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no. 4 2014 creative perspectives on retail lighting solutions

CONNECTED CONSUMERS Vivikes found new identity

INTERVIEW:

Margareta Andersson involves all senses in retail

COLOURFUL CREATIONS LATEST TRENDS NEW TECHNOLOGY BEAUTY IN THE ODD

Co-creation


Spark creativity through co-creation Retail is about delivering a branded experience, telling a story, evoke feelings, create needs, meeting desires or just making shopping a delight. Retail environments and concepts are often a result of a collaborative creative process. Retailers, decorators, architects, lighting designers and product designers often play an important part in making it come true. Ideas melt together to a shop concept that hopefully will inspire the customers and drive the perception of the brand.   We have dedicated this issue of The Innovator magazine to stories were co-creation and creativity have been key success factors.   We will follow Sound Architect Margareta Andersson and her interesting work with creating retail experiences by adding sound to retail concepts. A London trend workshop will give some insight in how courageous brands work with in-store branding today and in the future. We will also share with you how some of our most interesting customers, Vivikes and Volt, have created extraordinary shop concepts.   At Fagerhult, we are passionate about retail trends and concepts, creating branded experiences enhanced by light. Foremost we enjoy the creative process working together, where collaborative and innovative minds come together to spark creativity and set the retail concepts of tomorrow.

Enjoy!

Sofia Rudbeck Business Area Director Fagerhult Retail Lighting Solutions

publisher:

Fagerhult Retail AB Rinnavägen 12 SE 517 33, Bollebygd, Sweden Phone: +46 33 722 15 00 www.fagerhult.com/retail

editorial:

Camilla Hult, camilla.hult@fagerhult.se Elin Nilsson, elin.nilsson@fagerhult.se Katarina Styf, katarina.styf@fagerhult.se Scott Allen, scott.allen@fagerhult.co.uk Fran Pearce

graphic design: cover photo:

Elin Nilsson, elin.nilsson@fagerhult.se Benjamin Vnuk


Vivikes found identity in harmony and contrasts. //

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In this issue NO. 4, 2014

London report: Trends in retail design What is new and what matters?

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Colourful opportunities Create with colours

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Interview Margareta Andersson involves all senses in retail

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Tools for creation Geometric shapes

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Finding identity in harmony and contrasts A co-creation between Vivikes and Fagerhult

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Enhancing colours Marathon Rich and Glow

50

Alpha male address Alfred Dunhill embodies style and innovation

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Dressing up your brand Fagerhult Light AgencyTM

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Up close and personal The connected consumer

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Seeing beauty in the odd On Demand Design

54

Seamless magnificence The new Stuart Weitzman flagship store in Milan

36

A total image make-over LaHalle

58

Volt store concept Two in one

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The Brand Theatre coming alive Realising a showroom fashion shop

60

the innovator


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london report: trends in retail design


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London report:

Trends in retail design – what is new and what matters? The annual Retail Week SHOP was an insightful event that gathered an expert panel of distinguished speakers from across the retail industry to share their visions of retail. So, what are their ideas and thoughts of the near future? text katarina styf | photo retail week shop, ©istock.com/causamatias

a collection of the retail markets most knowledgeable minds, such as David Dalziel, Creative Director at Dalziel & Pow and Lorna Hall, Head of Retail & Strategy WGSN, got together to discuss and share their ideas and thoughts on trends and new in-store experiences. the future of retail We are getting quite familiar with the idea of larger retail brands executing big traditional roll out plans, in which every store concept look the same. Is this always the way to go? David Dalziel believes that it is not.   – It is time to do something different. “Urban Outfitters” and “& Other Stories” are great examples of brands that have. It is clearly a trend to be undesigned, David explains.    Both of the cited shop concepts have

succeeded to capture the essence of an unconventional, honest and simple expression with elements of wood, bare metal runner rails and retro looking luminaires. & Other stories, an independent brand within the H&M Group, has their own creative team that developed a lifestyle concept with displays that integrate beauty products and accessories along with clothing. Necklaces and nail polish are displayed on simple wooden shelves with corresponding pairs of shoes alongside a rail of clothes, rather than being neatly ordered in organised sections. In & Other Stories products are arranged pretty much like the way a woman might assemble her belongings at home.   – It is all about the story and H&M is willing to take the risk with this new

retail brand concept. Too many brands are too flat without any concept. It is very important to identify the “big idea” – to find a niche, to be special and have constant development cooking within the business, he continues.   Lorna Hall adds that she believes that it is the consumers that are driving the trends. How everyday people actually consume and think will also, evidently, shape the design and set up of the shops.   – We need a new way of presenting shop experiences. Clearly there is a need for new brands with different approaches. It is about building brands for the future and pushing out something relevant and anti–corporate. New brands that are adapting fast and reinventing are interesting and inspirational, Lorna explains.

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Lorna Hall, Head of Retail & Strategy WGSN.

the digital impact That online retail shopping growth is increasing rapidly is no secret. Just a couple of years ago people were sceptic of purchasing online leaving out credit card numbers, not being able to touch and feel the products – but now this is done by routine. As a consequence of this; either brands chose, or are forced to close down shops.   – I don’t think brands will need the same extent of geographical spread as previously. Therefore I think we will see fewer but nevertheless better shops as a consequence, David Dalziel says.   – I also believe that fewer transactions will be done in the shop. The physical shop is where consumers gather information and inspiration. It need to be less functional and more inspirational, giving people a reason to shop, selling something you never thought you would buy. I think it is good

london report: trends in retail design

David Dalziel, Creative Director at Dalziel & Pow.

that retailers are being challenged, he continues.

shop and brand experience, making it almost look like a grand museum. Another brand that has its own 24  h

creating a successful retail theatre Another topic discussed was the one of how to create a indulging and inspirational retail shop – the perfect retail theatre. But really, what is a true retail theatre experience? Paul Brooks, Joint MD at SFD, were explaining how trends translate to enhance the shop environment.   – Retail theatre is always evolving, is dynamic and reflects the brand essence. True retail theatres have that “wowfactor. They are fun, immersive and grab the consumer. They tickle all senses and can include sound as well as scent, they offer great expertise and they co-create with others, Paul explains.   As an example of a successful cocreative brand Paul mention Louis Vuitton. Here art and culture is included in the

museum is Prada. There is a trend towards luxury retail is becoming cultural.   Another side of the retail spectacle that Paul mentions is the “hipster hero”, “craft revolution” and when larger brands go “anti-big”. Tesco is one example buying more authentic brands to strengthen their brand portfolio; Topman goes hipster and Hackett team up with barbers.   Whether it is about a space where you can polish your beard while shopping or being invited to produce your own product, in-store brand theatre is always evolving. Nevertheless it should always be engaging, offer great expertise and inspiration and carry real values and stories in a 360° experience.


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Mark Shortland, Retail Director at Fagerhult UK, was invited to discuss “Maximum impact, minimum cost in retail store design� at Retail Week SHOP. Mark talked about enhancing customers experience with light, the LED technology, providing services that add value and that the best concepts and solutions are created in close collaboration with the customer.

"Many brands are too flat without any concept. It is very important to identify the big idea." David Dalziel, Creative Director at Dalziel & Pow.

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london report: trends in retail design


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Survey: Which aspects of store design are important to consumers? Percentage of consumers citing the following:* top 7 cites: Lots of space between displays so I can easily move around

82 %

Clear signage throughout so I can find what I want

71 %

Good views through the store so I can see what I’m looking for

57 %

Products I can easily reach, touch, feel, play with etc.

53 %

Somewhere I feel comfortable browsing for a while

51 %

Similar items/products grouped together, so the shop makes sense

51 %

Bright lighting so I clearly can see the products

50 %

*Source: Retail Week, Interior report; Store design trends 2013: consumer perspectives.

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Interview:

Involving all senses in retail An ideal store environment is one that engages our senses. When working with light, we are constantly developing lit experiences focusing on the visual sense. But there is so much more we can do to provide the customer with a total brand experience. Sound design, or directed sound specifically, is an emerging way of giving visitors a fantastic feeling of the brands identity. text camilla hult | photo benjamin vnuk, åhléns, mood stockholm: mathias nordgren

to find out more on how it all works, we talked to Margareta Andersson, founder of Lexter, a company that specialises in sound and scent design for public environments. Margareta came from the advertising world when she started her first company working with sound campaigns for Disney content music for movies, which later lead her in to her current occupation.    – Working with sound content for advertising campaigns on Disney movies made me think about the opportunity to have Elton John’s voice from the Lion King at the part of the shop where they displayed the movie. We tried a lot of different ways to do it, but in the end there was no product that could do the job at that time. Either there was too much noise pollution from the sound or there were too many wires, Margareta explains.

involving all senses in retail

so what is directed sound? Directed sound is a technology that enables you to create concentrated sound for a certain spot; exactly where you want it. The difference between directed sound and traditional speakers is roughly the equivalent to the effect of a light bulb compared with the light from a flashlight.   In 2007 Margareta came across the first technology that could be used within retail and other public areas which didn’t create "noise pollution". And here is where the story of Lexter begins. Today Lexter offers a holistic view within sound design, working with everything from the acoustics of the room, psychology behind dynamic sound to branding and sales driven messages.   Margareta compares the movement of sound with a glass of water.

Margareta Andersson.


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Mood in Stockholm.

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Mood in Stockholm.

"Margareta compares the movement of sound with a glass of water. When you pour it out on a hard surface it will bounce and spread over the room. If you pour it over a soft material it will not move but softly sink into the material."

involving all senses in retail

When you pour it out on a hard surface it will bounce and spread over the room. If you pour it over a soft material it will not move but softly sink into the material.     – We record the sound of the premises before we put our sound to it. We listen to the recording in our studio and after that we produce what ever it is we want to do. We need to know about the “natural” sound before we design ours, to avoid making it too noisy.   Scent is something food retailers have worked with for a long time. The aroma of freshly made cinnamon buns when you enter the shop will definitely make the customer at least consider buying some. Also chocolate, coffee and citrus are scents that are common within scent design. But now, even fashion


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Åhléns City in Stockholm.

retailers start to incorporate scent into shop concepts. Whyred is one brand that used both scent and sound to intensify the shopping experience in the tough competition with e-commerce. Lexter planned a modern, urban and unisex type of scent in the Whyred shop. mood stockholm  One of the largest projects they worked on was an unusual shopping centre called Mood Stockholm. Part of their brief was to transform an indoor shopping centre so that the visitors felt like they were in a city. Crucial to the success was getting Lexter involved at the inception of the project so they could advise the customer about the essential choices they had to make early on.    Sound was an integral part of shaping

the total experience within Mood Stockholm while equally providing individual zones, with their own target groups, a distinct audio articulation. The aspirational "Desire" zone houses the exclusive brands reflected by a high-end glimmering and sparkling sound. Within the “Wishing” zone the aim was to recreate a sense of London’s ultra-trendy Notting Hill with a soundtrack of soft guitar and someone whistling, while the more up-beat, fast and electronic vibe of the Everyday zone offers a more mainstream staple of everyday clothing. Combining individuality with consistency was a real challenge; however Lexter managed to preserve the natural ambience across all areas to avoid it being evident that the sounds are changing. The difference had to be incredibly subtle.

more than music Margareta is very clear on one thing; they do not work with music in shops. Their approach is more sophisticated, encompassing both branding and psychology.   How does the customer move compared to how we want them to is the key question you have to ask yourself when designing with sound. The placement of every speaker and technical instrument is meticulously calculated. The space between the speakers has to be exact; you can achieve more than you think by adding sound design, such as changing the visual expression. åhléns city  Another large project Lexter have been highly involved in is Åhléns City.

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Åhléns City is of Stockholm’s largest department stores. Across the bottom floor there are several areas targeting different type of customers. These areas are not separated by walls, which increase the risk of a high noise level. The new beauty department spans 2500 m2 which presents a great challenge since it is not only a shopping venue but also a place where people work.   Within the beauty section there are a number of departments each with a

involving all senses in retail

different target group and needs. The cosmetics and skin therapy area necessitated a “feel good”- atmosphere where the familiarity of sound was paramount.    – A cheerful, flowery, timeless pop is playing, in combination with the commercial tune for the department store.    On the opposite spectrum the Creative Make-up section wanted a more up-beat ambience with a lot of attitude. With no physical break between the two areas, there had to be an invisible border, avoiding an unappealing mash-

up of the sounds.   The café situated on the same floor had its own sound design with a distinct Parisian feeling. The objective was to make the visitor get a touch of France and a feeling of being outside. There is a harmonica playing and you can hear the sound of horse and carriage. To increase the feeling of being outside the sounds are designed so they appear to be coming from the street or a café next door.   Lexter has worked with more direct sales driven messages in supermarkets


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Mood entrance in Stockholm.

where the sound is sales message-focused on a specific area where there is a sales campaign. If the sound spreads beyond the targeted areas the result of the campaign could be compromised or it could have a negative impact in other areas of the store.   – A roaming cow is a great sound when selling milk, but maybe not the message you want to have when the customer is at the meat section, Margareta says.   – When working with beverages we

have measured a 60 % increase in sales with sound design featuring cans open and ice dropping down in a glass, Margareta continues. all about timing Timing is another important consideration. There should be the right sound level for the specific time of day. Monday mornings are usually slow and weekends busier. Than there is a possibility combining audio with a customer counting system it is possible for the

volume to increase automatically. Lexter has developed a system where the shop assistant can control volume and create playlists for different zones of the store. And everything can be handled by an app on the smartphone.   It is central that sound, lighting and interior cooperate and complement each other to create the ultimate brand experience. If this is achieved the customers want to stay longer, shop more and when they leave they take with them a total experience of the brand.

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Finding identity in harmony and contrasts Inspired by two words; harmony and contrasts, a creative collaboration between the fashion brand Vivikes and Fagerhult produced a radical change of the Vivikes identity and two stores in Oslo received a new warm and calm make-over. text elin nilsson | photo tone tønseth and trude westby

the development of the new Vivikes shop concept was just like completing a puzzle. By sketching the right personality for each store, in regards to both the interior and lighting, all the pieces fell into place, creating a fantastic shopping experience for the modern woman. warmer colour and contrasts   – We felt there was a need for a change, something drastic to renew ourselves. Just as fashions change during seasons we want our stores to follow trends in a flexible way. So we made a U-turn, the old white and clean interior were replaced with a completely new personalised concept of warmer colours and contrasts, says Anne Gro Fjeldheim, Creative Director and Buying Manager at Vivikes, that is a part of the Norwegian Varner Group.   Vivikes is one of Norway’s leading

finding identity in harmony and contrasts

fashion chains, focusing on making the modern woman look fabulous. They have 67 shops throughout the country and two of them situated in Oslo became targets for the new look. inspirational collaborations The inspirational process is very important for the project group at Vivikes when they develop new concepts. They contacted Fagerhult's Key Account Manager Kristian Renström to contribute with lighting ideas at the early stage of the project.   – Vivikes is really a partner that values quality and they see the importance of lighting. At the beginning we began with a blank paper and focused on creating puzzle pieces of identity carriers that we added together to create the right atmosphere. In Vivikes case it became all about harmony and cont-

rasts, says Kristian.   Fagerhult and Vivikes worked closely together over a three month period, creating and trying ideas together, from first thoughts to the finished concept.   – We enjoyed working with Fagerhult. They were a good creative lighting partner and came with many ideas and functioned as a good sparring partner during the process, says Anne Gro. light gives the atmosphere The two stores in Oslo are now furnished with a warmer interior, copper elements, big crystal crowns, LED-lines, and a lot of personalised interior, like photo frames, neon signs and a special made V that attracts the visitors from outside.   Fagerhult usually approaches a project in two parts; the important functional lighting, such as contrasts and adequate general lighting.


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"The lighting played an important role when creating the atmosphere." Anne Gro Fjeldheim, Creative Director and Buying Manager at Vivikes.

Anne Gro Fjeldheim.

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Sketches from the creative process.

"A special LED-framed cage was placed in the middle of the store to define the shapes of the interior."

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And the identity, how lighting can enhance the brand’s character.   – Vivikes new concept became a great combination of both, says Kristian.   – We are really pleased with the result, especially the lighting that plays an important role in creating the atmosphere. The stores have a warmer cosier feel but with the accent light you really get adequate illumination over

the clothes. It became very successful. The atmosphere encourages you to stay and walk around in the store, says Anne Gro.   The accent light was provided by a track mounted Marathon spotlight equipped with LED. Supplied in a black finish, its discrete design blended seamlessly into the black ceiling taking away none of the focus from the interior.

  An equally subtle integrated light solution, Diva II, was used to give dimension to the shelves, illuminating the clothing underneath and adding depth to the store by lighting up the walls.   The light agency and lighting department team at Fagerhult also created a special LED-framed cage placed in the middle of the store to define the shapes of the interior.

The final result at Vivikes in Strömmen. finding identity in harmony and contrasts


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Vivikes in Sandvika.

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"The contrast is created by the mix of integrated discrete lighting and really eye catching solutions." Kristian Renström, Key Account Manager at Fagerhult

The all-important dressing rooms also got a special made solution where a tiny little LED strip with good CRI was integrated behind the mirrors to create a smooth ambient vertical light on the observer.   – These are the features that make the difference. The contrast is created by the mix of integrated discrete lighting and really eye catching solutions with a design element that enhance the interior. We used the spotlights to create interest and curiosity around the store, says Kristian.

Dressing rooms in Strömmen with discrete LED stripes behind the mirrors.

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Crystal chandelier ad pieces of jewellery at the store in Sandvika.

pieces of jewellery One of the most central element in the store is the crystal chandelier that adds a distinct touch of glamour as a centrepiece of jewellery.   – These features add identity. Vivikes want to be flexible and add personality to each store and by adding just a few features you can create the personality and still find a cohesive brand, Kristian says.

finding identity in harmony and contrasts

  Some of the characteristic pieces will now be brought into Vivikes next project.   – Our new concept resulted a great change and at the same time it was very cost effective. We are now heading for the next project and will continue to think further, looking for inspiration and finding exciting solutions in the future, Anne Gro concludes.


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"By adding just a few features to each store you can create the personality and still find a cohesive brand." Kristian Renstrรถm, Key Account Manager, Fagerhult. The illuminated V creates interest from the entrance.

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alfred dunhill – alpha male address


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"The idea was to have a home of the brand so the shop feels domestic in character as seen by the very fact that it is a door off a courtyard and not shop front." David Murdoch, Architect.

Alpha male address Since 1893, Alfred Dunhill has been committed to "advancing the pursuit of male indulgence". Bourdon House, the first of its Homes in London, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tokyo, embodies the brand’s mix of masculine style and innovation. text fran pearce | images alfred dunhill

there are very few brands that succeed in being both exclusive and inclusive but since 1907, when it opened its first store in St James’s, the aristocratic corner of London affectionately nicknamed "clubland", Alfred Dunhill has achieved precisely that, by supplying ingeniously conceived and fashioned accoutrements to the grown-up, well-heeled and worldly male. It combines a sure-footed masculinity with refinement and innovation, all yours for the price of a beautifully cut sports coat or a handrolled cigar purveyed in an atmosphere of calm and competence, dark wood and deep polish – the very essence of the gentlemen’s club.   Alfred Dunhill, the man, was 21 when he took over the family harness and saddlery business in 1893, two years before George Lanchester built the first British car. As the new age of motoring began, he launched Dunhill’s Motorities offering "everything for the car, but the motor" even including a pipe that could be smoked in an open-topped vehicle.  

  The gloves-to-gadgets emporium soon moved into other areas of contemporary maledom, from fishing rods, cricket kit and golfing gear, before moving into "Avorities" – accessories and outfits for the new "aeroplanist".   In an age of technological progress and curiosity, Dunhill was a crafty eccentric, in the best sense of both terms. In 1908 he set up his own patent development company and is credited with the adjustable passenger mirror among other inventions. In 1922, for example, Alfred applied for a patent on an interior light for bags – legend has it – to enable his wife to apply lipstick with ease during the ballet.   Its male-orientation nothwithstanding – and unlike many of the hide-bound institutions of his own era – Dunhill’s emporium was never for men only. Today, Alfred Dunhill Limited has more than 180 stores and over 3500 wholesale points of sale around the world, and is part of Richemont, one of the world’s leading luxury goods groups,

whose other brands include Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Piaget, Vacheron Constantin, Jaeger-LeCoultre, IWC and Montblanc. a hybrid concept The core values of the brand – masculinity, luxury, functionality and innovation – are reflected in the most recent development of the brand: The Homes of Alfred Dunhill, a hybrid store-cumclub concept representing the "third dimension of luxury", the experience, and embodying the heritage of Alfred Dunhill himself.   The company calls the Homes its most ambitious and exciting project to date. There are four, in London, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Tokyo. They are intended to provide the pinnacle of Dunhill service in a distinctively superior retail environment distinguished by services that include bespoke tailoring, barber’s shops, fine wine cellars, bars and restaurants, screening rooms and spas.

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First among equals is Bourdon House, formerly the London residence of the Duke of Westminster, a Grade II-listed Georgian building, in the heart of London’s Mayfair. In Hong Kong, the Home is spread over the floors of the prestigious Landmark Prince's Building built in 1897 and once home to the Hong Kong Club.   The Alfred Dunhill Shanghai Home in Luwan District, is in a magnificent, perfectly restored, 1920s, neoclassicalstyle villa in the former French concession, surrounded by a beautiful English garden.   By contrast, Dunhill’s Tokyo Home on Ginza Chuo Street in the heart of the city, is distinctly modern but is still equipped with an elegant lounge area overlooking the street and a traditional barbers.   elegant georgian character For obvious reasons, Bourdon House is the most "British" of the homes. It was built in 1723 and is a fine illustration of Georgian architecture, which is characterised by proportion and balance and widely held as the epitome of good taste: elegant, much copied but seldom surpassed. The Duke of Westminster used it as his townhouse from 1917 to 1957. Over time it was altered and extended but since its acquisition by Alfred Dunhill it has undergone painstaking restoration under the direction of architect Aukett Swanke.   Specialised craftsmen worked carefully to restore its character and charm. The carved cornices, wood panelling and reinstated antiques are redolent of its past with noble materials from marble and mahogany to mosaic floors and hand-painted wallpaper sharing a home with high-tech sounds systems and cinema.   Aukett Swanke also replaced a modern extension with a single-storey, "contemporary glass dining room delicately slotted into the courtyard; "a jewel" situated within a distinguished historic setting". Style and craft shot through with innovation might equally describe Bourdon House’s refurbishment, the Dunhill brand or the man himself.

Alfred Dunhill in London.

alfred dunhill – alpha male address


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alfred dunhill – alpha male address


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alfred dunhill – alpha male address


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  – The idea was to have a home of the brand so the shop feels domestic in character as seen by the very fact that it is a door off a courtyard and not shop front, says architect David Murdoch.   – Having an exclusive club next to it enhances the brand and this has carried over well to the Far East. There is a synergy that I think has been very successful, he continues.

Alfred Dunhill in Shanghai.

evokes the exclusive In a suitably understated way, the emporium at Bourdon House is reached via an outdoor terrace and through a stone arch with a simple sign above. The retail aspect, which is open to the public covers three floors. The ground floor is home to the Dunhill emporium offering the most recent collection of menswear, leather, accessories, gifts, gadgets and gizmos.   The second floor reflects Dunhill’s approach to personalisation, luxury and exclusivity with rooms for bespoke tailoring and custom menswear and leather. In addition to a spa with two treatment rooms and a traditional gentleman’s barber, this floor also houses an elegant museum displaying pieces from the brand’s archives and vintage leather items. The basement, meanwhile, accommodates a subterranean private cinema, a lounge area serving food and drinks and a cellar bar.   The remainder of the building is dedicated to an invitation-only members’ club with lavish bedroom suites and a dining room, whose atmosphere and privacy are so sacrosanct that no pictures or details of it are made public. Though not an all-male preserve, Bourdon House evokes the exclusive and inclusive, the pursuit of masculine indulgence and Alfred Dunhill’s own legacy summed up in his motto: "It is not enough to expect a man to pay for the best, you must also give him what he has paid for."

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up close and personal


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Up close and personal Once associated with wealth and privilege, personal shopping is now very much in the mainstream with a range of brands and department stores offering it as a free-of-charge value added service. text fran pearce | photo burberry, estimote, images courtesy: selfridges

the latest evolution of the concept is pushing things one step further, bringing together the on- and offline worlds to create the ultimate personal shopping experience. connected consumer The real world, human contact involved in personal shopping is a big part of its appeal but personalisation is also a growing feature of online shopping. Whether the real world and online experience compete or complement one another is open for debate but e-commerce consultancy Amaze predicts that retailers who emerge out of the changing landscape will do so through using a mix of the online and offline experiences for the consumer – making shopping more convenient and easier, whether online, in-store or through mobile applications. Chief strategy officer Rick Curtis said:   – The wave of digital and technological innovation that is sweeping across the high street is creating a shopping environment with the connected consumer at its heart. For those brands that want to keep ahead of the curve and build a seamless customer experience, the very real benefits of "connected retail" are now here for the taking.

cross-selling The omnichannel concept – selling across multiple channels and devices, often to the very same customers – has taken a particularly strong hold in Europe and the USA according to a 2013 retail forecast by professional services company PwC.   In recent years, real world retailers have suffered at the hands – or should that be digits? – of e-commerce as a result of the practice known as "showrooming", where customers touch and try products in-store but buy on-line. However, by paying heed to advice to make the best of both worlds retailers can also take advantage of the reverse trend known as webrooming: researching on the web but buying in-store and it is growing among a very important demographic group. generation z Shoppers currently aged 14–19 , the so-called Generation Z, will eventually make up about 40 per cent of consumers in the USA, Europe and the BRIC countries. Their typical shopping patterns involve researching fashions on the web, creating a digital scrapbook and online price-checking but they also treat store visits as group excursions.

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Hence a flurry of predictions by retail and e-commerce analysts at the start of 2014 centred on trends whose common theme was the need to provide a more personal shopping experience, whether on the high street or online. technology "democratise" Digital technology has the potential to provide retailers with new insights that will enable them to tailor the "bricks and mortar" shopping experience to the individual shopper’s needs and preferences and, in essence, to "democratise" personal shopping, delivering personalised products and interactions through a process that has been dubbed "me-tailing". For example, social curation communities such as Pinterest where "pre-customers" post galleries of their favourite fashion items not only provide pre-purchase inspiration for other buyers but also highlight trends in customer tastes, providing retailers with a level of information impossible with traditional market research and directly affecting stock-buying.   In the "multichannel" world, shops are often selling across a variety of technology platforms to the same people and using every means at their disposal to "get close to the customer". As an example of the cross-over between the digital and the "real", menswear retailer Topman offers a personal shopping service provided on the premises by human advisors, supplemented by fortnightly trend talks on Facebook to answer customers’ style questions.   Burberry piles on the "retailment" at its flagship store on Regent Street with acoustic events featuring band such as The Kaiser Chiefs, and a "digitallyenriched" shopping environment that includes mirrors that turn instantly to screens displaying product-specific content.

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Burberry's flagship store on Regent Street, with acoustic events featuring band such as The Kaiser Chiefs.

up close and personal


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Selfrige's lounge area.

Estimote produces personalised micro-location based notifications for retail stores.

"A further trend forecast for the near future is the emergence of the "likeable expert", a member of the in-store whose job is not to sell but to offer advice, solve problems and build relationships."

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The "likeable expert".

hypertargeting Hypertargeting is another online technique that has moved in-store, in part spurred by the arrival in 2013 of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) devices such as Apple’s iBeacon, an indoor tracking device built into its operating systems and devices that communicates with customers’ smartphones. The idea is that the shop’s system registers when specific customers arrive and reminds them of their shopping lists, or previous purchases, as they reach the appropriate part of the store.   Geofencing, a mobile-phone technology used to alert parents when children wander off or a car goes missing, is also being used to tell stores when individual customers are close and send them intelligently targeted texts relating to in-store promotions. These systems also tell staff to bring goods ordered on the Internet to the counter ready for collec-

tion, thus cutting queues.   There are privacy concerns with hypertargeting technology but alternatives exist. For example House of Fraser has a less intrusive virtual queuing system for "click and collect customers" who use in-store terminals to notify the store that they have arrived. Customers receive a text when their order is ready. upcoming arrivals This year will see the arrival and (hopefully) swift and satisfied departure of the click and collect customer at many more locations. In the UK, initiatives include a drive-through collection service at Selfridge’s claimed to take as little as three minutes; supermarket click and collect branches at London Underground stations and the launch of the Streethub, a service designed to help shoppers reserve goods – mainly fashion and homeware – at local,

independent stores using their mobiles or laptops.   A further trend forecast for the near future is the emergence of the ‘likeable expert’, a member of the in-store whose job is not to sell but to offer advice, solve problems and build relationships: in effect, a personal shopping assistant on demand, for every customer, "connected" or otherwise.   The most recent Best Retail Brands report from the analyst Interbrand points out that “companies in search of growth can take their cue from consumer expectations; bring the online shopping experience into the bricks and mortar store and bring personal service back. Studies continue to show that the brands which invest in trained and motivated store associates comman higher margins and greater loyalty."

up close and personal


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stuart weitzman – seamless magnificence


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Seamless magnificence Stuart Weitzman has opened its innovative 3000 square foot, flagship store in Via Sant´Andrea, one of the most recognisable shopping streets in Milan. The boutique is the hundredth Stuart Weitzman store globally and is designed by the renowned architect Zaha Hadid, who has created a remarkable fluid and playful design of seamless magnificence. text elin nilsson | photo zaha hadid architects

stuart weitzman – seamless magnificence


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stuart weitzman – seamless magnificence


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at the forefront of style and design, the Stuart Weitzman brand is encapsulated by the fluid shapes and integrated lighting within their Milan store. An ideal blend of function and ergonomics, the space is defined by an innovative experimentation with materials and construction techniques. The displays and seating are created by fiberglass in

rose gold, using a technique similar to those used in boat manufacturing.     The fluid landscape creates curiosity together with the freestanding modules that function as both seating and as a way to showcase the shoes.   – The design is divided into invariant and adaptive elements to establish unique relationships within each worldwi-

de location; yet also enable every store to be recognized as a Stuart Weitzman space, explains Zaha Hadid.   The co-creation between Zaha Hadid Architects and Stuart Weitzman is a step towards making the brand entering recognition worldwide and additional flagship stores are now planned for Hong Kong, Rome and New York.

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volt – two in one


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Two in One Volt is different than other concepts since they have decided to split up their shops in two distinctive parts. One part is called Magazine and it displays more suits and shirts. The other part is called Library where more relaxed outfits are presented. text camilla hult

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volt – two in one


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the volt brand target fashion conscious young men who are confident in their style and know what kind of clothing they want. The stores want to inspire and offer clothing and footwear for both casual and dressy occasions.   Library should bring to mind an antique English library with an old-fashioned design – the feeling of quality. The lighting solution is a mix of mediumbeam and narrow-beam spotlights with a strong focus on pendants and decorative lighting. Authentic materials in chandeliers and table lamps in brass and green glass contribute to the correct genuine feeling.   – We have worked hard to develop many different fixtures that create ambience to highlight the fine furnishings and decor, Erik Torstensson Lighting Designer at Fagerhult explains.   The Magazine part is more modern.

This solution is dark and luxurious with sharp contrasts and the decorative lighting is more austere in its design. Both solutions have a dynamic lighting and when walking from one part to the other the change in the lighting solution should just be a smooth transition, and not two totally different experiences.

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colourful opportunities


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Colourful opportunities We all need light to see, to perceive the interior and feel the atmosphere. When LED entered the retail lighting industry it gave lighting designers a great tool of new colour spectrums with dynamic light. Any environment comes to life when playing with colour and contrasts – and it makes you the artist! text elin nilsson

dynamic light Using a palette of colours makes the lighting an attraction itself. Colour filters are on their way out, replaced with LED luminaires equipped with the ability to shift the light colour without the need for extra lamps, filters and fixtures.   By mixing light in a variety of colour temperatures and contrasts the possibilities are endless. Rather than embarking on a big renovation project with brushes and paint, dynamic light allows you to change the environment and define the architectural structure by altering the colour of the light instead,

transforming the appearance of steps, ceilings or a white wall.   With an extra touch of the same colour of light you can also enhance the existing colours within the interior. Or why not replace the traditional white with saturated coloured light to enhance the store.   Blue light is truly an accent colour, often used by ambulances and police cars to navigate through traffic, but it is also a regular feature on the stage, illuminating theatre and concerts.   – Blue is one of my favourite colours. It is very common to use blue as a background colour on stage as it creates

a great contrast when you put warmer colours on the actors and musicians faces. I think it would be interesting to apply this in retail, something happens when you mix cold and warm light, and you can use it when presenting items on a shelf or illuminating a wall, says Anders Strömberg, Concept Development Manager at Fagerhult.   This spring you can look out for the new tuneable white Marathon spotlight; “Marathon Dynamic”. With this fixture you can tune in any white colour from 2700 K to 6500 K but also control more saturated colours such as red, blue, yellow and purple.

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researching dynamic light Based on the thoughts and ideas of adaptive lighting Fagerhult is involved in a lighting study with the Finnish hypermarket Anttila in Uleåborg. Investigating three different lighting scenarios, the goal of the study is to increase knowledge in how dynamic lighting can attract customers, draw attention to certain products and impact on customer navigation through the store. tuneable white Tuneable white allows you to change the colour temperature of white light with one luminaire and one light source. But why is this a good thing? Within retail this actually offers many possibilities to enhance different types of merchandise.   For example, it is a great way to show what clothing looks like during the different hours of the day in a dressing room. You can also let the colour temperature in a shop window mirror that of the sun’s as it evolves throughout the day. Or why not create contrasts and do the opposite, have a warm colour when it is colder light outside and vice versa. By shifting light contrasts no environment gets boring.   Flexibility with colour temperature is also a good advantage when illuminating food at supermarkets and grocery stores. Fagerhult’s latest additions for those applications are the spotlights Marathon Rich and Marathon Glow. They are especially developed to illuminate and enhance different groceries. Read more about them on page 50–51.

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colourful opportunities


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Zone Evo

Tools for creation The language of points, lines, angles and curves composes the basics of geometrics. When illuminating a retail area there is a wide variety of options for the lighting; do you want it to be strictly discrete or breathtaking? To make it easier to identify which tools to use for creation, Fagerhult have developed their latest spotlights based on these basic geometric shapes. text elin nilsson

a spotlight characterised by a clean and conical shaped housing and equipped purely with LED is the latest evolution to the retail range. Zone Evo comes in three different sizes and mounting options, and the segmented MIRO reflector technology makes it extremely efficient with excellent visual performance.     Another geometric expression, the

tools for creation

square, is represented in Sync, a spotlight that distinctly contrasts with the others due to its angular design.   Available in three different sizes Marathon’s cylindrical shape and clean design makes it a spotlight ideal for any setting. The new additions Marathon Rich and Marathon Glow are furnished with carefully chosen LED modules, making them a perfect choice when

illuminating and enhancing the colours of different groceries.   – These three options, a cone, a square and a cylindrical flair, enable you to select a shape associated with the shape of your project, says Mathias Oskarsson, Product and Application Manager at Fagerhult.


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Sync

Marathon

"Cone, square and

cylindrical flair. Select shape from a wide palette of products." Mathias Oskarsson, Product and Application Manager at Fagerhult.

tools for creation


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marathon rich and glow


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Marathon Rich and Glow

Enhancing colours Fagerhult’s new additions of spotlights, Marathon Rich and Marathon Glow are equipped with tailor-made LED modules which makes them a perfect choice when illuminating and enhancing colours of different groceries or fashion items. text camilla hult

marathon rich and glow were initially developed for the food market where there historically has been a need for a light source that could render colour in a way that would make the groceries look tasteful. But it has been proved that both Rich and Glow are suitable also for other areas within retail.   With a special developed LED module you will get quality light with low energy usage compared to the old coloured lamps and filters. It is also important to remember that any colour you want to enhance in the displayed food needs to be one of the colours that the light source can render in a good way. marathon midi led rich This version is tailor-made and tested for the fish and meat sections in the

store. The spectral qualities of the LED module enhance both warm red tones but also cool tones. This functions for both red fish and seafood, such as salmon and shrimps, but also ice and silver skinned fish types.   Marathon Rich has a great colour rendering in blue and red colours so it will be successful where you would like to enhance these colours.

and cheese it is possible to combine spotlights with general light, making it suitable to illuminate groceries that radiate similar colours.   In dressing rooms there are often a wish to have a warm tone to reflect what the skin would look like in sunshine. Marathon Glow will also make tree furniture look good with a nice finish.

marathon midi led glow This version is tailor-made for the fruit/ vegetable and bread/cheese section and is equipped with a LED module that is specifically selected and tested for illuminating such foods. The LED module is strong in the warm coloured spectrum and brings out the warm red tones in the groceries. When accenting bread

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Dressing up your brand The physical shop is the perfect brand-carrying platform for retailers. Glamorously stylish, considerately enchanting or daringly edgy – there are unlimited possibilities. text camilla hult photo cecilia selvén

fagerhult's department The Light Agency offer customers guidance and advice on how their lighting solution can compliment or enhance their brand’s personality. Both the lighting design and the idiom and features of the fixture contribute to the communication of a retailer’s brand values. Whether you have a clear sense of direction or a general impression, Fagerhult offers the ability to transform the feeling you want your customers to experience through the lighting solution.   A broad range of products, coupled with the possibility to make special adaptations (Fagerhult O.D.DTM) offers

the fagerhult light agency™

the best possible tools for an optimised solution.   After ideas are generated together with the customer, a complete lighting solution with suitable products, light sources and colour temperatures are presented. Life Cycle Costs that compares the new lighting installation to the old one can be presented. By doing this, a pay-off time can be calculated and also how much maintenance cost and energy consumption will decrease over time.   Each brand has its own personality and Fagerhult makes an effort of getting to know the brand values and the characteristics of it.


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the fagerhult light agency™


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Seeing beauty in the odd It is not always a bad thing to be the odd one out. Actually, why be like everyone else when you can be something that stands out? Fagerhult believes it is important to be able to show your brand’s true personality. That is why we offer Fagerhult O.D.DTM – Fagerhult On Demand Design. A collaboration to invent a concept luminaire according your wishes. text elin nilsson | photo cecilia selvén

fagerhult o.d.dTM


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fagerhult o.d.dTM


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The clothing company Cubus wanted a special solution of a lighting fixture for their new jeans assortment. Fagerhult created a box of metal, and an outside of canvas fabric with a magnet function, so that the messages on the front could be changed. Cubus wanted a visible fluorescent lamp with blue light and the metal chain holding it up contributes to the industrial feeling.

This red luminaire dot in the ceiling was created together with the clothing company Dressmann to add a piece of identity and signage to their store ceilings.

any product ideas and concepts which are ideal for specific customers or venues but are not within the existing range are handled by the Fagerhult O.D.D M department. The team consists of colleagues from across the Fagerhult Group in China, Belgium and Sweden – all with different expertise but with the same passion to find the optimal solution.   Lars Gärdebäck, Technical Application Manager and Johan Lemaitre, Concep-

fagerhult o.d.dTM

tual Product Design Manager, both work with solving customer specific products. Lars Gärdebäck is a former electrician, lighting designer and even a teacher in Lighting Design at Jönköping University. His expertise in the technical and electronic issues is complemented by Johan Lemaitre who has studied design and has extensive experience of luminaire product design.   – Some clients have a great knowledge of light and the technical facts, while

some need guidance toward an even better, optimised product or solution than the one they initially had in mind. We can assist in either of these two scenarios, Johan explains.   Retail chains want to stand out; they do not want to have the exact same luminaires as the competitor next to them at the high street. Luminaire design is not only about vision today, it is about branding.


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The dressing room is the place where many purchase decisions are made. And it also offers a unique opportunity to stand out and make a difference. This solution is inspired by the make up room mirror, connecting it to the feeling of preparing for a true stage entrance.

"Luminaire design is not

only about vision today, it is about branding."

fagerhult o.d.dTM


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An O.D.D collaboration

La Halle – a total image make-over

La Halle is one of the brands of the French Vivarte group, which also have brands like Naf Naf and Kookai within its portfolio. Traditionally La Halle was associated with budget shopping but now they wanted to raise their image. text camilla hult

to transform their profile from budget outlet to a trendier alternative for women required a significant change. A more fashionable product collection had to be complemented by a new visual image and interior to both complement and signify their re-positioning.   Their existing interior and lighting was similar to those used with a 1000  m2 supermarket, lit predominately by general lighting which created a bright yet flat space. The new, revamped interior is made from wood to create a trendier and more enjoyable feeling.   In the middle of shop there is a lounge area with large armchairs for the visitors to relax. One of the main focal points is a specially created “bag bar” where a wide assortment of bags are

la halle – a total image make-over

showcased for customers to explore and experiment with different styles. A night sky full of stars was replicated within their event space, using a mixture of different coloured small LEDs spread across the ceiling which, like the walls, is painted black. cooler lighting Their vision for lighting of the new concept focused on providing a cooler light on the ceiling and walls; contrasting spotlights with T5 tubes in a colour temperature of 4000 kelvin. In the dressing room the light is warmer to create a more comfortable and homely feel.   To realise the lit effect, La Halle wanted a luminaire that was discrete and sophisticated but they couldn’t find

the exact match within the Fagerhult standard range. Working in close collaboration, La Halle and Fagerhult's O.D.D department adapted the Crossroad spotlight in LED to their exact requirements for accent lighting, with the general provided via a custom solution called Bridge.   Fagerhult O.D.DTM (On Demand Design) is a service which offers retailers a custom-made product tailored to their design preference or to address a specific need. La Halle appreciated this flexibility to create a non-mainstream solution that was both personal to them yet equally discrete.


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la halle – a total image make-over


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the brand theatre coming alive


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The Brand Theatre coming alive The small town of Bollebygd in Sweden is where Fagerhult's retail heart is situated. There has always been a passion to inspire customers here and a strong tradition in educating both staff and visitors. The showroom has been updated continuously and a large number of visitors have entered the bright and spacious building to get a journey through the world of lighting. text camilla hult | photo cecilia selvĂŠn | illustrations industriromantik

the brand theatre coming alive


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the brand theatre coming alive


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there is not only a great knowledge within lighting here. Fagerhult has always held great pride in the process of creating a lighting solution that matches the customer’s brand and appeals to its target group. This was something Fagerhult had to get across to their customers why The Brand Theatre Experience was created. The Brand Theatre Experience is Fagerhult's book where two fictional brands are described focusing on an analysis of the brand, what trends to consider and examples of how they create a concept.   A fashion shop was created with 3D imagery and it was named Twenty Once Denim. At the same time the showroom needed something new and fresh and the 3D renderings and ideas for the showroom became a parallel process.   In September 2013 Twenty Once Denim became a real and very important part of the Fagerhult showroom.   – It gives us wonderful opportunities to display and demonstrate different feelings and moods of lighting, but most of all it is a great way to play with lighting, says Anders Strömberg, Concept Development Manager at Fagerhult.

All the lighting is controllable with iTrack and LED spotlights. Pre-set scenes make the light wonder around the shop display emphasising different items.   – This is something that has proven to be something very positive among our visitors. People tend to stay longer and find it more interesting when the light is moving around.   It is possible to control the light with sensors illuminating a path for the customer and also to experiment with different light levels, colours, accents and general lighting and colour temperatures.   – For us the most valuable thing is to be able to sit in our shop, talk to the customer and together try out what kind of lighting they prefer in very easy way. We can get a feeling for what our customers like and the process of coming to a great result is much easier, Anders continues.   Visitors at the Fagerhult premises are very varying. Customers from all over the world come to see the premises. From architects, designers, lighting designers to retailers and installers. There is also a large interest from students to come and increase their

knowledge about light. Art-schools, lighting educations and visual merchandisers frequently visit Bollebygd and leave with more knowledge about how light effect us, motivated to learn even more. A constant development of the showroom is a necessity and makes it interesting for customers to come back for more inspiration.

Anders Strömberg,

See the realisation of Twenty Ounce Denim on the next page.

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Ideas...

Rendering of the social area and dressing room in the shop.

The wall area.

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A variety of ways to illuminate a retail wall is showcased at the new showroom.

...come to life.

The social area in the store becomes a place for creative meetings.

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Come visit! Collect new ideas and knowledge in a unique light experience center. Welcome to our showroom in Bollebygd, Sweden. Go to fagerhult.com to find out how to book a visit.

visit showroom

get a preview


retail main office: Fagerhult Retail AB, Rinnav채gen 12, SE 517 33, Bollebygd, Sweden, Phone: +46 33 722 15 00, www.fagerhult.com/retail


www.fagerhult.com

The Innovator #4  

An inspiring customer magazine that let the reader in on the latest retail and lighting trends.

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