatively uniform distribution, and proceed to travel down-gradient until they infiltrate, evaporate or become caught on surfaces or in depressions. Our first stormwater management strategy is to identify locations where a sizeable but manageable flow is sufficiently concentrated to allow for interception of stormwater before it enters the combined sewer system. Examples of this have been identified in our stormwater management strategies diagram, and include intercepting stormwater from catch basins (surface), existing stormwater pipes (subsurface), and roof gutters or underpass downspouts (elevated surface). Our team studied the +StL Greenway topography and existing sewer infrastructure to identify ideal locations for intercepting stormwater. The “low hanging fruit” are existing area inlets or catch basins that manage stormwater from large paved areas, such as parking lots found throughout the central corridor. In these instances stormwater can be intercepted before it reaches the drain and can be conveyed to a downstream stormwater management feature or managed on-site. One example is converting a portion of paved area into a planted area and creating a “living drain” - where runoff fills a planted depression before rising and overflowing through an inlet grate. Some sources of runoff have greater management potential than others. Elevated surfaces, such as elevated roadways or rooftops, offer an opportunity to use pipes to convey runoff for a considerable distance by providing the “head” needed to drive flows. Runoff from roadways, however, possess heavier contaminant loads (oils, metals, pathogens) and sediment burdens which have to be managed prior to discharge. In such cases, our team proposed features that provide detention as well as water quality benefits. Street bump outs, for example, are planted depressions that provide treatment and settling of solids in stormwater.

A living drainage system

Surface conveyance pathways can also lie within dedicated areas when space permits. Hardscaped channels are effective for moving water at minimal grade, but provide little by way of water quality or habitat benefits. Planted swales require a larger cross-section than hard channels because of added friction, but are highly effective at improving water quality through filtration and nutrient uptake, promoting infiltration and supporting a set of ecosystem benefits.

Rain Gardens

A less common but potentially more cost-effective method for intercepting stormwater is to capture runoff from an existing storm sewer before it reaches the combined sewer system. This is proposed for storm sewers that are directly connected to large impervious areas and are at a local high point, allowing for the pipe to be daylighted downstream. One such example is near Busch stadium, where an existing storm sewer beneath 8th street manages approximately 14 acres, including parking lots, roadways, and sidewalks. Intercepting this storm sewer can potentially remove over 13 million gallons of water from the combined sewer system annually.

Convey If an area is to properly drain, there must be pathways provided to safely convey concentrated flows. Before the prevalence of modern paving equipment, roadways were carefully “crowned” to quickly shed water from the pavement and also create a narrow gutter along the curb to act as a channel. Under this condition, and depending on topography, street gutters can safely convey runoff for several blocks without creating a hazard in the street. In recent decades, however, asphalt milling machines and road pavers have together erased much of the road crown and diminished curb reveals to the degree that no channel is available to provide sufficient conveyance. The results are stranded puddles within the right-of-way as well as increased seepage through cracks in the asphalt causing frost heave or “pumping” and promoting potholes. Systemically, these practices have also prompted more frequent use of street inlets in the interest of keeping roadways dry, which then exacerbates the “flashy” conditions that are the cause of sewer overflows and surcharges. One conveyance strategy our team is proposing is the use an enhanced gutter system or network of street channels that can convey flows to surface management structures or other points of capture. Water can be made to cross intersections by means of a modified warp in the pavement mimicking a

As stormwater networks must remain contiguous, our team will utilize a range of techniques, both green and gray, when retrofitting the developed areas along and around the Greenway. Subsurface pipes can be utilized when alternatives are not available or require too much space. Although we will prioritize green practices in our conveyance approach, most rainscaping in cities requires a hybridized approach.

Manage Green management practices generally rely on retention, infiltration, and evapotranspiration of runoff conveyed to a point of collection, and can be considered at the parcel, neighborhood, or regional scale. When managing smaller areas, such as individual lots along the Greenway, we can utilize rain gardens sized to receive runoff from single parcels or buildings.

required to remove debris and clear inlet grates. Mosquito issues are addressed in two ways: At smaller facilities we assess infiltration rates and/or provide underdrains to limit the time that water is permitted to stand on the surface. Elsewhere, especially where discharge of the open water volume is not feasible, we design diverse aquatic and fringe habitats that support predators to the offending larvae. Where the landscape supports diverse wetland ecosystems or maintains flowing water, mosquito issues are minimized. Nutrient loading is a concern for any stormwater management system. Hard surfaces do nothing to address nutrients, but healthy soil and plant communities aggressively capture and sequester nutrients. In some cases, when nutrient loading is especially heavy, it becomes necessary to periodically harvest some of the accumulated biomass for composting or disposal elsewhere. Wetlands and ponds need to retain water in order to support and sustain living systems, but also need to have additional storage available if they are to manage subsequent rain events. An innovative practice in stormwater management is the use of retention with “smart valve” release. A pond is fitted with a drain normally kept closed by the valve. In advance of predicted rainfall, the smart valve is instructed wirelessly (vendors provide appropriate software) to release water so that an adequate storage volume is available to capture the coming event. When release is to the combined sewer system, it occurs in advance of wet weather and can be managed by the municipal treatment system without causing CSO.

Within the ROW, such as the streets that run north/south through the Greenway, practices can include the use of curb cuts that divert water from the street into bioswales or stormwater treepits, built either within median strips, road verges, or bumpouts. Planted basins provide additional water quality and habitat benefits and, by connecting basins or bioswales into a network, can support some conveyance to lower points in the landscape where additional volumes can be safely managed. Regional retention systems, such as ponds and treatment wetlands, serve as reservoirs within subcatchments. Our team has identified potential sites for such features throughout the Greenway, with the most prominent being just south of Busch Stadium. Water quality is a priority whenever storing water for extended periods of time. Nutrients dissolved in runoff lead to eutrophication, which promotes unsightly algae growth and odor. Water left open and standing for more than 72 hours can become a breeding ground for mosquitoes; and litter and debris can collect causing sedimentation, trash build up, and inlet blockage. Our team will address the trash and debris issue by providing sediment forebays that receive runoff prior to release to the retention facility. Regular maintenance is

The addition of local water collection features


HYDROLOGY

eDesign Dynamics and MVVA designed a state-of-the-art stormwater capture and reuse system, a restored stream corridor, and new water garden for the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens.

Existing stormwater management.

Proposed stormwater management.


Young woodland restored by +STL team

Wetland restored by +STL team

Prairie restored by +STL team


ECOLOGY

INTRODUCTION & ECOLOGICAL APPROACH FEEDBACK LOOPS

INTERACTION & EXPERIENCE

ECOLOGICAL APPROACH

EXPERIENCE

Ecology is the study of the interactions between all living things in an area and their physical environment. The landscape, hydrology, and weather all affect the vegetation and animals that inhabit an area, with many feedback loops between the different parts of the ecosystem.

The native habitats along the +StL Greenway will provide important ecosystem services to the St. Louis area, as described later in this appendix. But the most important benefit will be to enhance the experience of visitors. Public interaction with the habitats and species that will be established can be facilitated through the incorporation of boardwalks and bridges over wetlands and water features, interpretive signs, and locations that optimize activities like birdwatching and outdoor painting. Our vision is for this project to help bring wildlife and nature into the heart of St. Louis, reducing the barriers that keep many residents from being able to enjoy and experience nature.

Our team’s approach is to integrate native ecosystems and a diverse assemblage of native species into the greenway and its associated neighborhoods. By incorporating natural habitats into the essence of the site design, the +StL Greenway has a wonderful opportunity to create landscapes that are ideal for local wildlife, increase urban biodiversity and improve residents’ access and exposure to the region’s ecology and habitats.

In order to have a successful habitat restoration project it is necessary to have the appropriate ecological knowledge.

Similarly, greenways provide a kind of ecological loop between nature and the local community, where people can establish the types of nature that they want to see and nature gives back by providing opportunities to relax, recreate, and observe the wonders of the natural world, both large and intimately small. Additionally, access to natural spaces encourages exercise and active, healthy lifestyles. The +StL Greenway is an excellent opportunity to bring more nature deep into the City, addressing one of the OneSTL regional plan Green Goals: Provide Increased Access to Nature for All Citizens. With native habitats as the foundation of the vegetative design of the greenway, the project will use species that are already well adapted to the local climate and will need less watering and maintenance than exotic cultivars. Additionally, by bringing some of these species back into the city limits, greenway visitors will have a chance to experience some of the habitats that were present in this location before development, ecosystems that are still present in the natural areas not far from the metropolitan area.

As technology advances and becomes increasingly interwoven into our daily lives, it is more and more imperative to ensure that we all have access to nature and the psychological benefits that time outside brings. This is increasingly true the closer one gets to the center of a large urban area where there is typically limited exposure to green space.

By planting a variety of native habitats in different parts of the greenway, visitors will be able to experience aspects of open woodlands, tall grass prairies, streamside marshes, and riparian forests which will provide interesting aesthetic experiences as a result of the vegetation and the animals these habitats will attract. Part of the hydrological design of the greenway will be the restoration of buried storm water pipes into natural waterways. The planting of adjacent wetlands and riparian trees and shrubs will not only provide benefits to the eye, but the interaction between the water and the adjacent soils and plants will provide water quality filtration and flood storage that would be very expensive to replicate using traditional engineering techniques. Travelling along the greenway, the open channel waterways will create a sense of continuity while any of the interconnected water features such as wetlands, pools, and ponds will provide experiential focal points of interest.

With extensive experience studying and classifying native ecosystems in Missouri, Illinois, and Kansas, our team has a thorough expertise of local ecology with a focus on native plant habitats. This knowledge is one of the factors in our success restoring biodiverse native prairies, forests, wetlands and stream channels. Additionally, our engineering knowledge regarding low impact development, green infrastructure, bioengineered stream bank stabilizations, erosion control, low impact development, regenerative stream restoration, and other innovative ecological engineering techniques means that we are able to reconcile the biological functioning of native habitats to the physical realities of the built environment.


ECOLOGICAL LOOPS


ECOLOGY

Blue flag iris in restored wetland

ECOLOGICAL LOOPS & GREAT STREETS ECOLOGY OF THE LOOPS

CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

GREAT STREETS

By fostering interactions among people, the +StL Greenway will strengthen the links between different communities. By bringing more nature into the City it will also create and reinforce the connections between people and nature. For this reason the greenway loops will connect the most important natural areas in St. Louis: Forest Park, the Missouri Botanical Garden and Tower Grove Park, Fairgrounds Park, and the Mississippi River.

The greenway’s layout as a series of ecological loops means that visitors to the greenway will have a wide diversity of options for their visit. They can choose any number of different lengths or paths as they travel from one place to another, or eventually circle back to their original starting point.

The incorporation of the Great Streets concept into our +StL Greenway design will help leverage the east-west benefits provided by the greenway into better north-south connections and will help integrate the greenway into the surrounding communities and infrastructure. Our team’s focus on Great Streets will help connect wonderful civic assets like Tower Grove Park and Fairgrounds Park to the rest of the greenway through such amenities as protected bike paths as well as all of the communities adjacent to the streets associated with this concept.

In addition to improving walking and biking between these great natural amenities in our area, our intention is to have the ecological loops that make up the +StL Greenway be biodiverse and interesting natural destinations in themselves. Just like fully natural ecosystems, it is essential for the habitats planned for the greenway to be integrated with their surroundings and the abiotic aspects of their positions like moisture levels, soil depths, and the amount of shade. The hydrology of each location will have a particularly large impact on the type of habitat planned for each location. Consequently, the site design for hydrology will be closely bound with the plans for vegetation and habitats. Water features are desired for their visual interest and, for this project, for the water quality improvements they will provide. As a result, riverside forests and various wetland habitats will be established along any of the open channels, ponds, or other water-related aspects of the greenway. Shade from trees will be a common feature along the greenway to both provide comfort to visitors and to counter the heat island effect.

The different loops will each have their own character and the neighborhoods, streets, and other surroundings will impress their own signature onto each portion of a loop. For example, some loops will have distinct water features like open channels or wetland storm water basins while others will have greater amounts of prairie plantings, especially vibrant fall foliage, or fruit trees. Similarly, certain loops will have more of a residential street nature while others are situated in industrial areas. As a result, the greenway can provide a wide range of experiences to suit the interests of a diverse community.

Specific to the environmental design of the greenway, the hydrology and ecology of the Great Streets will be enhanced through the installation of rain gardens. One of the benefits of rain gardens is that while at first glance they appear to just be attractive landscaping, they are also important low impact development storm water best management practices. While collecting stormwater from adjacent roads and sidewalks in their depressional shape, rain gardens allow much of the first flush of pollutants to be attached to soils or absorbed by plants, keeping downstream streams and rivers cleaner. Additionally, by delaying the time before the rain water enters the piped storm sewers, more water soaks into the soil which decreases the total amount of storm water that our aging infrastructure has to accommodate. Furthermore, the rain water detention can also reduce the magnitude of downstream flood peaks, returning the local flood flows a little toward their natural state where the peak of flooding took longer to occur and was less severe than in developed conditions.

Our rain garden and green infrastructure designs would ensure that the species planted in these features would have a variety of native species, all of which would be tolerant of the dry conditions that would be present most of the time, but also of the wet and slightly inundated state that would occur during and shortly after each rain event. As a result, maintenance costs will be minimal. Some species that would be featured would include grasses and sedges such as soft rush and little bluestem, of which would have attractive flowers, such as iris, butterfly milkweed, bee balm, coreopsis, and other species attractive to pollinators. Some trees and shrubs are also great choices for rain gardens, such as false shrub indigo, river birch, and ninebark.


Wetland floating island

Sketch of potential green infrastructure at +StL Avenue underpass

Restored waterway surrounded by native plants


Ecology

WORKING LANDSCAPES The habitats and vegetation along the +StL Greenway will enhance the visual experience and provide aesthetic beauty for all visitors. But just under the surface, this designed landscape will also be performing important social and environmental functions. HISTORIC HERITAGE Before European-American settlement, visitors to the +StL Greenway area would have seen prairies and open woodlands along with the Mill Creek waterway. Some of this heritage can be recreated along the project area through the restoration of prairie, woodland, riverside, and wetland areas, allowing visitors to experience glimpses of St. Louis’ past through native plant landscapes, art exhibits, and interpretive signs. This can highlight our identity as a river town through riverbank habitats and exhibits and as the Gateway to the West through aspects that show settlers traveling through prairies. These well-known aspects of St. Louis’ history could be combined with stories about individuals and communities whose significance has been less emphasized and which deserves greater attention. WATER QUALITY While acknowledging and honoring the past, the landscapes of the +StL Greenway will also be examples of innovative 21st-century bioengineering, harnessing the natural abilities of plants, soils, and landforms to provide needed ecological benefits. First among these is water quality. Our hope is that this project would help meet the OneSTL regional plan Green

Goal of Guarantee Clean Water for All Citizens. An important environmental and aesthetic aspect of the +StL Greenway will be the restoration of former storm sewer pipes to attractive open waterways. This will reduce the amount of storm water entering combined sewers and therefore lower the frequency and/or magnitude of combined sewer overflows, which are one of the primary threats to water quality in the area. In addition, our team’s design incorporates many other habitat features that will improve local water quality. First, the plants and soils in rain gardens and bioswales in the neighborhoods and upland portions of the project area will absorb and process a portion of the urban pollutants and runoff that they receive, reducing downstream contamination levels and flooding. Along the edge of any waterways or ponds, wetland fringes will also trap and filter water pollution and detain water which will reduce peak flood flows. Sometimes compared to coral reefs and rain forests because of their ecological value, wetlands are incredibly important landscape features because of the biodiversity, habitat productivity, and water quality benefits that they provide. Specific to water quality, the unique properties of wetland soils and plants is what earns wetlands their reputation as the kidneys of the landscape. The depletion of oxygen in wetland soils causes the dominant soil microorganisms to be those that use nitrogen and other elements in their cellular metabolism in the same manner that humans use oxygen.

As a result, when excess nitrogen and phosphorus from chemical fertilizers come into contact with wetland soils the microbes naturally metabolize the nitrogen, and the phosphorus becomes attached to elements in the soil. The lack of oxygen in wetland soils also slows the decomposition of organic matter. Consequently, the increased amount of carbon in wetland soils is a form of carbon capture from the atmosphere and provides more potential for the capture of other forms of chemical pollution which also cleans the water. Wetland plants also naturally metabolize excess nitrogen and phosphorus and deliver oxygen into the soils immediately near their roots. These numerous small oxidized areas trap metals, reduce the toxicity of some compounds, and facilitate the conversion of nitrogen water pollution to harmless nitrogen gas. Our +StL Greenway design harnesses these natural abilities of wetlands to improve water quality and provide significant wildlife habitat benefits in numerous locations, such as along the edges of stream channels, offchannel wetland areas, along the fringes of ponds, as floating islands, and in larger storm water features such as the Birding and Biodiversity Park. Wetland floating islands are a great way to increase the amount of beneficial soil-water contact with a very natural appearance that also provides wildlife habitat. A wetland floating island is an engineered habitat element that uses a recycled plastic frame as a buoyant foundation to hold the soils and plants in contact with the water. That frame is tethered to the bottom of the water feature which allows the islands to float even during times of rising water levels. The result is a natural-looking habitat feature that is pleasing to the eye, cleans the water, and provides habitat for fish, insects, and birds.

PHYTOREMEDIATION Our vision is for the +StL Greenway to both evolve beyond its industrial past and to simultaneously celebrate that history. For example, areas of mild petroleum hydrocarbon contamination are planned to be dealt with using phytoremediation whenever possible (public safety is our number one priority and more traditional methods of containing or removing contamination will be used whenever is necessary). This project has a wonderful opportunity to use the natural ability of many native species to convert moderate amounts of hydrocarbons to sugars and starches. Some of these native species include several of the prairie grasses that have already been mentioned, as well as cottonwoods, willows, and several other species. Exotic species may be considered for these areas if they are determined to provide superior phytoremediation levels and have minimal risk of becoming invasive.


Cardinal flower (left) and hibiscus (right)

Prairie restored by +STL Team

Foxglove beardtongue (left) and royal catchfly (right)

Marsh restored by +STL Team

Birding enthusiasts at Gilbert Water Ranch, an urban restored wetland in Arizona


ECOLOGY

WETLAND & BIRD PARK PRAIRIES Prairie plant communities would feature tall grass and mid grass species such as big bluestem, little bluestem, indiangrass, Canada wild rye, goldenrods, sunflowers, milkweeds, and many others. Local tall grass prairies feature grasses as high as seven feet as well as mid-story grasses that are typically up to four feet in height as well as scattered wildflowers of various heights. Annual mowing in the spring will keep shrubs and trees from becoming established in these areas, but the grasses should reach their desired height by the middle of summer. Native tall grass prairie areas will likely play a prominent part in the landscaping in several locations along the greenway, particularly those that are well-drained, sunny, and where trees would not be appropriate due to surrounding land uses, such as close to railroad lines. OPEN WOODLAND SAVANNAHS Open woodlands would feature a relatively sparse, park-like tree canopy consisting of a variety of oaks, hickories, maples, and elms. An understory of shrubs, grasses and forbs would contain such attractive species as aromatic sumac, hazelnut, goldenrods, sunflowers, beebalms, milkweeds, spiderworts, big bluestem, little bluestem, sedges, wild ryes, and many others. Woodland areas are similar enough to traditional wooded park conditions that visitors would likely not notice much

difference other than the fact that instead of mowed turf grasses, the grassy areas are not mowed and may reach up to hip height. Woodland areas would be found where a shaded trail or adjacent recreational area would be desired, particularly in streetside conditions. STREAMSIDE WOODS In many locations urban land uses and the greenway path would be adjacent to a small open, flowing channel with occasional riverside forest plantings. These streamside areas would feature a different suite of plant species adapted to higher levels of soil moisture than would be found in open woodlands. Typical trees planted in these areas would be river birch, pin oak, sycamore, and others. Although they can also be planted in wetlands, bald cypress are also an excellent tree to plant adjacent to flowing water. Somewhat unique for conifers, their needles turn a brilliant orange color in autumn before dropping. Scattered wetland shrubs like buttonbush would provide cover and nesting habitat for birds as well as ample nectar from their unique spherical flower heads. Herbaceous species are particularly affected by differences in soil saturation. As a result, there would be a wide diversity of these plants along the hydrologic gradient from drier areas down to the edge of the channel. Sedges, rushes and other wetland plants lining the edge would stabilize the shoreline,

treat some of the water pollution that may be traveling down the channel, and provide food for ducks. These locations could also feature several attractive flowering species, such as iris, New England aster, swamp milkweed, and great blue lobelia. In addition to locations adjacent to restored stream channels, this suite of species will also be used around the periphery of some ponds, and any other areas of moderate soil moisture. WETLANDS Wetlands occur where the soil is periodically or constantly saturated, conditions which lead to the establishment of unique plant communities. Many different habitats fall under the wetland category, including herbaceous marshes which would be established along some edges of permanently flowing open channels or within shallow pond-like storm water detention habitat areas, shrub or forested wetlands that may be found adjacent to permanent ponds, or herbaceous wet prairies, which would be found in flat soggy areas immediately upslope from marshes. Due to their high levels of biological productivity, wetlands often feature a lot of animal life, including insects, birds, and frogs, and these locations will be exceptional locations to observe wildlife. WETLAND & BIRD PARK Because of the high degree of species richness and abundance of animal life, wetlands will be the dominant habitat in the most prominent natural feature within the greenway: a wetland and bird park

A Wetland and Bird Park would be located along the southern east-west greenway path between Union Station and the baseball stadium at the position of a planned storm water management practice where existing piped storm water would be intercepted and conveyed to this location, keeping it from entering the combined storm water system. Instead of a typical engineered detention basin featuring concrete and turf grass, this area will be an urban bird oasis with shallow marsh conditions, a contoured natural water’s edge and extensive native plantings. Scattered trees adapted to wet conditions would be present for shade and roosting, like bald cypress, river birch, and black willow. A few areas of higher elevation would allow prairie plantings to provide habitat for upland birds and other species to inhabit. Those higher areas would feature bat houses and birdhouses to support those species which would provide additional sights to visitors and would feed on the insects that would inhabit the area. Creating a biodiversity hotspot near the new St. Louis Aquarium at Union Station would provide an even bigger draw to the area for nature lovers. Also, in order to fit in with the adjacent sporting atmosphere, significant groupings of red and white flowering species would emphasize the colors of the Redbirds. Some examples that are well adapted to moist or wet conditions include the brilliant red and appropriately named cardinal flower, white-flowering buttonbush shrubs (loved by butterflies), and beautiful white hibiscus.


ECOLOGY

FAUNA NATURE IN THE CITY

POLLINATOR INTERACTIONS

The plant communities established in the greenway would provide valuable wildlife habitat within the City. The fact that the greenway would connect Forest Park, the Mississippi River, Fairgrounds Park, and the Missouri Botanical Garden and Tower Grove Park area would not just increase human travel between these green spaces, the greenway would obviously create pathways for animals as well. This increase of habitat in St. Louis would also offer area residents more opportunity to experience nature than has historically been possible as the native plant communities will draw in small wildlife adapted to the food and shelter provided within each habitat area or planting strip.

Encounters with pollinating insects and birds will likely the most common animal experience for most visitors. Fortunately, the best method of attracting many fascinating and dazzling insects and birds is to plant large numbers of beautiful flowers.

With both adults and children spending less time outside, it is critical to create outdoor recreation opportunities for residents, a goal that Great Rivers Greenway has been successfully addressing for years. Nowhere is this more true than in the heart of a large city. Making native plantings, green infrastructure storm water design, and habitat restoration central pillars of our +StL Greenway design will help stimulate as much interaction as possible between people, plants, and animals. And while most people appreciate being surrounded by interesting and beautiful plants, interactions with animals are often the highlights of outings.

The creation of significant amounts of pollinator habitat will likely be one of the greenway’s most important ecological improvements. This is because most portions of the greenway will be too small to support larger animal species, but this is also true partly because our intensified agricultural practices and overuse of herbicides have imperiled numerous pollinating insect species, with honey bees and monarch butterflies as the most commonly cited examples. Our design will help address this environmental problem by planting large amounts of the greenway with a wide diversity of native flowering species. This wide assortment of plant species will support a significant diversity of pollinator species, with special attention paid to plants that will support bees and monarch butterflies. Specifically, a diversity of milkweed species would be planted in concert with the City of St. Louis’ Milkweeds for Monarchs Initiative plan to create 50 monarch gardens within the City. The great diversity of plant species already described in this document will create habitat for such pollinating species as honey bees, bumblebees, carpenter bees, mason bees, cuckoo bees, skipper butterflies, and ruby-throated hummingbirds. Several additional insects will also use our native plantings

as food during their caterpillar stage, including black swallowtails, Henry’s elfins, wavy-lined emerald moths, silvery checkerspots, dainty sulfurs, and goldenrod stowaways. A GREENWAY IN THE HEART OF A FLYWAY Described by the Audubon Society as a “River of Birds”, the Mississippi River flyway is a crucial migratory path for more than 325 bird species. As a result, Chouteau Greenway visitors could have the opportunity to view a great diversity of bird life, from species that inhabit the area year-round to those that migrate through seasonally. Migratory species that travel through the area and are therefore likely to be seen in the greenway include cedar waxwings, northern flickers, ruby-crowned kinglets, piedbilled grebes, sharp-shinned hawks, Cooper’s hawks, indigo buntings, sandpipers, vireos, orioles, gray catbirds, yellowbilled and black-billed cuckoos, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, various flycatchers, bank swallows, cliff swallows, red-breasted nuthatches, warblers, and scarlet and summer tanagers, In addition to the species that migrate through the area, with the greenway loops connecting major local parks, birds and other local wildlife will be extremely likely to disperse into the +StL Greenway. As a result, the +StL Greenway will provide visitors with sights of many local bird species. Some examples that would be seen in the greenway would include songbirds like cardinals, goldfinches, Carolina chickadees, tufted titmice, purple finches, rose-breasted grosbeaks, and American robins. Red-tailed hawks, barred owls, and

American kestrels would likely be among the most common birds of prey circling overhead or roosting in trees. Bald eagles have been seen flying over Forest Park, so some may be seen over the greenway as well upon occasion. DRAWN TO WATER Nothing attracts wildlife like water, and the many water features along the Chouteau Greenway will ensure that visitors will see birds, small mammals, and insects in these locations, particularly within the Birding and Biodiversity Park. Any restored water features will provide homes for frogs, fish, and a variety of interesting aquatic insects such as dragonflies. These smaller species also play an important role in food webs and will attract birds such as herons, egrets, red-winged blackbirds, blue jays, northern harriers, warblers, and swallows. Less common waterfowl that would likely be seen stopping by or migrating through any ponds, or restored stream channels include snow geese, white pelicans, American coots, ruddy ducks, blue-winged teal, and wood ducks. Bats also play a very important ecological role and would likely provide wonderful evening aerial displays as they feed on insects that congregate near water. WARM-BLOODED NATURE Small mammals will likely be seen occasionally along the greenway, particularly squirrels, chipmunks, cottontail rabbits, and mice. Mink and muskrats have been observed in Forest Park and could disperse into the greenway’s water features.


Great Horned Owl

Big Brown Bat

CANOPY/SKY

Red Tailed Hawk Red Shouldered Hawk

American Kestrel

Pileated Woodpecker

Northern Cardinal

Northern Flicker

MID-LEVEL

Scarlet Tanager

Eastern Wood Pewee

Mourning Dove Cape May Warbler

Prarie Warbler

Indigo Bunting

Firefly

White Eyed Vireo

White Throated Sparrow

Red Fox

Indigo Bunting

Red Headed Woodpecker

Dark Eyed Junco

Monarch Butterfly

Eastern Cottontail Eastern Grey Squirrel

Honey Bee Milk Snake

Coyote

Black Crappie

UNDER GROUND/ WATER

Largemouth Bass

American Toad

Vole

Mole

Bluegill Sunfish

Rainbow Trout

HABITAT

PONDSIDE FOREST (WASH U - FOREST PARK)

Eastern Bluebird

Grey Tree Frog

Black Swallowtail

Chipmunk

Box Turtle

Song Sparrow Goldfinch

White Breasted Nuthatch

GROUND LEVEL

Common Nighthawk

OPEN WOODLAND (METRO/CLAYTON-COMPTON)

PRAIRIE

(COMPTON - 20th)

Northern Fence Lizard


Barred Owl

Snow Goose

Coopers Hawk

Osprey

CANOPY/SKY

Big Bown Bat Bald Eagle Northern Harrier

Red Winged Blackbird

Northern Rough Winged Swallow

Blue Jay

Tree Swallow Cedar Waxwing

Downy Woodpecker

Seagull Great Blue Heron

Marsh Wren Wood Duck

Bluet Damselfly Dragonfly

Spring Peeper

MID-LEVEL

Carolina Wren

Ruby Throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Sora

Luna Moth

Mallard

Great Egret

Summer Tanager

Oriole Night Heron

Dragonfly Cave Salamander White Footed Mouse

Pelican

Painted Turtle

River Otter

Ladybug Beaver

Chorus Frog

Longnose Gar Tiger Salamander

GROUND LEVEL

Bullfrog

Cricket Frog Papershell Crayfish

Smallmouth Bass

Northern Pike

UNDER GROUND/ WATER

Catfish

STREAMSIDE FOREST (20th - TUCKER)

WETLAND

(TUCKER - MISSISSIPPI)

RIVER

(MISSISSIPPI)

HABITAT


Big Brown Bat

CANOPY/SKY

Red Shouldered Hawk Pileated Woodpecker

American Kestrel

Northern Flicker

MID-LEVEL

Mourning Dove

Song Sparrow Blue Jay White Breasted Nuthatch

Indigo Bunting

Eastern Wood Pewee

Goldfinch Firefly

GROUND LEVEL

White Throated Sparrow

Red Headed Woodpecker

White Eyed Vireo Eastern Grey Squirrel

Eastern Cottontail

Monarch Butterfly Eastern Grey Squirrel

Chipmunk Grey Tree Frog

Black Crappie

UNDER GROUND/ WATER

HABITAT

Mole

Vole

Bluegill Sunfish

LAKESIDE SAVANNAH (FAIRGROUND PARK)

Ruby Throated Hummingbird

NEIGHBORHOOD WOODLAND

(FAIRGROUND PARK - UNION PACIFIC/TRRA/METRO)


Red Tailed Hawk

Big Brown Bat

CANOPY/SKY

Common Nighthawk

Tree Swallow

Northern Cardinal

MID-LEVEL

Northern Rough Winged Swallow

Mallard

Downy Woodpecker

Great Blue Heron Cape May Warbler Carolina Wren

Scarlet Tanager

Eastern Bluebird

Black Swallowtail

Indigo Bunting

Dark Eyed Junco

Prarie Warbler

Oriole

Chipmunk

Honey Bee

Sora

GROUND LEVEL

Summer Tanager

Painted Turtle

Bullfrog American Toad

Mole

UNDER GROUND/ WATER Papershell Crayfish

NEIGHBORHOOD WOODLAND

(UNION PACIFIC/TRRA/METRO - TOWER GROVE PARK)

PONDSIDE SAVANNAH (TOWER GROVE PARK)

HABITAT


SPRING: PINK COLOR PROPORTION

Pink Dogwood (Cornus florida varieties) 15-30 ft

Redbud (Cercis canadensis) 20-30 ft

Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) 2-5 ft

Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 4-5 ft

Prairie Blazing Star (Liatris pycnostachya) 3-4 ft

Purple Prairie Clover (Dalea purpurea) 1-3 ft

HIGH

MID

LOW SPRING: YELLOW COLOR PROPORTION

Fringe Tree (Chionanthus_virginicus) 12-30 ft

Tulip tree (Liriodendron tupilifera) 60-90 ft

Bur marigold (Bidens aristosa) 3-4 ft

Common sunflower (Helianthus annuus) 3-10 f

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) 2-3 ft

Large-Flowered Tickseed Coreopsis grandiflora) 1.5-2 ft

HIGH

MID

LOW

SEASONAL CONDITIONS AND TRANSFORMATION IN THE GREENWAY SPRING COLOR SCHEME

ECOLOGICAL LOOP COLORS

PINK & YELLOW LOOPS

Each Ecological Loop will have its focus (food plants, medicinal plants, phytoremediation) while some functions such as water quality improvement and wildlife habitat will be distributed more evenly throughout the +StL Greenway. Each loop will also have focal color palettes among the biodiverse plantings in each area.

Yellow is a classic color of spring and its bright clean color is a welcome sight after drab winters.

As a result, in the springtime each loop will be dominated by either pink or yellow flower colors. Along with other factors, these spring colors will help make the experience of each loop unique and interesting. This design feature will also add an appealing seasonal aspect to visiting the greenway. Despite the focus on certain spring flowering colors, each ecological loop will still have a diversity of plant species and a variety of planting contexts (rain gardens, prairie areas, traffic strips, etc.). This focus on one flowering spring color will be affecting but not overpowering; other flower colors will still be present and the featured color may be emphasized in grouped plantings, or it may be noticeable as scattered flowers among the other shades of green in the landscape. However, the focus on the planned colors will be apparent as one travels along one of the many loop paths. People are not the only ones attracted by spring wildflowers. The spring blooms along these ecological loops will also draw in large numbers of pollinating insects, adding another layer of interest for greenway visitors.

As visitors travel along a yellow loop they would see trees with yellow spring flowers, such as tall tulip trees. This species is a common ornamental shade tree and occurs naturally in southern Missouri forests. Unsurprisingly, its large flowers resemble those of tulips and are mostly yellow with some white and orange markings. Its flowers attract a wide variety of pollinating bee species along with many kinds of beetles. Yellow-flowered magnolias could also be planted to add to the effect as could yellow buckeyes, both deciduous shrubs. These species would attract pollinators to the greenway, specifically a wide diversity of bee and beetle species with yellow buckeyes also pollinated by hummingbirds. There are many herbaceous plants with yellow spring flowers. As a greenway visitor bicycles past an upland prairie area, they would see copious coreopsis flowers with bright yelloworange blooms. Plains coreopsis would stand out from this mixture as it features a brilliant red circle along the inner ring of the yellow flowers. Black-eyed Susans would also catch the eye with their long petals and dark brown centers. These species attract a wide variety of bee species, butterflies, and butterfly-like skippers. Moth caterpillars feast on the flowers and leaves, and beetles are also sometimes attracted by the nectar.

After turning a corner the bicyclist passes a planter featuring smooth yellow violets and then starts pedaling alongside a rain garden dominated by the yellow flowers of golden Alexanders. A close inspection of this species might reveal black swallowtail caterpillars feeding on the leaves. In a short distance the rain garden drains into a small marsh area along the side of a restored open stream channel. Within that marshy edge are the yellow flowers of marsh marigold, a member of the buttercup family. This species attracts pollinators like honey bees and small fly species. Pink is another wonderful spring pastel color that really brightens the landscape. Going for a spring walk, a young family begins their greenway visit on a pink loop. They first notice the numerous redbud trees with their branches absolutely covered in tiny pink blossoms. Pink flowering dogwoods are also present here and there along the path with large rose-colored petals. Attractive bees hover around the flowers and small caterpillars of many species can be seen sporadically, feeding on the fresh new leaves. As the dogwood flowers mature into fruit, cardinals, thrushes, robins, and silky, colorful cedar waxwings come to these trees to feed.

Pink colors are also present along the ground and in planters. Purple milkweed has been planted profusely in this area and a multitude of pollinating insects is hovering around this species, including a wide variety of butterflies, skippers, and several species of bees. The family walks past a small hillside planting with prairie plants and sees a diversity of native pink flowers: wild geraniums, smooth phlox, prairie phlox, Ozark phlox, and purple poppy mallow. These species attract many kinds of bees: bumble bees, cuckoo bees, and long-horned bees among others. Butterflies, moths, and small bee flies also cross the path occasionally. Along a more formally planted area, numerous pink azaleas catch the family’s eyes. The smallest child bends down and picks a tiny spring beauty from the grass. Briefly appearing in the springtime, this species has a mostly white flower with pink highlights. Mason bees, bumblebees and honey bees visit these flowers, with an andrenid bee being a specialist pollinator of this species. As they near the end of the loop they pass a rain garden with several pink flowers providing different shades of color and a diversity of textures: rose verbena, beebalm, lemon mint, evening primrose, and dew flowers. Beebalms earn their reputation as great attractors of bees, with numerous moth species visiting the evening primrose and other flowers. The rose verbena and lemon mint add a wonderful scent to the family’s experience.


SPRING Spring is full of flowers and woodlands feature some of the most delicate examples. Because the tree canopy blocks light for most of the year, the small wildflowers that live on the forest floor have to concentrate their reproductive efforts into a short but brilliant period of time. So spring is the season to see spring beauties, a small white flower with subtle pink stripes only a few inches tall that also sometimes lives in grassy areas. Violets often proliferate among the trees with their purple flowers and occasional white variants. The greenway’s woodlands will also feature beautiful blooms from such species as Virginia bluebells, columbine, mayapple, Solomon’s seal, trout lily, and Dutchman’s breeches. Spring is also the time when pink redbuds and white flowering dogwoods blossom as do stately magnolias and tulip trees. Prairie areas should be mowed in late winter or very early spring to prevent these areas from being taken over by common local trees and shrubs or by invasive species like bush honeysuckle or tree of heaven. So prairie grasses will be at their lowest height during spring. That makes room for the blooms of early-flowering forbs like shining blue star and purple poppy mallow.

Eastern Redbud spring flowers

Along with new green growth and the common choruses of frogs, wetlands offer springtime blooms of iris, willow catkins, and the prolific blue-purple spikelets of false shrub indigo. In addition, sedges, grasslike plants that favor wet conditions, create numerous varieties of unique flowerhead shapes, resembling fox tails, small clubs, and fuzzy ovals.


SUMMER Plant growth is in full swing by summertime. Woodlands trees have completely leafed out, providing the relief of shade to greenway visitors. Woodland grasses now begin to flower along with prairie flowers in the sunny gaps between trees. Prairie grasses love the summer heat and grow rapidly in this time of year, with eastern gamagrass reaching full height and opening its long green spikelets with thin rusty red flowers. Summer is the peak of prairie wildflowers as numerous species take their turns blooming at this time. These include sunflowers, black eyed Susans, coneflowers, copious white spikelets of foxglove beardtongue, pinkish purple cylinders of blazing stars, and pink pincushions of wild bergamot and other beebalms. This is also the time when milkweeds bloom, offering sustenance to a variety of attractive butterflies which should be common during this time along with bird life.

American Basswood summer leaves

Wetlands and streamside areas also reach full bloom during the summer. Just like its drier cousins, swamp milkweed flowers at this time of year, with its large head of pink flowers enticing many butterflies and other pollinators. Buttonbush shrubs create large numbers of white spheres of tiny flowers. In addition, different sedge species flower in the summer than in the spring, offering a new diversity of round or oval green flowering shapes to observe. Arrowheads, with their large and unique leaves emerge from shallow waters and produce spikes of white flowers with yellow centers. Fitting with the height of baseball season, cardinal flower provides deep red splashes of color this time of year.


FALL Fall woodlands continue to have flowering grasses like Virginia wildrye, but now bottlebrush grass with its sparse but long flowers are added to the mixture. The late fall experience in woodlands is famously dominated by brilliant and changing leaf colors as trees prepare for winter. Scarlet oak, red maple, and black gum provide stunning displays of red leaves. Sugar maple and hickories offer yellow colors, with sugar maple leaves then becoming orange and then red. Fall is also the time when beautyberry bushes feature their distinctive large balls of purple berries along each stalk. Prairie grasses are in full bloom in fall, with many small yellow flowers emerging from the tips of indiangrass stalks and reddish-brown three-pronged turkey foot flower stalks at the top of each big bluestem plant. Many prairie wildflowers bloom in autumn, bringing color to grassy areas and open spots in woodlands. Some characteristic flowers at this time include goldenrod, Virginia mountainmint, culver’s root, yucca-like rattlesnake master, and sunflowers.

Acer Rubrum fall foliage

From late summer into fall, plate-sized white hibiscus flowers bloom in wetlands. Red cardinal flowers also maintain their flowers during this time. Orange colors become prominent in autumn wetlands and stream-side areas as annual bur marigolds have copious small sunflower-like flowers, often in great local abundance. In addition to the usual brilliance of tree leaves in fall, wetland areas also feature bald cypress, one of the few conifers that lose their needles, which turn to a yellowish-orange color before falling.


WINTER During the winter, life does mostly pause in order to endure the colder conditions. Despite that, many aspects of the greenway’s vegetative design will make it an attractive destination in spite of the weather. Several native trees and shrubs have singular and interesting bark that makes them great plantings for winter time. These include the familiar peeling bark of river birch and also the smaller shrub ninebark which has multiple layers of papery skin. The numerous knobby “knees” of bald cypress that proliferate around the water’s edge also provide visual interest during a walk next to wet areas. Finally, witch hazel is one of the few plants to bloom during winter and offers visitors orange and yellow strips of color when snow is on the ground. Prairie grasses keep their height and flower structures during winter, with reddish-brown little bluestem standing out among the brown colors provided by surrounding species. This plant structure creates cover opportunities for the wintering birds that are common during this time of year: white-crowned sparrows, dark-eyed juncos, and northern cardinals among others.

Witch Hazel winter blooms

Streamside areas and wetlands include some of the interesting trees already mentioned. In addition, sedges mostly keep their green color during the winter unlike most other plants, giving wetland areas additional points of interest until spring begins again.


Urban Harvest STL


EDIBLE & HERBAL PLANTS EDIBLE OPPORTUNITIES

URBAN ORCHARD

LOCAL HERITAGE

MEDICINAL PLANTS

Food deserts are a well-known problem in urban areas and St. Louis is no exception. By planting several edible species in one of the ecological loops, the +StL Greenway will help address the problem of access to healthy foods in areas without full-service grocery stores. As a result, the planting of the trees will help improve ecological health, human health, and social equity.

While the rest of the ecological loops will emphasize native plantings and habitats, the edible ecological loop will focus on the cultivated side of nature. The result will have the potential to be one of the more interactive portions of the Chouteau Greenway.

The area around the edible ecological loop and the food port is rich with the history of Native Americans, settlers, and African Americans.

Plants do more than provide habitat and food; they have been used for medicinal purposes for millennia. This ethnobotanical knowledge has accumulated across the globe and since St. Louis has residents with cultural heritages from all over the world, their stories of botanical knowledge can be told on the greenway by accentuating the medicinal usefulness of many species familiar to them that can grow in this area.

This aspect of the project will build upon the growth of local urban food production that has occurred in our area in recent years. Additionally, the common ground nature of any greenway food production will provide opportunities for people of different backgrounds, both culturally and agriculturally, to interact and cross-pollinate ideas, experiences, and wisdom. Located adjacent to the Food Port economic node and building upon the base of food culture, the edible ecological loop will still include the natural habitats and native plantings elsewhere in the +StL Greenway. What will make it a unique section of the greenway will be the inclusion of numerous plant species that produce fruit, nuts, and edible leaves. The food opportunities on this loop will not only add one more layer of variety of experience among the different ecological loops, the availability of a tasty treat will help lure some residents to the +StL Greenway who may not otherwise find themselves there.

Tasty and nutritious species can be planted, including wild plums, peaches, and apples. Local native plants that can be harvested would also be included, like blackberries, persimmons, walnuts, and pecans. Also, new cultivars of native paw paws shrubs are available, making this singular local fruit favored by people and wildlife easier to grow and harvest. Since not all of the produce of fruit and nut trees gets harvested, these plantings would be sited in locations slightly away from trails and roads to minimize maintenance. Also, this ecological loop could feature spaces for small plots of urban farming of vegetables and other crops if there is sufficient community involvement to sustain these areas.

From an agricultural and culinary perspective, the Native Americans who once lived in this location ate a very different diet than we do today. The plants and cooking practices of the area’s earlier inhabitants would be highlighted in specific areas with interpretive signs and examples of some of the crops of the local tribes: squashes, gourds, native barley, smartweeds, and sunflowers among others. The area’s African American history can also be emphasized as this was the location of St. Louis’ largest black neighborhood for a time. That history of community establishment and then displacement could be told alongside displays and plantings of local foods important to that community and that point in time. St. Louis also has one of the most storied beer-producing reputations in the country. While some aspects of this history are well known, the Chouteau Greenway would shine some light on the tradition of small-scale beer production in local caves in the area through interpretive displays and hopefully by highlighting any local businesses who revive this craft brewing heritage along the greenway.

Most prominent uses of herbal medicine in the area belong to the local Native American history of utilizing local vegetation for a multitude of ailments, but many other cultures have their own uses and species that would be highlighted. The slight emphasis on Native American uses of medicinal plants means that many of those species are found locally and are adapted to our climate and weather and are therefore low maintenance. The selection of specific species would be a great opportunity for the greenway to interact with the community by asking for the expertise of local residents, but some known potential medicinal examples include willows, coneflower, nettle, red clover, wild ginger, witch hazel, and Queen Anne’s lace. Interpretive signs and artwork would educate the public about such potential topics as the medicinal benefits of each species, their history of use, and the role that plants play in the development of modern prescription medicine.


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1

6

3

2

7

8

9 LEGEND Impacted by Pollution & Contaminated or Remediated Impacted by Soil or Groundwater Contamination Automobile and Train Diesel Air Pollution

Existing impacted areas and potential sources of pollution

1

CWE - Petroleum Pollution Areas

2

Foundry - Soil Pollution

3

Atlantic Express Bus Depot - Soil Pollution

4

North Sarah Phase I Development - Soil Pollution

5

MLK Plaza - Soil Pollution

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Laclede Old Town - Soil Pollution

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Chouteau Compton - Soil Pollution

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Cupples Station - Soil Pollution

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City Block 104 - Soil Pollution


ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

NORTH

WEST

EAST

Using additional tree canopy to buffer pollution with prevailing winds

SOUTH


+StL

GROW I AN U NG RB MOSA AN IC

TEAM SUPPORT JOYCE FONG GORDON HON ISSAC LAI KA LEUNG DESMOND LIU PAMELA MAGUIDAD KESHAV RAMASWAMI CASEY RYAN JESS VENECEK HON WONG STEPHEN ZIMMERER

TLS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE + OBJECT TERRITORIES + [dhd] DEREK HOEFERLIN DESIGN + KRISTIN FLEISCHMANN BREWER + BRYAN CAVE LLP + AMANDA COLÓN-SMITH + ECONSULT SOLUTIONS + eDESIGN DYNAMICS + EDSI + JEREMY GOSS + LANGAN + JAMES LIMA PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT + SAL MARTINEZ + PRESERVATION RESEARCH OFFICE + PROJECT CONTROLS GROUP + PROSPERITY LABS + JASON PURNELL + RAMBOLL + LINDA SAMUELS + PAOLA AGUIRRE SERRANO + SILMAN + TERRA TECHNOLOGIES

Chouteau Greenway TLS OT DH Design Report  
Chouteau Greenway TLS OT DH Design Report