Page 1

BE MORE THAN A TOURIST

Seasonal

Going Out

Visitors

Destinations

Festivals

Dining

Maps

Nagato

Beaches & Fireworks

Nightlife

Sights

Deep Hiroshima

A-bombed Trees

Art

Getting Around

Ganne Moon Beach

THE SUMMER ISSUE 2017

14

#


getting around

Streetcar lines Hiroden Line #1 (Hiroshima Station > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #2 (Hiroshima Station > Miyajima-guchi) Hiroden Line #3 (Hiroden Nishi Hiroshima > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #5 (Hiroshima Station > Hijiyama-shita > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #6 (Hiroshima Station > Eba) Hiroden Line #7 (Yokogawa Station > Hiroden Honsha mae) Hiroden Line #8 (Yokogawa Station > Eba) Hiroden Line #9 (Hatchobori > Hakushima) Astram Line (Hondori > Koikikoenmae)

Asa Zoo

Meipuru~pu bus

(Kamiyasu)

Limousine bus (Hiroshima City > Hiroshima Airport) ori

asu

miy

kat

Ta

Ka

World Heritage Route (boat) (Peace Park > Miyajima)

shi

higa

Yasu

i onda

am

Bish

chi

Oma

Chorakuji

Matsuyama Super Jet Ferry

ichi

Furu

JR Ferry and Matsudai Ferry to Miyajima

Tomo Obara

Nakasuji

Transport Museum

Tomochuo

(Chorakuji)

Ozuka

JR Train Lines Nishihara

Astram Line fares vary according to distance.

Koikikoenmae

¥190~480

Big Arch Stadium

Gionshinbashikita

Ushita

Station JR

Tera-machi

a-

him

us

k Fu

Hiroden nishi Hiroshima

s

nn

Ka

m

on

ho

c a-

nm

Te

hi

ac

ho

i-c

m

a Ko

ae m e) e- om m bD do m

u-

Dobashi

m

n-

no

an

K hi-

o ch

hi

ac

Shinkansen Station Hiroshima Station JR

¥110

Hakushima

Hiroshima Station

Katei Saibansho-mae Shukkeien-mae Jogakuin-mae Kamiyacho Higashi

ho

-c

isu

Eb

En

ho

m

ya

na

Ka

c a-

hi

ac

i-m

ar

In

Matoba cho

Hatchobori

Okonomi-mura mae

M

Nisseki byoin mae

Hiroden Honsha mae

ba

ki-

iyu

Minami machi 6-chome

i sh

The flat fare for inner city travel on the streetcare is ¥160 (child ¥80)

¥160

Moto-Ujina-guchi

a ug

k zo Fu ai- ae d -m ro Hi oin y nb Ke

e m ho -c e -3 om a h e in Uj -4-c om ina -ch Uj a-5 i in or Uj n-d iga Ka

Ujina 2-chome

Hiroshima Port

Miyajima

Matsuyama

ae

m

o-

kk

M

The fare for travel on Miyajima bound streetcars varies according to distance. (¥260 to Miyajima)

i-m

m

ina

Eba

Miyajima-guchi

e

m

ho

-c

i-2

h ac

M

Takano-bashi

Funairi-kawaguchi-cho

uy

ae

m

o-

sh

u ak

i-k

m

ina

i

sh

ba

a-

am

H

Shiyakusho-mae

Funairi-saiwai-cho

am

ijiy

Museum of Contemporary Art

ita

sh

a-

jiy

Hi

Fukuro-machi Chuden-mae

a

Mazda Stadium

e

om

ch

1-

ar

nb

Da

Hondori Peace Park

o

ch

hi-

as

b ko

Tate-machi

o cB

ak i nb(Atom hi i ac h i-m mac r i nna Fu i-ho ir na Fu Ge

Kamiyacho Nishi

Funairi-minami-machi Miyajima Guchi JR

Line

Hakushima Line, All Destinations,

Bus Center

o

h -c

a

aw

nk

Ho

Tokaichi machi

Nishi Hiroshima Station JR

Sanyo Main

Shin-Hakushima Johoku

Kencho-mae

Betsuin-mae

ai

oM

ny

(Ushita)

Museum of Art

Yokogawa 1-chome e

in nL

Big Wave

Hakushima

Yokogawa Station JR

Yokogawa Station

Ni

(Fudoinmae)

Hakushima

Shin

Kabe Line

Mitaki JR

Mitaki Temple

Sa

Fudoin Temple

Fudoinmae

(Koikikoenmae)


GetHiroshima Mag Issue 14 June, 2017 Circulation 10,000 copies Published quarterly by GetHiroshima Next issue September, 2017 Printed by Hiroshima Chuo Printing Co., Ltd. Motoaki Tahara

WELCOME Daily greetings have changed from konnichiwa to atsui desu ne (It’s hot isn’t it!) so summer is here. The heat can be exhausting. Try to fight it and you will surely lose. But, if you slow down and take your cues from the local inhabitants, it can be a thoroughly enjoyable time of year, particularly if you are fortunate enough to be on vacation. It is, of course, when people from all over the world turn their attention to the city for the annual commemoration of the A-bombing on August 6. Little more than a year on from US president Obama’s long hoped for visit, 2017’s commemoration is likely to have an added sense of urgency as the people of Hiroshima nervously eye news reports of renewed nuclear tensions in the region. Despite current concerns, there will be hope as well as sadness on display, and in this issue we look at Hiroshima’s hibakujumoku A-bombed survivor trees which provided some of the first rays of hope in the months after the attack, when it was believed that Hiroshima would be devoid of greenery for 75 years. In addition to our regular features on the season’s festivals and Hiroshima’s dining and entertainment options, we take a close look at the beautiful area of Nagato in neighboring Yamaguchi prefecture which makes for an excellent summer road trip destination. As always, we’d love to hear about how you #gethiroshima this summer, so please drop us a line or tag your exploits.

Editor-in-chief Paul Walsh

会話の始まりも「こんにちは」から「暑いですね」に変 わり、また夏がやってきました。今年も暑さにやられそ うな予感です。暑さと戦えば間違いなくバテますね。海 外からの広島在住者は、地元の知識が豊富な人に、余 裕を持って夏の過ごし方を聞いて見ると、充実した夏休 みを送れるかもしれません。あくまでも夏休みが取れ たらのお話ですが。。もちろん、8月6日の原爆記念式典 は、広島が世界中から関心を集める時でもあります。オ バマ前大統領の訪広から一年も経たない中で、日々ニ ュースで流れる近隣諸国からの核の脅威で、広島に住 む人々にとって2017年の記念式典は、より重みが増す ように感じます。現況に関わらず、この4月からリニュア ルオープンされた平和記念資料館東館は、消えぬ悲し みと同時に希望をもたらす展示になっています。この夏 号では、原爆投下後75年草木も生えないと言われてい たあの悲劇の数ヶ月に再び芽吹き、多くの人々に希望を もたらした被爆樹木について特集しました。また、季節 行事やイチオシの飲食店などの紹介に加えて、夏のロー ドトリップにはうってつけの山口県の長門市をクローズ

Design team NININBAORI http://nininbaori.co.jp/ Art Direction: Judith Cotelle Illustration: Steven Boura Contributors Eric Drummond Annelise Giseburt Goto Izumi Matt Jungblut Matt Mangham Linda Sue Paul Walsh Noriko Yamamoto Photography Kenichi Asano Junpei Ishida Matt Jungblut Linda Sue jjwalsh Paul Walsh Noriko Yamamoto

アップし、長門の美しい景色を取材してまわりました。 みなさんがGetHiroshimaを見てどんな夏にされるの か、#GetHiroshimaでタグをつけて教えていただける のを楽しみにしています。

Find us online

Cover: Paul Walsh

Assistant Editors JJ Walsh Ayaka Terao

Mendel Jonkers

www.gethiroshima.com GetHiroshima

GetHiroshima

GetHiroshima

gethiroshima

Photo: Junpei Ishida

Tag us with #gethiroshima

All rights reserved © GetHiroshima 2017 As far as we are aware, all info correct at time of going to print. If you see something that has changed, we’d really appreciate you letting us know at info@gethiroshima.com

082-225-7466

gethiroshima.com info@gethiroshima.com

Warning/Disclaimer GetHiroshima will not accept liability for any damages caused by the contents of GetHiroshima Mag, including, but not limited to any omissions, errors, facts or false statements. Opinions or advice expressed in GetHiroshima Mag are not necessarily those of GetHiroshima. No content published in GetHiroshima can be reproduced, republished, retransmitted or redistributed without permission.


CONTENTS 02 / Getting Around 03 / Welcome 05 / GetHiroshima Picks 06 / Festival Focus 09 / Kagura 10 / Beaches and Fireworks 24 / City Maps 29 / Place Listings 34 / News 35 / Art 46 / My Town 47 / Matt’s Moment

FEATURES 12 / Nagato More than home to one of Japan’s most striking shrines, summer is a great time to visit this beautiful corner of the region. 16 / Honshu’s Wild West Coast By Train Noriko Yamamoto introduces the coastal Sanin Honsen line between Shimonoseki and Nagato. 20 / Hibakujumoku: Hiroshima’s A-bombed Trees Powerful symbols of Hiroshima’s resilience and the indefatigable power of nature. 33 / When Was Last Time You Had A Magical Evening? Check out one of Hiroshima’s magic bars for unique night out.

36 / Eating The Stars A Michelin-starred tempura restaurant in the heart of Hiroshima, that won’t break bank. 38 / Vegan Hiroshima Our round up of the growing number of options for vegan diners in Hiroshima. 40 / Goto Izumi’s Deep Hiroshima The Motomachi Apartment Complex is a city within a city that even few locals venture into.


GetHiroshima picks You’ve been to the Peace Memorial Park and Miyajima. What next?

PEACE PAGODA

FAN FANTASTIC

KAGURA

Walk up Mt Futaba from Tōshō-gū shrine along a path that takes you under 100 red torii gates through an old growth forest to great views from the Peace Pagoda at the top.

Love for the Hiroshima Carp is unequivocal. Baseball fan or not, a home game is always memorable. Soccer lovers can enjoy the Japanese stadium experience at a Sanfrecce game.

Ancient myths and folktales performed in extravagant costumes to frenetic drum rhythms, complete with dry ice, fireworks and exploding cobwebs. City center shows at Kenmin Bunka Center on Wednesdays from April. (See p. 9 for more details).

MITAKI TEMPLE

EAT!

SHIMIZU GEKIJO

Cure Kyoto “temple fatigue” and calm the soul in the gorgeous verdant grounds of Mitaki Temple, 20min walk up the hill from Mitaki station (3 stops from Hiroshima on the Kabe Line).

Okonomiyaki is both a meal and a culinary performance. Oysters and tsukemen cold noodles in spicy dipping sauce are also local specialities. Wash it all down with some great local sake.

Step into the world of Japanese vaudeville performed by itinerant troupes with very loyal fans. 3hr shows at 12pm & 6pm (¥1900) or catch the 1hr finale for just ¥1000. http://bit.ly/shimizugekijo

SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

ISLAND HOP

OUT ON THE TOWN

Wander through the miniature landscapes in this city center garden or take a seat by the lake and watch the koi carp, turtles and birds. Lovely rain or shine.

Hiroshima Port is the gateway to the islands of the Inland Sea. Sleepy Ninoshima is the nearest. Don’t have great sea legs? Stroll the Ujina waterfront or walk over to Moto-ujina island.

We urge you to eat, drink, and yes, make merry with Hiroshima people. It’s only then that you can get a real appreciation of what a special place Hiroshima is and truly feel its message of peace. GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/05


summer Festivals Beautiful yukata. Dancing in rice paddies and dancing for the dead. Gorgeous bullocks. And fireworks, lots of fireworks. The heat makes the beer and shaved ice taste all the better, so why not blow off some steam at a festival or two this summer ?

Hiroshima’s 3-day Tōkasan yukata festival ushers in the long warm months and is the most festive of all the city’s events. It also heralds the coming of the rainy season, which is the time for planting the rice fields. It’s an event so central to Japanese culture that it has its own colorful rituals. Miyajima’s most spectacular shrine festivals are also at this time of year. Last but not least, you haven’t done a Japanese summer without spending an evening at a summer festival which culminates with a fireworks display.

TOUKASAN / 6/2-4 - HIROSHIMA

Yukata summer kimono get their first airing of the year at this fantastic festival. Chuo-dori is taken over by dancers, drumming and yukata fashion shows, but Shintenchi Park is where it’s at. You can join in with the dancing and the cheap festival treats keep kids happy and parents solvent.

MIBU-NO-HANA-DAUE / 6/4 - KITA-HIROSHIMA

A rice planting ritual said to have roots in the middle ages. Colorfully decorated bulls are led through the streets and paraded in a rice field. Saotome rice planting maidens sing as they plant, accompanied by traditional music. Arrive early to see the bulls up close at Mibu Shrine before they head out.

06\


RITUAL RICE PLANTING / 6/11 - SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

If you miss Mibu-no-hana-daue, you can see a smaller scale ritual right in the city center at Shukkei-en Garden the following weekend. There are no bulls here, but as well as rice planting, drummers perform several traditional dances. The performance spanning the walkway across the lake is quite a sight.

KANGENSAI / 8/8 - MIYAJIMA

A nautical event in which a portable shrine is carried from Itsukushima Shrine and transported by boat to shrines around the island and on the mainland, Miyajima’s most elaborate festival dates back to the 12th century. The boats return just before midnight for a spectacular finale inside the “floating” shrine.

FIREWORKS /

Summer is all about the fireworks and you can catch a display just about every weekend (weeknights too during the mid-August Obon holiday). Some of the most easily accessible and spectacular displays are at Hiroshima Port, on Miyajima and at Iwakuni’s Kintai Bridge, but check the full list on p.8 and map on p.10-11. GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/07


|| 5/30 Uma-tobashi Jigozen Shrine, Hatsukaichi

KIRIKUSHI OKANGENSAN / 7/22

|| 6/2-6/4 Tokasan Yukata Festival

A small, but colorful festival in the port town of Kirikushi on Etajima Island. There are stalls and a stage, but the main event is the floating of small straw boats, illuminated by candles, on the stream which flows through the town. It’s very picturesque, but also a very local affair and you may find you are the only off-islander there.

|| 6/4 Mibu-no-hanadaue ritual rice planting, Kita-Hiroshima || 6/4 Shōbu Tea Ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden || 6/10 Hasumi Firefly Festival, Ohnan, Shimane || 6/11 Ritual rice planting, Shukkei-en Garden || 6/24 Gion Festival, Onomichi || 6/25 Innoshima Island Festival, Innoshima || 7/1 Takehara Tanabata Festival, Takehara || 7/2 Tanabata Tea Ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden

ONOMICHI GION MATSURI / 6/24

|| 7/14-16 Tenjin Festival, Onomichi

Kyoto’s Gion Matsuri is one of Japan’s best known festivals. The port town of Onomichi also holds a Gion Festival in July which starts from its own Yasaka Shrine. It isn’t as elaborate as that of the former capital, but the energetic culmination of the festival on the waterfront will certainly get the heart racing and the cameras clicking.

|| 7/15 Mizuho Summer Festival, Ohnan, Shimane . || 7/15 Tadanoumi Gion Festival, Tadanoumi, Takehara || 7/15 Iwakuni Port Fireworks Festival, Iwakuni . || 7/15 Mizuo-cho Water Festival, Onomichi || 7/20 Mushiokuri Matsuri, Ohnan, Shimane || 7/20 Otake/Wakigawa Fireworks Festival . || 7/22 Hiroshima Port Dream Fireworks . || 7/22 Onomichi Sumiyoshi Fireworks Festival .

SUMIYOSHI SHRINE SUMMER FESTIVAL / 8/ 5-6 Along with Toukasan and Autumn’s Ebisu Festival, Sumiyoshi Shrine’s summer festival is one of Hiroshima’s “big three” grand festivals. That said, it’s quite low key and most of the people there are from the local neighbohood. There are a bunch of stalls, traditional boats that make the rounds of other shrines, kagura performances and a few fireworks.

MIHARA YASSA FESTIVAL / 8/11-13 - MIHARA

|| 7/22 Numata Hongo Fireworks Festival, Mihara . || 7/22 Okagensan Festival, Kirikushi, Etajima || 7/23 Nagato & Senzaki Fireworks Festival . || 7/29 Miyajima-san Kyousan Innoshima Suigun Fireworks Festival, Innoshima . || 7/29 Hikari Fireworks Festival, Yamaguchi . || 7/29 Kure Fireworks Festival . || 7/29 Yaekangensai, Kita-hiroshima || 8/1 Japan Sea Fireworks Festival, Hagi, Yamaguchi . || 8/5 Nishiki River Festival & Fireworks, Kintai Bridge Iwakuni . || 8/5 Matsue Suigosai Fireworks, Matsue, Shimane . || 8/5 Hamakko Fireworks Festival, Hamada .

Every August the whole of the usually sleepy city of Mihara pitches in and puts on the Yassa Festival. The festival runs from Friday night to Sunday, with local performers, a flea market, booths and parades of locals doing the catchy Yassa Dance of which Mihara locals are fiercely proud. The whole things finishes with a big fireworks display.

TAMATORI-SAI / 8/27 START AROUND 12:00, MIYAJIMA The annual tamatori (literally ‘ball grab’) is said to be based on a ritual dating back hundreds of years. After a ceremony in Itsukushima Shrine, a ball is placed on a platform suspended from a scaffold over the water. Men launch themselves from human pyramids and try to mount the platform and capture the ball to secure good fortune for their team.

08\

|| 8/5-6 Sumiyoshi Shrine Festival || 8/8 Kangensai, Miyajima || 8/11-13 Yassa Festival, Mihara . || 8/13 Yanai Goldfish Lantern Festival, Yanai . || 8/13-15 Fukuyama Summer Festival . || 8/15 Kisa Fireworks Festival, Miyoshi . || 8/19 Setoda Summer Festival, Ikuchijima Island . || 8/20 20:00-22:00 Eba Fire Festival, Eba || 8/19 Miyoshi Fireworks Festival, Miyoshi . || 8/26 Miyajima Fireworks, Miyajima . || 8/26 Innoshima Suigun Fire Festival . || 8/26 Takehara Fireworks Festival, Takehara . || 8/27 Tamatori Festival, Miyajima || 8/27 Innoshima Suigun Sea Festival || 8/27 Shobara Summer Festival Fireworks . www.gethiroshima.com/events

.= Fireworks


kagura spectacular folk theater for the masses

A giant, multicolored, eight-headed serpent writhes back and forth across the stage, attacking and entwining a sword-wielding hero. Engulfed in smoke and sparks spitting from its multiple jaws, the beast bites, spins and leaps, occasionally snapping at young children brave enough to come to the front of the stage. The hero, of course, eventually triumphs, severing each of the heads in turn, to the delight of the audience.

This is the thrilling conclusion to Yamata-noorochi, a crowd-pleasing tale from Japanese mythology, often performed as the finale at kagura festivals and competitions. Kagura is a diverse art form with a variety of performance styles. Those performed in northern Hiroshima and Iwami in Shimane are characterized by energetic dances in elaborate (and heavy) costumes, accompanied by stirring rhythms.

While you may not understand the dialogue, the exciting fight scenes, lots of dry ice, fireworks and lightning-fast costume changes keep even the uninitiated entertained. In Hiroshima city, kagura is most often seen at autumn shrine festivals. Every Wednesday, however, troupes come in from the countryside to perform at Kenmin Bunka Center near the A-bomb Dome. Non-Japanese readers are provided with basic English outlines of the two pieces to be performed. There’s also an opportunity to check out the masks and costumes up close and get some souvenir snaps after the show. Those who would like to delve deeper into the world of kagura should make a trip out to Monzenmura Kagura Village in Midorii, Akitakata. Here, around 20 troupes take turns in performing in the “Kagura Dome”. The facility also has restaurants, shops, a hot spring and accommodation.

H I R OSH IMA K AGURA I N HIROSHIM A CITY CE N TE R Every Wednesday Night at

∼Hiroshima Prefectural Citizen’s Culture Center∼ (Rijo Kaikan Kenmin Bunka Center)

SUMMER SEASON: July 5, 12, 19, 26 August 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Sept 6, 13, 20, 27

300m from Peace Memorial Park Admission: ¥1,000 Doors open: 18:00 First performance: 19:00-19:40 Intermission: 19:40-20:00 Second performance: 20:00-20:40 http://www.rccbc.co.jp/event/kagura/ All seats unassigned. Tickets on sale from 17:00 on day of performance.

Photo session with players and costumes on stage after the show from 20:40


BEACHES & FIREWORKS Japan isn’t Thailand, and Hiroshima isn’t Okinawa. However, while the region isn’t going to win any international prizes for its beaches, they do compare well with those in the Tokyo area, and at the height of summer provide a welcome opportunity to enjoy a refreshing dip in the water, feel the sand between your toes and relax in the shade of a palm tree. Iwami Seaside Park

When it comes to beaches in this region, you are rewarded in proportion to the effort you put in to get to them. Designated swimming beaches along the Inland Sea coast can’t be described as dirty, but many do tend to be littered with random debris - small plastic spacers, used to separate the shells on which oysters are grown below the rafts that dot Hiroshima’s waters, seem to be everywhere - and unless there are very dedicated clean up crews at work daily, you’ll be hard pressed to find a beach completely litter free. The more remote, the more chance of litter free sand and crystal clear water - you may even discover a tiny cove and have stunning vistas all to yourself. Hiroshima folk, especially its youth, make the most of what they have. During the swimming season which starts around the Umi-no-hi Marine Day holiday in late July, and runs until the end of August, many head to beaches near and far especially at weekends and during the mid-August Obon holiday.

9

Hamada

Sa ni n

M

ai n

Li ne

SHIMANE PREFECTURE

9

Masuda Segoe

191

Nagaiso beach and camping ground

SEA OF JAPAN

Sandankyo Gorge (© Nobuyuki Kondo)

Lin

Kiyogahama

Sandankyo Gorge

e

191

Ma

in

py

u

ok

Sa

nin

g hu

Ex

C

Segoe

Omijima Omijima Kiku-ga-hama

n

ni

Sa

Nagato

ain

Chichiyasu Pool

Hagi

ne

Li

M

YAMAGUCHI PREFECTURE

191

Miyajima Tsutsumi-ga-ura

Kiku-ga-hama / Hagi

Ch

py

C

Yamaguchi

Mine

Back of Miyajima island

2 ug

ok

uE

xp

n

Sa

Sh

y

en

ns

ka

in

yo

Iwakuni

o

ny

Sa

y an

S

en

ns

ka

hin

oS

y

p Ex

Sanyo

Sanyo Main Line

Ch

Otake

im

a-

Ex

sh

g hu

Hi ro

u

ok

316

Sa ny o

Iw ak un iR

oa

d

M

ai n

L

Mine Line

282

Expy

Yanai Matsuri 08/13 437

Yanai

Hikari

188

O

10\

Hikari


Dangyokei Ohnan

Sanburo-no-taki Tojo

Shobara Ha

ma

da

Ex

py

Miyoshi

Mibu-no-hana-daue 06/04

Fu

C

ku

Mibu

261

Lin

e

Ge

ibi

Lin

e

Akitakata

en

Setoda Sunset Beach

HIROSHIMA PREFECTURE

Fuchu

Karuga-hama

Sanburo-no-taki 485 432

Ex

py

191

ine

L ibi

sh

Ge

On

im

a

54

ro Hi

ine

nyo

Hatsukaichi

os him aE Ro ut e 1 xpy

in

Ma

e

Lin

ine

2 432

Hir

Hiroshima

2

yo

n Sa

oE

ny

Sa

in L

Hiroshima Airport

eL Kab

54

Ma

y

Expy

y xp

xp

Sa

iE

ich

Sanyo

o ny

Mihara

2

yo

San

sen

kan

Shin

2

Onomichi

2

n

se

an

ink

Sh

317

Sa

Ujina

Fukuyama

om

Bayside Beach Saka

Tomo-no-ura Port

195

Takehara Kure Line Kure Line

Mizushiri (Bayside Beach Saka)

hichiyasu

Innoshima Island

Ikuchi Island

Tsutsumi ga-ura

81

ne

Li

Kisa

py

Ex

u

ok

g hu

Setoda Sunset Beach

Karuga-hama

Miyajima Back of Miyajima

Kure

487

Kure

Etajima

Line

195

Osaki-kamijima Island

487

Kami-kamagari Island Ken-min-no-hama SETO INLAND SEA

Kurahashi Island Katsura-ga-hama

Innoshima Fire Festival 8/26 Ken-min-no-hama / Kami-kamagari Island Katazoe-ga-hama / Oshima Islands

Oshima Islands

437

Katazoe-ga-hama

Katsura-ga-hama / Kurahashi Island

SHIKOKU

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/11


nagato Nagato is a beautiful area located on the Japan Sea side of Yamaguchi Prefecture. It has become a very popular destination over the last few years thanks to Motonosumi Inari Shrine. However, there is much more to Nagato than this one, admittedly, beautiful shrine.


Motonosumi Inari Shrine is, of course, a must see. This shrine is located right by the ocean and has over one hundred and twenty red torii gates leading down towards the water. The views are spectacular on a beautiful day, but can be equally impressive, though in a different way, even on stormy days. It’s not a huge area so planning for an hour here should give you plenty of time to walk all around and take lots of pictures. Before leaving the shrine, be sure to stop by the large torii gate at the top of the hill to make your offering. The saisen offering box to place offerings is located in a very interesting spot and is quite a challenge to reach. My advice is to avoid using lightweight ¥1 coins. The best time to visit the Motonosumi Inari Shrine is in the morning as it does get very crowded, rather quickly. This is especially true if planning to visit at the weekend.

words: Linda Sue / photos: Linda Sue, GH & Yamaguchi Prefectural Tourism Association

After exploring the shrine area and spending a little more time than I like to admit on getting my offering into the box, I like to head over to Senjojiki for some lunch and more great views. Senjojiki is less than 15 minutes away from the shrine by car. It is a pretty large park that offers plenty of parking, lovely views, and a cute little café that serves up some great food. It can be a little pricey so if you don’t want to splurge, there are quite a few picnic tables and lots of grassy space to sit and enjoy a picnic or an o-bento from a convenience store. There are several walking paths that offer different views, so be sure to explore the area before moving on. If you enjoy camping, the Senjojiki Campgrounds are also located nearby.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/13


About twenty minutes away from Senjojiki is the Higashi Ushirobata Tanada, an area of terraced rice fields. It is especially pretty here when the fields are filled with water in preparation for planting season, which is typically in the latter part of May. It is, however, pretty cool to see just about any time of the year so don’t skip it just because it isn’t the planting season. Also, if you go in the evening, you can get a wonderful view of the terraces with a backdrop of the sun setting on the horizon and the darkening sea dotted with the lights of local squid boats. Please make sure to use one of the two designated parking areas available. One only has enough room for a few cars, but then there is a larger lot a little further down the road.

The best way to get around Nagato is by car. If you have to rely on public transportation, Nagato-Furuichi [ 長門古市駅 ] on the Sanin Honsen Line (See pages 16-19) is the closest station to the Motonosumi Inari Shrine. It can take anywhere from 2.5 hours to over 3 hours from Hiroshima Station, using a combination of the bullet train and local JR trains. Unfortunately, there is no public transportation from the station to the shrine at this time. It might be worth looking into getting a quote for use of a taxi service if you plan on seeing more than just the shrine. There are also some larger taxis that can accommodate larger families or small groups. Furuichi Taxi is the company that services the Nagato-Furuichi Station and their number is 0837-37-3194.

14\


Less than thirty minutes from the rice fields is Kawashiri Cape, another place which has amazing panoramic views. You can easily walk to the viewing point, and from there you can take a walking path that leads to a portion of the cape that extends out to the sea. If there has been rain recently, the walking path can get muddy in a couple of spots so I don’t recommend sandals or flip flops. It’s not necessary to walk the path at all to enjoy beautiful views so don’t let your shoe choice stop you from checking this area out. This is another spot in Nagato where you can pitch a tent and spend the night.

If a sandy beach with clear blue water is your thing, head to Ohama Beach. The sign may have said “Ohama Bathing Beach” and it is only about 5 minutes from the Kawashiri Cape. This is a great spot to relax and soak up the sun. The water is so beautiful here that I couldn’t stop looking at it.

Nagato Tsunoshima

Hiroshima

If time is not an issue and you have a car, you can continue on to the island of Tsunoshima. The bridge connecting it to the mainland, at over 1700m in length, is one of the longest in Japan, and one of the most photographed. The parking lot on the right side of the bridge entrance offers great views. Tsunoshima has some beautiful beaches, campgrounds and a lighthouse that is worth checking out. When visiting the lighthouse, be sure to walk around the whole area. It’s really nice down by the water, with some good views of the lighthouse. If you can handle heights, for a small fee, you can go to the top of the lighthouse for more gorgeous vistas. Nagato and Tsunoshima make both a great day-trip or overnight getaway. Be sure to add these two spots to your must-visit list this summer! http://visit-nagato.com/en/

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/15


honshu’s wild west c by train By Yamamoto Noriko ( Design Studio Shimaisha )

take in dramatic views along the hibikinada and japan sea coasts and explore picturesque nagato. the sanin honsen line (shimonoseki-senzaki, yamaguchi prefecture)

The spine of the Chugoku mountain range which stretches across the Chugoku region divides Western Honshu into two regions, the sanin [山陰] to the north and the sanyou [山陽] to the south. Most of the area’s local train lines cross the mountains, but the Sanin Honsen Line alone runs along the coast. The views of Yamaguchi Prefecture’s dramatic Hibikinada coastline, north of Shimonoseki on the very tip of Western Honshu, and along the Japan Sea to Nagato, elicit gasps of delight. A newly refurbished panoramic train service, which will offer local foods and sake to accompany the views is to begin soon, but there are good reasons to take the regular train before the schedules change on August 5.

Omijima Hiroshima Senzaki Nagato

Shimonoseki


coast

The Sanin Honsen Line between Yudama [湯玉] and Kogushi [小串間] © Ryouji Yamaoka http://yamaokaya.exblog.jp


senzaki [仙崎] JR West’s new ‘Marumaru-no-hanashi’ panoramic train service starts on August 5, and will run from Shimonoseki, through Nagato and on to Hagi. Until then, however, taking the 10:35 regular train from Shimonseki [下関] takes you all the way to the sleepy port town of Senzaki [仙崎] in a fraction over 2 hours without having to change trains. This gives just under 4 hours to explore before returning on the 16:27 train (arriving at Shimonoseki at 18:18), more if you leave on the 18:02 departure (which involves one change at Asa [厚狭] to get you back to Shimonoseki at 20:29). The benefit of taking the regular train is that you may be able to catch one of the stunning sunsets over the Japan Sea, for which this area is famous, on the return journey (something that will prove difficult

18\

once the schedules change on August 5). Most of Senzaki’s attractions are along ‘Misuzu Road’ and around nearby Omijima Seaside Square and are easily navigated on foot or by bicycle. Misuzu Road is named for Misuzu Kaneko, a much-loved early 20th century poet and writer of children’s verses. She was born in Senzaki and her image and references to her poetry appear all around the town. As well as the small museum dedicated to the poet, you’ll find some small shops and cafes, which include the 70 year old ivy-covered building that houses Cafe Struggle, known for its Creme Brulee. Yasaka Shrine and the Sawayaka Kaigan [さわやか海岸] seaside walk are also pleasant diversions.

A whale and its cub stand at the entrance to Omijima Seaside Square, a nod to the area’s whaling history. About 5-min walk from Senzaki Station, here you will find a visitor center with bicycles for rent, the Omijima pleasure boats and a collection of open-front shops hawking local seafood and souvenirs. These shops are to be replaced in autumn by a new “Kitchen Roadside Market”, and it remains to be seen whether the new facility will retain the current market’s charm. As well as the freshest squid, sazae turban shells and soft serve mikan ice cream, you will also find whale meat on the menu. The strangest offering, however, is perhaps peroshiki; in commemoration of the Vladimir Putin’s 2016 visit to the area. Fast food gourmets shouldn’t miss the Kamakatsu Burgers at Daichan, which feature deep fried locally made fishcake. If you are looking for something a little more refined, make for Kiraku [きらく] to enjoy melt in your mouth squid, selected fresh every morning by the chef at the local market.


Omijima [青海島] Across the Omijima O-hashi Bridge, Omijima is designated as a natural monument best known for its spectacular rock formations called the “Ocean Alps”. The “Alps” and much of the northern coast which is not accessible by road can be viewed up close from the sightseeing boats that leave Omijima Seaside Square in Senzaki on 80min trips (Adult ¥2200, Child ¥1100). Clear waters make, Omijima a popular spot for diving excursions and instructors on hand at Omijima Diving Center [青 海島ダイビングセンター]. Behind the diving center Omijima Campground has some funky bungalows that look out onto a nice grassy area and pleasant black sand Omijima Beach, perfect for sunset barbeques. A 2km nature trail from the campsite offers views over the “Alps” and leads to another beach from which you can see them from below. Hear trumpet sounds on the wind? There’s a good chance you’ll be urged by the energetic

parking lot attendant to check out video tapes of his appearances on national TV and watch him pedal his bicycle around the lot, backwards! At the eastern edge of the island is the former whaling community of Kayoi-ura. Whaling hasn’t been conducted here for over a century, but it is still an important part of local cultural identity. There is a small whaling museum and a reenactment of a traditional whale hunt, in which fishermen clan in loincloths ensnare a huge artificial whale, is held in the harbor at the annual Kayoi Whale Matsuri (July 16, 2017). On a hillside behind the museum, you will find a whale tomb dedicated to fetuses found in captured mother whales, inscribed with a plea for forgiveness and understanding.

Getting around Omijima: It’s only 6km from Senzaki Station to Omijima Diving Center and the trail to the Ocean Alps. It takes 10min by car (a taxi will cost about ¥2200 yen one way) and is possible by bicycle but be aware that there are a few up and downs to negotiate! Kayoi-ura is a further 4km east. The Omijima sightseeing boat tour takes about an hour and 30 minutes. Starting from Omijima-ohashi Bridge, the boat takes you around the various scenic locations to see and returns to Senzaki Port by way of the west and north seaside.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/19


Photo Š Kenichi Asano http://kenichiasano.wixsite.com/deltaphoto


hibakujumoku:

hiroshima’s a-bombed trees Words: Annelise Giseburt

WHAT ARE HIBAKUJUMOKU? Hibakujumoku are trees that survived the atomic bombing. There are currently 161 hibakujumoku, of over 30 different species, officially registered by Hiroshima City. Some carry obvious scars or show particular characteristics caused by their exposure to the atomic bomb, but other hibakujumoku are made up of completely new growth, as nothing was left of the original trees except their roots. Like stories of Hiroshima itself, these trees are complex: They represent the resilience of nature and humans but also war’s destructive power. Hibakujumoku also convey a silent testimony: Although they are powerful symbols in and of themselves, stories about hibakujumoku would never be given voice if not for the people around them. Another way to view hibakujumoku is to ask oneself what the trees have “seen.” Along with August 6 itself, what was happening around the trees, for years and decades, before and after the bombing? Hibakujumoku may now be defined by what happened to them in a single day, but thinking about how the city was built and rebuilt around them, how the lives of those who live near them have changed, and how community members interact with them adds depth to the trees’ stories.

peace park — chinese parasol tree (aogiri) 1300 meters from the hypocenter Out of all Hiroshima’s hibakujumoku, the parasol trees — two first generation trees and one second generation tree grow next to each other — living in Peace Memorial Park are the most well known. Although seeds of many other hibakujumoku have been sent around the world as messengers of peace, the parasol trees have the greatest number of second and third generation trees growing across the globe. In 2001, a nine-year-old girl wrote “Aogiri no Uta,” a song about the parasol tree and which can be heard through the speaker in front of the trees. The parasol trees’ bark has grown around their burns, but long, vertical scars are still clearly visible. The trees did not originally grow on the Park

grounds; they were moved there in 1973 from their original location at the Hiroshima Communications Bureau, where they were exposed to the atomic bomb. The first person to share the parasol trees’ story was Suzuko Numata, a hibakusha who worked at the Bureau during the war and who would often take her breaks under the trees. After losing her leg in the bombing, Ms. Numata was depressed, hopeless, and contemplated suicide, but seeing the burned parasol trees put out new, thin branches and little leaves restored her will to live. Having liked the trees even before the bombing, Ms. Numata refocused on what remained in her life rather than what she had lost, and she decided to tell the parasol trees’ story in their stead.

The following is an introduction to some of the easily accessible hibakujumoku in central Hiroshima. If you’re interested, grab your phone or this magazine and take a walk!

hiroshima castle — eucalyptus 740 meters from the hypocenter The eucalyptus at Hiroshima Castle is a testament to tenacity. Photos after the bombing show the eucalyptus reduced to just its vertical trunk; the tree had lost most of its branches and leaves. The present tree grows anything but straight up: After the war, its trunk was broken by a number of typhoons, but the eucalyptus kept putting out shoots, and now its branches often take sharp curves. Even the line of stone castle moat has been warped by the tree’s roots. It’s thought that this tree is able to regrow so quickly because bushfires are common in the eucalyptus’ native Australia; even if the leaves burn, the tree had adapted to quickly put forth new buds.

Only one part of the trunk from the time of the bombing is left. If one ducks under the eucalyptus’ branches and walks around to the side of the tree facing away from the path, the hollow scar near the ground is easy to spot.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/21


hiroshima castle — giant pussy willow 740 meters from the hypocenter There were more willows in this area before the bombing, but it isn’t known why only this one survived. The willow’s trunk is partially hollow, and the weight of the its branches would pull the trunk apart if it wasn’t bound with rope. It’s a sharp contrast to the robust eucalyptus so close by. Although the willow needs care from humans, it is also trying to put out new shoots near its base — the tree’s natural remedy to its weakened trunk. One of the larger shoots has already been pruned so that the tree doesn’t get in the way of castle visitors. However, the new shoots should be protected if the tree is to remain healthy; if the condition of the main trunk worsens, the tree could still survive through its firmly grounded new growth.

hiroshima castle — kurogane holly 910 meters from the hypocenter The holly trees in Hiroshima Castle’s main compound were planted around the time this site served as the Imperial Military Headquarters after the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War, when Emperor Meiji moved to the strategically located Hiroshima from September 1894 to April 1895. The Headquarters building was completely destroyed in the bombing and never rebuilt; only the foundation remains, immediately behind the holly trees. The roots of one of the hollies grow strongly on the opposite side of the tree from the atomic bomb’s hypocenter, while the side that faced the blast has

22\

few visible roots. Currently, almost all hibakujumoku are identifiable by a plaque, but before this holly had one, people would carve words and names into the trunk’s bark. Such activity ceased after a plaque was affixed, and the characters on the trunk are now faint.


motomachi — Camphor 1100 meters from the hypocenter The camphor near the Motomachi Apartments grows in harmony with its community. In the postwar period, some wanted to cut the tree down and use it for furniture materials, but it was protected because it was known to be a hibakujumoku. The road next to the camphor curves to give the tree space. The camphor’s thick roots, which, underground, can grow to a length equivalent to the trunk’s height, have slightly cracked the road’s pavement. Out of all of Hiroshima’s hibakujumoku, this camphor is, at around 30 meters, the tallest. Protected from strong winds by the apartment buildings around it, the camphor even now continues to stretch upward unimpeded. At the nearby Motomachi Elementary School, students learn about hibakujumoku and care for second- and third-generation saplings of a hibakujumoku hackberry tree that formerly grew nearby.

shukkeien — ginkgo 1370 meters from the hypocenter Shukkeien’s ginkgo, believed to be over 200 years old, leans toward the a-bomb’s hypocenter, and cables attached to nearby trees help support its weight. Shukkeien is elegant, and it can be difficult to imagine the garden in disarray and filled with people seeking refuge from the burning city — but the ginkgo is one of the reminders of Hiroshima’s history scattered throughout the garden. The ginkgo developed some health problems last year after it was excessively pruned. A light grey rash spreads across the tree’s underside, and although the ginkgo was formerly able to produce many offspring, its seed count significantly decreased since the pruning.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/23


A

Mitaki Temple

B

C

City map

OSHIBAKOEN

OSHIBA

MISASAKITAMACHI

MITAKIHONMACHI

1

OSHIBA PARK “Koutsuu Traffic Land”

JR MITAKI STATION

Mit

ak

iba

sh

i

Ota gaw a-h (dr osu ain age iro can al)

MITAKIMACHI

MISASAMACHI

a-

oh

as

hi

Kabe

KUSUNOKICHO

Gion S

Kit

Highw ay

ine

eL

hind

b Ka

o

RYUO PARK

Ry

uo

UCHIKOSHICHO

ba

sh

Hakushima

i

RYUOCHO

JR YOKOGAWA STATION

in Line

Sanyo Ma

Yokogawa-eki

inkansen

Sanyo Sh

2

HAKUSHIMA KITAMACHI

YOKAGAWACHO

Shin-Hakushima San yo

YOKAGAWASHINMACHI

YAMATECHO

Ma

in L

M

isa

sa

ba

ine

Sa

sh

ny

i

NISHI HAKUSHIMACHO

Yokogawa-1chome

oS

h

Sh Yokogin aw bashi a

aw nm

TERAMACHI HIROSE KITAMACHI

e4

Jonan-

dori

CHUO PARK

3

Hirose Primary School

Tera-machi

Outdoor Family Pool Open July-August

KAMITENMACHO

C

ashi

Tera m

MIYAKOMACHI

TOKAICHIMACHI

dori

ori Hiros eb

Legal Administration Office Cinematographic and Audio-visual Library

achi-

NISHITOKAICHIMACHI

Aioi-d

Aioib

ashi

Hiroshima Naka Post Office

HONKAWACHO

SAKAIMACHI

Hirode Tenm n a bashi

KANNONMACHI Nishi-Kannon-machi

aw tag

Ho n

Koami-cho Dobashi

ori

PEACE PARK Motoy asugaw

a agaw

Tsuchiya Hospital

Rou

te 2

(Ko

kud

A on

i-se

neh

i

Funairi-machi

o)

Kan Shin non bas

h

Bunka Koryu Kaikan

Na Kan kajima zakib ash i

FUNAIRI NAKAMACHI

n-g

Heiw

B

Aster Plaza Kozaki Primary School

KAKOMACHI

ashi H

OTEMACHI PARK 2

o

Mitsu

u-do Labi ri E

arca

de)

HORIKA

Bu

PARCO

Hiroshima Information Plaza

Heiw

a-o-

H

SEIBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

OTEMACHI

sha-d

Former ALICE SHINTEN Bank of FUKUROMACHI GARDEN Japan Don Fukuromachi FUKUROMACHI Fukuro-machi SHINTENCHI Quijotte Primary PARK PARK School H H H NAKAMACHI Shirakami Shrine Crystal Plaza H MIKAWACHO NAGAREKAW H

a-oh

NAKAJIMACHO

ash

Ebis red

iki-d

KAWARAMACHI Mifu

H

Den

Fukuya

ori

FUNAIRIMACHI

TATEMACHI

Nam

Tenm

4

Kannon Primary School

H

HONDORI

a

Midor ohas i hi

OTEMACHI PARK 1 H

Tokyu Hands Tate-machi Aioidori /

KAMIYACHO

Mitsubishi Tokyo Hondo ri (c UFJ Bank 4F ove

Rijo-d

i or Ku

ko

-d

o-dori

HATCHOBORI

Hiroshima Bank Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

Hondori

Heiwa-

NISHIKANNONMACHI

24\

OTEMACHI

Ho nk bas awa hi

DOBASHICHO

Kamiya-cho Higashi

Kamiya-cho Nishi Mizuho Bank Rijo Kaikan Sun Mall

yasu Moto shi ba

HONKAWA PARK

KOAMICHO

Prefectural Office (Kencho)

SOGO

(Ky u-o

Tenm bash a i

TENMACHO

Honkawa Primary School

NEKOYACHO

Jogakuin

KYUGUCHIMON PARK Chuo Police Station Chokaku YMCA Templ Prefectural Office East Office Momiji Bank

Kencho-mae

Bus Center (3F)

Genbaku Dome-mae

a)

Honkawa-cho

wa

Tenma-cho Fukushima-cho

ri

Hiroshima Municipal Hospital

H

FORMER BASEBALL STADIUM SITE

ENOMACHI PARK

n-do

HANOVER PARK

ka

Kannon-machi

H

Jona

Tennis courts

HONKAWACHO

Tokaichi-machi

ENOMACHI

HIGASHIKANNONMACHI

Immigra Offic

SORAZAYA PARK

HIROSEMACHI

FUKUSHIMACHO

KAMIHATCHOBO Gokoku-jinja Shrine

Sorazayabashi

wa

ahir

o-d

ori

Nakahir o ohashi

Nak

OGAWACHIMACHI

Hiroshima Castle

Motomachi Primary School

HIROSEKITA PARK

Chuden-mae H

C KOMACHI

H Hiroshima Chuo Post Office

dori

/ Pe

ace

H

Blvd

/ Hy

aku

reka

out

-dori

yR

Hakushima Primary School

Chuo

wa

Jizo-d ori

ess

ri

do

5

HA

-do

Shin

xpr

Gion

aE

MOTOMACHI

Te

im

Betsuin-mae

ag

NAKAHIROMACHI

osh

oku

Motomachi Senior High School

a

hi

as

eb

Hir

Joh

Johoku

Naga

at

m

Ya Nakahiro Junior High School

Enryuji Temple (Tokasan)

TA H

mete

r-do

ro

FUJIMICHO Kokutaiji

-d

ae


D

E

F

MT. USHITA

1

MT. MITATE

Ushita

3

SHIN USHITA PARK

HIGASHI-KU SPORTS CENTER (BIG WAVE)

Kohei bash

i

USHITA PARK

Supermarket

Hiroden Streetcar

Post Office

Astram Line Monorail

Tourist Info

Covered arcade

Â¥100 Bicycle Parking

Foreign Currency Exchange

Public Bath

International ATM

Airport Bus

Play area

Meipuru~pu bus

Hiroshima Free Wi-Fi

Hotel

Futaba-no-sato walk

Hiroshima Jogakuin University

USHITAASAHI Ushita Primary School

USHITAWASEDA

USHITAHONMACHI

H USHITANAKA

ta hi hi Us bas o

2

ab

as

hi

HAKUSHIMA NAKAMACHI PARK

Ka

nd

HAKUSHIMA NAKAMACHI

Kyo bas

HAKUSHIMA Ikari Shrine KUKENCHO

USHITHIGASHI

higa

hin

kan

wa

sen

USHITAMINAMI

Peace Pagoda

Kinko Inari Shrine

HIGASHI AKUSHIMACHO

Hakushima

3

To

kiw

Teishin Hospital

Onaga Tenmangu Shrine

MT. FUTABAYAMA

Nigitsu Shrine

MT. ONAGA

YAGAMACHI

Toshogu Shrine

ab

as

hi

Kokuzenji Temple

HIKARIGAOKA

Shokoji Temple

FUTABANOSATO Detention Center

ORI

YAMANECHO

Tetsudo Hospital

ation ce

HIKARIMACHI H

Fu

SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

ta

ba

KAMIOSUGACHO

-d

Futaba Junior High School

or

i

Jogakuin Junior High School

n-mae

Jogakuin High School

KAMINOBORICHO

ri

OSUGACHO

i

Hatchobori

HASHIMOTOCHO PARK H

KANAYAMACHO

ri

i ash

b

jin

Inari-machi

Inarioha

shi

Matoba-cho

H

H Yanagibashi

eb

HIGASHIKOJINMACHI

H

ori

ish

-dori

D

HIGASHIHIRATSUKACHO HIRATSUKA PARK

ri

Sa

ny

oM

ain

e

MAZDA ZOOM ZOOM STADIUM

i

Ozu

COSTCO

4

-do

ri

shi

ri do

aba

am ajiy Hi

nsen

Lin

DANBARA

E

F GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

HIJIYAMA PARK Hijiyamashita

ri

Geibi Line

Danbara-1chome

higawa

H

Kyobas

ANAKAMACHI

do

Shinka

sh

a ob

nbori Yage

hi hi as bas Hig ima h os

o-

NISHIKANIYA

Hiroshima Mall

Ta

MATSUGAWA PARK

on

ONAGAHIGASHI

NISHIKOJINMACHI

MATOBACHO

Hir

NISHIHIRATSUKACHO

H

Sanyo

ori

o-d

bon

MINAMIKANIYA YAYOICHO

WACHO

Ak

HIGASHIKANIYACHO

H

INARIMACHI

YAGENBORI

ONAGANISHI

ATAGOMACHI

A

Ake

Ko

ae-d

-dori

KOJINMACHI

H

B

dan

H

wa

AWACHO

H

H

ENKOBASHICHO

a kog

Momiji Bank

H

Enkobashi-cho

hi

bas Enko

Kyobashi

H H Kanayama-cho Hiroshima Bank

MATSUBARACHO

En

EBISUCHO

Hiroshima Bank

Ekim

Ebisu-cho

ukoshi

Hiroshima Station

Fukuya

KYOBASHICHO

HASHIMOTOCHO

WAKAKUSACHO

H

H

NOBORICHO PARK

a-do

or

H

Kam iy bas anagi hi

Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

NOBORICHO

utsu

H

-d

Ek o- ima ha e sh i

Noboricho Primary School

TEPPOCHO

NCHI

ku

H

H

ori

ho

H

H

JR HIROSHIMA STATION

Jo

H

3

SHINKANSEN

H

TOBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

KAMI NOBORICHO PARK

Haku shim a-do

uji le

hi

ebas

Saka

Heiw

H

H

Noboricho Junior High School

Onaga Primary School

Hiroshima Bank

Shukkeien-mae

do

ONAGAMACHI

Katei Saibansho-mae

DANBARAHINODE

/25


4

ta

Shukkeien-mae

station area Jogakuin Junior High School

H

Jogakuin High School

Jogakuin-mae

eb

KAMINOBORICHO

ri

Noboricho Primary School

TEPPOCHO

ashi

Saka

-d

Hiroshima Bank

or

i

SHINKANSEN

H

OSUGACHO ho

ku

-d

or

i

H

WAKAKUSACHO

H

H

H 14

2 Hotel Flex

H

ATAGOMAC

Hiroshima Station

Fukuya

Kam iy bas anagi hi

Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

H

8

Sheraton Hotel

JR HIROSHIMA STATION

Jo

H

TOBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

H

H

ba H

Noboricho Junior High School

KAMI NOBORICHO PARK

hima -do Haku s

Fu

17

Hiroshima Bank

HIGA

MATSUBARACHO

Ek o- ima ha e sh i

A

KAMIOSUGACHO

SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

12

Hana Hostel ENKOBASHICHO 1

NOBORICHO

H

NOBORICHO PARK Hatchobori

HASHIMOTOCHO PARK

Ebisu-cho

H

H

Inari-machi

Inarioh

ashi

/ Densha-dori HAioi-dori Yanagibas hi

PARCO SHINKAN

Takeya Primary School

Ts

OKONOMI MURA

MACHI

ri do aam jiy

H

uru

mi

ba

DAN

Hijiyamashita Molly Mallone’s

10

Merchant of Venice Sky Walk

sh

Escalator 9

7 i Washington Hotel

DON 1 QUIJOTTE

Hij

Koba 7

Lotus

iya 8 ma ba

Namiki-dori

H

Chuo-dori

Tropical Bar Revolución 13

FUKUROMACHI PARK

shi

Bourbon 3 Square

Vegan Cafe Hijiyamabashi H

1 Magic Bar Angel

Butsudan-dori

HIJIYAMA PARK

New King 11

4 Centre Point Danbara Shopping Center

Micks 7

DANBARAYAMAS

Yagenbori-dori

ALICE GARDEN

Fuji Grand Shopping Center

3

DANBARA

a

TSURUMICHO

DANBARAMINAMI

Choi Choi Ya 4

15

H

BILLY THE KID

Aitsuki 1

namiki / nagarekawa area Enryuji Temple (Tokasan)

H

1

2

H

-d o H

ae

H

ri

H

26\

im

H

19 Youin 17 5 Hallelujah

Bar Edge Bon Voyage

Ek

B

MINA

Magic Bar Mystery

6 Tenko Honten

KIRIN BEER

PARCO HONKAN

4

Magic Bar Tejinaya

shigaw

Hondori

H

Danbara-1chome

Hi

Kinzagai-dori

H

HIGASHIHIRATSUKACHO 3 Cinetwin Hondori HIRATSUKA PARK Kinzagai-dori

ri

Ebisu-dori

Kyoba

TANAKAMACHI

H

Ebisu-dori

Ebisu Shrine

HIROSHIMA BANK

Magic Bar Hiviki 2 6 Yamatoya

MATSUGAWA PARK

SHINTENCHI PARK

Yage

Naga

i i sh sh ga ba Hi ima sh iro

Kanayama-cho

MOMIJI BANK

MITSUKOSHI LABI

NISHIHIRATSUKACHO

do

Ebisu-cho

FUKUYA

YAYOICHO

H

T

hi

as

ob

h ais

5 Hatchoza

nbor

reka

i-dor

i

YAGENBORI Tate-machi

NISHIKANIYA

Hiroshima Mall

MATOBACHO

Ekim

ori

wa-d

KANAYAMACHO

ae-d

INARIMACHI

KAWACHO

ae

16

a

CHI

Matoba-cho

H

H

TENCHI

NISHIKOJINMACHI

aw

RIKAWACHO

HIGASHIKOJINMACHI

H

kog

Hiroshima Bank

Momiji Bank

hi

En

EBISUCHO

b Ake 6

bas

jin

Ko

H H Kanayama-cho

Mitsukoshi abi

H

ri

-do

ono

KOJINMACHI

Kyobashi

Nagarekawa-dori

ri

b

Enko

H

12

ori

a-do

KYOBASHICHO

HASHIMOTOCHO

Enkobashi-cho

ashi


2

B Cinematographic and Audio-visual Library

H

10 Tennis courts

C

Legal Administration Office

ri

n-do

Jona

YMCA

H

H

Chokakuji Temple

Jogakuin-mae

KYUGUCHIMON PARK Chuo Police Station Prefectural Office East Office

Momiji Bank

Enryuji Temple (Tokasan)

H

Jogakuin High School

Shukkeien-mae

Jogakuin Junior High School

H

H

Noboricho Junior High School

KAMI NOBORICHO PARK

KAMINOBORICHO

H

KANAYAMACHO

YAYOICHO

hi

ebas

D

Saka

H

TOBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

3

H

do ri

OSUGACHO

Jo ho ku -

H

1

H

2

Hijiyamashita

7

3

JR

Fukuya

Hirosh Ban

H

H

Mato

MATOBACH

MATSUGAWA PARK

Inari-machi

KYOBASHICHO

Kam iy bas anagi hi

H

Kyobashi

shi

Inarioha

INARIMACHI

i i sh sh ga ba Hi ima sh ro

H Yanagibashi

Hi

i

sh

iba

shigaw

a

D

Hijiyamabashi

rum

Kyoba

HIRATSUKA PARK

shi

Ts u

HIGASHIHIRATSUKACHO

NISHIHIRATSUKACHO

H

Hiroshima Bank

H H Kanayama-cho

HASHIMOTOCHO PARK

HASHIMOTOCHO

Noboricho Primary School Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

NOBORICHO

TEPPOCHO

H

Takeya Primary School

TSURUMICHO

TANAKAMACHI

i or -d ae

Fuji Grand Shopping Center

Momiji Bank

NOBORICHO PARK

Ebisu-cho

Hatchobori

Mitsukoshi Labi

dori

sha-

Den

HATCHOBORI

E

EBISUCHO HORIKAWACHO

-dor i

bisu

Fukuya

i-do ri /

Tokyu 15 Hands Tate-machi Aio

de)

arca

TATEMACHI

H

Hiroshima Municipal Hospital

Kencho-mae Prefectural Office (Kencho)

Kamiya-cho Higashi

1 5

KAMIYACHO

Hiroshima Bank

Bus Center (3F)

SOGO

Mizuho Bank

Kamiya-cho Nishi Rijo Kaikan14 Sun Mall Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

NAKAMACHI

i

2 HANOVER PARK

FORMER BASEBALL STADIUM SITE

5

OTEMACHI 2 Hondori

red

i (co ve

HONDORI

3

Mitsubishi Tokyo Hondo r UFJ Bank 4F 4

H

Crystal Plaza

H

oro

er-d

met

11 Ek

im

H

MIKAWACHO NAGAREKAWACHO

aku

FUJIMICHO

d/ Hy

ce B lv

/ Pe a

ash

Outdoor 1 Family Pool Open July-August

Aioib ashi

9

Genbaku Dome-mae Hiroshima Naka Post Office

1

u oyas Mot shi ba

6 4

H

9

H

dori

a-o-

Heiw

KOMACHI

H

Buts PARCO Hiroshima uda n-do Information ri Former ALICE SHINTENCHI Plaza 5 3 Bank of FUKUROMACHI GARDEN Japan Don Fukuromachi FUKUROMACHI Fukuro-machi YAGENBORI Quijotte SHINTENCHI Primary PARK PARK School H

Chuden-mae

H

Shirakami Shrine

H

OTEMACHI PARK 1

6

H

2

wab

PARK

Tsuruya Guesthouse 6

TOKAICHIMACHI

HONKAWACHO

Honkawa-cho

8

PEACE PARK

11

a-oh ashi

Heiw

H

H

Kokutaiji High School

Hei

HIROSEMACHI

A

Tokaichi-machi

12 13

Honkawa Primary School

HONKAWA PARK

Ho nk bas awa hi

13

Tsuchiya Hospital

5 Simple Stay

OTEMACHI

SEIBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

OTEMACHI PARK 2

Hiroshima Chuo Post Office Naka Ward Office

Kokutaiji Junior High School

TAKARAMACHI

Hij iya

ma ba

Ek

NISHITOKAICHIMACHI

1

4

DOBASHICHO

HONKAWACHO

NEKOYACHO

J-Hoppers

10

NAKAJIMACHO

3 Ikawa Ryokan

Bunka Koryu Kaikan

Aster Plaza

KAKOMACHI

Shiyakusho mae

KOKUTAIJI PARK

A

ri

/27

i

sh

ENOMACHI

ENOMACHI PARK

SAKAIMACHI Koami-cho Dobashi

KOAMICHO

2 KAWARAMACHI

Na Kan kajima zakib ash i

Funairi-machi

Kozaki Primary School Nakajima Primary School

Otemachi Commercial High School

Hiroshima City Hall

TAKEYACHO

C

ori

ae-d

a-do shim Haku ori

i

Shin-sum iyoshi bashi

HIGASHI SENDA PARK

Naga

o- ima GetHiroshima / Summer 2017 ha e

ri

Chuo

wa-d

reka

B

do

a-

am

nbor

Yage

ori

iki-d Nam

a) Ta Shopkanobas hi ping Stre et

B

dori

jiy

i

i-dor

KAMISHINONOMECHO

SAKI

Ekim

dori

aw

i-dor mach Tera

shiba shi

hi ibas Meij

Takanobashi

16

Jizo-

Sky Walk Escalator

HIJIYAMA

Hi

-dori

NBARAHINODE

ri

UNAIRIMACHI

3 Sum iyo

A

-do Ozu

AMIKANIYA

awa

Geibi Line

Rijo-

COSTCO

MAZDA ZOOM ZOOM STADIUM

yasug

e

Ky a( aw

nk Ho

tag

nsen

ONAGAHIGASHI ONAGANISHI

u-o

Shinka

Sanyo

ri do o-

ASHIKANIYACHO

on eb Ak

CHI

Onaga Primary School

Moto

Lin ain

oM ny Sa

city center

C

onmachi

Junior High School


Excellent Japanese cuisine served in stylish, smoke-free surroundings with traditional Japanese motifs. Our English speaking staff are ready to welcome you on the 7th floor of the Sheraton Grand Hiroshima Hotel.

• Luxurious sushi bar • Intimate Teppanyaki grill • Spectacular Kaiseki meals • Relaxing bar perfect for pre-dinner cocktails or a nightcap • Private rooms for groups large and small,

Miyabi-tei

Lunch Set Menus

Dinner Set Menus

Lunch 11:30-14:00 (L.O.)

Sushi ¥2,057~

Sushi ¥5,000~

Dinner 17:00-21:00 (L.O.)

Teppanyaki ¥3,500~*

Teppanyaki ¥8,800~

Kaiseki ¥2,571~

Kaiseki ¥5,657~

Smoke-free Miyabi-tei Bar 17:00-23:30 (L.O.)

Delicious a la carte options also available. Reservation / Tel: 082-262-7111 / map A p.26

HALLELUJAH KI TC HE N

&

B AR

www.facebook.com/hallelujah.kitchen.bar

Have a drink and some light food while enjoying the reggae, ska and rocksteady soundtrack or enjoy a full dinner. Western and Japanese food (fish, meat, salads, pasta etc is available). The staff don’t speak a lot of English, but are very friendly and welcoming and there’s a good chance you’ll find yourself laughing with them until well into the early hours. 18:00-05:00 Closed on Monday | Tel: 082-247-0199 Nakagawa bldg II 1F, 8-11, Nagarekawa-cho, Naka-ku, Map B p. 26 5

English Menu

available at no extra charge.

* Weekday only

8


List of places CULTURE

RESTAUR ANT & CAFES

PL ACES FE ATURED IN THIS ISSUE

1

A-Bomb Dome - Map C [B-1]

1

Aitsuki - Map B

1

Magic Bar Angel - Map B

p.33

2

Children’s museum - Map C [B-2]

2

Artcafe ELK - Map C [B-1]

2

Magic Bar Hiviki - Map B

p.33

3

Former Bank of Japan - Map C [B-2]

3

Ayur - Map p. 25 [D-3]

3

Magic Bar Mystery - Map B

p.33

4

Gallery G - Map A

4

Choi Choi Ya - Map B

4

Magic Bar Tejinaya - Map B

p.33

5

Hatchoza Cinema - Map B

5

Graffity Mexican Diner - Map C [C-2]

5

Motomachi Apartments - Map p.24 [C-3]

p.40

6

Hiroshima City International House - Map A

6

Kanak - Map C [B-2]

6

Tenko Honten - Map B

p.36

7

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art Map C [D-3]

7

Micks - Map B

8

Hiroshima City Tourist Information - Map C [B-2]

8

Miyabi-tei - Map A

9

Hiroshima International Center - Map C [B-2]

9

Nagataya Okonomiyaki - Map C [B-1]

10

Hiroshima Museum of Art - Map C [B-1]

10

Otis! - Map C [A-2]

11

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum - Map C [B-2]

11

Rojiura Teppan Kotaro - Map C [C-3]

12

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum - Map A

12

Sarii-chan Okonomiyaki - Map A

13

International Exchange Lounge - Map C [A-2]

13

Tokaichi Apartment - Map C [A-1]

14

Rijo Kaikan Kenmin Bunka Center - Map C [B-1]

14

Teppan-ya Tyson - Map A

15

Salon Cinema 1/2 - Map C [C-1]

15

Vegan Cafe - Map B

16

Shimizu Gekijo - Map A

16

Warung Matahari - Map C [B-3]

17

Shukkeien Garden - Map A

17

Youin - Map B

ACCOMMODATION

SHOPPING

1

Hana Hostel - Map A

1

Don Quijotte - Map B

2

Hotel Flex - Map A

2

Fleur Bleue - Map C [C-3]

3

Ikawa Ryokan - Map C [A-2]

3

Hiroshima Mono Koto Store - Map C [C-2]

4

J-Hoppers Hiroshima - Map C [A-2]

4

Tayama Bungu - Map C [B-2]

5

Simple Stay - Map C [A-2]

5

Outsider Book Nook / Global Lounge - Map C [C-1]

6

Tsuruya Guesthouse - Map C [A-1]

6

Yamatoya - Map B

7

Washington Hotel - Map B

HE ALTH & BE AUT Y

map p. 24 & 25

a

c

b map p. 26

map p. 27

NIGHTLIFE EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS

1

Family Pool - Map C [B-1] (Open July - August)

1

Bar Edge - Map B

2

Green Arena Gym & Pool - Map C [B-1]

2

Bon Voyage - Map B

3

Higashi-ku Sports Center (Big Wave) - Map p.24 [D-1]

• Police 110 / • Fire and Ambulance 119

3

Bourbon Square - Map B

4

Hiroshima Stretch - Map C [B-2]

• 24 Hour Hiroshima Hospital Information in English Freedial

4

Centre Point - Map B

5

Square Salon - Map C [B-1]

5

Hallelujah Kitchen & Bar - Map B

6

Kemby’s - Map C [B-2]

7

Koba - Map B

8

Lotus - Map B

9

Merchant of Venice - Map B

0120-169912 • 24h Emergency pediatric hospital (Funairi Byoin)

INTERNE T

082-232-6195 • Multilingual Interpreting Service (Trio-phone)

1

Global Lounge - Map C [C-1]

082-247-9715 09:00-19:00 (April-September) / 09:00-18:00 (October-March)

10 Molly Malone’s - Map B

• TELL English counseling service 03-5774-0992 (09:00-23:00)

11 New King - Map B

• Resident Consultation & Interpreting Service

12 Organ-za - Map C [A-1] 13 Tropical Bar Revolución - Map B

082-241-5010 • Immigration Information Center 0570-013-904 • Human Rights Counseling Center for Foreign Citizens 082-228-5792

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/29


Hana Hostel

Hotel Flex

Clean and friendly. 3min from Hiroshima Sta. Common lounge and kitchen. Dorm beds from ¥2500, Private twin rooms from ¥3200/person. No curfew, Free LAN/WiFi, Rental cycles 082-263-2980 http://hanahostel.com/ map A p.26 1

Stylish riverside hotel, rates include breakfast Singles ¥6825, Doubles from ¥11,555 The upper floor suites are really cool.

Ikawa Ryokan

J-Hoppers Hiroshima

Cozy, home-like atmosphere. Japanese and Western rooms. Coin laundry. S from ¥5940 / Twin ¥9720 / Tr ¥14,580 Quad ¥17,280 / Breakfast ¥756 www.ikawaryokan.net info@ikawaryokan.net 082-231-5058 map C p.27 [A-2] 3

Friendly base in an interesting neighborhood near Peace Park. No curfew, Kitchen, Rental cycles Dorm beds from ¥2500, Private rooms from ¥3000/person http://hiroshima.j-hoppers.com/ map C p.27 [A-2] 4 082-233-1360

Simple Stay Peace Park

Tsuruya Guetshouse

5-min walk from Peace Park, Hiroshima’s biggest hostel has mixed/single sex bunks, single sex dorms & Japanese rooms. No smoking, communal kitchen, coin laundry and a lounge equipped with a massive manga collection and table tennis table. ¥3000~. Cash only.

082-258-1881 map C p.27 [A-2] 5 www.simplestay.biz

More than a guesthouse, Tsuruya has a lovely cafe bar looking out to the Ota-gawa riverside near Peace Park. Great place to trade travel tales and meet locals of all nationalities. Full bar, good coffee & light food. Dorm beds ¥3000. 08:00-24:00 / 082-942-5500 map C p.27 [A-1] 6

Washington Hotel

Aitsuki あい月

Hospitality, amenity and security right in the heart of Hiroshima. All rooms equipped with great bathrooms and separate lavatory. WiFi in all rooms http://washington-hotels.jp/hiroshima/ 082-553-2222 map B p.26 7

Modern izakaya with traditional Japanese touches run by husband and wife team. Horigotatsu seating so you can sit Japanese style in comfort. Save room to round off your meal with Niigata style hegi-soba. 18:00-24:00 (L.O 23:30) Closed Tuesday, 082-231-9865 map B p.26 1F 1

Artcafe ELK

Ayur

2nd floor cafe near Peace Park. Good sandwich lunches, drinks, vegetarian menu. Ask about vegan and gluten free dishes and their vegan desserts. International exchange spot. 10:30-22:00 (L.O. 21:30) 082-247-4443 map C p.27 [B-1] 2F 2

English-speaking Katsu’s modern washoku bistro won the GH best Japanese restaurant award for its warm welcome and imaginative combinations of local ingredients. ¥4000 omakase chef selections or a la carte. Reservations recommended. 18:00-23:00 Closed Sunday map 25 [D-3] 2F 3

Cafe Lente

Choi Choi Ya

Escape the Miyajima crowds at this beautifully designed cafe. Wooden terrace. Great view of the floating torii gate, especially after dark. From 11:00 Tel: 082-944-1204 Located along the water inlet between Kiyomori Shrine & Miyajima Aquarium.

Shiho serves Hiroshima tsukemen, yaki-ramen (fish stock base), side dishes and drinks in a relaxed atmosphere. Eat, drink or both at the counter or a street-side table. Can get quite lively late at night. 20:30-03:00 Closed Sundays & hols that fall on a weekday map B p.26 4

Graffity Mexican Diner

Kanak

A spacious family-run diner serving homemade Mexican and US style foods. Great fresh salsa, highly rated margaritas and a good selection of tequila. 11:30-14:00 (L.O. 13:20), 18:00-24:00 (L.O. 23:00) 082-243-3669 map C p.27 [C-2] 4F 5

Delicious, additive-free Indian food, right next to Peace Park. Excellent lunch sets. Set meals and many a la carte dishes in the evening. Excellent understanding of vegetarian, vegan & halal needs. 11:00-15:00 (L.O. 14:30) 17:00-22:30 (L.O. 22:00) 082-236-7308 map C p.27 [B-2] 6

Micks

Nagataya

Lively and friendly izakaya. Casual atmosphere with good food, Japanese & western. Great selection of local sake.

Great okonomiyaki and plenty of space to sit, a stone’s throw away from Peace Park. Excellent understanding of vegetarian needs. Mon-Fri 11:00-20:30 (L.O.) Sat 11:00-21:00 (L.O.) Sun, hols 10:30-20:30 (L.O) (Closed Tue & 4th Wed) 082-247-0787 map C p.27 [B-1] 9

Sun-Thur 18:00-3:00, Fri, Sat, days before Hols 18:00-5:00 082-249-6231 map B p.26 7

082-223-1000 www.hotel-flex.co.jp/english/ map A p.26 2


Otis!

Rojiura Teppan Kotaro

Tex Mex and home-cooked food for meat eaters & vegetarians. Their vegetarian menu is one of the best in the city & includes vegan and gluten free dishes. Kids very welcome. Eclectic BGM & live music. 11:30-23:00 082-249-3885 map C p.27 [A-2] 10

Young grill master Kotaro serves delicious seasonal dishes & drinks just off Peace Blvd.

Sarii-chan Okonomiyaki

Tokaichi Apartment

Affable, soccer-loving okonomiyaki-ist serving Hiroshima’s favorite dish and drinks near Hiroshima Station. 11:30-14:00, 17:00-23:00 Closed Saturdays 082-236-7303 map A p.26 2F 12

17:00-02:00 (L.O. 01:30) Closed Tuesdays 082-249-1953 map C p.27 [C-3] 2F 11

Quirky, smoke free cafe in Tokaichi with some very interesting seating options. ¥850 set lunches served until 16:30. 11:30-23:00 (lunch L.O. 16:30) Closed Tuesdays 082-231-9865 map C p.27 [A-1] 1F 13

Vegan Cafe 100% vegan food made with fresh local vegetables and all natural seasonings. Our multi-dish set meals are heavily influenced by traditional Buddhist temple cuisine. 12:00-17:00 from Tuesday to Saturday 082-247-8529, map B p.26 3F 15

Warung Matahari

Teppan-ya Tyson Tasty okonomiyaki, teppan favorites like beef tongue and a fun vibe in Okonomi Monogatari Ekimae Hiroba near Hiroshima Station. Mitsumura-san trained under okonomiyaki master Lopez, so look for double yolks and try the jalapeño toppings. 11:00-23:00 082-568-7838 map A p.26 6F 14

Yoin 陽陰

washoku bar

Excellent Indonesian cuisine prepared by Balinese chef Surasna. Vegetarian and Halal friendly. If you like it really spicy, ask Surasna to let you have it! 17:30-22:30 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-240-2082 map C p.27 [B-3] 16

Bar Edge

Easygoing and cheerful “Take” Shimosaka has created something remarkable in Yoin. Relaxed enough for drinks, but also offering meticulously prepared, modern washoku created with all-natural ingredients. 20:00-05:00 facebook.com/youin.hiroshima 082-249-7129 Map B p. 26 2F 17

Long-running underground club on Nagarekawa. Small, but with a good sound-system, nice bar and DJs spinning every night (closed Monday if no event scheduled). Usually free entry on weeknights. 082-248-8146 22:00~ map B p.26 1

Bon Voyage

Bourbon Square

International bar with counter and 2 discount rooms in which to chill. Nice cocktails and some great food too.

Relaxed counter bar near Shintenchi Park. Great selection of bourbon, whiskies and fresh fruit cocktails. Plus some of the best tasting draft beer in the drinking district. Mon-Sat 18:00-03:00 082-242-3668, map B p.26 2F 3

Mon-Thur, Sun 18:00-02:00, Fri, Sat 18:00-04:00 082-249-2380 map B p.26 3F 2

Centre Point Nagarekawa bar catering to a late night crowd that prides itself on its whiskey selection. DJs spinning at weekends, good source of local nightlife info.

Kemby’s www.facebook.com/kembyshiroshima High quality food in a casual atmosphere. Kemby’s has all the bases covered with tapas, pasta,Tex Mex, gourmet sausages, seafood and their famous burgers. Owner Prakash prides himself on his wine list and is happy to help you make the right choice. The full drink menu includes international beers on draft and a selection of imported craft beers. Happy hours 17:30-00:30 selected alcohol ¥200 off Monday-Thursday 11:30-00:30, Friday & Saturday 11:30-01:00, Sunday 11:30-23:00 / 082-249-6201 map C p.27 [B-2] 6

Mon-Thur 20:00-03:00, Fri, Sat 20:00-05:00, Closed Sunday map B p.26 5F 4

Koba Rock loving BOM is one of Hiroshima’s most welcoming and entertaining bartenders. He whips up some very tasty food too. 18-00-01:30 (L.O), Closed Wednesdays 082-249-6556 map B p.26 3F 7


Lotus 5th floor bar with large windows on Namiki-dori St. Kick off your shoes and lounge at the low tables, take a seat at the counter or sit at a four-top. Jamaican food, rum and coffee, mostly dancehall reggae BGM & occasional DJ parties. 18-00-02:00, Closed Wed 082-246-0104 map B p.26 5F 8

Merchant of Venice Chilled out drinking space with subdued lighting offering some interesting Japanese themed cocktails at the bar counter or in the darts lounge. 19:00-04:00 (L.O. 03:30) Closed Mondays 082-240-1155 map B p.26 3F 9

Molly Malone’s

www.facebook.com/mollymaloneshiroshima Hiroshima’s authentic Irish pub. Great beer, great food, great service. The place to watch Premier League soccer. Tues-Thurs 17:00~01:00 / Fri 17:00~02:00 / Sat 11:30~02:00 / Sun + Nat Hol 11:30~24:00 / Closed Monday / 082-244-2554 map B p.26 4F 10

New King

Organ-za

Trendy and Pink, 2F bar run by the guys behind local hip men’s underwear boutique.

21:00-05:00 082-247-4487 map B p.26 2F 11

Bohemian queen, Goto Izumi's avant-garde center of operations. Great decor, food, drink and bizarre stage shows. Tue-Fri 17:30-01:30 (L.O.), Sat 11:30-01:30 (L.O.) Sun 11:30-23:30 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-295-1553 map C p.27 [A-1] 2F 12

Tropical Bar Revolución

Don Quijote

Nobu’s popular 8F hangout, friendly and relaxed complete with balcony.

Huge discount store open every day until 5am. Snacks, groceries, alcohol, medicines, souvenirs, cosmetics, electronics, costumes, household & sporting goods; you name it, they have it!

Mon,Wed 20:00-03:00, Tue,Thurs 18:00-03:00 Fri,Sat 18:00-04:00, Closed Sun & Nat Hol map B p.26 8F 13

10:00-05:00 082-543-6711 map B p.26 1

TAX FREE 8%

Hiroshima Mono Koto Store

Tayama Bungu

Unique, high quality products from upcoming Japanese artisans and creators at reasonable prices. Feel free to browse or order a drink from the coffee bar. http://www.monokotostore.com/ 09:30-18:00 Closed Wednesdays, Thursdays 082-545-1115 map C p.27 [C-2] 3

Tayama Bungu has been selling quality Japanese stationery on Hondori shopping arcade since 1897. From sushi erasers & quality postcards to fountain pens that will make pen aficionados drool, including some Sailor originals. 10:00-20:00 3F Hondori Hills (above the Adidas on Hondori arcade) 082-248-2221 map C p.27 [B-2] 4

Outsider Book Nook/Global Lounge

Yamatoya

Used English books to buy and exchange. Internet, cafe & meeting place. Bar from 19:00 Fri & Sat. Mon-Thurs 12:00-21:00 Fri & Sat 12:00-23:00, Closed Sun, hols 082-244-8145 map C p.27 [C-1] 5 1

Produced in limited quantities yet reasonably priced, a bottle of Hiroshima's top quality local Japanese sake makes for a great souvenir. www.e-yamatoya.jp/ 10:00-22:00 Closed Sundays 082-241-5660 map B p.26 6

Hiroshima Stretch

Square Salon (Nail Salon)

Relieve stiff muscles or travel stress at Hiroshima’s centrally located Stretch salon. Director Masamoto-san speaks English and has a deep understanding of how to help with muscle pain, sports injuries and posture. Mention GetHiroshima for a ¥5000 60min session map C p.27 [B-2] 3F 4 11:00-22:00 / 082-240-2077

Japanese style nail care and nail art near Peace Memorial Park. Reservation by e-mail (English is OK): info@nail-square.com or come directly to the shop. Mon-Sat 10:00-19:30, Sun, Hols 10:00-18:30, closed Tue map C p.26 [B-1]3F 5


when was the last time you had a magical evening?

All Hiroshima’s Magic Bars are found on Yagenbori-dori in the entertainment district:

Words: Eric Drummond / Illustration : Steven Boura

“It was magic!” is an exclamation we might use to describe a particularly memorable night out. It is a reaction, however, that one Japanese entertainment spot aims for on a nightly basis; the “magic bar.”

Magic Bar Mystery The family owned and operated, Magic Bar Mystery is known for its fun and relaxed atmosphere as well as hosting many special guest talents from around the area. map B p.30 3

Abracadabra! Themed restaurants and bars are not uncommon in Japan. The “magic bar” is one that can be fun for just about anyone of any age. Keep in mind, however, that this is not children’s entertainment. Some places do allow kids to come in (with their parents) these are bars, and the target audience is adults. The bars are usually like a standard “shot bar”. You sit at the bar or a table and after ordering your drinks, the customer service includes the performance of a skilled magician. Often it is the bartender that chats with their customers while engaging them with well-practiced routines of mysteries and prestidigitation. The bar charges a flat fee that includes all you can drink for a set period of time (such as 90 minutes), some bar snacks, and then Showtime! Hiroshima has about six magic bars. Some will have regular guest performers come in and even hire professional acts from around Japan and beyond. Most of the time, the magic is done just for you and those sitting with you. Known as “close-up”, often said to be the purest form of magic as it is done right in front of you and, occasionally, with your help. At some places the lights may go down, music start, and a more formal show happen right behind the bar. Some larger bars have cabaret stages for their performances.

Magic Bar Hiviki The legendary magician and mentalist Jin Hiviki is well known in Japan as a constant professional who flawlessly amazes his patrons on a nightly basis. map B p.30 2

If you wish to stay longer, some of the bars will just charge a by-the- drink after time is up while others have a smaller flat fee for more time. Honestly, it has been my experience that most are not too strict about that as long as customers are not abusing the system. Some of these bars are well stocked or have specialty drinks and others even have food. One thing that is consistent, however, is the performers are all working professionals and not just amature enthusiasts. What that means is that they not only know what they are doing but are in the business of entertainment. You will not be pranked or made fun of by these magicians. Instead, get ready to have some genuine fun with expert and approachable performance artists of all kinds. Magicians, jugglers, mentalists, variety acts, and more can be seen. Keeping up with what acts are coming is usually done through either the bar’s website or social media. Even if there is no special performer booked, the staff has the goods to entertain and passion for making magic to make it worth the trip. Private events can be booked for you and your party as well. Some are popular enough that reservations can be necessary.

Magic Bar Angel Magic Bar Angel has a relaxed atmosphere and a charm of its own, primarily due to its owner/operator Ryo performing behind the bar. map B p.30 1

Magic Bar Tejinaya At Magic Bar Tejinaya (Magic Pot) you will meet a variety of full time performers who work well as a team. Also, be sure to catch the full formal stage show! map B p.30 4

So next time you want to shake off the day or head out for some much needed fun with the crew, look out for a local magic bar. Step inside, relax, have a drink or two. The magic is about to begin! GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/33


S W E N MIYAJIMA SUNDANCE

LOCALLY GROWN ORGANIC TEA Tea Factory Gen’s organic tea is grown, picked and roasted in the highlands of Sera. If you can’t make it out to visit, Hiroshima Mono Koto Store carries several varieties at, including quite rare tea grown from seed and hana-cha which contains tea flowers. Map C p.27 [C-2] 3

WE NEVER FORGET THIS DAY

ONOMICHI NIGHT MARKET

WAREZ has been producing a limited run of T-shirts featuring a simple design based on Hiroshima’s cenotaph to the A-bomb victims for over a decade. This year, this silver necklace will also be available. warez-hiroshima.com.

Onomichi makes for a great day trip from Hiroshima and its retro covered arcade is one of the waterfront town’s many charms. On Saturday nights between 6pm and 9pm, June 10-July 15 and on July 29, the arcade is lined with nostalgic festival stalls and little shops. It’s a great way to round off your day

Hiroshima’s biggest international dance party returns to Tsutsumigaura on Miyajima, July 16. Tickets: Adv ¥2000 Gate ¥3000

FULL MOON NIGHTS ON GANNE MOON BEACH While Mendel Jonkers is working on getting beautiful Ganne Moon Beach on Etajima up to scratch (see page 46) his monthly full moon gatherings are free of charge. They are generally a laid back low key affair with people bringing food and drinks to share and camping over. August 12 and 13, however, is the beach is taken over by a two day trance party (Adv ¥3000/Gate ¥4000). Follow @HiroshimaFullMoonParty on Facebook for more details.

34\


ART

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

Hiroshima Museum of Art

End of year holidays: 12/27 to 1/1

End of year holidays: 12/25-1/1

End of year holidays: 12/29 to 1/2

Well-designed building in Hijiyama hilltop park. Interesting

One of the largest art museums in Western Japan with a

Works by Monet, Van Gogh, Picasso and many more great

sculptures and statues are dotted around the outside of the

large collection of Japanese nihonga painting, traditional

modern European painters in this small, but perfectly

museum that can be viewed for free. Map C p.27 [d-3] 7

Asian art crafts and 1920s and 1930s art. Map A p.26 12

formed museum near Hiroshima Castle. Map C p.27 [B-1] 10

10:00-17:00 Admission to the collection exhibition: Adult

09:00-17:00 Admission to the permanent collection Adult

09:00-17:00 Admission to the general exhibition: Adult

¥370, College students ¥270, High school students, seniors

¥510, College students ¥310, High school students and

¥1000, Seniors ¥500, College & high school students ¥500,

¥170, Junior High School and younger free.

younger free.

Junior high school and elementary school students ¥200

082-264-1121 https://www.hiroshima-moca.jp/

082-221-6246 http://www.hpam.jp/

082-223-2530 http://www.hiroshima-museum.jp/

Admission until 30 minutes before closing. Special exhibition charges vary and usually include admission to permanent collections. Closed Mondays (unless National Holiday when closed the following business day).Hiroshima Museum of Art and Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum open everyday during special exhibitions.

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

in Hiroshima Prefecture

The Prolific World of TOGO MURANO from the

Jun 24- Jul 9 / Adult ¥510, High school & College ¥310,

Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

Junior High and Elementary School ¥100

The 5th NEW KENBITEN Annual Competition of Art

May 16 - Jul 9 / Adult ¥1030, College ¥720, High school &

Gallery G Map A p.26 4 The 5th NEW KENBI TEN Annual Competition of Art in Hiroshima Prefecture

Seniors [over 65] ¥510

Private art space opposite the Prefectural Art Museum which

工芸

holds weekly free exhibitions by local artists, designers and

彫塑

artisans. 082-211-3260 写真

Fukuyama Museum of Art

69

The 120th Anniversary of the Birth of Seiji Togo

The 69th Kenbiten in total

映像

A Retrospective of Togo’s Depiction of Women

デザイン

開館時間/9:00∼17:00(金曜日は20:00まで)

Jul 8 - Sept 3 / Adult ¥1000, Grade

※入館は閉館の30分前まで ※6月24日は10:00開場

会場/広島県立美術館 3階企画展示室、地階県民ギャラリー

入館料/一般:510円(410円) 高・大学生:310円(250円) 小・中学生:100円(80円) ※( )内は前売・20名以上の団体料金 ※前売券は、広島県立美術館、広島市・呉市の主なプレイガイド・画廊・画材店などで販売しています。 ※学生券をお求めの際は学生証のご提示をお願いします。 ※入館券のご提示により、6月24日∼7月9日の期間、一般・大学生・高校生は100円で縮景園にご入園いただけます。 (ワンコイン縮景園)

School Students admitted free

巡回展および作品の地方受付

広島県立美術館での 作品の搬入受付 6月3日(土)及び4日(日) 9:00∼16:00

12:00∼13:00は受付を一時休止します。 業者による受付は6月2日(金)及び3日(土)の 同時間帯に行います。

市町名

巡回会場

会 期

受付場所

受付日

受付時間

連絡先

三 次 市

美術館あーとあい・きさ

7月19日(水)∼7月23日(日) 三次市生涯学習センター

5月31日(水)∼6月1日(木) 10:00∼19:00

0824-62-6191

竹 原 市

たけはら美術館

7月26日(水)∼7月30日(日) たけはら美術館 文化創造ホール

5月30日(火)∼5月31日(水) 9:00∼16:00 ※1

0846-22-3558

府 中 市

府中市生涯学習センター

福 山 市

ふくやま美術館

世 羅 町

5月31日(水)

13:00∼18:00

0847-43-7181

8月23日(水)∼8月27日(日) ふくやま美術館

5月31日(水)

14:00∼19:00

084-928-1117

8月30日(水)∼9月3日(日)

世羅町せらにしタウンセンター

5月31日(水)

10:00∼17:00 ※1 0847-37-2115

庄 原 市

庄原市田園文化センター

9月6日(水)∼9月10日(日)

庄原市田園文化センター

5月31日(水)∼6月1日(木) 10:00∼17:00

0824-72-1159

三 原 市

三原リージョンプラザ

9月13日(水)∼9月17日(日) 三原市民ギャラリー

5月31日(水)

10:00∼16:00

0848-64-9234

江田島市

世羅町せらにしタウンセンター

中町公民館

8月16日(水)∼8月20日(日) 府中市生涯学習センター

11月3日(金)∼11月5日(日) 江田島市教育委員会 生涯学習課

5月29日(月)

9:00∼17:00

0823-40-3037

※巡回展開催市町以外にお住まいの方で、市町での受付を希望される場合は、事前に作品の地方受付の担当部署へお電話で御連絡ください。 ※1 12:00∼13:00は休止

“Violet”, oil on canvas, 1952

Memorial Cathedral for World Peace, photo by Yasushi Ichikawa

絵画

主催/広島県 共催/三次市教育委員会・竹原市教育委員会・府中市教育委員会・福山市・世羅町教育委員会・庄原市教育委員会・三原市教育委員会    江田島市教育委員会・中国新聞社 後援/NHK広島放送局・中国放送・広島テレビ・広島ホームテレビ・テレビ新広島・広島エフエム放送・FMちゅーピー76.6MHz    エフエムふくやま・尾道エフエム放送・FMはつかいち76.1MHz・リビングひろしま 協力/

一般社団法人

広島県歯科医師会

広島市信用組合

広島県立美術館 HIROSHIMA PREFECTUR AL ART MUSEUM 〒730-0014 広島市中区上幟町2-22 Tel.082-221-6246 Fax.082-223-1444

http://www.hpam.jp/

The Shaun the Sheep Exhibition Hatsukaichi Art Gallery

An Aardman Animations 40th Anniversary Event Jul 15 -

20th Anniversary Art Exhibition

Aug 27 / Adult ¥1200, High School & College ¥1000, Junior

Hiroshima Museum of Art

Bi no Tsubo Kurashi to Akogare [Life and Longing]

High and Elementary School ¥600

All Picture Book Works of Akiko Hayashi

Jun 16 - Jul 23 / Adult ¥800, College ¥700, Grade School

Jul 15 - Aug 27 / Adult: ¥1200, High school & college ¥900,

Students admitted free

Elementary & Junior high school ¥500 / Includes admission

© Aardman 2016

Grandma, Please Heal Kon’s Wounds © Akiko Hayashi 1989

Yosegi (woodwork marquetry cabinet) photo © Teruuchi Studio

to the general exhibition of modern European art.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/35


eating the stars Words and photos: Matt Jungblut

“How would you like to eat at all of Hiroshima’s Michelin star restaurants? You’d be the Michelin Man.” Body shape issues aside, I quickly accepted GetHiroshima’s challenge. My daughter once said, someday she’d like to eat the moon. Me? I’ll eat the stars.

Tempura is the most underrated of Japanese foods. Sushi, ramen, and even yakitori receive most of the acclaim, while tempura is often perceived as greasy food for beginners and the finicky, confined to jumbo shrimp lunch sets at department store restaurants, best suited for such diners who are tired of udon. Expertly prepared tempura is harder to find than excellent sushi, but searching it out brings great rewards. Tokyo Ginza’s Tenichi is generally regarded as the best in the world, and Hiroshima’s Chef Higuchi, of Tenko Honten apprenticed there before opening the original Tenko in Fukuromachi thirty years ago. Higuchi opened Tenko Honten seven years ago, leaving the more casual (and twice as large) Tenko to his apprentice of quarter of a century, and making his new restaurant, Tenko Honten a more upscale experience.

When you are seated, chef and his assistant get to work. One of them sets out fine ran leaves (used with sushi as an antibacterial) to display the different items during preparation, while the other fishes live shrimp and fish out of a tank, that will be prepared with sushi grade knives. Tiny eggplants are removed from beautiful wooden boxes and unwrapped from tissue, locally harvested vegetables sliced into perfect sizes. As this is happening, the waitress ties a large paper apron around you before setting out the various

36\

condiments for your tempura course. There is pink salt, a slightly salty curry powder, lemon juice with sea salt, and the more commonly found ten-su, dipping sauce with grated daikon. Unlike at many restaurants, where guests unaware of which utensils to use and what items get which sauce are left to watch their neighbors to figure out their meal, Chef Higuchi will tell you what items should be combined with which seasoning for the best taste. Twenty seconds after the sound of the first bit of shrimp hitting the odorless oil, the real event begins, starting with the crispy shrimp legs in pink salt. Two pieces of delicately battered tender shrimp will appear, wanting the lemon and then the salt. Every few minutes a new delightful morsel will be set on your plate, fresh baby onions, mushrooms from the nearby mountains stuffed with local scallops, tiny ears of corn, dainty kisu fish, crunchy okra; each paired with the exact seasoning that will best enhance the flavor. If you have questions, Chef Higuchi will enthusiastically explain his choices, while using either metal chopsticks to serve or six centimeter thick ones to coat the next tidbit. Later, Chef wove five tiny white shrimp into a basket-like shape, adjusted the batter, before the intricate delicacy was offered, to be savored for a moment, and then onto more Tenko specialities including Hiroshima’s renowned anago (sea eel), and hamo (pike conger) topped with ground

daikon. Chef insisted that the hamo not have any other seasoning added to it, and encouraged that it be eaten in one large bite for best flavor and mouthfeel. After this I remarked to Mr. Higuchi how his guidance as well as various other elements (the ran leaves, the counter area prep work, his knives, and of course the live tank) gave Tenko a feeling akin to a preeminent sushi restaurant. He beamed at the recognition, and then he began to share much more of the ideas behind his menu. This analysis continued over the next course, which for me was ochazuke rice topped with shrimp, egg, mitsuba tempura combination - the other offering being white rice, miso soup, and another light shrimp tempura. The dessert course revolved around an excellent and expertly prepared matcha tea, of the quality you would be served during a formal tea ceremony. Paired with a small tea ceremony cake, each customer was served their own unique pottery bowl with the whisked olive drab colored drink. The zen-ness of the bitter drink and sweet cake, flavors absent until now, encouraged reflection over the meal. Be one of the fortunate folks who will dine on Tenko Honten’s peerless viands on any given evening, rather than making a trek to Tokyo. I can’t wait to return, both for another meal, as well as to continue my culinary conversation with Chef Higuchi.


Tenko Honten 天甲 本店 4-2 Horikawacho, Naka-ku, Hiroshima 082-249-8665 map B p.26 6 Rating* Atmosphere Clean, bright, huge hinoki wooden counter, counter seating only. Not good for large boisterous groups. Mr. Higuchi made it clear that children under thirteen are very welcome at the original Tenko in Fukuromachi, but not at this branch. There are only eight counter seats. No smoking. Sound Quiet. Conversations punctuated by the sound of tempura boiling and staff explaining what the different items are. Recommended dishes Only set meals are available. The original Tenko also has a la carte tempura pieces. Drinks and Wine Precisely chosen white wines, as well as local sakes. Bottled beer. Brown tea is offered for non drinkers. Matcha green tea is served with dessert. Language There is an English menu, and Mr. Higuchi seems to be able to give the item names in English and explain what seasonings should be used. This said, a little Japanese will go a long way, everyone was extremely patient and gracious with my limited Japanese. Price Two courses are currently available in the evening, a ¥7000 and a ¥9000 version both served with an impressive sashimi course. Lunch offers a ten-don (rice bowl with tempura) or an excellent omakase lunch for ¥4200. Drinks are reasonably priced. Open Lunch is from 11:30 to 15:00 with the last order at 14:00. Dinner is served 17:30 to 23:00, with two seatings, the late one starting by 21:30. I was a lucky walk in at lunchtime; however for dinner, reservations are required. Closed Sundays, Golden Week, Obon in August, and for New Year holidays.

*What the Moons Mean Ratings range from one to five moons. One moon is awful

Accessibility Street level, with two steps up, restroom is narrow.

or some major problem. Two moons, satisfactory, but not worth a long trip. Three moons, very good, worth making an effort to eat there. Four moons, excellent, well worth making reservations far in advance. Five moons, life changing.

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/37


vegan hiroshima Eating out in Japan for vegetarian and vegan diners is often hard work. Understanding of the concepts is spreading, but choices are still limited and the process of clarifying ingredients can be exhausting. Although the overseas vegan wave is lapping the shores of Japan, we still only have one completely vegan restaurant here in Hiroshima, but there are now enough places offering vegan options to be able to enjoy eating out in different places for two or three days. All the places featured have an excellent understanding of vegan needs and are ready and waiting to welcome you. Bon appétit!

vegan cafe Shanti’s Yoga’s Vegan Cafe is the only pure vegan restaurant in the city center. Based on Japan’s Buddhist shojin-ryori vegetarian temple cuisine, chef Midori Nakadoi prepares a limited number of set meals with 6 to 8 inventive dishes, complete with vegan miso soup, rice and a traditional dessert accompanied by matcha green tea. It’s a rare treat to enjoy trying all the different flavors and textures confident that everything is completely free of animal products. A curry and rice dish with seasonal ingredients is also available daily.

map B p.26

15

artcafe elk Hungry vegans looking to enjoy some homestyle Japanese cooking should head for ArtCafe Elk near the Peace Memorial Park entrance to the Hondori shopping arcade. Elk’s vegan lunch platter, which comes with tofu steak, miso soup, rice balls and vegetable side dishes, is a chance for vegans to try the kind of food cooked up by Japanese mommas everyday. Now, the menu is expanding to include vegan fast food such as vegan karaage fried chicken, mock salmon bagels, tempura buffalo wings and BLTs. Yaki-udon noodles, Elk’s vegan take on Hiroshima okonomiyaki, is colorful and hearty and they have a good vegan chocolate cake as well as delicious fried banana spring rolls with cinnamon for dessert.

map C p.27 [B-1]

38\

2


otis! This quirky eatery/live music space just south of the Peace Museum was one of the first places in Hiroshima to offer vegetarian meals. Vegetarian versions of all of their Tex-Mex dishes are available, and vegans can substitute homemade soy cheese. Their lentil curry plate with homemade fried bread is hearty and delicious, and their vegetable soup plate-lunches can be made vegan on request. The rye bread open sandwich with garbanzo bean paste makes for a great energy boosting snack (vegans should mention you don’t want cheese) and I recommend leaving room for a piece of moist vegan fruit and nut cake that comes with tangy marmalade.

map C p.27 [A-2]

10

map C p.27 [B-2]

6

kanak Indian curry houses have long been a safe haven for vegetarians Japan, so we would be amiss not to mention Kanak near Peace Memorial Park. Most of Kanak’s vegetarian dishes can be made vegan on request. Dishes such as vegetable pakora, fried chili tofu, papad, Indian fried rice and their samosas, are already vegan and all of their meatfree curries can be prepared vegan. Order a vegan version of the “Kanak Healthy Dinner” and they will switch their salad dressing for a sprinkling of tasty chat masala spice. Choose rice or substitute chapati or roti for non-vegan nan bread.

nagata-ya okonomiyaki

hallelujah Dining-bar Hallelujah, open until dawn at the southern end of the Nagarekawa drinking district, aims to provide sustenance for vegan nite-owls. A tasty vegan tofu croquette is the only regular offering right now, but owner Shuji seems serious about expanding his vegan menu, so watch that space.

Locals may look askance, but an impressive vegan interpretation of Hiroshima’s signature dish can be had at Nagata-ya. Adding mochi rice cake gives the dish a more authentic texture and is delicious with the vegetarian okonomiyaki sauce Nagata-ya supplies. map C p.27 [B-1]

9

map B p.26

5

cafe lente Famous for oysters and conger eel, it is perhaps understandable that Miyajima is a bit of a vegan desert. Seek out stylish Cafe Lente and, if you time your visit right, you can enjoy a delicious vegan risotto with a view of the island’s giant “floating” shrine gate. Out of season visitors are most likely to score here, as the little cafe is unable to offer this dish when things are too busy. GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/39


goto izumi's deep 14 hiroshima hi c a m o t o m the ap ar tm en ts

vol.

l if e in

it y c a in h it w y it c e th


motomachi high rise public housing complex [shiei-motomachi-kousou-apaato]

Designed by Masato Otaka, one of the founding members of the optimistic Metabolist school of architects of the 1960s. Built between 1969 and 1978, the ambitious housing complex was created on former military land to accommodate those living in the “A-bomb Slum”, a shanty town that developed after the A-bombing. There are two sections, one the 12-14 story Chojuen apartment buildings and 12-20 story zig-zag buildings of the Motomachi high rises. Built around a central park space, the complex includes a primary school, kindergarten, nursery schools, a shopping center, commercial spaces, a hospital and facilities for youth and the elderly.

For a place so expansive, Motomachi is strangely quiet during the day. Despite its being in the center of the city, there is no urban hustle and bustle to be found here. There is, however, much to discover by the patient and attentive, some of which I would like to share here.

map p.24 [C-3]

5

CAUTION Before we begin, I would like to make one thing clear. The Motomachi Apartment Complex is not a tourist attraction. I implore you, dear reader, on the occasion of your visit, to respect the privacy of the 5000 or more residents who make it their home. I urge you to treat a visit to the Motomachi Apartment Complex as you might one of Kyoto’s traditional zen gardens and conduct yourself accordingly. For here, you can find an alternative, but, to my mind, comparable beauty. Photos © Kenichi Asano http://kenichiasano.wixsite.com/deltaphoto

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/41


shopping center The famous “Motomachi Shopping Center” shoots off in all the directions of the compass from its central core and it’s easy to get disorientated. Unfortunately, many of the shops are shuttered, but there is a mixture of places still plugging away and those started up young newcomers. The place has an ambience unlike anywhere else in Hiroshima.

and stuff yourself with yaki-niku in a BBQ eatery at prices you won’t believe. Move on to what to all appearances looks like an ordinary izakaya. On entering, you may find yourself in as about as ‘deep Hiroshima’ as you can get and where those lucky enough to speak the language of this land can hear tales of Motomachi and all can communicate via the international love of karaoke.

During the day, the visitor can enjoy shopping for Asian groceries and enjoying a very reasonably priced lunch, but it is after dark that the place comes alive. Raise a glass with local residents

Even if you don’t pluck up the courage to step over the threshold, just walking around here makes one question whether one really is really still in Hiroshima, or even in Japan for that matter.

42\


GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/43


seikyo center Beyond the main shopping center there are many little businesses located at ground level around the complex. Most of these places, run by local ladies, are only open during the day and are great repositories of the Showa ambience to which I am addicted. You may come across various playthings, but please ask permission before diving in.

44\


the star houses

hibajumoku

Of interest to architecture and city planning buffs, this interesting multi-housing design was employed in public housing projects around Japan in the 1950s and early 1960s that are becoming something of rarity.

This Kusunoki Camphor tree is the tallest of Hiroshima’s hibakujumoku A-bomb survivor trees. (See more on p 20-23)

the parks There are parks everywhere, but they are generally empty, enveloped in silence. Many species of apparatus stand unused as the average age of the residents around them climbs.

the kissaten

the sento public bath

underground

Before I say adieu. The Motomachi Apartment Complex is a deep spot and not, as I mentioned in my introduction, a tourist spot. Once more I impress on you the importance of conducting oneself if you visit. At a time when many of these kinds of places are undergoing great change, it is a part of Hiroshima’s scenery that I hope will remain for many years to come. GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/45


my town It’s almost 20 years since Mendel Jonkers first landed in Hiroshima. We caught up with the energetic master of all trades to find out why he put an end to his family’s history of blacksmithing for Dutch royalty to play Robinson Crusoe on Ganne Moon Beach on Etajima.

You’ve been a craftsman and creator working in every material from iron to glass, photographer, event organizer and TV talent; how do you describe what you “do” these days? Mostly I’m a creator in wood and metal or other naturally occurring materials making furniture or other order made objects. The TV talent thing is something on the side but it’s an industry with which I’m quite familiar and it gets you into interesting situations. As for events, the summer trance festival is where I really go the extra mile to create an unforgettable experience for everyone who comes. But a lot of my time now goes into maintaining and improving Ganne Moon Beach. Why did you choose to stay in Hiroshima rather than return to continue the family trade? It was the toughest decision of my life, but it came down to the deep feeling of a connection with this place and its people. Sometimes you have to let go of things to move forward…as a 7th generation blacksmith those can be very deeply rooted. So, what’s going on at Ganne Moon Beach? I fell in love with Ganne Moon Beach on Etajima some time ago. I regretted the state it was in and started organizing camp events with clean ups beforehand. I always secretly wished to live here… isn’t it every artist’s dream to live on a semi-tropical island? I’m lucky that a fortunate chain of events led to my dream coming true. Sometimes it feels like the island chose me. It’s one of the area’s nicest beaches and, together with the owner, I hope to help restore it to its former glory with a café, restaurant and accommodation.

46\

Any regrets? I’m starting to realize this is the mother of all volunteer work! EVER! It’ll be worth it LOL! What can people expect if they come out to Ganne this summer? We’re renovating the buildings now, but the grass is mowed and we work on keeping the beach clean. Basically, right now it’s the ideal secret camping spot. You can rent canoes or SUP boards and we’re working on getting our 50cc mini jeeps ready for rental so you get your Indiana Jones on. We also host gatherings on the night of the full moon every month of the year, rain or (moon)shine. It’s usually a barbeque style affair with a little music under the stars. There’s no charge, just bring some drinks, some food to share and camp out. August 12/13, things get crazy at our annual 2 day trance party (check GetHiroshima.com for details). What is your vision for Ganne? I’d like it to become a health resort where people can relax and reconnect with nature. By 2020 we hope to be renting out accommodation, complete with a cafe and bar serving healthy food and offering a menu of both active and relaxing activities. A personal hope of mine is that it’ll be a hotspot for people interested in the new plasma technology with healing abilities. What are some of your favorite things about Hiroshima? Hiroshima is a great for outdoor sports, (snow) mountains, rivers and the Inland Sea; it’s all on our

doorstep, just amazing. People should take more advantage of this. I like climbing the mountains around Hiroshima and looking over the city. My No.1 spot, however, has to be the view of the back of Miyajima from Ganne - you can see silhouette of the sleeping goddess hidden in the island’s mountains. It’s an awe-inspiring side of our World Heritage island! I don’t eat out so much these days, but I like to drop by (Rojiura) Teppanyaki Kentaro when I can. I used to be a big clubber, but the local scene at the moment seems to cater mostly to either a (very) early 20s crowd or up-tight up-market clientele. That said there are still good one off events at places like Chinatown, Mugen, Agit and Ondo. To kick back and relax? Ganne Moon Beach, where else? Feeding the birds from your hands on bench across from the A-bomb Dome is a peaceful experience. I like the Shukkeien Garden too. Any final words for your fellow Hiroshima-jin, long term or just passing through? Looking for menu ideas for a resort restaurant. Healthy food and drinks as medicine kind of thing. If you have any ideas please come talk to me. Plus I could always use a helping hand beach cleaning. Please, support your local event organizers and don’t waste all of your time Facebooking! I look forward to welcoming you on August 12/13th for the trance music festival. It’s going to be an awesome experience, don’t miss it! Enjoy summer to the max!


Matt’s Moment reader’s lament

In 1976, my friend John Yen’s house looked exactly like those to either side. Across the threshold, though, it was a different world. Generally, in that place and time, a backyard was a square slab of concrete where you kept the grill and a couple of rotting deck chairs, and beyond that a patchy expanse of Bermudagrass where a dog lay in the shade of a young fruit tree. John’s mom, though, had built a multi-level garden, gravel paths running between stacked planters draped with things unheard of in the supermarkets of East Texas. Inside, by some trick of curtains or placement of lamps, even the light was different. There were songbirds in a tall cage and a table crowded with frog figurines. The living room walls were given over entirely to shelves of books, most in Chinese. I was ten years old. I’d seen Spanish bibles and Le Petit Prince. My father kept a few dry titles in German. But this was my first encounter with a roomful of books in a language other than my own. It seemed impossibly foreign, and the fact that John’s parents owned (and presumably read) these books rattled at the back of my tiny head whenever we met. It stood at odds with their excellent English, their devotion to the Houston Astros and the Chevy in the garage. Who were these people, really? There’s a point to this reminiscence, albeit nothing terribly original. It’s just this: when you keep and read real books, even sparingly, they share your space as tangible reminders of who you are, once were, or hope to be. Even books you’ve never opened whisper from the shelves, hinting at where you might go next, or teasing you about some fleeting enthusiasm. It’s a cliche, in fact, that new friends or lovers explore one another’s shelves, looking for clues or warnings.

Now, though, we read so much online, much of which can never be found again. We’re told in bright, breathless tones of the “life-changing magic” of tossing any book that hasn’t filled us with joy, to make space for space. The disembodied libraries of e-readers are the least cluttering of all, and utterly joyless. I own a Kindle. I also listen to audiobooks biking to and from work. Neither is perfect. Books are perfect. The folio is a perfect technology, as suited to its function as is the skull of a cat. No further elaboration is needed. Imagine if the Yen family library had existed only in the cloud, with no chipped spines, no deckled edges, maps in pockets, or folding timelines. My ten-year-old self, groping toward some reformulation of what the word “American” might mean in the mid-70s, would have been left with the Chevy, the songbirds, and the snake beans growing out back. That would have been a shame. It would also have been a lie. And it would have stolen from them the pleasure of sitting down in the evening in a new country and letting your eyes rove absently over the shelves, the stories, poems and histories of your own heritage a part of the material furniture of the home. Translations and books from elsewhere find their places, too. It’s a pleasure I’ve come to value deeply. I wonder where John’s parents got their books The closest place was The Book Bay, a nice little storefront bookshop, but Chinese wasn’t its long suit. Forty years later, it’s an adventure finding English books in western Japan. There’s Amazon, but it’s not a bookshop and doesn’t want to be. AbeBooks is terrific, but the shipping is often more than the books themselves. Local shops are a crapshoot. If they have foreign language books, the selection is narrow and dull. Less so at used shops, where

the choice veers toward the bizarre. You wonder who traded in Birds of Indiana, and what they got for it. A guide to acquiring clairvoyant powers leans against Dr. Malcolm B. Willis’s The Bernese Mountain Dog Today. And then there’s Hiroshima’s new Tsutaya outlet. This store is maddening. The entire shop is ringed with bookshelves three meters off the floor, displaying English books as decoration. In places, 22 ranks of shelves rise to the second floor ceiling, stuffed with English titles. I’m told some may only be false spines, but not all. Many of the Japanese books may be excellent, though the selection skews heavily toward lace-and-chiffon wedding planners, biopics on J-Pop units whose debut album arrived late this morning and manuals for serving an English afternoon tea in your 1DK squat in Daikanyama. At any rate, I can’t read any of it (my fault entirely) without a kanji dictionary and the threat of a beating. And above it all towers the largest selection of English books I’ve seen in Japan. Out of reach. And not the faded 1957 Yearbook for the Royal National Rose Society or Biggles Defies the Swastika! stuff that gets scattered around for atmosphere. I rode up and down the escalators, squinting hard, and spotted hundreds of books I’d happily browse if I’d brought twenty foot stilts. By resting a dangerously high fraction of my bulk atop a glass barrier, I was able to lunge out into empty space and snag a copy of Out Stealing Horses, which I was allowed to buy for 500 yen. Ah, Japan. I love you but. Now where’s my Kindle? There must be some free, typo-ridden scan of Trollope I haven’t looked at yet.

Words: Matthew Mangham

GetHiroshima / Summer 2017

/47


Larimar specialty shop in Hiroshima Stone of love and peace, the color of Caribbean waters. Blue Larimar, only found in the Dominican Republic. It is loved for its rare, natural beauty and highly prized by many for its reputed calming properties. Fleur Bleue is one of Japan’s foremost Larimar dealers with a large selection of stones at a wide range of prices. All of Fleur Bleue’s stones are ethically sourced and most of their finished pieces come with a certificate of authenticity. Browsers welcome.

ho ndo r i

http://fleur-bleue.jp/

Pa r c o

www.facebook.com/Fleur.Bleue.4F/ -

P eace Par k

c h u o - d o ri

n a m i k i - do r i

Tel. 082-259-3535 4F 8-5 Komachi, Naka-ku Map C p.27 [C-3] 11:00-18:00

hei wa- do r i

jiz o - do r i

Closed Mon, Tue 7/11

-

Profile for GetHiroshima

Gethiroshima Mag Summer 2017  

The best of Hiroshima. In English.

Gethiroshima Mag Summer 2017  

The best of Hiroshima. In English.

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded