GDUSA - Graphic Design USA - June 2021

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GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

GD USA

2021

HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS JUNE 2021

58TH ANNUAL

PRINT SURVEY SPONSORED BY

VERSO

LOGO TRENDS REPORT www.gdusa.com

JU N E 2021


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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER | YOU ARE SCOUTS AND GUIDES Guest on a podcast this winter, I was asked how and why a recent issue of GDUSA magazine felt especially rich in informative and inspiring content. I am not asked that question very often and, puffed up, I thought the answer should be a mission statement of uplift and purpose, akin to the banners that festooned my high school and college lockerrooms. Thus, I meant to say: “Success is the residue of hardwork and desire!” Instead, I blurted out the cold hard truth: “Sometimes you just get lucky.” With this June 2021 edition, we just got lucky again. HEALTH + WELLNESS AWARDS SHOWCASE Our annual competition honors graphic excellence in this hugely important and high-profile area. More than 200 projects are displayed here from a record number of entries. Honored projects run the gamut from traditional medicine and healthcare to healthy lifestyles and holistic alternatives to public and community health initiatives. Healthcare had already become the epicenter of the national conversation but, in a year when the unthinkable happened, GORDON KAYE IS THE PUBLISHER OF GDUSA Comments, suggestions and letters can be sent to gkaye @ gdusa.com.

the creative professionals represented in this very select showcase remind us once again — do we really need reminding? — that effective and impactful graphic communication can make all the difference in our personal and public health, safety and well-being. 58TH PRINT DESIGN READER SURVEY Since 1963, we have polled our readers to determine their print and paper-related activities. It is my personal favorite feature but, like all long-term relationships, it can sometimes feel like the same-old, same-old. Not this year. In 2021, the poll explores and tries to make sense of concepts and frames like digital fatigue, zoomification, WFH, stuff purging, reality rebound, the roaring 2020s — and what it all means for post-pandemic print communications. We also pose the related question of how the economy will fare. Spoiler alert: most graphic designers see an economic recovery coming and, with some caveats, they believe this is likely to redound to their favor. HIRING AND CAREERS The unexpected events of the past year have jolted us out of our comfort zones and prompted us to re-examine how we want to lead our lives. From this premise, staffing expert extraordinaire Diane Domeyer observes that research from The Creative Group and AIGA suggest that many creatives will be looking for new jobs and directions in the next 12 months. Diane’s column invites you to address a few hard questions before embarking on your journey of discovery. ANNUAL LOGO TRENDS REPORT Bill Gardner of Logolounge.com often graces these pages with his observations on logo trends. It is always a pleasure, eye-opening and mind-expanding, and as much a chronicle of our life and times as a look at shapes and fonts. But how do you make sense of any thing in a year like any other? Somehow, dammit, Bill manages it, finding patterns with noting, associations worth considering, wisdom worth taking in. THE OFF JOG One last thought. We are in the process of emerging from a cataclysmic event and it is human nature to believe that this, in itself, heralds transformative change. Maybe, maybe not. The real question is how much of what we are throwing against the wall will stick. In this context, I note “Off Jog,’ one of the more intriguing logo trends revealed in the Logolounge piece. Off Jog is a visual shift or hiccup in an otherwise continuous path. Does the hiccup/ break/gap suggest a dramatic change of direction? Or does the path/ribbon/band suggest continuity and return to course? Only time will tell and anyone who claims to have the answer is a charlatan or a politician, if there is a difference. One thing we can know: graphic designers have a vital role to play as the process unfolds. Bill Gardner nicely sums up a sentiment reflected by many in our reader poll: brands, consumers and marketers are “in alien territory and we are the scouts and guides.”


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CONTENTS | JUNE 2021

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FRESH Bay Area Headstart gets a playful and approachable new brand; Mr. Peanut adds substance to his swagger; frog’s Austin office anticipates a complex post-pandemic workplace; Oscar Mayer receives its first major brand overhaul in 138 years and, happily, the Wienermobile survives; Jones Ritchie Knowles crafts a hand made identity for premium bourbon distiller; and Pentagram puts the ‘national’ back in a more diverse and inclusive National Gallery of Art; and more.

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PRINT DESIGN SURVEY A tradition dating back to 1963. This year’s print and paper reader poll explores the role and the state of post-pandemic print communications. We report the results, publish the comments, and, along the way, try to make sense of digital fatigue, zoomification, stuff purging, the roaring 2020’s, WFH and WTF, and other frames for thinking about the future of print and digital design. As a bonus, the poll asked readers to opine on the prospects for an economic rebound this year, and what that could mean for creative agencies, businesses and departments.

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LOGO TRENDS 2021 Asterisks. Chains. Trans Flips. Off Jog. Electrical Tape. Swingers. Not a random series of words and phrases, but a carefully curated, if playfully named, list of logo trends observed and explained by Bill Gardner of Logolounge.com The report is always a pleasure, eye-opening and mind-expanding. But given the challenge of making sense of this past year, the 2021 edition is a tour de force. Leave it to Bill to comb through tens of thousands of logos to find patterns worth noting, associations worth considering, wisdom worth imparting. In short, a story worth reading.

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HEALTH + WELLNESS AWARDS Our annual GDUSA Health+Wellness Design Awards™ competition honors graphic excellence in this hugely important and high-profile segment of society. More than 200 pieces are displayed here and on gdusa.com from a record-breaking number of entries. In a year when the unthinkable occurred, the creative professionals represented in this showcase remind us that effective communication makes an incomparable contribution to our personal, and the public, health and safety.

GDUSA - Graphic Design USA Volume 58 / No. 3 May/June 2021 Kaye Publishing Corporation (ISSN0274-7499/USPS227020). Published 6 times a year with combined issues in January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December. Executive, editorial and advertising offices at 89 Fifth Avenue, Suite 901, New York NY 10003. Phone: 212.696.4380, Fax: 212.696.4564, www.gdusa.com. SUBSCRIPTION: Domestic, $72 one year. International, $140 one year. Periodicals postage paid at New York NY and additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GDUSA - Graphic Design USA, PO Box 3072, Langhorne PA 19047. Permit #224.

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HIRING + CAREERS For many, the pandemic has sparked questions about workstyles and lifestyles. New research from The Creative Group and AIGA suggests that one in two creatives could be looking for a new job soon. Industry expert, mentor and friend, Diane Domeyer, provides advice and perspective.


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THANKS TO THE VERSO CORPORATION A special thank you to VERSO CORPORATION for its ongoing exclusive sponsorship of GDUSA’s Annual Print Design Survey. VERSO CORPORATION is a leading American owned and operated producer of graphic,

GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

specialty and packaging paper and market pulp, with a long-standing reputation for quality and reliability. Verso’s graphic paper products are designed primarily for commercial printing, advertising and marketing applications, including direct mail, catalogs, corporate collateral,

Gordon Kaye Publisher

books and magazines. Verso’s specialty paper products include release liner papers and

ART & PRODUCTION

label face stock for pressure sensitive, glue-applied and laminate applications. Verso pro-

Ilana Greenberg Creative Director

duces packaging paper used in higher-end packaging and printing applications such as greeting cards, book covers, folders, labels and point-of-purchase displays. Verso also makes market pulp used in printing, writing, specialty and packaging paper, facial and toilet tissue, and paper towels. This entire edition GDUSA, including the 58th Annual Print Design Survey, is printed on

Charlotte Kaye Production Director Jay Lewis Jeff Rosenberg Photographer

Influence® Gloss, 60 lb. text from Verso. Influence® offers the highest quality coated freesheet in a No. 3 web paper. More information is available on Verso Papers later in this edition.

ADMINISTRATION & READER SERVICES

To learn more, please contact your Verso sales professional or visit versoco.com

Althea Edwards Circulation & Reader Services Jennifer Hoff Scott Sczcypiorski Internet Services

ABOUT THE COVER Like many of us, Mr. Peanut is more sober and serious but also ready to leave the great confinement and venture into summer. The icon and brand have been refreshed by Jones Knowles Ritchie. SEE PAGE 10

Angelo Abbondante Accounts Manager

EDITORIAL Gordon Kaye Editor | Print Sasha Kaye-Walsh Editor | Website & Social Media Susan Lewis Kaye Assistant Editor

FOUNDER Milton L. Kaye (1921-2016)

ADVERTISING

COVER PAPER CREDIT: The cover of this special edition of GDUSA is printed on FSC-certified Kallima Coated Cover C2S, part of the Kallima Paper family of FSC-certified coated cover paperboard, manufactured by the Tembec Paper Group. A leading advocate of sustainability, Kallima has a distinct low-density high-bulk construction resulting in less trees used and signficant cost savings to the customer. Contact: kallimapaper.com and 1.800.411.7011

Ron Andriani Executive VP Marketing + Sales 201.485.8720 212.696.4380 randriani@ gdusa.com Gordon Kaye Publisher 212.696.4380 gkaye @ gdusa.com COPYRIGHT 2021 BY KAYE PUBLISHING CORPORATION


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Tap into the sublime. Great content inspires connection. Start your free 1-month trial now and download any 10 images from a library of over 350 million photos, illustrations, and vectors.

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FRESH | NEW FROG STUDIO ANTICIPATES POST-PANDEMIC WORK

AUSTIN TX Legendary global design consultancy frog design

sought to create an engaging workplace that embraces its collaborative spirit for its new studio in Austin TX. To that end, frog engaged the architectural design studio of Perkins&Will — which had designed its former workplace ten years earlier — to define what was authentic to frogs Austin studio and to express this through a simple, cohesive direction. The resulting design blends influences from Southwestern architecture and elements found in MARFA and Mexico with a contemporary aesthetic. frog’s renewed emphasis on collaborative work inspired the layout, seeking to reconcile the desired focus on collaboration with the need to accommodate concentrated individual work. The studio revolves around a central hub as a place to gather, with breakout areas that support smaller co-working groups. The space allows for various hybrid models to ensure agility and adaptability as working habits and styles continue to evolve. The studio also provides a strong tie to the city, with ample space for event hosting, while honoring the frog design brand and allowing the building’s natural characteristics to shine and showcases the creative work happening within. frogdesign.com

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FRESH | JKR ADDS SUBSTANCE TO MR. PEANUT’S SWAGGER

NEW YORK NY The 115-year old PLANTERS brand, with the help of creative agency Jones Knowles Ritchie, has refreshed

its brand image, as well as introduced a campaign that spotlights how its products provide substance to nut-lovers. To relay this message, the brand has launched an illustrated spot (“Sustenance”) starring a revamped version of Mr. Peanut. The branding and the campaign pick up on the spirit of last year’s Superbowl spot in which the company introduced its mission of bringing substance to fans, both in snacking and in life, by using its $5 million Big Game budget to reward Little Acts of Extraordinary Substance. Although he has a similar look and feel to recent years — the graphics are refined and the voice more authoritative — Mr. Peanut is now encouraging fans to make substantial choices both in snacking and in life. The character also plays a new role on pack, showing off the product and signing off on every nut. Photography highlights the taste, texture, and variety of flavors of the brand’s offerings, while every detail, from the logo to the colors, seek to celebrate “substance with swagger.” Comments JB Hartford, Creative Director at JKR: “PLANTERS is a true American icon connecting generations and providing real food satisfaction with substance. The creative idea behind the new brand is all about celebrating the brand’s straight-to-the-nut sensibility, debonair flare, and crave-worthy irresistibility. We’re thrilled to finally share with the world the many sides of our beloved Mr. Peanut.” jkrglobal.com

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FRESH | RISING TIDE LIFTS BAY AREA HEAD START

SAN MATEO COUNTY CA Head Start services in the Bay Area are

delivered by an organization called the Institute for Human and Social Development — an largely unapproachable and complicated name that doesn’t convey the breadth or spirit of the educational and family services that IHSD provides. The organization needed a new name, identity and brand story that could rally their staff, teachers and families, and raise awareness of the institute among potential donors. Inspired by the diversity of people in San Mateo County, Stitzlein Studio gave the organization a more playful and memorable new name — Izzi — and a visual identity that is in motion and full of color. The foundation of the identity is a family of sea creatures that can be used interchangeably. They are intended to give Izzi a sense of life, spontaneity and curiosity unique to children. The identity is complemented by a brand manifesto called “Rising Tide” which reflects the shared success of the community and references its proximity to the Pacific Ocean. Credits include creative direction and brand strategy by Joe and Leslie Stitzlein; brand writing and naming by Austin Howe; art direction by Alexandre Henriques and Hymn; graphic design by Catherine Pouly and Alexandre Alvarez; and motion design by Anthony Velen and John Le at Widgets & Stone. stitzstudio.com

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FRESH | OSCAR MAYER REBRAND UNITES PORTFOLIO

MADISON WI Oscar Mayer has long held a special place in America’s heart (and stomach). From its catchy bologna and

wiener jingles to the 27-foot long Wienermobile, the company has a rich history of business and marketing success. But a growing cross-category portfolio and the introduction of new product entries led to a disjointed look and feel across the brand. For its first overhaul in 138 years, Oscar Mayer tapped BrandOpus to unite all of its products — from bacon and hot dogs to deli meat — under one narrative. For the new look, the design team chose to celebrate the brand’s iconic rhomboid logo with a straightforward design that exemplifies an uncomplicated approach to meats. The team also elevated the Wienermobile to be a core brand asset through a playful illustration style that extends into the brand world. Oscar Mayer yellow is featured prominently and drives recognition across all brand touch-points. Alongside a bespoke light-hearted typeface and expressive photography style, the brand renovation aims to resonate with Oscar Mayer lovers. These updates can be seen in the brand’s new creative platform from advertising agency Johannes Leonardo called “Keep It Oscar,” which reimagines meat in playful ways. “From a disruptive creative campaign, which reflects a wonderfully odd tone and breaks the mold of conventional CPG advertising, to new packaging design, which unites all of our high quality meats under one uncomplicated look, at every turn we'll be sparking smiles and reminding consumers not to take life to seriously,” said Sergio Nahuz, Meal Foundations and Coffee, Oscar Mayer. www.brandopus.com

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Apple Inc. has multiple positions available for the following job opportunities in Cupertino, CA: Refer to Req# & mail resume to Apple Inc., ATTN: D.W., 1 Infinite Loop 104-1GM, Cupertino, CA 95014: 1. Human Interface Designer (REQ#2689476) Wrk on tools to allw prtnrs & prvidrs to deliver cntnt to iTunes stre. 2. Digital Sculptor (REQ#2787477) Prepre 3D desgns using modeling sftwre according to specific requiremnts. Apple Inc. has multiple positions available for the following job opportunities in Cupertino, CA and various unanticipated locations throughout the USA: Refer to Req# & mail resume and transcript(s) to Apple Inc., ATTN: D.W., 1 Infinite Loop 104-1GM, Cupertino, CA 95014: 1. Human Interface Designer (REQ#6968516) Apply a broad rnge of user exp dsgn skills to envision, dsgn, & spcify cnversationl behaviors to dvlp Siri. Apple is an EOE/AA m/f/disability/vets.

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FRESH | PUTTING NATIONAL BACK IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

WASHINGTON DC The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC has

reopened with new mission and vision statements, values and strategic priorities focusing on serving the nation and engaging diverse audiences. The effort has been led by Director Kaywin Feldman and staff, and facilitated by AEA Consulting, with branding by Pentagram that communicates the Gallery’s commitment to be “Of the nation and for all the people.” Feldman says that the new logo and tagline — “National Gallery of Art: Of the nation. For the people.” — helps advance her primary mandate when hired, i.e., to “put the national back in the National Gallery of Art.” Energized by the monumental architecture of the museum campus, Pentagram, whose activities were led by partner Michael Gericke, sought to unite the classic and the modern. The emphasis on “National” in the logo underscores the promise while the typeface — Empirica by FrereJones — complements fonts already carved into the museum’s marble walls. Most conspicuous is the adoption of bright colors, which provide a distinct contrast to the muted palette of subtle grays and off-whites used since 1941. The palette –— with playfully dubbed colors such as Honesty Blue, Inspiration Red, Curiosity Yellow and Generosity Green — is said to represent what the National Gallery aspires to be: more energetic, more vibrant and, apropos of the moment, more inclusive in its audience and more diverse in its collection and staffing. www.pentagram.com

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FRESH | REINTERPRETING ART OF CINEMA THROUGH ART OF DESIGN

NEW YORK NY Original posters by Shutterstock’s creative team celebrate the Best Picture nominees in the recent 93rd

Academy Awards including, of course, the winner: Nomadland. Turning to famous pop artists for aesthetic inspiration, the team utilized the image provider’s collection of photos, vectors, patterns, and textures to capture the spirit of the films. Creative Director Flo Lau explains: “The 2021 Academy Award Best Picture nominees form an eclectic shortlist, from the power of words and the pursuit of justice in The Trial of theChicago 7 to a Korean-American family’s immigrant story in Minari, these films provide our team with endless inspiration for this annual poster collection.” The series has long been an opportunity to reinterpret the art of cinema through the art of design. Acclaimed artists provided inspiration for the eight in-house Shutterstock designers. From the bubbly color palette and black collage elements synonymous with Pauline Boty, the founder of the British Pop Art movement, to the modern calligraphy depicted in Russian artist Pokras Lampas’s street projects, each poster represents individual perspectives and unique interpretations. The list of nominated films and the artists that inspired the posters include: “The Father” inspired by Banksy with poster design by Zahi Haddad; “Judas and the Black Messiah” inspired by Emory Douglas with poster design by Nicole Dai; “Mank” inspired by Yayoi Kusama with poster design by Alice Lee; “Minari” inspired by Peter Max with poster design by Thahn Nguyen; “Nomadland” inspired by Johanna Goodman with poster design by Will Banchero; “Promising Young Woman” inspired by Pauline Boty with poster design by Abi Gaudreau; “Sound of Metal” inspired by Jamie Hewlett with poster design by Jac Castillo; and “The Trial of the Chicago 7” inspired by Pokras Lampas with poster design by Alex Bodin. www.shutterstock.com/blog/2021-oscar-pop-movie-posters

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FRESH | BOTTLE IS NORTH STAR FOR BOURBON IDENTITY

LORETTO KY Turner Duckworth has crafted a new visual identity system

for premium bourbon brand Maker’s Mark. The Maker’s Mark bottle has remained virtually unchanged since 1958 — its red wax top is a highly recognizable element in the aisle. Building upon this element, Turner Duckworth developed a visual language that evokes a handcrafted feel and celebrates the history of the brand. “The bottle acted as a North Star that we held all our creative work up to,” said Jared Britton, Creative Director. “Setting our direction, we wanted to contemporize the identity in a way that felt reflective of the original source, and ultimately create a foundation for Maker’s to become a true global icon.” The identity flexibly reinforces the brand’s core equities — leaning into its red and cream color palette, the introduction of a wax icon to graphically represent the familiar top, and abstract representations of the ‘red dip’ throughout the system. Assets were handcrafted using traditional wood etching techniques, while two custom fonts were created based on imperfect language found on the original label. The end result is a system that projects the idea of ‘hand-made’ and reflects the commitment of the distillery. turnerduckworth.com

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June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:41 PM Page 20

58TH ANNUAL

PRINT DESIGN SURVEY

SPONSORED BY

VERSO CORPORATION

BY GORDON KAYE

DESIGNERS DEBATE THE STATE OF POST-PANDEMIC PRINT No area of business or society has remained unchanged by the events of the past 18 months. And, of course, that is true for practitioners of graphic design and, in particular, print design which — even before the pandemic — had been evolving from the mainstay of graphic arts into a more niche and complementary role. The central question that our 58th annual print and paper reader poll seeks to address is whether the pandemic has altered or accelerated trends in media already underway, and more directly, where does print design fit once we fully emerge. Humility should govern in what is a very fluid situation. In truth, the most accurate responses to our survey are: “it’s too early to tell” and “it depends.” Nevertheless, the statistical results — combined with a plethora of free-form comments published below — do provide a sense of the debate, the divide and the trajectory.

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HERE ARE MY TAKEAWAYS FROM THE POLL, WHICH WAS CONDUCTED THE FIRST WEEK OF MAY 2021, THOUGH I URGE YOU TO REVIEW THE RESULTS AND THE COMMENTS AND DRAW YOUR OWN CONCLUSIONS:

Print plays a vital role in how professional graphic designers make a living. Fully 90% of respondents say they work in print as part of their professional mix, 55% of their projects involve a print component and 57% of their time is devoted to print. Interestingly, 50% worked on a pandemic-related print project in the past year. The importance of print work to the creative community should not be underestimated.

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Designers believe print endures because of its classic strengths. Foremost among these is tangibility — it is sensual, touchable, physical, real, permanent, and encourages a human connection often missing in the virtual world.

These classic strengths are amplified by digital clutter. Because print is relatively rare, it has the potential to stand out and be special — fresh, welcome, surprising, disruptive, personal, engaging, meaningful, a statement that a brand values itself and its customers. Closely related is the issue of trust: quality printed pieces are often perceived to possess authenticity and credibility because they feel real and present, spring from an identifiable source, and are the result of a deliberate act of craftsmanship.

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And, of course, there are large swaths of the country that don’t have access to internet or resources for smartphones who still need to be reached, especially with things like … say … public health campaigns.

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As the pandemic, hopefully, winds down, digital fatigue is real and pervasive. This may spark a new appreciation for the attributes of print and spur a rebound in the utilization of print.

If print is to stand out and be special, that imposes a responsibility on creators and producers: superior print design, well-crafted execution, strategic deployment, sustainable methods matter more than ever. Perhaps that explains why, when print is included as part of the marketing mix, designers try to retain responsibility and control for critical steps in the process. Nearly 8-in-10 make the paper specification and print buying decisions, quite a substantial number though modestly lower than in past decades.

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Despite the inherent strengths of print, most everyone understands that it is now a role player rather than the star — best used as part of an integrated marketing mix or for certain targeted audiences and purposes. That leads invariably to less volume and a lesser focus on the intricacies of the craft. Digital solutions tend to be the default position, and this is especially true for each younger generation of designers.

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In this context, the survey records a modest increase in those who expect to do less print design rather than more, and we also record small declines, once again, in the percentage of time spent on print by designers and on the number of designers specifying premium papers. This is part and parcel of the continuing challenges that confront the overall commercial printers and papermakers.

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Clients are drawn to digital media’s value proposition of a big reach with small budgets, fast turnaround times, and ease of use. The lure of “fast and cheap” is especially seductive when it comes to utilizing major social media platforms owned by Facebook, Google, Twitter and Amazon. It can be hard for print advocates to convince a resistant clientele otherwise.

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Just as digital fatigue may spur a rebound in print, a weighty counterbalance is the “Zoomification” of our world. This phenomenon, the argument goes, has made everyone more comfortable with technology, more expectant of instant communication and less patient with traditional means, and more likely to “stuff purge” which, writ large, means embracing a more virtual and spartan workstyle and lifestyle.

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And then there are the vicissitudes of the economy. How it moves will dictate much of what unfolds over the next year. The vast majority of designers — 90% in fact — expect an economic recovery in the second half of 2021 and an attendant rise in demand for design and related services.

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There is some disagreement as to how strong the recovery will be and how quickly and how directly it will stir creative businesses. There is no disagreement that good economic news will be welcomed by a community that has been rocked but remains resilient.

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MESSAGE FROM THE SPONSOR | VERSO CORPORATION

EMERGING FROM THE STORM D O YO U FE EL IT ?

Like a storm breaking and the sun beginning to shine through the clouds, the sense of hope is growing. Maybe normalcy’s meaning has changed forever, but it’s gradually returning. When everything so abruptly changed, people and businesses adjusted. Here at Verso, some worked from home, others masked up and came in to work, but wherever we were, we all kept our focus on making sure our people were safe and our customers were taken care of. AMERICAN PAPER, MADE WITH PRIDE BY AMERICANS.

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22 G D U S A

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June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:43 PM Page 23

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G D U SA 23


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june21ads.qxp_Layout 1 6/9/21 3:56 PM Page 25


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:43 PM Page 26

PRINT SURVEY | THE NUMBERS WHAT KINDS OF DESIGN PROJECTS DO YOU WORK ON?

WHAT KINDS OF PRINT PROJECTS HAVE YOU WORKED ON THE PAST YEAR? (IN ORDER)

IN THE PAST YEAR, HAVE YOU WORKED ON ANY PRINT PROJECTS RELATED TO THE PANDEMIC?

POSTERS BROCHURES/COLLATERAL SALES PROMOTION

90%

50%

PACKAGING DIRECT MAIL

PRINT

YES

ADVERTISING

58% PACKAGE

PUBLICATIONS/PERIODICALS INVITATIONS/ANNOUNCEMENTS ANNUAL/CORPORATE REPORTS POP/SIGNS/DISPLAYS

50%

LETTERHEAD/BUSINESS CARDS

NO

SELF-PROMOTION

82% ONLINE

CATALOGS

31%

BOOKS

TV | FILM | VIDEO | MOTION

CALENDARS CALENDARS

HOW MUCH OF YOUR WORK INVOLVES DESIGNING FOR PRINT?

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND, APPROVE PURCHASES OF ... ?

ARE YOUR PROJECTS PRINTED ON PREMIUM COATED OR UNCOATED PAPERS?

PRINTING

80%

PAPER

BOTH

56% OF YOUR TIME IS SPENT WORKING IN PRINT

55% OF YOUR PROJECTS INVOLVE PRINT

81%

10% COATED ONLY

76% 10%

DO YOU EXPECT AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN THE U.S IN THE SECOND HALF OF 2021?

55%

DO YOU EXPECT TO DO MORE OR LESS PRINT DESIGN THAN IN THE PAST?

STRONG RECOVERY

27%

36%

MORE

WEAK RECOVERY

33%

9%

SAME

NO RECOVERY

UNCOATED ONLY

ARE SWATCHBOOKS AND PROMOTIONS USEFUL IN SELECTING PAPER OR SELLING CLIENT ON PRINT?

85% YES

40% LESS

15% NO

Our 2021 poll was sent to a random selection of 10,000 GDUSA print magazine and e-subscribers. The benchmark results make clear that, even in a digital age, print remains essential to the graphic design profession. The highlights: 90% of GDUSA readers work in print as part of their mix, 55% of their projects have a print component, and 56% of their time is devoted to print work. With so much at stake, designers also continue to assert control over the process: 76% buy or specify paper and 81% buy or specify printing. At the same time, as digital messaging is increasingly the default position, a new high of 40% of designers forecast less print rather than more going forward. In testimony to the strangeness of the past year, Posters and Packaging rank higher than usual in terms of projects executed while Brochures and Collateral, Point-of-Sale and Event Invitations are relatively light. This makes sense in a pandemic year; will these patterns hold if and when normalcy returns?

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June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:43 PM Page 27

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

IS PRINT IMPORTANT IN YOUR PROFESSIONAL LIFE?

Working as a print designer in a tourist driven town — we have need for print everywhere. From restaurant menus, tickets and wristbands, all the way to large signage and way-finding, print is everywhere. I especially see direct mail holding its place.

There is still something more impactful about getting a printed piece, whether that is a business card, a magazine, or just a piece of mail. Holding a piece in your hands as opposed to just seeing it on the screen makes it more memorable. Print still matters.

The printed page is still very important. There’s a quality to it that is missing on a screen. The paperless office has never materialized, thank goodness. People are moving away from social media. As advertisers we are going to have to find new (or old) ways of reaching our audiences. As such, I believe that quality print materials will make a comeback. Direct mail will make a comeback too .... it just can’t look like

DUSTIN BRENTON

junk mail.

PRESIDENT/CREATIVE DIRECTOR, BRENTON CREATIVE I will always love print and prefer designing printed things. I love paper textures and all the possible treatments — foils - coatings I believe print is the best way to reach people. Direct mail done

available for print.

right can be very effective and, more than ever, consumers respond really well to print. Something to hold and feel creates trust.

Printed pieces give designs a sense of permanence and value digital can’t match.

No matter how far we go digital, the desire to hold a physical version of a book, a poster, a handwritten note will always be

I am an instructor and am bringing (virtually) a print specialist

there. Digital, for all of its convenience, is designed to be a

into my graduating design student classroom this term, to speak

temporary and often times disposable medium.

and promote the value of print.

Print is still important for my particular job but there is a growing

Print is definitely still important in our industry (manufacturing

importance being placed on digital assets. This was already the

of building materials). Even with the digital revolution, there is

case prior to the pandemic but I think that it was accelerated by

still a desire to make color choices based on actual printed samples,

the fact that people were/are staying home and buying online

and as a selling tool, there is still a benefit to having a leave-

even more because of COVID.

behind for homeowners/contractors. POP and environmental graphics also utilize the benefits of print, albeit in combination

Print will never go away. It is a staple. We may divert into various

with other digital tools/displays.

media mainly for the eyes to the brain, but as long as we are able to touch and see, like eating, print will remain.

The volume of paper that I have seen people purge from their house has made me realize how much of print’s “permanence”

Print is more essential than ever before. When virtual became the

is unnecessary. It is important that your house or car title, your

dominant experience we quickly realized how important a sense

birth certificate and other documents have permanence. That

of touch, texture, and the relationship to the page really is.

article you want to save for later? Read it and deal with it now. I love the texture and feel of reading a physical book, but don’t

Absolutely! There is still a large percentage of individuals who

have the space to store them all. Print products will likely become

prefer to hold a tangible item in their hands. Printed books,

more of a luxury item. If I want a book to read, I will get it on my

magazines and catalogs have lasting power.

Kindle or Nook, unless I want a nicely illustrated, first edition, signed copy of an author or book that I know and love, that I want

There is a sophistication and memory that you get with printed

to keep and experience in a more tactile way again and again.

materials that you can’t achieve in the digital world. For the digital

Casual consumption of print materials will continue to diminish,

world, attention is way shorter. With printed material, focus and

though there is still a market for specialized items that cater to a

retention are held way longer. If digital has some sort of reminder

specific niche crowd.

or reinforcement, it may be near the same level of retention, but I strongly believe that tangibility still wins out.

G D U SA 27


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:44 PM Page 28

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

IS PRINT IMPORTANT IN YOUR PROFESSIONAL LIFE? CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE The traditional strength of paper are more relevant than ever.

We do packaging design and production so from that standpoint

Because so much information is delivered digitally, a print piece

it's still relevant in our businesses and in my personal life —

takes on a feeling of importance, and we try to make sure the

I heart a good unboxing experience.

end result is worth spending time with and keeping. Print is absolutely important and relevant. From a design Print still matters especially when you are doing donor and

perspective, look/touch/feel are all details that help bring a

request for a high amount. The audience loves the feel of the

tangible design piece to life. Those attributes also tend to set

paper, the weight, and, of course, the design. This is a touchy-

design work apart from other work we see everyday. From a con-

feely audience and my job at the university caters to this.

sumer perspective, especially in 2021, experience is everything. The traditional strengths of print seemed to get overshadowed

Print will never lose it’s importance or permanence. Print is life!

when the growing presence of digital became such a big part of our everyday lives. Now more than ever, it seems like that same experience we looked for in the digital space is even more important in tangible print work today than it was ... and has

We handle most of our jobs as print-on-demand because we

become a difference-maker in whether we choose to buy into a

don't have storage space for all the literature and translated ver-

brand or product.

sions we produce. People still want something tangible. There is still a beautiful, functional, useful place for print. Getting I feel that online communications can’t compete with the immedi-

away from a screen of any kind for a bit is a beautiful thing.

ate impact of print, but print loses relevance because people are too hurried to care. Roll over, Beethoven …

Print is still important in work life. Our audience is tired of digital, whether it’s virtual events or email marketing. Print

We have been trying to convert most communications to digital,

makes people feel special. It's an experience.

but I do believe print is still an effective way of communicating your message.

Print is still important. People don’t want to be staring at a screen. This past year has brought about a need for a separation

Print design has ebbed considerably. Most clients don’t even

in your time/day from electronics to reconnect to the physically

print stationery as part of a major branding project, which is sad.

tangible, human part of what makes up who we are.

Print will always be a part of people’s lives. 25 years ago

We still do printed work, but rarely anything that really plays

print was supposed to be dying. I think the digital world can

with the tactile strengths. Meaning, we do a lot of brochures

be overwhelming and people will always come back to print.

and flyers and catalogs, but on whatever sheet the printer has as a house sheet.

There is no matching the feel of paper in your hand. And with the growing censorship by digital platforms ... print may be the

It’s my experience that many audiences still enjoy some tangible

only way for some to get their message out.

form of media. Even if they look at something for only a few minutes, the physical interaction makes a different, and many

Print is still important. It is multi-sensorily interactive, raises

times better, impact.

the value of design communication, and is “real”. It's a myth that printing destroys forests. Paper comes from crops and is a

Yes, print has become more important with the rapid rate of

commodity. In fact, where many people include a “do not print

change of technology. Software and hardware become obsolete

this email because trees will die if you do,” my email footer

very rapidly and are inaccessible to many, but a hardcopy over-

states: “Did you know that paper comes from trees that are

rides these concerns.

grown in managed forests and harvested as crops? Consider how you support tree farmers, paper mill workers, print designers,

While 50% of my work is in print, the majority of it is reproduced

and printers … you can print guilt-free!”

in-house on a printer/copier (not a digital press). The few times we do go outside, the quality upgrade, the look and feel, is always noticed. But when push comes to shove clients select cheap —

28 G D U S A


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:44 PM Page 29

print. There are markets where quality still matters.

PRINT DESIGN IN A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD?

Print is just one element of a complete package; there is a time

Print will never die. There will always be room

both in cost and look and feel. I think there will always be some

and place for it, depending on the client.

for business cards, posters, brochures, etc.

Print will be more and more for high prestige projects and less

There is a segment of people who don’t care to

and less for low end projects, which will shift to digital.

use their iPhones or computers for everything ...

Print stands out in among the overabundance of digital advertising.

Ultimately, we’ll always need some form of print. For example, in our business, a product catalog,

Print has always been, and I expect always will be, extremely important. Although I also do work online and with video, print

used intentionally, is an effective way of exposing

offers the tactile personal connection that on-screen experiences

new customers to a brand and an effective tool to

can’t match.

educate existing customers about new products.

Print is far less a regular part of our marketing and communica-

BRIAN LITTLER

tions strategy, but that also means that when print is used

SR. GRAPHIC DESIGNER, MEGUIAR'S, INC.

it’s more special, and the design and specification choices reflect that significance. In branding assignments and projects, a business card is an extremely personal piece of one’s identity I'm Editor-in-Chief for Kraft Paper Muse, a bi-monthly publication that celebrates the digitally analog creative life. We are free to read online but print 100 limited edition “stuffed” (with paper goods like art and stationery) copies. Both print and digital have their place. Both matter. Being accessible to both sides of the coin is its strength. I work in the event industry. Our attendees want something to look at and feel in their hands. I’m currently designing an amazing mailer that will be similar to opening a present when you open this brochure. Our lack of exposure to outside and experiences will make this piece even more amazing to receive in the mail. I can’t wait!

Digital fatigue is real. I am tired of screens. I am looking forward to holding something real in my hands — books, magazines, menus, flyers. Digital fatigue is real and we are on virtual overdose. When we had a client with a virtual sales kick-off, we sent more than 100 huge kits to everyone to bring them something tactile. THAT’s the piece they talked about for days. I feel torn on this issue. While I agree that digital has become even more important because of the pandemic, print still has a place. Though we might need to figure out exactly how it can be optimized. Delivery services with pretty packaging/unboxing seems to be on the rise even with the pandemic. I also think that people are craving to get away from their screens and get out as the economy opens up so there could be a comeback to in-store shopping. I can see the future as further integration of print and digital, and translating from print to digital and digital to print — back and forth — like some of the electronic pens and erasable notebooks. This will be “the new normal” where most pages, flyers, memos, etc. are equipped with QR codes and are responsive to digital pens that write on both electronics and paper. Fatigue is a good way to word it. A parallel is virtual learning versus in-class. Students, teachers, parents, and supervisors are eager to get back to the classroom for obvious reasons. Virtual-only is missing something elusive .

G D U SA 29


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:44 PM Page 30

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

PRINT DESIGN IN A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD? CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE I have a feeling that print will rebound in some ways, but will

And there is the possibility that it will fall by the wayside as

be needed less in other ways. After spending so much time in

‘Letterpress’ did. Evolution.

front of a screen, it's possible people will want to read actual printed books/magazines, but there are items such as menus that

Print stands strong. There are a lot of pieces that just don’t

may now reside mostly in the digital realm with QR codes. The

translate or work when digital. Plus having printed pieces will

ease at which they can be updated/modified without having to

help bring back a sense of normalcy.

reprint may be a marked benefit for that industry. Also, with so much digital marketing and targeted marketing, the need for

The younger generation breathes online communications. Print

sales circulars may have been diminished now that people are

isn’t on their radar the way that Tik Tok is. Print won’t rebound.

much more proficient at online shopping. Some people will always appreciate the feel and permanence

There will be a print rebound but

of a well designed print piece, but I also feel, some people

designers must make a point of bringing

don't really care, and find it cumbersome and are more

it to the attention of your clients!

enamored with a digital piece that includes motion. I don't think we are anywhere near digital fatigue. It is a way of life.

More eyes are on digital work due to the pandemic. But I believe the need for us to get ourselves back into the real

I think that post-pandemic, the mix of digital and print will remain the same. People are either comfortable with digital or not. I don't believe the pandemic will change those preferences.

world will once again create those opportunities to experience print and packaging in our encounters with products in stores, restaurants and brick & mortar locations, etc. People buy what they buy, eat where they eat, shop where they shop, largely due to the experience they get from a brand. Print plays a huge

I have been a designer for almost 40 years and have lived and

role in that.

worked through many prophecies about the demise of print. While the industry is not the same (is much of anything the same?) as it was, I find that all forms of media ebb and flow with the times and seasons. Lately, some clients are actually more eager to print their promotional material. “It depends” sounds so non-committal, but it’s a far more accurate statement than a stab in the dark about the future.

We aren’t ‘After the Pandemic.’ We are still in it and I think it’s too early to tell what will happen. If I had to guess, I’d say that people will trend away from print for several reasons. 1) People are now more comfortable with digital. 2) People realize that it is more hygienic to go digital. 3) People did a lot of “stuff purging” during the pandemic. A lot of that stuff was paper and they don't want to add that back into their lives. 4) We've become

Print will rebound close to pre-pandemic levels. The trend has been towards more online interactions and remote working (Zoom, etc.), but the prepandemic value of print communica-

accustomed to a faster way of getting information (not saying that is a good thing, just a thing) and paper products are slow media. By the time the message gets out, it’s already outdated.

tions in general has remained unchanged. I would say that there will be more print design after the Those who argue that we are trending away from print have been proven wrong over and over and over. Thankfully design is

pandemic. Why? Because (hopefully) there will be a need for posters, flyers, etc. to promote events.

like a collage — it spreads across all platforms and mediums. There is room and use for all of it.

Print design and printed products are everywhere. In a digital world, information and content are easily lost or overlooked,

Print may be stronger after the pandemic and see a resurgence as a cost-effective way to reach customers who can’t be reached by social or email.

easily deleted. Print work isn’t so easily dismissed. I observe resurgence of interest in letterpress printing, printed journals, bound sketchbooks, pen-to-paper writing and sketching, paper planners, calendars. I believe that paper adds a level of comfort

Print design will cycle back. However, the younger generations to come may not admire or appreciate the elements of print.

for people, because it's tactile, flexible, has two sides, comes in varieties of physical textures and thicknesses... we humans form attachments to things we can touch and carry around.

30 G D U S A


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:44 PM Page 31

More people than ever are opening up physical mail.

Print will resurface but mainly for the need of the human touch

Especially those pieces designed with quality paper or

and connection. Virtual has its place as it will be perceived as a

unique coating or shape.

way to open up more time to enjoy the things in life, to also reduce the cost of conferences for small businesses and more

One problem we’re seeing is getting print into the hands of the

ways to network and still be able to speak directly to a person.

intended audience. No one is in their office so if you mail out a printed piece it may just get thrown out. Once people are

I design much more for digital these days. I agree that more

reliably back in the office, I think a well-designed, well-printed

digital is likely to come. That makes those print projects which

piece could really make a statement and be memorable. If

still exist that much more important to catch the reader’s

people continue to WFH deliverability of printed items will be an

attention with experiential touches.

ongoing problem. Digital design is important here, but if design is good and useful Digital communication is going to continue to be more the default

individuals will hold on to it. I noticed that during the pandemic

and some marketing won’t have any print component (e.g. the pro-

people hold onto printed pieces more than before. You just have

motion of virtual events).

to be selective as to the use and make sure the design is on point.

It will all balance out. Printed books and magazines will still

Print will become stronger in the high-end, specialty, market

surge, though, it will depend on topic. Books are a welcome relief

because it is not digital. Though not as fast from author to recipi-

from the digital, a kind of reverse escapism. Audiobooks are also

ent, it shows you care because of the extra effort involved in using

on the rise, as are podcasts, so having the ability to design effec-

it. Electronic touch points are too easily ignored and deleted but a

tive digital media to support that is growing.

well-designed printed piece has staying power with a tactile and visual presence that electronic media can't match. That said, it

Markets where people meet face-to-face will always need print.

will be more expensive. Digital, in my opinion, is the new junk

That probably will accelerate as we get a handle on the pandemic.

mail and is here to stay.

WILL THERE BE AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN 2021 AND WILL IT BENEFIT CREATIVE BUSINESSES? From my experience, creative business has thrived during the pandemic. I found that clients were putting in more of the work during the quarantine so they could be prepared for when businesses open back up. And for those businesses put on hold, it seems opportunity is increasing now as people start engaging more with physical locations. I only expect the economy, and as well as creative businesses, to continue to improve.

The economy will rebound in the second half of 2021 and YES it most certainly will benefit my organization. In-person trainings, workshops, and conferences will pick up and, therefore, increase the need for graphic design and printed materials. There will be a need to redefine companies and help them communicate internal messages to employees.

CRAIG VALENTINO DESIGNER, THANK GOD IT'S MONDAY/RABE & CO.

G D U SA 31


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:45 PM Page 32

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

WILL THERE BE AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN 2021 AND WILL IT BENEFIT CREATIVE BUSINESSES? CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

A healthier economy will definitely benefit the business I work

There will be a greater need for design and creative support

for. It will lead to more creative opportunities because people

as those businesses who were not well established digitally

expect so much more from brands these days, both in print and

(or had been more static in prior years) to activate their digital

in digital form. People expect an open dialogue with brands,

marketing in a much more significant way. I expect a lot of new

and the creative business is perfectly suited to deliver.

website and restructuring work, further integration of social/

Graphic design is a trickle-down business. Not a popular

e-communications strategies and a proliferation of social

phraseology, but it is true. As the society opens up, designers

influencer engagement.

are going to experience a nice bump. A rising tide, they say, lifts all boats. That means good things ahead.

“This Virtuous Cycle Is Starting Now”

I hope so! If history is a guide, the roaring 20s were, in part,

Recruitment and retention will be critical moving forward.

a response to the influenza outbreak of 1918.

Companies will need to figure out what employees need and want moving forward. Some industries like home improvement

Most definitely! People will be aching to get out and be more

have flourished. It will be interesting to see how these compa-

social. More events, more advertising, more design. And,

nies adjust to a return to pre-pandemic sales and opportunities.

by the way, I’ve built more websites during this time, too. Opening up is happening too fast and is spurred by revenue People will always have information to share, things to sell,

concerns by governmental bodies. We could be in bad shape

and stories to tell. And they will need creative people to help

with variants come fall.

them do that. Things are different now but the fundamentals will always be the same.

When the economy is good, there is more funding for projects. If there is more funding for projects, people need designers.

It’s good to have a challenge that makes you rough up the

My company has been lucky during the pandemic because we

ground and dig deep. Being flexible, learning new ways of doing

make consumer products for use in the home, and this category

things and new approaches to meet new needs is all part of our

has been booming during the pandemic. It’s hard to imagine

evolutionary journey as creatives. There will definitely be things

that we could do even better once things open up. Trend

specific to the pandemic that are writing a new history for this

reports indicate that people will continue to do a lot at home so

“Age” but humans are resilient. People are spending more on

I think we should continue to see the benefit.

joy which is what we try to create.

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June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:45 PM Page 35

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

WILL THERE BE AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN 2021 AND WILL IT BENEFIT CREATIVE BUSINESSES? CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE From my experience, creative business has thrived during the

Graphic design and creative business will play a more

pandemic. I found that clients have been putting in more of

important role as people are finding out that our reach goes

the work during the quarantine so they could be prepared for

beyond being in-person. Great creative/graphic design can

when businesses open back up. And for those businesses put

make/break first impressions and break boredom for retention.

on hold, it seems opportunity has really begun to increase at this point as people start engaging more with physical locations.

Like other firms, we’ll adapt or decline.

I only expect the economy, and as well as creative businesses, to continue to improve. My industry will improve when air

Whether the economy improves in the second half of 2021 or

travel, business travel, and leisure travel ramps back up.

not, it’s critical for businesses and organizations to maintain a

This will help me.

meaningful presence. Emphasis on “meaningful presence.”

I expect ridiculous inflation. I also expect ridiculous paper

People will always have information to share, things to sell, and

prices (following the already ridiculous lumber costs).

stories to tell. And they will need creative people to help them

As such, printing costs will escalate.

do that. Things are different now but the fundamentals will always be the same.

It’s hard to say. Some rebound is inevitable, but other communication functions that were forced on everyone during

I am not very optimistic about the second half of 2021.

the pandemic will probably stay and become the norm.

So many industries do not need to advertise or promote right

I see a quick uptick in work followed by a gradual stall.

now due to the ongoing shortages of goods and workers.

Small companies who have made it through this far are going

I do not expect the economy to improve much. It may even get

to need help getting back on their feet and it’s up to us to

worse. We need to open up our businesses, schools and event

find new ways to get them back out in the public eye again.

venues! I don’t think that is going to happen to the extent that

I do expect the economy to improve later this year and have

it needs to.

already felt the effects of people wanting to brush up their branding and print materials. Overall, I think graphic design

I do not expect the economy to improve under the current

and the creative business in on the rise even more because

US administration... The current policies in the US [including

people want to be engaged in all the ways. People are ready to

California’s rulings that threaten independent contracting and

live their lives again.

freelancing] do not make for a strong, prosperous system where creativity and diverse points of view can thrive. I do not expect

I have found the loyalty factor between myself and my clients

my design business to increase in 2021.

to have a far greater impact than any trend. So far, I have seen a welcome improvement of both work and cash flow in the first

Recovery? Yes and no. The business that I work for, yes. As

half of 2021. I expect it to continue.

in in-house designer, I am fortunate that our clients have adapted to the new trends, and the market is picking back up.

There will be a correction to the lack of spending; I think

The graphic design and creative business in general, however,

some normalcy will be restored, but innovations made in the

will recover from the recession and some jobs will be brought

pandemic economy will stick.

back, but it won’t be at the level that we hope to see because of the deep job losses, the bankruptcies, and designers who

I’m not sure how it will affect higher education, as most of the

have ventured into other fields. I look forward to 2022 and 2023

loss in our revenue is because we went remote. For extended

because that should be back to around where 2019 left off for

education, our revenue has been steady with the move to all

the design industry.

online classes for our Summer Session/Intersession and certificate courses.

A robust economy will provide more business growth. The future of advertising and marketing will ride on the coat tails of manufacturing and intellectual products. A national comeback will spur industry and our industry. G D U SA 35


June 2021 Print Survey Impo.qxp_SEPT 07 People 6/9/21 3:45 PM Page 36

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

WILL THERE BE AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN 2021 AND WILL IT BENEFIT CREATIVE BUSINESSES? CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

The public will need to know that businesses are open, and

I work for a non-profit (food pantry) so the fact that we saw an

they are doing all they can to keep the public safe. There may

increase of 777% of people using our services tells me that

need to be promotions to get people to come back to that

there is a thin line of where people are economically,

restaurant, theater, store, etc. That is where the creative/

and unless the government does something to increase the

design world will benefit. If we can make people feel safe and

minimum wage things won’t change.

comfortable to return to a somewhat normal life again, then we have done our jobs.

I’m not 100% sure the economy will improve — I see a lot of rumors of increased taxes for small businesses. Hopefully,

As a retail advertising specialist, as more stores open up,

it will improve and then, yes, that would definitely improve

so does my business.

our business.

I’ve been furloughed since March of 2020. Over time, I’ve been

Perhaps more hope or gut feeling than any quantifiable

working from home and since then things have been moving

benchmark, I see us benefiting from pent-up demand and a

along fairly well. If it has not yet paid off financially, it’s

(slight) loosening of the purse strings as we head toward the

definitely increased with networking with new clients.

final quarter of the year, by which time we should have a much better handle on the pandemic and the overall global

Most of our clients will need to communicate to their audiences

economic situation.

the opportunities or changes so we'll have work to do. I know we're taking the opportunity to capture our story and send

Yes. We now have greater ability to reach more clients. Connect

something out to all the clients. A stronger economy should

to more creatives. Access to more printers as well. A new form

benefit us, but we have to do the work to ensure that clients

of work-life balance is being formulated; “the office” can be

think of us!

anywhere in the world.

People are ready to live their lives again. The public will need

I'm mixed about what to expect in the second half of 2021.

to know that businesses are open, and they are doing all they

Like other industries, the creative industry has evolved to an

can to keep the public safe. There may need to be promotions

online model. As more businesses look to take on new clients,

to get people to come back to that restaurant, theater, store,

you'll see more customers looking outside their immediate

etc. That is where the creative/design world will benefit. If

geographic area for comparable talent. Key attributes will

we can make people feel safe and comfortable to return to a

include creatives who are dependable, reliable, and excel in

somewhat normal life again, then we have done our jobs.

customer service.

36 G D U S A


june21ads.qxp_Layout 1 6/9/21 3:57 PM Page 37

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June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:35 PM Page 38

| 2021 |

LOGOLOUNGE TREND REPORT DESIGNERS AS SCOUTS AND GUIDES IN ALIEN TERRITORY BY BILL GARDNER FOUNDER + PRESIDENT, LOGOLOUNGE.COM

Preparing for this year’s LogoLounge.com Logo Trend Report, I couldn’t help but land on the word drama. No, not the flippant kind that plays out as passive aggressive jabs between partners, but more like the ancient Greek kind: comedies, tragedies and satire that help us fully connect with the human experience. Design firms either did very well or very poorly. Either their

Products related to pets, plants, and cleaning caught our

phone was ringing off the hook or quit ringing entirely.

at-home attention, delivery reigned, and new skills were

Distance working has enabled distant client relationships

served up through online courses: cooking, writing, art,

and more connectivity between virtual offices opened op-

crocheting, juggling, you name it. Connectivity was our driv-

portunities for those willing to embrace it.

ing factor, and cyber interactions were the hygienic choice.

Go-to freelancers often saw even more work because

The big question is how much of this will stay stuck to the wall over the next few years and how much is a reactionary foible?

agencies are more amenable to remote contractors. It’s just as easy to connect with an in-house designer on Zoom as it is with someone halfway across the country. New players emerged and old ones shifted into new spaces.

What we do know from graphic trends is that they swing It was a year of learning, as we all picked up new skill sets and had to hone our communication style to fit the

on a pendulum. When anything reaches saturation we will rush back to the other side to fill the void.

medium. Folks previously unfamiliar found themselves meeting solely via Zoom, Team, Skype, Google Meet, etc.

All of this is exceptional news for designers and especially for branding. This infusion of new products, services and

Small businesses had space to flourish, as side gigs became full-time hustles. And until many of these scale up, they

enthusiasts have stories to be told and we are the people to do that.

depended on small-batch artisan brands to avoid being so pretentious as to be beyond belief — authenticity matters.

People in branding are hired to tell stories and create meaning. Make the drama matter.

Our trip to a virtual business model hyper jumped in time by necessity. The burgeoning business that is on digital is trying to find the blendo between slick and personal.

Consumers are looking for guidance in alien territory and we are the scouts and the guides. Brands have to be where the customers are and this year they weren’t in brick and mortar locales, they were online. All the more reasons brands need to be designed to live in the RGB world.

38 G D U S A


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:36 PM Page 39

Conversely, we felt a deep need to disconnect from technology this year, and connect with nature. Ecology and the environment were huge themes this year, with a slight twist in every genre toward sustainability. Unsurprisingly, many of the trends are geared to showing a shift in our culture or in a brand. Off Jogs visually jump from level A to level B in an abrupt message of change, while Swingers and Spliced CBC both show transitions in space. Electric Tape and Dog Tags speak to the immediacy of the message without following past conventions to finesse and pamper the message — intentional and strategic imperfection that speaks to the aesthetic. Responsive identity design shifted from variable fonts to variable typefaces that shifted from display serif to stark

It is an observation of the trajectory and evolution of key

sans serif just to prove it could be done and demonstrate

design directions. Yours is not to imitate but to use these

extraordinary metamorphoses.

to inform you where our industry is going and if you are able to stand on the shoulders of these designs and push

Old school etched logos came back with a vengeance but

them to the next great iteration or a completely new level.

were retooled to reproduce digitally.

If so you may be the creator of what we’ll be admiring with envy a year from now. You may well have crafted the

Snakes on Swords and Sushi on Chopsticks as well as every

beginnings of the next exceptional trend.

iteration of the revolutionary fist thrust into the air abound. Avocados, droplets, palm trees and pine trees and a few too

2021 marks the 18th year of this one-of-a-kind report.

many cute critters chopped in half to expose their innards

Each year, it offers the opportunity to literally review thou-

are not as we assumed.

sands upon thousands of logos one at a time, looking for nuances and artifacts of emerging trends. As we acknowl-

And as with ABSOLUTELY every report it is key to remem-

edge that each design represents hours and hours of thought

ber I am just reporting what we have found by thoroughly

and struggle from designers around the world, we are as

scrutinizing the more than 35,000 logos submitted to

humbled and awed as ever by their dedication to the craft

LogoLounge since last year’s report. This is in addition to

and grateful for the important role they play in helping us

reviewing every significant brand introduction and update

create these reports. So thank you to all of the designers

internationally for the past year as well.

who have and will contribute to the Trend Reports then, now, and for years to come. For an even deeper look at

This is a trend report and NOT a trendy report.

this year’s trends, visit our course on LinkedIn Learning (formerly Lynda.com).

G D U SA 39


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:36 PM Page 40

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2021 LOGO TREND REPORT

ASTERISK It’s no surprise that following a year with the rampant use of lightning bolts and twinkling four-pointed stars, designers lead a scavenger hunt in search of their next little star. And this is exactly where they’ve netted out with the asterisk, which literally translates from Latin as “little star.” Whether parading in the five, six or eight-pointed variety, this punctuation icon is now firmly rooted in the designer’s graphic vernacular. Incorporated as a bit player in a more involved logo or cast in the solo starring role, this mark tops our list with the most annual credits and will likely be found for a few years to come in brands currently in pre-production. Though Walmart and FedEx Office have been sporting asterisk derivative marks for better than a decade, the resurgent popularity generally focuses in on the sans serif iteration. This clean aesthetic scales well and reads universally as a sun, a star, a flower, a spark or an idea and of course as a signal of possible omission or to take note. Oddly an alternate iteration is also gaining traction where the symbol is being modified by visually dropping the convergence point to create an off center representative of cannabis. Shall we refer to this as a poterisk? The asterisk is proving to be much more flexible than as a character place-holder for passwords. Visually, this symbol can be broadly interpreted and embellished without losing its imbued linguistic meaning. The only down side seen here is the vigilant consumer, head tipped downward scanning for the qualifying footnote.

DESIGN AGENCY: TYPE08 CLIENT: PARTNER

DESIGN AGENCY: MYKOLA STRILETC CLIENT: BIRD BROTHER

DESIGN AGENCY:

CLIENT: TOLUNA

WALL VS. CRAYON

DESIGN AGENCY: R/GA CLIENT: EVOLVED BY NATURE

DESIGN AGENCY: APERIOS DESIGN CLIENT: HEMPEN

CLIENT: ASTERISM

OFF JOG This is perhaps one of the most intriguing trends of the year, easily spotted once pointed out but elusive in definition. Imagine any band or ribbon that alters and resumes course. It is that point of alteration that is of interest, not what happens before or after. That occurrence along the path could be a shifting up in gears, or an adoption of a new process, or entering a new generation. It may be a transition of space, materials, ownership or product, but regardless the path once altered continues forward true to course. Following left to right the Bancontact logo reads as a ribbon twisting a half turn exposing it’s golden side and proceeding forward with new elevation. Eisbach uses a nearly identical alteration, but the trio of bands reflect the point break in the water for surfing. What unites all of these marks in the jog creates a tenuous junction between before and after that barely allows a bridging of the gap. A bit like glorifying the moment. There is no doubt it occurred but scant evidence remains. From a designer’s perspective this creates a narrative of continuity married to a moment of significant change. There was a hiccup, good or bad, but we’re on course, just like we planned.

CLIENT: BANCONTACT

40 G D U S A

DESIGN AGENCY: JAY FLETCHER

DESIGN AGENCY: GRETEL

DESIGN AGENCY: BUROCRATIK

CLIENT: EISBACH

CLIENT: BREX

CLIENT: HEMATOGENIX


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:37 PM Page 41

SPLICED CBC It was 1974 when Burton Kramer crafted the seminal Canadian Broadcast Corporation’s kaleidoscopic logo, less reverently referred to as the exploding pizza. Though updated and iterated over the years, the husk of the original design remains with a red circle radiating in a faceted geometry, as might be seen through a dragonfly’s eye. And though the CBC logo was not the first nor the last to adopt this elegant burst effect it certainly is to this day the most visible, and is now impacting a generation of designers absent at its birth. An array of diminishing fragments projecting out of a core element is the signature of this motif. Each splice expanding out yet visibly dissipating like ripples from a pebble tossed in a pond. Proliferation, multiplication and reach all come to mind with this concept that looks like mitosis incarnate. Sony Music Publishing riffs on this look perfectly to represent dissemination of sound and the delivery of a digital product. Several in this new generation recognize the projectiles don’t all have to physically be disconnected from the host to demonstrate the idea. Despite the original CBC mark displaying a sunny sequential palette of colors, the majority of these trending marks have embraced a single tone, understanding the graphics convey change enough and that stepped colors may be a step too far.

CLIENT:

DESIGN AGENCY: SHAWN BANKS

DESIGN AGENCY: MISTERSHOT

DESIGN AGENCY: NOUR OUMOUSSE

SONY MUSIC PUBLISHING

CLIENT: PANORAMA

CLIENT: B MONOGRAM

CLIENT: GEOMETRIC BIRD

ELECTRIC TAPE Not sure if this is a step forward or backwards when a designer’s media of choice is a roll of electrical tape. Landing somewhere in the realm between a brutal application of graffiti and a finely finessed monoline design, these logos have embraced a miscreant’s attitude. The kind of art you might expect to see on the side of a service truck whose owner couldn’t afford a vinyl placard. This DIY styling is typically crafted out of common width, straight strips, that fail to negotiate a corner without a hard cut, and cobbled together with little concern for cleaning up junctures. How completely appropriate for the witty Czech Skateboard Association, mashing up the Republic’s two tailed rampant lion with a marauder on a longboard. Mis-registered corners and unbending structure give a mischievous feel to this group of marks that make them completely approachable and remove any doubt that anyone is taking themselves too seriously. Flexibility of this style allows it to morph from image to typography but it becomes most evident in the absence of curves. This naive quality is going to have a pretty finite market but when there’s a need to completely remove any pretentious mantel, guaranteed, this is the express.

DESIGN AGENCY: FRANK ATELIER

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: MOTHER DESIGN

CLIENT: CZECH SKATEBOARDING

DOUG RANSDELL

CLIENT: FILTHY

ASSOCIATION

CLIENT: NOVUSWAY MINISTRIES

DESIGN AGENCY: NAKED BUREAU CLIENT: RYABCHICK

G D U SA 41


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:37 PM Page 42

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2021 LOGO TREND REPORT

TRANS FLIP Hypnotic, mesmerizing, and spellbinding all come to mind gazing into these faceted bauble logos. Something about the rhythmic symmetry and inner light lets you lose yourself in their depth. Imagine anyone of these before being flipped and embedded on itself, and you can see how that layered transparency is a force multiplier. For practical reasons, the more layers you have, the deeper the color becomes as they begin to overlap. Even when utilizing opaque layers or a modest gradient, the illusion of depth can be equally spellbinding. Certainly this is not the first of these that we’ve seen but this is the year they’ve really seemed to proliferate. Where layered transparency is a factor, too many subtle steps of hue can become a challenge to manage even in an RGB environment. From necessity this can also create enough sequential color cells that the integrity of a logo is lost as it scales down. With the popularity of gradient fields of color, this tonal stepping technique gives designers an option to create a non-gradient color trance that’s just as engaging. Even though the examples shown here display mirror symmetry this same technique is being utilized with equal success in some asymmetrical applications. The upside for a client adopting this direction is an engaging vision that represents the prospect of an orderly, transparent relationship.

DESIGN AGENCY: ALMOSH82

DESIGN AGENCY: VADIM CARAZAN

DESIGN AGENCY: SIGNIFLY

DESIGN AGENCY:

CLIENT: M

CLIENT: LIVING THE

CLIENT: POWERSIDE

JEFFREY DEVEY DESIGN CLIENT: KICKCHARGE CREATIVE

FEMININE FUTURE

STACKED There can be a very gray area between logo design and icon design at times. Or in this trend a white area is more apropos. Consumers have become comfortable with the avalanche of symbols, pictograms and emojis that populate even the most obscure interface. Not just the international language on your mobile device but there to guide tire inflation, iron settings, recycling, heart rate, ovulation and every other noun or function you can fathom. These icons reward designers with what is ultimately a universal visual utopia to draw upon. A virtual cornucopia of graphic building blocks and that is exactly how they are being stacked. Give me a mark for an exceptional resort. Well let’s see, waves, a home and the Sun for some really good rays and a swarthy tan. Stack them up and we're done. Frankly, that is a nicely crafted mark and the idea of bringing visuals associated with a locale is nothing new. What probably is new-ish is our ability to visually knock down the film industry or photography to a ring in a square and a series of floating hash marks for a clapper board. Six wedges sliced off a circle and a square transport us to a tropical paradise. These marks are to the point and spatially pleasing with their blend of positive and negative space. Though they can appear somewhat generic that can also signal the ownership and authority of the symbolic genre their logo represents.

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: SERGIO JOSEPH

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: ATLAS BRANDING

JOSH CAPEDER

CLIENT: KNAPP STUDIOS

BANOWETZ + COMPANY

CLIENT: CITY CHURCH

CLIENT: CASA DOS RIOS

42 G D U S A

CLIENT: NRP GROUP


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:37 PM Page 43

QUADS Just because it’s the way things are, the really important things in life tend to come in fours, like seasons, cardinal directions, the suits in a deck of cards, the fantastic four, the fab four, and CMYK. I may have missed a few here but this year designers didn’t. Foursomes were on their mind and in particular there was a true obsession with the tidy practice of quartering a square. We have to admit that a square is a fundamental go-to logo design element and wait for it ... the shape has FOUR sides! Whether actually being used to neatly pack up four initials or partners, or offerings, it was not a mandate for this trend as it could just as easily have been a way to signal diversity or abundance in a tidy container. Branding is largely about building consistency and being able to demonstrate order in a logo can be fundamental to our craft. When applied to the appropriate client, all the better. Amongst others, it’s not surprising to see these marks representing architecture, museums, builders, and urban entities that are often called on to create spatial organization. Because dividing a square into quads creates four more squares, it assembles a cluster of elements each still large enough to scale well as part of a single logo. These can become really over worked in detail and a Spartan design aesthetic can be a plus, thus what appears to be basic geometry inside of basic geometry or letterforms.

CLIENT: GOOGLE FIBER

DESIGN AGENCY: YOUNIQUE STUDIO

DESIGN AGENCY: STUDIO TRASHLINE

DESIGN AGENCY:

CLIENT: NATIONAL ART

CLIENT: MAINZER

HOLLIS BRAND CULTURE

MUSEUM OF LITHUANIA

MINIPRESSEN MESSE

CLIENT: FLOWERHILL PROMENADE

CHAINS I was always taught that the quickest way from point A to point B is a straight line. Then it pretty much stands that the serpentine line is for someone with either too much time on their hands or it’s more about the aesthetics of the journey than the destination. These thoughts come to mind with this set of marks that all use a composition of half circles alternately flipped and gathered together in a chain like fashion and connected at their tips. Any of these probably could have been served by utilizing a serpentine line but without nearly the effect or the visual weight created here. Steam, smoke, waves or any other good reason to use the symbolic wavy line seems to have been a candidate for this technique that sees a rise in logo design over the last year. Used in a supporting role like the steam rising from the bowl or to create a simple geometric pattern, this technique adds a rhythmic field to a mark using minimal visual exertion. The method becomes more challenging when the central focus of the mark as sprinting forward with too many links either vertically or horizontally limits scale. It’s perfect if you’re carving out a letter s but not too much more. It will be interesting to see where this evolves as it is one step away from describing the threedimensional space of a spiral with a line run through its core.

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: WALL VS. CRAYON

DESIGN AGENCY: GENIUSLOGO

DESIGN AGENCY:

NADIA CASTRO

CLIENT: CAMPFIRE STORES

CLIENT: SERBIA

MONTENEGRO DESIGN

CLIENT: HER CAFÉ

CLIENT: SETMA

G D U SA 43


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:38 PM Page 44

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2021 LOGO TREND REPORT JANUS Variable fonts have made as much of a contribution to shifting the design landscape over the last few years as have any tools we’ve seen introduced. So much of the fascination with a typeface that can easily be manipulated into various approved weights and widths has been in the visual demonstrations of the transformation occurring. Only less captivating is the static result of whatever characteristics the user lands on. Give credit where it is due, but we should only be modestly surprised at this next step in the evolution. A crafty designer posed the question, what happens if we create a variable font that transitions from a serif font for example to a very different sans serif option. Exploiting the premise, designers did their damnedest to display an analog demonstration of variable fonts by creating word marks where each letter sequentially shifted weight or another attribute. Evolved By Nature visually nails the process of evolution in their wordmark, but it becomes all the more evident as each letter, from left to right, starts to molt serifs until the final svelte transfiguration is evident. Even the asterisk logo for Evolved goes through a similar transition but in much tighter confines. This is a technique that shines when it comes to demonstrating diversity and change. Canal Brasil takes an even more brazen and entertaining path to this trend with a looped animation of letter-forms, each in full transformation as if caught squandering polyjuice potion.

DESIGN AGENCY: R/GA

DESIGN AGENCY: MORROW

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: TATIL DESIGN

CLIENT: EVOLVED BY NATURE

CLIENT: NATION

VISUAL ARTS INSTITUTE

CLIENT: CANAL BRASIL

CLIENT: FLUIDO

MERGER Each of us has at some point stared at a windowpane covered with raindrops from a shower. A droplet with just the right gravity starts to trickle across the glass merging with the next, then the next, until it creates a rivulet of water that races down gobbling every drop in its path. There is a random nature about this but also an inevitability that every drop adds to the power of the whole. Magnetism draws elements together, and what was once a chain of two or three drops might become a torrent. These logos demonstrate the multiplied strength of those that have joined in the effort as well as the individual beads prepared to join in the movement. A building drop used in this scenario stands resolute on its own in a perfect dome. It's completely self-sufficient but at a tense proximity only a fraction away from becoming a part of something larger. These logos represent strength in numbers or a magnification of capability. They demonstrate an ease of blending and a mercurial ability to react. Most of these logos demonstrate this process with a chain of unions, captured at the second in time when the merger occurs. Snapshots taken at the perfect moment to best engage the consumer’s imagination.

DESIGN AGENCY: TOMKO DESIGN

DESIGN AGENCY: BESTBEFORE2065

DESIGN AGENCY: MILAD DESIGN CO.

DESIGN AGENCY:

CLIENT: OARS

CLIENT: IREN

CLIENT: MILKOM

MARKFIELD DESIGN CLIENT: CELLARIA

44 G D U S A


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:38 PM Page 45

O’REALLY There is probably no more foundational shape for a designer than the circle. It harkens to a level of perfection that is terribly unforgiving and blessed are we as designers that design software can whack them out perfectly time after time. And another circle knocked out of the first but a little smaller and exactly centered, and there’s your ring. Or a letter O if you’re working with Avante Garde. And it may seem that in producing the ring, that the only real decision to be made is regarding the thickness, light, medium, bold, or black? But as this series of beautiful logos attest, there is so much more. And the much more part is why this group of logos can even be considered a trend since we’ve been busting out rings and calling them logos for generations. It’s the use of gradients or a halftone effect that’s really caused this shape to leap to the top of the popularity heap. Yes, a ring still conveys eternity, unity, perfection or a cycle. It signals completion and is unbroken and the hole in the middle can convey passage or a window or portal. All of those connotations stand true, but with the treatment of the surface to a wash of tone and a new world of symbolism is exposed. It’s not just a cycle, but one from cool to hot, or night to day, or properly shaded the ring takes on dimension. Gradients can wander the ring’s perimeter or spread across the face or even diminish into an inner abyss. And though it’s swell if your name starts with an O, the imbued power of this shape far exceeds mere association as a monogram.

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: SML DESIGN

DESIGN AGENCY: CIRCULO COMUNI-

DESIGN AGENCY: SIGNIFY

GLITSCHKA STUDIOS

CLIENT: SOLUBILITY

CACION CREATIVA, SC

CLIENT: COPENHAGENIZE INDEX

CLIENT: MAGENTA 360

CLIENT: ORA COINS

SWINGERS Leave it to a designer to dispel Sir Isaac Newton’s law of motion that “an object at rest will stay at rest.” He’d frankly not anticipated designers adding motion stripes or a visual vortex to speed up or whirl an object from its place of rest in the consumer’s mind. Designers are a pretty clever band and if a project calls for the static demonstration of movement, there’s no shortage of solutions in their kit of tricks. Spinning, leaping, flying, exploding, dashing and all the other ingings have been trotted out time and again but this year logo designers have taken to swinging. Swingers as we’ve named them are those marks that want to demonstrate motion but are tethered to a principle or a core that signals stability. These marks may represent an entity that is pivoting from a previous position. Possibly this hinged effect reinforces the idea that stability and flexibility are not exclusive of each other. The marks using transparency to convey a series of frames in motion convey openness and clarity, and all of these logos define space through optical dimension. Whether these logos appear to be swinging, flapping or waving in the breeze, none of the entities they represent appear to be objects at rest.

DESIGN AGENCY: HRISTIJAN EFTIMOV DESIGN CLIENT: TURBOPAY

DESIGN AGENCY: PIONEER DESIGN CLIENT: MAYSA AIROWAISHED

DESIGN AGENCY: MIHAI DOLGANIUC DESIGN CLIENT: ALSTU.NL

DESIGN AGENCY: SIGNIFY CLIENT: PAPERFLOW

G D U SA 45


June 2021LogoloungeImpo.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:39 PM Page 46

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2021 LOGO TREND REPORT DOG TAGS There’s that certain charm, beauty, and finality that attaches itself to the idea of cramming all of your vital stats onto a small metal lozenge with a limit of 72 characters. Decisions are made as information goes through the triage of suspect abbreviations, dropped details, and just determining what’s critical and what’s not. A cadence is evident when looking at these solutions that disregard kerning or letter modifications as words swing around the inside of curves and tend to consume every iota of space. Though this trend may allow an additional typeface to squeeze into the solution they are often crafted with an unremarkable font with a single weight and point size. Constraints that we live by lead the creative to some exceptionally clever solutions and these marks reflect that. For the client these logos represent, they exhibit simplicity and functionality that is forthright and honest. The text itself becomes decoration or a pattern used to define or repeat the shape of the tag, exhibiting a level of resourcefulness. As a rule these logos avoid using graphic symbols in the letter mix, which means the external shape becomes the sole iconic signal. Finding the client with the right aesthetic to rep this mark is key. Like the right look, on the wrong person these logo’s unintentional nature is completely intentional.

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: BE GOOD STUDIO

ZAC JACOBSON

PIONEER DESIGN

JORDAN WILSON DESIGN

CLIENT: COUNSEL CREATIVE

CLIENT: COASTAL CLOUDS CO.

CLIENT: NINE TWENTY

CLIENT: PERSONAL BRANDING

CATTLE COMPANY

ETCHED Mascots and logos as we came to know them often were extracted from engraved advertising art used even before the turn of the prior century. The Smith Brothers or the Quaker Oats man or even Nipper the RCA Victor dog with the quizzical face were lifted from the art used to hock the wares. Those logos were etched and full of nostalgic charm from when the world was more innocent, but illustrated in this manner solely because that technique was essential for printing. Our continued infatuation with this style has nothing to do with reproduction and everything to do with reflecting on products imbued with qualities from a prior generation. It’s a fair comment that finely engraved logos and badges have hung around or been newly crafted as an artifact of another era for eons. This recent season of marks has however been riddled with ever greater numbers of logos of exactly this ilk. A fair assumption is two things have converged for this to occur. Firstly there has been an entrepreneurial rush over the last several years to provide curated and/or small batch products and services that counter the behemoths. Secondly, there have been a number of capable illustrators and designers cutting their teeth on gin bottles and chocolate boxes with exactly this style. Now they are fueled up and ready to deliver. Quality levels and styles vary from naive to highly honed and sophisticated but all transport the consumer to an intangible place.

DESIGN AGENCY: ALMOSH82

DESIGN AGENCY: MEEM DESIGN

DESIGN AGENCY: PETER VOTH

DESIGN AGENCY: CF NAPA BRAND

CLIENT: CARLSBERG

CLIENT: VATRINA

CLIENT: DIE FUTTERMACHER

DESIGN CLIENT: BIGSBY’S FOLLY

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RODS Perspective has everything to do with everything. Possibly the difference between a dot and a dash is really the angle from which it’s being viewed. Staring down the barrel of a rod from just off center gives us a shaft that diminishes width, and rounds off at either end. Start to splay these in an orderly array and you have the makings of this trend set. Give the center a minor twist and the same logo evokes the rotation of a gradually winding vortex. It’s easy to make the jump to this set being a derivative of the auras and halos so often employed over the last few years. These are more about the shafts themselves than about providing a nimbus to circumscribe a central feature. The rounding of the ends on these keep them friendly and approachable and truly is their distinguishing element. From this display you’ll note that the effect is equally impressive using a single tone or when gradients are used to define shape and distance. These marks nearly always project from a vacuous center torched clean by a burst of light and convey a sense of expansion, hope, and outreach. It’s all about the management of the action and less about what caused it.

DESIGN AGENCY:

DESIGN AGENCY: ZAC JACOBSON

DESIGN AGENCY:

DBWORKPLAY

CLIENT: TRANSCEND

1 OR BILLION DESIGN

CLIENT: M

CLIENT: IFS

CLIENT: DWEI

MORE ABOUT BILL GARDNER AND LOGO LOUNGE BILL GARDNER is the president of Gardner Design and founder of LogoLounge.com, a repository site where, in real time, members can post their logo design work and search the works of others by keyword, designer’s name, client type, and more. The site also offers news curated expressly for logo designers as well as unlimited entries for consideration in the bestselling LogoLounge book series. Bill can be contacted at bill@logolounge.com.

LOGOLOUNGE.COM is the most comprehensive and searchable database of logos available today. More than 300,000 logos have been submitted to the site since 2002, growing it to the largest online treasury of professionally designed logos. Through their submissions, members also gain the benefit of consideration for publication in the LogoLounge book series, the result of the most prestigious logo design competition in the world.Through the line of LogoLounge books (currently published in volumes 1 through 12) designers can gain even more insights from a collection of the smartest logo designs submitted to LogoLounge from all over the world, which are hand-selected by a preeminent panel of some of the most respected names in the industry. In 2016, LogoLounge took a giant step forward as it extended membership to the next generation of designers with LogoLounge Leap, which allows educators and students free or deeply discounted access to the site as well as online resources and educational tools.

For more information on membership and identity design news, visit LogoLounge.com.

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| 2021 |

HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Our annual GDUSA Health+Wellness Design Awards™ competition honors graphic excellence in this hugely important and high-profile arena. More than 200 pieces are showcased here, from a record-breaking number of entries representing leading institutions, creative agencies and design departments. They run the gamut from traditional medicine to healthy lifestyles to public health initiatives. This showcase dramatically demonstrates what we have all learned the hard way during the pandemic: effective communication makes a vital contribution to our personal and collective health and safety.

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DESIGN FIRMS AND DEPARTMENTS REPRESENTED AARP Brand Creative Services AARP Publications

50 50, 51, 52

KUDOS Design Collaboratory™ + MTWTF

71

Mangold Design

72 72

Aegis Dental Network

52

Memorial Health System Marketing

Affinity Creative Group

53

National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)

Alight Solutions

53

Communications and Brand Strategy

American Pharmacists Association

53, 54

Amwins Connect

54

NIH Medical Arts Branch

Apervita, Inc.

54

NC State University, College of Design

Argus

54, 55

72

National Institutes of Health |

O’Brien et al Advertising

72, 73, 74 75 75

Aronson Hecht Agency

55

Odonnell Company

Avid Creative

55

Office Depot Brand Creative

76

Big League Pins/Statement Design

55

One Zero Charlie

76

Birk Creative

56

Open Door Design Studio (ODDS)

76

56

Palm Beach County Parks & Recreation Dept.

77

Black Graphics BrandHive Bruce Power Creative Strategy Team Brunet-Garcia Advertising

56, 57 57 57, 58

Payton Brands PBD Partners

75, 76

77 77, 78

PepsiCo Design & Innovation

78, 79 80, 81 81, 82

C&G Partners

59

Place Creative Company

Care Value, Inc.

59

Quill Creative

Cause Communications

59

Ratkaj Designs

CBX

60

RLD Creative

Cedars-Sinai Creative Services

60

Ron Lewis Creative

Cepheid | Marketing Communications

61

RTI International

Ceros

61

Rule29

Charles Thomas Design

62

Saputo Design

84

Christiansen Creative

62

Shih-Wei Cheng

84

Cisner Media

62

Simplicity by Assurance Scientific Laboratories

84

Community First Health Plans

63

Sizewise Marketing

Craig Calsbeek Graphic Design (CCGD)

63

Smith Design

David Hazelton

63

Spring Hills

Deloitte Digital

63

Stony Brook Medicine, Office of Marketing

Derry Noyes Graphics | USPS

64

and Communication

Design Revolution

64

Strategic Design + Advertising (SDA)

87

Due West Design, LLC

64

Studio O+A

87

Ellen Bruss Design

64

Test Monki

Elmwood

65

The Creative Pack LLC

Firebrand Cooperative

65

The Goldstein Group

Goodwin Proctor LLP | Marketing + Communications

65

The Hatcher Group

82 82, 83 83 83 83, 84

85 85, 86 86 86, 87

88, 89 89 89 90, 91

The Hive at Humana

91

Hartford Design | Woz Design | Ted Stoik

66

The Kitchen Collaborative

92

HB Design

66

Thomas Jefferson University

92

Huntsman Cancer Institute Communications Dept.

69

Topco Creative Services

92

Iconix Inc.

69

Tower Health | Creative Services

92

Inseego

69

University of Massachusetts Boston |

invok brands

69

Marketing and Engagement Team

93

Jennifer Cogan Design

70

Viola Design

93

Journey Group | USPS

70

Voraco International

Hammer Marketing

65, 66

Werremeyer Creative

Kaiser Permanente Brand,

93 93, 94, 95

Marketing + Creative Services

70

Wynk Design

95

Kick

71

Xhilarate

95

KUDOS Design Collaboratory™

71

Yoske Mitsui

96

KUDOS Design Collaboratory™ + Gimongo

71

Zoo Valdes

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: AARP Brand Creative Services, Washington DC Client: AARP Title: COVID-19 Trusted Resources Campaign Creative Director: Mike Hilker Designer: Michelle Moser

Design Firm: AARP Brand Creative Services, Washington DC Title: AARP Responds To COVID Campaign Creative Director: Mike Hilker Designer: Mike Hilker

Design Firm: AARP Brand Creative Services, Washington DC Title: AARP Family Caregiver Resource Guide Creative Director: Mike Hilker Designer: Matt Rosser

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: AARP The Magazine Title: COVID and the Brain Creative Director: Scott A. Davis Art Director: Lesley Q. Palmer Illustrator: Ryan Johnson

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Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: AARP The Magazine Title: The Back-to-Normal Health Plan for Your 60s Creative Director: Scott A. Davis Associate Art Director: Joanna F. Hagan Illustrator: Chloe Zola

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: AARP The Magazine Title: Tony Bennett: Breaking the Silence Creative Director: Scott A. Davis Associate Art Director: Joanna F. Hagan Senior Deputy Photo Director: Caitlin DeFlaviis

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: AARP Bulletin Title: An American Tragedy - Cover, December 2020 Creative Director: Scott A. Davis Photo Director: Michael Wichita

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: The Ethel Title: The One Thing I Need to Get a Good Night’s Sleep Design Director: Todd Albertson Illustration: Flip Fröhlich

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: The Girlfriend Title: 24 Thoughts We All Have at The Gynecologist’s Office Senior Deputy Art Director: Dian Holton Illustrator: Alice Mollon

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: Sisters from AARP Title: Skip the Gym and Get Slim Senior Deputy Art Director: Dian Holton Illustrator: Maya Ish-Shalom

Design Firm: AARP Publications, Washington DC Client: AARP The Magazine Title: Women and Alzheimer’s Creative Director: Scott A. Davis Design Director: Todd Albertson Designer: Devan Feeney Illustrator: Lucy Jones Photo Director: Jane Clark

Design Firm: Aegis Dental Network, Newtown PA Client: Inside Dental Hygiene, Vol. 16, No. 10, Special Issue 4 Title: Bridging the Gap Editorial Feature Designer: Jennifer Barlow Illustrator: Craig Bowman Brand Director: Jason Mazda Senior Editor: Catherine Paulhamus

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Design Firm: Affinity Creative Group, Mare Island CA Client: PharmaStrip Title: PharmaStrip Flash Dissolve Oral Strips Packaging Design Designer: Affinity Creative Group

Design Firm: Affinity Creative Group, Mare Island CA Client: PharmaStrip Title: PharmaStrip Retail Display Box & POP Materials Designer: Affinity Creative Group

Design Firm: Alight Solutions, Lincolnshire IL Client: PepsiCo Title: Healthy Living Care Package Creative Director/Client Lead: Jill Rafkin Art Director/Designer: Cristine Giannotti Writers: Maureen Corrigan, Ken Mastro Project Manager: Kristine Peacock Production Editor: Randall Van Vynckt

Design Firm: American Pharmacists Association, Washington DC Title: Pharmacy Today Magazine | Remaining Resilient Cover Story, June 2020 Creative Director: David Tompkins Art Director/Designer: Scott Neitzke

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: American Pharmacists Association, Washington DC Title: Pharmacy Today Magazine | Pharmacy’s Journey During The Covid-19 Pandemic, December 2020 Creative Director: David Tompkins Art Director/Designer: Scott Neitzke

Design Firm: Amwins Connect, Woodland Hills CA Title: Amwins Connect Website Design VP of Marketing: Jeff Grocky Sr. Marketing Manager: Dena Nicotra Creative & Marketing Supervisor: Scott Rovin Copywriter: Leila Lavizadeh Graphics & Social Media Lead: Gladys Rodriguez Designer: Anuja Phansalkar Marketing Events Coordinator: Jennifer Hakim

Design Firm: Apervita, Inc., Brookfield IL Title: Apervita Website Design Creative Director: Laura Passero Art Director: Laura Passero Designer: Laura Passero Illustrator: Laura Passero Copywriting: Kaley Simon, Michell Schallhorn

Design Firm: Argus, Oakland CA Client: Flightpath Biosciences Title: Flightpath Biosciences Website Creative Director: Jeff Breidenbach Art Director: Jeff Breidenbach Designer: Jeff Breidenbach

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Design Firm: Argus, Oakland CA Client: SNAPkids Title: SNAPkids Website Creative Director: Stephanie Wade Art Director: Stephanie Wade Designer: Stephanie Wade

Design Firm: Aronson Hecht Agency, Wayne NJ Client: Worldwide Clinical Trials Title: Worldwide: Sickle Cell Disease Poster Campaign Creative Director: Phillip Aronson Art Directors: Phillip Aronson, Jonah Hecht Designer: Jonah Hecht

Design Firm: Avid Creative, Burlington ON, Canada Client: University of Toronto, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing Title: 2018-2020 Research Report Art Director: Ashley Howell Designer: Ashley Howell

Design Firm: Big League Pins/Statement Design, Chicago IL Client: Big League Pins Title: Vaccinated Pins Design Creative Directors: Kirsten Goede, Angie Garbot Art Director: Kirsten Goede Designer: Kirsten Goede

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Birk Creative, Chicago IL Client: Advocate Health Care Title: We Got You Public Awareness Campaign Creative Director: JinJa Birkenbeuel Art Director: JinJa Birkenbeuel Designer: JinJa Birkenbeuel

Design Firm: Black Graphics, New York NY Client: ChangeLab Solutions Title: Equitable Enforcement to Achieve Health Introductory Guide Art Director: Karen Parry Designer: Karen Parry Illustrator: Karen Parry

Design Firm: Black Graphics, New York NY Client: Rabin Martin | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Title: Maternal Immunization Infographics Art Director: Karen Parry Designer: Karen Parry Illustrator: Karen Parry

Design Firm: BrandHive, Salt Lake City UT Client: STADA Title: NUVIA Package Design Creative Directors: James Fagedes, Erika Granath Art Director: James Fagedes Designer: James Fagedes President: Andy Yorkin Account Director: Meet Nagar

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Design Firm: BrandHive, Salt Lake City UT Client: STADA Title: Bio360 Probiotics Online Design Creative Directors: Erika Granath, James Fagedes Art Director: Nate Peterson Designers: Erika Granath, Nate Peterson President: Andy Yorkin Account Director: Meet Nagar Client Website: www.Bio360.com

Design Firm: Bruce Power Creative Strategy Team, Tiverton ON, Canada Client: Bruce Power Title: Elements – Bruce Power Isotopes Campaign Art Director: Stacey Hill

Design Firm: Brunet-Garcia Advertising, Jacksonville FL Client: Baptist MD Anderson Cancer Center Title: The Art of Healing Book Creative Director: Aerien Mull Art Director: Bronie Brunet ECD: Eduardo Sarmiento Copy: Jack Twachtman

Design Firm: Brunet-Garcia Advertising, Jacksonville FL Client: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Title: HIV Social Graphics Creative Director: Aerien Mull Art Directors: Bianca Borghi, Dani Simmons Illustrator: Dani Simmons ECD: Eduardo Sarmiento Copy: Jack Twachtman

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Brunet-Garcia Advertising, Jacksonville FL Client: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Title: Flu Season Public Service Announcement Creative Director: Aerien Mull Art Directors: Cassie Deogracia, Em Spitler Animation: Castaño Group ECD: Eduardo Sarmiento Copy: Jack Twachtman

Design Firm: Brunet-Garcia Advertising, Jacksonville FL Client: Florida Health Department Title: Power To Protect ‘Questions’ Animation Series Creative Director: Aerien Mull Art Director: Bianca Borghi ECD: Eduardo Sarmiento Copy: Jack Twachtman

Design Firm: Brunet-Garcia Advertising, Jacksonville FL Client: Health Resources and Services Administration Title: Poison Control Experts Animation Creative Director: Aerien Mull Art Directors: Blake Hicks, Sarah Langston ECD: Eduardo Sarmiento Copy: Jack Twachtman

Design Firm: Brunet-Garcia Advertising, Jacksonville FL Client: U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources Title: I’m Ready Poster Series Creative Director: Aerien Mull Art Director: Sarah Langston Designer: ABDM Studio ECD: Eduardo Sarmiento Copy: Jack Twachtman Production: Castano Group

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Design Firm: C&G Partners, New York NY Client: David H. Koch Center for Cancer Care at Memorial Sloan Kettering Title: Dreams in Fiber Optic Wood Partner-In-Charge/Managing Partner: Jonathan Alger Associate Partner: Alin Tocmacov Lead Designer: Daniel Rodriguez Designers: Christian Montoro, Bruce Chao, Melinda Sekela Producer: Lauren Tomanelli Illustrator: Joao Ilustrator/Animator: Calista AV Integrator: Barco Fiber Optic Wood Manufacturer: Luminoso Architects: Ennead Collaborating Architects: Perkins Eastman Lobby Interior Architects: ICRAVE

Design Firm: Care Value, Inc., Farmington NY Title: CareValue Enrollment and Promotional Materials Designer: Trevor Smith

Design Firm: Cause Communications, Los Angeles CA Client: LA County Department of Mental Health Title: Help Line Toolkit

Design Firm: Cause Communications, Los Angeles CA Client: LA County Department of Mental Health Title: WE RISE: Virtual May Landing Page

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: CBX, Minneapolis MN Client: Manitoba Harvest Title: Manitoba Harvest CBD Creative Director: Scott Fisher Designer: Steve Swanson

Design Firm: CBX, Minneapolis MN Client: Celestial Seasonings Title: Teawell Functional Teas Packaging Creative Director: Audra Nebolini Design Manager: Mikki Beymer

Design Firm: Cedars-Sinai Creative Services, Los Angeles CA Client: CedarsSinai Obstetrics and Maternity Title: Patient Education Collateral Suite Creative Director: Rebekkah Schaubach Art Director: Jennifer Rzepka Designer: Brad Donenfeld, Principal, Living by Design Project Manager: Audrey Karitani Associate Director of Communications: Leslie Reed Editorial Supervisors: Kyle Beswick, Antonio Gonzalez

Design Firm: Cedars-Sinai Creative Services, Los Angeles CA Client: CedarsSinai Facilities Planning, Design and Construction Title: Way To Go, An Introduction to Cedars-Sinai Mobile Wayfinding App Creative Director: Rebekkah Schaubach Art Director: Jennifer Rzepka Project Manager: Jack Stotler Writer of Internal Communications: Tania Chatila Editorial Supervisors: Kyle Beswick, Antonio Gonzalez Animation: Inveniv, LLC Creative Direction: Aaron Mazze Art Direction: Jake Williams Illustrator/Animator: Jake Williams Project Lead: Stephanie Zimmerman

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Design Firm: Cepheid | Marketing Communications, Sunnyvale CA Title: Cepheid Health Systems Brochure Creative Director: Jared Tipton Art Director: Bijal Patel Designer: Kristin Bialaszewski

Design Firm: Cepheid | Marketing Communications, Sunnyvale CA Title: Cepheid Healthcare Heroes Advertising Creative Director: Jared Tipton Art Director: Bijal Patel Designer: Kristin Bialaszewski

Design Firm: Ceros, New York NY Client: Johns Hopkins University Title: Family Planning Voices Art Director: James Hu Designer: Ming-Hsuan Lee Communications Team Lead: Anne Kott, Johns Hopkins University Program Officer II: Elizabeth Tully, John Hopkins University

Design Firm: Ceros, New York NY Client: Contec, Inc. Title: Your COVID-19 Vaccine Questions Answered Art Director: James Hu Designer: Ming-Hsuan Lee Content Strategist: Maggie Malach Digital Marketing Coordinator: Jacob Chambers, Contec

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Charles Thomas Design, Tulsa OK Client: Florence Park Pediatrics Title: Florence Park Pediatrics Logo Creative Director: Charles Thomas Art Director: Charles Thomas Designer: Charles Thomas

Design Firm: Christiansen Creative, Hudson WI Client: American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Title: AART Stories 2020 | Lessons Learned From COVID-19

Design Firm: Christiansen Creative, Hudson WI Client: Hudson Area Chamber of Commerce Title: Keep The Heart In Hudson - Wear A Mask Video

Design Firm: Cisner Media, Brooklyn NY Client: Bills Right, Inc. Title: Heroes Advertising Campaign Creative Director: Yossi Cisner

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Design Firm: Community First Health Plans, San Antonio TX Client: Employee Retirement System of Texas Title: Summer Virtual Open Enrollment Mailer Creative Director: Ana Vela Designer: Richard Betancourt

Design Firm: Craig Calsbeek Graphic Design (CCGD), Carlsbad CA Client: Firefly Autism Title: Firefly Autism Logo Design Creative Director: Craig Calsbeek Art Director: Craig Calsbeek Designer: Craig Calsbeek Illustrator: Craig Calsbeek

Design Firm: David Hazelton, Washington DC Client: Florida Occupational Health Conference (FOHC) Title: FOHC 2021 Theme Design Creative Director: David Hazelton

Design Firm: Deloitte Digital, New York NY Client: Gateway Health Title: Gateway Health Rebrand Creative Director: Dima Rigby Head of Design: Tracey Smith Associate Creative Director: Daniel Smith Designer: Nicole Lewis

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Derry Noyes Graphics, Washington DC Client: United States Postal Service (USPS) Title: Enjoy the Great Outdoors Stamp Design Art Director: Derry Noyes Designer: Derry Noyes Illustrator: Gregory Manchess

Design Firm: Design Revolution, Reading PA Client: BMSH Foods, LLC Title: Brocmar Smokehouse Packaging Creative Director: Janelle Paisley Art Director: Amy Whitehead Designer: Kailee Ziegler Photographer: Bob Sweeney Copy and Strategy: Shane Paisley, Dylan Becker

Design Firm: Due West Design, LLC, Colorado Springs CO Client: Palmetto Palace Title: Mobile Health Unit Vehicle Wrap Designer: Meg McConnell

Design Firm: Ellen Bruss Design, Denver CO Client: LOVA Botanics Co. Title: LOVA Branding and Identity Creative Director: Ellen Bruss Art Director: Ken Garcia Designer: Ken Garcia

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Design Firm: Elmwood, New York NY Client: Summit Health Title: Summit Health Branding and Identity Executive Creative Director: Meg Beckum Senior Designer: Tyler Bengtsen Design Director: Claudia Sandoval Senior Production Designer: Bruno Nexci Motion Designer: Steve Haslip Designers: Dee Dalencour, Emma Fontaine Typographer: Tien-Min Liao Executive Strategy Director: James Cockerille Senior Strategist: Paul Collins Strategist: Marci Gentile Senior Account Director: Melissa Braun Senior Account Manager: Julia Gaede Managing Director: Nulty White Writer: Betsy Wise Implementation Partner: TenTen Credits Founder: Darren Horwitz Managing Director: Samantha Eliot Design Lead: Loren Clapp Production Lead: Jahaun Umar Environments Design Lead: David Rockwell

Design Firm: Firebrand Cooperative, Fargo ND Client: McLean County Regional Planning Commission Title: Go:Safe Action Plan Creative Director: Melanie Shellito Designer: Melanie Shellito Copywriter: Jonathan Seiden, Hile Group Safety Consultants: Julie Hile, Jonathan Seiden

Design Firm: Goodwin Proctor LLP | Marketing + Communications, New York NY Title: The Power of Science: Celebrating Moderna Art Director: Hayan Ava Chong Multimedia Producer: Jason Bramble Multimedia Artist: Kevin James

Design Firm: Hammer Marketing, Allentown PA Client: HoverTech International Title: HoverTech Website Creative Director: Brenda Bittinger Designer: Kyle Hutzinger Developer: Ouadie Limouni Client Website: HoverMatt.com Agency Website: Hammermarketing.com

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Hammer Marketing, Allentown PA Client: HoverTech International Title: HoverTech Brochure and Catalog Creative Director: Brenda Bittinger Designer: Kyle Hutzinger Client Website: HoverMatt.com Agency Website: Hammermarketing.com

Design Firm: Hartford Design | Woz Design | Ted Stoik, Chicago IL Client: Abbott Title: Abbott 2020 Annual Report Creative Directors: Tim Hartford, David Wozniak, Ted Stoik Art Directors: Tim Hartford, David Wozniak, Ted Stoik Designers: Tim Hartford, David Wozniak, Ted Stoik Photographer: Tom Maday, Dan Socie

Design Firm: HB Design, Morro Bay CA Client: Platinum Performance Title: Equine Client Welcome Kit Designer: Heather Barbis

Design Firm: HB Design, Morro Bay CA Client: AlphaLogix, LLC Title: AlphaFlo Branding Designer: Heather Barbis

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Huntsman Cancer Institute Communications Department, Salt Lake City UT Title: Huntsman Cancer Institute Cancer Screening Campaign Creative Director: Meredith Vehar Designer: Claire Davis

Design Firm: Iconix Inc., Auburn Hills MI Client: Seva Universal Inc. Title: Seva Universal Website Creative Director: William Young Art Director: Kristy Galli Designer: MaryKay Gill Photographer: Al Vanderkaay

Design Firm: Inseego, Eugene OR Title: Inseego Balance Branding Creative Director: Don Haugen Art Director: Don Haugen Designer: Don Haugen Illustrator: Don Haugen

Design Firm: invok brands, New York NY Client: Copperstate Farms, LLC Title: arae concentrates Creative Director: Richard Shear Art Director: Timothy McLaughlin Designers: Timothy McLaughlin, Devon Luxmore-Rousset

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Jennifer Cogan Design, Reseda CA Client: Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center Title: Journey to Magnet Excellence Mural Creative Director: Jennifer Cogan Art Director: Jennifer Cogan Designer: Jennifer Cogan Service Area Director, Education and Professional Practice: Laranda Yarijanian Diretor of Clinical Education and Professional Development: Debra Stillwell Printefex: Seth Ovanespour

Design Firm: Journey Group, Charlottesville VA Client: United States Postal Service (USPS) Title: Drug Free USA Stamp Design Art Director: William Gicker Designer: Greg Breeding Illustrator: Aaron Draplin

Design Firm: Kaiser Permanente Brand, Marketing + Creative Services, Rockville MD Client: Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Mid-Atlantic States Title: Medicare Special Enrollment Period Advertising Campaign Creative Director: Franklin Parrish Designers: Jason Wennet, Jim Robinson Video: Bryan Litt and Team Copy and Editorial: Tim Snead, Pamela Golden Operations: Aldo Martinez

Design Firm: Kaiser Permanente Brand, Marketing + Creative Services, Rockville MD Client: Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Mid-Atlantic States Title: Cardiac Care Branding and Identity Campaign Creative Director: Franklin Parrish Designer: Victoria Hochstein Copy and Editorial: Pam Golden Operations: Aldo Martinez

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Design Firm: Kick, Minneapolis MN Client: Alydia Health Title: Jada System Brand Identity Creative Director: Stefan Hartung Designer: Stefan Hartung

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory™, Jackson Heights NY Client: Poster House Title: #CombatCovid PSA Posters Creative Director: John Kudos Designer: Ashley Wu

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory™ + Gimongo, Jackson Heights NY Client: Rendr Title: Rendr Visual Identity System Creative Directors: John Kudos, Greg Wong Designers: Ashley Wu, Huiqu Qui, Own Febiandi

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory™ + MTWTF, Jackson Heights NY Client: AIA New York, Center for Architecture, and MIT’s Civic Data Design Lab Title: Visualize NYC 2021 Creative Directors: Sarah Dunham, Glen Cummings Designer: Joel Kern Web Development: Chris Manlapid

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Mangold Design, Napa CA Client: Rajkumari Neogy & Sarah Peyton Title: Epigenetic Circuits of Emotion Creative Director: Annabel Mangold Designer: Annabel Mangold Icons: Noun Project

Design Firm: Memorial Health System Marketing, Gulfport MS Client: Memorial Health System Title: COVID-19: One Year Later Creative Director: Angie Juzang Art Director: Cece Shabazz Designer: Paul Donnell Photographer: William Pace

Design Firm: National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) Communications and Brand Strategy, Washington DC Client: NAM Title: This Is Our Shot: Yellow and Red Ribbon Vaccine Awareness Initiative Creative Director: Samantha Moya Art Director: Cameron Alvarez Designers: Christine Jimenez, James Steinberg Illustrators: Christine Jimenez, James Steinberg Vice President, Brand Strategy: Chrys Kefalas Printers: ColorNet Printing, Envision

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: Office of Research Services Title: Schedule Your COVID-19 Vaccination Campaign Creative Director: Jeffrey Everett Illustrator: Jeffrey Everett

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Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Institute on Aging Title: Three (Formerly) Blind Mice Poster Creative Director: Martha Blalock Art Director: Jeffrey Everett Illustrator: Jeffrey Everett

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Institutes of Health Title: NIMH Director’s Innovation Speaker Series Poster Art Director: Jessica Jackson Designer: Jessica Jackson

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Institutes of Health Title: NIAMS About Our Strategic Plan Brochure Art Director: Jessica Jackson Designer: Jessica Jackson

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Institutes of Health Title: All of Us Office Artwork Creative Director: Bonnie Hamalainen Art Director: Jessica Jackson Designer: Jessica Jackson

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute Title: Brand Standards & Family Engagement Series Collateral Creative Director: Bonnie Hamalainen Art Director: Bonnie Hamalainen Senior Designer: Jeffrey Everett

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Institutes of Health Office of Animal Care and Use Title: Animals Are Partners in Vision Research Creative Director: Bonnie Hamalainen Art Director: Bonnie Hamalainen Illustrator: Erina He

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Cancer Institutes Title: Nature Medicine Journal Cover, February 2021 Creative Director: Jeffrey Everett Art Director: Erina He Illustrator: Jeffrey Everett

Design Firm: National Institutes of Health | NIH Medical Arts Branch, Bethesda MD Client: National Institute on Aging Title: SARS-CoV-2 Revealed, Neuron Cover, February 3, 2021 Art Director: Bryan Traynor Designer: Ethan Tyler Illustrator: Ethan Tyler Macromolecular Structures: Protein Data Bank

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Design Firm: NC State University, College of Design, Raleigh NC Client: Cabarrus County, Catawba County, Gaston County, Haywood County, Union County Title: North Carolina County Government COVID-19 Response Project Director: Tasailu Liu Project Manager: Kahren Kersten Designers: Kennedy Liggett, Rachel Thomas, Joseph Rogers Animation/Video Editors: PNTA Behavioral Scientists: Center for Advanced Hindsight at Duke University

Design Firm: O’Brien et al Advertising, Virginia Beach VA Client: VESTEX® Title: VESTEX® Protects Website

Design Firm: Odonnell Company, New Haven CT Client: Connecticut Department of Mental Health Addiction Services (DMHAS) Title: CT Stronger Coach Campaign Creative Director: Eileen Odonnell Senior Art Director: Denise Arsenault Art Director: David Nguyen Website Designer: Paul Ruocco Production Manager: Peter Gartner

Design Firm: Odonnell Company, New Haven CT Client: Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) Title: Vulnerable Testing COVID Campaign Creative Director: Eileen Odonnell Senior Art Director: Denise Arsenault Art Director: David Nguyen Website Designer: Paul Ruocco Production Manager: Peter Gartner

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Odonnell Company, New Haven CT Client: Connecticut Department of Public Health/Oral Health Title: Eat Smile Be Healthy Campaign Creative Director: Eileen Odonnell Senior Art Director: Denise Arsenault Art Director: Sabrina Labadia Production Manager: Peter Gartner

Design Firm: Office Depot Brand Creative, Boca Raton FL Client: Office Depot Office Max Title: Work Well Campaign Creative Director: Phil Tucciarone Art Directors: Lindsay Stewart, Mike Morrison Designer: Victoria Barriola VP: Wesley-Anne Brinkhurst Project Manager: Jennifer Benstein Senior Manager, Email: Aaron Kirker Web Design Manager: Amanda Macedo Senior Manager, Digital Experience: Caleb Smith Senior Manager, Direct Response: Gabriela Pujols Photographer: CreativeDrive

Design Firm: One Zero Charlie, Woodstock IL Client: Family Health Partnership Clinic Title: Trademark and Business Papers Creative Director: Michael Stanard Art Director: Michael Stanard Designer: James Westwood Illustrator: James Westwood Photographer: Laura Wolverton

Design Firm: Open Door Design Studio (ODDS), Muncie IN Client: Kultureshop India Title: Keep Distance Mask Designer: Shantanu Suman

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Design Firm: Palm Beach County Parks & Recreation Department, Lake Worth FL Title: Okeeheelee Nature Center Interpretive Signage Designer: Kimberly Krieger Photographers: Okeeheelee Nature Center Staff, Stock Photography Content & Research: Heather Moody, Emilie Travis, Alex Melligon

Design Firm: Payton Brands, Fort Myers FL Client: Family Initiative Title: Savor Our Differences Campaign Strategy & Creative Direction: Wendy Payton Art Direction: Kellie Bambach Copywriting: Tracy Crowell Photography: Eric Perry Audio/Visual Production: Bill Rogers

Design Firm: Payton Brands, Fort Myers FL Client: Bridge To A Cure Foundation Title: 2020 Annual Report Strategy & Copywriting: Wendy Payton Art Direction: Kellie Bambach Client: Robert Martin

Design Firm: PBD Partners, Newton MA Client: Brigham & Women’s Hospital Title: Giving Thanks: 2020 Honor Roll Creative Director: John Bach Art Director: Shannon Beer Designer: Holly Broussard Photographer: James P. Rathmell, MD

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: PBD Partners, Newton MA Client: Massachusetts General Hospital Title: The Campaign for Mass General Prospectus Art Director: Shannon Beer Designer: Jennifer Whitty Dominguez

Design Firm: PBD Partners, Newton MA Client: Massachusetts General Hospital Title: COVID-19 Newsletter Art Director: Shannon Beer Designer: Mary Reed Photographer: Kate Flock

Design Firm: PepsiCo Design & Innovation, New York NY Client: PepsiCo Title: LIFEWTR Black Art Rising Designer: PepsiCo Design & Innovation

Design Firm: PepsiCo Design & Innovation, New York NY Client: PepsiCo Title: Driftwell Designer: PepsiCo Design & Innovation

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Design Firm: PepsiCo Design & Innovation, New York NY Client: PepsiCo Title: Quaker Meal Replacement Designer: PepsiCo Design & Innovation

Design Firm: PepsiCo Design & Innovation, New York NY Client: PepsiCo Title: TAZO CALM Iced Herbal Tea Designer: PepsiCo Design & Innovation

Design Firm: PepsiCo Design & Innovation, New York NY Client: PepsiCo Title: Gatorade Gx Patch 2021 Designer: PepsiCo Design & Innovation

Design Firm: PepsiCo Design & Innovation, New York NY Client: PepsiCo Title: Sunbites China Yogurt Bites Designer: PepsiCo Design & Innovation

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Place Creative Company, Burlington VT Client: Sana at Stowe Title: Sana at Stowe Landing Page Design Creative Director: Steve Crafts Art Director: Jordan Meserole Designer: Jordan Meserole Senior Web Developer: Michael Niggel

Design Firm: Place Creative Company, Burlington VT Client: DaVinci Laboratories Title: Senior Momentum Campaign Creative Director: Steve Crafts Art Director: Jordan Meserole Designer: Jordan Meserole

Design Firm: Place Creative Company, Burlington VT Client: EZCPak Title: EZCPak Immune Support Packaging Creative Director: Steve Crafts Art Director: Jordan Meserole Designer: Ann Kiley

Design Firm: Place Creative Company, Burlington VT Client: FoodScience Corporation Title: FoodScience Corporation Website Creative Director: Steve Crafts Art Director: Jordan Meserole Designer: Ann Kiley Senior Web Developer: Michael Niggel

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Design Firm: Place Creative Company, Burlington VT Client: Vermont Department of Health Title: Rocking Horse Program Brochure Art Director: Michelle Boutin Designer: Michelle Boutin

Design Firm: Quill Creative, Oshkosh WI Client: ThedaCare Title: FOCUS Brand Identity Creative Directors: Ryan Albers, Joshua Tyner Designer: Jacob Smith

Design Firm: Quill Creative, Oshkosh WI Client: Fork Farms Title: Greater Good Greens Packaging Creative Director: Ryan Albers Art Director: Joshua Tyner Designer: Alice Huntley

Design Firm: Quill Creative, Oshkosh WI Client: VL Labs Title: VL Labs Brand Identity Creative Directors: Joshua Tyner, Ryan Albers Art Director: Arden Helm Designer: Jacob Smith

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Quill Creative, Oshkosh WI Client: Mercy Health Foundation Title: Staying Alive Campaign Identity Creative Director: Ryan Albers Art Director: Arden Helm Designers: Kong Thao, Isabella Tremonti-Scopp, Alice Huntley

Design Firm: Quill Creative, Oshkosh WI Client: Feeding America Title: 2020 Annual Report Creative Director: Ryan Albers Designer: Alice Huntley Illustrator: Jacob Smith

Design Firm: Ratkaj Designs, Madison WI Client: Pivotal Health Title: Logo and Branding Creative Director/Designer: Rochelle Ratkaj Moser

Design Firm: RLD Creative, Elgin IL Client: The Scion Group Title: Slow The Spread - Corporate COVID-19 Protocol Creative Director: Rick Lesser Art Director: Brandon Ribbs Designer: Anthony Ashner

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Design Firm: RLD Creative, Elgin IL Client: Reef Edibles Title: Branding and Package Design Creative Director: Rick Lesser Art Director: Brandon Ribbs Contributors: Julia Bellinger, Zack Sikat, Phil Bricston, Marcus Holley

Design Firm: Ron Lewis Creative, Cherry Hill NJ Client: DiD Agency Title: Mylicon Connect Creative Director: Susanne Munn Art Director: Ron Lewis Designers: Ron Lewis, Anne Wren Illustrators: Dawid Ryski, Ron Lewis, iStockPhoto, Getty Images Copywriter: Susanne Munn, Megan Walls

Design Firm: RTI International, Research Triangle Park NC Client: Family & Youth Services Bureau, Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program Title: Find Your Passion - Youth Sexual Risk Avoidance Educational Resources Creative Director/ Graphic Design Lead: Shari Lambert Graphic Designers: Valerie Garner, Veronica Romero Project Director/Research Public Health Analyst: Denise Dickinson Research Education Analyst: Amanda Seagroves Video Director: Dilsey Davis Videographers: Ari Kirschenbaum, Robert Walton, Carter Reedy, Hannah Hamza, Becky Hipp Editors: Staci Rachman, Sallie Fiore, Merri Aiken, Emily Callot Accessibility Specialists: Danny Occoquin, Pamela Tuck, Teresa Mink, Kim Cone

Design Firm: Rule29, Geneva IL Client: We Can Vote Title: Healthy Voting Campaign Creative Director: Drew Davies Designers: Drew Davies, Josh Schwieger, Adam Torpin

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Rule29, Geneva IL Client: UNICEF Title: UNICEF Won’t Stop Virtual Event Promotion Creative Directors: Susan Herda, Justin Ahrens Designers: Zach Amato, Paul Bonnell Account Lead: Dawn Bjork

Design Firm: Saputo Design, Westlake Village CA Client: Amgen Title: Amgen 40th Anniversary Sponsorship Campaign Creative Director: Dana Saputo Designer: Jennifer Phillipson Photographers: Bruce James, James and James Photography

Design Firm: Shih-Wei Cheng, Kirkland WA Title: Core Wellness Website and Mobile Design Creative Director: Shih-Wei Cheng Art Director: Shih-Wei Cheng Designer: Shih-Wei Cheng Female Portrait Photo Credit: Noun Project Bell Icon Photo Credit: Landan Lloyd from Noun Project Fitness Icon: Fitness by Larea from Noun Project

Design Firm: Simplicity by Assurance Scientific Laboratories, Birmingham AL Title: Simplicity COVID-19 Test At-Home Collection Kit Designer: Courtney Fisher

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Design Firm: Sizewise Marketing, Lenexa KS Title: COVID 19 Surge Readiness Campaign Designers: Frank Myles, Stacy Beltz Vice President of Marketing: Dan Vogt

Design Firm: Smith Design, Morristown NJ Client: FULFIL Title: FULFIL Nutrition Vitamin & Protein Bar Package Design Creative Director: Jenna Smith Art Director: Glenn Hagen Designer: Glenn Hagen Photographer: Ken Kiger

Design Firm: Smith Design, Morristown NJ Client: Henkel Title: Dial Clean + Gentle Package Design Creative Director: Tim Williams Designer: Mike Doyle

Design Firm: Smith Design, Morristown NJ Client: Henkel Title: All Free Clear Pure Package Design Creative Director: Tim Williams Art Director: Tim Williams Designer: Gayle Sahre

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Smith Design, Morristown NJ Client: Hormel Title: Skippy Protein Innovation Package Design Creative Director: Glenn Hagen Art Director: Melissa Sadowski Designer: Miles Hoffman Photographer: Ken Kiger

Design Firm: Spring Hills, Clifton NJ Title: Spring Hills Home Care Services Welcome Home Program Director of Branding + Media: Krystal Pratt Vice President of Branding + Media: Christina Everett

Design Firm: Spring Hills, Clifton NJ Title: Spring Hills Livingston Assisted Living Post Card Campaign Director of Branding + Media: Krystal Pratt Vice President of Branding + Media: Christina Everett

Design Firm: Stony Brook Medicine, Office of Marketing and Communication, East Setauket NY Client: Stony Brook Dermatology Associates Title: Spring 10s Savings Event Campaign Creative Director: Rachel Velocci Art Director: Gail Swedberg Designer: Gail Swedberg Copywriting: Gina Bruce

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Design Firm: Stony Brook Medicine, Office of Marketing and Communication, East Setauket NY Client: Stony Brook Children’s Hospital Title: Medical Care Designed Just For Kids Creative Director: Rachel Velocci Art Director: Aiyi Liao Designers: Aiyi Liao, Donna Monte Copywriting: Gina Bruce

Design Firm: Strategic Design + Advertising (SDA), Steamboat Springs CO Client: City of Steamboat Springs Title: SOS – Save Our Season Creative Director: Justin Hirsch Art Director: Justin Hirsch Designer: Justin Hirsch Digital Designer/Developer: Grant Johnson

Design Firm: Stony Brook Medicine, Office of Marketing and Communication, East Setauket NY Client: Stony Brook Children’s Hospital Title: COVID-19: Next Steps from Our Experts Creative Director: Rachel Velocci Designers: Stu Suchit, Gail Swedberg Illustrator: Stu Suchit

Design Firm: Studio O+A, San Francisco CA Client: A Toolkit for the Times Title: O+A’s Guide for Healthy Workplaces Creative Director: Primo Orpilla Art Director: Elizabeth Vereker Designer: Pauline McFarland Illustrators: Minnee Pham, Sarah Hotchin Contributors: C19 Team at Studio O+A

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Brown + Co Ortho Title: Brown + Co Ortho Brand Identity Creative Director: Suzy Simmons Designers: Suzy Simmons, Gaby Quintana, Gabby Nguyen

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Paventy & Brown Ortho Title: Paventy & Brown Ortho Bond Box Creative Director: Suzy Simmons Art Director: Suzy Simmons Designers: Sarah Wright, Sofi Cruz, Justice Crisp

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: The Ortho Barr Title: The Ortho Barr Brand Identity Creative Director: Suzy Simmons Designers: Suzy Simmons, Sarah Wright, Gaby Quintana, Justice Crisp

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Tooth + Tusk Title: Tooth + Tusk Brand Identity Creative Director: Suzy Simmons Designers: Sarah Wright, Suzy Simmons, Gaby Quintana

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Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Local Smile Co. Title: Local Smile Co. Halloween Activity Book Creative Director: Suzy Simmons Art Director: Suzy Simmons Designer: Sarah Wright

Design Firm: The Creative Pack LLC, Redondo Beach CA Client: R2 Technologies Title: Glacial Rx Branding Creative Director: Danielle Beal Designers: Emma Tung, Paola Ip, Heather Storie

Design Firm: The Creative Pack LLC, Redondo Beach CA Client: Everytable Title: Everytable Juice & Wellness Shots Creative Director: Danielle Beal Designers: Casey Chui, Paola Ip Photographer: Erica Allen

Design Firm: Goldstein Group Branding, New York NY Client: Apothecus Pharmaceu-tical Corporation Title: VCF: Vaginal Contraceptive Film Package Design Creative Director: Claudia Arisso Strategic Director: Terri Goldstein

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: The Hatcher Group, Bethesda MD Client: OSI/OSF Title: Bridges Campaign Creative Director: Reece Quinones Art Director: Marzia Motta Designers: Marzia Motta, Debbie Rappaport, Daniela Aguero, Bailey Gregory

Design Firm: The Hatcher Group, Bethesda MD Client: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Title: Hub For Injury Prevention (HIP) Video Creative Director: Reece Quinones Art Director: Bailey Gregory Designer: Katelynne Viscayno Motion Designer: Scott Cooper

Design Firm: The Hatcher Group, Bethesda MD Client: American Heart Association Title: Flavored Tobacco Danger Campaign Creative Director: Reece Quinones Art Director: Bailey Gregory Designer: Marzia Motta

Design Firm: The Hatcher Group, Bethesda MD Client: Maryland Health Care Commission Title: Wear The Cost Campaign Creative Director: Reece Quinones Art Director: Bailey Gregory Designers: Annette Allen, Daniela Aguero, Marzia Motta

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Design Firm: The Hatcher Group, Bethesda MD Client: Anne Arundel County, Maryland Title: COVID Prevention Campaign Creative Director: Reece Quinones Art Director: Bailey Gregory Designers: Lindsey Smith, Daniela Aguero

Design Firm: The Hive at Humana, Louisville KY Client: Humana Title: Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Animation Art Director: Stefanay Allen Designer: Briana Kapper Animator: Sunshine Matthews Senior Account Executive: Meagan Cecil Project Manager: Dia Thompson Senior Copywriter: Brette Digon Proofreader: Michael Whitpan

Design Firm: The Hive at Humana, Louisville KY Client: Humana Title: COVID Response - Mask Kit Campaign Art Director: Daniel Carroll Designer/Animator: Mark Cooper Senior Designer: Audrey Ruppel Designer: Joshua Nicholson Senior Account Executives: Connor Work, Craig Roszkowski Project Manager: Dia Thompson Senior Project Manager: Emily Strobo Senior Copywriter: Ken Walker Proofreader: Michael Whitpan Quality Assurance: Peggy Key Mask Production: JPR Medical

Design Firm: The Hive at Humana, Louisville KY Client: Humana Title: 2019 Inclusion & Diversity Report Senior Designer: Audrey Ruppel Designer: Shayna Reinbold Senior Account Executives: Allison Chessler, Nick Tallarico Senior Project Manager: Emily Strobo Senior Copywriter: Charity Murphy Senior Production Artist: Matt Wood Photographer: Rachel Waters Proofreader: Michael Whitpan Quality Assurance: Peggy Key

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: The Kitchen Collaborative, Porter Ranch CA Client: Seachrome Title: Silhouette Seat Brochure Creative Director: Aniko Hill Designer: Doris Jew Photographer: Jesse Hill Copywriter: Alexa Chigounis

Design Firm: Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA Client: Sexual Assault Forensic Examination Center at Abington-Jefferson Hospital Title: SAFE Center Prototype Recommendations Program Director: Maribeth Kradel-Weitzel Professors: Laurie Churchman, Brian Gerardo Student Team: Stephen Andreo, Eva Floyd, Meghan Garrity, Alyssa Liegel, Iman Morsy, Eli Steiker-Ginzberg

Design Firm: Topco Creative Services, Elk Grove Village IL Client: Topco Member Stores Title: TopCare Flesh-Tone Fabric Bandages Creative Director: Brian Carron Lead Designer: Kara Fleming-Ward Designer: Tamara Silver

Design Firm: Tower Health | Creative Services, West Reading PA Client: Tower Health | Communications Title: COVID-19: A Year in Review Creative Director: Holly Raser Chew Designer: Katie Pendergast

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Design Firm: University of Massachusetts Boston | Marketing and Engagement Team, Boston MA Title: Bobby Beacon COVID-19 Social Media Campaign Creative Director: Megan D. Sullivan Art Director: Sarah Weatherbee Designer: Wendy Lanchester Illustrator: Wendy Lanchester Photographers: John Gillooly, Getty Images Writer and Social Media Strategy: Crystal Valencia

Design Firm: Viola Design, Healdsburg CA Client: Fox Home Health Title: Fox Home Health Brand Identity Art Director/Designer: Deb Viola Writer: Kathy Lemmon Programmer: Christy Molnar

Design Firm: Voraco International, Short Hills NJ Client: EXXAT, LLC Title: EXXAT – Powering Health Education Through The Pandemic Creative Director: Pramod Maharana Art Director: Pramod Maharana Designers: Jayesh Rane, Pallavi Shedge Web Developers: Shreekanth Ganesh, Saurav Khare Copywriter: Mallika Rao Digital Strategy: Varangi Vora Digital Marketing Executive: Suhani Vats Exxat Co-Founder Kunal Vaishnav Marketing & Sales Regional Manager: Wilson Knapp

Design Firm: Werremeyer Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Barnes-Jewish Hospital Foundation Title: 2021 Honor Roll – Annual Report Creative Director: Steve Hartman Art Director: Allison Trullinger Designer: Allison Trullinger Illustrator: Monica Duwel Writer: Gail Appleson

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Werremeyer Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Bi-State Development Title: Welcome Back Signage Creative Director: Steve Hartman Art Director: Ann Campbell Designer: Allison Trullinger

Design Firm: Werremeyer Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Aurora Commons Title: Aurora Commons Brand Identity Creative Director: Steve Hartman Art Director: Allison Trullinger Designer: Allison Trullinger Writer: Matt Glarner

Design Firm: Werremeyer Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Barnes-Jewish Hospital Title: Curiosus Magazine Summer 2020 Creative Director: Steve Hartman Art Director: Cheryl Bonnett Illustrators: Abigail Goh, John DiPersio, MD, PhD Photographer: Gregg Goldman Editor: Anne Makeever

Design Firm: Werremeyer Creative, St. Louis MO Client: St. Louis University School of Medicine Title: Ground Rounds Fall 2020 Creative Director: Steve Hartman Illustrator: Basil Kincaid Photographer: Gregg Goldman Writer: Julie Taylor

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Design Firm: Werremeyer Creative, St. Louis MO Client: The Gatesworth Title: Words of Wisdom Campaign Creative Director: Matt Glarner Art Director: Cheryl Bonnett Photographer: Gregg Goldman

Design Firm: Wynk Design, Inc., Huntington NY Client: SomaWell LLC Title: SomaWell Brand and Identity Creative Director: Kim Ann Piccora Art Director: John Einemann Photographer: E.Beth Photography

Design Firm: Wynk Design, Inc., Huntington NY Client: Aulief - Organic Topical Pain Relief Title: Aulief Brand and Identity Creative Director: Kim Ann Piccora Art Director: John Einemann

Design Firm: Xhilarate, Philadelphia PA Title: Ya'Mon Energy Drink Package Design Creative Director: Michael McDonald Art Director: Michael McDonald Designer: Michael McDonald Illustrator: Michael McDonald Client Relationships: Russ Napolitano

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HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS

Design Firm: Yoske Mitsui, Brooklyn NY Client: University of Maryland Title: Visual identity For Public Health Beyond Borders Art Director: Yoske Mitsui Designer: Yoske Mitsui

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Design Firm: Zoo Valdes, Columbia SC Client: Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital Title: MUSC Children’s Hospital Emergency Room Hallway Art Director: Marius Valdes Illustrator: Marius Valdes Art Collections Coordinator: Britt Bates


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June 2021 Pub Letter/Domeyer.qxp_feb news play 6/9/21 3:29 PM Page 98

5 THINGS TO CONSIDER IF YOU’RE THINKING OF A CAREER CHANGE BY DIANE DOMEYER

Unexpected events or big life changes

1. ARE YOUR SKILLS IN DEMAND RIGHT NOW?

have a way of disrupting our normal routines,

Ninety-seven percent of marketing and creative leaders

jolting us out of our comfort zones and prompt-

polled by Robert Half said they found it challenging to

ing us to question how we want to lead our

recruit the skilled professionals they need. And more than

lives. No wonder, then, that the COVID-19

half (51%) of firms are looking to add new positions in 2021. You will be in the driver’s seat if you decide to take

pandemic has led many marketing and creative

the plunge, especially if you have some of the most in

professionals to re-evaluate their careers.

demand skills.

Working remotely, learning new skills or, in some cases,

Throughout the pandemic, marketing and creative profes-

being furloughed have scrambled the status quo. New research

sionals have played a key role in helping firms expand digital

from The Creative Group, a staffing division with Robert Half,

services, improve the customer experience and promote new

and AIGA, the professional association for design, suggests

offerings in a socially distant world. With the acceleration of

that one in two creatives could be looking for a new job in

e-commerce expected to continue, innovation on the rise and

the next 12 months.

immersive technologies becoming more mainstream, demand for tech-savvy creatives will remain high as firms seek to roll

The recovering U.S. economy may make this a good time to

out digital-first business strategies.

change jobs. But should you? Can you? Would a change within your current company increase your job satisfaction, or do you

Additionally, more organizations are putting design at the

need to look elsewhere? Here are some things to consider.

core of their growth strategy. If you can demonstrate how you

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have applied the creative process to solve complex business

Does your current company’s corporate culture and mission

problems with measurable results, you will have an advantage

align with your values? Do they practice what they preach?

in the hiring process.

Consider the same questions for a career change to a new company, too. Reaching out to employees at the prospective

And even if you feel good about your chances from a functional

employer via social media, for example, would give you the

perspective, have you also developed strong interpersonal

opportunity to gauge a firm’s corporate culture.

skills? In a business world now alert to the potential for sudden and widespread disruption, soft skills such as resilience,

4. HOW WILL THIS OPPORTUNITY ADVANCE YOUR

adaptability and empathy are more valued than ever. Think of

CAREER PROSPECTS?

any times over the past year when you’ve called upon skills such as these to help your team continue to meet deadlines. 2. WHAT WORK ENVIRONMENT BRINGS OUT YOUR PRODUCTIVITY AND CREATIVITY AND MAKES YOU HAPPY?

When discussing an opportunity with a recruiter or hiring manager, ask about career development. What opportunities will you have to stretch your abilities and gain new technical or professional skills? What trainings are offered, and will you have access regardless of where you’re based? Leadership style and experience can also have a significant impact on

While plenty of offices will at least partially reopen, a full return

your growth and career prospects. Will you be mentored, and

to on-site working seems unlikely for most firms. Creative

if so, how?

professionals have proved they can work productively from home, and only 8% of those polled by The Creative Group

5. ARE YOU LOOKING FOR AN IMPROVED AND

and AIGA say they’re keen to return to the office full-time.

HEALTHIER WORK-LIFE BALANCE?

Is your current or new position likely to be on-site, remote or hybrid (a mix of the two)? While many employees have found homeworking improves their quality of life, some have struggled to adapt. Video call fatigue, background distractions and the challenges of juggling work with personal responsibilities can take their toll. If you’re just as happy working from home as you are in an office, you can leverage that flexibility to your advantage, chasing opportunities not only in your local area but also around the country and even the world. If applying for a fully remote position, just bear in mind that around a quarter of firms plan to adjust salaries to the market the employee works from — even if that means a pay cut. 3. WHAT VALUES ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU?

Consider how a new role will impact your mental and physical wellbeing. Does the opportunity you’re considering embrace flexible schedules such as windowed working or a compressed work week? What about wellness initiatives such as reducing stress, proper nutrition and mental health? Does it offer an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) that includes therapy, counseling and coaching services? The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way we live and work. Don’t ignore an opportunity to reassess your professional goals and emerge with a sharper focus on what you hope to achieve, and remember to first evaluate whether an internal change with your current employer can meet your objectives. Whether you were already considering a career change, or the pandemic has brought these feelings to the surface, now is the perfect time to explore new challenges.

DO YOUR CURRENT OR PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYER’S VALUES MATCH YOUR OWN?

DIANE DOMEYER is Executive Director of The Creative Group, a specialized

The pandemic has given many workers a new perspective

staffing service placing interactive,

on their career priorities. Nearly nine in 10 creatives surveyed

design, marketing, advertising and

by The Creative Group and AIGA say they would not accept

public relations professionals with a

an attractive job offer with a company whose values were

variety of firms. For more information,

incompatible with their own.

visit roberthalf.com/creativegroup

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SUSTAINABILITY MORE OPTIONS WITH 30% POST-CONSUMER FIBER Accent® Opaque RE-30 gives you the consistency, quality and opacity you expect from Accent, with 30% post-consumer fiber and a wide range of text and cover weights. Request your swatchbook accentopaque.com/ request-a-swatchbook

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©2021 International Paper Company. All rights reser ved. Accent is a registered trademark of International Paper Company

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