Concrete Contractor January 2021

Page 1

7 Questions on Colors & Stains with Solomon Colors

30 January 2021

[ [ Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Part 1 of 3

THE LEADING TRADE MAGAZINE IN THE CONCRETE INDUSTRY

The Benefits of a TECHNICAL DATA TO HELP YOU CHOOSE YOUR NEXT

GRINDER 38

A CUSTOM FOUNDATION The story of Concrete Foundation Association’s 2020 Commercial Project of the Year

CONCRETE PUMP ATTACHMENT 10

How an 8-FOOT THICK CONCRETE PIER Pushed the Limits of Hydrodemolition 14

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WHAT’S INSIDE

January 2021 | Issue 1, Volume 21

18 A Custom Foundation

COVER STORY

A profile of contractor Custom Concrete and the project that won them the Concrete Foundation Association’s 2020 Commercial Project of the Year Award. Photo Credit: Custom Concrete

DEPARTMENTS 6

Editor’s Letter

8

New Products

28 Product Focus Saws & Blades

42 Advertiser Index 44 The Last Placement Cover Photo Credit: Aquajet Systems USA

24 Concrete Tips for Safer Sawing & Drilling

FEATURES 10 The Benefits of a Concrete Pump Attachment Maximize productivity, a quick return on investment, and open up opportunities.

12 Reimagining the Next Evolution of Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Part 1 of a 3 part series.

14 What do You do With a Damaged 8-foot Thick Concrete Pier? You remove it. But that’s easier said than done and required pushing the limits of hydrodemolition.

Expert advice on how you can optimize safety during cutting and drilling operations.

30 7 Questions on Colors & Stains John Reynolds of Solomon Colors answers some questions on acid vs water stains, common problems, some insight on application.

Five quick questions on trends, safety, and values ForConstructionPros.com/21219785

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38 Specification Guide: Grinders Technical data to help you choose your next grinder.

David Howard takes position as the 2021 Chair of the American Concrete Pavement Association.

Q&A with Sun Concrete Pumping’s Jim Manson

JANUARY 2021

It can be cost-prohibitive to own.

32 A Vision of the Long Road Ahead

WHAT’S ONLINE

4 CONCRETE CONTRACTOR

36 How Renting Grinders & Scarifiers Can Save Money, Time

How to Turn Your Business into a Masterpiece Four tips on sculpting your business how you want and achieve great personal satisfaction ForConstructionPros.com/21206166

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Announcing our 2021 Editorial Advisory Board

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o be able to serve you a clear message on the issues and trends in the concrete industry, we at Concrete Contractor have reinstated its editorial advisory board. Combined, the years of experience in our members counts to decades upon decades. Please welcome the members of the Concrete Contractor 2021 Editorial Advisory Board. JONATHAN KOZLOWSKI, EDITOR James Baty II, Executive Director for the JKOZLOWSKI@ ACBUSINESSMEDIA.COM Concrete Foundations Association (CFA), is currently chair of ACI 332 and a voting member for ACI 306 with priorities of establishing better guidance and structure for residential concrete construction. As a regular contributor to this magazine, his credits also include the development of a number of thermal design and engineering tools. Kim Basham is president of KB Engineering LLC which provides engineering services to the concrete industry and a registered professional engineer in 19 states. Dr. Basham also teaches seminars and workshops dealing with all aspects of concrete including concrete technology, concrete construction, and troubleshooting for the American Concrete Institute, World of Concrete and other concrete/construction organizations. A former editor for Concrete Contractor (2013 to 2019), Ryan Olson now applies his experience and insight to Ligchine as the company's director of marketing. He proudly returns to the magazine as the newest member of our editorial advisory board. Jim Cuviello has been in the concrete polishing industry since 2002. He is the owner of Cuviello Concrete, a concrete polishing contractor in Stevensville, Md., and a founding member of the Concrete Polishing Association of America. Cuviello has been in the stone restoration business since 1996 and the concrete polishing industry since 2002. He brings the methodology and technicalities of mechanical polishing stone to concrete and brings a scientific approach to polishing concrete. Chris Klemaske joined Sundek as Director of Commercial Development in 2019, where she continues her role as an industry leader working with designers, architects, and commercial developers on projects nationwide. Along with her many career accomplishments, Klemaske is a champion for the architectural concrete industry and a sought-after industry spokesperson. Dennis Purinton of Purinton Builders Inc. has built a successful foundation, site work, and waterproofing business by taking advantage of opportunities to expand his company and implement new technologies to improve quality and efficiency on the work site. Always one to stay on the industry's cutting edge and share his knowledge and experiences with other contractors, he received the CFA Contractor of the Year award in 2007. We are honored to have these members offering their guidance and support. Thank you all. Here's to a great 2021! Stay safe out there.

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Published by AC Business Media

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www.ForConstructionPros.com/Concrete PUBLICATION STAFF

Editor Contributing Writers Senior Production Manager Art Director Audience Development Manager

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FORCONSTRUCTIONPROS.COM

Larry Stewart lstewart@ACBusinessMedia.com Kimberly Hegeman khegeman@ACBusinessMedia.com

Editor Managing Editor CHANGE OF ADDRESS & SUBSCRIPTIONS

PO Box 3605, Northbrook, IL 60065-3605, Phone: (877) 201-3915 Fax: (847) 291-4816 • circ.ConcreteContractor@omeda.com REPRINTS Sean Dunphy, (800) 538-5544 , sdunphy@ACBusinessMedia.com LIST RENTAL Bart Piccirillo, Sr. Account Manager, Data Axle, Phone: (518) 339-4511 Email: bart.piccirillo@infogroup.com AC BUSINESS MEDIA

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Published and copyrighted 2021 by AC Business Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher. CONCRETE CONTRACTOR (USPS 021-799, ISSN 1935-1887 (print); ISSN 2471-2302 (online) is published 7 times a year: January, February/March, April/May, June/July, August/September, October/November and December by AC Business Media, 201 N. Main Street, 5th Fl., Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. Printed in the U.S.A. Periodicals postage paid at Fort Atkinson, WI, and additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Concrete Contractor, PO Box 3605 Northbrook, IL 60065-3605 January 2021, Issue 1, Volume 21 One year subscription to non-qualified individuals: U.S. 1 year: $35, 2 years: $70. Canada & Mexico 1 year: $60, 2 years: $105. All other countries 1 year: $85, 2 years: $160 (payable in U.S. funds drawn on U.S. banks). Single copies available (prepaid only) $10.00 each (U.S., Canada & Mexico), $15.00 each (International). Canada Post PM40612608. Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Concrete Contractor, PO Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2. Printed in the U.S.A. Concrete Contractor is the Official Media Sponsor of the CFA Foundation Company Certification Program

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NEW PRODUCTS

10

PRODUCTS FOR THE CONCRETE INDUSTRY

Curb Roller Eel Screed 6100

The lightweight Eel Screed 6100 corded roller screed offers variable speed control for working speeds from 0-300 rpm and provides easy adjustment for different slump conditions or delivery rates. One-pin connection on the stainless-steel shaft and screed ends allows for fast setup Simply insert screed ends into the SCH40 4-in. aluminum pipe and plug the system into a power source Single button directional change Features a direct drive system, multi-position folding handle, all-steel housing and heavy-duty kickstand. Requires a 120V, 60-Hz outlet or generator.

Miller Formless Expands Concrete Lineup with Slipform Paver Models C-101 and CG-200

ForConstructionPros.com/21136234

Somero S-22EZ Laser Screed Machine

The Enerpac ZU5 Post Tensioning Pump

Enerpac’s ZU5 Post Tensioning Pumps offer increased jobsite efficiency for post tensioning contractors. With six pistons for increased stressing speed, operators can stress more tendons per day. In a head to head jobsite test, the Enerpac ZU5 performed 30% faster than traditional hydraulic pumps. The ZU5 improves contractors’ ability to stay on schedule or move onto other jobs. Available in two models, the ZU5 features an on-pump control switch, on-pump remote switch, and user adjusted relief valve. The ZU5708RB-P features a 3-way, 2-position valve. The ZU5908PB-P model features a 4-way, 3-position valve along with a pendant control. ForConstructionPros.com/21199219

The S-22EZ features 360 degree machine rotation, a 20-ft. telescopic boom and a choice of pivoting screed heads. • Offers zero-turn drive capability with a 360 degree steering angle • Customized OASIS laser control system • Comes with a full-color LCD display with integrated diagnostics, Quick GradeSet System, automatic throttle and Programmable Quick Pass

• Redesigned, EZ Clean Head reduces cleanup time and improves long-term maintenance • Options include a 12- or 14-ft. head width, roller plow, onboard pressure washer with hose reel, operator heat, spray bar and Floor Levelness System

Miller Formless has acquired the MBW slipform paver models C-101 and the CG-200. The C-101 and CG-200 will be added to the growing line of products manufactured by Miller Formless. The two machines will join the company’s six other products capable of installing concrete curb, curb and gutter, barrier walls and concrete pavements and currently in use throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe, Central America, Asia, and Australia. “In an effort to expand market share and continue our corporate growth strategies, we saw this small paver as an excellent opportunity to add a quality machine to our existing line of products,” said Darick L. Franzen, vice president of business development - North America, Miller Formless. “Miller Formless has the reputation, knowledge and experience in the slipform paving industry to take this well-developed product and bring it to another level of productivity and professionalism,” Andrew Multerer, CEO/President of MBW Inc., commented. “It is bittersweet for MBW because we have a deep and rich history with the paver, but in our hearts we know that Miller Formless has the core focus for the slipform paving world and MBW’s core focus is on compaction and concrete finishing.” ForConstructionPros.com/21199642

ForConstructionPros.com/21136302

Ruwac’s Workhorse WB307 Propane-Powered Vacuum

Ruwac USA’s Workhorse WB30713 h.p is a Honda propane-powered direct bagging vacuum. The WB307 is built with Ruwac’s Max Flo multi-stage turbine system providing 300 CFM at 85” H20. This Workhorse Series vacuum features an oversized 28 sq. ft. MicroClean primary filter, 99% efficient at 0.5 microns and guaranteed for 3 years. All Ruwac USA vacuums are built with their exclusive “bulletproof” oval housing design guaranteed to never dent, rust, or go out of round. External filter cleaning mechanism and continuous pull bagging system eliminates operator exposure to dust for a higher level of protection. Ruwac USA engineers these vacuums to offer the lowest cost of ownership on the market. This means less filter changes, less filter clogs, less downtime and more production. The Workhorse WB307 is designed to be paired with small to mid-size propane powered surface prep equipment where electrical power is not available. ForConstructionPros.com/21200752

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Ruwac Upgraded the Throttle Cable on Early Entry Saw Vacuum Systems

Ruwac USA has redesigned and upgraded the throttle cable (part # 2501312C01) for its V1000 / GV10XLT early entry saw vacuum systems. This throttle cable design has been used in the aircraft industry for many years and Ruwac has customized its design to outfit and upgrade any existing units in the field. The new HD throttle cable upgrade relocates the throttle location for better protection during transportation and operation while using a thicker cable diameter and heavy-duty cable sheath for durability and longer life expectancy. The upgrade includes a heavy-duty powder coated steel mounting bracket, and the cable utilizes a locking screw mechanism to provide the operator precise control of the engine’s operation and RPM. The V1000 / GV10XLT is a specially designed gas-powered vacuum system paired with an on board HEC preseparation system designed for the collection of “green” concrete dust during early entry sawing applications. ForConstructionPros.com/21203590

Cortec’s MCI-2062 Biological-Based Surface Cleaner

Cortec’s MCI-2062 is another biological-based concrete surface cleaner similar to MCI-2061. Both MCI cleaners make use of the natural abilities of microorganisms to biodegrade their target waste substances effectively without the use of harsh acidic or alkaline products. However, where MCI-2061 focuses on the critical task of digesting hydrocarbon stains, MCI-2062 targets stains from organic wastes, proteins, fats, greases, and starches. It is therefore particularly suited to concrete heavily soiled by organic wastes in and around dumpsters, restrooms, and food processing facilities. MCI-2062 is a multipurpose concentrated bio-enzymatic blend formulated for general cleaning on a variety of surfaces. It combines powerful cleaning chemistry with free enzymes and microorganisms capable of biodegrading a wide range of organic waste in order to leave facilities sparkling clean and odor-free. All the components work in synergy: cleaning agents lift and disperse the waste while enzymes work to speed up digestion by microorganisms. ForConstructionPros.com/21205899

Hilti SDS-Max Combination Hammer Drill

When the challenges mount, when the ground starts moving under you, the Iron Age Solidifier is there for you. With its defined heel, polyurethane abrasion tough outsole, super strong leathers and welts, and waterproof membrane (IA5062 and IA5082 only), the Solidifier is a firm foundation. • ASTM F2413, Bootbed memory foam footbed • Electrical hazard protection • Composite toe • Hydrotex waterproof system • Goodyear welt construction • Ladder latch defined heel Available in brown, sizes 7-12, 13 and 14 in medium and wide versions are available.

The 22-lb. TE 70-ATC/AVR, SDS-Max combination hammer includes Active Torque Control (ATC) technology, which stops the tool body from spinning uncontrollably if the drill bit jams. • 10.7-ft.-lb. of single impact energy and full hammering frequency of 2,830 impacts per minute • TE-YX bits and TE-YPX flat and pointed chisels designed specifically to handle the power of this tool • Comes with a universal detachable power cord that fits eight other Hilti tools • Brushless motor Hilti North America’s TE 70-ATC/AVR, SDS-Max combination hammer will help commercial contractors and tradespeople drill up to 40% faster in reinforced concrete. Understanding the importance of worker safety on a construction jobsite, the SDS-Max combination hammer includes Hilti’s Active Torque Control technology, which stops the tool body from spinning uncontrollably if the drill bit jams.

ForConstructionPros.com/21201088

ForConstructionPros.com/21205487

Iron Age Footwear’s Solidifier Work Boot Series

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Honda Engines New GC Series Models for Pressure Washers

Honda Engines launched two, all-new engines designed specifically to increase the performance of pressure washers—enhancing the user experience and making jobs easier. Replacing the Honda GCV160 and GCV190, the Honda GCV170 and GCV200 pressure washer engines deliver more: more power and more torque for premium residential applications, along with a range of technological attributes, innovative features, and a simple design that make the new models even more reliable and easier to operate and maintain. The power behind any pressure washer is its engine, and the core of the new Honda GCV170 and GCV200 pressure washer engines is true power output. Both engines offer best-in-class power and torque that deliver peak performance in the toughest of operating conditions. More power and torque from the engines allow the pump of a pressure washer to produce a steady, even amount of high pressure to the hose and cleaning attachment while reducing the need for the operator to repeat spray. • GCV170: an increase in torque of 18% and a 9% horsepower gain over the GCV160 • GCV200: an increase in torque of 13% and 10% horsepower gain over the GCV190 “The Honda GC Series…provides efficient power, superior fuel efficiency, and quiet operation for customers who rely on their outdoor power products to get jobs done,” said William Walton, vice president, Honda Power Equipment. “When it comes to pressure washing, the new Honda GCV170 and GCV200 models enhance our current GC Series, offering a host of added benefits— delivering more power and torque than earlier models and innovative design features that provide for an easy, enjoyable operating experience for consumers.” Both pressure washer engines meet the SAEJ1349 net horsepower standard, which rates engine power with the muffler and air filter in place. This net standard rating accurately reflects real-world operating conditions. ForConstructionPros.com/21200255

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FLATWORK/SLAB

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BY TRIPP FARRELL, PRESIDENT, BLASTCRETE EQUIPMENT LLC

The Benefits of a Concrete Pump Attachment Maximize productivity, a quick return on investment, and open up opportunities.

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ime is money. Nowhere is that more evident than the highly competitive construction market. With tighter deadlines and increased overhead, many contractors are looking for creative solutions to keep their bids low and their profits high. One way contractors are maximizing productivity is by adding a concrete pump attachment to their fleet that pairs with existing auxiliary hydraulic systems—such as a skid-steer or compact track loader (CTL). This versatile attachment allows fast, efficient pumping of grout materials, 3/8-in. aggregate shotcrete mixes and 1/2-in.

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concrete for a number of applications. When fully utilized, a concrete pump attachment can provide an efficiency boost and bidding advantage for a number of applications. WORK AT YOUR PACE Coordinating with a pump truck can be one of the biggest headaches for contractors, and one of the most expensive. A booming construction market means concrete providers are in high demand and so is their equipment. Coordinating schedules to have a pump truck on site when crews are ready to pour doesn’t always work out, which can result in costly delays and missed deadlines. While large projects will still require the use of pump trucks, many contractors are finding concrete pump attachments provide an optimal solution for on-demand pumping on small

projects. A concrete pump attachment gives them the freedom to pump when they want at a significant savings. With pump trucks running $800 to $1,500 or more per job, replacing this expense with a user-friendly attachment that utilizes an existing auxiliary hydraulic system can quickly produce a return on investment—sometimes in as few as 12 jobs. INCREASE YOUR OPPORTUNITIES In addition to being available when needed, a concrete pump attachment offers the freedom to pump in difficult to access or confined spaces. Some attachments are as small as 4 ft. x 6 ft. and can operate pretty much anywhere a skid steer or CTL can, including backyards and other tight spaces inaccessible by larger pump trucks. Despite this

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Concrete pump attachments can provide an optimal solution for on-demand pumping on small projects. Images courtesy of Blastcrete Equipment LLC

small footprint, high-output concrete pump attachments can provide up to 25 yds. per hour and pump material as far as 250 ft. horizontally and 50 ft. vertically using the auxiliary hydraulics of your machine. Lower output attachments are another consideration for those new to concrete pumping. Certain manufacturers offer compact units with pumping rates ranging from 6 to 12 yds. per hour. Lower pumping pressure is ideal for crews with little or no experience pumping concrete. As entry-level equipment, these units are more cost efficient than higher output models, making them a steppingstone for contractors looking to diversify. Selecting an output that aligns with desired applications is key to maximizing efficiency. But regardless of which model you opt to use, adding a concrete pump attachment opens up a number of applications in ICF, block fill, form and pour, driveways, basements, grouting, cellular concrete and wet shotcrete applications.

MAXIMIZE YOUR EQUIPMENT UTILIZATION Not every concrete pump attachment is created equal, so those looking to optimize their opportunities and ROI should ensure the equipment offers userfriendly features to make operation and maintenance easier. Some OEMs offer attachments with design features such as universal mounting plates and forklift pockets to make equipment easier to operate and transport. While certain models will only work with a high-flow skid steer or CTL of the same brand, other units can integrate seamlessly with any auxiliary hydraulic system to provide quality results with only minimal training. Attachments with a squeeze or peristaltic pump design also offer productivity and safety benefits over swing tube pump types. In addition to a simple, user-friendly design that’s easy to operate, this pump is the easiest to clean and maintain. No concrete comes in contact with the pump’s moving parts, allowing you to clean the unit in about five minutes using just water and a sponge ball. In addition, the primary wear part on this type of pump is a rubber pumping tube that can be easily replaced on the jobsite in about 20 minutes, resulting in maintenance costs that are typically less than $1 per cubic yard of pumped material.

For operations looking for a competitive edge in the commercial and residential construction industry, adding a concrete pump attachment can be a cost-effective way to increase productivity and opportunities. Working with reputable manufacturers to identify the right pump for your specific needs can further increase overall efficiency. After all, time is money—and with the right equipment, you can save both.

For more on concrete pumps, visit ForConstructionPros.com/ concrete/equipment-products/ concrete-pumps. Adding a concrete pump attachment opens up a number of applications in ICF, block fill, form and pour, driveways, basements and more.

Concrete pump attachments can operate pretty much anywhere a skid steer or compact track loader can, including backyards and other tight spaces.

www.ForConstructionPros.com/Concrete

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FOUNDATIONS & WALLS

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BY THOMAS SZOCINSKI, DIRECTOR OF VAPOR INTRUSION, LAND SCIENCE

Adobe Stock images | By kalpis

Reimagining the Next Evolution of VAPOR

INTRUSION

MITIGATION Part 1 of a 3 Part Series

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ince the early 1970s, environmental professionals and health experts have called attention to contaminant vapor intrusion and have alerted the public to the serious health problems caused by poor indoor air quality. Beginning with radon, the understanding that chemicals could enter occupied spaces and cause adverse health effects has steadily expanded over the ensuing decades. It is now widely known that hydrocarbons and industrial solvents are commonly found on brownfield properties where former industrial sites once operated—many of which are now undergoing redevelopment within major metropolitan areas. Even in very low concentrations, these compounds can pose significant health issues, such as cancers and birth defects. In order to safeguard human health, it is necessary to prevent vapors from entering occupied spaces, but it was not

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until recently that a vapor barrier was created specifically for that purpose. Despite the increased knowledge related to the problem, effective mitigation solutions still lagged behind. Historically, vapor barrier solutions were adopted directly from the waterproofing industry. These barriers were typically comprised of plastic sheets (e.g. polyethylene, polypropylene, geotextiles, etc.) bonded together by a spray-applied asphalt latex mixture containing styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). Looking to create a better, safer and more long-term solution, scientists and engineers have been conducting intensive scientific research and development to create a first-of-its-kind suite of safe, cost-effective passive vapor barrier systems designed specifically for vapor intrusion. To do so, they examined two main components—the base layer and spray-applied seal—and reimagined them from the ground up.

METALLIZED FILMS To upgrade the base layer, vapor barrier scientists decided to incorporate aluminum, which is well known to be able to prevent the permeation of organic volatile compounds. By sandwiching it between layers of flexible polyethylene, they developed an easyto-install base layer with chemical resistance 100 times higher than the simple waterproofing sheets composed of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) used in the past. Turning to the spray-applied seal, scientists focused on finding a replacement for the generic latex-asphalt spray components previously adapted from the waterproofing industry. These sprays historically included synthetic rubber components such as SBR which was hydrophobic and thus very effective at repelling water, but also had an unfortunate tendency to sorb industrial solvent and hydrocarbon contamination,

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concentrating them until they would eventually break through the membrane and potentially enter the indoor air space. Additionally, applicators of the SBR material would need to clean their equipment with petroleum hydrocarbon solvents which may cause even greater damage to the affected properties where it is applied. After evaluating several potential options, scientists developed a NitraCore spray-applied barrier material, designed to replace SBR-based latex waterproofing material with nitrile, a key component of chemically resistant personal protective equipment used in handling hazardous materials (e.g. blue disposable gloves). Studies comparing the chemical resistance of the new nitrile-advanced asphalt barrier material to generic latexasphalt barriers determined the nitrileadvanced material to be 10X more resistant as a contaminant vapor barrier against the common industrial solvent contaminant trichloroethylene with the generic asphalt-latex material allowing 10X more contaminant vapor diffusion across the barrier. In addition to the increased chemical resistance, both the base layer and sprayapplied seal were designed to be easily installed, thus reducing construction timelines and saving money. They were also built to withstand the stresses of a construction site both during installation and afterwards (e.g. foot traffic, heavy equipment,

and the occasional dropped tool), thus preserving its structural integrity and maintaining its efficacy. AN EVOLUTION IN VAPOR BARRIER TECHNOLOGY Instead of just repurposing inferior technology that was developed for a different industry, scientists and engineers understood that in order to effectively tackle the issue of vapor intrusion, they needed to approach the problem with a full understanding of its challenges to effectively meet the needs of the environmental professionals tasked with guarding human health. The ideal vapor barrier would be easy and quick to apply, physically tough, and chemically resistant. Through the innovative use of barrier materials such as aluminum and nitrile, researchers have created a suite of barrier systems that meet all those criteria and, unlike the vapor intrusion solutions of the past, are specifically designed to handle the vapor intrusion problems of today.

Part 2, “An Easy & Fast Install” can be found at ForConstructionPros. com/21200081 Part 3, “Safety” can be found at ForConstructionPros.com/21200084

Thomas Szocinski is the director of vapor intrusion for the Land Science division of REGENESIS, Inc.—a leader in advanced technologies for contaminated site remediation. Since 1994, REGENESIS has developed and commercialized a range of proven soil, groundwater and vapor intrusion products to treat a wide variety of contaminants. Land Science was established in 2008 to address the increasing occurrence and regulation of vapor intrusion. It provides scientifically proven solutions that offer environmental engineering firms and developers costeffective and innovative vapor mitigation technologies for environmentally compromised properties.

Find this article at ForConstructionPros.com/ 21200062. Installation of a TerrShield barrier in downtown Sacramento as part of a large brownfield redevelopment project. Photo Credit: REGENESIS

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FOUNDATIONS & WALLS

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BY ARIELLE WINDHAM

What do You do With a Damaged 8-foot Thick

CONCRETE PIER?

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You remove it. But that’s easier said than done and required pushing the limits of hydrodemolition.

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ore than 400 miles north of Winnipeg, Canada, the Keeyask Generation Project is being constructed on the lower Nelson River. The 695-megawatt hydroelectric generating station, scheduled for completion in 2021, will be a source of renewable energy, producing an average of 4,400 gigawatt hours of electricity each year. The energy produced will be integrated into Manitoba Hydro’s electric system for use in Manitoba and to export to other jurisdictions. Throughout its construction, now in its seventh year, the project has managed a number of location-specific challenges. One such challenge occurred in 2017 when water in a 24-inch pipe in the intake froze, damaging an 8-footthick concrete pier. To minimize impact to the overall project, Keeyask managers opted to use Hydrodemolition to remove the damaged section. The job required a specialized contractor, one able to leverage all of their experience and equipment to overcome environmental and logistical challenges, while delivering quality results. Water Blasting & Vacuum Services Inc., a Canadian industrial cleaning specialist, secured the contract based on a plan that provided not only the efficiency to complete the

With Aquajet’s technology, combined with years of hydrodemolition experience, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services Inc. pushed the boundaries of Hydrodemolition to work deeper and cleaner than any Canadian project to date, completing a 4,944-cubic-foot removal project on time and recycling nearly 80% of the water.

4,944-cubic-foot (140-cubic-meter) removal work on time, but recycled nearly 80% of the water. With Aquajet’s technology, combined with years of experience, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services pushed the boundaries of hydrodemolition to work deeper and cleaner than any Canadian project to date. Water Blasting & Vacuum Services began operations more than three decades ago providing household cleaning products, but quickly branched out to include high-pressure cleaning services for industrial, municipal and commercial entities when it recognized a need for innovative, customer-focused solutions in these applications. As industrial cleaning services grew to become a core market for the company, ensuring employee safety in increasingly hazardous environments encouraged management to explore robotic options. In its 33rd year in business, today Water Blasting & Vacuum Services Inc. is run by president and owner Luc Laforge. Its 58 full time employees offer a number of industrial, municipal, commercial and environmental cleaning services, specializing in large-scale industrial cleaning applications for facilities in the manufacturing, pulp and paper, petrochemical and public works and other industries. The company also provides hydrodemolition and hydromilling services. “The safety of our team members has always been paramount,” says Laforge. “Many industrial cleaning applications require long hours in confined spaces and specialized PPE, like forced air systems and chemical protective suits. We wanted to take advantage of any opportunity where we could send in a machine instead of a person.” While its first hydrodemolition machines were bought used and converted in-house to meet the cleaning challenges of mills and other industrial

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With one of their pieces of Aquajet equipment—an Aqua Cutter 410A—Water Blasting & Vacuum Services saw an 80% increase in efficiency, taking a routine scrubber cleaning application from a 30-hour process to just five. Photos courtesy of Aquajet Systems USA

facilities, the company quickly realized the benefits of working with an original equipment manufacturer to increase precision, safety and efficiency. “Our old equipment kept the team safe and got the job done, but with most plants slowing down for routine maintenance during the same few months, we needed to find a way to maximize efficiency,” Laforge says. With one of their pieces of Aquajet equipment—an Aqua Cutter 410A— Laforge saw an 80% increase in efficiency, taking a routine scrubber cleaning application from a 30-hour process to just five. The power and efficiency of the 410A and additional Aquajet equipment, including a 710V, allowed Water Blasting & Vacuum Services to branch out

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FOUNDATIONS & WALLS CONTINUED JOB STATS Location: Keeyask Generating Station, Manitoba, Canada Dates: March 2018 – May 2018 Duration: 53 days Material Demolished: 140 cubic meters of concrete Water Recycled: estimated 1,325,000 gallons (5,016 cubic meters) Equipment: Aqua Cutter 710V, EcoClear

The EcoClear water filtration system allowed Water Blasting & Vacuum Services to present a revolutionary solution to project managers — one that promised maximum productivity while minimizing resource consumption and protecting the environment.

into hydrodemolition, hydromilling and other applications, greatly increasing the company’s service offerings. Over time, a reputation for delivering creative solutions and timely, high-quality results with minimal environmental impact propelled the company to the forefront of the Canadian hydrodemolition industry—and opened the door for even more challenging projects. That reputation put Water Blasting & Vacuum Services on the shortlist for a local hydroelectric company in need of a specialized solution for an unexpected concrete removal job that threatened to delay the project. “This was a very intriguing project—the first of its kind,” says Maurice Lavoie, general manager at Water Blasting and Vacuum Services and site manager for the project. “The pier was solid concrete, 8 feet thick, 40 feet wide and 30 feet tall at the highest point. A portion of the structure needed to be removed and re-poured. No one in Canada—very few in the world—had

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used hydrodemolition to vertically remove 8-foot-thick concrete. But that was just the start when it came to the complexities and challenges of this job.” LOCATION. LOCATION. LOCATION. The construction site was approximately 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) from the contractor’s headquarters in Edmundston, New Brunswick, and 450 miles (725 kilometers) north of Winnipeg, Manitoba. Limited access needed to be carefully factored into any proposed solution. While project managers could provide access to water, power or other general construction supplies, getting specialty equipment or replacement parts presented a time-consuming challenge. Contractors needed dependable equipment and a fully stocked toolbox to limit any unnecessary downtime. “The project had a lot of challenges to overcome,” Lavoie says. “The remote location left us with no access to technicians or spare parts if something were to go wrong. On top of that, we would be dealing with subzero temperatures that could easily get down to 40 below. You had to have a lot of confidence in your team and your equipment to even submit a bid.” Strict environmental controls also limited contractors’ application choices. The project partners, known as the Keeyask Hydropower Limited

Partnership—which includes four Manitoba First Nations and Manitoba Hydro—had made environmental protection a cornerstone of the overall project. So, while the original brief specified hydrodemolition as an acceptable process, the contractors would need to ensure all wastewater was properly collected and treated. “Whatever technique we used, we had to ensure there would be no negative impact on the surrounding environment,” Lavoie says. “Limiting environmental impact is always an important part of any project for our company, but, when combined with this project’s remote location, we knew there would be additional challenges. From previous experience on a jobsite at the Muskrat Falls Generating Project in Labrador, we knew hauling water in and out was an option, but it was costly and inefficient. Treating the water onsite and reusing was the most economical and environmentally friendly solution. And with the Aquajet EcoClear we already had the right machine to make it work.” The EcoClear water filtration system, in combination with Water Blasting & Vacuum Services’ extensive experience and expert logistics, allowed the contractor to present a revolutionary solution to project managers—one that promised maximum productivity while minimizing resource consumption and

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protecting the environment. Water Blasting & Vacuum Services purchased the EcoClear system in 2017 as a more efficient and cost-effective alternative to hauling wastewater with vacuum trucks for off-site treatment. The system neutralizes water pH and reduces turbidity to allow safe release back into the environment. It has the capacity to move up to 88gpm, or about 5,238 gallons (20 cubic meters) per hour. However, for the hydroelectric power project, rather than treating and releasing the water, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services proposed using the EcoClear as part of a closed loop system that would recycle the water back to its Aqua Cutter 710V. It would be the company’s first time using the EcoClear to recycle water on such a large scale, but Lavoie and his team were confident the EcoClear and 710V would make the perfect pair to tackle the challenging application. “This project put our people and equipment to the test,” Lavoie says. “There were a lot of firsts, but we knew we had the experience and the support of the Aquajet team to take our plan from theory to reality.” CLEARING A PATH Water Blasting & Vacuum Services arrived at the jobsite in March 2018.

e

With temperatures averaging -20º F (-29º Celsius) and dipping as low as -40º F (-40º Celsius) at times, a hoarding system and heaters had to be set up around the demolition site to provide shelter and keep the pumps operating. In addition to the EcoClear system and 710V, the contractor used a spreader bar and additional tower sections to maximize the hydrodemolition robot’s reach from the standard 23 feet to 40 feet. An extension kit allowed the contractor to make a 12-foot-wide cut, as well. These enhancements greatly reduced the downtime frequent repositioning would have required. Additionally, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services employed additional lance sections to increase efficiency and allow the 8-foot depth the project required. Steve Ouellette, lead supervisor at Water Blasting & Vacuum Services, was put in charge of the closed loop system with two 21,000-gallon tanks providing water to the Aqua Cutter 710V. Wastewater was directed to a low point then pumped to the EcoClear. Once the water was treated, it was pumped back to the holding tanks for reuse. In a 12-hour shift, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services removed an average of 141 cubic feet (four cubic meters) of concrete and used an estimated 40,000 gallons of water. Of this, roughly 20% of the water was lost during the hydrodemolition process due to evaporation and absorption into the concrete. However, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services was able to collect and recycle the remaining 80%—32,000 gallons—with the EcoClear system. Over the course of the project, the EcoClear processed more than 1.3 million gallons of water. Water Blasting & Vacuum Services worked with project managers to integrate demolition into the complex

In addition to Aquajet’s EcoClear system and 710V, Water Blasting & Vacuum Services used a spreader bar and additional tower sections to maximize the hydrodemolition robot’s reach to 40 feet.

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Water Blasting & Vacuum Services created a closed loop with the EcoClear system and two 21,000-gallon tanks to provide water to the Aqua Cutter 710V. Over the course of the project, the EcoClear processed more than 1.3 million gallons of water.

timeline of the overall project, completing the work in two multi-week phases. Lavoie and his team operated the Aqua Cutter daily for almost an entire 12-hour shift, working in 12-foot-wide sections to completely demolish the wall. A separate crew would come on at night to remove rebar and debris. The process repeated for approximately 41 days of blasting and a total of 53 days onsite. NEW OPPORTUNITIES Water Blasting & Vacuum Services completed demolition in May 2018. Thanks to a revolutionary and expertly executed plan, as well as innovative equipment, the removal did not disrupt the timeline of the overall project. “Projects like that are once in a lifetime,” Laforge says. “Thanks to a dedicated team with the experience and daring to take on the impossible and innovative equipment, we were able to find a unique solution that allowed us to push the boundaries of hydrodemolition and be part of such an important construction.” While Water Blasting & Vacuum Services waits for the next first-ofits-kind project, Laforge and his elite team plan to continue expanding their hydrodemolition experience with innovative processes and cutting-edge equipment from Aquajet. Arielle Windham is a writer for the construction and demolition industry.

For more on hyrodemolition by Aquajet, visit ForConstructionPros. com/10209677.

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COVER STORY

»

BY JONATHAN KOZLOWSKI

A CUSTOM

FOUNDATIO A profile of contractor Custom Concrete and the project that won them the Concrete Foundation Association’s 2020 Commercial Project of the Year Award.

T

he commercial and residential contractor, Custom Concrete is a family-owned and operated company going on 50 years young. They celebrated their quinquagenarian anniversary in April 2019. For three generations the company focused primarily on residential foundations. To further diversify work offerings, about eight years ago they added a commercial division. Six years later, it turned to be an advantageous decision and became its own standalone company within the Custom Concrete umbrella. Including

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the subcontractors, the company is comprised of roughly 250 employees, about 50-55 are in the commercial division. One of the largest challenges for Custom Concrete has been personnel. They’ve found a short-term solution with subcontracting more, but then discovered that’s a double-edged sword: even the subcontractors are challenged with personnel. On top of that, COVID. While the business was able to qualify as essential, they discovered like many other

The purpose of the foundation was to be home of a heavy stamping machine for an automotive manufacturing plant. Precise accuracy was key to sucess. Photos courtesy of Custom Concrete

concrete contractors around the country, that a number of clients did not. While they experienced some stalled projects or some projects not move forward at all, others ramped up and were able to pivot their strategy to take advantage of those opportunities when they came by. One tactic was to bid more aggressively—or more robustly. They pursued where they could in the opportunities within the commercial market like warehouses for Amazon and Walmart. The pandemic also brought an opportunity in the construction of a laboratory for diagnostic equipment for COVID testing. It is this Commercial Division that earned the company its recognition from the Concrete Foundations Association (CFA). Its commercial project for

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ION Lafayette, Ind., won the CFA’s 2020 Project of the Year Award for Commercial Structure. Where they are typically known for foundations—this project brought them placing a foundation of a different kind. As described at CFAwalls.org: “Projects of the Year is a program that delivers recognition of the combination of innovation, craftsmanship and creativity of the concrete contractor as well as the vision and creativity of the design professional. Projects submitted annually to this program represent the leading work across the breadth of castin-place concrete solutions produced by association members. They demonstrate the technical challenges overcome by the professional craftsmen found throughout North America and continue to set a new standard for quality and technological achievement for the castin-place industry.” Project submittals for 2021 are now open with a deadline of April 30. Additional recognition programs from the

CFA include: • The Top Safety Awards: Recognizing those committed to a safe working jobsite; • The Professional Achievement Awards: Recognizing the professional achievement and commitment from individuals, honorees are nominated by peers; • The Legacy Awards (The Robert D. Sawyer Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award): A special recognition to individuals who made significant contributions to the industry; • The Contractor of the Year: Acknowledging a contractor’s unselfish commitment to peers, service, technology, and knowledge; • Associate of the Year: Honoring a single National Associate member

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for their commitment to the CFA; • Innovative Contractor of the Year: Recognizing an individual’s or company’s innovative ideas within the construction, management, marketing, etc.;

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COVER STORY CONTINUED The project included multiple construction joints which also required PVC waterstop. All footings had a double mat of rebar.

• Kick-start Member of the Year: Given only to members within their first three years with the CFA; and • Most Valuable Player: Recognizing one’s hard work in the research, pioneering spirit in poured concrete foundations.

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COMMERCIAL PROJECT OF THE YEAR Custom Concrete’s 2020 CFA Commercial Project of the Year ended up being an isolation base for stamping press for a major automobile manufacturing plant. Picture a stamp coming down onto a raw piece of plate

steel to cut out a part, because it takes so much volume and pressure, the foundation needed to be isolated to not shake the surrounding foundation every time. It is here that Custom Concrete had to overcome their first challenge: all work had to be done indoors and while work was ongoing all around them with active employees and processes. High safety standards had to be met without disrupting production which was a logistic challenge all around to balance productivity and safety. On top of the limited indoor space, material and equipment were bottlenecked. Everything needed to travel in and out through a single point of access to the location inside: one overhead door. A 100- by 50-ft. area was made available to them to collaborate, but even then this area wasn’t always available. They installed a dust curtain with an air scrubber around the project itself (also roughly 100 by 50 ft.) to contain airborne particulates and emissions. In essence, picture a swimming pool with a base featuring a joint around the perimeter with foam insulation as a buffer. Contractors dug a 12-ft. hole in the middle of the existing building next

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COVER STORY CONTINUED to existing foundations and placed 300 cubic yards of 5,000-mix concrete. The majority of the concrete needed to be poured at once, but because of its 9-ft. thickness (roughly), it was important to keep the temperature consistent throughout so it cured correctly. The team utilized three battery-operated sensor/thermometers in the concrete to track the temperatures to ensure it cured as needed. The device connected to a phone and synched via wi-fi providing readings and the necessary data. They placed one at the bottom elevation, one mid-elevation and one at the upper to track the curing through the entire slab. Plans had to be thought of from the pit bottom and up. Each step carefully planned out. The base was poured then the foam to isolate the block from the rest of the facility. Using 2x4s at the top, the dowels required a specific spacing to support the weight of the concrete—else the plywood would break. Screws from the 2x4s held the dowels in place. Once the seams were taped and a Visqueen barrier was used to keep the concrete from adhering to the plywood—concrete was then ready to be placed. One of the special specifications in the job included a vibration isolition foam called Regufoam, which they acquired from Unisorb, which required itself a 1.5-in. air gap. Quick on their feet, they discovered a quite clever solution to overcome this challenge – through the thickness of the form itself.

QUICK SPECS • 1,146 sq ft. footprint • 157.75 linear ft. of wall, 8 ft. wall height with 12 in. and 16-in. thicknesses • 602.75 cubic yards of concrete • 35 tons of steel reinforcement • 6 tons of #8 and #10 rebar • 286 inertia blocks

Custom Concrete installed 3/4-in. plywood with 3/4-in. slick dowels. Once cured and the dowels and plywood removed, they had their needed gap space. The experience was a learning curve, but representatives for the Regufoam product were available for any questions regarding the installation.

The job required a high level of accuracy and pours were done in phases. The lowest pad was 24-in. thick.

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PRECISION The placement has to be precise. Heavy machinery was planned to be placed at the location and it needed to be level to the rest of the work floor. Custom Concrete needed to accommodate for the pressure of the weight and the absorption in the Regufoam. This required exactly 5/8-in. of concrete to be placed higher than the finished floor. Besides that, Custom Concrete needed to think on their feet to get the heavy equipment down the 12-ft. deep project area (and then out again) as well as removing the slick dowels themselves. The manufacturing client, allowed them to utilize an overhead crane. They ended up utilizing a subcontractor for the pump truck and poured during the week of Christmas. At first, they set up a pump inside, but later foot traffic inside the building limited this efficiency. A pump truck with a z-boom was set up outside and connected through the overhead door to the next pump—piggybacking or daisy-chaining pumps together to get material into place. The z-boom design allowed Custom Concrete to use a 30-meter pump accommodating the low clearance. Unique challenges aside, they actually ran ahead of schedule. In fact, they poured the actual base two weeks prior to the original plans. The deadline was at the end of January and wanted to give the block a full 27-day cure. Since the client was going to place heavy stamping manufacturing equipment on top, no polishing was done. The only finishing that was applied was a slick finish and drilling to set equipment anchors. Aside from needing to install a footing for a specialized piece of equipment, aside from needing to hit exact specifications to ensure safety and a level floor, the best part: the entire project went without injury.

For more from the Concrete Foundations Association, visit ForConstructionPros. com/10072513.

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PRODUCT FOCUS: SAWS & BLADES

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BY BECKY SCHULTZ, EDITOR OF EQUIPMENT TODAY

Concrete Tips for Safer Sawing & Drilling Expert advice on how you can optimize safety during cutting and drilling operations.

A

s with other applications, it’s important to conduct an assessment of the application and jobsite prior to cutting or drilling into concrete, asphalt or other surfaces. This will enable you to plan out the project, identify the necessary equipment for the task, as well as assess any potential risks. A jobsite assessment is very important as it will allow the workers to plan their work more efficiently, say product experts at Hilti. In addition, it increases the worker’s awareness of potential hazards and how best to mitigate them, therefore helping ensure the proper measures to increase health and safety on the jobsite are implemented. Tony Calcopietro, national account/ export sales manager, EDCO, agrees, noting, “Construction sites are always full of potential hazards. Before saw cutting or drilling, it is extremely important to inspect the work area. Check to ensure a safe and secure workspace for things like proper lighting, ventilation, auto or pedestrian traffic, noise, etc. “Address all hazards accordingly before you begin operating the equipment to ensure safety for both the operator and those surrounding the jobsite,” he adds. USE THE PROPER TOOLS Having the right tools is one of the basics required to complete cutting or drilling operations in a safer manner. An inappropriately sized tool can do more than slow production or potentially lead to equipment downtime.

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“Inadequately powered equipment can also expose an operator to physical injury should they try to push an underpowered saw or drill beyond its capability,” Calcopietro points out. “Diamond blades or bits may jump out of the cut or get pinched in the cut, creating additional expenses and exposing operators to preventable, unnecessary steps. “Know how deep you are cutting or the size of the hole you will be drilling,” he advises. “Knowing depths of cuts or drilling diameters will help you choose the right horsepower saw or drill based on manufacturer guidelines.” Conducting a jobsite assessment can help to ensure operators have the proper tools and accessories. It will also help you to identify the power source available or needed to run the saw or drill. Gas-powered equipment is recommended for outdoor use, while electric-powered saws and drills are primarily used indoors. “For electrical saws and drills, identify and utilize an electrical outlet that is secured by a GFI and ground,” says Calcopietro. “Inspect

When wet cutting with diamond blades, make sure you have ample water on the blade for dust suppression to prevent hazardous silica dust from becoming airborne. Photo Credit: EDCO

extension cables and any electrical junction boxes to be sure they are safely run to the workplace from a generator or outlet.” Make sure cables are intact and not frayed. “Frayed cables that expose internal wiring can expose personnel to electrocution,” says Calcopietro. “Also, choosing the correct cable size (length and gauge) will prevent downtime caused by tripping circuit breakers or damaging electric motors on the equipment.” Larger industrial facilities are where you typically find propane-powered saws. For these applications, proper ventilation is required. “Improper ventilation can result in the operator or nearby workers passing out from the propane engine exhaust fumes,” says Calcopietro.

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PREPARE FOR OPERATION Prior to use, conduct a thorough inspection of the saw, drill, blade or bit. “Be sure the machine is operating at 100%, and make sure all machine hardware is tight,” says Calcopietro. “Loose machine hardware can cause the equipment to vibrate excessively, causing blade or bit damage, which can be harmful to the operator or nearby workers.” Inspect the blade or bit for defects or cracks and check that it is installed properly with a tightened locking collar and nut. “Failure to ensure all hardware and accessories are tight can cause the diamond blade or bit segments to fracture and chip, resulting in projectiles on the site causing injury or death to operators or nearby workers,” Calcopietro cautions. At minimum, follow the manufacturer’s routine maintenance schedule in the user’s manual, Hilti product experts advise. Checking air filters, tightening the blade arbor before use and checking for any damage can reduce downtime and improve safety. Certain applications may require additional accessories to maximize safety. For example, most manufacturers recommend using a drill stand when core drilling with core bits over 3 in. in diameter. “This helps the operator gain better control of the equipment. A core drill stand prevents the operator from losing their grip on the drill, thus twisting out of his/her hands, resulting in injury,” says Calcopietro. “Also, be sure the surface you are standing on is firm and secured,” he continues. “Proper stands, a firm grip and proper footing of hand-held core drills is important to prevent physical injury.” KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GETTING INTO Prior to cutting or drilling, make sure you know what’s behind the wall, in the floor or below the surface.

“Assessing the jobsite is very important—this will let you know where you can and cannot cut or drill,” says Andrew Mayer, business development manager - light equipment, Chicago Pneumatic Power Technique. Prior to starting the job, walk the site to look for potential hazards such as rebar sticking out of the surface or debris along the cut line. Mark off these areas so they are clearly visible to the operator. Be sure to identify the location of gas lines, electrical cables, water lines, etc. Hilti recommends scanning surfaces to help identify areas where rebar, live lines, post-tension cables or pipelines could be present. Don’t always rely on the drawings of a surface to tell the full story of what’s behind or underneath it, the company’s product experts advise. “Be aware of and avoid cutting into live electrical conduits, any pipes, any rebar or areas that are important for the integrity of the building or structure. Cutting through live power cables, water/sewer pipes or structurally required supports will result in unforeseen project cost overruns and possible operator injury,” says Calcopietro. “This is why it would be a great idea to get in touch with the utility companies before any cutting or drilling is started,” Mayer comments. “This way, they can identify those areas for you and accidents can be prevented, saving a lot of time by not having to do this yourself.” In addition, take special precautions when cutting or drilling into floors on multi-level structures. “Once the cut or drilling is complete on a multi-level structure, the floor slab or core could fall from the ceiling into an active workspace, creating the potential for striking a worker, resulting in injury or possible death,” says Calcopietro.

“To avoid this, be sure the work area below is clear of personnel and properly secure the cut-out material, preventing it from dropping below.” Another necessary precaution for this and other types of cutting or drilling may include using barricades around the work area to protect workers and/or prevent unauthorized access. During the cutting process, let the tool and blade do the work, Hilti product experts advise. Don’t apply unnecessary pressure to the tool, which can cause extra wear and tear on both tool and blade. In addition, keep the tool in line with the cut. Twisting in the cut can cause wear on the tool, risks breaking the blade or, worse, increases the chance of kickback. CONTROL THE RISKS Of course, proper personal protective equipment (PPE) is essential when cutting and drilling. Make sure operators follow OSHA requirements for PPE, as well as those required and suggested in the tool or equipment operating instructions. According to Hilti, required PPE may include safety glasses, safety toe boots, hard hats, ear protection and potentially gloves, depending on the task. In some situations, such as flying sparks, face shields may be advised. Be especially wary of the risk of eye and ear damage and whether both eye and hearing protection are required. “Users must be vigilant when it comes to these two parts of the body,” says Mayer. Injuries to feet are also common. “Proper foot protection should always be worn.”

Knowing depths of cuts or drilling diameters will help you choose the appropriate power required based on manufacturer guidelines. Photo Credit: EDCO

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PRODUCT FOCUS: SAWS & BLADES CONTINUED But when it comes to hazards, perhaps the most commonly identified— and frequently cited—is dust. “In my opinion, the largest and most dangerous risk is the exposure to silica dust,” says Mayer. “While running this type of equipment, there tends to be a lot of dust created.” “Breathing in harmful silica dust particles can lead to silicosis and cancer,” says Calcopietro. Dust control was once largely ignored. “Some users were wearing no protection at all,” Mayer points out.

It is now closely regulated by OSHA, with strict standards for silica dust exposure. OSHA regulations require some form of dust suppression for most cutting and drilling applications to ensure exposure levels fall below prescribed limits. The type of dust mitigation required varies depending on the equipment and application.

DOWEL PIN DRILLING SAFETY TIPS One of the more specialized types of drilling applications is dowel pin drilling. These drill units are typically used for larger-scale outdoor drilling such as road or airport construction or repair. While many of the risks associated with hand-held drills are eliminated, certain precautions are still required with these drill rigs. For example, a dowel drill uses percussion-style drilling, meaning the drill steel used to chip through the concrete applies a hammer-type action. “This causes vibration in the drilling unit itself,” says Rob Minnich, president/chief marketing officer, Minnich Manufacturing. “Injuries can easily be prevented by maintaining and tightening bolts and brackets on the drilling unit daily.” Dowel pin drills also contain moving parts with pinch points that should be avoided. E-Z Drill advises staying clear of the carriage assembly to avoid being caught between the carriage and frame, and using the carriage lock when moving the drill to prevent the assembly sliding onto fingers and hands. The drill’s lifting handles, and proper lift techniques, should also be used if manually moving the drill around the jobsite. For greater distances, E-Z Drill advises using a weight-rated chain or strap attached to the drill’s lifting bale and locking the carriage. Because many patchwork jobs require dowel pin drilling to be performed in high-traffic areas, Rob Minnich advises utilizing an airpowered, self-propelled drilling unit. Not only do these drills pull the air compressor while moving to the next drilling type, they are typically a remote-controlled system. Such machines can reduce operator fatigue by eliminating the need to manually move the machine. Remote operation further enhances safety by keeping operators away from active traffic. “Using a remote-controlled unit offers operators maximum drilling efficiency and uptime while enhancing overall safety and productivity on the jobsite,” says Minnich. “Wireless remote-control technology also allows operators to drill faster and more accurately while avoiding dust, debris and obstacles.” Further enhancing safety is technology designed to mitigate dust. “Silica dust inhalation is a long-term concrete drilling hazard,” Minnich acknowledges. “OSHA and manufacturers have addressed this issue by providing dust collection equipment to accompany drilling units.” Optional dust collection systems or dust suppression kits not only minimize the risk of inhalation, they help to eliminate the “dust storms” that can obscure drivers’ visibility as they pass through the work area, further enhancing safety for workers as well as for motorists.

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Conducting a jobsite assessment can help to ensure operators have the proper tools and accessories available. It will also help you to identify the power source available or needed to run the saw or drill. Photo Credit: Chicago Pneumatic

OSHA MOVES FORWARD WITH REVISIONS TO SILICA DUST RULE Diamond blades and core bits can be operated wet or dry. “For wet blades/ bits, be sure you have ample water on your blade/bit for dust suppression to eliminate hazardous silica dust from becoming airborne,” says Calcopietro. “The water is also used to properly cool diamond segments to prevent them from chipping and becoming projectiles causing injuries. Have a proper slurry management system in place to be OSHA compliant.” For dry blades/bits, use proper manufacturer-specified dust collection shrouds and vacuums. “The use of some type of dust suppression equipment, either dry, such as a vacuum system, or wet— using either a water hose or a fixed water-emitting system attached to the equipment—would help mitigate risk,” says Mayer. But dust suppression doesn’t replace the need to wear the prescribed PPE throughout the cutting or drilling process. “Make sure you are wearing the proper PPE equipment—shoes, hard hat, gloves, eye protection and dust mask,” Mayer emphasizes. “This would also apply to all personnel working in the same area.”

For more information on saws, visit ForConstructionPros. com/equipment/worksite/ walk-behind-saws.

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THE STINGER The Stinger electric flex shaft vibrator is rugged, lightweight, and powerful. The 115v electric motor has been designed to run cool with the power and torque to handle todays concrete loads. The stinger attaches to competitor core and casing with quick disconnect adapters.

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PRODUCT FOCUS

CONCRETE SAWS & BLADES Makita XEC01 Cordless Concrete Cutter

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Diamond Products CC2500 Medium Walkbehind Saw

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The XEC01 cordless 9-in. power cutter features 18V X2 (36V) LXT technology that allows for lower noise, immediate starts and reduced overall maintenance. • Zero emissions enables indoor use • Compact and light weight for reduced strain for wall or above-chest cuts • Integrated water delivery with flow adjustment knob continuously feeds water for OSHA Table 1 compliance

The CC2500 medium walk-behind saw offers 14- to 26-in. blade capacities with a depth of cut ranging from 4 5/8 to 10 3/8 in. • Rigid high-strength 3/16-in. steel box frame with heavy bar reinforcement • Push- or self-propelled drive • Two-position tilt handle bars • Screw feed raise and lower with optional power raise and lower • Cyclone air filter on gas models • Positive gear drive to rear axle via the Eaton hydrostatic transmission

ForConstructionPros.com/21114289

ForConstructionPros.com/21007188

U.S. Saws JS-130 Joint Cleanout Saw

The JS-130 is designed to mill out debris or old joint fill material prior to filling control joints with epoxy or polyurea. • 2 3/4-in. maximum depth of cut with screwdown depth control • Uses an 8- or 10-in. dry diamond blade • Up-cut blade rotation ejects debris into a vacuum port on the blade guard where the dust collector can capture it • Cleans joints at a rate of 20 to 60 fpm • Fully boxed heavy gauge steel frame for extra long life and straight accurate cuts • 13-hp Honda gasoline engine

SK-18 Downcut Walk-behind Saw

EDCO's 18-in. SK-18 downcut walk-behind saw is ideal for short-run slab cutting, contraction joints, asphalt patch repairs, and traffic loop installation and trenching. • 18-in. blade capacity • Improved throttle cable • Easy turn crank for lowering and raising blades in and out of cut • Screw boot belt tensioner prevents frame damage • 7-gauge steel blade guard with welded protective segment flap • Heavy-duty lifting bail (optional) • 13-hp gasoline engine • Heavy-duty 7-gauge steel laser cut frame • Large screw-type depth control • Wide-T handles with rubber grips • High quality molded rubber wheels • 3,600 rpm • 6.75-in. cutting depth • 214 lbs.

M

ForConstructionPros.com/21007218

DeWalt 60V Max Flexvolt Circular Saw

DeWalt upgraded its 60V MAX FLEXVOLT 7-1/4 in. Circular Saw (DCS578) with new motors, software and controls. Other features include: • Available as a kit with a 9.0 Ah battery, compared to the original 6.0 Ah battery • Up to 47% more powerful than its predecessor • Maximum bevel capacity of 57 degrees with bevel stops at 22.5 degrees and 45 degrees • Electric brake stops the blade after the trigger is released • Integrated LED for increased visibility and cut accuracy • Uses a 7-1/4 in. circular saw blade and features a maximum cut depth of 2-9/16 in. at a 90-degree bevel • Integrated rafter hook for quick and easy storage ForConstructionPros.com/ 21132297

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ForConstructionPros.com/21111930

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M 4 o g c a w m d c s a f i s H t e i w 1 t c f h o

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SKILSAW Walk-behind MEDUSAW

The 7-in. model SPT79A-10 MEDUSAW walk-behind saw incorporates a Dual-Field worm drive motor with added overload protection. • Adjustable arm extends to the user’s height and folds and locks into place for transporting and storage • Large handle with a ambidextrous side assist handle and two-finger trigger provide greater control when making long cuts • Includes an improved pointer for stronger support and a larger wheel for greater visibility • Features a large foot and oversized wheels for stability • Integrated dust control in both wet and dry operation ForConstructionPros.com/20986024

EDCO DS-20 Downcut Walk-behind Saw

In developing the DS-20 concrete/asphalt saw, EDCO took its proven 18-in. walk-behind saw's design and added the ability to use a 20-in. blade, allowing users to cut 7 3/4-in. deep without the need for a larger self-propelled unit. A 13-hp Honda GX390 gasoline engine with heavy-duty anti-vibration mount provides consistent, reliable power. The throttle system features a positive locking mechanism to ensure wide open throttle when engaged during sawing applications. The unit comes with a 7-gauge steel blade guard with welded protective segment flap and an easy turn crank for lowering and raising the blade in and out of cut. It includes a heavy-duty 7-gauge steel laser cut frame, large screw-type depth control, wide-T handles with rubber grips and solid-steel lifting handles. • 13-hp gasoline engine or available as the three-phase, 230V DS-20E with a 7.5-hp electric option • DS-20 generates 3,600 rpm and DS-20E produces 2,880 rpm • Easy turn crank for lowering and raising blades in and out of cut • Large screw-type depth control • Includes an improved throttle cable, heavy-duty anti-Vibration engine mount, screw boot belt tensioner to prevent frame damage and heavy-duty lifting bail for easy loading and unloading • High-quality molded rubber wheels ForConstructionPros.com/21111934

Metabo’s High Powered Masonry Chaser

Metabo’s High Powered Masonry Chaser MFE 40 has a 15 amp motor and a no-load speed of 5,000 rpm derived from its planetary double gear reduction, which makes it easy to cut into concrete, brick, block (up to 1 9/16 in. deep and 3/8 to 1 3/8 in. wide) for the installation of wiring, conduit, or pipe or laying in reinforcing materials. Dust-free work is achieved by the die-cast aluminum cover with 1-1/4-in. vacuum connection. The wall chaser includes the soft start feature, which allows for smooth start-up and restart protection. This prevents the tool from starting on its own in the event of a power interruption. It also includes an LED light that signals if the tool is in danger of overloading. Heavy-duty rollers enable easy guidance, and the rear D-handle and front loop handle are ergonomically designed for best control. The tool includes two 5 by .08 in. diamond cutting wheels, which can be spaced at widths from 3/8 to 1 1/8 in. wide and can be adjusted to cut from 3/8 to 1 9/16 in. deep. The parallel cuts can then be chipped out using a chipping hammer to create a finished slot in concrete for embedment. Metabo has two accessory diamond cutters that slot in one pass, either 3/4 in. wide or 1 3/16 in. wide. ForConstructionPros.com/21172250

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Milwaukee Tool MX FUEL 14-in. Cut-Off Saw

The lithium ion battery-powered MX Fuel 14-in. cut-off saw (MXF314-1XC) offers fast cuts from start to finish with quick and easy push-button activation.

Husqvarna FS 7000 D Concrete Saw

The FS 7000 D diesel walk-behind flat saw comes with a low-emissions, Tier 4-compliant engine. • Designed for concrete and asphalt cutting up to 17 1/2 in. deep • High output, compact size and good maneuverability provides versatility for mid-sized road work, service work and smaller jobs that require high production rates • Intuitive and ergonomic digital control panel ForConstructionPros.com/21134492

• Provides the same cut speed as most two-cycle gas saws and a full 14-in. blade capacity to cut more in a single pass • 5-in. cut depth • Up to 50% less noise and reduced vibration for a smoother cut • ONE-KEY compatibility provides ability to track the saw with community tracking and alerts, complete inventory management and smart equipment technology ForConstructionPros.com/21131552

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DECORATIVE CONCRETE

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BY JONATHAN KOZLOWSKI

7COLORS & STAINS Questions on

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sat down with John Reynolds, director of technical services at Solomon Colors to talk about the difference between acid- and water-based stains, common problems, and get some advice on applying stains to a slab. Does one type offer benefits over the other? A. Water-based stains are nonreactive products. They’re more popular than acid stains in some scenarios and in other scenarios they’re not. They offer some versatility that acid stains can’t achieve like a wider variety of colors. Acid stains are limited to rust and browns (really dark browns) and then blues and greens because of the chemical nature of the stain. Water-based stains, being iron oxide pigment, have a much wider variety of color selection possibilities. Although they’re versatile, [water-based stains] can be finicky, because surface preparation is much more important with them because they have to absorb into a slab. Acid stains are chemically reactive and basically made of hydrochloric acid, blends of metallic salts, and water. Once the hydrochloric acid breaks through the tight cream at the surface of the concrete, the metallic salts get in and react chemically with the free lime at the surface of the concrete. We’re not depositing pigment, we’re creating a chemical change… so an acid stain is only as effective as the slab’s ability to react. If you have an old slab that has a lot of sand and aggregates exposed through age—your reactivity is minimal. But, because it’s a reactive stain you have a limited selection of colors. There are only so many colors that these metallic salts can create. That said, you’ve got limitations because greens and blues can’t be used outside. There’s a copper content in them that turn black when they come in contact with moisture.

Q.

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JANUARY 2021

Q.

What’s the most common issue contractors run into? A. The biggest issues that I've found over the years are surface preparation. Because a power troweled floor that's really tightly troweled is not going to allow an acid stain to get in and chemically react. [The troweling] acts as a sealer. It seals off that slab and doesn't allow the stain to get in to react. It’s the same with a water-based stain. If I have a super slick surface, I've got no way for that pigment to get in and bond. Say I clean a floor really well. I got a floor squeaky clean, but it's super tight and it's slick. I can spray on an acid stain, come back and completely wash it off. It'll look like it was never stained. Because there was no way for those salts to get in and react the way they're supposed to. Same way with a water based. I've had jobs where the contractor did no surface preparation to open up the slab to be able to get that material to something to bond to. Surface preparation is probably the number one problem. The second biggest problem is with acid stain: neutralization and residue removal. Any advice on application? A. There’s no pigment in [acid stain] at all—it’s totally dependent upon that slab. If you look at any manufacturer’s literature, regarding acid stain, it’s going to tell you to do a mock-up, because we don’t know how that slab is going to react to the metallic salts in the stain. I’ve done basement floors in acid stains and I always go into the utility room or bedroom where they’re going to put carpet or something like that. I’ll put down samples for the people—that way they can see how their slab is going to react with the color that they like. There’s surface preparation. There’s staying application. There’s residue

Q.

removal process. And then there’s a sealer. All four of these things are going to change and alter the way [how the result] looks. Without getting into a whole dissertation on surface preparation, you have to open up a slab to allow it to stick. So…we open it up with the intention of getting a chemical as well as a mechanical bond on the top of the concrete. I always tell people with acid stains, you have to prepare the surface for the sealer. Whatever sealer you're using, look in their tech data. Look and see what the surface preparation requirements are. When I teach people about acid stain, I'm always emphasizing prep for your sealer. That said, that preparation for your sealer can alter the way the stain reacts. That's why I always recommend mockups or test samples, so that you can say, “Okay, if I'm going to sand this floor, clean it and scrub it…if I'm going to use an etching product to get a profile on the slab, that's going to alter the way my stain looks as well.” [You] got to figure all that stuff out before [you] cover up 1,000 square feet of a basement floor with acid stain. It's not rocket science, but there's a degree of being careful. If you follow the rules, acid stains can give you beautiful, long-lasting floors. If you don't follow the rules, you can have trouble. Generally speaking, we want to spray an acid stain down with an acid-resistant sprayer, so that you get a nice even distribution of the stain and avoid an overlap mark. As soon as that acid stain hits the concrete, it's chemically reacting. So, if I roll across a slab, and then I come back and I start rolling again, I'm going to have a line because it's reacting longer where the overlap mark is. It's doing a more intense reaction in those spots. You'll end up with this slab that

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AdobeStock/Brad Pict

looks like a roller marked mess. That's why we spray and we overlap and create a nice natural modeling with the application to a sprayer. What about clean up? A. Once that stain chemically reacts for a minimum of four to six hours—typically, you'll leave an acid stain overnight—it brings salts to the surface. All of these salts are like a powdery residue. This is where homeowners typically freak out, “What did you do to my concrete slab?” All of this stuff comes up to the surface. Get a scrubber or [my preference] some sort of mechanical agitation of these salts so that they loosen from the surface and rinse them off. I'll run a floor scrubber if I'm on an exterior slab with a nylon bristle brush attachment. If I'm on an interior slab, it'll be a floor scrubber with a red pad on it. You have to neutralize the slab because you're making it acidic with this muriatic acid that's in there. Neutralize it. Scrub it. Rinse it. Scrub it again and rinse it. I typically do three scrubs. The first one to neutralize and get the bulk of the acid and/or the residue off. Then, I'll do a clean water rinse. And I'll do a final clean water rinse so that I'm sure that I've got all of this residue off because if I don't have the residue off…it's going to force your sealer off the slab. Your surface preparation is important, your application technique is important, your cleaning, neutralizing residue removal process is important. And then allowing everything to dry and getting that sealer on there. All four of these things will contribute to a successful acid stain. A lot of people will go in and mop a floor or they'll let it sit for a while and they'll just mop it—maybe throw some water on it, mop it up real quick and think they're ready for sealer. You really have to aggressively remove those salts, that residue, that comes up to the surface Does this process differ with water stain? A. Over to water-based stain. It's extremely important to have an open slab because we're dealing with micronized iron oxide pigment. That pigment must have a place to go and grab on to. Some water-based stains

Q.

Q.

have an acrylic additive in them, some don't. Either way, you must have a nice open slab for the product to get in there and cling. For example, the windshield of a car. I can spray a water-based stain on a windshield of a car and you're going to be able to wash it off because there's nothing for it to stick to. If we sandblast the windshield, and then apply the water-based stain and let it dry, then it's going to be a real bugger to get off because it's got something to stick to. Cleaning and profiling is very important with water-based stains. Then it becomes an application technique. Typically you don't want to go over a dry surface with water-based stains because they can flash dry and you'll end up with unsightly overlap marks. By dampening the slab surface saturated-dry, (the surface is saturated with water but there's no ponding) it doesn't flash dry. [The water-based stain] has a chance to slowly penetrate into the pores of the slab. There are two things we're looking for with water-based stain: profiling for the sealer. Whatever sealer we're putting down we want to read the tech datasheet first and figure out what it requires. The other thing is we need an open slab so that that water stain can get in and cling to the pores of the concrete without putting a layer of pigment or dust. Because once the carrier the water evaporates, you're left with iron oxide pigment, we want a nice even distribution of that pigment. We don't want concentrations of it because that's going to form that dust on the surface and going to cause the sealer to fail. Once the water-based stain is dry, you're ready for the sealer. You don't have to clean it, you don't have to neutralize it, scrub it, or anything like that. There's advantages: many different colors and no cleaning or washing of the slab compared to acid stain. Since acid stains are limited in their color pallet, could you accent with a water stain? What if your client wants a black color? A. You're basically doing everything with the acid stain up until the point that

Q.

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you're going to see. Because you can't get a true black with an acid stain due to the metallic salts, if somebody wants a really dark floor, close to black without being completely black, you can take a black water-based stain. Go through the acidstain prep, apply the stain, let it set, do all the cleaning residue removal. Once you’re basically ready for sealer, then you can take your black stain and apply that and give it the look that you're after by enhancing the color that's down on the floor already. So, whether it's a dye or a water-based stain, it's the last thing that you're going to do to the slab when you're accenting an acid stain. Typically, what I tell people on acid staining if you're going to do artistic work, get really familiar with how these stains react. Because blues are going to react completely different than a rusty color; it's important to be familiar with that. I typically don't mix colors together on acid stains. I never mix different colors together. Like I won't take our Mission Brown and mix it with our Mahogany. I just won't do that. But, on the water-based stain, I'll take our Ebony and our Walnut and mix them together to create a really dark brown…it'll work because it's pigment. It's non-reactive. Will admixtures affect the color at all? A. With acid stains, yes. With waterbased stains, no - your water-based stain is going to be what it is. Now, if you have a lot of different admixtures in concrete, you can alter the color of an acid stain. Or if you have different cement contents. If I have a 7-sack mix compared to a 5-sack mix, I'm going to have a different color with an acid stain. With a waterbased stain, it might be a little darker because there's more Portland cement in there that will darken when my sealer darkens everything, but you're still going to have that same general color.

Q.

Editor’s Note: More from Solomon Colors can be found at ForConstructionPros. com/10074663.

For more information on colors and stains, visit ForConstructionPros. com/concrete/decorative/ colors-stains.

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CONCRETE PAVEMENT

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BY JONATHAN KOZLOWSKI

A Vision of the Long Road Ahead David Howard takes position as the 2021 Chair of the American Concrete Pavement Association

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ollowing the trend of virtual meetings and Zoom calls, the American Concrete Pavement Association (ACPA) had its 57th Annual Meeting online. Amidst an interchange of mute buttons and cameras, on Dec. 3, a white gavel was passed to David Howard, the president and CEO of Kansas-based Koss Construction Co., to mark the start of his new role as the new ACPA Chair of the Board. Howard took over from the previous Chair, James Mack, P.E, Director of Market

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Development – Infrastructure with CEMEX. As a volunteer position, the chair supports and sustains the work of the association and provides governance leadership and strategic support. This is a seat three years in the making; while nominated to the position, one sits as 2nd Vice-Chair and 3rd Vice Chair prior to appointment. This assures a smooth transition each year as the gavel passes from one to the next. The Board Chair sits as a partner to other board members, the president, and CEO, and communicates with the president and CEO regularly. Responsibilities include presiding over board meetings, leadership on issues, and plans being pursued by the association.

David Howard, CEO of Koss Construction Images courtesy of Koss Construction

The seat also serves as the ambassador of the association by interacting with members, the network of chapters, research and technology partners, and public officials. Research and technology partners include the National Center for Concrete (National CP Tech Center) at Iowa State University, the International

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Grooving & Grinding Association, and the Innovative Pavement Research Foundation. “There’s more”, says Bill Davenport, VP – Communications of ACPA. “Including some strategic oversight, fiduciary responsibilities, but in general, the Chair sets a course of action for our staff, affiliates, and members to follow each year.” Headquartered in Rosemont, Ill., as well as an office in Washington D.C. supporting its public policy and funding advocacy efforts and federal agency relationships, the ACPA was founded in 1964 with the primary mission to advocate for the use of concrete pavements in surface transportation applications. The association has approximately 400 members with contractors making up about 55% of the membership. Members can range from concrete pavement contractors, cement companies, materials and equipment suppliers, and others. “On a day-to-day basis we are addressing a wide range of topics, including inter-industry competition, concrete overlay technology,

performance-engineered mixtures; funding and public policy decisions (notably the support of a robust and adequately funded federal-aid highway bill and federal-aid airport legislation); research, technology and innovation aimed at pavement quality; sustainability and pavement resilience; downfield issues that may impact transportationconstruction 10 to 20 years into the future,” explains Davenport. There’s more, but—put simply—it all comes down to providing the best pavements consistently over time. Howard has been involved with the ACPA early in his career, since the 1990s, and sees this new role as a way of giving back to the association. As the primary trade association for concrete pavement products, “they’ve been the number one advocate for the company and the products that we sell, both on a technical and a relationship basis— especially the federal and state levels,” says Howard.

He has also had other leadership roles within the ACPA. As the chair of the ACPA Strategic Advisory Committee, a sort of prerequisite to leading the board, he made a significant impact and paved a new path. “He had a vision for taking a different approach with our strategic advisory committee and the task forces that existed at the time,” says Davenport. Howard's vision had taken the existing advisory groups and had them focus on specific areas. The association recast the model of its groups to create a highways market, permit airport market for streets, roads forum, and an industrial forum. “These firms and committees are… already making a very dramatic difference that, I think, we're going to see that continue,” says Davenport. “[David] has a vision for carrying the association well into the 21st century.” The goal or function of the Strategic Advisory Committee, explains Howard, is to engage membership and distill what

Construction of the I-630 highway in Little Rock, Ark.

New Colors - New Bag Same Great Results Powdered Integral Color

The colors on this color chart are approximate, using laboratory samples of troweled concrete made from a 6-sack mix, using Type II gray portland cement, silica sand, and water to achieve a 4 inch slump. Different colors in cement, as well as some sands and water content will result in different colors.

Different types of finishing techniques and curing methods will alter the finished appearance. A job-site sample or test slab should be done, using the specified materials, as well as the finishing and curing techniques that will be used on the project. Batch-to-batch uniformity must be maintained to produce consistent color.

1 BAG PER 2 YARDS

*Caution: Carbon Black can negate the amount of entrained air in the concrete mix. Due to the particle size of Carbon, it has the tendency to dissipate out of concrete over time. Seal the concrete with a premium sealer to protect the surface color.

High quality, non-fading pigment 19 new colors - Easy color dosing Convenient 10# repulpable bags

1 BAG PER 1 YARD

(PC-6001) EARTHEN

(PC-1001) SLATE

RAWHIDE

SRI 22

(PC-2017) THISTLE

(PC-3001) BUFF

(PC-4005) SAND

SRI 40

CHAMOIS

SRI 41

DESERT SAND

(PC-8001) OATMEAL

SRI 37

OAK

(PC-8051) BISCUIT

SRI 45

FAWN

(PC-9001) MUSHROOM

SRI 29

UTOPIA

SRI 44

CROISSANT

1 BAG PER 1 YARD

RAVEN*

3 BAGS PER 1 YARD

SRI 24

LEATHER

STORM GRAY

CURRANT

RUBY

HARVEST GOLD

SRI 41

GOLDENROD

SRI 48

MOROCCAN TAN

SIENNA

(PC-9051) LLAMA

1 BAG PER 2 YARDS

BUCKSKIN

SHALE

PINE CONE

TAN

(PC-5001) CARAMEL

(PC-908) SHADOW*

2 BAGS PER 1 YARD

SRI 25

LIGHT GRAY

REDBUD

RUSTIC RED

SRI 29

HAZELNUT

SRI 45

YELLOWSTONE

SRI 23

SILT

SRI 41

DEER VALLEY

SRI 29

BOURBON

SRI 20

MOCHA

SRI 16

SRI 44

HONEYCOMB

SRI 61

ALABASTER

1 BAG PER 1 YARD

(PC-600) FOG

CARIBOU

3 BAGS PER 1 YARD

SRI 71

www.brickform.com • (800) 624-0261 • www.solomoncolors.com

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CONCRETE PAVEMENT CONTINUED Construction of the I-70 highway in western Kansas.

membership sees where the association has blind spots in marketing, technology, legislative, or membership engagement. The committee provides a mechanism to act on what they need to do. Originally, the committee attempted to meet the entire membership once or twice a year—but when new things come up like COVID, Howard found it not the most efficient way to engage. “The vision was simply to restructure this in kind of a matrix organization chart,” he says. One axis of the matrix being the functional expertise in pavement design, another in communication, in marketing, in legislative affairs, in construction, etc. “Our staff at ACPA, we have all these things—so we split them up in smaller teams.” He planned a roadmap to create interest-based “focused” forums for members seeking more information on a specific type of project to, hopefully, produce an efficient action out of the experts in the association.

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KOSS CONSTRUCTION Founded in 1912 by George Koss, Koss Construction began working with infrastructure. Then, as many businesses had to adjust in response to the post-World War II world, the company’s focus changed to concrete paving, working on a lot of bridges, as well as asphalt. Of note, the company received the first highway contract back in 1956 with a stretch of I-44 in Missouri. In 1970, they completed the first interstate contract with the I-70 in Kansas. “The company has paved an awful lot of airfields in the Midwest,” says Howard. Interestingly enough, they also did the airfield in Roswell, New Mexico in the 1950s. Yes, that Roswell, New Mexico. “If you drive through the Midwest—Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska—you’ll drive through one of our projects,” says Howard. Employees are proud of their work and many of the companies wear this on their sleeve, literally, along with the title “hard roader.” As explained on their website, “these men and women, laborers and craftspersons, engineers and foremen who are Hard Roaders are all experienced in their trades and take great pride in recognizing high standards.” Employees earn a small red star per five years with the company. The full-time staff runs about 75, but balloons to 200 during the construction season. Work continues for Koss Construction. Their 2021 includes business as planned with interstate projects through the Midwest: Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. They’ve also worked on a number of airfields. At current, they’ve returned to their historic roots; Howard explains that half of the company’s business has been by interstate reconstruction. With such an area to cover, it’s to their benefit to be as mobile as possible. Shipping heavy materials can be costly so bringing what they need to the site helps them be more effective. “We only work on highways, and for the most part just the larger projects,” says Howard. “We produce our own concrete and have mobile concrete plants. We mobilize to a project with everything that’s required to do the project— the plant to produce the concrete, the equipment to the old roadway. Production is more cost-effective.”

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1/11/21 12:15 PM


Picturesque windmills tower over the horizon with the 6x6x6 pavement slab of the western Kansas I-70.

With each state only doing large interstate projects only two, three, or four times per year, Howard finds it necessary to “cast a wide net.” IN THE SEAT “The ACPA is very good at what it does,” says Howard. “It has a nice toolbox of resources, both on the technology front…and we have a network of chapter state organizations throughout

the country. I think we’re keeping our eyes on the road, looking ahead, and providing stability. Because in a time of change, you don’t want to get caught up in the minutiae—we have things to do, no matter what gets thrown at us. Howard looks to leverage the decades of his experience for his new role. “I understand how sales opportunities come in—the municipal owners, the state owners—I understand the process,

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I understand the technical side of concrete pavement. And having been involved in the ACPA for so long, I understand the association well.” Through hard work and determination, Howard values focus. He imparts this piece of advice, “Somebody once said to me, when you get into executivelevel positions, one of the strongest things you have to lean on is that you have pretty much seen everything before. There may be some nuances and some changes, but it’s the time-tested ability to deal with whatever comes up and maintain focus on the agenda.”

For more news and stories from the ACPA, visit ForConstructionPros. com/10071933.

JANUARY 2021

CONCRETE CONTRACTOR 35

1/11/21 12:15 PM


GRINDERS

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BY CARY BARROWS, UNITED RENTALS

How Renting Grinders & Scarifiers Can Save Money, Time

C

oncrete projects can call for a wide range of equipment. Removing glue, grinding down high spots, smoothing rough surfaces and preparing a surface for a coating are just a few of the applications that could be done. Concrete grinders and scarifiers, also known as planer or rotary

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cutters, each have their own unique applications. CLOSER LOOK AT GRINDERS AND SCARIFIERS Concrete grinders remove imperfections and stains to about 1/8 in. below the surface. Example use cases include

stripping off material such as paint, or glues and adhesives that remain after tile is removed, getting rid of oil and dirt stains before resealing concrete and removing industrial-strength coatings to prep a surface for new material. Concrete grinders range from single-head to heavy-duty dual-head

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Clock/Hiron-Icons/AdotbeStock

Unless a contractor specializes in floor projects, it can be cost-prohibitive to own concrete grinders and scarifiers that are not used frequently. Photo Credit: United Rentals

and planetary machines. Each machine has its own ideal applications, as well as power requirements that must be considered on a case-by-case basis. The aggressiveness of the grind varies on each machine based on its weight and down pressure on the diamonds tooling, as well as grit and tooling design. The heavier the machine, the greater down pressure which results in greater concrete removal and faster production. Each grinder is outfitted with specific diamond tools to reach the desired result on the floor, whether that be removal, prep or polish. Walkbehind, single-head grinders are ideal for edging and small spaces such as garage floors, offices and basements.

Larger, planetary machines are preferred on larger commercial jobs for higher production and a smooth flat cut across the floor. A concrete scarifier is used for heavyduty concrete removal. These machines remove unwanted concrete and overlays quickly and efficiently, pummeling up to a 1/4 in. of concrete in a single pass. They are typically used for removing trip hazards, overlays and heavier commercial coatings. Scarifiers have a series of wheels made of steel or tungsten. The wheels spin and pummel the ground until the concrete breaks up. Depending on the profile the contractor is trying to achieve, they can either leave the surface rough or follow the scarifier with a grinder to help smooth out the surface. When removing concrete this aggressively, it is important to have a dust collector connected to any machine that will produce dust. Scarifiers and grinders can be seamlessly paired with manufacturers’ recommended dust collection units designed to help operate cleanly and safely. For both grinders and scarifiers, always be sure to check equipment specifications to determine a model’s exact capabilities and consult experts when necessary. Grinders and scarifiers are offered in a variety of sizes and power options and can be fitted with different accessories to tackle the needs of a particular job. SOURCING EQUIPMENT WHEN IT’S NEEDED Unless a contractor specializes in floor projects, it can be cost-prohibitive to own concrete grinders and scarifiers that are not used frequently. Besides the purchase price, there extra costs from maintaining the equipment and purchasing parts.

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When renting, contractors pay only for the equipment they need, at the time they need it. Usually the shortterm rental cost of this equipment is easily built into the job. Equipment rental providers typically have a local team to offer personal service, including knowledge of accessories needed and equipment familiarization that can help a user to safely operate the machine. They also can provide convenient business terms including credit card payment. Once projects are up and running and unexpected needs arise, local support becomes an even more important consideration. Even a small delay can have a ripple effect on a project timeline. If renting the equipment, the rental provider should be able to fix a broken machine or replace it quickly to help avoid or minimize downtime. When assessing equipment needs for a project, it is important to note that neither grinders nor scarifiers can cut into concrete—a concrete saw is needed for that task. Complex projects may call for additional tools like concrete saws, core drills, pavement breakers, demo hammers and more. Rental companies have a broader inventory of equipment than most contractors own. Working with a rental company with a wide product offering can reduce time spent sourcing and supporting equipment and eliminate invoicing from multiple suppliers. Preparing, grinding and polishing concrete floors can be demanding jobs. Having the right equipment, and right equipment rental provider, can help the job get completed safely and efficiently. Cary Barrows is branch manager for United Rentals in Olathe, Kansas. He has worked for United Rentals for more than 20 years.

For more information on surface prep, visit ForConstructionPros.com/ concrete/equipment-products/ surface-prep.

JANUARY 2021

CONCRETE CONTRACTOR 37

1/11/21 12:17 PM


SPECIFICATION GUIDE: GRINDERS

5

16 GRINDERS FOR YOUR LARGE & SMALL PROJECTS Technical data to help choose your next grinder. 1. LAVINA 38GRE GRINDER FROM SUPERABRASIVE One of the biggest propane grinders on the market, the L38GRE combines size and power with ease of use. It is remote-controlled and loaded with user-friendly features: integrated weights, three 13.2-in. heads, water system plus misting for dust suppression, LED lights, transportation wheel, a Blue Sky engine with closed loop fuel management, low emissions, and more. ForConstructionPros.com/21107467 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Lavina 38GRE

69” x 40” x 63”

1,585 lbs.

35 hp, Kawasaki FX1000V

n/a, propane powered

36.5”

603-898 lbs (built in weights)

Planetary

Yes

2. THE LAVINA 32E GRINDER L32E is a 32-in. heavy duty, powerful grinder from the Lavina Elite Series, ideal for large commercial projects, including everything from prep to polishing. It is a forced planetary machine, with three 13.2-in. grinding heads, and equipped with integrated weights, water system plus misting for dust suppression, LED lights, transportation wheel, and more. Offered in 230V and 480V models. ForConstructionPros.com/21204174

Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Lavina 32E

63” x 37” x 63”

1,455 lbs.

20 hp

3 Phase, 200-240, 60 Amp

32”

562-878 lbs. (built in weights)

Planetary

Yes

3. LAVINA 16E COMPACT GRINDER FROM SUPERABRASIVE One of Superabrasive’s newest elite grinders, the Lavina 16 is a lightweight and compact planetary grinder with three 7-in. heads and variable speed, suitable for small residential and commercial projects. The frame folds for easy transportation and storage, and it can also be easily detached from the grinding head for loading, etc. Offered in 115V and 230V models. ForConstructionPros.com/21107480 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Lavina 16E

31” x 20” x 34”

216 lbs.

2.45 hp

1 Phase, 115 V

16”

148-180 lbs. (can add weights)

Planetary

No

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Non-planetary

No

4. EDCO 2EC-NG – MAGNA-TRAP DUAL DISC FLOOR GRINDER Strip, grind and remove with EDCO’s Magna-Trap Dual-Disc Grinder. The 2EC-NG is idea for production grinding and floor cleaning in large and small areas. Perfect for light cleaning, removing mastics, thinset epoxies, urethanes as well as leveling high spots and lightly texturing slippery concrete. ForConstructionPros.com/21022967 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

2EC-NG, Magna-Trap Dual-Disc Floor Grinder

46” x 27” x 37”

258 lbs.

1.5 hp, 115/220V

16/8

22”

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Grinding Pressure

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5. THE M-SERIES ELECTRIC SURFACE GRINDER LINE The SG24EM from General Equipment features a 2-horsepower electric motor that operates from a 115 VAC, 60Hz, single-phase power source and can also be field wired for 230 VAC operation. This grinder works with a wide range of industry-standard magnetic type attachments, including those in General’s MAGNETACH® Tooling System or attachments utilizing the Lavina®/EDCO® magnetic tooling mounting configuration. ForConstructionPros.com/21207017 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

SG24EM Electric Duel-Head Surface Grinder

55.25” x 27.5” x 38”

325 lbs.

2 hp

115

24”

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Planetary

No

6. THE SG12EM SURFACE GRINDER The SG12EM from General Equipment features a single rotating disc with a 12-in. working width. Its 1.5-horsepower electric motor operates from a readily available 15-ampere, 115 VAC single-phase power source that can be found on most jobsites. The model works with a wide range of industry-standard magnetic type attachments, including those in General’s MAGNETACH® Tooling System or attachments utilizing the Lavina®/EDCO® magnetic tooling mounting configuration. ForConstructionPros.com/21207034

Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

SG12EM Electric Single-Head Surface Grinder

39” x 28.5” x 40.5”

242 lbs.

1.5 hp

115

12”

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Planetary

No

7. THE PREP/MASTER JUNIOR GRINDER The Prep/Master® Jr. floor grinding machine by STI works extremely well in small, hard-toreach areas that requires a more compact design — perfect for residential garage floors and basements. This grinder is very aggressive, yet extremely easy to operate due to the smooth operation of the STI rotary gear system. In addition, the low price of the Prep/Master Jr. is very affordable and fits any project budget. ForConstructionPros.com/12298967 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Prep Master Junior

50” x 23” x 48”

450 lbs., including pocket weights

7.5 hp, variable speed drive (5.6 kW)

220-240 V single phase, 40 A

23”

45 lbs. / tool x6

Non-planetary

Yes

8. THE PREP/MASTER 2807 GRINDER The STI-2807 floor grinding machine is designed for small to medium-sized commercial projects and residential garage finishing. This machine is the smallest of the P/M machine line, but still produces perfect results in grinding or polishing. Its 7.5 hp motor is built to last and its variable speed drive easily adapts to different grinding or polishing conditions for concrete, terrazzo, marble, and stone applications. The movable pocket weight system adjusts head pressure depending upon application and the standard water tank makes it easy to switch from dry to wet work. Available in 230V or 480V. Uses two tool plates (included). Recommended for project sizes up to 2,000 SF (200m2). ForConstructionPros.com/12152105 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Prep Master 2807

57” x 28” x 51”

743 lbs.

7.5 hp, three phase (5.5 kW)

220/230 VAC, 1 or 3 Phase, 60 Hz or 380/480 VAC 3 Phase, 50-60 Hz

28”

89 lbs. / tool x6

Non-planetary

Yes

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CONCRETE CONTRACTOR 39

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SPECIFICATION GUIDE: GRINDERS

1 9. THE PREP/MASTER 3030 GRINDER The Prep/Master STI-3030 floor grinding machine is an ideal choice for project sizes up to 10,000 SF (1,000 m2). Despite its heavy weight and size, this grinder is extremely easy to operate due to the smooth operation of the STI rotary gear system. Its 30-hp motor is built to last and its variable speed drive easily adapts to different grinding or polishing conditions for concrete, terrazzo, marble, and stone applications. The movable pocket weight system adjusts head pressure depending upon application and the standard water tank makes it easy to switch from dry to wet work. The 3030 is available in 230V and 480V. Uses four tool plates (included) and 12 tools. ForConstructionPros.com/10739977 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Prep Master 3030

86” x 30” x 52”

1,338 lbs.

30 hp, three phase

220/230 VAC, 1 or 3 Phase, 60 Hz or 380/480 VAC 3 Phase, 50-60 Hz

30”

89 lbs./ tool x12

Non-planetary

Yes

10. THE SDG-11 SINGLE DISC GRINDER The MK-SDG-11 features a tapered front nose that provides enhanced visibility. The removable handles and nose weight provide for easy transportation and storage. An easy to operate foot pedal raises grinding discs off the ground for engine starting and idling. A gas Honda GXV340 engine powers the SDG-11. It has a fully encapsulated grinding shroud with vacuum pick up port or a water control valve for wet grinding. The SDG-11 uses a 10 or 20 segment, and a 10-in. diameter diamond grinding head. ForConstructionPros.com/21206981 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

SDG-11 Single Disc Grinder

40” x 16” x 42”

212 lbs.

11.7 hp

n/a, gas powered

10”

152 lbs.

Non-planetary

No

11. THE COLOSSOS XTX FLOOR GRINDER This 10-head, 28-in. wide floor grinder was engineered for industrial surface preparation, concrete grinding and polishing. The only machine in its class that “edges to 1/8 in. of the wall.” Its auto sensing dual voltage VFD lets you plug directly into 460V or 230V three phase power, eliminating the need to use a step-up transformer. An EZ Bak tilt feature allows for operators to easily tilt back the machine to change tooling and to transport. Designed to remove heavy coatings, mastic, thinset, VCT glue, carpet glue, epoxy, paint, and levels and preps uneven floors, WerkMaster’s UltraFloor Polishing System delivers super high gloss results in fewer steps. ForConstructionPros.com/21205856

Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

The COLOSSOS XTX

41” x 28” x 48”

1,126 lbs.

20 hp

30

28”

1,017 lbs.

10 Heads Multi-Disc

Yes

12. THE EDGE FLOOR GRINDER/POLISHER A compact and powerful transportable floor grinder/polisher that is also a complement to any large planetary or rotary drive floor machine. The EDGE gets to less than 1/8-in. of the wall, eliminating the need to hand grind edges when prepping and polishing concrete, stone and terrazzo. • Edge to within 1/8 in. (3 mm) of the wall • Safely removes thinset, VCT glue, carpet glue, epoxy, paint, levels and preps uneven floors • Disassembles into 3 components for easy transport • Available in 220V or 110V models • Features dustless grinding and sanding when attached to appropriate HEPA vacuum system ForConstructionPros.com/21205860 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

The EDGE

24.5” x 14” x 33.5”

202 lbs. (110V) / 212 lbs. (220V)

1.5 (110V) / 3 (220V)

15 (110V) / 20 (220V)

14”

175 lbs.

Multi-Disc

No

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13. THE TITAN XT PROPANE PREP/POLISH FLOOR GRINDER One of the most aggressive 20-in. Propane Concrete Surface Prep/Polish floor grinders in its class. The TITAN XT’s Multi-Disc Technology features 8 heads and edges to within 1/8-in. of the wall. It’s power to torque ratio delivers loads of torque when removing heavy coatings, mastic, thinset, VCT glue, carpet glue, epoxy, paint, and levels and preps uneven floors faster than much larger planetary and rotary floor grinders. WerkMaster’s UltraFloor Polishing System delivers super high gloss results in fewer steps. Its EZ Bak tilt feature allows for operators to easily tilt back the machine to change tooling and to transport. Designed to exceed the needs of the professional contractor on commercial, industrial, residential and facility maintenance projects. ForConstructionPros.com/21205864 Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

The TITAN XT Propane

39” x 20” x 40”

600 lbs.

18 hp Kawasaki, 603 cc CARB certified

n/a, propane

20”

526 lbs.

Multi-Disc

No

14. THE LAVINA 30GE GRINDER

• • • • •

Easy-to-use integrated weights Improved dust collection efficiency LED lights in front and back New adjustable handle bar Charging phone station with dual USB 2.0 ports • A durable stainless steel cup holder

• Dust-proof grinding head with lowfriction chain gear planetary drive • Dust suppression fine misting system with high pressure spray nozzles • EPA and CARB Blue Sky engines with intelligent fuel control system

ForConstructionPros.com/21207003

Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Lavina 30GE

76.5” x 32” x 48”

794 lbs.

19 hp

n/a, propane

30”

448-529 lbs.

Planetary

Yes

Introducing for 2021, The TPC Guidance Controlled Slipform Concrete Paver The TPC is operated via a Radio Controlled Belly Pack instrument box. In auto mode, the machine will follow the guidance string and adjust tracking and screed elevation automatically. The screed comes in different widths from 48” to 96”. The TPC eliminates the need for forms. Just grade and set the string line!

Standard Features • The conveyor can be moved to feed the machine from either side. • The hopper has an auger inside to be sure the material fills both sides of the hopper. • The hopper has two hydraulic cylinders which raise the hopper and screed for transport and easy loading on the trailer. • The 74 HP Hatz German engine is EPA compliant in all 50 states and delivers plenty of power. • This engine, coupled with a proclaim pump, will give the hydraulic power needed year after year. • This is a machine designed with only the basics needed to slipform the walk or pad with no forms required. By designing the TPC this way, we were able to cut the cost and make it affordable for everyone, not just the big guys.

e

m

MADE IN THE U.S.A.

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105 School House Road Cheshire, CT 06410, 800-872-5726, 203-271-1682

www.salsco.com JANUARY 2021

CONCRETE CONTRACTOR 41

1/11/21 12:20 PM


SPECIFICATION GUIDE: GRINDERS 15. THE LAVINA 25GE GRINDER

• • • • •

Easy-to-use integrated weights Improved dust collection efficiency LED lights in front and back New adjustable handle bar Charging phone station with dual USB 2.0 ports • A durable stainless steel cup holder

• Dust-proof grinding head with lowfriction chain gear planetary drive • Dust suppression fine misting system with high pressure spray nozzles • EPA and CARB Blue Sky engines with intelligent fuel control system

ForConstructionPros.com/21207006

Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Lavina 25GE

71” x 28” x 48”

764 lbs.

19 hp

n/a, propane

25”

428-499 lbs.

Planetary

Yes

16. THE LAVINA 25E GRINDER • Dust-proof grinding head with lowfriction chain gear planetary drive • Dust suppression fine misting system with high pressure spray nozzles • Added protection against excessive voltage

• • • • •

Easy-to-use integrated weights Improved dust collection efficiency LED lights in front and back New adjustable handle bar Charging phone station with dual USB 2.0 ports • A durable stainless steel cup holder ForConstructionPros.com/21207012

Model

Dimensions (LxWxH)

Weight (lbs)

Horsepower

Amperage

Grinding Path (in.)

Grinding Pressure

Planetary/ Non-Planetary

Water Tank (Yes/No)

Lavina 25E

71” x 28” x 48”

754 lbs.

10 hp

30 amp

25”

348-428 lbs.

Planetary

Yes

INDEX ADVERTISER..................... PAGE American Concrete Institute ........................7 Graco, Inc. ...................................................21 Josam ..........................................................35 Minnich Manufacturing ..............................27 Multiquip Inc. ................................................5 Oztec Industries Inc. ...................................44 Rocketts Glass & Concrete Overlay ........ 2-3 SafeBasements Inc. ....................................34 Salsco Inc. ....................................................41 Slip Industries ..............................................42 Solomon Colors ..........................................33 Somero Enterprises ....................................23

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1/11/21 12:20 PM


BY BRAD HUMPHREY

«

THE LAST PLACEMENT

Finding Workers… Places In

S

everal years ago, I told the story of a client of mine who, while eating at a fast-food restaurant, observed the leadership exhibited by a store employee, not the store manager, when a major shutdown of their drivethru lane speaker took place. No speaker means angry and hungry customers which leads to no business. The contractor was so impressed with the young employee’s efforts (when his own store manager had erupted in anger), that he offered the young man a job on the spot. A few years later, this same contractor attended one of my workshops at the National Pavement Expo and introduced me to his newest foreman, the same individual who had been hired at that restaurant. Now, before you start thinking about all the fast food restaurants you will visit in the future, understand the message behind this real event. We need to be open to looking in, sometimes, very surprising locations to find potential candidates for our company. As the contractor in my illustration discovered, finding a potential employee, much less a future foreman, was not even on his recruiting radar. For us today, maybe we need to include more surprising places to look for and find workers. In the spirit of finding future workers who, while they may not have the experience and skills currently but who possess an attitude and willingness to learn, we may need to be more open to

such places—non-traditional places—to recruit a future workforce. Consider a few of these surprising places when seeking new recruits: • Visit your retail hardware and lumber stores. This “oldy but goody” remains a great pool of potential workers. • Tap into not only your local churches but look for those churches that are quite influential to reaching many people through ministries they may have in place to help those in need, including looking for full-time employment. • Get engaged with local training and educational organizations involved with building up the skilled labor force. A Skills USA local or state group might have just the right sort of young person who would be interested in a career in construction. • Reallocate some of your marketing budget and invest in a booth at job fairs around your town, especially those geared at attracting young people looking for job ideas. • Post job ads in schools such as business colleges, arts and science areas, psychology and science buildings. Many students often work construction for summer jobs and may only be getting degree in something that they like…while they may not be able to make a great living being a school teacher or social worker. • Hold your own “Get to Know Us” Saturday fairs where you send invites

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©olinchuk– stock.adobe.com

to local schools and social gatherings frequented by younger workers. • Regularly contact government and/or military bases where workers might be looking to leave/retire and would be interested in staying in your area. • Also—this is a big one—take off the paradigm blinders to only looking for men to recruit. There are more and more women proving that they can be, and are, fantastic workers in our industry. Finding workers through our more traditional avenues will not be enough to keep the number of applications coming in to find and hire the needed number of workers. So, don’t be afraid to seek out some new and surprising places to find what you need. Here’s to looking in new and surprising places to find tomorrow’s workers and leaders in the pavement maintenance industry! Known as The Contractor’s Best Friend, Brad Humphrey continues to write and speak in support of the construction industry. His international podcast, The Contractor's Best Friend, sponsored by AC Business Media and Caterpillar, continues to be one of the favorites of suppliers and contractors alike. As Vice President of Pavecon Ltd., Brad continues to develop, teach, write, and share his 35-plus years of industry knowledge.

Find more from Brad Humphrey at ForConstructionPros. com/10116722.

JANUARY 2021

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