Page 1

BE MORE THAN A TOURIST

Seasonal

Going Out

Visitors

Destinations

Festivals

Dining

Maps

Sake

Autumn Colors

Nightlife

Sights

Earth Hiroshima

Sake

Art

Getting Around

Dog Rescue

THE AUTUMN ISSUE 2017

15

#


I don’t know if you’ve heard, but Japan has four seasons. We are not supposed to play favorites, but, well, autumn is pretty tough to beat. Other than the odd typhoon, the weather is generally awesome, and, from pretty Cosmos ”autumn sakura”, fields of ripening rice and the deepening of the red, yellow and gold of the foliage, the countryside is spectacular at this time of year. It’s also a busy festival season and the time to enjoy the best local food and sake. This issue is filled with off the beaten track destinations, as well as places to eat, drink and make merry. This month’s “face of Hiroshima” is brewmaster Miho Imada who talks about her journey along the path of sake and some of our partners offer some valuable tips on sampling local sake culture. We share the best places to catch the autumn colors, including one destination that train buffs will not want to miss. Many threads meet in Jinseki-kogen highland at on the northeastern edge of Hiroshima prefecture. It’s a place that not only has beautiful scenery, gorgeous autumn foliage and delicious sake, but is also the venue for the finale of a year long celebration of the region’s satoyama countryside culture, and the home of a passionate canine welfare organization. Finally, we have two tales which may inspire anyone who has ever dreamed of dropping everything to earn a Michelin star or become a superhero.

WELCOME Cover: Miho Imada Photo: Junpei Ishida

聞き飽きてるかもしれませんが、日本には四季がありま す。この場でどの季節が一番かを特別扱いするつもりは ありませんが、秋は最高です。季節外れの台風はさてお き、天気はたいていの場合素晴らしく、秋の桜と呼ばれ るコスモスから、稲刈りが始まる田園風景、道端に落ち る葉が次第に赤、黄、金へと深まるこの時期の田舎の 景色は、見事なものです。賑やかなお祭りの季節でもあ り、美味しい地元の食べ物や、お酒を楽しむ最高の時 間です。今号では、あまり知られていない場所だけでな く、食べたり、飲んだり、陽気にはしゃいだりできる場

取り上げた場所の中からあなたがどこを選んだのか、行 った先々の感想をメールやタグで共有していただけると 嬉しいです。

Steve Boura Goto Izumi Steve Jarvis Matt Jungblut Matt Mangham Hana Shiraishi Katherine Steen Paul Walsh JJ Walsh Noriko Yamamoto Photography Goto Izumi Junpei Ishida Matt Jungblut Kazuyuki Nakano Katherine Steen Noriko Yamamoto Ryouji Yamaoka JJ Walsh Paul Walsh 奥出雲町観光協会, 備後落合通信事務局 Illustration Emmie Tsumura @emsakko

Paul Walsh

CONTENTS 02 / Welcome 03 / GetHiroshima Picks 04 / News 06 / Festival Focus 09 / Kagura 10 / Autumn Colors 12 / Miyajima Aquarium 14 / Beaches, gorges and food in Shimane 18 / From the mountains to the sea on the Kisuki Line 22 / New local brand Earth Hiroshima

Team Editor-in-chief Paul Walsh Art director NINBAORI (Judith Cotelle) Deputy Editor JJ Walsh Proofreader Kismet Cordova Sales manager Ayaka Terao Contributors

所を多く取り上げています。毎度のことですが、今号で

As always, we’d love to hear what you get up to this season, so feel free to get in touch by email or just tag us.

GetHiroshima Mag Issue 15 September, 2017 Circulation 10,000 copies Published quarterly by GetHiroshima Next issue December, 2017 Printed by Nakamoto Honten Motoaki Tahara

24 / Maps 28 / Place Listings 33 / Art 34 / Cover Feature: Talking Sake With Master Sake Brewer Miho Imada 38 / Kampai! 40 / Eating the stars 42 / Goto Izumi’s Deep Hiroshima 44 / Peace Wanko 46 / Satoyama Future Expo 47 / Matt’s Moment

082-225-7466

gethiroshima.com info@gethiroshima.com

Find us online

www.gethiroshima.com GetHiroshima

GetHiroshima

GetHiroshima

gethiroshima

Tag us with #gethiroshima

All rights reserved © GetHiroshima 2017 As far as we are aware, all info correct at time of going to print. If you see something that has changed, we’d really appreciate you letting us know at info@gethiroshima.com Warning/Disclaimer GetHiroshima will not accept liability for any damages caused by the contents of GetHiroshima Mag, including, but not limited to any omissions, errors, facts or false statements. Opinions or advice expressed in GetHiroshima Mag are not necessarily those of GetHiroshima. No content published in GetHiroshima can be reproduced, republished, retransmitted or redistributed without permission.


GetHiroshima picks You’ve been to the Peace Memorial Park and Miyajima. What next?

PEACE PAGODA

FAN FANTASTIC

KAGURA

Walk up Mt Futaba from Tōshō-gū shrine along a path that takes you under 100 red torii gates through an old growth forest to great views from the Peace Pagoda at the top.

Love for the Hiroshima Carp is unequivocal. Baseball fan or not, a home game is always memorable. Soccer lovers can also enjoy the Japanese stadium experience at a Sanfrecce game.

Ancient myths and folktales performed in extravagant costumes to frenetic drum rhythms, complete with dry ice, fireworks and exploding cobwebs. City center shows at Kenmin Bunka Center on Wednesdays from April. (See p. 9 for more details).

MITAKI TEMPLE

EAT!

SHIMIZU GEKIJO

Cure Kyoto “temple fatigue” and calm the soul in the gorgeous verdant grounds of Mitaki Temple, 20min walk up the hill from Mitaki station (3 stops from Hiroshima on the Kabe Line).

Okonomiyaki is both a meal and a culinary performance. Oysters and tsukemen cold noodles in spicy dipping sauce are also local specialities. Wash it all down with some great local sake.

Step into the world of Japanese vaudeville performed by itinerant troupes with very loyal fans. 3hr shows at 12pm & 6pm (¥1900) or catch the 1hr finale for just ¥1000. http://bit.ly/shimizugekijo

SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

ISLAND HOP

OUT ON THE TOWN

Wander through the miniature landscapes in this city center garden or take a seat by the lake and watch the koi carp, turtles and birds. Lovely rain or shine.

Hiroshima Port is the gateway to the islands of the Inland Sea. Sleepy Ninoshima is the nearest. Don’t have great sea legs? Stroll the Ujina waterfront or walk over to Moto-ujina island.

We urge you to eat, drink, and yes, make merry with Hiroshima people. It’s only then that you can get a real appreciation of what a special place Hiroshima is and truly feel its message of peace.


S W E N GET CULTURED ON MIYAJIMA The sacred island of Miyajima is the perfect location to try out some traditional Japanese activities, and Okeiko Japan is the perfect place on Miyajima. Try one or a mix of different activities in a 300 year old Tokuju-ji Zen temple, 5 minutes walk from the ferry terminal. Activities offered include tea ceremony, calligraphy, cooking, sake tasting, origami and zazen meditation. For the full experience, let them dress you in a kimono free of charge. 2 activities (60min) ¥4000, 3 activities (90min) ¥5000 Go to okeiko-japan.com for schedules and reservations.

KAGURA AT THE PREFECTURAL ART MUSEUM While there are many opportunities to see Hiroshima kagura at shrine festivals during autumn, plus weekly shows at the Rijo Kaikan every Wednesday night, these three performances are tailored for English speakers looking to learn more about this exciting folk art. The inaugural August event was very well attended and great fun. English subtitles displayed on an unobtrusive screen made it easier to follow the action, the post-show Q&A with the performers was fascinating and everyone loved taking photos with the troupe members, costumes and masks. At only ¥500, it really is an experience not to be missed if you are in Hiroshima on one of the dates below. Show up early to ensure you get a seat.

SAKE TASTING AT KEMBY’S

Sept. 23 (Sat) Momijigari Oct. 7 (Sat) Yamatanoorochi

Oct. 14 (Sat) Tsuchigumo

04\

September 23, October 7 & October 14 Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum Auditorium Map A p.26 34 Admission: ¥500 Tickets sold on the day of the performance from 17:30. Performance 18:00-18:45 18:45 followed by Q&A and photo session.

Get ready for October’s big sake festival in Saijo by trying some of the best sake in Japan, selected by Yamatoya, at this seasonal event at Kemby’s September 16 18:30-21:30 ¥1000 incl a plate of food Sake by the glass ¥400-¥600 Map C [B-2] p.27

6


HIROSHIMA TV’S “MESSAGE FROM HIROSHIMA”

Local broadcaster Hiroshima TV have produced around 130 documentaries concerning the Hiroshima A-bombing and, this year, they made 6 of them available to be streamed free of charge with English subtitles. While the development and use of the A-bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been the subject of many documentary films produced in the west, those made in and from the perspective of the cities attacked have been rather difficult to access, both in terms of availability and language, to those outside of Japan. The films can be viewed on a special page on the TV company’s website, launched on the 72nd anniversary of the A-bomb attack on Hiroshima and publicized with a full page ad in the New York Times. For rights reasons, one of the films was only available for one month, but the other 5 will be streamed free of charge between September and the end of March next year: Ishibumi (1969), U.S. POWS and the A-bomb (2016), Homeward Bound (1977), Streetcars and School Girls (2003) and A Message from the Vanished Streets of Hiroshima (2005). http://www.htv.jp/hiroshima/

RUN WITH KOBO DAISHI 10K TRAIL RACE 10TH HIROSHIMA PEACE PRIZE EXHIBITION

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art Until October 15 See page 33 for details Born in Beirut and based in London, Mona Hatoum is the recipient of the 10th Hiroshima Art Prize and an exhibition of her work is on display at HMOCA until Oct 15th. The collection includes performance pieces, large-scale installations and an assortment of smaller bizarre objects. Each exhibit features everyday objects in strange forms, questioning daily norms which are in stark contrast to the harsh reality many people face around the world.

Shiraishi Island off the coast of Kasaoka in Okayama Prefecture is one of our favorite island getaways, and running or walking its 88 stage pilgrimage trail is the perfect way to see it. A challenging, but beautiful 10km trail race and a kid-friendly 3km walk along the pilgrimage trail. All proceeds go to the ongoing, valiant efforts to restore and maintain the 400 year old trail. October 29, 09:00-15:00 https://www.facebook.com/shiraishi88/

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/05


autumn Festivals With moon-viewing, brush-worshipping, candle-lighting, sake-sampling, fire-walking, baby-beating, rock-riding and, of course, harvest festivals that come with a healthy dose of dragon-slaying, matsuri come thick and fast during the autumn months.

Starting with the handcrafted boats of Miyajima’s Tanomo-san, autumn is packed with celebrations, some age-old, others more recent, but all colorful and exuberant. September is the time to look up to the harvest moon, to reflect and enjoy tsukimi-dango sweets, and also of Kumano’s thank you to the calligraphy brush that has brought them fame. Autumn shrine festivals follow the harvest and local kagura dance troupes get very busy. In November, demons beat children in Onomichi and Hiroshima’s businesses court Ebisu.

TANOMO-SAN / 9/20 - MIYAJIMA

A little known, but delightful festival on Miyajima. Around 5pm locals start to assemble carrying little handcrafted tanomo boats, complete with passengers fashioned out of sweets, to Shinomiya Shrine in Momiji-dani Park. Once blessed, the boats are carried to Itsukushima Shrine from where they are set afloat.

KUMANO BRUSH FESTIVAL / 9/23 - KUMANO

Kumano to the east of Hiroshima city has been a center of calligraphy fude brush production for over a century. Every year they give thanks with ritual brush-burning, giant calligraphy painting, brush dances and higan-bune boat spinning. This is one of our favorite local festivals. Kagura performances the night before.

06\


SHIRAKAMI-SAN / 10/28-29 - HIROSHIMA CITY CENTER

Shirakami Shrine on Peace Boulevard is one of HIroshima’s oldest, once marking the location of a rocky outcrop in the sea before the city expanded southward via land reclamation. The shrine’s autumn festival is very atmospheric and features kagura performances performed before an enthusiastic crowd on both nights.

BETCHA MATSURI / 11/1-3 ONOMICHI

On the final day of this 3-day festival, three fearsome masked demons parade the streets of Onomichi, beating and poking people with ceremonial rods and bamboo whisks to bring them good health, intelligence and fertility. It’s a great place to get photos of screaming babies being offered up by laughing parents.

EBISU-KOU / 11/18-20 - HIROSHIMA CITY CENTER

Commonly known as Ebessan, this festival dates back over 400 years. The cherry chubby, fish-bearing Ebisu looks after commerce and is one of Japan’s most popular gods. Thousands line up to have brightly-colored komazarae rakes blessed and toss cash into a huge barrel at Ebisu Shrine. Lots of stalls and kagura shows too. GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/07


SAIJO SAKE MATSURI / 10/7-8 - SAIJO, HIGASHI-HIROSHIMA CITY Thousands throng the narrow streets of Saijo’s brewery district to celebrate and sample (a lot of) the town’s highly ranked sake. The main tasting area is the Sake Hiroba in a local park for which you have to pay for admission, but there’s lots more going on around town, mostly centered on food and drink. Tip: Buy your return train ticket on arrival.

SANNOSE BONOMAI MATSURI / 10/23 SANNOSE, SHIMO-KAMAGARI ISLAND

A community festival begun in 1980 to try and revitalize a community facing depopulation which draws on the town’s medieval history as an important port of call of Korean emissaries making their way to the imperial capital by sea. Local children perform folk dances the night before the main event, an 8 hour grand period parade.

FUDOMYO FIRE WALKING RITUAL / 11/3 - DAIGAN-JI TEMPLE, MIYAJIMA A large group of priests in colorful robes begin a drawn out ceremony that plays out in front of the Holy Fire Hall within the precincts of Daigan-ji Temple across from the public exit of Itsukushima Shrine. At around 2pm a large fire is lit and the priests, followed by members of the public, cross the ashes.

GRAND INOKO MATSURI / 11/4-5 - HIROSHIMA CITY CENTER A contemporary interpretation of the traditional Inoko Matsuri children’s festival in which a huge rock is suspended by ropes hung from a ring of bamboo stalks in Fukuromachi Park in the center of Hiroshima City to create an impressive art installation. Music and fun starts on Saturday, but the main action is from mid-afternoon on Sunday.

DAISHO-IN FIRE WALKING RITUAL / 11/15 - DAISHO-IN TEMPLE, MIYAJIMA © Lance Cpl. Benjamin Pryer

08\

Arrive ahead of time to ensure a good view of this Shingon Buddhist ritual at Daisho-in Temple on Miyajima. Sutras are chanted from 11am and crowds gather before 1pm for the ritual lighting of the pyre of cypress branches. Around 2pm the head monk and mountain priests, followed by members of the public, make the walk across the embers.

|| 9/8-10 Miyajima Mantoe Candle-Festival, Daisho-in Temple, 18:00-21:00 || 9/16-17 Isonomiya-Hachiman-jinja Shrine Festival Parade, Takehara || 9/18 Respect the aged tea ceremony & concert, Shukkeien Garden 09:00-15:00 || 9/20 Tanomo-san, Miyajima (Page 6) || 9/23 Kumano Fude Brush Festival 10:00-18:00 (Page6) || 10/4 Moon Viewing Tea Ceremony, Shukkeien Garden 16:00-20:00 || 10/7 Sankeien Garden Viewing, Next to Hiroshima Airport, Mihara || 10/7 Setoda Kangetsu-kai Moon Viewing, Setoda, Ikuchijima island 17:00-20:30 || 10/7 Onomichi Akari Candle Festival, Onomichi temples, Onomichi 18:00-21:00 || 10/7-8 Saijo Sake Matsuri (Page 8) || 10/14 Children’s Kagura & Shishimai Lion Dance, Tōshōgu Shrine 11:00-16:00 || 10/15 Kikka-sai Chrysanthemum Festival, Bugaku court dance & music, Itsukushima Shrine, Miyajima 17:00|| 10/21-22 Ogashira Shrine Autumn Festival, Ono-cho, Hatsukaichi (Taiko & Kagura from 18:00~ on 10/22) || 10/22 Traditional music concert, Shukkeien Garden || 10/23 Sanno-jinja-sai, Bugaku court dance & music at Sanno Shrine, next to Itsukushima Shrine , Miyajima 10:00|| 10/23 Korean envoy parade reenactment, Sannose, Shimo-Kamagari Island, Kure 10:45-15:00 (Page 8) || 10/28-29 Shirakami-san(Page 7), Shirakami Shrine at Peace Boulevard || 10/28-10/29 Hiroshima Food Festival, Hiroshima castle || 10/28-11/12 Chrysanthemum display, Hiroshima castle || 10/28-29 Takehara Bamboo Candle Festival, Honmachi, Takehara 17:00-21:00 || 11/1-3 Betcha Matsuri, Ikkyu-jinja Shrine, Onomichi(Page 7) (18:00~) 11/2 (11:00) 11/3 (07:30-18:30) || 11/1-12 Chrysanthemum display, Shukkeien Garden || 11/3 13:00 Daiganji Fire walking Ritual, Daigan-ji Temple, Miyajima (Page 8) || 11/3 Chryanthemum viewing tea ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden 10:00-15:00 || 11/4-5 Grand Inoko Festival, Fukuromachi Park, Hiroshima (Page 8) || 11/12 Maple viewing tea ceremony, Shukkei-en Garden 10:00-15:00 || 11/15 Daisho-in Fire walking Ritual, Daisho-in Temple, Miyajima (Page 8) || 11/18-20 Ebisukou, Ebisu Shrine, Chuo-dori St, Hiroshima (Page 7) www.gethiroshima.com/events


kagura spectacular folk theater for the masses

A giant, multicolored, eight-headed serpent writhes back and forth across the stage, attacking and entwining a sword-wielding hero. Engulfed in smoke and sparks spitting from its multiple jaws, the beast bites, spins and leaps, occasionally snapping at young children brave enough to come to the front of the stage. The hero, of course, eventually triumphs, severing each of the heads in turn, to the delight of the audience.

This is the thrilling conclusion to Yamata-noorochi, a crowd-pleasing tale from Japanese mythology, often performed as the finale at kagura festivals and competitions. Kagura is a diverse art form with a variety of performance styles. Those performed in northern Hiroshima and the Iwami region of Shimane are characterized by energetic dances in elaborate (and heavy) costumes, accompanied by stirring rhythms. While you may not understand the

dialogue, the exciting fight scenes, lots of dry ice, fireworks and lightning-fast costume changes keep even the uninitiated entertained. In Hiroshima city, kagura is most often seen at autumn shrine festivals. Every Wednesday, however, troupes come in from the countryside to perform at Kenmin Bunka Center near the A-bomb Dome. Non-Japanese readers are provided with basic English outlines of the two pieces to be performed. There’s also an opportunity to check out the masks and costumes up close and get some souvenir snaps after the show. Those who would like to delve deeper into the world of Hiroshima kagura should make a trip out to Monzen Kagura Village in Midorii, Akitakata. Here, around 20 troupes take turns performing in the “Kagura Dome”. The facility also has restaurants, shops, a hot spring and accommodation. The Iwami area, across the mountains in Shimane, has a strong claim to being the birthplace of kagura and the weekly performances inside atmospheric Sanku Shrine [三宮神社] are a must see if you are in Hamada (see page 15) on a Saturday night.

H I R OSH IMA K AGURA I N HIROSHIM A CITY CE N TE R Every Wednesday Night at

∼Hiroshima Prefectural Citizen’s Culture Center∼ (Rijo Kaikan Kenmin Bunka Center)

AUTUMN SEASON: Sep 6, 13, 20, 27 Oct 4, 11, 18, 25 Nov 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

300m from Peace Memorial Park Admission: ¥1,000 Doors open: 18:00 First performance: 19:00-19:40 Intermission: 19:40-20:00 Second performance: 20:00-20:40 http://www.rccbc.co.jp/event/kagura/ All seats unassigned. Tickets on sale from 17:00 on day of performance.

Photo session with players and costumes on stage after the show from 20:40


Kono michi ya yuku hito nashi ni aki no kure All along this road not a single soul only autumn evening comes Basho (1694)

Koyo

How things have changed since Basho’s day. Vermillion, orange, russet, gold; the colors of autumn are still spectacular, but on some days, thousands of tourists head out of town to stroll under glorious canopies of maple, poplar, beech and other trees from late October through November. On the busy weekends, the narrow leaf strewn trails fill with large numbers of enthusiastic leaf-watchers, some in their Sunday-best and others seemingly equipped for a day in the Alps. Weekdays are better. Bring a sweater, wear walking shoes if you have them, and don’t forget your camera. Hiroshima JR Station usually has an easy to read information board indicating the state of the leaves each day to help you decide where to go.

MIYAJIMA Tens of thousands of people descend on Miyajima during November to enjoy the autumn colors in Momijidani (Maple Valley) and around Daisho-in Temple. The red bridge at the entrance to the valley is a favorite spot for a “classic” autumn shot. Further up in the valley the leaves are equally gorgeous, and Shinomiya Shrine looks amazing framed by the golden and crimson leaves. Sometimes the crowds can be overwhelming, but it is surprising how easy it is to find relative calm by hopping off the main path. Those that hike up Mt Misen can be rewarded with some picture postcard views and pockets of splendid solitude. Best viewing: Mid to late November

MITAKI TEMPLE The top spot for enjoying the autumn leaves within the city limits. Beautiful at any time of the year, Mitaki is particularly stunning when the leaves turn. Fallen leaves litter the pathways and lie cradled in the hands of some of the hundreds of statues that silently watch over the verdant grounds. You are unlikely to have the place completely to yourself, but, visit on a weekday, and you may well come close. Don’t leave it too late however, as the hillside temple falls into shadow fairly early in the afternoon. Best viewing: Mid to late November

10\


SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

Very pretty at any time of the year, autumn colors further enhance this garden central enough to pop in for a quiet interlude during a day in the city. Informal tea ceremonies are held daily during the “Momiji Matsuri” at the end of November when there are extended opening hours and the red leaves are illuminated after dark. Best viewing: Mid November to mid December

TAISHAKUKYO GORGE

Taishakukyo is another lovely spot. 15km of trail and natural features that include a 40m high natural limestone arch that straddles the path, but access requires your own transport. 3h 25 min from Hiroshima to Tojo Station by JR Kibi Line OR 2h from Hiroshima Bus Center to Tojo by bus. 20 min from Tojo Station to Taishakukyo. Best viewing: Late October to early November

GOKURAKUJI TEMPLE

YOSHIMIZUEN GARDEN

This lovely private Japanese garden in Kake with beautiful autumn colors only opens the second and third weekends of November. A worthy stop off on the way to Sandankyo Gorge or a destination in its own right. 15 minutes drive from Togouchi interchange on the Chugoku Expressway

TSUTSUGA OICHO GIANT GINGKO TREE

SANKEIEN GARDEN

Sankei-en doesn’t have the history of Shukkeien in the city center, but this expansive garden located right next to Hiroshima Airport has its own very pretty “maple valley”. Kids enjoy feeding koi carp in the lake here too. Best viewing: Late October to late November

SANDANKYO GORGE

Gokuraku-ji is a mountaintop temple in Hatsukaichi City originally established in the early 8th century and rebuilt in the 16th century by Mori Motonari. Many of the leaves on trees in the temple precinct and around the nearby lake turn a vibrant bright red in November and there are good views out over the sea. A 30 minute drive up Rt 433 from Hatsukaichi City or a 90min-2hr hike from Hatsukaichi JR Station. Best viewing: Early to mid November

BUTTSUJI TEMPLE

Hit this 16km long ravine in the north of the prefecture at the right time and the mix of the various autumn colors is simply gorgeous (see what I did there?). Even out of season, however, this is a lovely trail and well worth a trip for nature lovers. Please note that weather can change quickly up here, and even early snowfalls are possible so it pays to be prepared, however nice the weather may be in the city. Best viewing: Late October to mid November

Buttsuji Temple is the head temple of a branch of Rinzai Zen. The mountain temple complex in Mihara City has a history that goes back over 600 years and today many people study Zen there. The leaves here are absolutely stunning in the autumn and attract many, many people to view them. A 40min bus ride from JR Mihara Station to the Buttsu-ji Temple bus stop Best viewing: Early to mid November

Many people make the trip out to this one single tree in the grounds of Otoshi Shrine in Akiota City. This is no ordinary tree, however. Said to be over 1000 years old, this gnarled gingko tree is 8m around and almost 50m tall, and at the beginning of November the leaves turn the most incredible shade of yellow and carpet the ground. 5 minutes drive from the Togouchi interchange on the Chugoku expressway, this is another place that can be visited on a (self powered) trip to Sandankyo Gorge. Best viewing: Mid November

OZEKIYAMA KOEN PARK

This riverside hillpark, a former northern getaway for Hiroshima’s nobility located just outside the center of Miyoshi City attracts many visitors in the middle of November when the entire mountain blazes red. Best viewing: Mid November GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/11


miyajima public aquarium

Give the kids a break from temple overload at the fun and educational Miyajima Public Aquarium. With 350 species and 13,000 creatures on display, the aquarium, which is currently celebrating its 50th anniversary, packs a lot into a small space. You will find crowd pleasers like penguins, seals, otters and many tropical fish here, but Miyajima’s aquarium prides itself on showcasing local sea life. The cute and playful sunameri finless porpoises are the aquarium’s star attraction and are native to the Inland Sea. Other notable locals are strange kabuto-gani horseshoe crabs, rare ōsanshōuo giant salamanders, and a look at what is to be found under the oyster rafts you see along the coast here. With sea lion shows, feeding and petting times staggered throughout the day, there is no chance of getting bored (our kids’ favorites were watching the feeding of the huge Steller sea lions and feeding time by a diver surrounded by rays, moray eels, blow fish and miniature sharks in the biggest tank). An interactive rock pool exhibit is open all day where you can stroke starfish and squishy sea cucumbers. Miyajima Aquarium can get busy on weekends and holidays, so we recommend arriving early in the morning or later in the afternoon at these times. As it’s OK to go in and out throughout the day (just ask the staff at the exit to give you a re-entry stamp), you can tailor your time at the aquarium to your itinerary, energy level and, of course, the moods of your kids. Free strollers, lockers and a deer-free picnic area are also available.

12\


Opening hours: 09:00-17:00 (Last admission 16:00) Admission charges: Adults ¥1400 Elementary & junior high school students ¥700 Pre-school over 4 years old ¥400 Under 4 years old free 10-3 Miyajima-cho, Hatsukaichi-shi, Hiroshima-ken Japan 739-0534 (5 minutes walk from Itsukushima Shrine exit) Tel: +81 829-44-2010 https://www.miyajima-aqua.jp/english/

Mt Misen summit

Daisho-in Temple

Please note schedule and displays are subject to change without notice.

Shopping Street

Itsukushima Shrine

Miyajima Public Aquarium

Ferry terminal

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/13


SPONSORED ARTICLE

Beach Hamada 浜田 http://www.all-iwami.com/en/

Hamada’s beaches are no secret to locals. Although the Inland Sea is nice enough, it’s the Sea of Japan to which we head for long sandy beaches and surf. Well-kept Iwami Seaside Park is open throughout the year and, along with grassy camping areas, cabins that accommodate between 2 and 6 people are available for rent (booking in English at http://kkisp.jp/camp-en/). Autumn weather is perfect for camping, and, even if you find the water a bit chilly for swimming, beachcombing, taking in the dramatic views from the Akabana cliff path and exploring the rock pools among the weird and wonderful geological formations at Tatami-ga-ura all make for pleasant diversions. If you need a break from the great outdoors, AQUAS Aquarium with its famous beluga whales and the Sekishu Washi Center are a short drive away. At weekends, look out for entertaining Iwami Kagura folk dance performances.

14\

&


&

Fresh Seafood Lunch

Kokufu Beach is a short 10-minute drive west of Iwami Seaside Park. It’s one of the most popular surf beaches in the area. Arrive early in the morning on just about any day of the year, and you’ll find expectant surfers looking for a good wave. Overlooking the beach is Senjōen, which, as well as accommodation and a public bath with a panoramic sea view, has an excellent restaurant that serves great seafood, fresh from the local market. Although Senjōen has a somewhat institutional look, on a fine day, the view from the Shiokaze dining area out through pine trees to the beach and sea beyond is lovely. Open for lunch between 11am and 3pm, Shiokaze is a seafood lover’s dream, with the freshest produce served at great prices. You can enjoy quite a feast for well under ¥2000. As well as sushi, tempura and kaiseki style lunch sets, specialities include nodoguro rockfish and hearty uzume-meshi rice bowls with hidden seafood “toppings” you dig out with your chopsticks.

Hashi Beach

Senjōen [千畳苑 ] 2164 Shimokō-chō, Hamada, Shimane Prefecture 〒697-0006 島根県浜田市下府町2164 Tel: 0855-28-1255 http://senjoen.jp/ Restaurant Shiokaze 11:00-15:00 (L.O. 14:45) English menu / Credit Cards accepted Access 8min by car from Hamada IC 12min by bus from Hamada JR Station 8min walk from Senjōen bus stop

SEA OF JAPAN

Aquas

Hamada

Iwami Seaside Park

Iwami Tatamigaura Kokufu Beach Senjoen

Hamada Station

Hamada IC exit

Hiroshima

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/15


SPONSORED ARTICLE

Ohnan 邑南

http://www.ohnan-kanko.com

Dangyokei Gorge is a spectacular spot. The Nigorigawa River has carved beautiful smooth slots through a wide, flat expanse of rock that sits between steep cliffs dotted by waterfalls. From the parking lot by the restrooms, it is only a short walk to the gorge, though please bear in mind there are some steep and somewhat uneven sets of steps to negotiate. A small area is currently off limits, but most of the gorge is open for exploration. For energetic kids, Dangyokei is like a huge natural parkour course and they’ll love skipping among the rocks. Surprisingly, there is a good chance that you'll have this natural gem almost to yourself. There is also a nice park, perfect for picnicking and Dangyokei is one of the area’s best known places to view the colors of autumn foliage. Access: 25km from Oasa IC. Exit Hamada Expressway at Oasa IC, follow Route 261 and exit left just before Dangyo Tunnel.

16\

& Gorge


&

Friendly rural cafe

Whether filling up beforehand or refueling after exploring Dangyokei Gorge, Cafe Tōrimichi is the place. Hidden in plain sight on Route 261, just 1.5km away from the gorge, with delicious pasta dishes, salads and some of the most imaginative pizzas you’ll find, Tōrimichi has a simple but unique selection of western and Japanese style dishes. The pizzas are the stars of the show and Cafe Tōrimichi has served over 10,000 since 2010. Each comes with a ticket showing its number; collect 10 and get one free. Also not to be resisted is the indulgent dessert drink menu (and, yes, dessert pizza). Open until 11pm, Cafe Tōrimichi is also one of the few places in this area where you can enjoy some after dinner drinks. Although not fluent, the owner-chef Kasaoka-san’s English conversations are always memorable. Call ahead as this dedicated dad occasionally closes to spend some quality time with his family.

Access: 2min (1.5km) drive from Dangyokei Gorge 30min (25km) drive from Oasa IC

Ohnan SEA OF JAPAN

Hamada

Ha

mad a

Exp res s

wa

Mizuho IC

y

Cafe Tōrimichi [喫茶 とおりみち] 1362-5 Ibara, Ohnan-cho, Ohchi-gun, Shimane Pref. 〒696-0101 島根県邑智郡邑南町井原1362-5 Tel: 0855-95-0927 http://to-rimichi.com/ 11:00-15:00, 17:00-23:00 Closed Sundays

Dangyokei Gorge Cafe Tōrimichi

Koboku no Mori Garden 261

Oasa IC

SHIMANE PREFECTURE HIROSHIMA PREFECTURE

Hiroshima

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/17


the kisuki line [ 木次線 ] through the mountains to lake shinji by train

18\


This rural train climbs higher than any railway in the region through some spectacular autumn foliage. Shinji [宍道] Matsue, Shimane - Bingo-Ochiai [備後落 合](Shobara, Hiroshima) 81.9km/18 stations The 82 kilometer Kisuki Line climbs from close to the shore of Lake Shinji, near the historical cities of Izumo and Matsue in Shimane Prefecture, over the formidable Chugoku mountain range to Bingo Ochiai Station in the north of Hiroshima Prefecture where three rural rail lines converge. Along the way, passengers are treated to impressive views of mountain scenery and to some of the prettiest autumn foliage in the region. It is an area steeped in legend and each of the line’s stations are named for characters the appear in the Kojiki chronicles of the mythical origins of Japan. Photo: The Kisuki Line train passes the highest point of any rail line in the region between Izumo-Sakane [出雲 坂根] and Miinohara [三井野原] stations.

Matsue[ 松江 ] Izumo-shi [ 出雲市 ]

Shinji [ 宍道 ]

Kisuki Line Niimi [ 新見 ]

Bingo-Ochiai [ 備後落合 ] Shimane Pref.

Toujou [ 東城 ] Miyoshi

Hiroshima Pref.

Hiroshima

Photo by Ryouji Yamaoka / http://yamaokaya.exblog.jp

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/19


the land of iron and legend The Kisuki Line passes through “Tatara country”. The areas Oku-izumo, Unan and Izumo in Shimane were once important centers of tatara iron production, producing the iron from which Japan’s famous samurai swords were made. It’s a history that goes back over 1000 years and subject of a Japanese movie, Tatara Samurai, released earlier this year. Okuizumo also provided the inspiration for Iron Town in the Ghibli animated feature Princess Mononoke. Going back even further, many places in this area are referenced in the Kojiki ‘Record of Ancient Matters’ compiled in the early 8th century; a collection of myths about the origin of Japan and its gods, the kami. The head of the Hii-kawa River [斐伊川], which flows alongside the Kisuki Line, is said to be the location of the tale of the 8-headed orochi serpent that is the subject of the much-performed Yamata-no-orochi kagura play. Some say that the legendary sword, one of Japan’s three sacred Imperial regalia, plucked from the tail of the orochi by the victorious storm god Susanoo was actually forged in a local tatara. High quality, tamahagane ore produced from iron-sand using the traditional, highly intuitive, long and laborious tatara method is the only material used to forge traditional Japanese katana swords.

3-STAGE SWITCHBACK The highlight of the Kisuki Line, and one that will delight train buffs, is Japan’s only 3-stage switchback which the train traverses to negotiate the 162m elevation change between Minohara Station [ 三井 野原駅 ] and Izumo-Sakane Station. The driver has to move back and forth from the cab at one end of the train to the other to zig and zag up and down the steep gradient. Admirers of feats of civil engineering will appreciate the views of the red Miino Ohashi Bridge [ 三井野大橋 ] and the Okuizumo Orochi Loop, Japan’s largest double loop bridge.

Photos: Kazuyuki Nakano, Noriko Yamamoto, 奥出雲町観光協会 , 備後落合通信事務局

20\


Okuizumo Orochi-go Taking the distinctive blue and white Orochi-go seasonal sightseeing train is a great way to experience the Kisuki Line. A diesel locomotive pulls the train up to Bingo Ochiai and pushes it back down on the return journey. The fittings in one car are delightfully retro and the other car has open windows so you can really enjoy the scenery (bring warm clothing in autumn as it can get chilly). One ticket allows you to sit in either car and you can switch between the two. All kinds of goodies are on sale on board for those who want to sample local delicacies and you can buy even more from local merchants who meet the train at some of the stops along the way.

bingo ochiai station The Okuizumo Orochi-go departs from Kisuki Station at around 10am (which gives you plenty of time to get the train from either Izumo or Matsue), arriving at Bingo Ochiai at just after 12:30 and heads back about 20 minutes later. It runs Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and on national holidays until the end of November, with weekday departures during the autumn colors. Reservations are recommended. http://www.hiikawa-summit.info/orochi/ [ja]

This sleepy station is the end of the line as far as the Kitsuki Line goes. It’s amazing to think that in its heyday over 100 people worked to keep this 3 line passenger and freight junction moving. Remnants of most of the, now unused, tracks remain but are much overgrown and the ruins of a turntable from the age of steam can be seen. Railway buffs will find more than enough to keep them interested before making the return journey.

enjoy your own night at the museum

okuizumo soba Okuizumo’s pure water and wide daily temperature variation make locally produced Nita rice and buckwheat soba noodles particularly flavorful. Great homemade warigo stacked soba noodles can be had at Yakawa Soba in front of Yakawa Station [八川駅] and at Kamedake Station [亀嵩駅] where the station building itself is a noodle shop. Let either of these places know which train you’ll be on ahead of time, and they’ll meet you with a soba noodle bento lunch.

One of the region’s most unusual accommodation options has to be the Okuizumo Tane Natural History Museum. Located about 2km from 85 year old Izumo-yashiro Station, the museum has a collection of fossils and dinosaur bones which are illuminated at night for overnight guests. The museum is surrounded by beautiful countryside, there are fantastic views of the stars at night and there is even an onsen hot spring and restaurant right next door.

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/21


earth hiroshima from hiroshima to the world Words: Matt Mangham

https://earth-hiroshima.com/

22\


EARTH Hiroshima is the brainchild of Chizuru Gorai, a local businesswoman who has set out to create a support framework for local freelancers and independent designers. The brand matches local creatives with local manufacturing enterprises, giving access to both skilled craftsmen and cutting edge technologies that would normally be out of reach for most independent designers. More fundamentally, the motivation behind EARTH Hiroshima is a hope Ms. Gorai first felt nearly twenty years ago, after attending the August 6th commemorations in Peace Memorial Park. Leaving the park, she found the city engaged in business as usual. The juxtaposition was jarring, but instructive. In a place where nothing was expected to grow for a full seventy years after the bombing, life has continued, even thrived. Hiroshima works to keep its memory of suffering alive and vital, potent enough to honor the dead and warn the world away from the brink. And yet the joys of daily life are as present here as anywhere else. It’s a balancing act that Ms. Gorai understands well, and believes that every resident of the city performs.

Speaking directly to this experience, EARTH Hiroshima seeks to imbue small, everyday pleasures like choosing jewelry or writing a thank you note with a quiet wish for peace. The image of Earth was chosen to emphasize the idea of a single planet, beyond artificial boundaries and divisions.

tinkering with the company’s 3D printers and a few misses at color coating the complex shape, company craftsmen succeeded in creating an orizuru crane in Soul Red, a color used both in locally made Mazda cars and for the helmets of the beloved Hiroshima Carp.

One of the most eye-catching of EARTH Hiroshima’s initial offerings is a small, sculptural representation of the famous orizuru paper crane that is so strongly associated with Hiroshima’s role as a witness to the costs of war. The object is a perfect example of how EARTH Hiroshima works to bring local designers and manufacturers together.

A full palette of colors followed, and the little cranes were turned into earrings, bookmarks, necklaces and even ear scoops. The designer might never have managed it on her own, and for the craftsmen at Baba Plastics the challenge was a welcome departure from their routine work.

The initial design was created by Tomoko Kanagu, an award-winning art director and designer. Though normally working in two dimensions, she took up paper clay in an effort to create a 3D original that would uniquely express the orizuru shape.

With this modest, open-ended beginning, and with its heart in exactly the right place, it will be interesting to see what else EARTH Hiroshima comes up with over time. You can currently find EARTH Hiroshima products in Orizuru Tower, the Peace Memorial Park tourist information office, Tokyu Hands and at Hiroshima Station.

The prototype was then passed on to Kunihiro Baba, president of Baba Plastics, a local company producing automobile components. After some

https://earth-hiroshima.com/

1

4

7

2

5

8

3

6

BABA PLASTIC Co., Ltd. × Tomoko Kanagu 1. Earrings ¥1800 / 2. Key ring ¥ 600 / 3. Bookma rk ¥1300 / 4. Recycled Orizuru Postcard s PENGUIN GRAPHICS ¥320/ 5. Cenotap h Craft Card Tsushima Design Office ¥900 / 6. Kumano Fude Brushes Koyudo Co.,Ltd. × Tomoko Kanagu ¥4200 / 7. Orizuru Beads Postcard TOHO Co., Ltd. × Tomoko Kanagu ¥500 / 8. Kendam a Iwata Mokko Inc. ¥12,000 GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017 /23


A

Mitaki Temple

B

C

City map

OSHIBAKOEN

OSHIBA

MISASAKITAMACHI

MITAKIHONMACHI

1

OSHIBA PARK “Koutsuu Traffic Land”

JR MITAKI STATION

Mit

ak

iba

sh

i

Ota gaw a-h (dr osu ain age iro can al)

MITAKIMACHI

MISASAMACHI

a-

oh

as

hi

Kabe

KUSUNOKICHO

Gion S

Kit

Highw ay

ine

eL

hind

b Ka

o

RYUO PARK

Ry

uo

UCHIKOSHICHO

ba

sh

Hakushima

i

RYUOCHO

JR YOKOGAWA STATION

3

in Line

Sanyo Ma

Yokogawa-eki

inkansen

Sanyo Sh

2

HAKUSHIMA KITAMACHI

YOKAGAWACHO

Shin-Hakushima San yo

YOKAGAWASHINMACHI

YAMATECHO

Ma

in L

M

isa

sa

ba

ine

Sa

sh

ny

i

NISHI HAKUSHIMACHO

Yokogawa-1chome

oS

h

Sh Yokogin aw bashi a

aw nm

TERAMACHI HIROSE KITAMACHI

e4

Jonan-

dori

CHUO PARK

Hirose Primary School

Tera-machi SORAZAYA PARK

HIROSEMACHI

FUKUSHIMACHO

Outdoor Family Pool Open July-August

KAMITENMACHO

C

ashi

Tera m

MIYAKOMACHI

TOKAICHIMACHI

dori

ori Hiros eb

Legal Administration Office Cinematographic and Audio-visual Library

achi-

NISHITOKAICHIMACHI

Aioi-d

Aioib

ashi

Hiroshima Naka Post Office

HONKAWACHO

SAKAIMACHI

KANNONMACHI Nishi-Kannon-machi

Dobashi

aw tag

yasu Moto shi ba

HONKAWA PARK

KOAMICHO

PEACE PARK Motoy asugaw

a agaw

Tsuchiya Hospital

Rou

te 2

(Ko

kud

A on

i-se

neh

i

Funairi-machi

o)

Kan Shin non bas

h

Bunka Koryu Kaikan

Na Kan kajima zakib ash i

FUNAIRI NAKAMACHI

n-g

Heiw

B

Aster Plaza Kozaki Primary School

KAKOMACHI

ashi H

OTEMACHI PARK 2

o

Mitsu

u-do Labi ri E

arca

de)

HORIKA

Bu

PARCO

Hiroshima Information Plaza

Heiw

a-o-

H

SEIBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

OTEMACHI

sha-d

Former ALICE SHINTEN Bank of FUKUROMACHI GARDEN H Japan Don Fukuromachi FUKUROMACHI Fukuro-machi SHINTENCHI Quijotte Primary PARK PARK School H H H NAKAMACHI Shirakami Shrine Crystal Plaza H MIKAWACHO NAGAREKAW H

a-oh

NAKAJIMACHO

ash

Ebis red

iki-d

KAWARAMACHI Mifu

H

Den

Fukuya

ori

FUNAIRIMACHI

TATEMACHI

Nam

Tenm

4

Kannon Primary School

H

HONDORI

a

Midor ohas i hi

OTEMACHI PARK 1 H

Tokyu Hands Tate-machi Aioidori /

KAMIYACHO

Mitsubishi Tokyo Hondo ri (c UFJ Bank 4F ove

Rijo-d

i or Ku

ko

-d

o-dori

HATCHOBORI

Hiroshima Bank Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

Hondori

Heiwa-

NISHIKANNONMACHI

24\

OTEMACHI

Ho nk bas awa hi

DOBASHICHO

Kamiya-cho Higashi

Kamiya-cho Nishi Mizuho Bank Rijo Kaikan Sun Mall

ori

Hirode Tenm n a bashi

Ho n

Koami-cho

Prefectural Office (Kencho)

SOGO

(Ky u-o

Tenm bash a i

TENMACHO

Honkawa Primary School

NEKOYACHO

Jogakuin

KYUGUCHIMON PARK Chuo Police Station Chokaku YMCA Templ Prefectural Office East Office Momiji Bank

Kencho-mae

Bus Center (3F)

Genbaku Dome-mae

a)

Honkawa-cho

wa

Tenma-cho Fukushima-cho

ri

Hiroshima Municipal Hospital

H

FORMER BASEBALL STADIUM SITE

ENOMACHI PARK

n-do

HANOVER PARK

ka

Kannon-machi

H

Jona

Tennis courts

HONKAWACHO

Tokaichi-machi

ENOMACHI

HIGASHIKANNONMACHI

Immigra Offic

wa

3

KAMIHATCHOBO Gokoku-jinja Shrine

Sorazayabashi

-dori

ahir

o-d

ori

Nakahir o ohashi

Nak

OGAWACHIMACHI

Hiroshima Castle

Motomachi Primary School

HIROSEKITA PARK

Chuden-mae H

C KOMACHI

H Hiroshima Chuo Post Office

dori

/ Pe

ace

H

Blvd

/ Hy

aku

reka

out

Hakushima Primary School

Chuo

yR

Jizo-d ori

wa

ri

do

ess

HA

-do

Shin

xpr

Gion

aE

MOTOMACHI

Te

im

Betsuin-mae

ag

NAKAHIROMACHI

osh

oku

Motomachi Senior High School

a

hi

as

eb

Hir

Joh

Johoku

Naga

at

m

Ya Nakahiro Junior High School

Enryuji Temple (Tokasan)

TA H

mete

r-do

ro

FUJIMICHO Kokutaiji

-d

ae


D

E

F

MT. USHITA

1

MT. MITATE

Ushita

2

SHIN USHITA PARK

HIGASHI-KU SPORTS CENTER (BIG WAVE)

Kohei bash

i

USHITA PARK

Supermarket

Hiroden Streetcar

Post Office

Astram Line Monorail

Tourist Info

Covered arcade

Â¥100 Bicycle Parking

Foreign Currency Exchange

Public Bath

International ATM

Airport Bus

Play area

Meipuru~pu bus

Futaba-no-sato walk

Hiroshima Jogakuin University

USHITAASAHI Ushita Primary School

USHITAWASEDA

1

USHITAHONMACHI

Hotel

H USHITANAKA

ta hi hi Us bas o

2

ab

as

hi

HAKUSHIMA NAKAMACHI PARK

Ka

nd

HAKUSHIMA NAKAMACHI

Kyo bas

HAKUSHIMA Ikari Shrine KUKENCHO

USHITHIGASHI

higa

hin

kan

wa

sen

USHITAMINAMI

Peace Pagoda

Kinko Inari Shrine

HIGASHI AKUSHIMACHO

Hakushima

3

To

kiw

Teishin Hospital

Onaga Tenmangu Shrine

MT. FUTABAYAMA

Nigitsu Shrine

MT. ONAGA

YAGAMACHI

Toshogu Shrine

ab

as

hi

Kokuzenji Temple

HIKARIGAOKA

Shokoji Temple

FUTABANOSATO Detention Center

ORI

YAMANECHO

Tetsudo Hospital

ation ce

HIKARIMACHI H

Fu

SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

ta

ba

KAMIOSUGACHO

-d

Futaba Junior High School

or

i

Jogakuin Junior High School

n-mae

Jogakuin High School

KAMINOBORICHO

ri

OSUGACHO

i

Hatchobori

HASHIMOTOCHO PARK H

KANAYAMACHO

ri

i ash

b

jin

Inari-machi

Inarioha

shi

Matoba-cho

H

H Yanagibashi

eb

HIGASHIKOJINMACHI

H

ori

ish

-dori

D

HIGASHIHIRATSUKACHO HIRATSUKA PARK

ri

Sa

ny

oM

ain

e

MAZDA ZOOM ZOOM STADIUM

i

Ozu

COSTCO

4

-do

ri

shi

ri do

aba

am ajiy Hi

nsen

Lin

DANBARA

E

F GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

HIJIYAMA PARK Hijiyamashita

ri

Geibi Line

Danbara-1chome

higawa

H

Kyobas

ANAKAMACHI

do

Shinka

sh

a ob

nbori Yage

hi hi as bas Hig ima h os

o-

NISHIKANIYA

Hiroshima Mall

Ta

MATSUGAWA PARK

on

ONAGAHIGASHI

NISHIKOJINMACHI

MATOBACHO

Hir

NISHIHIRATSUKACHO

H

Sanyo

ori

o-d

bon

MINAMIKANIYA YAYOICHO

WACHO

Ak

HIGASHIKANIYACHO

H

INARIMACHI

YAGENBORI

ONAGANISHI

ATAGOMACHI

A

Ake

Ko

ae-d

-dori

KOJINMACHI

H

B

dan

H

wa

AWACHO

H

H

ENKOBASHICHO

a kog

Momiji Bank

H

Enkobashi-cho

hi

bas Enko

Kyobashi

H H Kanayama-cho Hiroshima Bank

MATSUBARACHO

En

EBISUCHO

Hiroshima Bank

Ekim

Ebisu-cho

ukoshi

Hiroshima Station

Fukuya

KYOBASHICHO

HASHIMOTOCHO

WAKAKUSACHO

H

H

NOBORICHO PARK

a-do

or

H

Kam iy bas anagi hi

Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

NOBORICHO

utsu

H

-d

Ek o- ima ha e sh i

Noboricho Primary School

TEPPOCHO

NCHI

ku

H

H

ori

ho

H

H

JR HIROSHIMA STATION

Jo

H

3

SHINKANSEN

H

TOBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

KAMI NOBORICHO PARK

Haku shim a-do

uji le

hi

ebas

Saka

Heiw

H

H

Noboricho Junior High School

Onaga Primary School

Hiroshima Bank

Shukkeien-mae

do

ONAGAMACHI

Katei Saibansho-mae

DANBARAHINODE

/25


4

ta

Shukkeien-mae

station area Jogakuin Junior High School

H

Jogakuin High School

Jogakuin-mae

eb

KAMINOBORICHO

ri

Noboricho Primary School

TEPPOCHO

ashi

Saka

-d

Hiroshima Bank

or

i

SHINKANSEN

H

OSUGACHO ho

ku

-d

or

i

H

WAKAKUSACHO

H

H

H

3 Hotel Flex

H

ATAGOMAC

Hiroshima Station

Fukuya

Kam iy bas anagi hi

Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

H

Sheraton Hotel

JR HIROSHIMA STATION

Jo

H

TOBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

H

H

ba H

Noboricho Junior High School

KAMI NOBORICHO PARK

hima -do Haku s

Fu

17

Hiroshima Bank

HIGA

MATSUBARACHO

Ek o- ima ha e sh i

A

KAMIOSUGACHO

SHUKKEIEN GARDEN

12

Hana Hostel ENKOBASHICHO 2

NOBORICHO

H

NOBORICHO PARK Hatchobori

HASHIMOTOCHO PARK

Ebisu-cho

H

H

Inari-machi

Inarioh

ashi

i i-dor

PARCO SHINKAN

Takeya Primary School

Ts

OKONOMI MURA

MACHI

uru

mi

ba

ae-d

ri do aam Hi

Butsudan-dori

DAN

Hijiyamashita Molly Mallone’s

10

Merchant of Venice Sky Walk

sh

Escalator 9

8 i Washington Hotel

DON 1 QUIJOTTE

Hij

Koba 7

13 Raku Beer

Lotus

iya 8 ma ba

Namiki-dori

H

Chuo-dori

Tropical Bar Revolución 14

FUKUROMACHI PARK

shi

Bourbon 3 Square

Vegan Cafe Hijiyamabashi H

New King 11

4 Centre Point Danbara Shopping Center

Micks 12

DANBARAYAMAS

Borrachos DANBARAMINAMI 4

MAU 11

Choi Choi Ya 5

18

H

BILLY THE KID

Aitsuki 1

namiki / nagarekawa area Enryuji Temple (Tokasan)

H

1

2

H

-d o H

ae

H

ri

H

26\

im

H

19 Yōin 21 5 Hallelujah

Bar Edge Bon Voyage

Ek

B

MINA

HIJIYAMA PARK

Yagenbori-dori

ALICE GARDEN

Fuji Grand Shopping Center

H

DANBARA

a

TSURUMICHO

5 Yamatoya

H

KIRIN BEER

PARCO HONKAN

Danbara-1chome

shigaw

Hondori

Ebisu Shrine

Ebisu-dori

SHINTENCHI PARK

Yage

H

HIGASHIHIRATSUKACHO 3 Cinetwin Hondori

HIROSHIMA BANK

jiy

nbor

Kinzagai-dori

H

Ebisu-dori

HIRATSUKA PARK Kinzagai-dori

i

MATSUGAWA PARK

Kyoba

TANAKAMACHI

or

Ekim

ori

wa-d

reka

Naga

i i sh sh ga ba Hi ima sh iro

Kanayama-cho

MOMIJI BANK

MITSUKOSHI LABI

NISHIHIRATSUKACHO

-d

T

hi

as

ob

h ais

5 Hatchoza FUKUYA

YAYOICHO

H

MATOBACHO

Ebisu-cho

NISHIKANIYA

Hiroshima Mall

a

/ Densha-dori HAioi-dori Yanagibas hi

YAGENBORI Tate-machi

KAWACHO

ae

16

INARIMACHI KANAYAMACHO

CHI

Matoba-cho

H

H

TENCHI

NISHIKOJINMACHI

aw

RIKAWACHO

HIGASHIKOJINMACHI

H

kog

Hiroshima Bank

Momiji Bank

hi

En

EBISUCHO

b Ake 6

bas

jin

Ko

H H Kanayama-cho

Mitsukoshi abi

H

ri

-do

ono

KOJINMACHI

Kyobashi

Nagarekawa-dori

ri

b

Enko

H

16

ori

a-do

KYOBASHICHO

HASHIMOTOCHO

Enkobashi-cho

ashi


1

B Cinematographic and Audio-visual Library

H

Bus Center (3F)

SOGO

10 Tennis courts

NAKAMACHI

C

Legal Administration Office

ri

YMCA

n-do

Jona

Prefectural Office East Office

H

Enryuji Temple (Tokasan)

oro

er-d

met

H

H

Jogakuin-mae

Chokakuji Temple

15

H

Jogakuin High School

Shukkeien-mae

Jogakuin Junior High School

H

H

Noboricho Junior High School

KAMI NOBORICHO PARK

KAMINOBORICHO

H

KANAYAMACHO

YAYOICHO

hi

ebas

D

Saka

H

TOBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

3

H

do ri

OSUGACHO

Jo ho ku -

H

1

H

2

Hijiyamashita

7

3

JR

Fukuya

Hirosh Ban

H

H

Mato

MATOBACH

MATSUGAWA PARK

Inari-machi

KYOBASHICHO

Kam iy bas anagi hi

H

Kyobashi

shi

Inarioha

INARIMACHI

i i sh sh ga ba Hi ima sh ro

H Yanagibashi

Hi

i

sh

iba

shigaw

a

D

Hijiyamabashi

rum

Kyoba

HIRATSUKA PARK

shi

Ts u

HIGASHIHIRATSUKACHO

NISHIHIRATSUKACHO

H

Hiroshima Bank

H H Kanayama-cho

HASHIMOTOCHO PARK

HASHIMOTOCHO

Noboricho Primary School Memorial Cathedral for World Peace

NOBORICHO

TEPPOCHO

H

Takeya Primary School

TSURUMICHO

TANAKAMACHI

i or -d ae

H

MIKAWACHO NAGAREKAWACHO

aku

d/ Hy

FUJIMICHO

im Ek

Fuji Grand Shopping Center

Momiji Bank

NOBORICHO PARK

Ebisu-cho

Hatchobori

Mitsukoshi Labi

dori

sha-

Den

HATCHOBORI

E

EBISUCHO HORIKAWACHO

-dor i

bisu

Fukuya

i-do ri /

Tokyu 15 Hands Tate-machi Aio

de)

arca

Momiji Bank

KYUGUCHIMON PARK Chuo Police Station

red

TATEMACHI

H

Hiroshima Municipal Hospital

Kencho-mae Prefectural Office (Kencho)

Kamiya-cho Higashi Hiroshima Bank

1 4

2 2

i (co ve

HONDORI

9 KAMIYACHO

Sumitomo Mitsui Bank

Crystal Plaza

i

2 HANOVER PARK

FORMER BASEBALL STADIUM SITE

Sun Mall

Hondori

19 3

H

Mitsubishi Tokyo Hondo r UFJ Bank 4F 3

Mizuho Bank

Kamiya-cho Nishi Rijo Kaikan14

7

OTEMACHI 2

H

H

9

H

dori

a-o-

Heiw

/ Pe a

8

ce B lv

H

Buts PARCO Hiroshima uda n-do Information ri Former ALICE SHINTENCHI Plaza 6 3 Bank of FUKUROMACHI GARDEN H Japan Don Fukuromachi FUKUROMACHI Fukuro-machi YAGENBORI Quijotte SHINTENCHI Primary PARK PARK School H Shirakami Shrine

H

Chuden-mae

KOMACHI

ash

Outdoor Family Pool Open July-August

Aioib ashi

13

Genbaku Dome-mae Hiroshima Naka Post Office

1

u oyas Mot shi ba

6

OTEMACHI PARK 1

10

H

wab

PARK

Tsuruya Guesthouse 7

TOKAICHIMACHI

HONKAWACHO

Honkawa-cho

8

PEACE PARK

11

a-oh ashi

Heiw

H

H

Kokutaiji High School

Hei

HIROSEMACHI

A

Tokaichi-machi

12 17

Honkawa Primary School

HONKAWA PARK

Ho nk bas awa hi

13

Tsuchiya Hospital

6 Simple Stay

OTEMACHI

SEIBUKAGAN RYOKUCHI PARK

OTEMACHI PARK 2

Hiroshima Chuo Post Office Naka Ward Office

Kokutaiji Junior High School

TAKARAMACHI

Hij iya

ma ba

Ek

NISHITOKAICHIMACHI

1

5

DOBASHICHO

HONKAWACHO

NEKOYACHO

1 Mange Tak

J-Hoppers

14

NAKAJIMACHO

4 Ikawa Ryokan

Bunka Koryu Kaikan

Aster Plaza

KAKOMACHI

Shiyakusho mae

KOKUTAIJI PARK

A

ri

/27

i

sh

ENOMACHI

ENOMACHI PARK

SAKAIMACHI Koami-cho Dobashi

KOAMICHO

2 KAWARAMACHI

Na Kan kajima zakib ash i

Funairi-machi

Kozaki Primary School Nakajima Primary School

Otemachi Commercial High School

Hiroshima City Hall

TAKEYACHO

C

ori

ae-d

a-do shim Haku ori

i

Shin-sum iyoshi bashi

HIGASHI SENDA PARK

Naga

o- ima GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017 ha e

ri

Chuo

wa-d

reka

B

do

a-

am

nbor

Yage

ori

iki-d Nam

a) Ta Shopkanobas hi ping Stre et

B

dori

jiy

i

i-dor

KAMISHINONOMECHO

SAKI

Ekim

dori

aw

i-dor mach Tera

shiba shi

hi ibas Meij

Takanobashi

20

Jizo-

Sky Walk Escalator

HIJIYAMA

Hi

-dori

NBARAHINODE

ri

UNAIRIMACHI

3 Sum iyo

A

-do Ozu

AMIKANIYA

awa

Geibi Line

Rijo-

COSTCO

MAZDA ZOOM ZOOM STADIUM

yasug

e

Ky a( aw

nk Ho

tag

nsen

ONAGAHIGASHI ONAGANISHI

u-o

Shinka

Sanyo

ri do o-

ASHIKANIYACHO

on eb Ak

CHI

Onaga Primary School

Moto

Lin ain

oM ny Sa

city center

C

onmachi

Junior High School


List of places CULTURE

RESTAUR ANT & CAFES

PL ACES FE ATURED IN THIS ISSUE

1

A-Bomb Dome - Map C [B-1]

1

Aitsuki - Map B

1

Irakuan - Map p.25 [D-2]

2

Children’s museum - Map C [B-2]

2

Artcafe ELK - Map C [B-1]

2

Misery Record Shop - Map C [C-2]

3

Former Bank of Japan - Map C [B-2]

3

Ayur - Map p. 25 [D-3]

3

Yokogawa Cinema - Map p.24 [B-2]

4

Gallery G - Map A

4

Borrachos - Map B

5

Hatchoza Cinema - Map B

5

Choi Choi Ya - Map B

6

Hiroshima City International House - Map A

6

Graffity Mexican Diner - Map C [C-2]

7

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art Map C [D-3]

7

Kanak - Map C [B-2]

8

Hiroshima City Tourist Information - Map C [B-2]

8

Kiseki - Map C [C-3]

9

Hiroshima International Center - Map C [B-2]

9

Kissa Saeki - Map C [B-1]

10

Hiroshima Museum of Art - Map C [B-1]

10

La Vague - Map C [B-2]

11

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum - Map C [B-2]

11

Mau - Map B

12

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum - Map A

12

Micks - Map B

13

International Exchange Lounge - Map C [A-2]

13

Nagataya Okonomiyaki - Map C [B-1]

14

Rijo Kaikan Kenmin Bunka Center - Map C [B-1]

14

Otis! - Map C [A-2]

15

Salon Cinema 1/2 - Map C [C-1]

15

Rojiura Teppan Kotaro - Map C [C-3]

16

Shimizu Gekijo - Map A

16

Sarii-chan Okonomiyaki - Map A

17

Shukkeien Garden - Map A

17

Tokaichi Apartment - Map C [A-1]

18

Vegan Cafe - Map B

19

Wabaru Tobira - Map C [B-2]

20

Warung Matahari - Map C [B-3]

21

Yōin - Map B

ACCOMMODATION 1

Guesthouse Hiroshima Mange Tak - Map C [1-A]

2

Hana Hostel - Map A

3

Hotel Flex - Map A

4

Ikawa Ryokan - Map C [A-2]

5

J-Hoppers Hiroshima - Map C [A-2]

1

Don Quijotte - Map B

6

Simple Stay - Map C [A-2]

2

Hiroshima Mono Koto Store - Map C [C-2]

7

Tsuruya Guesthouse - Map C [A-1]

3

Tayama Bungu - Map C [B-2]

8

Washington Hotel - Map B

4

Outsider Book Nook / Global Lounge - Map C [C-1]

5

Yamatoya - Map B

NIGHTLIFE

SHOPPING

map p. 24 & 25

a

c

b map p. 26

map p. 27

EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS

HE ALTH & BE AUT Y • Police 110 / • Fire and Ambulance 119

1

Bar Edge - Map B

2

Bon Voyage - Map B

1

Green Arena Gym & Pool - Map C [B-1]

• Japan Helpline 0570-000-911

3

Bourbon Square - Map B

2

Higashi-ku Sports Center (Big Wave) - Map p.24 [D-1]

24 hour non-profit, nation emergency assistance service in English.

4

Centre Point - Map B

3

Hiroshima Stretch - Map C [B-2]

Anytime, from anywhere, about anything.

5

Hallelujah Kitchen & Bar - Map B

6

Kemby’s - Map C [B-2]

7

Koba - Map B

8

Lotus - Map B

9

Merchant of Venice - Map B

• 24h Emergency pediatric hospital (Funairi Byoin) 082-232-6195

INTERNE T

• Multilingual Interpreting Service (Trio-phone) 082-247-9715

1

Global Lounge - Map C [C-1]

09:00-19:00 (April-September) / 09:00-18:00 (October-March)

10 Molly Malone’s - Map B

• TELL English counseling service 03-5774-0992 (09:00-23:00)

11 New King - Map B

• Resident Consultation & Interpreting Service

12 Organ-za - Map C [A-1]

(Monday to Friday / 9:00 a.m. ~ 4:00 p.m.)

13 Raku Beer - Map B

082-241-5010

14 Tropical Bar Revolución - Map B

• Immigration Information Center 0570-013-904 • Human Rights Counseling Center for Foreign Citizens 082-228-5792

28\


MAU High quality Washoku cuisine in stylish Japanese surroundings. Omakase courses: ¥4500, ¥6500, ¥8500 A la carte ¥1800 seating charge includes three beautifully presented appetizers and a wonderful sashimi selection. 1F Nakashinchi Bldg, 4-3 Nagarekawa-cho, Naka-ku 082-240-9030 / 18:00-02:00 (L.O. 01:30), closed on Sun. Map B p.26 11

HALLELUJAH KI TC HE N

&

B AR

www.facebook.com/hallelujah.kitchen.bar

Have a drink and some light food while enjoying the reggae, ska and rocksteady soundtrack or enjoy a full dinner. Western and Japanese food (fish, meat, salads, pasta etc is available). The staff don’t speak a lot of English, but are very friendly and welcoming and there’s a good chance you’ll find yourself laughing with them until well into the early hours. 18:00-05:00 Closed on Monday | Tel: 082-247-0199 Nakagawa bldg II 1F, 8-11, Nagarekawa-cho, Naka-ku, Map B p. 26 5

Guesthouse Hiroshima Mange Tak

Hana Hostel

Scandinavian and Japanese design meet at Mange Tak. Mixed & female only dorms (from ¥3800). Laundry & kitchen facilities. Stylish cafe-bar & roof terrace. 082-533-7655 map C p.27 [1-A] 1

Clean and friendly. 3min from Hiroshima Sta. Common lounge and kitchen. Dorm beds from ¥2500, Private twin rooms from ¥3200/person. No curfew, Free LAN/WiFi, Rental cycles 082-263-2980 http://hanahostel.com/ map A p.26 2

Hotel Flex

Ikawa Ryokan

Stylish riverside hotel, rates include breakfast Singles ¥6825, Doubles from ¥11,555 The upper floor suites are really cool. 082-223-1000 www.hotel-flex.co.jp/english/ map A p.26 3

Cozy, home-like atmosphere. Japanese and Western rooms. Coin laundry. S from ¥5940 / Twin ¥9720 / Tr ¥14,580 Quad ¥17,280 / Breakfast ¥756 www.ikawaryokan.net info@ikawaryokan.net 082-231-5058 map C p.27 [A-2] 4

J-Hoppers Hiroshima

Simple Stay Peace Park

Friendly base in an interesting neighborhood near Peace Park. No curfew, Kitchen, Rental cycles Dorm beds from ¥2500, Private rooms from ¥3000/person http://hiroshima.j-hoppers.com/ map C p.27 [A-2] 5 082-233-1360

5-min walk from Peace Park, Hiroshima’s biggest hostel has mixed/single sex bunks, single sex dorms & Japanese rooms. No smoking, communal kitchen, coin

Tsuruya Guetshouse

Washington Hotel

More than a guesthouse, Tsuruya has a lovely cafe bar looking out to the Ota-gawa riverside near Peace Park. Great place to trade travel tales and meet locals of all nationalities. Full bar, good coffee & light food. Dorm beds ¥3000. 08:00-24:00 / 082-942-5500 map C p.27 [A-1] 7

Hospitality, amenity and security right in the heart of Hiroshima. All rooms equipped with great bathrooms and separate lavatory. WiFi in all rooms. http://washington-hotels.jp/hiroshima/ 082-553-2222 map B p.26 8

laundry and a lounge equipped with a massive manga collection and table tennis table. ¥3000~. Cash only.

082-258-1881 map C p.27 [A-2] 6 www.simplestay.biz


Aitsuki あい月

Artcafe ELK

Modern izakaya with traditional Japanese touches run by husband and wife team. Horigotatsu seating so you can sit Japanese style in comfort. Save room to round off your meal with Niigata style hegi-soba. 18:00-24:00 (L.O 23:30) Closed Tuesday, 082-231-9865 map B p.26 1F 1

2nd floor cafe near Peace Park. Good sandwich lunches, drinks, vegetarian menu. Ask about vegan and gluten free dishes and their vegan desserts. International exchange spot. 10:30-22:00 (L.O. 21:30) 082-247-4443 map C p.27 [B-1] 2F 2

Ayur English-speaking Katsu’s modern washoku bistro won the GH best Japanese restaurant award for its warm welcome and imaginative combinations of local ingredients. ¥4000 omakase chef selections or a la carte. Reservations recommended. 18:00-23:00 Closed Sunday map 25 [D-3] 2F 3

Cafe Lente Escape the Miyajima crowds at this beautifully designed cafe. Wooden terrace. Great view of the floating torii gate, especially after dark. From 11:00 Tel: 082-944-1204 Located along the water inlet between Kiyomori Shrine & Miyajima Aquarium.

Borrachos Mexican food (with a touch of Okinawa) in the drinking district, sunset till dawn. Traditional Mexican tacos and Tex Mex Dishes with quality meats and seafood. Great decor and amazing tequila selection. Good for groups. No smoking until 9pm on the 2nd floor. Show this mag to waive the ¥300 per person table charge! Monday to Saturday 18:00-05-00, Sunday 18:00-02:00 082-241-3911 map B p.26 1F 4

Choi Choi Ya

Graffity Mexican Diner

Shiho serves Hiroshima tsukemen, yaki-ramen (fish stock base), side dishes and drinks in a relaxed atmosphere. Eat, drink or both at the counter or a street-side table. Can get quite lively late at night. 20:30-03:00 Closed Sundays & hols that fall on a weekday map B p.26 1F 5

A spacious family-run diner serving homemade Mexican and US style foods. Great fresh salsa, highly rated margaritas and a good selection of tequila. 11:30-14:00 (L.O. 13:20), 18:00-24:00 (L.O. 23:00) 082-243-3669 map C p.27 [C-2] 4F 6

Kanak

Kakure Daidokoro Kiseki

Delicious, additive-free Indian food, right next to Peace Park. Excellent lunch sets. Set meals and many a la carte dishes in the evening. Excellent understanding of vegetarian, vegan & halal needs. 11:00-15:00 (L.O. 14:30) 17:00-22:30 (L.O. 22:00) 082-236-7308 map C p.27 [B-2] 1F 7

This "hidden kitchen" is a cozy little izakaya, just off Jizo-dori single handedly run by an amiable Carp fan. The popular ¥650 Japanese teishoku set lunches are great value. A la carte & drinks at night. 11:30-14:00, 17:00-22:30, Closed Sun 082-249-3299 map C p.27 [C-3] 1F 8

Kissa Saeki organic cafe & kitchen

La Vague

A delightful family-run retro style kissaten coffee shop serving breakfast until 11:00, great lucnhes (including many vegan options) throughout the day and raw desserts. 100% local, organic veggies. 7:30-20:00 (L.O. 19:00) Closed Sun & Nat Hols 082-246-9339 map C p.27 [B-1] 1F 9

European course lunches (¥1500 or ¥2300) & a la carte dinners in this basement restaurant near Peace Park. Subdued rustic chic interior. Wide selection of wines by the in-house sommelier. 11:30-15:00, 17:00-24:00 082-247-0989 map C p.27 [B-2] B1F 10

Micks

Nagataya

Lively and friendly izakaya. Casual atmosphere with good food, Japanese & western. Great selection of local sake. Sun-Thur 18:00-3:00, Fri, Sat, days before Hols 18:00-5:00 082-249-6231 map B p.26 1F 12

Great okonomiyaki and plenty of space to sit, a stone’s throw away from Peace Park. Excellent understanding of vegetarian needs. Mon-Fri 11:00-20:30 (L.O.) Sat 11:00-21:00 (L.O.) Sun, hols 10:30-20:30 (L.O) (Closed Tue & 4th Wed) 082-247-0787 map C p.27 [B-1] 1F 13

Otis!

Rojiura Teppan Kotaro

Tex Mex and home-cooked food for meat eaters & vegetarians. Their vegetarian menu is one of the best in the city & includes vegan and gluten free dishes. Kids very welcome. Eclectic BGM & live music. 11:30-22:30 (L.O.) 082-249-3885 map C p.27 [A-2] 1F 14

Young grill master Kotaro serves delicious seasonal dishes & drinks just off Peace Blvd.

17:00-02:00 (L.O. 01:30) Closed Tuesdays 082-249-1953 map C p.27 [C-3] 2F 15


Sarii-chan Okonomiyaki Affable, soccer-loving okonomiyaki-ist serving Hiroshima’s favorite dish and drinks near Hiroshima Station. 11:30-14:00, 17:00-23:00 Closed Saturdays 082-236-7303 map A p.26 2F 16

Tokaichi Apartment Quirky, smoke free cafe in Tokaichi with some very interesting seating options. ¥850 set lunches served until 16:30. 11:30-23:00 (lunch L.O. 16:30) Closed Tuesdays 082-231-9865 map C p.27 [A-1] 1F 17

Vegan Cafe

Wabaru Tobira

100% vegan food made with fresh local vegetables and all natural seasonings. Our multi-dish set meals are heavily influenced by traditional Buddhist temple cuisine. 12:00-17:00 Sat-Sun, 12:00-16:00 Tue-Fri. 082-247-8529, map B p.26 3F 18

Traditional Japanese style, great food and lively vibe at this street level izakaya. Counter, table and tatami seating. Good selection of sake, both local and from other parts of Japan. 11:30-14:00, 17:00~ 082-244-3883 map C p.27 [B-2] 1F 19

Warung Matahari

Yōin 陽陰

Excellent Indonesian cuisine prepared by Balinese chef Surasna. Vegetarian and Halal friendly. If you like it really spicy, ask Surasna to let you have it! 17:30-22:30 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-240-2082 map C p.27 [B-3] 1F 20

Easygoing and cheerful “Take” Shimosaka has created something remarkable in Yoin. Relaxed enough for drinks, but also offering meticulously prepared, modern washoku created with all-natural ingredients. 20:00-05:00 facebook.com/youin.hiroshima 082-249-7129 Map B p. 26 2F 21

Bar Edge

Bon Voyage

Long-running underground club on Nagarekawa. Small, but with a good sound-system, nice bar and DJs spinning every night (closed Monday if no event scheduled). Usually free entry on weeknights. 082-248-8146 22:00~ map B p.26 B1F 1

International bar with counter and 2 discount rooms in which to chill. Nice cocktails and some great food too.

Bourbon Square

Centre Point

Relaxed counter bar near Shintenchi Park. Great selection of bourbon, whiskies and fresh fruit cocktails. Plus some of the best tasting draft beer in the drinking district. Mon-Sat 18:00-03:00 082-242-3668, map B p.26 2F 3

Nagarekawa bar catering to a late night crowd that prides itself on its whiskey selection. DJs spinning at weekends, good source of local nightlife info.

washoku bar

Mon-Thur, Sun 18:00-02:00, Fri, Sat 18:00-04:00 082-249-2380 map B p.26 3F 2

Mon-Thur 20:00-03:00, Fri, Sat 20:00-05:00, Closed Sunday map B p.26 5F 4

Koba Rock loving BOM is one of Hiroshima’s most welcoming and entertaining bartenders. He whips up some very tasty food too.

Kemby’s www.facebook.com/kembyshiroshima High quality food in a casual atmosphere. Kemby’s has all the bases covered with tapas, pasta,Tex Mex, gourmet sausages, seafood and their famous burgers. Owner Prakash prides himself on his wine list and is happy to help you make the right choice. The full drink menu includes international beers on draft and a selection of imported craft beers. Happy hours 17:30-00:30 selected alcohol ¥200 off Monday-Thursday 11:30-00:30, Friday & Saturday 11:30-01:00, Sunday 11:30-23:00 / 082-249-6201 map C p.27 [B-2] 1F 6

18-00-01:30 (L.O), Closed Wednesdays 082-249-6556 map B p.26 3F 7

Lotus 5th floor bar with large windows on Namiki-dori St. Kick off your shoes and lounge at the low tables, take a seat at the counter or sit at a fourtop. ¥300 drinks during happy hour 6-8pm, light food and mellow BGM on a nice JBL system. 18-00-02:00, Closed Wed 082-246-0104 map B p.26 5F 8

Merchant of Venice

New King

Chilled out drinking space with subdued lighting offering some interesting Japanese themed cocktails at the bar counter or in the darts lounge. 19:00-04:00 (L.O. 03:30) Closed Mondays 082-240-1155 map B p.26 3F 9

Trendy and Pink, 2F bar run by the guys behind local hip men’s underwear boutique.

21:00-05:00 082-247-4487 map B p.26 2F 11


Organ-za Bohemian queen, Goto Izumi's avant-garde center of operations. Great decor, food, drink and bizarre stage shows. Tue-Fri 17:30-01:30 (L.O.), Sat 11:30-01:30 (L.O.) Sun 11:30-23:30 (L.O.) Closed Mondays 082-295-1553 map C p.27 [A-1] 2F 12

Raku Beer Discover the world of Japanese craft beer with 15 taps of the finest Japan has to offer! (Other drinks also available.) Full food menu with great appetizers, handmade pizzas, weekly curry specials, and more. 17:00-24:00 (L.O. 23:30), Weekends & Hols: 12:00-24:00 (L.O. 23:30), Closed Tue / 082-247-6768 map B p.26 1F

Molly Malone’s

www.facebook.com/mollymaloneshiroshima Hiroshima’s authentic Irish pub. Great beer, great food, great service. The place to watch Premier League soccer. Tues-Thurs 17:00~01:00 / Fri 17:00~02:00 / Sat 11:30~02:00 / Sun + Nat Hol 11:30~24:00 / Closed Monday / 082-244-2554 map B p.26 4F 10

Tropical Bar Revolución

Don Quijote

Nobu’s popular 8F hangout, friendly and relaxed complete with balcony.

Huge discount store open every day until 5am. Snacks, groceries, alcohol, medicines, souvenirs, cosmetics, electronics, costumes, household & sporting goods; you name it, they have it!

Mon,Wed 20:00-03:00, Tue,Thurs 18:00-03:00 Fri,Sat 18:00-04:00, Closed Sun & Nat Hol map B p.26 8F 14

10:00-05:00 082-543-6711 map B p.26 1

TAX FREE 8%

Hiroshima Mono Koto Store

Tayama Bungu

Unique, high quality products from upcoming Japanese artisans and creators at reasonable prices. Feel free to browse or order a drink from the coffee bar. http://www.monokotostore.com/ 09:30-18:00 Closed Wednesdays, Thursdays 082-545-1115 map C p.27 [C-2] 2

Tayama Bungu has been selling quality Japanese stationery on Hondori shopping arcade since 1897. From sushi erasers & quality postcards to fountain pens that will make pen aficionados drool, including some Sailor originals. 10:00-20:00 3F Hondori Hills (above the Adidas on Hondori 13 arcade) 082-248-2221 map C p.27 [B-2] 3

Outsider Book Nook/Global Lounge

Yamatoya Produced in limited quantities yet reasonably priced, a bottle of Hiroshima's top quality local Japanese sake makes for a great souvenir. www.e-yamatoya.jp/ 10:00-22:00 Closed Sundays 082-241-5660 map B p.26 5

Used English books to buy and exchange. Internet, cafe & meeting place. Bar from 19:00 Fri & Sat. Mon-Thurs 12:00-21:00 Fri & Sat 12:00-23:00, Closed Sun, hols 082-244-8145 map C p.27 [C-1] 2F 4 1

Hiroshima Stretch Relieve stiff muscles or travel stress at Hiroshima’s centrally located Stretch salon. Director Masamoto-san speaks English and has a deep understanding of how to help with muscle pain, sports injuries and posture. Mention GetHiroshima for a ¥5000 60min session map C p.27 [B-2] 3F 3 11:00-22:00 / 082-240-2077

広 告 募 集 中 ! 広告掲載に関するお問い合わせはtel.082-225-7466 (日本語OK) またはMail / info@gethiroshima.com お気軽にお問い合わせください。

は 、“ ひ ろ し ま ” の 魅 力 を 、世 界 に 発 信 し て い ま す 。

GetHiroshima Web

GetHiroshima Map

世界 100 ヵ国以上からアクセス!

広島中心部の情報をコンパクトに まとめた英語版マップ!

GetHiroshima Mag 広島の「今」をぎゅっと詰め込んだ英語版季刊誌。


ART

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

Hiroshima Museum of Art

Well-designed building in Hijiyama hilltop park. Interesting

One of the largest art museums in Western Japan with a

Works by Monet, Van Gogh, Picasso and many more great

sculptures and statues are dotted around the outside of the

large collection of Japanese nihonga painting, traditional

modern European painters in this small, but perfectly

museum that can be viewed for free. Map C p.27 [d-3] 7

Asian art crafts and 1920s and 1930s art. Map A p.26 12

formed museum near Hiroshima Castle. Map C p.27 [B-1] 10

082-264-1121 https://www.hiroshima-moca.jp/

082-221-6246 http://www.hpam.jp/

082-223-2530 http://www.hiroshima-museum.jp/

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

Vlaminck

Leonardo da Vinci and The Battle of Anghiari:

Nov 3 -Dec 24 / Adult ¥1300, High School & College ¥1000,

The 10th Hiroshima Art Prize Mona Hatoum

The Mystery of Tavola Doria

Elementary & Junior Hish School ¥600/ Includes admission

Jul 29 - Oct 15 / Adult ¥1030, College ¥720, High school &

Sep 5 - Oct 22 / Adult ¥1300, High School & College ¥900,

to the general exhibition of modern European art.

seniors ¥510, Junior high & younger free

Junior High & Elementary School ¥600

Tavola Doria (scene of the ‘Fight for the Standard’ from The Battle of Anghiari)

Le Silo 1950 France, Private Collection © ADAGR

Hiroshima Prefectural Art Museum

Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

The Bhutan Exhibition:

Fukuyama Museum of Art

A Hint to Happiness

marimekko – Design, Fabric, Lifestyle

Nov 2 - Dec 24 / Adult

Sep 16 - Nov 26 / Adult ¥1000, Grade School Students

¥1300, Hish School &

admitted free

College ¥900, Junior High & Elementary School ¥600

A mask used in a religious Bhutanese mask dance

Hiroshima Museum of Art The Mark of Maki Sasaki

Hot Spot, 2013 © Mona Hatoum, Photo: Ken Kusakari

Sep 9 - Oct 22 / Adult ¥1200, High School & College ¥900,

Terunobu Fujimori: Architecture with Nature,

to the general exhibition of modern European art.

Elementary & Junior High School ¥500, Includes admission

and “ROJO” Sep 29 - Dec 3 / Adult ¥1030, College ¥720, High school &

Takasugi-an, 2004 Photo: Akihisa Masuda

seniors ¥510, Junior high & younger free Woodone Museum of Art GLOBAL NEW ART -Essence of Taguchi Art CollectionAug 25 - Nov 12 / Adult ¥1200, High School & College ¥510, Junior High School and Elementary School admitted free

I Am a Wolf Myself, After All © Maki Sasaki 1973

Tomoko Konoike (Chapter Two "Giant") 2005 ©Tomoko Konoike

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/33


“We evaluate each grain of rice, we supervise the brewing process on a 24-hour basis without sleeping, and we never ignore our mistakes. We feel great pride in the taste we have protected for generations and that makes our sake special. Without this sake, my life would be incomplete.”


a story of pride and passion talking sake with master brewer, miho imada Fukucho is a small sake brewery located in Akitsu [安芸津], Hiroshima that opened in 1868. Hiroshima is one of Japan’s three pre-eminent sake-producing areas alongside Kyoto and Kobe, and Akitsu is the birthplace of Hiroshima sake. The small port town on the coast of the Inland Sea has produced some of Japan’s most skilled master brewers. These tōji, as they are called, conquered the difficult challenge of producing high quality sake using Hiroshima’s soft water, and the term “Hiroshima Tōji” is synonymous with “Akitsu Tōji”. In this interview, In this interview, Miho Imada, who is both Fukucho brewery's tōji and company president, shares the story of her journey to sake master.

Did you ever think you would take over your father’s sake brewery? Never! Growing up in the mundane countryside, I always dreamt of studying and working in the big city, so that’s what I did. I completed my university degree in Tokyo and became involved in the effort to revive traditional Noh theatre songs the lyrics of which remained but melodies were lost. It was all very exciting because Japan was in the midst of the “bubble economy”. However, when the bubble burst and funding for our projects dried up, I became financially troubled. That was when I started to think about the work opportunity back home at my father’s brewery. Lucky for me, none of my four other siblings were interested in pursuing a career in sake so my father was very grateful that I, the eldest child, was willing to take over Fukucho. I was 33 years old then, and thus began my relationship with sake.

sake here in Hiroshima because the water is soft. Soft water has low mineral content, which makes it susceptible to contamination because it ferments very slowly. Consequently, it requires much stricter supervision than sake brewed with hard water in areas such as Kobe. My father and other tōji taught me very patiently, but I didn’t have the natural talent that some do, so I often got frustrated with myself for not meeting my own standards. How were you able to persevere as a sake master despite the many failures? Even now after 24 years, I am not fully satisfied with my sake and that is exactly what keeps me going. People have watched me fail and told me to just quit or have someone else take over, but I could never allow that. I owe it to myself and to my family to pursue the tradition that runs in my blood. But more importantly, I keep doing what I do because I love it.

most important ingredient. If you get the kōji right, everything else usually works out, but it’s almost impossible to make good sake if you don’t. It’s a long process which is adjusted according to the quality of that particular season’s rice. For 48 hours, the team constantly monitors the batch of rice on which the mould is grown, as a whole, but also grain by grain, making tiny adjustments that will balance the flavor. This is all done using traditional wooden implements. It requires immense concentration for an extended period, with an attention to detail that seems to me to be an important characteristic of traditional Japanese shokunin work-ethic. In fact, I often think, only the Japanese would be crazy enough to put themselves through such hardship! Although it may only make a minor difference to the customer whether we assess each grain or not, it matters to us because that is the extra step we take to achieve the taste we are proud to serve. That willingness to invest additional time makes me very proud.

How was it when you first started? It was a cycle of failures upon failures. I remember how disappointed I felt when I drank our sake in Tokyo for the first time. Although the scent and taste of sake is supposed to become richer as the quality and price rises, our sake varieties all tasted the same. But it is especially challenging to brew

What is it that you love about brewing sake? With time, I have come to appreciate the process because I feel it reflects the values of what it means to be Japanese. Take, for example, the production of the kōji mould that is perhaps sake’s

Words: Hana Shiraishi Photos: Junpei Ishida and JJ Walsh

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/35


What is the most important aspect of sake brewing? Teamwork! Winter is the busiest and most vital season for brewing sake. As a team of around 7 Tōji, we must work, sleep and eat together, maintaining constant supervision of sake while executing individual tasks. Even if we produce one or two tanks of great sake, that is not good enough. It is important that we keep producing high-quality sake consistently, year on year, so we must sustain the strong team dynamic. Being a team also means pointing out each other’s weaknesses. In order to create the taste we seek, we must first understand what it is we are creating. By being very strict with each other, we are able to challenge our skills and enrich the flavor of our sake. What makes Fukucho sake special? Of course the use of soft water and local Hiroshima rice, but what really makes the difference is our ability to produce the Fukucho taste we have protected for generations. In Akitsu, the greatest compliment you can give someone’s cooking is to say it has “ko-aji”. It refers to a umami that is not bold, but subtle. I like to compare it to a sound that can only be heard when you choose to listen. The people of Akitsu is steeped in this culinary

36\

tradition and it is a sensibility that has informed the way we make sake. This is the kind of concept upon which our sake is made. It is exciting because it takes time to truly appreciate. That is something only we can do which makes our sake special. What is “sake” to you now? Well, surely without sake my life would be incomplete. The mere fact I was born in a major sake town makes me invariably bonded to Japanese sake. It’s a connection that has always existed, from even before I was born.


Is it particularly challenging to be a woman in the sake industry?

What type of foods match Fukucho sake best?

No. When I first joined 24 years ago, there were 7 people working at Fukucho including 2 women. Although the team was led by a male tōji, the women were immensely relied upon and equally as respected due to their talent and hard work. Come to think of it, Hiroshima tōji have never really had an issue with women being involved. Even when I joined, everyone here was fully supportive of me because unfortunately, less and less young people are choosing to pursue their family’s traditional work. It is true though that you may sometimes read that Fukucho has a feminine taste. But that is because Hiroshima sake is brewed with soft water, which is thought to create a certain gentleness and subtle strength that reflect some “feminine” characteristics. Contrarily, sake brewed with hard water in regions including Kyoto is characterized as more “masculine” because it tastes more firm and robust.

I would recommend the fish and oysters as well as dishes made with leafy vegetables local to the Seto Inland Sea and near Akitsu, in particular. Any foods sourced from the same soft water that is a critical ingredient in our sake is a good match. Is Fukucho sake available overseas? Yes. In recent years I have participated in various events overseas to showcase our sake. In addition to seeking popularity in America and Europe, I am hoping more and more Chinese restaurants will serve sake because their meals revolve around a rice-based umami, which makes it a natural match with Japanese sake. It will surely spread the appeal of sake to a much wider audience if we manage to raise its popularity in Chinese restaurants around the world. However, my priority is to have more young people in Japan like you enjoy sake. Our society is changing and less young people are

interested in drinking traditional sake, but I hope to change that gradually by emphasizing its historical significance as well as unique umami. What advice do you have for beginner sake-drinkers like me? I advise first timers to take three or four sips of several types of sake at once to compare flavor, distinguish the differences and find the one you prefer. I also recommend you ask about the origins and ingredients of the sake to gain insight of each type. In small restaurants, bars or “izakaya”, sake is typically served in very small cups called o-choko but I recommend you ask to have it poured in a larger glass, even a wine glass, if available. A wider glass allows you to appreciate the aromal and taste of the sake, allowing you to experience it fully. Although often compared to wine, sake is a completely different drink, so I recommend newcomers approach it without preconceptions and appreciate it for what it is on its own merits, rather than comparing it to other drinks. GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/37


kampai!

Visitors to Hiroshima might be forgiven for thinking Hiroshima’s only contribution to Japan’s culinary landscape is its much-hyped okonomiyaki. From the coastal islands to the high elevations in the mountains, however, the region produces a wide range of delicious produce. And in each place, locally brewed sake that perfectly complements the area’s produce can always be found.

Ever since tōji master brewers in Akitsu cracked the formula for producing sake using Hiroshima’s soft nansui water at the end of the 19th century (see page 34), Hiroshima has maintained its reputation as one of the country’s top sake producing regions and local breweries win many prizes. The world of sake is complex, but, with a glass of even the most highly regarded sake costing little more than a beer or a glass of wine, narrowing the field and discovering the right variety for you is one of Japan’s great culinary adventures. But where to start? We asked some local purveyors of Japan’s national tipple to recommend some of their favorite autumn sake and foods that pair well with them.

MAU

WABARU TOBIRA

AITSUKI

Washoku restaurant

Mid-range dining

Relaxed izakaya

This excellent Washoku restaurant is a wonderful place for a special dinner and has a very good selection of sake. As well as a very reasonable Dassai (Iwakuni, Yamaguchi) tasting set MAU offers a good range of local sake from around the region. Chef Hanabusa recommends this Seikyo junmai daiginjo from the Nakao brewery in Takehara, the flavor profile of which changes as it warms to room temperature, along with beautifully presented sanma Pacific saury sashimi. Map B p.26 11

Sake sommelier Nakashima-san recommends this interesting Junmai Nakate-shin-senbon from Kyokuhō, a brewery north of Hiroshima city with a history of over 150 years. It can be enjoyed chilled and at room temperature, but, this autumn, Nakashima recommends drinking it slightly warmed with their yamitsukitebakara spicy peppered chicken wings. Map C p.27 [B-2] 19

Aitsuki specializes in Niigata specialities hegi soba noodles and abura-age deep-fried tofu and always has great sake, often also from Niigata, to accompany it. Their early autumn recommendation, however, is the beautifully-named Cosmos produced by this issue’s cover star Miho Imada of Fukucho in Akitsu. Map B p.26 1

38\


WASHOKU BAR YOIN

HALLELUJAH

MICKS

Relaxed dining

Casual dining

Izakaya

Take-san always has a wide selection of sake from around the country and can recommend just the right dishes to go with them. Autumn is a great time to eat at Yoin with so much delicious produce, like these hamaguri clams with matsutake mushroom, on offer. You can’t go wrong with sanma Pacific saury (or mackerel pike), however this skillful chef prepares it. Map B p.26 21

Shuji at Hallelujah also likes to offer sake from outside Hiroshima and always has two or three carefully selected varieties in stock. For autumn, he recommends his popular oden. You know, that stuff you see next to the counter in convenience stores, except much tastier. Don’t be afraid to ask him for more seasonal recommendations, as he is always willing to oblige. Map B p.26 5

This izakaya, popular with a young Japanese crowd, offers quite a wide selection of sake from around Hiroshima and beyond. Owner Mizoguchi-san also plumped for a Fukucho brew. Hatanso Junmai is made from a heritage rice variety grown in the north of Hiroshima. He recommends pairing it with Gansu fried fishcake, a lesser known, but much loved local speciality. Map B p.26 12

YAMATOYA Sake shop Looking for a local sake as a gift or souvenir, or just to enjoy at home? Kamise-san from Yamatoya sake shop recommends three distinctive early autumn varieties.

1- Fukucho Cosmos Junmai Ginjo 富久長 秋桜 純米吟醸

2- Miwasakura Daiginjo Nakadori 美和桜 大吟醸 中取り

3- Shinrai Junmai 神雷 純米

Autumn only sake from Fukucho. Perfect with Inland Sea seafood. It’s Aitsuki’s recommendation, so why not try a glass there and then go pick up a bottle from Yamatoya? Yamatoya recommends drinking either slightly chilled or slightly warmed.

Treat yourself to this unique sake from Miyoshi only available at Yamatoya. Nakadori means only the sake taken from the second of 3 pressings that sake undergoes is taken and is prized for being well-balanced.

Brewed in the at the highest elevation of all Hiroshima’s sake, this sake is made with a mix of soft and hard water and is closer in taste to sake from further north in Japan. Pairs well with meats and root vegetable dishes.

720ml ¥1400 (excluding tax)

720ml 2381 (excluding tax)

720ml 2381 (excluding tax)

Map B p.26

5

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/39


eating the stars Words and photos: Matt Jungblut and JJ Walsh

“How would you like to eat at all of Hiroshima’s Michelin star restaurants? You’d be the Michelin Man.” Body shape issues aside, I quickly accepted GetHiroshima’s challenge. My daughter once said, someday she’d like to eat the moon. Me? I’ll eat the stars.

Chef Sasaki of Irakuan is a hero of mine. At age fifty-five, much to the surprise of his wife, he chucked in his job as a department store manager to make the best soba he could. Fourteen years later, he has an amazing restaurant and a Michelin star. Mr. Sasaki grinds buckwheat that he imports from Ibaraki in his shop weekly. He makes the noodles daily, by hand, in his small glassed in room at the back of the restaurant, cutting them with a soba-hōchō blade forged by one of the few master swordsmiths left in Japan. The blade is amazingly light and sharp, and undoubtedly expensive, as there are only about a dozen in the country. In many shops you can see the noodle maker at work, but not at Irakuan, because here, the flavor is more important than the show. Soba noodles taste better after being allowed to sit and chill, so Mr. Sasaki makes them the night before. Additionally, since he has made the noodles in advance, he is able to personally handle every step from grinding the buckwheat to plating the dish his wife then serves to you. Irakuan is quiet. Irakuan is tranquil. Irakuan is a respite from busy nonstop modern Japan. The side street restaurant is painted white and has gorgeous tables milled from huge trees, seasonal flowers, and a map of Edo (Tokyo) dating back to the 1600’s. You will also notice the no cellphones, no photographs, and no young children policies. The former department store manager is not a snobbish children-hating Luddite - he and his wife hope you’ll relax and enjoy a meal, with no distractions so that you will be able to appreciate the care that goes into each dish. If you are thinking of conducting some business over a rushed lunch of slurped noodles, Irakuan isn’t the place. And you can actually take photos, just ask first. The Sasakis do, however, prefer that you concentrate

40\

on experiencing your meal for yourself, rather than Instagraming it to your friends; tell them about it later, in person.

sauce) from your meal, creating a nice healthy broth with a thickness of your choosing; it is one of my favorite parts of any Japanese meal.

This all makes sense as soba is actually one of the very first foods designed to be a health food. During the Tokugawa reign, wealthier citizens were more susceptible to beriberi, so they ate soba to supplement the thiamine missing from their highly polished white rice diet. The menu at Irakuan is not diverse or lengthy, a few flawlessly made soba dishes, including the unique nut flavored sarashina gonomi soba, and some splendid appetizers/sides.

The drink menu consists of bottled beer or one of seven different sakes from around Japan; recommended is “Harmony” sake, which is brewed about a five minute walk away from Irakuan by Sasaki’s friend Mr. Hara. It was chosen since Hiroshima’s other fine sakes are widely available elsewhere, this one is special.

The meal comes surprisingly quickly, but there is no need to rush. The grilled duck is a fantastic starter, as is the airy light dashi maki tamago (omelette-like rolled egg). Mr. Sasaki says that guests from overseas often opt for the warm noodle dishes such as the tanuki (topped with crunchy tempura batter), kitsune (with its sweet fried tofu), or the rich nishin (green onion and herring). He hopes that they will try their more traditional cold zaru soba dishes, so that the flavor of the soba can be appreciated. My personal favorite is the kamo soba with its smoky duck, also available as a cold dish. Towards the end of the entree, the soba yu is served. The soba yu is the nutrient filled creamy hot water that your soba was cooked in, served in a lacquer pot, to be drank from the small cup provided or added to the remaining tsuyu (dipping

Dessert is the simple kumazasa sorbet, made in the shop with kumazasa bamboo from Hokkaido blended with fresh cream, water and a little sugar. The flavor is similar to matcha (green tea), but the Sasakis made it clear that there is no green tea whatsoever in the dish. They feel the bamboo has a cleaner taste, better suited to their menu. Small touches complete the experience, after my third visit, I was given a small jar of blueberry jam. I later found out that the jam is homemade from blueberries growing in the restaurant’s back garden and that they give them to customers who become regulars. Inexpensive and welcoming, Irakuan is a place at which you can easily become a regular.


Irakuan 為楽庵 2-2-22 Ushitanaka, Higashi-ku, Hiroshima 082-227-6798 (about one kilometer from Ushita and Hakushima stations) map p.25 [D-2] 1 Rating* Atmosphere Uncluttered, refined and quiet. The clichéd “zenlike atmosphere” truly applies here. No smoking. Restaurant kindly requests no children under age four. Seating at six tables for sixteen guests. Sound Very hushed. Any loud talk would be out of place. No loud noodle slurpers or noisy diners. Recommended dishes Everything is excellent, the sarashina gonomi soba is the specialty. Dinner and lunch menus are identical. A complete English menu is available. Drinks and Wine Beer, sake, or tea (which comes with your meal). Price The most expensive entree is the kamo nabe soba (roast duck soba) at ¥1400. Most other entrees average around ¥900. Even with an entree, appetizer, dessert and a drink, it would be difficult to spend more than ¥3000 per person. Cash only. Open Lunch 11:30-14:00 Dinner 18:00-20:00 Closed Tuesday and Wednesday, as well as New Year and Obon holidays. Accessibility Street level, no major obstacles or stairs. There is a small step to the restroom.

*What the Moons Mean Ratings range from one to five moons. One moon is awful or some major problem. Two moons, satisfactory, but not worth a long trip. Three moons, very good, worth making an effort to eat there. Four moons, excellent, well worth making reservations far in advance. Five moons, life changing.

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/41


goto izumi's deep 15 hiroshima es c r o f e h t Meet

vol.

be hi nd Hi ro sh im a’ s underground culture

Whenever I turn my thoughts to what sets Hiroshima’s underground scene apart from that of other cities in Japan and around the word, certain figures always come to mind. This issue, dear reader, I would like to take the opportunity to introduce to you four such instigators. It is thanks to their tireless efforts behind the scenes that our local underground culture stays alive.

42\


GUY (1965.08.02)

OWNER OF DISKSHOP MISERY BAND LEADER OF ORIGIN OF M EVENT ORGANIZER Map C p.27 [C-2] 2F

2

TORU MIZOGUCHI (1970.12.30)

MANAGER OF YOKOGAWA CINEMA Map p.24 [B-2]

3

Started his first band Gudon when he was 19 years old and began running his own label and promoting his own events soon after. In 1993 he opened his hardcore punk record store Diskshop MISERY.

First started working part-time in a cinema at 18 and then full time at Station Cinema at 22. After that theater closed in 1999, he helped open the Yokogawa ‘mini-theater’.

“I’ve been playing in hardcore punk bands for 33 years and have yet to discover a sound other than hardcore that excites me. I started my record shop as the punk “band boom” was coming to an end because I was worried the sound might disappear altogether. Despite starting at the bottom of the scene, I kept the faith that if I kept at it, things would pick up again some time. Although there is a definite greying of the hardcore scene, I’m still on the attack, using SNS to reach as wide an audience as possible. I want to maintain my place at the center of the Hiroshima scene by working hard and working right. I’m still learning new things all the time!”

“Although I was quite interested in filmmaking, I never particularly wanted to run a cinema. Frankly, not being able to do anything else, I just went with the flow, and here I am. The only thing that’s been tough has been bringing in enough money. The reason I keep at it is that I know for sure that there are films that would never get shown in Hiroshima otherwise. That’s really the only reason for my existence. I feel that we are in something of an incubation period and the Hiroshima underground is developing nicely. Well, we seem to be out of the starvation years anyway. Which means, for now at least, I can really focus on cinema.”

Izumi’s take: However many years may pass GUY will keep keeping on; the godfather of Hiroshima’s band scene.

ANNDOE (1981.01.16)

EVENT ORGANIZER JAILBIRD Y BAND MEMBER

Izumi’s take: Stubborn and not particularly friendly, it’s clear to everyone that this is a man who truly loves cinema.

OSAMU OTSUKI (1969.04.16)

MANAGER AT CAFE TEATRO ABIERTO PERFORMER Influenced by itinerant “tent theater” troupes, started performing at around the age of 20. Founded underground theater group “Funzoku” in 1996, at the age of 27. Solo performer and event promoter organizer since 2004.

Joined his first band at 18 and formed jailbird Y at 26. Currently focused on his PEXPOX project which aims to build provocative events centered around edgy bands from around Japan and overseas. “I get to support the bands I like while feeding them into our local scene by creating the kind of events I think everyone should experience. I don’t really make any money, but I approach it just like a job. Rather than money, it’s all about developing new relationships. The toughest thing about trying to get things going here in Hiroshima compared to bigger cities basically comes down to the small population. I’d really like to spread the word about what I do among younger people and to visitors from overseas.” Izumi’s take: I love the way this guy is taking up the mantle and trying to push the underground music scene forward. I’m looking forward to seeing what he has achieved 10 years from now.

“I’ve been working in Hiroshima for 28 years. When I first started there were all kinds of people involved, but now when I look around, it seems to be just me who is still going. I’m a bit of an oddball here in Hiroshima. I don’t really fit into any industry. I don’t really make much of an effort to get along with others, though I don’t go out of my way to quarrel. Hiroshima’s dancers are all gone. There was no one to run Cafe Teatro Abierto, so it fell to me. If there is anyone who’d like to take it over, I’d happily pass it on. We haven’t educated the next generation in the art, but I don’t think there is any “correct” way of doing so, except to give younger people more freedom to explore how they want to express themselves. Then again, I’m not sure young people can really get their head around my means of expression. I don’t really care about the “Hiroshima scene”. Why limit ourselves? We should set our sights on the wider world.” Izumi’s take: This is the kind of truth that only one who has put in the time and lived the life can tell.

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/43


peace wanko: a growing community of dogs and the people who love them By Katherine Steen

After moving to rural Hiroshima last fall, I found myself desperately missing the pooches I had so often passed on the sidewalks of Brooklyn. Apart from the occasional Shiba among the rice paddies, there was a depressing lack of dogs in my new neighborhood. Enter Peace Wanko.

I first heard about Peace Wanko, an organization that provides homes and seeks adoption for discarded dogs, via GetHiroshima. Peace Wanko runs adoption centers in Hiroshima, Kanagawa, Tokyo, and, most recently, Fukuyama. I had the opportunity to visit their main shelter located in Jinsekikōgen, a rural town at the northern edge of Hiroshima prefecture. It’s a gorgeous, expansive outdoor space filled with the sounds of birds and the barking of dogs, located literally on top of a mountain among bucolic campgrounds and a golf course.

Junko Onishi, the founder of Peace Wanko, is a tall woman who smiles easily and often. She has an air of calmness to her, able to continue our interview seamlessly despite the occasional bark piercing our conversation. Clearly, she is comfortable around animals. Originally from Osaka prefecture, Onishi currently lives in Jinsekikōgen with her six dogs and a tiny toy-like kitten rescued from the road in Fukuyama.

WHEN YUME BECAME REALITY Prior to starting Peace Wanko, she worked as a TV broadcaster, during which time she reported on Peace Winds Japan. The biggest NGO in Japan, Peace Winds is a broad and multifaceted humanitarian NGO that provides emergency relief, rehabilitation, and social assistance to people in need. Their activities span the world in countries including Sri Lanka, Syria, and Kenya, though they of course lead Japan-based missions as well. Onishi was inspired to switch gears and join the NGO. Peace Wanko (or “Peace Doggie,” as Onishi translated it) got its start in 2010 when Peace Winds wanted to train dogs to search for people caught in natural disasters. Originally, Onishi went to a breeder to purchase dogs for training, but she decided breeder dogs weren’t a good fit for search

44\

and rescue dogs. Onishi explained, “Japanese breeders tend to breed puppies and sell them as show dogs. Many do not breed working dogs.” Instead, Onishi decided to visit a shelter in Hiroshima that had more mixed breed dogs. She was shocked to find, however, that many of these dogs, were scheduled to be euthanized. It was at this shelter that Peace Wanko rescued Yumenosuke, a Shiba Inu mix, scheduled to be euthanized in the so-called “dream box” (in Japanese, yume means “dream.”) Since then, Yumenosuke has been trained as a search and rescue dog, and has helped find victims in the wake of natural disasters. “Yumenosuke is a hero for rescue dogs,” Onishi glowed. “He had a big impact on Japan.” She continued to explain what qualities Peace Wanko looks for in its rescue dogs. “Golden Retrievers and Labradors are good at search and rescue. They have a good sense of smell, and they are strong and active. They are large dogs and they have stamina. Mixed breed dogs are closer to ‘wild dogs’ in terms of their sense of smell. Yumenosuke, for example, has a very good nose. I have to find it! Yes, he is an excellent search and rescue dog!”


IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME Today, Peace Wanko houses dogs of all breeds, sizes, and ages, not just search and rescue dogs. They do not euthanize dogs, even those that are old or aggressive. Some dogs have even established permanent residence at their home in Jinsekikōgen. “We have some aggressive dogs in Jinsekikōgen,” she admitted, “but they can live with us and enjoy it a lot.” Peace Wanko’s mission is to end the euthanization of dogs in Hiroshima, as well as to continue to promote the adoption of dogs from shelters rather than buying from breeders. Currently, people adopt about one dog per day, and with a new location in Fukuyama, hopefully that number will only increase. “In the winter season, people can’t get to Jinsekikōgen. It’s too hard in the snow,” she laughs. “So the adoption center here in Fukuyama, which has a population of 400,000, acts as an antenna shop for Jinsekikōgen.” The Fukuyama center is a sparkling clean space with rustic wooden gating for the dog pens that house 11 dogs. There is also a small shop that includes Peace Wanko books, fresh ground coffee, and deer jerky. The jerky is for canine consumption only; Don’t make the same mistake as I did! There is, however, still much work to be done, and Onishi emphasized the need to shift the mentality in Japan further toward adoption.

DON’T SHOP; ADOPT! Currently, Peace Wanko cares for over 1,300 dogs, the majority of which reside in Jinsekikōgen. When I asked Onishi if she thinks there will ever be zero dogs in the shelter, she scrunched her face at the idea. “Hmm… That’s a difficult question!” she started. “In Japan, people have many dogs and many cats, so when the owners pass away, we have to take care of that dog and cat. So we’ll probably have to continue the shelter work a long time.” In addition to dog shelters, Peace Wanko also runs cafes and restaurants, including Café de Taishakukyō in Jinsekikōgen, which overlooks the serene Taishaku Gorge and dam. When asked why Peace Winds has a café in addition to their dog centers, Onishi explained, “We have to help domestic countryside towns. Jinsekikōgen is a very small town with a small population. Many elderly people live there. Not many young people live

there. So we have to make jobs in Jinsekikōgen, to encourage young people to stay or come back. We can also attract tourists.”

CULTURAL EXCHANGE OF THE CANINE VARIETY Those interested are welcome to visit and the help of volunteers from foreign countries is particularly valuable. Peace Wanko needs translation help at their Hiroshima location due to its proximity to the U.S. Marine Corps Air Station in Iwakuni, but Onishi stressed that she’d love to have more volunteers from foreign countries overall. Why? “People from foreign countries can be very good with dogs. When I was a child, I lived with a dog, but most people in Japan have not grown up with dogs.” An overseas perspective can also help when sharing and discussing ideas on dog shelters and animal welfare, says Onishi. “We’d like to know more about the situation in other countries, to communicate and share information.” So if you’re living in Japan and would like to engage in some cultural exchange with both furry and non-furry friends, shoot an email to support@ peace-winds.org to arrange a time and place to volunteer (or adopt!). With three shelters strategically placed around Hiroshima, the dogs are just a train, car, or bike ride away. There are plenty of wet noses and wagging tails ready to greet you. English website: http://peace-winds.org/pw/ en/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pwj. rescue.dog/ Phone: +81 847-89- 0039 Fax: +81-847- 82-2949 Jinsekikōgen address: Japan, 〒720-1702 Hiroshima Prefecture, Jinseki District, Jinsekikogen, Kamitoyomatsu, 7 2-8 Hiroshima Marina Hop address: Marina Hop, 4-14 Kannon-shin-machi, Nishi-ku,Hiroshima-shi Fukuyama address: 2-9-15 Higashi-hukatsu-cho Fukuyama-city, Hiroshima 720-0974

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/45


Music, handicrafts and cows

a different kind of countryside fair in east hiroshima Words: Steve Jarvis Photos: Jinseki Kogen Tiergarten Inc

and towns of Hiroshima’s countryside. As the Expo’s main event, the Satoyama Futures Exhibition brings together a wide selection of these small-scale events and activities into one place, allowing visitors to get a concentrated taste of the best Hiroshima’s countryside has to offer.

Does kicking back on the grass listening to live music while the kids occupy themselves making fresh butter sound like a good weekend? Or maybe you are more attracted to the challenge of making a wooden stool while the children are working off their energy on the Stryder course? No? Then you must have come for the camping and stargazing. Regardless, of your preference, the Satoyama Future Exhibition and Autumn Festival being held in Jinseki Kougen’s Tiergarten between September 16th and 18th will have something to keep you happy. Far from its namesake located in central Berlin, Hiroshima’s version of Teirgarten (literally Animal Garden) is nestled amongst lush green mountains in the East of the prefecture within shouting distance of neighboring Okayama. Year round visitors can enjoy interacting with animals, having farm and craft experiences, letting off steam in the

46\

rolling green hills and playgrounds, and spending their nights around campfires. For 2017, the annual Autumn highlight of a three-day local music festival will be jointly held with the Satoyama Futures Exhibition, part of the “Satoyama Futures Expo” being run by the Hiroshima prefectural government to promote the pleasures and benefits of spending more time in the countryside. For many Japanese “Satoyama”, the border area between human world and wild nature, is an evocative word harking back to a time when people lived in harmony with nature sharing the available space in a sustainable way. If ever there was a concept in need of re-popularization, this is it! Breaking from the traditional model of an Expo, this year-long event has no pavilions nor even a single location, rather people are encouraged to visit any of the 350 community events taking place in the mountains, fields

Highlights of the event include two stages with music, performance and guest speakers, multiple children’s playgrounds, craft workshops to hone your skills with wood, leather and clay, photographic and soundscape exhibitions and tutorials, and a wide range of stalls selling local foods and produce. The night program features a campfire, stargazing, candle art and more. Limited numbers of rental tents are available, but if possible, bring your own tent to stay on site. For those wanting to branch out, there are nature walks, rental bikes for nearby trails, and Tiergarten also serves as the base for daily tours uncovering many of Jinseki Kougen’s hidden attractions.

https://satoyama-mirai2017.jp/


Matt’s Moment The Magician

I’ve lived in this house for fifteen years and never seen the attic. I’m sitting beneath it now. Occasionally, ominously, a thin trickle of dust issues from cracks between the thin slats that form the ceiling. Attic dust, made up of attic things gone to rot. But I have never opened the access hatch and climbed the ladder to have a poke around. In part, of course, this reflects no more than a disgraceful lack of curiosity. Then again, the house wasn’t built with anyone my size in mind, and I have scars to prove it. I don’t trust the attic floor to support me, and you can call it ungenerous, but I’m not ready to treat my children to the spectacle of their father falling through the ceiling and landing belly-first on the coffee table with a loud, comic book “Uff!” But I’m also happy to let the house hold onto a mystery or two. Who knows what’s up there? This house has been around for more than 65 years, with multiple owners from an extended family. I imagine treasures untold, and I’m willing to let them go a bit longer without the telling. Like someone waiting for his deathbed to read Don Quixote, I’ll visit the attic one day. But not just yet. It’s something I love in people too, undisclosed talents that come suddenly to light. In Japan, where “hobbies” are often pursued well beyond the proper jurisdiction of the word, the results can leave you thunderstruck. I remember a night, twelve years ago, when I was at a work party with a group of colleagues who had nothing in common except teaching the tenth grade. We were forty minutes into a two hour all-you-can-eat shabu-shabu course, and fresh out of things to say. We sat sweating and silent in the steam from the seething vats of pork, smiling brightly at one another and taking furtive glances at our watches. Someone lit a cigarette. Forty-one minutes.

To my left sat a math teacher, a year from retirement. He was a small, quiet man, and in the time we had worked together we’d spoken no more than an occasional greeting. If, like the Cheshire Cat, he had slowly faded from view right there at the table, it’s possible no one would have noticed. And then he cleared his throat. “All right, everyone. Watch this!” We turned to look. Two of the fingers of his right hand were ringed with a rubber band. He briskly shook his hand, and the band leapt to the next two fingers. A ripple of exclamation ran round the table. Something was happening. For the next hour, he put on a magic show. Not a few tired tricks, but a full routine, one effect leading smoothly into the next. His sole props were whatever was at hand: a fistful of rubber bands from the bound test papers in his briefcase, chopsticks and cigarettes, coins and thousand yen bills. Tissues from a promotional packet were torn in half and made whole again. They floated in the air between his palms, then vanished. His movements were elegant and sinuous, his head thrown back and a commanding light in his eyes. His hands made tight loops and passes as coins rained on the tabletop from fingers that had been empty a second before. There was a comedy bit, where he tucked chopsticks behind both ears and pretended to be unable to find them. My colleagues collapsed into one another’s laps in fits of laughter, faces flushed with the giddy, aerobic glow brought on by impromptu, close-up magic over shabu-shabu. The night was saved. And the best trick of all, of course, was that sudden revelation of a startling and wholly unexpected talent, just when it was needed. True, not everybody loves magic. Personally I think of magic tricks, when I think of them at all, as an endearing ornament for the sort of grandfather who keeps plastic covers on his car seats and never takes you fishing. But a live show is a live show.

Obviously, it’s not only Japanese that pull this trick off. By sixteen, I’d acquired modest proficiency at both knife throwing and rope tricks. Even now, if my mind seems to wander, it’s not that you’re boring me. I’m just having a Walter Mitty moment, standing in my imagination at the edge of a dry wash somewhere on the Edwards Plateau, paying out the rope, building my loop, and doing a little Texas Skipping before practicing head and heel shots with Earl, my patient and genial Angus bull. But as an adult, my hobbies seem a tad lackluster. I like to read. I bake a pie or two. I enjoy pencils. I would be powerless to rescue a shabu-shabu party succumbing to ennui. How did things get this way? It’s easy to roll your eyes at the frequency with which dreams are invoked in this culture. “Make my dreams come true” is a stock answer when I ask students about their future plans, and something in me flinches every time I hear it. But where a greying, nondescript math teacher can step out of the shadows cast by his own life to be revealed as Professor S, the Astonishing Geometer, things suddenly appear in a different light. Whatever you think you see, walking the streets of Hiroshima, you are mistaken. You are surrounded by wizards, alpinists, dancers and deep sea divers. The cartoonist murmurs an apology as he jostles the archer. Across from you on the bus, the chess master runs patterns on her smartphone. And why not? You’ve got to pay the bills, but surely those bastards don’t get all your time, do they? I can't remember every hope that, always for sensible reasons, I’ve packed away over the years. Can you? Perhaps I’ll let down the hatch, blow the dust off and take a fresh look. There must be something in there besides pies and lassos.

Words: Matthew Mangham Illustration by Emmie Tsumura @emsakko

GetHiroshima / Autumn 2017

/47


getting around

Streetcar lines Hiroden Line #1 (Hiroshima Station > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #2 (Hiroshima Station > Miyajima-guchi) Hiroden Line #3 (Hiroden Nishi Hiroshima > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #5 (Hiroshima Station > Hijiyama-shita > Hiroshima Port) Hiroden Line #6 (Hiroshima Station > Eba) Hiroden Line #7 (Yokogawa Station > Hiroden Honsha mae) Hiroden Line #8 (Yokogawa Station > Eba) Hiroden Line #9 (Hatchobori > Hakushima) Astram Line (Hondori > Koikikoenmae)

Asa Zoo

Main Meipuru~pu bus stops (orange, green, lemon)

(Kamiyasu)

Limousine bus (Hiroshima City > Hiroshima Airport) ori

kat

Ta

asu

miy

Ka

World Heritage Route (boat) (Peace Park > Miyajima)

shi

higa

Yasu

dai mon

a

Bish

chi

Oma

Chorakuji

Matsuyama Super Jet Ferry

ichi

Furu

JR Ferry and Matsudai Ferry to Miyajima

Tomo Obara

Nakasuji

Transport Museum

Tomochuo

(Chorakuji)

Ozuka

JR Train Lines Nishihara

Astram Line fares vary according to distance.

Koikikoenmae

¥190~480

Big Arch Stadium

Gionshinbashikita

Ushita

e

Station JR

Yokogawa Station JR

ain

e

Lin

a nk

ho

im

sh

ku

Fu

Hiroden nishi Hiroshima

s

o nn

Ka

nm

a

i ch

d u-

k ic ba om

n

Ge

t

(A

hi

ac

m iri-

Shinkansen Station

K

Kamiyacho Nishi

i

Shukkeien-mae

o

ch

Jogakuin-mae Kamiyacho Higashi

isu

Eb

Ka

o

ch

a-

am

y na

hi

ac

m ri-

I

na

Matoba cho

Hatchobori

Nisseki byoin mae

u

M

ae

-m

ho

us

e

m

ho

-c

2 hi-

ac

i-m

m

ina

M Hiroden Honsha mae

Minami machi 6-chome

i

b

ki-

iyu

h as

The flat fare for inner city travel on the streetcare is ¥180 (child ¥90)

¥180

Moto-Ujina-guchi

a ug

ok uz i-F e da ma o r Hi oin y nb Ke

e m ho -c e -3 om ina -ch e j U -4 om ina 5-ch j U ai in or Uj n-d iga a K

Ujina 2-chome

Hiroshima Port

Miyajima

Matsuyama

ae

m

o-

kk

M

The fare for travel on Miyajima bound streetcars varies according to distance. (¥280 to Miyajima)

s

k ya

i-k

m

ina

hi

ba

a-

am

Eba

Miyajima-guchi

m iya

jiy Hi

Chuden-mae

ita

sh

a-

j

Hi

Fukuro-machi

Takano-bashi

Funairi-minami-machi

a

Mazda Stadium

e

om

ch

1-

ar

nb

Da

Shiyakusho-mae

Funairi-kawaguchi-cho

o

ch

hi-

as

ob

k En

Tate-machi

Funairi-saiwai-cho

Hiroshima Station

Shukkei-en

Katei Saibansho-mae

Hondori Peace Park

Hiroshima Station JR

¥130

Hakushima

Bus Center

Bo

h ac

m nna Fu i-ho air n Fu

ho

i-c

m oa

ae m e) e- Dom ommb

o

h -c

a

Te

Line

Hakushima Line, All Destinations (child ¥70),

Ho

Dobashi

m

n-

no

an

K hi-

c a-

hi

ac

m n-

ho

-c

wa

Tera-machi Tokaichi machi

Nishi Hiroshima Station JR

Sanyo Main

Shin-Hakushima Johoku

Kencho-mae

Betsuin-mae

n Sa

(Ushita)

Hiroshima Castle

Yokogawa 1-chome M yo

Big Wave

Hakushima

Shin

Yokogawa Station

Miyajima Guchi JR

(Fudoinmae)

Hakushima

Kabe Lin

Mitaki JR

Mitaki Temple

Ni

Fudoin Temple

Fudoinmae

(Koikikoenmae)

Museum of Contemporary Art

Gethiroshima Mag Autumn 2017  

The best of Hiroshima. In English.

Advertisement