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ABOUT THIS GUIDE When we build a strong, skilled, and empowered workforce, we ensure that the community will thrive, now and long into the future. Use this guide to discover the necessary steps to create a prosperous economy and a community of empowered individuals. Regardless of ability, economic status, or circumstance, we believe success is always possible—through the Power of Work.

MISSION

Goodwill provides education, career development, and employment opportunities to help Coloradans in need achieve self-sufficiency, dignity, and hope through the Power of Work.

VISION

The communities we serve are better, stronger, and more sustainable because Goodwill is there.

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- NOTES DEAR FRIENDS OF GOODWILL, WE BELIEVE THAT THE COMMUNITIES WE SERVE ARE BETTER, STRONGER, AND MORE SUSTAINABLE BECAUSE GOODWILL IS THERE. THAT IS GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF DENVER'S VISION STATEMENT AND IT'S SOMETHING WE STRIVE TOWARD EVERY DAY. IT'S A BIG GOAL, BUT IT IS ATTAINABLE, THANKS TO YOUR SUPPORT. WE'VE CREATED THIS REPORT TO SHOW YOU—OUR DONORS, VOLUNTEERS, AND SUPPORTERS—THE IMPACT THAT OUR CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AND BUSINESS HAS MADE. THIS COMMUNITY IMPACT IS SHOWN THROUGH SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVES. PLEASE ALSO USE THIS REPORT AS A FIELD “GUIDE TO WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT.” WE'VE CREATED IT AS A REFERENCE TOOL FOR YOU AND OTHERS TO SEE WHAT IS POSSIBLE WHEN WE MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO CREATE LASTING, POSITIVE CHANGE. THROUGHOUT, YOU'LL SEE REFERENCES TO THE COLLABORATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS THAT ARE ESSENTIAL TO OUR SUCCESS AND THE SUCCESS OF MORE THAN 23,000 AT-RISK STUDENTS, STRUGGLING ADULTS, AND INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES. JOIN US TO EMPOWER AND SUSTAIN OUR WORKFORCE, OUR ECONOMY, AND OUR ENVIRONMENT. USE THIS REPORT AS YOUR GUIDE. SINCERELY, STUART DAVIE PRESIDENT & CEO GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF DENVER


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GO ODWI LL STU DEN T ADVIS ORY CO UN

CIL

SCENARIO By 2018, the United States will have more than 46 million job openings. Of these jobs, 30 million will require some kind of higher education, and there will be a shortfall of three million individuals with the appropriate level of education to fill them.1

SOLUTION The Goodwill Youth Career Development Program addresses this “Middle Skills Gap” and the growing importance of higher education by helping at-risk students graduate from high school with a plan for a successful future.

Carnevale, A. P., Smith, N., and Strohl, J. (2010). Help Wanted: Projections of Jobs and Education requirements through 2018. Washington, DC: Georgetown University. 1

EMPOWERMENT: [EM-POW-ER-MINT], NOUN: THAT FEELING THAT ACCOMPANIES GETTING YOUR DREAM JOB; THE FEELING THAT ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE.


STEPS TO SUCCESS EDUCATION Goodwill partners with local schools to employ licensed teachers who teach a career-readiness curriculum. The curriculum is focused on defining a path for the future, including exploring career options, working on job-skill development, and exploring higher education options.

MENTORSHIP Goodwill brings career professionals into the classroom to provide valuable and relevant connections to the “real world” of work.

CAREER EXPLORATION The Goodwill Youth Career Development Program focuses on supporting youth to understand their potential and become future contributors to our workforce, regardless of circumstance or ability.

HIGHER EDUCATION Goodwill specialists provide support and resources to young people who have just started college, many of whom are the first in their families to attend, to ensure they continue to pursue a degree or certificate.

STU DEN T TRI P—SU MM ER 2014

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RESULTS & IMPACT 17,684 Students served

13,033

Students served intensively in classroom, case management, mentoring, and placements

4,651

Served through basic services, such as one-time outreach activities

69.7%

Percentage of students at schools with Goodwill programming qualified for free or reduced lunch


GOODWILL STUDENTS BY ETHNICITY 56% LATINO 16% CAUCASIAN 15% AFRICAN AMERICAN 3%

ASIAN

1%

NATIVE AMERICAN

9%

OTHER

GOODWILL STUDENTS BY GRADE LEVEL 10%

MIDDLE SCHOOL

85%

HIGH SCHOOL SEEKING GED

3%

HIGHER EDUCATION

2%

HIGH - CO LLA B O RATIO N

LIGHT -

D EW MILE HIGH UNITE N E TH IN E AC SP CE ES FI RAM STAFF SHARE OFCHANGE. THIS CO-LOCATION ENCOURAGMOST OG PR TH U YO L IL DW E TY GOO NTER FOR COMMUNIGANIZATIONS IN ORDER TO BENEFIT TH WAY MORGRIDGE CETW EEN THE TWO OR E. BE N IO AT OR AB LL CO UALS IN OUR STAT VULNERABLE INDIVID

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EVIDENCE OF SUCCESS

STUDENTS EXCEL AS COMMUNITY AMBASSADORS The Goodwill Student Advisory Council (SAC) is a group of high school students who represent seven school districts from all over the Denver metro area. The students work on leadership skills, participate in valuable business networking events, and connect with the community through various service projects. Many SAC students struggle to overcome obstacles such as homelessness, extreme poverty, and the burden of caring for younger siblings, as they focus on high school graduation and beyond. View their story at youtube.com/goodwilldenver.


JA CKIE AT HER LO CA L CA REER CO

NN ECTION CEN TER

SCENARIO As the broader community recovers from a recession and we see unemployment rates improve, individuals with barriers to employment—including poverty, age, and disability—still face hurdles when looking for work.

SOLUTION Goodwill’s Adult Career Development Program works to ensure that everyone in our community is employable and self-sufficient.

POWER OF WORK: [POW-ER OF WURK], NOUN: THE IDEA THAT A JOB IS THE DRIVITNG FORCE TO LEAD INDIVIDUALS TO FIND INDEPENDENCE, DIGNITY, AND HOPE.


STEPS TO SUCCESS CAREER CONNECTION CENTERS Goodwill provides resources, job-search assistance, education, and skill development to anyone in the community looking for work in our ten Career Connection Centers.

AGRABILITY Farmers and ranchers with limitations from aging, an accident, or illness receive assistance to ensure they are able to keep working.

JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES Goodwill trains, screens, and provides liaison support to help individuals find career opportunities and help employers find a great match.

COUNTY-BASED PROGRAMS Goodwill provides job search and career development assistance to individuals who are receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in Fort Morgan and Arapahoe Counties.

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RESULTS & IMPACT 5,672

Participants served

3,040

Participants who received intensive services

2,632

Participants who received basic services

811

Job placements

$11.72

Average hourly wage

17


BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT 1331

UNEMPLOYED CRIMINAL BACKGROUND

521

LEARNING OR OTHER DISABILITY

500

HISTORY OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE

374

LANGUAGE

350

HOMELESSNESS

324

LACK OF GED/DIPLOMA

323

OLDER WORKER

298

WORKING POOR

240

OTHER DISADVANTAGING CONDITION

226

H - CO LLA B O RATIO N

IGH LIGHT -

Note: Participants may appear in more than one category if they experience multiple barriers to employment.

D CAREER READINESS AN Y AC R TE LI LT U AD S ON CENTERS PROVIDEIZATIONS ACROSS THE STATE. PARTNERD TI EC N N CO ER RE CA L AN GAN , GOODWIL IP WITH VARIOUS EORCOLORADO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SH ER N RT PA IN S SE CLAS ONG OTHERS. UNITY COLLEGE, TH INCLUDE AIMS COMMDEVELOPMENT CENTER OF COLORADO, AM THE ASIAN PACIFIC

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EVIDENCE OF SUCCESS

BECOMING MORE THAN SHE THOUGHT WAS POSSIBLE A few years back, life was a struggle for Jackie. She was putting herself through college and taking care of her son on her own. Though she was looking for work, she was on government assistance and didn’t feel empowered. When she was referred to Goodwill’s Career Connection Center, things began to change. Jackie worked with Goodwill employment specialists to identify her strengths and hone in on her interests. She decided that being an educator and mentor to others who faced the same barriers would be the perfect fit. Now she is inspiring others. View Jackie's story at youtube.com/goodwilldenver.


SCENARIO In 2014, the unemployment rate for individuals with disabilities INCREASED even as the rest of the U.S. population saw improvements.2

SOLUTION Goodwill provides pre-vocational services and support to help identify an individual’s abilities, strengths, and interests in order to help them find meaningful work—and independence.

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2015), Persons with a Disability: Labor Force Characteristics http://www.bls.gov/news.release/disabl.nr0.htm 2

DIGNITY: [DIG-NI-TEE], NOUN: HAVING SELF-CONFIDENCE THANKS TO ACHIEVEMENTS, SUCH AS GETTING A JOB OR GAINING WORKFORCE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE.


STEPS TO SUCCESS PRE-VOCATIONAL SERVICES Goodwill has the goal of helping each individual in this program find community employment within five years.

ENCLAVES Small groups of four to eight individuals work together, with supervision and support from a Community Employment Specialist, and all earn minimum wage or higher.

LIFE ENRICHMENT In order to enable each individual to participate fully in the life of the community, Goodwill provides additional supportive services as needed.

FEATURED PROGRAMS Goodwill helps individuals gain specific job-related skills in bike maintenance and repair and electronic refurbishing, in addition to promoting confidence and independence.

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RESULTS & IMPACT Goodwill’s Community Employment and Day Programs provide about 637 hours of service per person through pre-vocational services, enclaves, or life enrichment and supportive services.

153

Individuals with disabilities served

97,466 Hours of service

96%

Percentage of participants who earned a wage


BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT 107

LACK OF POST-SECONDARY CREDENTIAL LEARNING DISABILITY

99

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY

97 76

LACK OF/LOW LITERACY

59

OTHER DISABLING CONDITION DEAFNESS OR OTHER HEARING IMPAIRMENT

39

LACK OF GED/DIPLOMA

36

OTHER DISADVANTAGING CONDITION

35

OLDER WORKER

34

OTHER PHYSICAL DISABILITY

32

PSYCHIATRIC AND/OR EMOTIONAL DISABILITY

32

NEUROLOGICAL DISABILITY

18

BLINDNESS OR OTHER VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

17

UNKNOWN/UNREPORTED BARRIER

16

AUTISM

- CO LLA B O RATIO N

HIGH LIGHT -

11

Note: Participants may appear in more than one category if they experience multiple barriers to employment.

ARDS, SUCH AS BO ED ER NT CE TY NI U M VARIOUS COM TO MANAGE AND DELIVER SERVICES H IT W RS NE RT PA L IL R GOODW FAMILIES. AN SERVICES, IN ORDE ROCKY MOUNTAIN HUITHM DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES AND THEIR TO INDIVIDUALS W

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EVIDENCE OF SUCCESS

SHE NEVER LOST SIGHT OF HER DREAMS Although Tonya Johnson has an extreme visual impairment, she never let her disability get in the way of her goals. When Tonya went searching for a job, Goodwill offered an employment setting that would meet her personal needs. When she became part of the Goodwill Community Employment Program, Tonya began to have greater confidence, learned about money management, and the responsibilities that came with being employed. The result has been astonishing. Her family says she has a great sense of accomplishment and independence. View Tonya's story at youtube.com/goodwilldenver.


SCENARIO Many individuals are one illness, injury, or financial shortfall away from potentially losing their earning capability.

SOLUTION Goodwill provides assistance to employees to navigate life’s hurdles and stay employed in order to support themselves and their families.

SUCCESS: [SUH K-SES], NOUN: ACHIEVING SELFSUFFICIENCY AND INDEPENDENCE, REGARDLESS OF ABILITY OR CIRCUMSTANCE.


STEPS TO SUCCESS EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE FUND This fund was created by Goodwill employees, for Goodwill employees. Contributions have helped individuals with emergency medical needs, threat of eviction, homelessness, and other life events.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SUPPORT Goodwill has partnered with Financial Stability 1st program to provide financial education to help employees increase their personal financial health and literacy. In addition, employees are given access to low-interest emergency loans.

DONATION OF HOURS Any Goodwill employee can contribute unused sick or vacation hours to coworkers who have a need to take a leave due to family or medical reasons, who may not have the accrued time off.

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM One-on-one support and third-party counseling helps employees with mental and personal health, legal advice, recovery assistance, and more.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Goodwill extends career development services to all of our employees in order to encourage advancement. These services include: professional and personal development classes, hiring practices that ease barriers to employment, and job training.


RESULTS & IMPACT 50%

Percentage of employees who report a disability and/or disadvantaging condition

251

Employees received intensive support services

213

Employees received emergency assistance

$41,770 Distributed for emergency needs

770

Donated hours used by employees in need

169

Benefited from an emergency loan or opened a new bank account

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EVIDENCE OF SUCCESS

HE FELT LOST UNTIL HE FOUND A STEADY JOB Life seemed like an uphill battle for Leo Melgosa. When he was young, he lost his mother, and his father struggled to support the family. Leo didn't have nice clothes to wear for job interviews, and he didn't even have a phone—so getting a job felt impossible. His life began to go down the wrong path. He finally found Goodwill—where he could begin a meaningful career. Leo was rapidly promoted throughout the organization—eventually becoming a manager—where he is thriving as a leader and a mentor. In addition to success at work, after a 16–year separation, Leo reunited with his daughter, which furthered his drive to succeed. View Leo's story at youtube.com/goodwilldenver.

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ASSISTANCE NEEDS Every year, our employees experience hardships or life events that require support. These are the most requested types of assistance.

60%

HOUSING (TEMPORARY, EVICTION AVOIDANCE) UTILITIES SUPPORT

20%

FOOD AND MEDICAL BILLS

10%

OTHER

10%

HIG - CO LLA B O RATIO N

H LIGHT -

SERVICES ASSEMBLY S AN M HU AL ON TI NA OM EE RESOURCES TO EMPLOY ED GRANT FUNDING FR GOODWILL HAS RECEIALV FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT CLASSES ANGD THEM TO BUILD LONG-TERM TO PROVIDE PERSON IAL SUPPORT FROM GOODWILL, HELPIN WHO RECEIVE FINANCAND GOOD CREDIT. STABILITY, ASSETS, 31


SCENARIO Through our mission programs and outreach, Goodwill emphasizes the opportunity to connect with the business world and the value of hands-on experience. Goodwill’s career development curriculum is enhanced with the addition of volunteers, mentors, and guest speakers.

RESULTS & IMPACT 1,161 Volunteers

14,242 Volunteer hours

157

Mentors provided

530

Youth were matched one-on-one with mentors

$365,735 Value of volunteer time3

3

Based on the 2014 Bureau of Labor Statistics data

PURPOSE: [PUR-PUHS], NOUN: THE REASON WE EXIST: TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE GREATER GOOD.


VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES VOLUNTEER IN A CLASSROOM Volunteers provide career and college mentoring of at-risk students, give feedback and encouragement to students through portfolio and resume reviews and mock interviews, and speak about their jobs on a career panel.

ADULT CAREER DEVELOPMENT Adults with disabilities or disadvantaging conditions receive help with skill development, resumes, job searches, and work experience.

RETAIL Volunteers help to collect donations, stock shelves, and bag purchased goods in a retail store. Many host donation drives to benefit Goodwill and its mission.

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS Goodwill Nextgen hosts volunteer events, professional development opportunities, and social gatherings for young professionals interested in giving back to their communities.

MUCH MORE Volunteers contribute in many more ways tailored to their availability and interests. For more information, visit goodwilldenver.org/volunteer.

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- VERNON’'S STORY COMING UP FROM “ ROCK BOTTOM” IN MAY 2011, VERNON SMITH WAS LAID OFF FROM HIS JOB. FOR A FULL YEAR AFTER, HE LOOKED FOR WORK IN A TOUGH MARKET TO NO AVAIL; HIS CONFIDENCE WAS SHATTERED AND HE SPIRALED INTO DEPRESSION. AS HE DESCRIBES IT—HE BOTTOMED OUT. NOW MORE THAN EVER, HE REGRETTED NOT GRADUATING FROM COLLEGE. HOPE CAME FROM AN UNEXPECTED PLACE: THE GOODWILL YOUTH CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, WHICH OFFERED HIM AN OPPORTUNITY TO VOLUNTEER IN A LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL, WORKING WITH AT-RISK STUDENTS. "VOLUNTEERING WITH GOODWILL WAS THE BEST THING I EVER DID IN MY LIFE,” I T GAVE ME A SPRING IN MY STEP—A SENSE OF PURPOSE."

VERNON BEGAN VOLUNTEERING IN THE CLASSROOM, SPEAKING ON CAREER PANELS, AND HELPING STUDENTS IN MOCK INTERVIEWS AND SCHOLARSHIP PREPARATION. HE FOUND THAT HELPING OTHERS GAVE HIM THE STRENGTH TO HELP HIMSELF. HE WENT BACK TO COLLEGE AND IS NOW EMBARKING ON HIS OWN CONSULTING BUSINESS. EVEN WITH HIS BUSY SCHEDULE, HE CONTINUES TO VOLUNTEER TWICE A WEEK. "GOODWILL IS INSPIRING KIDS TO NOT ONLY STAY IN SCHOOL, BUT START THINKING ABOUT WHAT THEY WILL DO AFTER SCHOOL. I WENT TO COLLEGE AFTER HIGH SCHOOL, BUT I DROPPED OUT. WHEN I TALK TO KIDS, I CAN GIVE THEM REAL PERSPECTIVE ON THAT. " –VERNON SMITH, 2014—2015 GOODWILL VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR 35


GOODWILL PRIORITIZES PEOPLE, PLANET, AND PROSPERITY IN ORDER TO CREATE A SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY. OUR RETAIL OPERATIONS PROVIDE WAYS FOR THE COMMUNITY TO REDUCE WASTE, WHILE ALSO CONTRIBUTING 90% OF REVENUES TO PROGRAMS THAT BENEFIT COLORADANS IN NEED.

RETAIL STORES & DONATION CENTERS Goodwill Industries of Denver operates numerous retail stores and donation centers throughout metro Denver and northern Colorado communities. Each location is a hub for recycling and reducing waste.

3,827,860

Number of transactions

1,649,634

Number of donations

84,054,135 Total pounds donated


GOODWILL OUTLET WORLDS Goodwill Outlet Worlds give donated goods one more chance to be repurposed. Goods are sold by the pound at deep discounts in three outlet stores in Aurora, Denver, and Englewood.

184,558

Number of transactions

ONLINE SHOPPING Collectors, book worms, and shoppers looking for a convenient way to peruse Goodwill’s offerings can shop Goodwill online through shopgoodwill.com, eBay, and Amazon, while also supporting local community programs that help people right here in Colorado.

402,612

Number of transactions

- CO LLA B O RATIO N

HIGH LIGHT -

S TO IMPROVE ON TI CA LO L IL W OD GO ING DO HAS BEEN EVALUATFURTHERING GOODWILL'S COMMITMENT TO RA LO CO CH EA TR OU ENERGY ENERGY USAGE, THUS EFFICIENCY AND REDUCE THE ENVIRONMENT. 39


BECOMING THE ULTIMATE SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE RETAILER ALSO MEANS POSITIVELY AFFECTING OUR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. GOODWILL WORKS DILIGENTLY TO BECOME MORE EFFICIENT WITH OUR RECYCLING PRACTICES EACH YEAR, WORKING OUR WAY TOWARD ZERO WASTE.

RESULTS & IMPACT 39,553,456 Pounds recycled

66%

Donated goods diverted from the landfill


The Goodwill Good Electronics recycling program is a free program to help Coloradans recycle used computer equipment in an environmentally safe way. Each computer is wiped clean of its data and recycled or refurbished in our EPA-registered recycling facility. Refurbished computers are then sold at Goodwill stores and online.

RECYCLING BY CATEGORY (IN POUNDS) 12,100,895

CLOTHING

6,878,856

BOOKS METALS COMPUTER EQUIPMENT CARDBOARD

4,309,033 3,219,000 2,043,985

SHOES

1,637,171

PLASTIC

1,426,798

BELTS AND PURSES

301,642

STUFFED TOYS

152,930

OTHER

4,223,888

- CO LLA BORATION HIGHLIGHT -

Y (NREL) HAS HELD MULTIPLE DONATION THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATOR LL'S GOOD ELECTRONICS RECYCLING DRIVES WITH THEIR EMPLOYEES TO BENEFIT GOO3,0DWI00 POUNDS OF COMPUTERS AND PROGRAM. IN A RECENT DRIVE, MORE THAN ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT WERE COLLECTED.

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FROM EMPLOYING INDIVIDUALS TO PROVIDING ADDITIONAL TAXES AND WAGES, GOODWILL’S ECONOMIC IMPACT CAN BE SEEN IN THE COMMUNITIES WHERE WE OPERATE AND SERVE.

ECONOMIC & FISCAL TOTALS $155,000,000

Goodwill’s total economic impact

$58,000,000

Goodwill’s total fiscal impact

EMPLOYMENT IMPACT 1,552

Goodwill employees

1,430

Individuals placed through Goodwill's career development programs into jobs at various companies in 2014

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Note: Results are approximate and based on the Elliott Pollack Economic Impact Analysis.


BUSINESS & PROGRAM IMPACT $29,000,000

Additional economic impact facilitated by Goodwill in 2014 by placing program participants into jobs

$642,400

In state taxes as a result of Goodwill's business operations

$126,000,000

In economic impact through Goodwill’s business operations, including jobs and wages

$5,200,000

In state taxes as a result of Goodwill’s job placement programs

2014 FINANCIAL SUMMARY Goodwill is the ultimate socially responsible retailer, sending 90 percent of revenues to our community programs. This annual impact report includes retail, economic impact, and financial data from the 2014 calendar year and program impact data from the 2014–2015 program year (July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015).

THE COMMUNITY GAVE TO GOODWILL (REVENUES) SALES

$63,819,038

90.4%

CONTRACT REVENUES

$3,002,606

4.3%

OTHER PUBLIC SUPPORT

$2,641,365

3.7%

OTHER INCOME

$1,140,798

1.6%

TOTAL: $70,603,807 GOODWILL GAVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY (EXPENSES) RETAIL OPERATIONS/PROGRAMS*

$56,111,890

78.7%

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

$7,677,654

10.8%

GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE

$7,054,792

9.9%

FUNDRAISING

$429,048

0.6%

TOTAL: $71,273,384 *Retail operations and programs serve the 50% of Goodwill employees who have disabilities or disadvantaging conditions, and maximize environmental sustainability.

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2014 DONORS President’s Circle ($10,000+)

Hope Circle ($1,000-$2,499)

Evon and Shawn Holladay

Vass and Lynne Sirpolaidis

Anonymous

Donald Holmes

Lisa and Robert Allen

Robert Hottman

Virginia Arter

Merry Jo Howland

Bill Bettag

Donna Kornfeld

Kristen Blessman

Jean and Bob Lawhead

Independence Circle ($5,000-$9,999) Don Gallo Marvin McDaniel Stephen and Paula Reynolds Peter Simon Dignity Circle ($2,500-$4,999) Greg Ball and Karen Hasse Vanessa and Kyle Clark Stuart and Ginny Davie Mary and Ken Downes Mark E. Honnen, Honnen Equipment Company Harold and Margaret Klausner Todd and Sue Munson Doug Rooney David Leonard and Clare Soderberg Jim Torgerson

Tom and Sara Bradbury, Bradbury Family Partnership David and Susan Brisnehan Winifred Brown Jim and Stephanie Browning Travis and Jenny Carlson Maggie Cheney Warren and Vici DeHaan Randy and Debbie Dohne Michael and Michele Ebedes Bill and Joan Elsner

Gilbert and Kristin Lopez Jane McKinstry and Art Dorsey Joe Michaels Ilene and Mark Nathanson Chuck and Michelle Nichols Brian and Dana Ondre Mike and Marcia Pritchard Brit K. Probst Deb and Will Quinby Dean and Carolyn Salter

The Esbenshade Family

John Starkweather

Darla Figoli

Joyce, David, and Claire Schlose

Gary Hahnenkamp Russell and Susan Haskell Ann Hinkins-Steiner

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Gary Leitner

Richard E. Hoffman, M.D.

John Shunk and Wendy Caspari Kathy Vieth Marilyn Welichko Tim and Julie Welker


2014 DONORS Meghan Van Portfliet

Jennifer Nash

Monthly Donors

Jennifer Wozniak

Jesse Ofner

Ann Beauvais

Clifford and Dorothy Young

Richard Otterstetter

Preston Brasch

Daniel and Susan Paulien

Nancy Broome

Power of Work Circle ($500-$999) Anonymous Jeff Ayers Ann Beauvais Leo Beserra Lucas Bills Eric and Barbara Boe Lisa Buechler John Chandler John Cuny Connie Davidson Mark Deuschle Tannia France Beverly and Fred Fox Michelle Fuller Bruce and Sharon Hann Nancy Haven Scott Hefner Mary Hendrix Tammy Hilgeford Lynn Louvar Charles Martin Mike and Julie McKesson Henry B. Mohr Shelley Moses-Reed

Fern Paulson Leslie Peabody Martin and Christy Pocs John Popovich and Nancy Juday Rebecca Pritchard Michelle Pujol Terence Quirke, Jr. Barry Reid Dick Salmon Kevin Shea

Rogene Buchholz Tim Byrnes Tawnya DeHerrera Cynthia Maas Traci McBee Brandon Moore Todd and Sue Munson Jesse Ofner Chris Stengle George Valuck Nate Easley

Nick Sirpolaidis

Ilene and Mark Nathanson

Jennifer and Henry Sobanet

Aaron Wilmot

Geraldine F. Swan Rob and Jenny Tallmadge Mark Tapy Manish and Dana Vachharajani Dean and Jerie Vanatta Chrissy and Travis Winkler


CORPORATE, FOUNDATION, & GOVERNMENT SUPPORT $100,000+ Adams 12 Five Star Schools Colorado Office of Economic Development Denver Public Schools Developmental Disabilities Resource Center Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Mile High United Way State of Colorado (ReHIRE) Office of Economic Security/Division of Employment & Benefits U.S. Department of Agriculture U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention $50,000-$99,000 Adams County District 14 Aurora Mental Health Center Colorado Department of Public Health

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Colorado Department of Higher Education

New America Schools

Colorado Department of Human Services

Pepsi Step 13

Center for Healthy Relationships

S.O.A.R.

Daniels Fund

West Career Academy

El Pomar Foundation $20,000-$49,999 Aurora Central Arapahoe County Housing & Community Development Services Bank of America Berengaria Development

$10,000-$19,999 Academy of Urban Learning Adolf Coors Foundation Bank of the West Charles Schwab EON Office

Bringing Back The Arts

The Virginia W. Hill Charitable Foundation

Colorado Department of Military and Veterans Affairs

Jefferson Success Pathway

Colorado Youth for a Change Energy Outreach Colorado Gateway High School Grant Beacon Middle School Helen K. and Arthur E. Johnson Foundation

Liberty Mutual Peyback Foundation Sheridan School District Spalding Community Foundation Fund United Way of Weld County Waste Management

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Weld County School District

Kenneth King Foundation

Wells Fargo Foundation

Morgan County

Xcel Energy


CORPORATE, FOUNDATION, & GOVERNMENT SUPPORT $5,000-$9,999

$1,000-$4,999

AIG

Able Trading

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Advanced Labeling Systems

Comcast

Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

Crosbie Real Estate Group, Inc. Delta Dental of Colorado Developmental Pathways Edward Madigan Foundation EKS&H Ernst & Young LLP FirstBank Hinkley High School IMA LibertyGives Foundation Mabel Y. Hughes Charitable Trust

Asian Pacific Development Center Boettcher Foundation Community Foundation Serving Greeley and Weld County CenturyLink Davis Partnership Architects Denver Community Church John G. Duncan Charitable Trust eSCO Processing and Recycling

Kaiser Permanente

Messner & Reeves, LLC

Koelbel Family Foundation

Ottercares Foundation Prime Trailer Leasing Rollie R. Kelley Family Foundation Fund S.P. Richards Co. TDA_Boulder Towers Watson

Schlessman Family Foundation SEM Farnsworth Group Smashburger SOEX The Sturm Family Foundation Syntrinsic Investment Council Tebo Store Fixtures Thomas and Beatrice Taplin Fund Tointon Family Foundation UPS WJD Foundation The Women’s Fund of Weld County, Inc.

InLine Media

Marsh

Mid-West Textile, Co.

Sam S. Bloom Foundation

Land Rover Denver northhighland PCR America Philadelphia Insurance Companies PwC Retail Control Systems

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR

VICE CHAIR

TREASURER

SECRETARY

Greg Ball AIG

Jennifer Wozniak Xcel Energy

Michael Ebedes PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLC

Jean Lawhead Delta Dental of Colorado

DIRECTORS

Damon Barry Palladium Holdings LLC

Stuart Davie Goodwill Industries of Denver

Vanecia Kerr City Year Denver

Harold Klausner Towers Watson

Vicki Lovato Silver & DeBoskey, PC

Venetia Marshall Kaiser Permanente

Dan May Renal Ventures Mgmt LLC

Diane Reeder Thompson White LLC

W. Dean Salter Bryan Cave HRO

Jennifer Sobanet CO Dept. of Higher Education

Dawn Taylor Owens College in Colorado

Kathy Vieth AgeWellMD

Chrissy Winkler RevGen Partners

Scott Worrell Beechwood Corporate Real Estate

Cliff Young University of Colorado at Denver


LEADERSHIP TEAM Stuart Davie President and CEO

Kristen Blessman Chief Marketing Officer

Jim Browning Chief Operations Officer

Joyce Schlose Chief People Officer

Chief Financial Officer position currently in transition

2014 HIGHLIGHTS GROWTH

AWARDS

New Stores

Community Awards

•  Arvada 6340 McIntyre Pkwy. •  Aurora 18355 E. 35th Pl. •  Highlands Ranch 8585 Poplar Way

Bayaud Enterprises

EVENTS Good Exchange for Change Fashion Show & Clothing Swap •  750 attendees •  $59,260 raised

18th Annual Goodwill Power of Work Luncheon •  650 attendees •  $130,000 raised

Driving for Diplomas Goodwill Golf Classic •  132 golfers •  $189,073 raised

•  2014 Employment Partner of the Year

Green Awards Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce •  Non-Profit Green Business of the Year

Colorado Association for Recycling •  Non-Profit Recycler of the Year

State of Colorado •  Environmental Leadership Silver Award for Good Electronics •  Environmental Leadership Silver Award for recycling program

Good Electronics R2 Certification •  First & only Goodwill to receive this award

ColoradoBIZ Magazine •  2014 Green Company of the Year

Marketing Awards American Marketing Association •  Gold Peak Award for outdoor advertising •  Gold & Silver Peak Awards for the 2014 Good Exchange for Change Fashion Show & Clothing Swap •  Bronze Peak Award for the 2013–2014 Annual Impact Report


MAP LIST RETAIL STORES AND DONATION CENTERS

LAKEWOOD

CENTENNIAL

1450 S. Wadsworth Blvd.

ARVADA 7547 W. 80th Ave. 6340 McIntyre Pkwy.

161 W. County Line Rd. 11561 W. Hialeah Pl. 6710 S. Pierce St.

5270 E. Arapahoe Rd. 8501 E. Arapahoe Rd. 6820 S. University Blvd.

AURORA

LONGMONT

18355 E. 35th Pl. 14400 E. Belleview Ave. 10590 E. Colfax Ave. 15509 E. Iliff Ave.

1750 Main St.

575 Clayton St. 2553 S. Colorado Blvd. 6850 Federal Blvd.

LOVELAND

EVERGREEN

BROOMFIELD 4775 West 121st. Ave.

BOULDER 2486 Baseline Rd.

DENVER 7797 E. 36th Ave. 5825 W. 44th. Ave. 21 S. Broadway 6435 E. Hampden Ave. 5000 Leetsdale Dr. 3100 S. Sheridan Blvd.

LITTLETON

DENVER

935 E. Eisenhower Blvd.

1250 Bergen Pkwy.

PARKER

HIGHLANDS RANCH

11000 S. Parker Rd.

THORNTON 550 E. 102nd Ave.

9579 S. University Blvd. 2209 Wildcat Reserve Pkwy.

LITTLETON

DÉJÀ BLUE BOUTIQUE

8168 S. Holly St.

DENVER

9227 E. Lincoln Ave.

303 University Blvd.

OUTLET WORLDS AURORA

LONE TREE

CAREER CONNECTION CENTERS

ENGLEWOOD

13600 E. Mississippi Ave.

AURORA

4160 S. Broadway

DENVER

FORT COLLINS

4355 Kearney St.

18355 E. 35th Pl. 15425 E. Iliff Ave.

315 Pavilion Ln.

ENGLEWOOD

FORT MORGAN

3155 S. Platte River Dr.

110 W. Platte Ave.

GOLDEN 17722 S. Golden Rd.

GREELEY

DONATION CENTERS AURORA

2510 47th Ave.

18852 E. Hampden Ave. 22880 E. Smoky Hill Rd.

HIGHLANDS RANCH

BOULDER

8585 Poplar Way

LAFAYETTE 555 W. South Boulder Rd.

3043 Walnut St.

CASTLE PINES 562 E. Castle Pines Pkwy.

CASTLE ROCK 814 S. Perry St.

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DENVER 7797 E. 36th Ave. 7125 Cherry Creek N. Dr. 2675 S. Decatur St. 2020 Larimer St. (part of Step 13) 3100 Sheridan Blvd.

GREELEY 1012 11th St.

LOVELAND 1511 E. 11th St.

THORNTON 8978 Washington St. (part of New America School)


MAP LIST CORPORATE OFFICE DENVER 6850 Federal Blvd.

PROGRAM OFFICE DENVER 711 Park Ave. W. (Located Inside the Mile High United Way offices)

SCHOOLS ADAMS CO. DIST. 12 Northglenn High 601 W. 100th Pl.

Thornton High 9351 N. Washington St.

ADAMS CO. DIST. 14 Adams City High 7200 Quebec Pkwy. Adams City Middle 4451 E. 72nd Ave.

Academy Of Urban Learning 2417 W. 29th Ave. Career Education Center Middle College Of Denver 2650 Eliot St. Contemporary Learning Academy 200 E. 9th Ave. Denver School Of The Arts 7111 Montview Blvd. East High 1600 City Park Esplanade Emily Griffith Opportunity School 1860 Lincoln St. Florence Crittenton High 96 S. Zuni St.

Kearney Middle 6160 Kearney St.

George Washington High 655 S. Monaco Pkwy.

Lester Arnold High 6500 E. 72nd Ave.

Grant Beacon Middle 1751 S. Washington St.

AURORA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Aurora Central High 11700 E. 11th Ave.

Martin Luther King Early College 19535 E. 46th Ave.

Hinkley High 1250 Chambers Rd.

North High 2960 N. Speer Blvd.

COLORADO CHARTER SCHOOL INSTITUTE

Place Bridge Academy 7125 Cherry Creek N. Dr.

DENVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Abraham Lincoln High 2285 S. Federal Blvd.

Thomas Jefferson High 3950 S. Holly St. West Career Academy 951 Elati St. West Generation Academy 951 Elati St.

JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT Jefferson High School 2305 Pierce St.

SHERIDAN SCHOOL DISTRICT Sheridan High 3201 W. Oxford Ave. S.O.A.R. Academy 3201 W. Oxford Ave.

WELD COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Greeley Central High 1515 14th Ave. Greeley West High 2401 35th Ave. Northridge High 7001 Grizzly Dr.

High Tech Early College 11200 E. 45th Ave.

Gateway High School 1300 S. Sable Blvd.

The New America School 1751 S. Washington St.

Summit Academy 3001 S. Federal Blvd.

P.U.S.H. Academy 4501 Airport Way South High 1700 E. Louisiana Ave. This list reflects services & locations as of Dec. 2015

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Profile for Goodwill Industries of Denver

Goodwill Industries of Denver Annual Impact Report 2014-2015  

When we build a skilled and empowered workforce, we ensure that the community will thrive, now and long into the future. Introducing the c...

Goodwill Industries of Denver Annual Impact Report 2014-2015  

When we build a skilled and empowered workforce, we ensure that the community will thrive, now and long into the future. Introducing the c...

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