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BE MORE THAN A TOURIST

Seasonal

Going Out

Visitors

Life

Festivals

Dining & Nightlife

Pull-out maps

Culture

Fireworks

Events

Sights

Leisure

Beaches

Art

Transportation

Shopping

THE SUMMER ISSUE 2015

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06


45 bis awa | quarante-cinq bis awa | Everyone is welcome at this roadside standing “bubble bar” and grill. Enjoy Champagne, wine, beer, etc with some char-grilled dishes, hot off the flames. The charcoal grill brings out the full flavor of our high quality ingredients. Prices are so reasonable you could pop in every day.

menu includes

Charcoal Grill Yakitori Tapas

¥190 + tax~ ¥480 + tax~ ¥300 + tax~

address

1-18, Fukuro machi, Naka ku, Hiroshima tel

082.545.0450 business hour

17:00-23:30

45 | quarante-cinq | A bistro in the heart of the city, 45 has a great selection of wine, including many varieties of Natural Wine or Vin Naturel, known as “Bio Wine” in Japan. Pair a glass or two with dishes from our wide selection of foods on the menu. Why not treat yourself to homemade Italian salsiccia sausages, Hiroshima oysters or some of our many dishes featuring locally grown vegetables. Popular dishes

Salad Niçoise Homemade Italian sausage (pork, lamb, beef) Duck confit with potatoes

address

1-18, Fukuro machi, Naka ku, Hiroshima tel

082.545.1225 business hour

11:30-23:30

NINNIKUYA MANAO | ninnikuya manao | A real taste of Thailand prepared with authentic Thai ingredients and cooking methods. our Thai chef has worked in the kitchens of some of Bangkok’s most popular restaurants and prides himself in his use of super fresh herbs to create perennial Thai favorites like green papaya salad, tom yum soup, fresh spring rolls and massaman curry. Real Thai flavors right here in Hiroshima! menu includes

Green papaya salad Tom yum soup Gai yaang Vietnamese spring roll Green curry

¥1,080 + tax ¥1,480 + tax ¥880 + tax ¥380 + tax ¥880 + tax

address

Tatemachi build. 2F, 6-11, Tatemachi, Naka ku, Hiroshima tel

082.240.0229 business hour

11:30-14:00 / 17:30-23:00

¥680 + tax ¥500 + tax ¥1,800 + tax


WELCOME

GetHiroshima Mag Issue 6 June 2, 2015 Circulation 5,000 copies Published quarterly by GEC Next issue September, 2015 Printed by Hiroshima Chuo Printing Co., Ltd. Motoaki Tahara Editor-in-chief Paul Walsh Design team NININBAORI http://nininbaori.co.jp/ Art Direction: Judith Cotelle Katsuyoshi Kunimasa Norimitsu Maki Ryouta Kumagai

Summer in Hiroshima moves from the last balmy and breezy days of spring, through the sticky rainy season, and into the furnace of summer proper. The heat can certainly slow you down, but there’s lots to do and enjoy. Try to beat the heat and you’ll most likely fail, but take lots of breaks, carry lots of wet wipes and drink lots of water, and there’s no need to let it cramp your style, too much.

Illustration Naomi Leeman http://www.naomileeman.com/ 広島の夏は爽やかな風が吹き心地よい春の日々から、湿った 梅雨を通り本格的な灼熱の夏を迎えます。

その暑さは確実に体の動きを遅くしますが、夏にはたくさん楽 しい事があります。暑さに打ち勝つことは難しいですが、たく さん休憩と汗拭き、そしてたくさん水分を飲むことで自分を閉 じ込めてしまう必要はありません。来る8月6日は原爆の日が 70周年を迎え、少なくとも当日、その近日は世界中が広島に

This August 6 is the 70th anniversary of the A-bombing and the attention of the world will be focused on Hiroshima, at least for a day or so. The recent failure of Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty talks will be fresh in the minds of many, already concerned about the dwindling numbers of hibakusha survivors able to bear witness to the horror of the nuclear attacks. Undoubtedly, there will much discussion about how to move forward, continue their work and honor their legacy, but it all starts with remembering. So, by all means enjoy the summer. We will. But, wherever you are at 8:15am on August 6 and at 11:02 on August 9, please turn your thoughts to Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Paul Walsh

注目します。最近の核拡散防止条約の失敗は多くの人の心の 中で新鮮に残っており、核兵器の恐ろしさの証人である被爆 生存者の減少も懸念されています。

どのように進展、維持及び遺産を尊重するかの議論が確実に 行われますが、まずはそのことを覚えておくことから始まりま す。是非夏を楽しんでください。ですが、どこにいても8月6 日8時15分と8月9日11時2分に広島と長崎のことを思い 描いてください。 ポール ウォルシュ

Sales, PR and marketing GEC World/GetHiroshima Yuko Asada Contributors Adam Beck Tim Buthod Judith Cotelle www.jud-hiroshima.com Izumi Goto Naomi Leeman http://www.naomileeman.com/ Matt Mangham Alex Rey Charlie Rose http://charlieroselovelove.com/ JJ Walsh Photography Judith Cotelle www.jud-hiroshima.com Jumpei Ishida Mish Vampiro Photography http://www.mishvampiro.com JJ Walsh About the cover Wearing a yukata made by her grandmother for her mother, 2014 Hiroshima Goodwill Ambassador Rio Sekimoto enjoys a dessert in Chamonix Mont Blanc which celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. Find us online

www.gethiroshima.com Cover: Rio Sekimoto Photo: Junpei Ishida Thanks to Chamonix Montblanc

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All rights reserved © GetHiroshima 2015 As far as we are aware, all info correct at time of going to print. If you see something that has changed, we’d really appreciate you letting us know at info@gethiroshima.com Warning/Disclaimer GetHiroshima and GEC World will not accept liability for any damages caused by the contents of GetHiroshima Mag, including, but not limited to any omissions, errors, facts or false statements. Opinions or advice expressed in GetHiroshima Mag are not necessarily those of GetHiroshima or GEC World. No content published in Get Hiroshima can be reproduced, republished, retransmitted or redistributed without permission.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/03


Peruvian, Spanish & Mexican Food & Drinks Lunches from ¥600 15:00-19:00 Happy hour drinks and tapas ¥350

COUPON Show this magazine ad for

FREE CAKE WITH LUNCH 10% OFF DINNER (over ¥1000)

All-you-can-drink deals From ¥1000 for 60min Any time of day Open Mon-Fri 10:00-23:00 L.O. / Sat, Sun & Hol 11:00-23:00 L.O.

Credit Cards accepted 0 8 2- 5 0 2-74 6 6

Map C P. 29 [C-1] 8

Cusco Cafe is a Hiroshima favorite. Great breakfast, lunch & dinner. Great happy hour & cocktails, home made pizza, Mexican tacos, Peruvian & Spanish food. Lovely view and friendly staff.

International DJ bar Open till 5am 365 days of the year No cover Sunday-Thursday ¥1000 cover Friday & Saturday (incl 1 drink) Happy Hour ¥350 drinks 20:00-22:00 Music requests OK! No cover for ladies Fridays

Credit cards accepted 0 8 2-2 4 6 -5 8 0 0

Map B p.28 2

COUPON Show this magazine ad for

You’ll find the full spectrum of the international crowd here. The DJs are very happy to take floor requests. Always packed at the weekends, it’s where everyone seems to end the night. Also a good bet if you are looking for some mid-week action. https://www.facebook.com/barcosgroup

FREE ADMISSION ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ¥350 DRINKS UNTIL 12AM ON FRIDAY & SATURDAY


CONTENTS Welcome must see gethiroshima picks news Shopping Summer Festivals kagura Okonomiyaki Hiroshima Carp and Sanfrecce 34. Events 36. art 37. Sponsors 03. 06. 07. 08. 09. 14. 17. 18. 32.

50. Q&A 51. Matt’s Moment

Features 10. #HIROSHIMA70 DIGITAL STAMP RALLY Get more out of Hiroshima and share it with friends, family and the world.

13. 8.6

The day when Hiroshima and the world stops to remember.

20. BEACHES & FIREWORKS GUIDE 22. SUO-OSHIMA Beautifully illustrated guide to this island getaway. By Naomi Leeman

42. GANKO YATAI

Satisfy late night munchies at this retro food court. By Judith Cotelle

23. 8 page pullout city guide maps and languag e

44. Goto Izumi’s Deep Hiroshima Because japanese ice cream!!! By Goto Izumi

46. P E O P LE / A C O N V E R S A T I O N W I TH A W A R D

WINNING POET ARTHUR BINARD By Matt Mangham

49. EVEN A CHILD KNOWS WAR IS WRONG By Adam Beck

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/05


Beaten tracks

MUST SEE

SHUKKEI-EN GARDEN A delightfully compact reconstruction of a “circular tour style garden” designed by warrior tea master Soko Ueda in 1620. The central lake is populated by koi, turtles and heron. Explore the narrow paths. See P.12 for regular cultural events held here.

PEACE MEMORIAL PARK AND MUSEUM Most visitors are here to learn about the A-bombing, and the Peace Memorial Park and Museum is the place to do that. The museum certainly isn’t fun, but you should set aside at least an hour to make your way through the exhibits, plus some time to process the experience. You will find hope as well as tragedy here. Hiroshima endured the unendurable and has rebounded. The museum not only documents and preserves the memory of the event and those it affected, but also appeals for the abolition of nuclear weapons. Hiroshima’s commitment to spreading that message is evident in the nominal ¥50 admission fee.

A sudden return to the hustle and bustle of the city center can jar the senses and the grounds of the Peace Park provide a buffer, emotional as well as spacial. Here, you can sit quietly beneath trees that defied fears that “nothing would grow for 75 years”. Nervous school children approach to ask questions in halting English. The contrast of their smiling, happy faces with what you have seen in the museum lifts your heart.

MIYAJIMA The island of Itsukushima - known as Miyajima - is quite simply, divine. Its very trees, rocks and sands deemed sacred from times of myth and legend, Itsukushima Shrine was built over the water in the 12th century so as not to impinge on the island’s sacred soil. All Shinto shrines have a torii gate through which the gods housed within are to be approached. The gate to Itsukushima is an iconic image that has adorned the front of many a guidebook since being designated as one of the nihon sankei, “three great scenic views of Japan”. “Great view” status brings great crowds. However, most visitors stick to the area between the ferry terminal and Itsukushima Shrine. Try to catch the great torii gate in both its “floating” state at high tide and at low tide when you can walk out and marvel at its bulk. Then, head off and explore Miyajima’s side streets and park trails. Visit the One Thousand Mat Senjokaku Pavillion and Daishoin Temple. The view from the top of mythical Mt Misen is impressive, as are the huge boulders on the summit. Late afternoon, Miyajima’s crowds melt away and, just before sunset, lanterns light up and Itsukushima Shrine and the torii gate are illuminated. The atmosphere is quite special.

HIROSHIMA CASTLE “Carp Castle” is a 1958 reconstruction of the original Edo-era castle built by Terumoto Mori in the late 16th century. It houses a mildly interesting museum and has a viewing platform. Despite its pleasant grounds, visitors who have come from Himeji may not be too impressed.

Go Deeper Hiroshima Optional Tours offer private tours by friendly and knowledgeable licensed guides. For more details of these and other tours check out HiroshimaTours.info [en]

Only have one day in Hiroshima? We feel sorry for you as you are going to miss so much! However, if it can’t be helped, here’s one way to “do” Hiroshima in just 12 hours or so. It’s pretty full on and you’ll probably be exhausted when you sink into your train seat to head back to your digs. Sure you don’t want to stay the night?

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tcar Stree Station Walk

Shukkei-en

Stree t

car

• Flex Hotel • Kyobashi • Riverside cafes Riverside Breakfast

• Nagataya • Caffe Ponte • Kanawa Oyster Boat

car

t Stree

Peace Park

Lunch at Peace Park

Boat to Miyajima

12 hour model course


GetHiroshima picks

KAGURA Ancient myths and folktales performed in extravagant costumes to frenetic drum rhythms. Kagura evolved from sacred dances performed by priests into a folk art that involves whole communities, and is currently undergoing something of a renaissance. See Page 13 for more details.

Futabayama hike

Photos © JudHiroshima Futabayama view

MITAKI TEMPLE Beautiful and atmospheric at any time of the year. Whether you consider yourself spiritual or not, the dense greenery and flowing water will calm the most harried traveler. Highly recommended, even for those suffering from Kyoto “temple fatigue”. Mitaki Station is 10min by train from Hiroshima on the Kabe Line, from where it is a 20 minute walk up the hill. Gate closes at 5pm.

Shimizu Gekijo Taishu Engeki is theater for the masses, Japanese vaudeville performed by itinerant theater troupes for very loyal fans. Distinctly downtown in atmosphere, it really is another world that few outsiders ever see. 3 hour performances start at 12pm & 6pm daily for ¥1900. Or just catch the final hour’s “Grand Show” for a bargain ¥1000. Find out more at http://bit.ly/shimizugekijo

Peace Pagoda

PEACE PAGODA, FUTABA-YAMA As you come into Hiroshima Station on the shinkansen, you may notice the bulbous, silver Peace Pagoda on top of Mt Futaba. The walk up the mountain, starting at Toshogu Shrine and winding up through a forest under 100 or so red torii gates, is worth the effort and you are rewarded with a commanding view of the city and surrounding islands from the top.

• Torii Gate & Itsukushima Shrine • Daisho-in • Mt Misen • Snacking on Omotesando Shopping Street Miyajima

JR Train

Carp

Station

Dinner

SHIMIZU GEKIJO

THE CARP Baseball fan or not, a home game at Mazda Stadium is always a memorable experience. Read more about Hiroshima’s local heroes on Page 20. LAST TRAINS To Tokyo: NOZOMI: 20:01 / Non-NOZOMI: 19:03 To Osaka: NOZOMI: 22:13 / Non-NOZOMI: 21:58 To Fukuoka (Hakata): NOZOMI: 22:50 / Non-NOZOMI: 22:34 Train schedules do change so we highly recommend you double check the above information. • Kanawa • Roopali • Sarii-chan

OUT ON THE TOWN After learning about all that Hiroshima endured, it can be tempting to give in to the urge to hole up in your hotel. Resist that urge and get out into this fun city to eat, drink and, yes - make merry, with its people. Only then can you get a true and full appreciation of what a special place Hiroshima is. GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/07


NEWS LOOK THE PART AT TOKASAN Tokasan (see page 14) is one festival at which you can be more than a spectator and really feel a part of. The key, of course, is to dress the part. Hit the festival in a yukata summer kimono and you will not only feel like one of the tribe, but you’ll also attract admiring looks and compliments. It’s a great conversation starter. With all that attention, it’s nice to come correct, but this can be difficult to pull off even with the relatively simple yukata. During the festival there are stations in Fukuromachi Park, the Hiroshima Kokusai Hotel and in the Shareo Underground shopping mall where someone will get your yukata looking just right for ¥500. There’s also a yukata market in Shareo, so you can get kitted out and fitted in one go if you do desire. Unsure if you want to take the plunge and buy a yukata? The local government is here to help. Yukata and traditional geta sandal sets are available for free rental to 10 lucky visitors (8 women and 2 men each day) on June 5 and June 6. It’s on a first come first served basis at Fukuromachi Park 13:00-21:30. Proof of foreignness and a ¥3000 deposit is required. A word of warning: While yukata are quite comfortable, geta sandals can leave the feet in the uninitiated in shreds. It’s worth keeping a pair of shoes handy to slip into between photos.

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CHAMONIX MONT BLANC, 60 YEARS YOUNG! We are big fans of old school junkissa coffee shops and their post-war ambience. Chamonix Mont Blanc (the location for this issue’s cover photo) is one of Hiroshima’s most venerable and we’d like to congratulate them on their 60th year in business on Ebisu-dori!.

SHOP, AND RIDE FOR FREE

BEER GARDENS

Overseas visitors who spend ¥2000 in one of the many stores in PARCO’s department stores get a free Hiroden 1 day bus and streetcar pass. *1 pass per customer, presentation of passport required. Limited to 100 passes a month.

How about a sweaty night spent drinking copious amounts of beer on a department store roof covered in astroturf? Beer Gardens are one of Japan’s great summer traditions and they are great places to meet locals loosened up by the booze. Hiroshima’s beer gardens are found on top of city center department stores and a couple of the hotels. Look for the icon on the maps in our pullout guide and check http://bit.ly/hiroshimabeergardens for more details.

HIROSHIMA PEACE CAMP A little far out of town, but the Hiroshima Peace Camp offers cheap camping at Hiroshima City University August 4-7 when most hotels in Hiroshima are fully booked. Volunteers cook up meals for very low prices, there is free transport to the Peace Memorial Ceremony on the morning of August 6 and they also have some tours with free English guides. http://hiroshima-peace-camp-english.jimdo.com/


SHOPPING

shopping summer 2015 Words / Photos: Charlie Rose http://charlieroselovelove.com/

Hiroshima is a city with a small, hometown vibe, but when it comes to fashion, if you know where to look, its eclectic shopping districts have much to offer.

LOCAL LOVE Japan is famous for its love of brands and you’ll find your Louis Vuitton, Zara, H&Ms etc around the ‘Hondori’ shopping area. But if you want to take home something a little different search out one-of-a-kind pieces at some of Hiroshima’s local boutiques. Two of my favorites can also be found near Hondori. LILIAN: With a young, fresh feel to their clothing, you can’t help but fall in love with Lilian’s playful denim options and enticing ‘how to wear’ displays for currently carried products. I personally love how varied in style all of their items are, while still being able to maintain a very classic look. 1 Map p.29 [C-2]

MERCI: Also carrying a great selection of fantastic denim, Merci offers youthful style with a sophisticated twist. I love how friendly and willing to help the staff are and how happy they are to make suggestions. Even if you can’t speak Japanese, they are incredibly warm and their friendly smiles will put you immediately at ease. 2 Map p.29 [C-2]

HIDDEN FASHION TREASURES OF HIROSHIMA Looking for that perfect dress? That dress you’ve always pictured in your mind, but can never quite find? Next time you’re in Hiroshima, be sure to check out RUBY, a local made-to-order-dress shop. Kura Tomomi specializes in wedding dresses, party dresses, and casual clothing. If she doesn’t have that perfect piece for you on hand, she’ll make it! Be sure to bring your dictionary and BIG gestures. Despite the fact that she can speak hardly any English, Kura loves a foreign language challenge ;) www.rubydress.com 3 Map p.29 [A-1]

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/09


0 7 a m i irosh ally

#H

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#1

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Children’s Peace Monument

Sadako Sasaki, the little girl who aimed to fold over 1000 orizuru origami cranes in the hope of curing herself of leukemia 10 years after the A-bombing, was the inspiration for this statue in Peace Memorial Park. It’s a story now known around the world and the orizuru has become a symbol of the hope for peace. The plaque at the base of the statue reads

R in g th e golden cr

pe ac e be ll w

an e hi le m ak in g

your ow n w is h for pe ac e an d po st a ph ot o of your or iz ur u pe ac e cr an e fr om th e Fr ee W iFi Sp ot at th e “R es t Hou se ” vi sitor in form at ion ce nt er.

This is our cry. This is our prayer. Peace in the world. Pick up origami paper and orizuru folding instructions at the Rest House visitor information center, or ask someone at the memorial to help you fold your peace crane

#2

The Gates of Peace

Po st a pict ur e of th

G at es of Pe ac

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Across Peace Boulevard south of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum are the Gates of Peace - nine meter tall glass arches inscribed with the word “peace” in 49 languages. Can you find the word peace in your language and in the Japanese characters 平和 (heiwa)?

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ot in th e H ir oLoun ge fr om In te rnation al Ex ch an ge Loun ge an d Li br ar y in th e Inte rn at iona l Confer en ce Ce nt er or th e lo bby of th e Pe ac e Mem ori al Mus eu m . sh im a Pe ac e


#3

Become a samurai at Hiroshima Castle

When Terumoto Mori built the original Hiroshima Castle just over 400 years ago the Mori clan controlled almost the whole of western Japan. You too can become a samurai on the first floor of the reconstructed castle keep.

Po st a pict ur e of

your se lf in yo ur sa mur ai ar m or fr om th e Fr ee W if i Sp ot in H ir os hi m a Ca st le .

#4

Compose a Haiku at Shukkei-en Garden

Haiku (pronounced hai-koo) are 3 lined Japanese poems. They are mood poems, don’t have to rhyme and are often inspired by nature. The first line should have 5 syllables, the second 7 syllables and the third 5 syllables.

赤薔薇や萌黄の蜘蛛の這ふて居る by Masaoka Shiki akabara ya moegi no kumo no hohteiru

a red rose a yellow green spider crawling on

Next level Haiku • Include a seasonal reference • Connect to your feelings about your visit to Hiroshima

#5

Say Okonomiyaki!

Watching okonomiyaki being made is fun, but it’s even more fun to help out!

Po st your H ai ku al

w it h a ph ot o

ga rden fr om

on g of th e

th e Fr ee W iF i Sp ot at Shuk ke i-e n G ar de n.

Po st a ph ot o of yo

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GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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#3

• Hiroshima Castle -en shukkei garden

a hiroshim castle

#4

• Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum • A-bomb Dome rk

peace pa

• Caffe Ponte

#1

• Children’s Peace Monument Rest House Hiroshima City •Tourist Information Center

International Conference • Hiroshima Peace •Center Memorial Museum Hiroshima

Kinzagai Shopping Street Hondori Shopping Street

Urabukuro Shopping Street

#2

Ebisudori Shopping Street

• •

Alice Garden Okonomimura

#5

tag your instagrams and tweets #hiroshima70 heiwa-odori

The Gates of Peace

For more access points, Check our website” Hiroshima navigator” http://www.hiroshima-navi.or.jp/en/information/wifi/854808.php

Hiroshima City’s official free WiFi service

HOW TO SIGN UP TO USE HIROSHIMA FREE WI-FI

1. Tap “settings”, open the Wi-Fi settings screen, and turn on the Wi-Fi option. 2. From the list of wireless networks shown, select SSID “Hiroshima_Free_Wi-Fi”. 3. Follow the instructions. After agreeing to the Terms of Service, you can connect to the Internet easily after registering with just your name and email address.

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On connecting, the “Adventure Travel on the Wi-Fi” download screen will automatically appear. From here it is possible to access any desired online content.

Download the app to help you get the most out of your stay in Hiroshima!

Download here (You must be connected to Internet)

Adventure Travel on the Wi-Fi


8.6 HIROSHIMA DAY

Every year, thousands of people fill the city and this day of peace is often far from peaceful. Police in riot gear jar the senses. On this, the 70th anniversary, against the continuing Fukushima nuclear crisis, the failure of the recent non-proliferation talks and the current government’s aim of revising Japan’s “Peace Constitution“, large crowds and vocal protests can be expected.

In Hiroshima the A-bombing is ever present. It’s not that it is constantly on the mind of people as they go about their daily business, but it is always in the background. Everything that happens here, happens in the context of it happening in the world’s first A-bombed city. Here, even the most mundane of activities can be viewed as an affirmation of life, a testament

At 8:15am, however, when the peace bell is struck, except for a sole protester surrounded by police officers, all go silent in and around Peace Memorial Park and only the sound of cicadas chirping in the summer heat can be heard.

ARTISTIC AND UNOFFICIAL COMMEMORATIONS

In recent years, more and more events - ranging from lectures and workshops to music concerts and DJ nights - are being held around town on August 6. For well over a decade DJs have held the free “Summer of Love” gathering in Hanover Park across the road from the A-bomb Dome, until the (usually good natured) police shut things down. With other events being held in the park this year, keep an eye on GetHiroshima.com to find out if and where be on go this year.

to survival and manifestation of hope realized.

The anniversary of the bombing is, however, a day on which the citizens of Hiroshima reflect on the tragedy and pay remembrance to those who perished in the blast and from its after effects. Hiroshima Day, Peace Day or hachi-roku (“eight-six”) as it is often referred to here in Hiroshima, is also the day when the rest of Japan and the world turn their attention to Hiroshima.

FLOATING OF PEACE LANTERNS As night falls the police melt away and the crowds return to the Motoyasu River between the A-bomb Dome and Peace Park, to take part in the poignant, but somewhat less sombre tourou nagashi floating of lanterns. Thousands of people, including lots of families and small children, many in bright summer yukata, make their way to the riverside and set lanterns decorated with wishes for peace afloat on the river. It’s a beautiful sight and with the musicians playing on the riverbank, the mood is very different from the daytime ceremonies.

Float your own lantern Make a ¥600 donation at one of the tents (open from 6am) opposite the A-bomb Dome and a lantern will be set afloat on the river for you after dusk from a designated boat. For the same ¥600 donation you can design your own lantern cover which you can affix to a lantern on the concrete bank of the Motoyasu river after 6pm, from where you can set it afloat yourself. NB you can expect a long wait in line to float your lantern from the designated spot.

This day attracts all sorts of people, for whom “Hiroshima” necessarily holds many different meanings. Relatives and friends mourn those lost in the blast and the chaos that followed. Politicians jet in and disappear just as quickly. There are many peace activists as well as right wing groups; and of course there are the tourists.

For the latest information about events on August 6 check GetHiroshima.com.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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F e st iva l s

Bon odori dance at Shintenchi Park / photo © Hiroshima Kankou Renmei

tokasan

6/5-7

Toukasan [とうかさん], the most festive of Hiroshima’s downtown festivals, dates back 400 years. It signals the start of summer, and locals mark the occasion by giving traditional lightweight summer kimono, called yukata, their first outing of the year. Everyone from young punks to pensioners loves Toukasan and the streets are packed and ablaze with color. Most will line up at the temple at the end of Chuodori street to pray to Touka Daimyoujin for good fortune, but Toukasan is as much about showing off your yukata, sampling the street food and playing festival games as it is about religious ritual.

Girls in yukata © Hiroshima Kankou Renmei

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Enryuji Temple

Toukasan starts around noon each day and runs until about 11pm. It’s after dark that it gets really lively. The main Chuo-dori street is closed to traffic from 7pm, though much of the street is taken up by dance and drum performances, fashion shows and other events. Our recommendation is to duck into Shintenchi “Park” just off Chuo-dori where the local residents association holds an old school “bon odori” dance festival in which everyone is welcome to join in. It’s an event that evokes 1960s and 1970s Japan. Kids love the retro cotton candy, snacks and ramune drinks, sold at parent-pleasing low prices.


fireworks

YANNAI GOLDFISH FESTIVAL / 8/13

It’s all about fireworks during the summer in Japan and just about every largish town and even quite a few small ones have a display either as the main attraction or the finale to a festival. Young and old love to dress up in brightly decorated yukata, graze the festival stalls and play carnival games. From mid-July until the end of August you can catch some fireworks every weekend somewhere in the region and, during mid-August, on weeknights too. Below, we highlight some of the big ones, but look overleaf and on pages 20-21 for more listings and locations.

INNOSHIMA SUIGUN / 8/30

KINTAIKYO FIREWORKS / 8/8

Spend the afternoon touring the preserved Edoera quarter famous for its traditional soy sauce warehouses and artisanal workshops. After dark, hundreds of red and white goldfish lanterns are lit and giant versions are paraded through the town before a fireworks display rounds things off.

rice planting

A beach festival just off the Shimanami Kaido bridge route. As the sun goes down, the triumphant return to shore of Murakami “pirate” warlords who once dominated this part of the Inland Sea is reenacted with a large cast and an ample use of fire. The finale is a fireworks display over the bay.

Another spectacular back drop. Also very popular, but the river banks are long, so finding a viewing spot is easier than you might think.

MIYAJIMA FIREWORKS / 8/11

HIROSHIMA PORT DREAM / 7/2

Hiroshima’s streetcars are packed with brightly-colored yukata as people make their way to the city’s big fireworks festival near Hiroshima Port in Ujina.

Rice cultivation is deeply engrained in Japanese culture so it’s no surprise that there are traditional rituals associated with its production. The Mibu-no-hana-daue ritual reenacted on the first Sunday of June is said to have roots in the middle ages. Bulls used to plough the fields are led through the streets of Chiyoda to Mibu Shrine where they are dressed with elaborately decorated saddles and colorful necklaces. After ploughing, saotome (rice planting maidens) in kimono and wide-brimmed sugegasa hats sing as they plant seedlings to traditional music. The following weekend, you can see a smaller scale rice planting event at Shukkei-en Garden in the center of Hiroshima city. There are no bulls here, but as well as rice planting, drummers perform several traditional dances. The drummers spanning the walkway that across the pond is quite a sight. Mibu-no-hanadaue: 6/7, 11:00-15:00, Chiyoda Ritual rice planting: 6/14, 13:00-15:00, Shukkei-en Garden

The great floating torii gate is dramatically silhouetted against a huge display which attracts thousands of people. Arrive early to secure a prime spot. Plan to stay on the island overnight or set aside time, and perhaps a bottle of sake, for the human tide making its way to the ferry terminal to subside, before attempting to get home. GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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KANGEN-SAI / 7/13 16:00-23:00, MIYAJIMA

photo © Hatsukaichi Tourism Division

Miyajima’s most elaborate festival dates from the 12th century when it was introduced by Heike warlord Taira-no-Kiyomori. Beautifully decorated boats carry a portable shrine and musicians playing classical kangen court music between Itsukushima Shrine and other shrines on Miyajima and the mainland. Beginning with a shinto ceremony at Itsukushima Shrine at 4pm, the festival continues until 11pm when the portable shrine is returned to Itsukushima Shrine. More details at http://bit.ly/kangensai/

TAMATORI-SAI / 7/27 START AROUND 12:00, MIYAJIMA

|| 6/5-7 Tokasan Yukata Festival || 6/7 Mibu no Hanadaue rice planting, Kita-hiroshima Shoubu Tea Ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden || 6/14 Ritual rice planting, Shukkei-en Garden || 6/14-19 Onomichi night shops || 6/27 Gion Festival, Onomichi || 7/5 Tanabata Tea Ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden || 7/17-19 Tenjin Festival, Onomichi ||

7/18 Innoshima Habu Port Fireworks Festival . Iwakuni Port Fireworks Festival, Iwakuni . Miyoshi Summer Fireworks Display . Mizuo-cho Water festival, Onomichi

||

7/25 Nagato & Senzaki Fireworks Festival . Numata Hongo Fireworks Festival, Mihara . Onomichi Sumiyoshi Fireworks 19:30-21:15 . Hiroshima Port Dream Fireworks . Yaekangensai, Kita-hiroshima . Okagensan Festival, Kirikushi, Etajima 16:00-21:00

|| 7/28 Otake/Wakigawa Fireworks Festival .

photo © Hatsukaichi Tourism Division

The annual tamatori (literally ‘treasure ball grab’) festival is said to be based on a ritual dating back hundreds of years. After a ceremony in Itsukushima Shrine, a ball is placed on a platform suspended from a scaffold built over the water in front of the shrine. Teams of men, many dressed only in loincloths, make human pyramids in the water and attempt to jump from the top, mount the platform and capture the ball, thus securing a year of good fortune for his team. To keep things interesting, the platform is moved vigorously up, down and back and forth all the while..

|| 7/29-30 Sumiyoshi Shrine Summer Festival || 8/1 Kangensai, Miyajima 16:00-24:00 Kure Fireworks Festival . Hamakko Fireworks Festival, Hamada . || 8/13 Yanai Goldfish Lantern Festival . || 8/7-9 Yassa Festival, Mihara (Fireworks: 9th 20:00-20:45) . || 8/8 Kintaikyo Bridge Fireworks Festival, Iwakuni . Hikari Fireworks Festival, Hikari, Yamaguchi . || 8/11 Miyajima Fireworks 19:40-20:40 . || 8/13 Eba Fire Festival || 8/13-15 Fukuyama Summer Festival & Ashidagawa Fireworks Festival (fireworks: 15th) . || 8/13-16 Shiraishi Odori

MIHARA YASSA FESTIVAL / 8/8-10, MIHARA Every August the whole of the normally sleepy city of Mihara pitches in and puts on the Yassa festival. The festival runs from Friday night to Sunday, with local performers, a flea market, booths, a fireworks show, and, most importantly, parades of locals doing the Yassa Dance of which Mihara locals are fiercely proud. The dance is so catchy and simple you might just join in and try it yourself without realizing it.

|| 8/14 Tamatori-sai, Miyajima || 8/15 Kisa Fireworks Festival, Kisa, Miyoshi . || 8/16 Setoda Summer Festival . || 8/22 Setoda Lantern Floating Festival || 8/22,23 End of August Shobara Yoitoko Festival || 8/23 Shobara Summer Festival 19:30-21:30 || 8/24 Cooling Tea Ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden || 8/29 Takehara Fireworks Festival . Akitakada Fireworks Festival, Haji Dam . || 8/30 Innoshima Suigun Fire Festival . || 8/31 Innoshima Suigun Water Festival www.gethiroshima.com/events

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.= Fireworks


kagura spectacular folk theater for the masses

A giant, multicolored, eight-headed serpent writhes back and forth across the stage, attacking and entwining a sword-wielding hero. Engulfed in smoke, sparks spitting from its multiple jaws, the beast bites, spins and leaps, occasionally snapping at young children brave enough to come to the front of the stage. The hero, of course, eventually triumphs, severing each of the heads in turn, to the delight of the audience.

This is the thrilling conclusion to Yamata-noorochi, a crowd-pleasing tale from Japanese mythology, often performed as the finale at kagura festivals and competitions. Kagura is diverse art form with a variety of performance styles. That performed in northern Hiroshima and Iwami in Shimane is characterized energetic dances performed in elaborate (and heavy) costumes, accompanied by stirring

rhythms. While you may not understand the dialogue, the exciting fight scenes, lots of dry ice, fireworks and lightning- fast costume changes keep the uninitiated entertained. In Hiroshima city, kagura is most often seen at autumn shrine festivals. Every Wednesday, however, troupes come in from the countryside to do two performances Kenmin Bunka Center near the A-bomb Dome. Admission is only ¥1000, and non-Japanese readers are provided with basic English outlines of the pieces to be performed. There’s also an opportunity to check out the masks and costumes up close, and get some great souvenir snaps after the second show has finished. Those who would like to delve deeper into the world of kagura should make a trip out to Monzenmura Kagura Village in Midorii in Akitakata. Here, around 20 troupes take turns in performing in the “Kagura Dome” and the facility also has restaurants, shops, a hot spring and accommodation.

Hiroshima Kagura in the City Center

7/1 prog. 1: Yamabushi / prog. 2: Jinrin 7/8 prog. 1: Amano-iwato / prog. 2: Kurozuka 7/15 prog. 1: Sesho-ishi / prog. 2: Katsuragi-san

Two Performances Every Wednesday until December 23 at

~Hiroshima Prefectural Citizen’s Culture Center~ (Rijo Kaikan Kenmin Bunka Center) p.29 [B-1/2]

Photo session with players and costumes on stage after the show from 20:40

Admission: ¥1,000 (All seating is unassigned) Tickets sold on day of performance: from 17:00 Doors open: 18:00 First performance: 19:00 Intermission: 19:40-20:00 Second performance: 20:00

7/22 prog. 1: Jinrin / prog. 2: Modori-bashi 7/29 prog. 1: Oye-yama / prog. 2: Yamata-no-orochi 8/5 prog. 1: Momiji-gari / prog. 2: Yamata-no-orochi 8/12 prog. 1: Tsuchi-gumo / prog. 2: Takiyahsa-hime 8/19 prog. 1: Inamura-ga-saki / prog. 2: Takiyasha-hime 8/26 prog. 1: Masakado-no-ran / prog. 2: Myoujin-san 9/2 prog. 1: Momiji-gari / prog. 2: Kumaso 9/9 prog. 1: Modori-bashi / prog. 2: Takiyasha-hime 9/16 prog. 1: Katsuragi-san / prog. 2: Yamata-no-orochi

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9/23 prog. 1: Katsuragi-san / prog. 2: Akko-den

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

9/30 prog. 1: Akko-den / prog. 2: Takiyasha-hime


You ha v en' t d o n e hir oshima if you ha v en't d o n e

Hiroshima Okonomiyaki! Okonomiyaki, a savory pancake cooked on an iron hotplate, containing egg, chopped vegetables, meat and/or seafood is found all over Japan. In Hiroshima, this dish is beefed up by adding noodles and lots of veggies. Rather than mixing all the ingredients together, as in the more common Kansai or Osaka style, here in Hiroshima they are layered. The whole thing is topped with a savory-sweet sauce.

Locals are very proud of their contribution to Japanese cuisine, and regional rivalry, while good natured, is strong. Be prepared to be quizzed about whether you prefer your okonomiyaki Hiroshima or Kansai style. Sitting at the counter of a small okonomiyaki joint (especially if you give the local lingo a try) is one of the best places for the outsider to connect with Hiroshima folk. Okonomiyaki is often described as “Japanese pizza”. The name literally means “cook it how you like” and you can create your own personal okonomiyaki by selecting toppings to add to the standard dish. That’s where the analogy ends however, as the finished dish, while round and flat(ish), tastes nothing like pizza. Described as Hiroshima’s soul food, okonomiyaki began to be widely eaten in the years during and after the war when rice was in short supply, and people

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OF TH O P E TO P PI

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added extra ingredients to simple wheat pancakes and street stalls selling okonomiyaki sprang up all over the city. Today, there are said to be about 2000 okonomiyaki shops, and a visit to at least one of them is likely to be at the top of any Japanese tourist’s list of things to do in Hiroshima. While it’s fun to mix and cook okonomiyaki on your own hotplate (often possible at Kansai style restaurants), here in Hiroshima, the cooking is left to the professionals. Watching the chef from the counter is like having front row seats at a cooking show.

How to order All Hiroshima okonomiyaki starts with the basic niku-tama, consisting of pork, eggs, cabbage between two thin crepes. Your first choice is which kind of noodles to add - thin soba noodles or thicker udon noodles. State your preference by asking for “niku-tama-soba” or “niku-tama-udon”. If you are really hungry you can opt for a double helping of noodles. Next, choose any additional “toppings” - as likely to go inside as they are on top. Common choices include green negi onions, seafood, mochi rice cake, cheese, korean kimchee, shiso leaf and natto. In winter, local oysters are also often available.

Vegetarians While the eggs rule it out for vegans, at first glance okonomiyaki appears to be promising option for hungry vegetarians. Chefs are generally happy to leave out the pork slices if you ask for niku-nashi (without meat), but most places do use lard and a kind of grease that includes pork stock. Shaved dried fish flakes or dried squid pieces are also likely to find their way into your meal. Strict vegetarians should head to Nagataya at the very end of the Hondori shopping arcade near the

A-bomb Dome; here they have a good appreciation of vegetarian orders and can cook up a completely vegetarian okonomiyaki. Also be aware that Otafuku okonomi sauce contains oyster extract. Seek out shops that use Carp sauce or offer Otafuku’s “From 1 Year Old” (issai kara) sauce.

How to eat Okonomiyaki is traditionally eaten hot (very hot) off the teppan griddle with a metal spatula (hera). The inexperienced diner who takes up the challenge may find their okonomiyaki is dried to a crisp by the time they are finished. It is by no means rude to ask for a small plate and chopsticks. To get a laugh, make your excuses with the expression nekojita nanode. Literally “I have a cat’s tongue” which means you can’t take hot food. It isn’t necessarily a problem to linger at the counter and have some drinks, but be aware of your surroundings. If it is busy and people are waiting to eat, you will be expected to vacate your seats soon after you are done eating.


Aonori (dried seaweed)

Okonomiyaki sauce

Eggs

A walk on the wild “sides”

Soba or udon noodles

Most okonomiyaki shops will have a range of side dishes that can be whipped up on the teppan. You can play it safe and go for something like asparagus wrapped in bacon (bekon no aspara maki), or go for something a little more adventurous.

Sliced pork

Kaki Oysters Uni horen Sea urchin grilled with spinach Shirako Fish sperm

Bean sprouts

Horumon-yaki Grilled beef or pork offal Takowasa Chopped raw octopus marinated in wasabi Ika no Shiokara Fermented salty raw squid meat and guts (great with sake or shochu) Ika-natto Slimy natto fermented soy beans with raw egg and squid topped with green onions and wasabi Negi green onions

Mokuren Okonomiyaki & Teppanyaki Traditional & creative okonomiyaki on 6F of the Full Focus Bldg in front of Hiroshima Stn. Local oysters & sake. Ice cold draft beer. Left out of the elevator, look for the pink counter on the left near the back. 10:00-23:00 (L.O. 22:30) 082-568-7850 map A p.28 20

Tempura crisps

Nagataya Great okonomiyaki and plenty of space to sit, a stone’s throw away from Peace Park. Excellent understanding of vegetarian needs.

Chopped cabbage

Mon-Fri 11:00-20:30 (L.O.), Sat 11:00-21:00 (L.O.), Sun, hols 10:30-20:30 082-247-0787 map C p.29 [B-1] 21

Sarii-chan Okonomiyaki Affable, soccer-loving okonomiyaki-ist serving Hiroshima’s favorite dish and drinks near Hiroshima Station. 11:30-14:30, 17:00-23:00 Closed Saturdays 082-236-7303 map A p.28 31

This is a pretty standard

Dried fish powder

okonomiyaki, but most shops will have their own recipe with different ingredients and combinations. Batter


BEACHES & FIREWORKS Japan isn’t Thailand, and Hiroshima isn’t Okinawa. While the region isn’t going to win any international prizes for its beaches, they compare well with those in the Tokyo area and, at the height of summer, they provide a welcome opportunity to enjoy a refreshing dip in the water, feel the sand between your toes and relax in the shade of a palm tree. Hamada Iwami Seaside Park

When it comes to beaches in this region, you are rewarded in proportion to the effort you put in to get to them. Designated swimming beaches along the Inland Sea coast can’t be described as dirty, but many do tend to be littered with random debris - small plastic spacers used to separate the shells, used to grow oysters, that hang on wires below the rafts that dot Hiroshima’s waters, seem to be everywhere - and unless there is very dedicated clean up crew at work daily, you’ll be pushed to find a beach completely litter free. The more remote, the more chance of litter free sand and crystal clear water - you may even discover a tiny cove and have stunning vistas all to yourself. Hiroshima folk, especially its youth, make the most of what they have. During the swimming season which starts around the Umi-no-hi Marine Day holiday in late July, and runs until the end of August, many head to beaches near and far especially at weekends and during the mid-August Obon holiday.

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Kami-kamagari Island Ken-min-no-hama SETO INLAND SEA

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SHIKOKU

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Dreaming of a beach getaway, sipping a drink on an outdoor veranda, and taking in some spectacular scenery? Then it’s time to plan a weekend to Suo-Oshima Island. Kick back, relax, and enjoy the “Hawaii of the Seto Inland Sea”. Words/Illustrations/Photos by Naomi Leeman (naomileeman.com) & Emily Walters

Known simply as “Oshima” to the locals, SuoOshima Island (周防大島) offers a plethora of summer activities for the whole family: camping, boating, hiking, sightseeing, and simply just relaxing. Recently, Oshima’s beautiful beaches, mild climate, and easy-going country lifestyle has caught the eye of Tokyo hipsters looking to return to their farming roots. Mikans and strawberries are the local specialties and several farms open their fields to allow you to pick them yourself. Oshima’s connection with Hawaii was forged years ago during the Meiji era when nearly 4,000 Oshima residents moved to Hawaii to work on plantations. 1 Museum of Japanese in Hawaii Visit the © (日本ハワイ移民資料) to learn more about the unique immigration history. The bond with Hawaii has remained strong and Kauai is now Oshima’s sister city. Every Saturday between July 18 and August 8, you can enjoy hula performances 2 Green Stay Nagaura (グリーンステ at the © イながうら).

Kids will enjoy going on a scavenger hunt to find all five of the carved tiki statues that are scattered about the island. Enjoy some authentic Hawaiian 3 Aloha Orange - macadamia nut cuisine at © pancakes and garlic shrimp... need I say more?) The adventurous types won’t want to miss 4 Tachibana Wind Park (橘ウインドパー © ク) where you can learn to paraglide (or just enjoy watching others fly around above you). Rent kayaks 5 Tom Sawyer Club and snorkeling gear at the © (トムソーヤ倶楽部) on the south side of the island. Miles of trails crisscross the mountains; 6 Monju Mountain (文 start by climbing © 珠山) to enjoy the panoramic views from the observation deck at its peak, then hike over to 7 Kanozan Mountain (嘉納山) if you have © extra time.

Spend a relaxing day on one of the many beautiful 8 Katazoe Beach (片添ヶ浜海水 beaches; © 9 Shonan Beach (庄南ビーチ) 浴場) and © are two of the most established. Pitch a tent or rent a cabin at Katazoe (prices range from 3,600 to 15,000 yen per night). Take the kids to the 10 Nagisa Aquarium (なぎさ水族館) to © see the interactive pool where you can wade with sharks and touch starfish and other local 11 Summer marine animals. Oshima’s annual © Fireworks Festival will be on August 16. Getting to Oshima Island It is easiest to get around Oshima by car and takes about 1.5 hours from Hiroshima. Take the Sanyo highway south to the Kuga exit, then head east on 437 until you reach the bridge to Oshima. By JR train, head south on the Sanyo Main Line for about 2 hours to Obatake Station. Grab a taxi or bus to the island from there.

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BE MORE THAN A TOURIST

Pullout Guide

HIROSHIMA

←Iwakuni

UJINA

←Kyushu

NINOSHIMA

Takehara→ Onomichi→ Osaka→

KURE

MIYAJIMA ETAJIMA

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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language DIRECTIONS Where’s ...? ...wa doko desu ka? ...はどこですか? straight massugu 真直ぐ right migi 右 left hidari 左 far tooi 遠い near chikai 近い turn magatte 曲がって Would you call …. for me? … ni denwa shite moraemasen ka? …に(代わりに)電話してもらえませんか?

Hot sake atsukan 熱燗 Cold sake hiyazake 冷や酒 What do you recommend? osusume wa nan desu ka? おすすめはなんですか? I can’t eat... ...taberu-koto ga dekimasen ○○たべることが、できません。 wheat 小麦 (komugi) / meat 肉類 (niku-rui) / pork 豚肉 (buta-niku) / nuts ナッツ(nattsu) / fish 魚(sakana) / eggs 卵 (tamago) / allergy アレルギー (arerugi) / seafood 魚介類 (gyokai-rui) / dairy products 乳 製品 (nyuseihin) / soy 大豆製品 (daizu-seihin) That’s really delicious! sugoku oishii (Hiroshima dialect: bari umai!) すごくおいしい!

NUMBERS

SOCIALIZING

1 2 3 4 5

ichi 一 6 roku 六 ni 二 7 shichi (nana) 七 san 三 8 hachi 八 shi (yon) 四 9 kyu 九 go 五 10 ju 十

50 goju 五十 100 hyaku 百 1,000 sen 千 10,000 ichi-man 一万 Yen en 円・¥

SHOPPING Do you have…? … ga arimasu ka? ..がありますか? Please kudasai ください Please (do me this favor) onegaishimasu お願いします Thank you arigato ありがとう Where’s a good place to …? ...ni wa doko ga ii desu ka? ..するにわどこがいいですか? ...buy a yukata? yukata o kau 浴衣を買う ...sunscreen hiyakedome 日焼け止め ...insect repellant hiyakedome 虫除け ...seabreeze shi-buri-zu シーブリーズ ...deoderant deodoranto デオドラント ...wet wipes uetto tisshu ウェットティッシュ How much is this? kore wa ikura desu ka? これはいくらですか? Do you accept credit cards? kurejito kaado o tsukaemasu ka? クレジットカードを使えますか? This one please Kore ni shimasu これにします。 Can I have … more? mo …. kudasai も...ください

EATING & DRINKING (To call the waiter / waitress) sumimasen! すみません! We’ll start with a draft beer toriaezu nama biiru kudasai とりあえず生ビール下さい I’ll have another one mou ippai もういっぱい Cheers! kampai! 乾杯!

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Universal summer greeting It’s pretty darn hot isn’t it? atsui desu ne?! (Hiroshima dialect: buchi atsui ne) 暑いですね! Can I buy you a drink? ippai ogorimashou ka? 一杯おごりましょうか You’re cute! (to girls) kawaii! かわいい You’re cool! (to boys) kakko ii! かっこいい! Let’s take a selfie together serufii o torimasho セルフィーを撮りましょう Do you mind if I speak to you in English? eigo de hanashite mo ii desu ka? 英語で話してもいいですか? How about we…? Issho-ni … wa dou? いっしょに…はどう? ...go out for something to eat gohan o tabe-ni iku ごはんをたべに行く ...go drinking nomi-ni iku 飲みに行く ...go check out Suo-Oshima Suo-Oshima e itte miru 周防大島へ行ってみる Would you put sunscreen on my back please? senaka ni hiyakedome o nutte morattemo ii desu ka? 背中に日焼け止めを塗ってもらってもいいですか?

AT THE ONSEN men’s bath otoko-yu 男湯 women’s bath onna-yu 女湯 open-air bath roten-buro 露天風呂 open-air foot spa ashi-yu 足湯 soap sekken 石けん Can I use this onsen if I have a tattoo? tattoo ga arimasu ga, koko no onsen ni hairemasu ka? タトゥーがありますが、ここの温泉に入れますか? Can I use this onsen if I cover my tattoo? tattoo o kakushitara, koko no onsen ni hairemasu ka? タトゥーを隠したら、ここの温泉に入れますか?


List of places CULTURE

SHOPPING 1

IACE Travel - Map C [B-1]

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Mokuren Okonomiyaki & Teppanyaki - Map A

2

Outsider Book Nook / Global Lounge - Map C [C-1]

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Nagataya Okonomiyaki - Map C [B-1]

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Travel With - Map B

4

Yamatoya - Map B

1

A-Bomb Dome - Map C [B-1]

22

Ninnikuya Manao - Map B

2

Children’s museum - Map C [A-2]

23

Organ-za - Map C [A-1]

3

Cinetwin Hondori - Map B

24

Otis! - Map C [A-2]

4

Former Bank of Japan - Map C [B-2]

25

Pasta La Vista - Map C [B-2]

5

Gallery G - Map A

26

Plus Minus - Map B

1

Cleo Hair International - Map C [B-1]

6

Hatchoza Cinema - Map B

27

Porta Porte - Map B

2

Family Pool - Map C [B-1] (Open July - August)

7

Hiroshima City International House - Map A

28

Robatayaki Jindaiko - Map B

3

Green Arena Gym & Pool - Map C [B-1]

8

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

29

Rojiura Teppan Kotaro - Map C [C-3]

4

Laff Hair Design - Map C [B-1]

Map C [D-3]

30

Saishoku Kenbi - p.26 [A-1]

HE ALTH & BE AUT Y

9

Hiroshima City Tourist Information - Map C [B-2]

31

Sarii-chan Okonomiyaki - Map A

10

Hiroshima International Center - Map C [B-2]

32

Shabuzen - Map B

11

Hiroshima Museum of Art - Map C [B-1]

33

Sprout - Map C [A-1]

12

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum - Map C [B-2]

34

Tinto - Map C [B-2]

1

Global Lounge - Map C [C-1]

13

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum - Map A

35

Tokaichi Apartment - Map C [A-1]

2

Popeye Media Cafe Ebisu-dori - Map B

14

International Exchange Lounge - Map C [A-2]

36

Warung Matahari - Map C [B-3]

3

Popeye Media Cafe Hondori - Map C [C-1]

15

Salon Cinema 1/2 - Map C [B-3]

37

Zucchini: bar and cucina - Map C [B-1]

16

Shimizu Gekijo - Map A

17

Shukkeien Garden - Map A 1

Ganko Yatai - Map B

INTERNE T

FASHION SHOPPING

ACCOMMODATION ICE CRE AM

1

Dormy Inn - Map C [B-2]

2

Hana Hostel - Map A

3

Hotel Flex - Map A

1

Iwataya - Map C [A-1]

4

Ikawa Ryokan - Map C [A-2]

2

Kogane Shokudo - Map C [B-2]

5

J-Hoppers Hiroshima - Map C [A-2]

3

Koharu Cafe - Map C [A-1]

6

Reino Inn Peace Park Hiroshima - Map C [B-2]

7

Washington Hotel - Map B

1

Lilian - Map C [C-2]

2

Merci - Map C [C-2]

3

Ruby - Map p.C [A-1]

EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS

• Police 110 • Fire and Ambulance 119

RESTAUR ANT & CAFES

• 24 Hour Hiroshima Hospital Information in English Freedial

NIGHTLIFE

0120-169912

1

45 quarante-cinq -Map B

2

Artcafe ELK - Map C [B-1]

1

45bis “Awa“ - Map C [C-2]

• 24h Emergency pediatric hospital (Funairi Byoin) 082-232-6195

3

Bakudan-ya Honten - Map C [C-3]

2

Barcos - Map B

• Multilingual Interpreting Service (Trio-phone)

4

Cafe Cinnamon - Map C [A-2]

3

Bar Edge - Map B

082-247-9715

5

Caffe Ponte - Map C [B-1]

4

Bon Voyage - Map B

09:00-19:00 (April-September)

6

Chamonix Mont Blanc - Map B

5

Cafe Spice - Map B

09:00-18:00 (October-March)

7

Choi Choi Ya - Map B

6

Chinatown - Map B

• TELL English counseling service 03-5774-0992

8

Cusco Cafe - Map C [C-1]

7

Centre Point - Map B

(09:00-23:00)

9

Galley - Map B

8

Ekimae Chelsea Drinks - Map A

• Resident Consultation & Interpreting Service

10

Graffity Mexican Diner - Map C [C-2]

9

Kemby’s - Map C [B-2]

082-241-5010

11

Jabar Nakatake - Map B

10

Koba - Map B

• Immigration Information Center 0570-013-904

12

J-Cafe & Bar Motel - Map C [C-3]

11

La Luna - Map B

• Human Rights Counseling Center for Foreign Citizens

13

Kanak - Map C [B-2]

12

Mac - Map B

082-228-5792

14

Kanawa ASSE - Map A

13

Mambos - Map B

15

Kanawa Kaki Meian - Map A

14

Molly Malone’s - Map B

16

Kanawa Oyster Boat - Map C [B-2]

15

New King - Map B

17

Karşiyaka - Map C [B-2]

16

Southern Cross - Map B

18

Kemby’s+ Taps & Tapas - Map B

17

The Shack Bar and Grill - Map B

19

Mabui Hiroshima Oyster Bar - Map C [C-2]

18

Tropical Bar Revolución - Map B

Map A: p.28 Map B: p. 28 Map C: p.29

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/25


A

B

C

City map

OSHIBAKOEN

OSHIBA

MISASAKITAMACHI

MITAKIHONMACHI

1

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JR MITAKI STATION

Mit

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Outdoor Family Pool Open July-August

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Hiroshima Bank Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

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Kamiya-cho Higashi

Kamiya-cho Nishi Mizuho Bank Rijo Kaikan Sun Mall

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KOAMICHO

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Honkawa Primary School

NEKOYACHO

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Hiroshima Naka Post Office

Jogakuin

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Hiroshima Castle

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Supermarket

Hiroden Streetcar

Post Office

Astram Line Monorail

Tourist Info

Covered arcade

짜100 Bicycle Parking

Foreign Currency Exchange

Public Bath

International ATM

Airport Bus

Play area

Meipuru~pu bus

Hiroshima Free Wi-Fi

Hotel

Futaba-no-sato walk

Hiroshima Jogakuin University

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F GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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/27


ta

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4

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39

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24

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1 PARK

SAKAIMACHI Koami-cho Dobashi

KOAMICHO

2 KAWARAMACHI

Na Kan kajima zakib ash i

Funairi-machi

Kozaki Primary School Nakajima Primary School

Otemachi Commercial High School

Hiroshima City Hall

TAKEYACHO

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HIGASHI SENDA PARK

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Sky Walk Escalator

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Onaga Primary School

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city center

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Junior High School


GETTING AROUND

Streetcar lines Hiroden Line #1 (Hiroshima Station > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #2 (Hiroshima Station > Miyajima-guchi) Hiroden Line #3 (Hiroden Nishi Hiroshima > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #5 (Hiroshima Station > Hijiyama-shita > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #6 (Hiroshima Station > Eba) Hiroden Line #7 (Yokogawa Station > Hiroden Honsha mae) Hiroden Line #8 (Yokogawa Station > Eba) Hiroden Line #9 (Hatchobori > Hakushima) Astram Line (Hondori > Koikikoenmae)

Asa Zoo (Kamiyasu)

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Limousine bus (Hiroshima City > Hiroshima Airport)

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iya

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Meipuru~pu bus

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Bish

Chorakuji

World Heritage Route (boat) (Peace Park > Miyajima)

chi

Oma

ichi

Furu

Matsuyama Super Jet Ferry

Tomo Obara

Nakasuji

Transport Museum

Tomochuo Ozuka

¥190~480

Big Arch Stadium

Gionshinbashikita

Ushita

Hakushima

(Fudoinmae)

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Yokogawa Station JR

Kencho-mae

Betsuin-mae

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Tera-machi

Hiroden nishi Hiroshima

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Line Shinkansen Station

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Kamiyacho Nishi

Hiroshima Station JR

Hakushima Line, All Destinations,

¥110

Hakushima

Hiroshima Station

Shukkeien-mae Jogakuin-mae Kamiyacho Higashi

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isu

Eb

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Hondori Peace Park

Okonomi-mura mae

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Funairi-minami-machi

Nisseki byoin mae

Hiroden Honsha mae

Minami machi 6-chome

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The flat fare for inner city travel is ¥160, (child ¥80)

a ug

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Ujina 2-chome

¥160

Moto-Ujina-guchi Hiroshima Port

Miyajima

Matsuyama

30\

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The fare for travel on Miyajima bound streetcars varies according to distance. (¥260 to Miyajima)

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Bus Center

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Museum of Art

Yokogawa 1-chome e

(Ushita)

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Yokogawa Station

in nL

Big Wave

Shin-Hakushima

Kabe Lin

Mitaki JR

Mitaki Temple

Miyajima Guchi JR

Fudoin Temple

Fudoinmae

(Koikikoenmae)

Ni

JR Train Lines

Nishihara

Astram Line fares vary according to distance.

Koikikoenmae

Sa

JR Ferry and Matsudai Ferry to Miyajima

(Chorakuji)


KeMBY˙s I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Tapas, Bar & Restaurant

17:30-00:30 Sunday-Thursday 17:30-01:00 Friday-Saturday

FREE TM

Naka-ku, Otemachi 2-9-13 082-249-6201 map C p.29 [B-2] 9

facebook.com/kembyshiroshima twitter.com/KembysHiroshima Hiroshima Restaurants > KeMBY’s OK!

Happy Hou!!r 17:30-19:30 All alcohol

Good food, Good people, Good atmosphere

¥ 2 0 0 OF F

Looking for high quality food in a casual atmosphere? Kemby’s has all the bases covered with a great selection of tapas, pasta and Tex Mex, as well as gourmet sausages, seafood and their famous burgers. Owner Prakash prides himself on his excellent wine selection, and is happy to help you make the right choice. Whether you are in the mood for a meal, you want to shoot some pool, or just shoot the breeze with the bilingual staff and friendly regulars, great nights start at Kemby’s.

Cosy, clean bar with lots of local and imported craft beers all reasonably priced. Tapas and other dishes on the menu. Occasional live music on a Friday night. For food and music times check our facebook page.

Lunch 11:30-15:00 Friday-Tuesday Dinner 17:00-1:00 Thursday-Tueday

FREE TM

Naka-ku, Horikawa-cho 5-15 2F 082-249-0630 map B p.28 18

facebook.com/kembysplus OK!

Happy HFoFu!!r 17:00-19:00 ¥10 0 O Beers & Cocktails


SPORT

Fan fantastic Hiroshima is passionate about its pro-sports teams, and Hiroshima Toyo Carp baseball and Sanfrecce soccer games are great opportunities to see locals letting their hair down. In the bleachers or in the back of a taxi, sports talk is always great for breaking the ice.

HIROSHIMA TOYO CARP Watching the Hiroshima Carp at Mazda “Zoom Zoom” Stadium is one of Hiroshima’s greatest spectacles. Baseball fan or not, you won’t easily forget the experience. Tickets start at ¥1700 for general admission in the upper deck infield. Hardcore fans are to be found in the “Performance” zone, with its band and male cheerleaders in traditional garb. Most regular fans, however, opt for ¥2100 lower right deck seats which have a good atmosphere and plenty of opportunity to meet locals. Make sure to buy a pack of Carp balloons (¥400 for a pack of 4) from one of the roving vendors to set off in the seventh inning stretch when thousands of them fill the air.

RED RISING Every year the Carp and other Japanese teams choose a new slogan for the team, and these slogans are often in English. The Carp English slogan this year is “Red Rising”. To a fan like me, who grew up in the Cold War, it seems fairly menacing, but it is surely a reference to the team’s expected ascent in the standings. Past slogans, on the other hand, have not always been as intimidating. The 1978 slogan “All men dash!” and 1989’s “Winning smile” were somewhat puzzling while 2010’s “We’re gonna win!” was, if anything, too direct (and, alas, incorrect). From 2006 to 2009, the team used variations on “All-in”. This left English speakers to wonder whether the Carp were planning a desperate gamble to fend off imminent extinction or if the team was simply exhausted. Then again, the 1999 slogan was apparently inspiring enough to make a fan out of the young Barack Obama. The Carp that year used the catch phrase “Yes, we can!” Carp Home Game Schedule All games played at Mazda Stadium unless stated.

32\

Inter-league 6/2 vs Nippon Ham Fighters 6/3 vs Nippon Ham Fighters 6/4 vs Nippon Ham Fighters 6/5 vs Rakuten Eagles 6/5 vs Rakuten Eagles 6/7 vs Rakuten Eagles

Central League 6/26 (18:00) vs Chunichi Dragons 6/27 (14:00) vs Chunichi Dragons 6/28 (13:30) vs Chunichi Dragons 7/3 (18:00) vs Yakult Swallows 7/4 (14:00) vs Yakult Swallows 7/5 (13:30) vs Yakult Swallows 7/7 (18:00) vs Yokohama DeNA BayStars 7/8 (18:00) vs Yokohama DeNA BayStars (in Miyoshi) 7/20 (18:00) vs Chunichi Dragons 7/21 (18:00) vs Chunichi Dragons 7/22 (18:00) vs Chunichi Dragons 7/24 (18:00) vs Yomiuri Giants 7/25 (14:00) vs Yomiuri Giants 7/26 (18:00) vs Yomiuri Giants 8/4 (18:00) vs Hanshin Tigers 8/5 (18:00) vs Hanshin Tigers 8/6 (13:30) vs Hanshin Tigers 8/11 (18:00) vs Yakult Swallows 8/12 (18:00) vs Yakult Swallows 8/13 (18:00) vs Yakult Swallows 8/14 (18:00) vs Yokohama DeNA BayStars 8/15 (18:00) vs Yokohama DeNA BayStars 8/16 (18:00) vs Yokohama DeNA BayStars 8/21 (18:00) vs Yomiuri Giants 8/22 (18:00) vs Yomiuri Giants 8/23 (18:00) vs Yomiuri Giants 8/25 (18:00) vs Hanshin Tigers 8/26 (18:00) vs Hanshin Tigers 8/27 (18:00) vs Hanshin Tigers All-Star Game 7/18 (7/19 in ivent of rain)

SANFRECCE They’ll probably always be runners up in the hearts of locals, but Sanfrecce have grabbed a loyal following while becoming a force in the J-League. Coach Hajime Moriyasu took his team to the 2012 J-League title, Sanfrecce’s first, and for good measure, did it again the following season. They are only the second team to win back-toback championships in the J-League’s history. The biggest problem with Sanfrecce is their home. A 35 minute ride out of town stadium, built for athletics and so big even a crowd of 35,000 doesn’t fill it. Club and fans have been lobbying for a purpose-built football stadium, hopefully they will get one soon.

Sanfrecce J-league Home Games 6/20 (19:00) vs Montedeo Yamagata 7/15 vs Matsumoto Yamaga FC (kick off time TBC) 7/25 vs Yokohama F Marinos (kick off time TBC) 8/12 vs Kashima Antlers (kick off time TBC) 8/16 vs vs Kashiwa Resol (kick off time TBC) 8/29 vs Nagoya Grampus (kick off time TBC)


watch the carp in japanese Words: Tim Buthod

Photo ©Tomo www.flickr.com/photos/azzuriceo/

KEY TERMS For most baseball terms you can just use the English and be understood. Your counterpart, however, may throw some of these completely Japanese words in the conversation. For any other important terms, you can probably assume it’s some variant of the English. Yakyu: baseball Shiai: game Senshu: player Kantoku: manager Rui: base (ichirui, nirui, sanrui) Ten: run (itten, niten, santen...) Kai: inning (ikkai, nikai, sankai...) Sanshin: strikeout Karaburi: swing and a miss Sachuukan: left-center Uchuukan: right-center Shomen: right at a fielder Okuri-banto: sacrifice bunt Sayonara home run: walkoff home run

IS THAT ENGLISH? A number of Japanese baseball terms seem to have derived from English, but they would draw quizzical glances if you tried to use them in North America. Here are a few examples with their English equivalents:

Running home run: inside the park home run Timely hit: any hit that scores a run, even if it’s already 10-1 Nighter: night game Dead ball: hit batsman Straight: fastball Cleanup: a general word for the middle of the batting order (3-4-5 hitters) Shoot: screwball Get two: double play Four ball: walk Home in: a run scores

CONVERSATION WITH FANS If you happen to be in a bar, ramen shop, or even an office while a game is going on, people are likely to be glued to the TV. This is a great opportunity to strike up a conversation and get to know local people. Here are some phrases you can use to break the ice.

Kyou no senpatsu pitcha wa? (Who is the starting pitcher today?) Ima nankai? (What inning is it?) Kyuukai no omote/ura. (Top/bottom of the ninth.) Dare ga utta? (Who hit it?) Suki na senshu wa? (Who is your favorite player?) Kotoshi no kaapu wa dou? (How are the Carp doing this year?) Kono pitcha heta kuso! (This pitcher stinks!) Kono shimpan baka! (This umpire is an idiot!) Mata bunto? Nande itsumo bunto suru? (They’re bunting again? Why do they always bunt?) Ano gaijin no senshu dare? (Who is that foreign player?) Mou go ren pai! Saiaku! (We’ve lost five in a row! This is awful!) Go ren sho! Zettai yusho suru! (We’ve won five in a row! We’re definitely gonna win it all!)

Doko no chiimu no fan? (What team do you support) Kaapu tsuyoi ne. (The Carp are good, aren’t they?) Kaapu katteru? (Are the Carp winning?) Katteru yo. (They’re winning!) Iie, maketoru. (No, they’re losing.) Nan tai nan? (What’s the score?) Ni tai rei. (Two to nothing.) GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/33


EVENTS NEW CLUB NIGHTS AT GUERNICA

PEXPOX ‘011-HARO ROCK FESTIVAL ‘15

Spacious restaurant-bar Guernica on Peace Boulevard

Chicago-based duo Werewheels (Plastic Crimewave aka

SUNDANCE INTERNATIONAL BEACH PARTY

has started hosting club events on weekends. A mixture of

Steve Krakow & Dawn Aquarius) “open clogged mind

Bands, DJs, contests, cocktails and bikinis. Hiroshima’s

local and invited DJs spin various permutations of house

passages using guitars, keys, treated voices, and machines,

international party people will be out in force and letting

music on Saturdays and occasional Fridays. It’s also home

creating a unique transcendent wall of sci-fried sounds--

off steam over two days at Tsutsumigaura Beach Park on

to Hiroshima’s own foam party, Espuma. June’s events are

inspired by gnarly biker and horror film soundtracks, bad

Miyajima Island at Hiroshima’s biggest international party.

listed below, but check the Sonar Del Guernica Hiroshima

vibes krautrock, psychedelic synth-punk, and musical idols

Facebook Page for details and SNS discounts.

like Chrome, Suicide, Gong, 39 Clocks, La Dusseldorf and Cabaret Voltaire.” Also on the bill is a solo set by Kawabata Makoto of Japanese psychedelic rock band Acid Mothers Temple, a rare psych 45s DJ set by Plastic Crimewave and local bands.

HIROSHIMA REGGAE

ONOMICHI SATURDAY NIGHT MARKET (DO YOU-YAMISE)

Experience the local reggae scene featured in our last issue.

As much festival as shopping expedition, on Saturday

Chazbo from the Roots Temple label, who has collaborated

nights in June and July Onomichi’s usually quiet shotengai

on two releases by local dub artist Jah93, is the guest at

retro shopping arcade buzzes with people buying

Dubway on June 19 at Mugen. On June 21 is a laid back Sun-

HIRODEN STREETCAR FESTIVAL

knick knacks and playing traditional festival games. It

day night session at bar Centre Point hosted by pioneers of

Get up close to, in and under Hiroshima’s streetcars at

gets particularly colorful from the end of June when

Hiroshima’s reggae scene, Big Stone, in the style of Jamaica’s

Hiroden’s Senda-machi yard. Heaven for train geeks, and

the arcade is festooned with Tanabata star festival

Sunday night Rae Town dances.

little kids will love it too, but there is also a good deal to

streamers. 6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4, 7/11, 7/18

interest the casual observer

MIYAJIMA “WOODMAN” INTERNATIONAL TRIATHLON June 14. At 8am the gun goes off and several hundred triathletes power through the water below the great floating torii gate in front of Itsukushima Shrine on Miyajima before biking and running the very tough course through the mountains of Hatsukaichi. It’s a spectacular sight. http://miyajimatriathlon.com/

SENDA WASSHOI FLEA MARKET 6/7, 6/21, 7/12, 7/26, 8/23, Higashi Senda-machi Park next to the old Hiroshima University building.

MINATO MARCHE FARMER’S MARKET Hiroshima Port Terminal Ujina 6/7, 6/21, 75, 7/19, 8/2, 8/16

34\


LIVE MUSIC DUMB RECORDS 10TH ANNIVERSARY VOL.1

SUNDANCE INTERNATIONAL BEACH FESTIVAL f August 22-23 @ Tsutsumigaura Beach Park, Miyajima

Adv ¥3000 On the day ¥3500

f June 7, 17:00 open 18:00 start @ Club Quattro

Asakusa Jinta, SO-CHO PISTONS, KINGONS, Colobockles,

WHAT ABOUT WEDNESDAY? f every 3rd Wednesday @ Centre Point

ULTRA HAZE f every 2d Sunday

Monkey Business, (Adv ¥3000 Door ¥3500)

CLUB NIGHTS

BEGGAR’S BANQUET

PABLO VALENTINO

f June 7, 18:00 open 18:30 start @ Organ-za

f June 6 @ Bar Edge, Adv ¥2000 Door ¥2500 (plus one

local indie bands, ¥1000 + 1 drink order

¥500 drink)

GOTO IZUMI DINNER SHOW

HOUSE TRIBE

f June 12 @ Organ-za, no cover

f June 6 @ Sonar Del Guernica, Guernica Nishio

f Bar Edge / Techno, Dubstep, Drum n’ bass, Reggae

FROIDE f every 3rd Friday f Enjoint Bar Cover / House, Techno

THE CLUB ROCKS f every 3rd Friday f Bar Edge / Rock, Soul, House

Guest DJ Ogawa

PUSHIM LIVE TOUR 2015 “PEACE ALIVE”

YARU KISS ROCK NIGHT

NEW WORLD

f June 19 @ Club Quattro

f June 9 @ Bar Edge

f Sacred Spirits (Cafe Jamaica) / Techno, House

HED KANDI

SOUL FOOD

f June 13 @ Sonar Del Guernica, Guernica Nishio

f every last Thursday @ Centre Point / Soul, Funk

DUBWAY

IN DA DINING

f June 19 @ Mugen 5610

f every last Friday

Guest Chazbo, dub reggae selectors and bands

f Lotus (June / August)

f every 4th Friday

18:45 open 19:30 start Adv ¥5940

ANDO FES f June 21 @ Koushinji Temple

11:00-20:00 Free

PEXPOX ‘011-HARO ROCK FESTIVAL ‘15 f June 23 @ Organ-za

f Bar Edge (July) / Hip-Hop, Soul, House

Werewheels, Kawabata Makoto, Plastic Crimwave a.k.a

ESPUMA FOAM PARTY

Steve Krakow (7” DJ set) + 3 local bands, 19:00 start Adv

f June 20 @ Sonar Del Guernica, Guernica Nishio

¥2000 Door ¥2300 (+ 1 drink order)

SADIE

SUGAR & SPICE f June 21 @ Centre Point, No cover

f July 24 @ Club Quattro, 18:30 open 19:00, Adv ¥5400

Rae Town style reggae party hosted by Big Stone

KALAPANA 40TH ANNIVERSARY JAPAN TOUR

HOUSE TRIBE f June 27 @ Sonar Del Guernica, Guernica Nishio

f July 14 @ Club Quattro

18:00 open 19:00 start, Adv ¥7000 Door ¥7500

RED BULL NIGHT f every last Saturday f Bon Voyage / House, Hip-Hop, Techno

IZMICAL f every 4th Friday @ Bar Edge / Eclectic dance

DUBWAY f every 3rd Friday @ Mugen 5610 / Dub

REGULAR CLUB NIGHTS

FAMILY

f August 5-6 @ Club Quattro

SACRED SPIRITS

HIRODEN STREETCAR FESTIVAL

HUSKING BEE and more (8/5), NAMBA69 and more (8/6),

f (almost) every Saturday

f June 7 @ Hiroden Yard, Senda-machi, Free

10-FEET and more (8/7), Adv ¥4000 (plus one ¥500 drink

f Cafe Jamaica, ¥1000 (incl 1 drink, 2 if enter before 24:00)

EIGHT SIX LIVE

order)

SOUND MARINA f August 8-9 @ Green Arena

EASY SKANKING f every 2nd Tuesday f Centre Point / Dancehall, Reggae

Artists and prices to be announced http://www.sunmari.jp/

ART POP ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS CRUSH OF MODE-HYPER HOT SUMMER ‘15 TOUR

EURASIAN SUITE f every 4th Thursday

SPORTS & OUTDOOR GANSU INTERNATIONAL HIKING f June 7 @ Chiyoda, Kita-Hiroshima, Free

Mt. Mibu-jo & Mibu-no-hana-daue ritual rice planting https://gansunetwork.wordpress.com/

f Bar Edge / Soul, Jazz, Old school House

f August 22 @ Club Quattro, 17:00 open 18:00 start

COMPACT

Go to gethiroshima.com/events for more details about these

Adv ¥4000, NoGoD, SEX-ANDROID, ADAPTER, RIU, Minus

f every 3rd Wednesday

and many more events.

Jin-Say Orchestra, The Benjamin, ALSDEAD, 怪人二十

f Bar Edge / Electro, House, Techno

面奏

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

/35


ART

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

Hiroshima Museum of Art

Well-designed building in Hijiyama hilltop park. Interesting

One of the largest art museums in Western Japan with a

Monet, Van Gogh, Picasso and many more works by great

sculptures and statues are dotted around the outside of the

permanent collection of over 4,800 works which include

modern European painters on display in this small, but

museum that can be viewed for free. Special exhibits and

Japanese nihonga painting, traditional Asian art crafts,

perfectly formed museum, very close to Hiroshima Castle.

the exhibits from the museum’s own collection displayed on

1920s and 1930s art, displayed on rotation. Right next to

Visit on a weekday and you may well have the whole place to

rotation along various themes. Map C p.29 8

Shukkei-en Garden. Map A p.28 13

yourself. Map C p.29 11

10:00-17:00 Admission to the collection exhibition: Adult

09:00-17:00 Admission to the permanent collection Adult

09:00-17:00 Admission to the general exhibition: Adult

¥370, College students ¥270, High school students, seniors

¥510, College students ¥310, High school students and

¥1000 Seniors ¥500 College & high school students ¥500

¥170, Junior High School and younger free

younger free .

Junior high school and elementary school students ¥200

082-264-1121 http://www.hiroshima-moca.jp/

082-221-6246 http://www.hpam.jp/

082-223-2530 http://www.hiroshima-museum.jp/

HMOCA is closed June 1 - July 17

Admission until 30 minutes before closing. Special exhibition charges vary and usually include admission to permanent collections. Closed Mondays (unless National Holiday when closed the following business day).Hiroshima Museum of Art and Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum open everyday during special exhibitions.

EXHIBITIONS

The 70th Anniversary of the Atomic Bombings of Susanne Valdone ‘Nue debout et le chat’ 1919 COLLECTION PARTICULIERE

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: War and Peace Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum July 25-September 13

Gallery G Map A p.28 5 Private art space opposite the Prefectural Art Museum which holds weekly free exhibitions by local artists, designers and artisans. 082-211-3260 Käthe Kollwitz, ‘Woman in the Lap of Death’ 1921 Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art

Exposition Suzanne Valadon et Maurice Utrillo

Gallery G is hosting a series of free exhibitions commem-

Breathing Shadow of

Hiroshima Museum of Art

oration the 70th anniversary of the A-bombing during July

A-bombed Trees

July 11-August 30

and August.

Shunya Asami

Hiroshima Trilogy: 70th Anniversary of the Atomic

Shimpei Takeda MEMORIA(L) メモリア(る)

Bombing, Part 1: Life=Work

July 21-July 26

July 28-August 2

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art July 18-September 27 「広島の衣服 Vêtements Shin-kenbiten Art Competition

d’Hiroshima」Michel Aguilera

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

August 4-August 9

July 18-September 6 Fujiko F. Fujio 80th Anniversary Exhibition Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

Touching A-bombed Tree, Okabe Masao

July 18-September 6,

August 25-August 30

36\


kanak Delicious, healthy, additive-free Indian food right next to Peace Park. Excellent lunch sets. Indian pub-style atmosphere at night with many a la carte dishes to choose from as well as curry meals. Curry lunch sets from ¥780 Free refills of rice/nan at lunch Vegetarian, vegan and Halal food. A la carte Kids sets ¥500 ~¥590 (ex tax) Party room available

Lunch 11:00-15:00 (L.O. 14:30) Dinner 17:00-22:30 (L.O. 22:00) 082-236-7308 Map C p.29 [B-2] 13

Artcafe ELK 2nd floor cafe near Peace Park. Good sandwich lunches, drinks vegetarian menu. Ask about vegan and gluten free dishes and their vegan desserts. International exchange spot. 09:30-21:00 (Until 22:00 Fri & Sat, 18:00 Wed) 082-247-4443 map C p.29 [B-1] 2

Media Cafe Popeye Hondori / Ebisu-dori So much more than Internet in 2 city centre locations Internet access (PC), Free soft drinks, Shower rooms available (additional charge), Overnight stay OK Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Popeye Ebisu-dori map B p.28 2 Popeye Hondori map C p.29 [C-1] 3

Cafe Cinnamon Closed Tues. Charming little blue cafe worth seeking out for great food and drinks. 11:30-15:00, 18:00-22:00 Closed Tuesdays 082- 942-3424 map C p.29 [A-2] 4

Cafe Lente

Chamonix Mont Blanc

Escape the Miyajima crowds at this beautifully designed cafe. Wooden terrace. Great view of the floating torii gate, especially after dark. 11:00-21:00 Closed Tuesdays Located along the water inlet between Kiyomori Shrine & Miyajima Aquarium.

Venerable kissaten since 1955, now with a British connection.

Choi Choi Ya

Galley

Shiho serves Hiroshima tsukemen, yaki-ramen (fish stock base), side dishes and drinks in a relaxed atmosphere. Eat, drink or both at the counter or a street-side table. Can get quite lively late at night. 20:30-03:00 Closed Sundays & hols that fall on a weekday map B p.28 7

3F casual French bistro overlooking Namiki-dori in the center of Hiroshima’s shopping district. Open for lunches, dinner and in between.

08:00-24:00 082-241-2726 map B p.28 6

Lunch 12:00-14:00 Cafe 14:00-18:00 Dinner 18:00-24:00 (L.O. 23:30) 082-243-3669 map B p.28 9

Graffity Mexican Diner

Jabar Nakatake

Homemade Mexican and US style foods in this family run-diner.

Jabar” is a fusion of traditional Japanese cuisine and the laidback Spanish baru or bar. Chef, Nakatake Akira, who honed his skills in Michelin-starred restaurants in Spain, as well as in Tokyo and Hakodate, is on a mission to offer high quality Japanese food, designed with a European sensibility, in a relaxed and convivial atmosphere. A la carte and set course menus. Wide selection of wine, Japanese sake and shochu. Also available for parties. Located in Hiroshima’s entertainment district, why not check out Jabar?

11:30-13:20, 18:00-24:00 (L.O. 23:00) 082-243-3669 map C p.29 [C-2] 10

Karşiyaka Kebabs and authentic Turkish dishes prepared by a Turkish chef near Peace Park. Vegetarian and Halal diners catered for. Belly dance shows at weekends. 11:30-14:30 (L.O. 14:00) 17:30-23:30 (L.O.22:30) 082-247-2202 map C p.29 [B-2] 17

http://www.ja-bar.jp/ 18:00-24:00 (L.O 23:30) Closed Sun & hol 082-535-0200 map B p.28 11


MABUI Hiroshima Oyster Bar Fukuromachi Super fresh oysters from Hiroshima waters and overseas - raw, fried, steamed, smoked and more! Well presented seafood, meat and Italian dishes. 11:30 - 24:00 (L.O 23:00) open everyday 082-249-2490 map C p.29 [C-2] 19

広告募集中

082-299-2953 info@gethiroshima.com

Organ-za

Otis!

Bohemian queen, Goto Izumi's avant guard center of operations. Great decor, food, drink and bizarre stage shows.

Eclectic and ethnic music. Tex Mex, vegetarian, vegan and gluten free dishes available.

Tue-Fri 17:30-01:30 (L.O.), Sat 11:30-01:30 (L.O.) Sun 11:30-23:30 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-295-1553 map C p.29 [A-1] 23

Mon-Sat 12:00-22:30 (L.O.) , Sun, hols 16:00-22:30 (L.O.) 082-249-3885 map C p.29 [A-2] 24

Pasta La Vista

Plus Minus

Stylish eatery near Peace Park which prides itself on its many pasta types & local ingredients. Smoke free at lunch. Vegetarian options.

Top quality yaki-niku on 1 F in retro Japanese surroundings, and stylish, modern lounge bar upstairs. Good range of local sake.

Lunch Mon-Fri 11:00-15:00 (L.O. 14:30) / Sat, Sun, hols 11:00-16:00 (L.O. 15:30) Dinner 17:00-24:00 (L.O 23:30) map C p.29 [B-2] 25

17:00-06:00, Bar 19:00-06:00 082-236-8810 map B p.28 26

Porta Porte Authentic Napoli style pizzeria with a view of the park out back. 11:00-15:00, 17:00-22:00 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-249-8010 map B p.28 27

Robatayaki Jindaiko

Rojiura Teppan Kotaro

Long running establishment opposite Ebisu Shrine serving grilled meat, fish and vegetables.

Young grill master Kotaro serves delicious seasonal dishes & drinks just off Peace Blvd.

17:00-23:30 (L.O.) 082-246-4873 map B p.28 28

17:00-02:00 (L.O. 01:30) Closed Tuesdays 082-249-1953 map C p.29 [C-3] 2F 29

Saishoku Kenbi

Shabuzen

Completely vegetarian menu (some dishes contain eggs & dairy) 1500m from Nishi Hiroshima Station. Tofu based, hearty daily set lunches and veggie ramen too! 11:00-16:00 (lunch until 14:00, L.O. 15:00) Closed on Tue 082-271-3770 map p.26 [A-1] 30

Hearty and social, shabu-shabu is healthy, cookit-yourself dining treat for meat lovers. Plates of high quality beef or pork with plenty of veggies, rounded off with noodles. 17:00-23:00 (L.O. 22:00) Open everyday 082-240-1700 map B p.28 32

Sprout

Tinto

Delicious extensive menu. 5 min walk from peace park. Pasta, pizza, fish, meat and veggie dishes.

Mediterranean dining bar open all day, with some great drink deals. Home made pizza.

082-294-2019 17:30-1:00(L.O.). Lunch Fri. Sat. Sun. Holiday 11:30-14:00(L.O.) - Closed on Wednesday map C p.29 [A-1] 33

11:30-24:00 Sun-Thurs, 11:30-01:00 Sat, Sun & hols 082-546-0007 map C p.29 [B-2] 34

Tokaichi Apartment

Warung Matahari

Quirky smoke free cafe in Tokaichi. ¥850 set lunches served 16:30.

Excellent Indonesian cuisine prepared by Balinese chef Surasna. Vegetarians catered for.

11:30-23:00 (lunch L.O. 16:30) Closed Tuesdays 082-231-9865 map C p.29 [A-1] 2F 35

17:30-22:30 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-240-2082 map C p.29 [B-3] 36


Zucchini: bar and cucina

Bar Edge

Lively, reasonably-priced tapas restaurant-bar next to Peace Park.

Small underground club with a good sound system.

11:30-15:00 (L.O 14:00) 17:00-24:00 (23:30 L.O) 082-546-0777 map C p.29 [B-1] 37

082-248-8146 map B p.28 3

Bon Voyage

Cafe Spice

International bar with counter and 2 discount rooms in which to chill. Nice cocktails and some great food too.

Relaxed SE Asian atmosphere amid the buzz of Nagarekawa

Mon-Thur, Sun 18:00-02:00, Fri, Sat 18:00-04:00 082-249-2380 map B p.28 4

18:00-03:00 082-246-7934 map B p.28 5

Chinatown

Centre Point

Well worn, but large dance venue in the depths of Nagarekawa, rented out by local promoters for live and club events. Check local listings for events 082-247-5270 map B p.28 6

Nagarekawa bar catering to a late night crowd that prides itself on its whiskey selection. DJs spinning at weekends, good source of local nightlife info.

Eki-mae Chelsea Cafe

Koba

Drinks, tapas and meals. Good whiskey selection. Carp baseball games live on big screen.

Rock loving BOM is one of Hiroshima’s most welcoming and entertaining bartenders. He whips up some very tasty food too.

Tue-Thur 20:00-03:00, Fri, Sat 20:00-05:00, Sun 20:00-01:00 map B p.28 7

Monday-Saturday 17:00-03:00, Sunday 17:00-24:00 Tel/Fax 082-263-4330 map A p.28 8

18-00-01:30 (L.O), Closed Wednesdays 082-249-6556 map B p.28 10

La Luna

Mac

International Food Bar with good music to relax, in comfortable surroundings Events every weekend

Legendary Hiroshima watering hole with massive CD collection.

22:00-late Closed Sundays 082-241-6788 map B p.28 11

18:00-late Closed Sundays 082-243-0343 map B p.28 12

Mambos The place to dance to Latin music in Hiroshima. Salsa lessons every day and party nights every Friday and Saturday. 20:00-01:00 082-246-5809 map B p.28 13

Molly Malone’s

www.facebook.com/mollymaloneshiroshima Hiroshima’s authentic Irish pub. Great beer, great food, great service. The place to watch Premier League soccer. Tues-Thurs 17:00~01:00 / Fri 17:00~02:00 / Sat 11:30~02:00 / Sun + Nat Hol 11:30~24:00 / Closed Monday / 082-244-2554 map B p.28 14

Southern Cross Spacious ex-pat bar particularly with an antipodean theme. Room to breathe in a smoke free atmosphere. www.facebook.com/southerncrosshiroshima 18:00-01:00 082-236-3396 map B p.28 16

New King Trendy and Pink, 2F bar run by the guys behind local hip men’s underwear boutique.

21:00-05:00 082-247-4487 map B p.28 15

#Hiroshima70


Tropical Bar Revolución Nobu’s popular 8F hangout, friendly and relaxed complete with balcony.

18:00-03:00~04:00 Closed Sun, hols map B p.28 18

The Shack Bar and Grill Spacious American-style bar amd grill on the Hondori covered shopping street near PARCO Department Store. Great for groups. Import bottled beers, week night drink deals, big menu and free pool table. Sun-Thurs 17:00-01:00, Fri & Sat 17:00-03:00 082-504-4170 map B p.28 17

Outsider Book Nook/Global Lounge Used English books to buy or exchange. Internet, cafe & meeting place. Lunches daily, bar from 19:00 Fri & Sat.

IACE Travel Competitive prices, regular offers, and English speaking staff make IACE a popular choice for travellers. 082-240-2051 map C p.29 [B-1] 1

Travel With A.G. Tanaka will get you a great deal for your international and domestic travel needs.

Mon-Thurs 11:30-21:00 Fri & Sat 11:30-23:00, Closed Sun, hols 082-244-8145 map C p.29 [C-1] 2 1

10:00-20:00 (Sat, Sun, hols until 19:00) Closed Wednesdays 082-544-7718 map B p.28 3

Yamatoya

Cleo Hair International

Produced in limited quantities yet reasonably priced, a bottle of Hiroshima's top quality local Japanese sake makes for a great souvenir. www.piconet.co.jp/yamatoya/

Pamper yourself in this state of the art beauty salon on the 9th floor of the PACELA shopping center.

09:00-22:00 Closed Sundays 082-241-5660 map B p.28 4

10:00-20:00 082-511-2470 map C p.29 [B-1] 1

Laff Hair Design

Dormy Inn

Ippei’s skills and service have made him a huge hit among Hiroshima’s international community.

Great location. Single ¥6000 Double/Twin ¥10,000 (tourist discount)

082-504-7636 (English line) map C p.29 [B-1] 4

082-240-1177 map C p.29 [B-2] 1

Hana Hostel

Hotel Flex

“Hybrid inn” with knowledgeable staff near the station.

Stylish riverside hotel, rates include breakfast Singles ¥6825, Doubles ¥11,555≤

082-263-2980 map A p.28 2

082-223-1000 map A p.28 3

Ikawa Ryokan

J-Hoppers Hiroshima

Cozy, home-like atmosphere. Japanese and Western rooms. Coin laundry. S ¥5,940≤ / Twin ¥9,720 / Tr ¥14,580 Quad ¥17,280 / Breakfast ¥756 www.ikawaryokan.net info@ikawaryokan.net 082-231-5058 map C p.29 [A-2] 4

Hiroshima’s first backpacker guesthouse. Beds from ¥2300.

Reino Inn

Washington Hotel

Centrally located “Art & Culture” Hotel. Families and small pets welcome. Dorms ¥2700, singles from ¥3700 (¥2800 per person for 2 ppl), family rooms.

Hospitality, amenity and security right in the heart of Hiroshima. All rooms equipped with great bathrooms and separate lavatory. WiFi in all rooms

082-236-7003 map C p.29 [B-2] 6

http://washington-hotels.jp/hiroshima/ 082-553-2222 map B p.28 7

(Peace Park Hiroshima)

082-233-1360 map C p.29 [A-2] 5


“Hiroshima’s famous oysters” Kaki-gozen Gourmet Oyster Lunch A beautifully presented

Kanawa Kakifune Oyster boat

selection of delicious dishes that includes grilled and deep fried oysters, tempura and sashimi. ¥3800 (¥4104 incl tax)

PEACE PARK Lunch 11:00-14:00 (L.O.) Dinner Monday-Saturday 17:00-21:00 (L.O.) Sunday & National Holidays 17:00-20:30 (L.O.) Ote-machi 3 chome, Naka-ku, Hiroshima-shi (082-241-7416) Just south of Peace Memorial Park Map p.29 [B-2] 16 KAISEKI Oyster course (lunch and dinner) ¥5,400 Various course menu available from ¥5,400

HIROSHIMA STA TION 6F

Kaki Meian Oyster Bar

ASSE Kanawa

One fresh oyster from ¥280 (+ tax), we have a lot of different kinds of oysters.

11:00-22:00 (L.O. 21:30) 6F Hiroshima Station ASSE Building (082-263-7317) Raw oyster & wine set

map A p.28 15

¥1300 (+ tax)

Enjoy a set including steak from Takehara (Hiroshima Pref.), tempura and oyster rice for ¥290 0 (+ tax)!

11:00-22:00 (L.O. 21:30)

6F Hiroshima Station ASSE Building (082-263-3296) map A p.28 14

Kanawa Hiroshima Airport A AIRPORT

HIROSHIM

3F

those from the Compare Hiroshima oysters with 0 (+ tax) ¥250 plate er Oyst ! rest of the world

08:00-L.0 20:00 / 3F Hiroshima Airport (0848-86-8330)

English menus and ma jor credit cards accepted at all locations. www.kanawa.co.jp


ganko yatai THE STUBBORN STALL COURT

words and photos: Judith Cotelle

Ganko Yatai is a lively and somewhat unique place in Hiroshima, well-known among nite owls and night workers. The name, which literally means “stubborn food stalls”, probably comes from the fact that the place never sleeps. Ganko Yatai has been open until 7 or 8 in the morning, 365 days a year, for over two decades! If you have the late night munchies and are in need of a nightcap, you should definitely give this place in the heart of Hiroshima’s nightlife district a try.

Ganko Yatai consists of 7 stalls: (clockwise from the entrance) Nonki: Sushi stall, Kazu: Inaka ryōri (rural food) & Oden, Tajima : Okonomiyaki and Teppanyaki, Heiwa-en: Chinese food, Yotchan: Teppanyaki, Ittetsu: Grill and charcoal-grilled food, and Mensōre: Yakitori. You can enjoy a wide variety of specialities and it’s fine to order from any of the stalls, wherever you may be seated. Although open from early evening, Ganko Yatai doesn’t usually get lively until around 4am! Sure, it’s a bit messy and can gets quite loud, but that all adds to the atmosphere. It’s a distinctly shitamachi downtown crowd. You’ll bump into a lot of club hostess and hosts, bar and restaurant staff after work, as well as people at the end of a night out. The age range is pretty wide too. Nobody speaks English and there are no English menus, but dive in and there’s a good chance you’ll have a lot of fun and find yourself chatting with other customers squeezed onto your bench. You may even end up sharing food with them! Now, let’s visit some of these stalls!

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Map p.28

のんき NONKI The chef is quite shy but famous for exclaiming “whoooooyyyhhhaaaa!” when handing you your sushi (if you go late enough). Large selection of nigiri-sushi (¥150 to ¥800), sashimi, maki-zushi, grilled fish and shellfish, tataki, tempura and other small dishes. I really like the crab gratin!

Sashimi

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¥1500 Sushi Set: 寿司盛り合わせ (¥1000-¥2500 available)


かず KAZU Many types of rural and homestyle food like grilled meat and sea food, tofu, natto, vegetables, teppanyaki food, tempura, tonkatsu, miso soup, omusubi.. but it’s mostly famous for its oden and its カリポン gari-pon (crunchy pig’s throat cartilage in citrusy ponzu sauce).

Oden

Gari-pon, ¥500

平和園 HEIWA-EN Popular place for Chinese dishes like gyoza, ramen, wok food, bifun, donburi, pork, crab, shrimp.. 手羽先唐揚げ Tebasaki-karaage (battered chicken wings), マーボー豆腐 Mābō-dōfu (tofu in meat sauce), and 肉ダンゴ Niku-dango (meat balls) are the top recommendations.

Mābō-dōfu, ¥700

よっちゃん Yotchan: Meat, entrails, on the teppan, a lot of dishes with melted cheese (tomato cheese bacon, cheese salmon, cheese potato...), aspara(gus)-bacon, fresh and grilled vegetables.

たじま Tajima: Okonomiyaki and various teppanyaki dishes.

Yaki-gyoza, ¥450

Tebasaki-karaage, ¥850

一鉄 Ittetsu: Grilled meat, fish, oysters, shrimps, mentaiko, 山芋チーズ焼き Yama-imo cheese yaki... めんそーれ Mensōre : Yakitori (meat, seafood and vegetable kebabs)

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goto izumi's deep hiroshima vol.

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Words and photos by Goto Izumi translation by Paul Walsh

これぞ日本の アイスクリーム!!!

Because Japanese ice cream!!!! Ice cream is an ultimate good and so shall be for eternity. Who doesn’t love ice cream? Few foods can claim such levels of affection. Here, I will not delve into the history of ice cream, and there will be no lengthy exposition on the subject of what makes the very best ice cream. Frankly I don’t give a fig about such things. What you will find here, dear reader, is a selection of some of the best exponents of the art of Japanese ice cream to be found in Hiroshima. They will never find their way into a common all garden guide book, but all are most worthy of your attention. Do not dilly dally. These ice creameries are, one by one, going the way of venerable post-war junkissa coffee shops and truly are an endangered cultural species. Don’t even think about sloping off to try one of approximately thirty flavors!

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Hiroshima’s Most Astonishing Kaki-gori Shaved Ice

Megadon Kakigori at Kogane Shokudo

Kogane Shokudo is a fairly standard Japanese diner in the center of the city that caters to salarymen looking for no nonsense homestyle cooking. Come summer, however, an absolute monster of a dessert joins the menu. So big that surrounding customers squeal when it leaves the kitchen, it has great shock value. This dessert is not only about the scale though. The syrup and sweet azuki beans are homemade and it is so delicious that, although at first you think there’s no way you’ll get through the whole thing, it’s gone in no time! I highly recommend ordering the ujikintoki and condensed milk「宇治金時+ミルクかけ」 or ichigo and condensed milk「イチゴ+ミルク かけ」versions. They are available in a variety of sizes, but you’ve really got to go for the biggest, the kogane-mori 「こがね盛り(大)」. And don’t be sharing, one customer, one order is an unspoken rule here. Are you up to the challenge? Kogane shokudo こがね食堂 082-248-3018 map p.29 [B-2] 2 11:30-22:00 (L.O. 21:00) Closed Sundays *Kaki-gori is served 14:00-17:00 until the end of September. It’s also possible to order after 17:00 if ordered along with a meal.

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MENU kaki-gori かき氷 small ¥250-¥350, medium ¥400-¥600, large ¥400600, X-large ¥500-¥750, extra milk ¥30~¥100

Flavors: Strawberry いちご, Lemon レモン, Mizore syrup みぞれ, Melon メロン,Blue Hawaii ブルハワ イ, Kintoki adzuki beans 金時, Uji maccha 宇治 , Uji-kintoki azuki beans and maccha 宇治金時


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Japanese ice cream with history, perfect for vegans and the lactose intolerant

Cream Zenzai (Azuki Bean Ice Cream) at Koharu Cafe

I’m a big fan of creamy ice cream, but I could hardly believe it when I found out that this ice cream is completely milk free. It just tastes so… milky. The secret lies within their 60 year old ice cream machine, the age of which makes Koharu Cafe’s ice cream something of an endangered species. Made with nothing more than azuki beans, sugar and mizuame “liquid candy” this ice cream which they call zenzai has a really interesting taste and is perfect for sweet-toothed vegans and people with milk allergies.

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MENU Cream Zenzai Small ¥300 Large ¥400 Take out ¥250 Koharu Cafe 小春カフェ 11-1 Enoki-cho, Naka-ku, map p.29 [A-1] 082-942-5861 11:30-17:00 Closed Thursdays

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Hiroshima’s Cheapest Kaki-gori

Iwataya’s ¥100 Kaki-gori

Originally made for the kids that play in the park next to the shop, this has got to be the cheapest kaki-gori in the city. This kaki-gori isn’t made with an automatic ice shaving machine, but by one worked by hand, which is something of a rarity and produces very fluffy ice. They only do take out, and in spite of the low price, it’s absolutely delicious! *This place is actually a very popular kaitenyaki shop. These are light muffin-like pancakes with various sweet fillings, the most popular of which is their azuki and soy milk cream mix which sell for ¥130 a piece

MENU Kaki-gori Shaved Ice かき氷, Strawberry いちご, lemon れもん, melon めろん, blue hawaii ハワ イアンブルー・レインボー ¥100, Grape ぶ どう, soda ソーダ, peach もも, pineapple パ イン ¥130, Ujikintoki 宇治金時, Iced azuki beans 氷あずき ¥300 Toppings Condensed milk 練乳 ¥2, Anko red bean paste あ んこ ¥40 Shiratama sweet rice dumplings 白玉 ¥60 Anmistu syrup-covered red bean paste あん みつ ¥100

Iwataya いわた屋 2-2-17 Sakai-machi, Naka-ku, 082-231-0846, 10:30-18:00, Occasional irregular days off, map p.29 [A-1]

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Bonus treat: Onomichi’s Top Batter, Ice Monaka Ice Cream Sandwich

Everyone’s favorite, Karasawa’s Ice Monaka

10 out of 10 cats in Onomichi will send you to Karasawa when asked for an ice cream recommendation. Do an internet search for Onomichi ice cream and nowhere else pops up. I went to see what all the fuss was about for myself. Karawa’s unassuming appearance belies a 60 year history. The menu is even more simple, offering only monaka ice cream sandwiches and cream zenzai. The monaka are filled with delectable vanilla ice cream made with plenty of eggs and the wafer casing has a tasty fragrant flavor. It’s, by far, the best ice monaka I’ve ever tasted, and thus the question of its dominance of Onomichi’s dessert world was answered..

MENU Take out Ice Monaka アイスモナカ ¥150 Cream Zenzai クリームぜんざい ¥280 (eat in ¥340) DATE Karasawa Hand made Iceからさわ 1-15-19 Tsuchidou, Onomichi-shi 0848-23-6804 10:00-19:00 (Nov-Feb until 18:00) Closed Tuesdays (unless National Holiday when closed the next day) Nov-Feb also closed 2nd Wednesday of the month) GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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All These Stories – AN INTERVIEW WITH WRITER/TRANSLATOR ARTHUR BINARD Words: Matt Mangham

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This is a mercilessly edited excerpt of a much longer, much more widely ranging interview, available in its entirety online. If you’re interested, please follow the link at the end.

Matt Mangham: What are you working on at the moment? Arthur Binard: I’m working on a kamishibai (a form of storytelling using a sequence of illustrated boards) based on the Hiroshima Panels. I’m on my fifth version, just trying to get something that’ll work. I’ve found that the kamishibai form is even more difficult than picture books, because so much is left to the performer. The picture book is sometimes an individual thing between the reader and the book, sometimes it’s someone reading the book to a child, but still, the book has more control of what happens. Whereas a play depends so much more on the person who performs it. So the story really has to tell itself. The storyteller can add a lot to the story, but even if the storyteller isn’t up to the task, it still has to work, otherwise it fails completely. MM: What prompted you to try a kamishibai project? AB: Well, from what I know, and from what people have told me, this is the first time anyone has tried to do a kamishibai with paintings that already existed. And now I understand why no one else has done it (laughing) because it’s really hard to do. I still believe it’s possible. MM: You haven’t given up. AB: No, I haven’t given up. I thought I could do it, first because the original works, a series of fourteen huge panels called the Hiroshima Panels, Genbaku no zu in Japanese, is so vast, and there’s so much detail in the paintings that Maruki Toshi and Iri have left us. I’ve been to the museum in Saitama thirty times, and every time I go I see someone I’ve never noticed, animals that I’ve never seen before. There’s so much in these panels that if I can choose the right characters and details, and pull out what will speak to the readers, then the project must be possible. MM: When were they done? AB: The originals were completed by 1950, while the Occupation’s censorship is in full force. So the paintings are illegal! You’re not allowed to tell the story of the atomic bombing! So the first panels, they did them not as folding panels, they

were hanging scrolls. And they were exhibited as hanging scrolls because no matter where they did an exhibition the police would shut it down. So you hang these scrolls, and you put guards outside, and when the Occupation forces show up, you roll them up and you’re out. So the exhibition was guerrilla, not warfare, but a guerrilla peace event. That’s the Maruki’s basic stance as artists. MM: I read somewhere that you first came to Hiroshima in 1996. AB: Sounds right. MM: In the years since, you’ve written on issues from the exposure of fishermen to the Castle Bravo Test to Hiroshima and the aftermath of Fukushima. Specifically in terms of Hiroshima, how did that first exposure change your way of thinking or working? AB: The first poem I published about nuclear issues, in the collection Catch and Release, deals with the fast breeder reactor in Fukui prefecture that’s named after Monju, the bodhisattva of wisdom. The poem is called “Monja.” It’s a play on Monju and monja, which is kind of like okonomiyaki, except it’s mushy. They make it in Tokyo. So it’s a play on that, but it talks about a fast breeder reactor melting down. And I wrote it, and then Monju melted down. Well, it didn’t...it was a sodium cooled reactor and they had a leak and it caught fire in 1995. That was before I came to Hiroshima. I was writing about Monju, and I wasn’t thinking about it as something connected to my childhood. But I did have a sense that as a fetus, I was exposed to leakage from the fast breeder reactor Fermi 1, on the shores of Lake Erie near Detroit. It melted down in the fall of 1966, but didn’t explode, miraculously. Lucky for me. It was only exposed years later. There’s a book called We Almost Lost Detroit that tells the story, really good investigative journalism. The whole thing was covered up because Fermi 1 was sold as an electric power plant, but it was really a plutonium-producing reactor for the Pentagon.

MM: That was a secret? AB: It wasn’t advertised. So going back through my childhood, I can ignore the issue because I don’t have any obvious health issues stemming from my exposure. I can live my life pretending that I have nothing to do with the meltdown of Fermi 1 in Monroe, Michigan, right upwind from where I was born and raised. I can ignore that and live my life, or I can think about that and live my life. Those are the choices. And in 1994, when I was writing this light and in some ways shallow poem about the reactor in Fukui, I was aware that my childhood also had a fast breeder reactor in it. But it wasn’t a strong, concrete connection for me. It was just something that kind of echoed in the poem. But coming to Hiroshima in 1996, that was the first time that I was actually faced with the choice. The issue was there, but I was living in a half-conscious state and not really thinking of it as my problem. And when I came to Hiroshima, I came on a day when there was someone telling their story at the museum. I had no reservations, hadn’t set anything up. I was just walking around. Look at the Dome, go to the museum. And I heard a woman tell her story, I don’t even know her name, and when she told her story she didn’t say A-Bomb, she didn’t say nuclear weapon. She said pika. And that was a word I didn’t know. I knew there was an expression pika pika, and I used it. But I didn’t know there was a word that meant the fissioning of Uranium 235 over a city. Then in the museum there’s Pikadon, the Marukis’ first book that was confiscated by the authorities, a little illustrated version of Maruki Iri’s mother’s story. The whole first edition was confiscated. But they got the plates out before the authorities came and took them to another printing house and printed another edition (laughing) like the next week. So, I came to Hiroshima I heard a woman tell her story, and in the museum there was the Pikadon book, and I had these two new words. And for me, the pika and the pikadon, as new units of language, became new lenses to think about my relationship to what happened here, to what happened on the shores of Lake Erie, or in Nagasaki. All those things, the beginning of the connections was this word pika. Because when you say pika, you’re talking about something that in English we GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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describe as an atomic bomb or nuclear weapon, but you’re standing in a different place. When I say atomic bomb, I’m looking down from the Enola Gay. A-bomb, that’s the A-bomb! But when that woman said pika she was looking up. So do you look up, at the pika, or do you look down at the A-bomb? It’s a totally different world. Pika, as a unit of language, puts you on Aioibashi Bridge, puts you on the shore of the river right there. Pika! Pikadon is a bit farther on, because you’re hearing the sound. People really close never heard the sound. The shock wave came before the sound.

reality there. Whereas if I’m on the Enola Gay, with Tibbets, and we drop it and then we photograph it, I don’t think that’s reality. That distance, the distancing that the pilot and soldiers on that plane went through, it’s indoctrination. Indoctrination happens no matter what language, no matter what society you grow up in, but literature is a way of getting beyond indoctrination. We can step out of ourselves, out of our species, out of our set-ups. Literature allows us to do that, that’s the whole point, that’s why there’s any literature that’s not propaganda.

I didn’t understand yet how different the pika expression was, but anytime I learn a new word I use it. I learned it in Hiroshima, went back to Tokyo, I’m telling people about Hiroshima. I don’t say genbaku, because everybody knows genbaku. I say pika, because it’s my new word. But when I say pika, it puts me in a different place, and that’s when I first started understanding how important perspective is. Me, born and raised in Michigan, do I put myself on the shores of Lake Erie with Fermi 1 melting down and talk about it, or do I stand in Washington, do I stand on Wall Street? It’s a political choice, but it’s a choice we have to make no matter what. You have to stand somewhere when you tell a story, you have to stand somewhere when you’re listening to someone. So where do I stand? Where do I choose to place my feet?

Hiroshima made those issues real and present. It wasn’t a historical lesson, it was a lesson about how you live.

I’d been studying literature, reading poetry, and the importance of perspective is just so basic. Are you telling this story in the first person or the third person? Are you an omniscient narrator? As a writer it’s a basic choice you always make, but I hadn’t thought about it as being a basic choice in my life. Hiroshima made it a choice about life first, and then literature. And I saw that it was a choice I was going to have to make no matter what, not just with nuclear issues, not just racial issues. Anything. If I’m writing a little picture book about insects, am I going to stand with the bee (laughing)? Do I stand with the hornet? Am I down with the ant, or against the ant? It’s every story. And that became so immediate when I came to Hiroshima. That’s how Hiroshima’s influenced everything I’ve done. So it really isn’t just nuclear issues, it’s a question of where I stand. And I thought, okay, I’m going to stand with the people who say pika. I was born in 1967, so I didn’t see the pika, but if I’m going to tell a story here I’ll stand with pika, because I feel like I have to choose the real perspective. Standing on Aioibashi, there’s

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MM: So you’re less interested in conventional activism than in forwarding a perspective that’s gone unheard in some quarters? AB: Yeah. I don’t care about messages. People always ask me, “What’s the message?” I don’t know. You’re the reader! The message is your thing. I’m a storyteller. My job is to give you a story that will allow you to think. That’s why this kamishibai is so hard. The temptation is to deliver a message, and kamishibai lends itself to the message. It was used for propaganda during the war. But that’s not what I’m trying to do. I don’t think we can get out of this cul-de-sac that we’re in as a species through propaganda. The only way we’re going to get out is if we start really thinking and creating and being less gullible.

some way, been battling stupidity. So I don’t have an agenda. But nuclear issues are important. It’s only been 75 years since plutonium was invented, and look at the state of the earth, what we’ve done. Look at Fukushima. It’s a total, endless hell. There’s nothing in the reactor vessels of 1 and 2. There’s nothing in there. It’s in the rocks. It’s amazing that we can be here talking about cherry blossoms and what happened in Hiroshima 70 years ago and on the same island there are reactors where the whole core has gone through and it’s killing the Pacific Ocean. So we’re gullible too. But it doesn’t help to panic, we’ve got to do something. And literature and poetry is part of doing something. Poetry doesn’t exist because we have to save the human race, that’s not why it exists. But poetry does have a role to play, and it always has. Societies have always had poetry as part of their continuum, and part of the way societies don’t commit mass suicide is poetry. MM: The last time we talked, you were thinking about a permanent relocation here. AB: Yeah, it’s back and forth. We’re not going to leave Hiroshima. I would love to cut Tokyo out of my life. But I have a weekly radio show and a weekly TV show, so the plan is how to handle that, because the people I work with are amazing, but it’s in Tokyo. So it’s an issue. Actually I’d love to be in Mihara, farming (laughs). But I haven’t quite gotten there. MM: But your work is shifting this way?

So, the war on terror. I’m more of an anti-war guy. But I do think there’s a need for a war on gullibility. We’ve been so gullible. The way the American public has been duped into thinking the atomic bomb ended the war, it’s the scam of the century. And we know that war is a racket. Smedley Butler told us in 1935, in no unclear terms, as a great Marine war hero, exactly how we were being duped. How the American public are just suckers. And we’re still suckers, we’re even bigger suckers than we were in 1935, because we’ve been scammed into thinking that the A-bomb was necessary, of all things! And then nuclear deterrents! Come on! But that’s what we have to deal with. As Homo Sapiens trying to survive and keep our cultures alive, we’re in a war against advertising agencies. We’re in a war against scams. And literature is basically that fight. All the great writers have, in

AB: The material has always been, well, outside of Tokyo. We think we understand Hiroshima, what the hibakusha went through, we think we understand Nagasaki, then we meet another person and go, “Wow, I didn’t know any of that!” It’s a totally undiscovered story. We just have the tip of the iceberg! That’s all we’ve ever heard. We think we know but then you actually meet people, or go into something like the history of the Hiroshima Panels, and it’s undiscovered territory. I’ve been here in Tokaichimachi for four years. I think I know this place because it’s my neighborhood. But then I go to Takagi, which is that sweets shop over there, and every once in a while the old lady comes out to talk, she tells me about when they rebuilt the store, all the bones that came out of the ground. All these stories. All these stories that somebody out there still has. http://bit.ly/arthurbinard


Even a child knows war is wrong By Adam Beck, Hiroshima resident and founder of Bilingual Monkeys, http://bilingualmonkeys.com

When you ask children about war and peace, their answers are a sharp reminder of the simple truth: war is bad and peace is good. As adults, we tell children not to fight, to talk things out instead...and yet we have trouble living up to our own instruction. Of course, life isn’t always so black and white, but a child’s instinct for peace can serve as a touchstone for our own ideals, which tend to get watered down as we age. After all, without idealism, the ideals we truly wish for, deep down under jaded adult thoughts, can never really be advanced. The more we think like children, the more peace there will be in this world.

Naturally, children who live in Hiroshima are more keenly aware of war and peace than children in many other places. Peace education is an important part of the curriculum in Hiroshima schools and the environment itself continuously raises awareness of these issues. To mark the August anniversary of the atomic bombing, half-a-dozen children in Hiroshima were asked their thoughts about war and peace. May these quotes be small reminders of simple truths.

Nia, 8: Peace is really quiet and nice, but war is really loud and CRAZY. Keimi, 10: Go in the middle of wars and say, “STOP!”

Eimi, 10: War is a bad thing and peace is a good thing!

Felix, 12: Just talk about it. Figure it out by talking.

Kian, 8: When I grow up, I won’t make nuclear weapons. Join the conversation Tag Instagrams and Tweets with your thoughts on moving towards a more peaceful world #Hiroshima70.

Issa, 9: If you’re a kid, be friendly to other kids. If you’re an adult, be friendly to other adults. Just keep that going!

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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INTERVIEW

Rio Sekimoto: 2014 Hiroshima Goodwill Ambassador We talked with Rio Sekimoto as she approaches the end of her year as one of Hiroshima’s Goodwill Ambassadors. Along with fellow ambassadors, Mayu Matsuoka and Nagisa Yoshida, she has been extolling the virtues of Hiroshima at local events, around Japan and abroad.

a while to learn things like holding appropriate expressions, use of the eyes, how to stand etc. And, of course, the public speaking. What has been your most memorable experience? Definitely having the chance to meet all the people I have thanks to this opportunity. And I’ve grown really close with my fellow ambassadors Mayu and Nagisa. We have become just like sisters.

What did you find most difficult? I’m very shy so, at first, I wasn’t confident I could perform my role properly. However, the support and encouragement of my family and everyone around me, helped me to believe in myself and take on the job. What have you learned from the experience? It was really interesting to compare the cities I visited with Hiroshima. It made me see my hometown in a new light and pick up hints as to how to

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Left to right: Rio Sekimoto, Mayu Matsuoka and Nagisa Yoshida

better promote Hiroshima. We spend a lot of time on show in front of lots of people and it took me

How do you hope to use your experience over the past year in the future? I’d like to use my experience to contribute in some way, whether through tourism or in another field. And, of course, I love Hiroshima. So I’ll still be sure to give visitors to Hiroshima a warm welcome even after my time as ambassador ends.


Matt’s Moment

Bird’s Eye

Years ago, visiting Miyajima, my brother and I leaned against the heavy pillars of the Thousand Mat Hall, furtively sharing a paper sack of chocolate-filled maple leaf cakes and taking in the view. From the torii gate in the sea below us, the eye traveled up, first to the shrine, then lifting to Daishoin temple sheltered under the forested flanks of Mount Misen. My brother gave a wheezing, happy fat man’s sigh and said, “Levels.” For a country so mountainous, Japan can do an excellent impression of Denmark. The population centers are mostly flat, even artificially so, as with the reclaimed tidelands where my own house stands. Large towns are linked by excellent roads and rail, neatly obviating the difficulties that once attended long overland journeys. The mountains are always there, usually within sight, but on a tour of the standard sights (Mt. Fuji and a few others aside) they can remain a backdrop, a few moments of darkness as the train hurtles through another tunnel. On a trip to Tokyo with my daughter, we waited seventy minutes to ride the elevator to the observatory of the new Skytree. A clear day would have shown us Fuji in the distance, but that day the city itself stretched to the horizon in every direction. If there was a hill out there anywhere, it was hiding. Mostly, this is fine. I’ve never complained that my bicycle ride to work deviates from the flat only twice, as I cross bridges. But the countryside, which in Hiroshima prefecture means the mountains, shows another side of Japan. I hesitate

to say another, older side of Japan, because people have always preferred coastal plains and broad intermontane valleys. In Japan, the obvious reason is rice. If ripe goat’s-milk cheeses had ever been a staple, there might be more photogenic alpine villages clinging to the heights. Instead, rice fields bordered by mixed-use satoyama, marking the boundary between settlement and forested uplands, are nearly universal in the countryside. I love to take visitors into the mountains. Even without a car, a bus or train will quickly carry you into valleys where, as my brother noticed years ago, Japan becomes a staircase country of changing levels, all verticals and wheeling shadows. Waterways carve steep notches, and houses cluster around terraced fields beneath the slopes. Climbing out of one valley to plunge into the next, smaller roads break left and right, narrow tracks vaulting upward into the gloom beneath the trees. The leaf-strewn stone steps of old shrines rise toward wedges of blue sky. Religious structures, enforcing distinctions of high and low, make excellent use of levels. Think of the shrine’s sanctum, perched atop pillars beyond the main hall, or pilgrims leaning over the rails of the great veranda at Kyoto’s Kiyomizu temple. One of my favorite places in Miyajima is an airy room at the top of a steep, turning flight of stairs in Daishoin’s Maniden Hall. By one historical count, as many as 43 peaks on Honshu were once considered sacred. Ascetics of the old mountain faith, a tangle of nearly every religious impulse that ever troubled Japan, secluded themselves among

the peaks to seek enlightenment through trials of brute endurance. Some still do. You wonder, though, how often they broke off from reciting sutras or casting strange spells beneath frigid, threading waterfalls to admire the view. Scenically, Japan does benefit from a bit of elevation. The Seto Inland Sea is lovely from the water, but from the summit of Mt. Kyougoya above Hatsukaichi even the industrialized stretch of coast from Ootake to Kure becomes picturesque. The islands are another wonderful study in levels, as you wind from one bridge to the next past steep citrus orchards where toy-like monorails ferry cartloads of luminous oranges along the slopes. I suppose I ought to draw some labored metaphor about the ups and downs of life here, the much-discussed vicissitudes of the outsider. I’d rather not. I’d rather leave you with the image of me standing in pink, fresh-scrubbed majesty at the edge of a hot bath high on a hillside on Osakikamijima. Night has fallen on the Inland Sea and fat, island-grown lemons are knocking winsomely against my thighs. Perhaps you are with me. Perhaps we have a sack of cakes to share, and nothing to say that can’t wait. Below, the sea stretches away black but for patches of light reflected from distant villages and the lamps of fishing boats. Islands rear dark against the sky, like bathers themselves, and there is a trace of smoke on the wind. This will be what you remember. Never neglect the view.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2015

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GetHiroshima Mag Summer 2015  

The best of Hiroshima, in English. Going Out :: Festivals :: Beaches & Fireworks :: Suo Oshima :: Arthur Binard :: Japanese Ice Cream ::...

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