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fall 2014

Kicking Off

Our

Second Year


FIAT Freemont Cross

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Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

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FALL 2014 The 1st and only Men’s Fashion & Lifestyle Magazine featuring exclusively Made in Italy. Cover: Jacopo Rampini (left), Francesco Meola (middle), Francesco Andolfi (right)

Editor in Chief Francesco Di Maio

Culture & Travel Editor Business Development Dafne Perticarini

PR & Communications Federica Fatale

Photo Credits Scott A. Drake (pp. 8, 9) Darryl Madison (pp. 18-19) Paolo Pavan (pp. 42-45) Canottaggio.org—ph M. Perna (pp. 60-63) Jorge Arcagni (pp. 82-85) SPECIAL CREDITS (Cover, pp. 10-17) Creative Director & Photographer: Viktorija Juodenaite Stylist: Asanti Austin Hairstylist: Addam Moreno Makeup: Carmela Zampieri Video: Andy Clancy Photo Assistant: Sandy Griffin

Graphic Design Cecilia Giménez de Paz design@gimenezdepaz.com

Contact Info info@uomo-moderno.com Website: uomo-moderno.com

Uomo Moderno is a quarterly publication of Men’s Fashion by Francesco. © 2014, All Rights Reserved ISSN 2329-9258

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Uomo Moderno Winter 2014


rumjungle

Lancia and Alfa Romeo, stars of the “Vernasca Silver Flag 2014”— a tribute to the historic Castell’Arquato-Vernasca time trial, which ran from 1953 to 1972.

Uomo Moderno Winter 2014

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what’s inside

Contents

Fragrance

20 Dr. Vranjes When the Nose Knows

Music

24 Gigi D’Alessio A Wardrobe of Music

42 Perturbazione An Atmospheric Disturbance

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Accessories

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Cover Story

Artillerylane The Press and the Mess

Celebrating One Year Kairos Italy Theater Parsons The Spring Launch Party

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Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

Superduper Hats In Their Own Words


Fashion

Sports

Cuisine

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Pomandティre By Carlo Zanuso

Rowing in Italy Romano Battisti Vincenzo Abbagnale Francesco Fossi

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Davide Civitiello Pizza Maker Numero Uno

Leitmotiv Universal Dreamer

52 Day to Day with Au Jour Le Jour

64 Lvchino A Tribute to Ernesto

68 Caruso The Contemporary Nomad

Travel

Dテゥcor

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Napoli City of the Sun

Caleido One Hot Atelier

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窶連 Lengua Napulitana The Neapolitan Language

Tagina The Evolution of Italian Tile

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窶連 Canzona Napulitana Neapolitan Music

Neutra But Not Indifferent

Grooming

56 Cily Hairstylist The World Generation

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Benvenuti! It is hard to fathom a world without Italy and, yet, such was the case prior to 1861 when the Italic peninsula had been partitioned and reapportioned over the centuries since Roman times. But precisely this turbulent history of foreign invasions and territorial fragmentation has created a rich diversity within the culture, language, music, cuisine, architecture, and art of modern-day Italy. Unfortunately what often defines contemporary Italian society is also known to divide us, fomenting into interregional animosity and hostility. It is not uncommon to hear of spontaneous referendums on seceding from the nation to restore a former golden era. Probably the most sizable seismic line of division is the one between the North and South. Without a background in history, it is impossible to understand present-day Italy, which, like the Tower of Pisa, always seems to be leaning but never quite topples over. Another way to comprehend our diverseness across the peninsula is through culinary mapping, such as with pizza, or even a linguistic chart. Italy is not only home to regional accents and dialects but also official languages, which are mutually unintelligible from one another. It is hard to believe that, just a little over a year ago, Uomo Moderno did not exist. For this reason I have dedicated this anniversary edition to Italy’s abundant heritage in all its facets, viewing them with an appreciation for what is different rather than a motive for division. On a larger scale, we marked our anniversary by celebrating Italy’s contribution to other cultures around the world, as well as our unique differences that set us apart. Happy reading! Francesco Di Maio

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Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

Welcome to the & One Year


2014 Autumn Anniversary Edition

of Uomo Moderno

Thanks to Nico Didonna for outfitting me at the Spring Launch Party of the magazine! Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

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When Tutti Frutti Stands for Everyone

Just as the average Italian citizen dwells in a country with innumerous regional differences in culture, cuisine, language, politics, and customs, so too each global citizen inhabits a world with a shared yet divergent heritage. So what better way to celebrate the one year anniversary of Uomo Moderno (literally ‘modern man’) than with a photographic shoot of three young actors from Italy who modelled the creations of seven student designers from around the globe?! 10

Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

The Kairos Italy Theater of New York provided actormodels Francesco Andolfi, Francesco Meola, and Jacopo Rampini; while the Parsons School of Fashion furnished over thirty garments from seven design students: Yushi Hida, Ency Lu, Apple Suye Yang, Ryan Seng, Charles Chuang, Trip Dressler, and Choong Hyun Lee. The shoot took place at the Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò of New York University and was commemorated by the Spring Launch Party in the Rooftop Lounge of the Gansevoort Park Hotel in New York City with 600 guests.


when tutti frutti stands for everyone

Feature Story

Did You

Know?

The Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò is currently home to the Department of Italian Studies at New York University. In 1988, the Baroness Mariuccia Zerilli-Marimò dedicated this 19th-century Italianate brownstone to her late husband, Guido Zerilli-Marimò, who was not only a diplomat and journalist but also a successful entrepreneur in pharmaceuticals from Italy.

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Did You

Know? The Kairos Italy Theater was established in New York fourteen years ago as a cultural exchange between the U.S. and Italy and now resides in the Casa Italiana Zerilli-Marimò. Founded and directed by Laura Caparrotti, KIT is an Italian offBroadway company.

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francesco andolfi

Feature Story

Francesco Andolfi Born in 1990, Fancesco Andolfi grew up in Rome with his dog Yanez, who was his pretend tiger. A renaissance man in the true sense of the word, Francesco plays the drums and guitar and writes poetry, as well as short stories. He sings and dances, and he is fond of old movies. Lately he has been meditating on Edgar Allan Poe and Vincent Price.

What attracted you to acting? My family always fed me pasta and art. We went to see many shows together and, when we were traveling, almost everywhere we went we saw a show that was traditional to the customs of that country, from a Chinese opera to Greek dance…. Opera was also a side dish at our table.

How do you define Italian style? It comes with living in Italy. It’s an acquired sense that gives you ease as you go about your life. I see many people looking like ants that robotically go to Starbucks every day to get their “venti latte tutti frutti” as a part of their routine. Would you compare that to getting an espresso in a ceramic cup at the bar downstairs? (We call “bars” what Americans call “cafés”—ironic!) Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

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Francesco Meola

Vegan. Soccer player. Percussionist and writer. Francesco Meola’s first love is theater. Despite the cultural and economic crisis in Italy, Francesco is a firm believer in recovery. He advocates returning to our native potential as inventors, poets, actors, painters, designers, and architects, applying the innate power of imagination that once made us a great nation!

“I was born 1984 in Milan as the last of three brothers…five and seven years older than me and, for this reason, to gain their respect I tried to attract their attention with some crazy or very goofy actions: dancing as Elvis in a room in front of them, dressing in medieval costumes, wearing ties at the age of five, and flying with my imagination to invented dialogues. “I love art because it is a way to escape and create something new and also a chance to be more connected to your feelings, your life, and the people around you.” 14

Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


jacopo rampini

Feature Story

Jacopo Rampini

Born in Rome , Jacopo Rampini grew up in Milan and Paris until the age of fourteen when he moved to San Francisco with his family. His personal style is taking life with a smile. He recently played the young Stalin in The World Wars on the History Channel. How did you get your start in acting? My parents took me to the theater from a very early age, and they always exposed me to the finest forms of art; so they have definitely played a role in sparking this passion. I fell into acting by chance. One day as I was pursuing a Masters in Literature, I walked by an acting conservatory and decided to audition. It went well.

What else do you enjoy? I played soccer my whole life; I also like to write, draw, and take pictures. Favorite movies? On the Waterfront. Preferred genre of music? Opera. What do you miss most about Italy? I miss the people, the weather, and the food.

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Did You

Know?

A forerunner in art and design, Parsons has been spearheading new movements since its founding in 1896 by the renowned Impressionist William Merritt Chase. The school was renamed in 1941 after Frank Alvah Parsons, who once stated “Art is not for the few, for the talented, for the genius, for the rich, nor the church….”

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simon collins

Feature Story

“We really think that there are three words that are the root to great fashion design: creating beautiful solutions. At the School of Fashion at Parsons The New School for Design, we work hard to provide students the opportunity to exercise their individuality, ask smart questions, and identify their unique vision. Technical skills you can learn anywhere. At Parsons, we really want to help our students find their vision and bring it to reality. “We give our students the chance to work with a host of major fashion labels and companies…. These collaborations are crucial because they allow students to experiment in a way that they will later experiment in their careers, with real-time results and real brands. We don’t specify exactly what the outcome has to be or the process. We simply give guidelines; we give the tools and allow the students to solve problems in a way that expresses themselves the most completely.”

Simon Collins

Dean of Fashion, Parsons Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

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The Spring Launch Party On April 25, Uomo Moderno celebrated its first anniversary in the rooftop lounge of the Gansevoort Park Hotel with 600 guests. Organized by Herbert Fox Productions, the event featured Hollywood’s designer of the stars, Domenico Vacca, and special guests from the Kairos Italy Theater. The lounge was scented by Dr. Vranjes Firenze, who decorated the lounge with 2.5- and 5-liter bottles of heavenly fragrances, while Pureology and Rare Salon provided 200 gift bags to the guests. Particular thanks to New York Italians, who promoted the event, and to Dr. Vranjes and Mosaique for the door prizes.

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Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


Launch Party

A New Drink for the Modern Man For the occasion, publisher and host Francesco Di Maio mixed a new signature drink called the Uomo-tini, which consists of citrus vodka, peach schnapps, blue Curaçao, a splash of pineapple juice, and a lime garnish.

“I wanted to create something novel with a tropical flare,” commented Francesco, “to symbolize the blue of Mediterranean Sea and the green of Ischia—my family’s hometown, which is also known as the emerald island.”

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Dr. Vranjes Firenze When the Nose Knows

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dr. vranjes firenze

Fragrance

Dr. Paolo Vranjes’ story is one of the “nose,” which was seduced by the evocative scents emitted from rare perfume bottles that his grandfather collected on his travels around the globe in search of silk. Born and bred in Bologna, Dr. Vranjes was infused with an ardent passion for exotic fragrances, leading him to study chemistry, cosmetology, and the connection between aromas and human perception. Inspired by the memory of his everyday environment— such as a flower, the sunrise, or a sea breeze—Dr. Vranjes has codified over two thousand scents, which he combines like musical notes into creative formulas that evoke the emotions. He suggests spices like nutmeg or ginger at the office for concentration, lemon or orange blossom for relaxation.

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dr. vranjes firenze

Fragrance

“Home fragrances should not conflict with the aroma of a dinner,” so for romantic evenings Dr. Vranjes advises Rosso Nobile, which possesses the notes of a floral bouquet, fruits of the forest, seasoned wood, and smoked birch. Available in glass crystal and ceramic, Lamparfum is an air purification and perfuming alternative with antibacterial and antimicrobial action that is five times more concentrated than the competition with natural essences. Situated in Florence since 1983, Dr. Vranjes Firenze relies on local artisans to handcraft each bottle, which is inspired by the “City of Art” whose history of olfactory delights dates back to Catherine de’ Medici, Queen consort of France.

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A Wardrobe of Music

Gigi D’Alessio

Pianist, composer, actor, TV presenter —a one man show—Gigi D’Alessio is an Italian singer from the city of Naples, who, against all odds, has succeeded in filling stadiums around the world. Born in 1967, Gigi has sold over twelve million albums throughout his twenty-two-year career. 24

Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


gigi d’alessio

music

In three words, who is Gigi D’Alessio? Simple, fair, and cheerful. How do you define your hometown? Naples is home, the sun, the place where I grew up and where I never stopped living in my heart. I return to Naples very often; and if I said that I miss it, I would be lying because it’s like I have never left it. Do you miss the food? Lots, let’s say I run after it around the world as best I can! What was the turning point in your career? Maybe when I filled the San Paolo in ‘97 for the first time; but to tell the truth, I always think that I have not yet done enough. It helps me never to relax! They say that dreams never end, no? Was dreaming enough to succeed? Talent must be the starting point and, then, hands-on experience certainly puts you to the test and helps you build success over the years through defeat, as well as the “small big” wins that come slowly. You have to have a lot of patience! What was the key to your success? Everything that I have gained in life is the result of so many sacrifices that I have overcome, because I never gave up in the face of difficulties. In the end I was rewarded. But it is true that health is the most important thing. You compare your many styles of music to a wardrobe…. Having gone to conservatory and being trained in different instruments, I am fortunate to compose many different kinds of music, precisely because I know music and scores. It then follows that every album and every song becomes a different outfit that I wear according to the season of life that I’m going through. Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

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Will we ever see Gigi, the designer? Never say “never,” but I’ll leave that for my son who has been venturing into the field of clothing for some years. Do your children listen to your music? They listen to everything and, yes, even mine. Sometimes Claudio sits at the piano and sings some of my songs; this definitely makes me smile. Who are your favorite performers? I’ve always been a fan of Claudio Baglioni, among many others: Questo Piccolo Grande Amore. Is it true that you have a lifelike statue of Elvis? Yes, in my recording studio. When colleagues come to record their albums, they are always shocked, thinking it’s real. What makes Neapolitan music so widely accepted? Fortunately, in addition to having universal themes, it is always current. There are so many bad things but also many beautiful ones and, above all, there are many people who want to live them out. Do you have an overriding message? I really think we are all equal. If I think of bullying, the unfortunate result of rampant ignorance in families, the parents are often worse than the children who have wrong attitudes. What wish do you keep in your secret drawer? There are so many that I find it hard to open the drawer! Dinner with Sophia Loren or Maradona? With Sophia at the stadium to see Diego Armando back on the field.

Interview by Federica Fatale

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gigi d’alessio

music

Any final words? I wish our country would invest in new recruits; then I would ask them never to sit with folded hands.

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Artillerylane

The Press and the Mess 28

Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


Artillerylane

This season’s collection draws inspiration from the chaos of violent events around the world and their interpretations by the press, both of which serve as a catalyst for social change. Photographer Marianna Jamadi provides the backdrop with images of the Trans-Siberian Railway, which extends from Moscow to the Pacific.

Accessories

Artillerylane was created in 2009 by three school buddies in Verona who named their brand of scarves after an alley in London that connects Liverpool Street to the regenerated Brick Lane area. Niccolò, Daniele, and Michea have not only been entrepreneurs since adolescence but they have also remained good friends.

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Artillerylane

Accessories

Did You

Know?

It’s hard to imagine Italy without tomatoes, but such was the case before 1548 when Italian cuisine was all but red, except for the wine! Interestingly, the word tomato in Italian is pomodoro, which derives from pomo d’oro—‘golden apple’. But many of Italy’s dialects and languages adopted the original variant from Nahuan (Aztec): tomatotl.

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SuperDuper Hats In Their Own Words

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superduper hats

Accessories

“‘Super Duper’ is an expression from Irving Berlin’s famous song Puttin’ on the Ritz, written in 1929 and popularized by Fred Astaire…our products definition, which is very dear to us. “The project was born 2010 in Florence out of both fun and passion…but first as a hobby. Since we shared a passion for hats, together at a flea market we bought an old form to make hats. Fortunately we were in the right place: Florence has a long tradition in this field of art. “Besides me, Ilaria Cornacchini, the team consists of my sister Veronica and our friend Matteo Gioli, who is now engaged to Veronica. We have become a family, but we met through an internship at the Department of Fashion and the University of Eindhoven. Our background is far from our current work: I’m an architect and my two colleagues studied Industrial Design; but the skills and mindset are transferable and useful for making hats. “The Hobo hat references this figure’s worn look, giving the idea of an endless journey and made intentionally for the modern traveler. The hat is completely crushable and comes in a flat box; therefore, it is easily transported in a small space without getting ruined. The Gandy dancers were workers who aligned railroad tracks as they sang. “Maybe it’s cliché to say, but accessories are very important. Two men dressed in the same clothes make a totally different visual impact. After all, accessories allow us to play and define our personality better upon first glance.

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“More here than in other countries, we tend to conform to the masses: if the majority likes wearing grossly visible labels, we make no issue. I’m sad to say, but it’s a very Italian problem. Building a more personal look often puts us in a crisis. “If you love hats, our advice is to find one that does something for you and makes you feel comfortable. In this way, you will not be awkward and you will enhance your style. “For the reasons that I stated, 90% of our products are sold abroad, especially in Japan. The Japanese love the quality of Italian craftsmanship and are passionate about the stories of small companies like ours. Interview by Daphne Perticarini

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Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


superduper hats

Accessories

Did You

Know?

La pizza romana—Roman pizza—is round, thin, and crispy. The first literary allusions to pizza in Italy date back to 997AD in Gaeta, just south of Rome. Most likely the word comes from the ancient Greek pita, which evolved into pizza, piadina, pitta—all types of flatbread.

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pomandère

FASHION

Pomandère By

Carlo Zanuso

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pomandère

“ I was born and raised in Vicenza . My education was of an economic nature. In fact, I have a degree in Business and Economics from the Catholic University of Milan; but my family’s passion and background prompted me to take this path. “My parents have run a small shirt business for more than thirty years, and from childhood I followed their activities with great curiosity. This was definitely the deciding factor of my future work. Their job was to manage production for other brands. I always thought that it would be interesting to propose something of our own—hence the idea of Pomandère. “Pomandère was born in 2008. The name means ‘potpourri’, while the quest comes from the name of my parents’ company: Pomegranate. From there came the idea to enclose within this fruit sensations and colors that represent each collection—the right mix to narrate each season, along with the sensations, colors, and scents. “The men’s line was born the following summer with the debut of the 2014 autumn/winter collection. For me it was the mere desire to wear the same simple and well-made clothes. I thought to recover the sartorial dictates that originate in the world of vintage but extend them to modern times.

FASHION

“Craftsmanship is the DNA of the Pomandère woman and man. He is a contemporary and dynamic man who likes to travel, feeling comfortable and casual in his look but not giving up the pleasure of well-made things. “My inspiration comes from the idea of a trip to Morocco. The colors are reminiscent of the spices, as well as the fabrics, textures, and aspects of carpets. All refer to the vapor of a hot tea that blurs the colors of a sunset, with the collection unfolding into materials like jute mixed with cashmere and cotton. “Another great passion of mine is décor and everything about the house; I would love to collaborate with or create a niche of products dedicated to home furnishing. “My other great passion is antiques; I can’t live without discovering new flea markets in Italy and abroad. One of the most fascinating I find to be in L’Isle-sur-la-Sorgue of France, a village where time seems to stand still. “I find it interesting and relaxing to cook for friends, trying new recipes that are inspired at the moment by the ingredients in the house—a detail not to be underestimated! The greatest satisfaction is then to see a beautifully set table.”

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Did You

Know? La pizza genovese—Genovese pizza—is baked in a pan and derives from the ancient flatbread known as focaccia, which characteristically uses more leaven than pizza. Literally ‘baked in a hearth’ in Latin, focaccia is reportedly the forerunner of pizza and originates in Genoa where it is called “fugassa,” a word close to the French “fougasse.”

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pomandère

FASHION

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Perturbazione

An Atmospheric Disturbance

In 1988, Tommaso Cerasuolo (singer) and Rossano Lo Mele (drums) founded their pop rock band in Rivoli—just outside Turin—with two other schoolmates, who were later joined by Gigi Giancursi (guitar), Elena Diana (cello), Cristiano Lo Mele (guitar), and Alex Baracco (base).

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perturbazione

MUSIC

Let’s start with the name….

How about your look?

It was the late Eighties and punk bands were raging with the suffix “zione” like Negazione, Contrazione, etc. Tommaso and Rossano were on a trip and took a photo in the rain. They didn’t know that they would actually start performing, but they thought Perturbazione [literally ‘atmospheric disturbance’] was a perfect name.

For some time we tried to have a unified look in general, even though we have never loved “uniforms.” But we have learned over the years that image contributes to imagination.

And your hometown?

Some time ago a description of countries was being tweeted on the web. Italy was reported as “formerly the cradle of culture but now the producer of shoes.” Apart from simple irony, “Made in Italy” is that prestigious item that is struggling to deal with the crisis, the chain of consumption, and the risk of global competition, which exchanges quality for competitiveness. In all areas—from shoes to cheese—let’s say it’s an excellent species on the way to extinction.

Turin is a city very different from others. Until ten to fifteen years ago, Turin was only Fiat and its suppliers. It was a very difficult city, one of southerners who came to build cars but to whom no one would rent a house. I still remember what it meant in the Eighties to be the son of a Sicilian or Apulian worker. I think this has contributed greatly to the desire for emancipation, which is often translated into music, from the hardcore of Negazione to the hip hop of Sangue Misto, from the reggae of Africa Unite to the pop of Subsonica.

Do you prefer any one of these genres? We are very different, thankfully, and each brings a piece of him- or herself to the group: from more “mainstream” pop to classical music, from R&B to dance. And we are constantly changing; we don’t have set roles.

As an Italian group, does “Made in Italy” mean anything?

You mention tweets; do you use social media? Yes, always. We are very curious about the network: we were the first group to manage a blog; the first to launch an album exclusively on Myspace…. Currently we are on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and various other social networks. We always try to respond to everyone and, nowadays, this is the fastest way to keep in touch with the public.

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perturbazione

MUSIC

What is it like to perform in Italy today? It is difficult. There is still talk of crisis in music, but in reality it is an induced crisis. So money is short, resources are often inadequate, the public is reduced and stoic. However, one thing remains unchanged: it is one of the most beautiful things that can happen to you.

Have you ever thought about quitting? In December of 2013, we closed our Music X Tour in central Italy with many difficulties: few people, very late hours, tiredness, financial hardship, and an album that was not in stores. It seemed to us that we had made a huge effort by trying to reinvent ourselves with an effort of biblical proportions but reaping no benefits. I believe that, if the Festival of Sanremo had not arrived, we would have seriously questioned our future. For now we have an extension.

So how was the Festival? For us it was a carnival of music: five tiring days but so much fun. Thanks to everyone’s warm welcome, we felt as if we finally had the chance to do not only the “right” thing but also the most important one. Interview by Federica Fatale

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Universal Dreamer

Leitmotiv


leitmotiv

FASHION

Two men. Two tastes.

Fabio Sasso with a flair for decorative Baroque. Juan Caro—an eye for Gothic themes. Born in Milan, Fabio studied Art at the University of Bologna; Juan grew up in Bogotå, transferring to Bologna to pursue studies in Visual Arts. In 2006, their imagination for the mythical and surreal detonated into a new brand: Leitmotiv.

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How did you meet? We met one another while looking for the same book in the library of Bologna.

What motivated you to launch a brand together? We were both studying Art: Juan, Painting, and Fabio—the History of Art. This common interest was the first necessary element to give life to the brand. So we launched without much thought to realize what our aspiration was at that time. From there, this desire took shape, leading us to win several awards in Italy from the National Chamber of Fashion, Vogue Italia, Mango Fashion Awards….

Why the name Leitmotiv? Leitmotiv means ‘guiding motif’. Our guiding theme has always been the union of art and fashion.

Juan, why did you choose to study in Italy? I’ve always been fascinated by Italian culture, especially art. I think Italy is the most artistic country in the world.

Who is the Leitmotiv-kind of guy? The Leitmotiv man can be defined as particularly sensitive to the uniqueness that a garment can transmit and quality in terms of materials and concepts.

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leitmotiv

FASHION

What inspired this collection?

What is the symbolism behind the pool table?

As in all our work, the inspirations are very diverse from each other, since we love our messages to be eclectic and our references—mixed. We wanted to imagine garments that spoke about the concept of freedom, freedom of expression, energy, and strength to face life.

We liked the idea of finding a timeless space, frozen in time, which is in sharp contrast with the Leitmotiv man, who is projected towards the future.

Why did you name the collection Universal Dreamer? The Leitmotiv man is a dreamer because he is a man who can transform reality and make it his own. So he loves to imagine that everything is possible for him and that his garments are the armor to confront everyday life with a message of power and beauty.

Can you elaborate on the prints and colors? The patterns are always the result of a very long and personal creative process. We do a lot of research on those, which are the themes; thus, the images are full of references. There are inspirations that range from science fiction of the 1980s to the study of Roman coins. There is a touch of rock, focusing attention on the world of music.

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How do you view menswear in Italy today? As for men’s fashion in Italy, there is a world of possibilities and innovations to be proposed. Italian men’s fashion has always been recognized throughout the world for its excellence. At the same time, we believe it is necessary to look to the future, at new generations, to the voice of young people. We believe that man has an absolute desire and need for uniqueness and new elements that make him more lighthearted and fascinating.

How does Leitmotiv fit into this scene? Leitmotiv wants to be a brand with a very precise and defined personality, which imparts a product rich in content and emotion to the man who wears it.

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leitmotiv

FASHION

Did You

Know?

La pizza marchigiana—pizza of Le Marche—is called “crescia,” which, often made with lard, differs across the region from a single layer pita-like piadina to a stuffed focaccia.

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Day to Day

with Au Jour Le Jour 52

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au jour le jour

FASHION

A native of ForlÏ in Emilia Romagna, Diego Marquez studied Civil Engineering before entering the world of fashion. Mirko Fontana, on the other hand, hails from Ascoli Piceno in Le Marche and graduated in Business Administration and Media Relations. In 2010, the two broke new ground by launching their label as an au courant expression of day-to-day bon vivant. This autumn, Mirko and Diego draw on the creativity of Wes Anderson’s comedy dramas: Moonrise Kingdom, which sets forth an eccentric pubescent love story in a Khaki Scout camp of Rhode Island, and the retro sportswear look of Margot in The Royal Tenenbaums. Uomo Moderno Fall 2014

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au jour le jour

Did You

Know?

FASHION

La pitta china—literally ‘filled pizza’—is a typical dish of Calabria wherein pitta refers to ‘bread’. The word china comes from the Spanish llena, while pitta dates back to ancient Greek—a demonstration of Italy’s culinary and linguistic diversity!

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Cily Hairstylist The World Generation 56

Uomo Moderno Fall 2014


cily

Grooming

Drawing inspiration

from the lifestyles of London and New York, this fall hairstylist Francesco Cilidonio proposes “World Generation”—a haircut that originates with the recent hipster movement and the classicism of the 1950s.

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“Classic styles fuse with modern ones, creating a messy but elegant and fashionable look. This combination is expressed by bright colors, soft shapes, and natural lightening. “The look is deconstructed into maximum natural styling with the return of waves, kiss curls, rockabilly, and tapering on the sides. Double cut, undercut— the accuracy of scissors and avant-garde details are returning. “Ombre finally becomes masculine, with the length and tips illuminated to fade into the natural color at the base. Red dominates with its shine and brilliant effects. Dark blue returns, as magenta comes to life with cashmere and velvety violet. Gaudy floral colors reminiscent of the hippies bring bright hope to Italy’s youth during these dark times. “These indispensable cuts complement a look that represents the determination to break free from the stress of everyday life and retrieve a dimension of fun in the city, but not avoiding all the daily pressures. They help rediscover those nostalgic years when everything had to be built, even one’s outer appearance. “With simplicity at the base, new lines merge with old ones for a future that grasps the past. A new world generation that desires to move forward must first go back in time.”

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cily

Did You

Know?

Grooming

La pizza siciliana—Sicilian pizza—varies widely across the island. Palermo’s sfinciuni [from ‘sponge’ in Arabic] is rectangular, thick and spongy, and thought to be the forerunner of the deep-dish Sicilian pizza. Catania’s scacciata consists of two layers with vegetables in-between, all baked in an oval pan. Syracuse’s pizzolu was originally a sort of stuffed focaccia.

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Rowing in Italy The Italian Federation of Rowing was established in 1888 on the banks of the Po River and held the first rowing championships in Italy on Lake Maggiore. In Olympic history, Italy ranks seventh in the world with a total of thirty-eight medals. In the 2012 Summer Olympics Romano Battisti swept the silver in double skulls, while Vincenzo Abbagnale and Francesco Fossi have medaled numerous times in world championships.

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rowing

Sports

Vincenzo Abbagnale “It was impossible not to be in contact with this sport, given the history of my family. However, I was never forced. At the age of 11 years, I wanted to start by myself; certainly the example of my father and uncles was very challenging. “Continuing the tradition of my family is something much too big for me. They won several Olympic Games; I hope to achieve these high goals, but it is premature to talk about history now. It used to weigh on me up to a certain age, but then I learned how to handle it. “My relationship with dad is special. Today he is president of the Italian Rowing Federation and, therefore, plays a very important role. I try to steal from him all the valuable advice that he can give me. “I have had some crises: they’re on the agenda; but so far I have never thought of abandoning the sport. “I really like to play soccer. If I had not gone into crew, I would have definitely played soccer. “Rowing in Italy unfortunately does not have a high profile. It is much easier to buy a soccer ball than a boat for thousands of euro.”

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Romano Battisti “I grew passionate about rowing by watching the Olympics on TV and, from there, I started training. I didn’t want to play soccer because I wasn’t so good and it was a sport that too many people played. “I believe that rowing is spreading a lot, thanks to the universities that continue to have it within their team sports, the internet, and new media like social networks. “Rowing mainly teaches how to have strength and never give in, even when faced with difficulties in life. “Our nutrition is based on the Mediterranean diet, with a pinch more carbohydrates and proteins. “When we are abroad, we really miss our family and friends but most of all our food: pasta, pizza, and something fundamental for us—espresso!

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rowing

Sports

Francesco Fossi “When I was little I played so many sports, but as soon as I tried rowing with Canottieri Firenze I fell in love with the competitive component. “Victories are important and definitely a great showcase, but the strong point of rowing is the message it conveys: that results depend on hard work and mainly come with patience over time, intelligently making the most of your qualities and those of others. “We follow guidelines on when and what to eat, but it’s not very different from a normal healthy diet. “Food in Italy is central to society, combining thousands of diverse dishes that are scattered throughout Italy. In Italy food is not just food. “My next goal is the World Rowing Championship in Amsterdam and, certainly, the most important is the Olympics in Rio. Then maybe I will look for other goals outside rowing. “I love sports in general, especially cycling. I do it for training, but also for fun. I also really like art and visiting museums or exhibitions.”

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A Tribute to Ernesto

Lvchino


lvchino

FASHION

“Nothing is more united than opposites; nothing is more cohesive than contrasts,” affirms designer Luca Bellei. “Polka dots become maxi, checks are converted into a pattern, micro-patterns hide a perforated heart.”

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Even the materials play on connections and contrasts, as velvet meets linen and wool in the soft embrace of blue sapphire and the green of open spaces. A threeyear old Weimaraner emerges as a symbol of elegance and confidence, with a sweet ironic note. “Without a doubt my biggest passion is my dog,” says Luca, “Ernesto, who has the real ability to make my days lighter and always put a smile on my face, no matter what. I wanted to reward him by including him in the autumn/winter 2104 collection!”

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lvchino

FASHION

Did You

Know?

Deriving its name from Weimar, Germany, Weimaraners were originally bred for hunting in the 19th century and now exceed 500 in Italy. There even exists the Weimaraner Club Italia. Moreover, Italy lays claim to over a dozen indigenous breeds, many regional, whose history can be traced back thousands of years, such as the Courser, Sicilian Hound, and Italian Greyhound.

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The Contemporary Nomad

Caruso


caruso

Like many Neapolitans in the postwar period, Raffaele Caruso bid addio to his city of the sun and—in hopes of a better life in the industrializing north—set up a tailor shop in Soragna, near Parma. It was not long before the little suit maker grew into MA.CO Manifattura Confezioni, which his two sons— Alberto and Nicola—transformed into Raffaele Caruso Ltd in the year 2000, later acquired by former Brioni CEO Umberto Angeloni. As a reflection of the label’s long transformation, this season Caruso takes a walk through evolutionary history, gazing at nature through romantic eyes and

FASHION

reclaiming space with iconic pieces that describe the human body’s interaction with its environment. Fur coats reference the primitive hunter, who after the brutal struggle donned this primordial item for warmth and protection. The cloak evokes imagery of long nights and romantic duels; while the apron, a covering for the vital organs, symbolizes Italian craftsmanship. Within the general collection there exist mini capsule collections that depict sophisticated men around the globe, from Naples to Shanghai and Seoul to Buenos Aires, onto Los Angeles, then Paris.

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caruso

FASHION

Did You

Know?

World famous tenor, Enrico Caruso, was born 1873 into a poor family of Naples. After the passing of his mother, he earned money as a teenager by singing on the streets, in cafés, and at resorts. After a professional debut in Naples at the age of twenty two, Caruso’s international career ignited into performances at La Scala in Milan, the Metropolitan Opera of New York, and London’s Royal Opera House.

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Napoli City of the Sun 72

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Travel

Grottoes, Grapes & Greeks

Blockbusters, Byzantines & Barbarians

The curtained opens nearly three thousand years ago with the ‘people of purple’—the Phoenicians—who sail up the Italic coast in search of precious metals; but the first stage troop to settle these sunny shores is the ancient Italic tribe named Osci.

Even though the Roman war machine rewrites the script in 82BC, the Greek score and showmanship persist in Naples until the 6th century AD when Byzantium enters center stage with a succession of pageant masters, who bar the doors to encroaching northern playhouses.

The Greeks set the stage in the second act with Magna Graecia, establishing a colony on the isle of Ischia and, later, across the bay in Cuma—just down the block from Sophia Loren’s hometown. In due time, however, the actors grow tired of the old settlements and debut in a ‘new city’ called Neopolis.

Naples, Normans & Nabbings In the 12 th century, the curtain falls on Naples’ selfdirecting act when the Normans set up new props for the Kingdom of Sicily, which are soon replaced by a German intermission of Swabian dramaturges.

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From Feudalism to Family Feuds Until unification in 1861, a succession of foreign artistic directors ensues. The French House of Anjou lift the curtain in 1266 as Naples is hailed prima donna by the Kingdom of Sicily—second only to the diva of Paris. In 1442 Naples kisses Anjou “adieu” and bids “hola” to the House of Aragon, which inaugurates the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, whereupon Naples basks in the limelight as a cultural, intellectual, and musical center. Soon the despotic performance of Spanish playwrights leads to the side shows of banditry, delinquency, and secret guilds like the Camorra—the Neapolitan style mob.

Bourbon Anyone? Inspired by France’s Revolution, the freedom fighters 74

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of Naples begin rehearsing a new solo act; but despite a short-lived French aperitif, the city settles for Bourbon, whose stagehands turn the spotlights off any patriotic concertino!

Naples, Nations & New Notions Refused of their demands, the partisans of Naples and its isle-studded bay beat the drum to unification as a last resort. In 1861 a new script is written: the Republic of Italy. To finance the show, ticketing offices are drained throughout the city, prompting one of the largest mass emigrations in history—only to be exasperated by epidemics, world wars, and corruption. In spite of all the odds and critical reviews, the Neapolitan spirit remains unbroken—and the show goes on!


napoli

Did You

Know?

Travel

During the “Four Days of Naples” (27-30 September 1943), the populace rose up and liberated the city from Nazi occupation. Many of the fighters were socalled armed scugnizzi—‘street urchins’ (pronounced shkoonyeezzee)—who, with nothing to lose, did what came naturally and fought for survival. The city was awarded the Gold Medal of Military Valor.

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‘A Lengua Napulitana Although numerous dialects exist within its territory, ‘o nnapulitano is not a dialect but an official language—declared so by UNESCO—with a very complex history and system of grammar.

Dating back to pre-Roman times, the Neapolitan language has been influenced by Greek, Latin, Arabic, French, Catalan, and Spanish. Although some Neapolitan renditions are indirect translations of the original language, the following are examples of loanwords:

Neapolitan Italian Meaning Origin Language crisòmmola albicocca apricot chryso milo Greek crai domani tomorrow cras Latin fellusse danaro money fulus Arabic buàtta barattolo canister boîte French ammuïna chiasso noise, bother amoïnar Catalan cu’ mmiche con me with me conmigo Spanish

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napoli

Did You

Know?

Travel

The English exclamation “yo” was popularized in the Forties by children of Italian immigrants in the U.S. who corrupted the Neapolitan word for boy [guaglione, commonly pronounced wahl-yò-nuh] into just “yo,” meaning ‘hey’.

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窶連 Canzona Napulitana 78

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Travel

One of the most famous Italian songs around the world is ‘O Sole Mio, written in 1898 by Giovanni Capurro and composed by Eduardo di Capua. The most startling fact, however, is it was not written in Italian but rather the Neapolitan language, which is the most distinguishing feature of ‘A Canzona Napulitana—Neapolitan music. Dating back to the 13 th century, the popular music of Naples has evolved over the centuries but what remain unchanged are the passionate rhythms and optimistic themes of the songs, which eulogize love, the sun, the sea, the mountain, and romantic sites around the city. In addition to the popular music, conservatories began springing up in the 16 th century and, by the 18 th century, Naples had become known as “the conservatory of Europe,” attracting prominent composers like Pergolesi, Rossini, and Donizetti. When San Carlo opened in 1737, this Royal Theater was the grandest opera house in the world, bolstering the city’s reputation as the capital of European music until unification in 1861 when the wealth shifted northward to foster La Scala.

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Did You

Know?

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The first shopping malls originated in Rome around 100AD, and over the centuries successive malls appeared in Tehran, Istanbul, Paris, London, and St. Petersburg. Reminiscent of Milan’s Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Galleria Umberto I is Naples’ upscale shopping mall, which was constructed 1887 in the shape of a Latin cross.


napoli

Travel

Did You

Know?

Named after the 10th-century church, Via San Gregorio Armeno is a narrow street in the historic center that is renowned worldwide for artisanal nativity scenes.

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Davide Civitiello Pizza Maker Numero Uno

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davide civitiello

Cuisine

Everybody loves one kind of pizza or another, but not everyone has tasted the forerunner to the modern-day variety—‘a pizza napulitana. Dating back centuries, Neapolitan pizza is baked in a stove oven at 900°F (485°C) and who knows its secrets better than the world champion pizzaiolo of Naples: Davide Civitiello. “As I always say, there are pizzas and then there is pizza. ‘Pizza’ is the one word that does not change in any language, but the Neapolitan pizza is another thing. This pizza has a history of feeling, love, and delicate emotions. We often compare the Neapolitan pizza to a woman who must be courted, understood, and cared for more and more every day. “I come from an ancient school of pizza making, a craft handed down from generation to generation with enormous passion. I started in a historic pizzeria of Naples where my teacher— Vincenzo Costa, who has since passed away—always told me that with the dough must be made with truth and love. “In addition to water, salt, yeast, and flour, to make good dough you need so much love to put it to rest and, then, prepare the balls of dough, which still must rise for hours and hours without ever putting them in the fridge. This process allows the Neapolitan pizza to be the lightest and easiest to digest in the world. “Naturally, let’s not forget a good San Marzano tomato, excellent buffalo mozzarella from Campania, and fresh basil for the world’s best results!

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“The differences among pizzas in Italy are numerous. I think the biggest difference is in the dough since every pizza chef—whether Neapolitan, Sicilian, or Milanese— has a different way of working. Often cooking times range from 3 to 5 minutes; however, Neapolitan pizza is cooked for 90 seconds, making it soft but crunchy at the same time and allowing the pizza to be fragrant and delicious in a way that all the ingredients remain alive and tasty. “There are numerous differences between Neapolitan pizza and what I encounter around the world. The leavening, for example, of the Neapolitan pizza takes almost 2 days; whereas in my travels, I often see commercial yeast that leavens the dough in a half hour. But this is not good for the human body. The oven is another difference: the Neapolitan pizza needs a wood-burning oven and a high temperature to ensure excellent results. Then people often think, since it is pizza, the ingredients can be mediocre; but I think using quality ingredients gets 70% of the job done. “Everyone tells me that my pizza is good because I am the world champion, but I don’t think this way. The secret to my pizza being judged as the world’s best was that I was simply Davide and I did what I have been doing every day at work for 20 years. I believe that the passion and love for what you do cannot be beaten by anyone!”

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davide civitiello

Did You

Know?

Cuisine

La pizza margherita was reportedly created in 1889 by Raffaele Esposito of Naples, who wished to honor the queen consort of Italy, Margherita of Savoy. Representing the red, white, and green of the Italian flag, the skilled pizzaiolo garnished the pizza with tomato, mozzarella, and basil.

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Caleido

One Hot Atelier 86

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DĂŠcor

Founded in Nave of Brescia, Lombardy, Caleido has been producing stylish radiators, towel warmers, bio fireplaces, and heating systems since 1993, relying on state-of-the art technology and the artistic creativity of world-famous designers. Decorative radiators not only provide essential heat but also furnish living spaces with style to warm both body and soul. Multifunctional radiators with slatted racks serve as shelves and towel warmers. Powered by raw materials of vegetable origin, bio fireplaces are open hearths that have no need of a chimney installation and they do not emit toxic substances. Caleido—the atelier of warmth and fine design.

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DĂŠcor

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Tagina

The Evolution of Italian Tile

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tagina

Décor

“Tarsina is the ancient Umbrian name that the Roman conquerors attributed to the city called ‘Gualdo Tadino’ today. Even then in that important town, ceramic tiles were produced for the local thermal bathes. “By the 17th century, Tadino majolica had received world acclaim by royal courts and collectors, thanks to the development of the ‘metallic luster’ technique used by the local artisans and introduced by the Master Giorgio. From there, a school and ceramic tradition were born. “Hence, Tagina was built on the foundation of forerunners who symbolized the artistic, technical, and commercial know-how that dates back to pre-Roman times and exalts the ancient splendor of ceramics.

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“On one hot August evening in 1973, we young founders waited with bated breath to celebrate the first tiles of the newborn Tagina to exit the kiln. “I can proudly say that in forty years…Tagina has adapted to a changing scenario…anticipating a season of unexplored spaces and challenges with reference to ‘Made in Italy’—that is, ‘Super Made in Italy’—which to us is synonymous with ‘Made in Tagina’.” Interview with CEO Mario Moriconi

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DĂŠcor

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Neutra

But Not Indifferent

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neutra

DĂŠcor

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Décor

Located in Cantù of Como, Lombardy, the historic company Arnaboldi Angleo has been breathing life into marble and natural stone since 1880, combining precious wood and nine types of stones into a collection of refined bathrooms in neutral colors. Designed by Steve Leung, the Inkstone Collection draws inspiration from the revered practice of traditional Chinese calligraphy, which employs a ceramic ink stone to grind the solid ink stick into liquid ink. The Neos Collection, designed by Luca Martorano, is rigorously geometric, minimalist, abstract, and pure, utilizing sheets of stone for surfaces. Wooden surfaces are finished in a process called “Silk,” which is intended to resemble fine fabrics.

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Uomo Moderno Fall 2014  

The First and Only Men's Fashion and Lifestyle Magazine from Italy. In this issue: • Read all about Italy's diverse cultural, linguistic, p...

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