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no. 3 2013 creative perspectives on indoor lighting solutions

creativity in focus

CATCHING FIRE Fagerhult and Ingegerd R책man making magic

CREATIVE LIGHTING: DESIGNERS AND ARCHITECTS THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX

INTERVIEW:

Light, colour and creativity according to Karl Ryberg

Future office Petteri Kolinen about ABO THE BLUE PLANET ART IN THE ARCHIPELAGO LIGHT PLANNING + INSPIRATION


Inspiration, light and creativity dear reader, we see you as a creative person who is very passionate about innovative lighting solutions. So are we at Fagerhult! That’s why we have dedicated this issue of the Innovator Magazine to the creative people who truly innovate and inspire others.

Read about the amazing Blue Planet with its

organic, curved lines, beautifully enhanced by the lighting. The psychologist Karl Rydberg explains how colours influence the human brain, Henrik Clausen guides us through the six emotions of lighting design, and Charlotta Mellander shows how companies can prepare for a new dynamic generation in an article about the Creative Class. We have also filled the magazine with inspiration and ideas from lighting designer Robert Jan Vos, design engineer Andreas Gustavsson, light advisor Jeannett Kristjánsson, industrial designer Christian Andresen, designer and artist Ingegerd Råman and the creative light artist Jason Bruges.

Lighting technology is developing rapidly,

creating exciting opportunities for light planning. We have therefore included an article with examples from Fagerhult’s broad range, which offer opportunities for new, unique expressions.

I’m also delighted to announce the launch of

Fagerhult’s Creative Lab™, which has been designed to inspire and support you in your creative work. The Creative Lab™ covers the creative process, examples of designing and lighting rooms for creativity, innovative products, inspiring projects and updates on trends and research.

Happy reading!

Elisabeth Back

Head of Products and Brands – Fagerhult

publisher:

Fagerhult Belysning AB Åvägen 1, SE 566 80, Habo, Sweden Phone: +46 36 10 85 00 www.fagerhult.com

editorial team:

Klas Andersson, klas.andersson@fagerhult.se Cindy Hoetmer, cindy.hoetmer@fagerhult.nl Scott Allen, scott.allen@fagerhult.co.uk Henrik Clausen, henrik.clausen@fagerhult.dk

graphic design:

Simon Ackeby, simon.ackeby@fagerhult.se

cover photo:

Jesper Anhede


Spira – Catching fire.

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In this issue NO. 3, 2013

No compromise – The Blue Planet Northern Europe's largest aquarium

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Jason Bruges – Creative light-artist Light as a primary source of expression

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Light and colour are software for the brain Karl Ryberg about colours and creativity

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Light planning with opal surfaces Unlimited possibilities with LED

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Centre of Psychiatry; Creative colourwork A happy place made of colour and light

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Catching fire A collaboration with Ingegerd Råman

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Labelling the light The six emotions of lighting design

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Light increases creativity The importance of ambient light

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The Creative Class is here to change the game Prepare to be open-minded

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Creative lighting without limits Exciting references of light

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A B O. The three letters of the future workplace New and flexible ways of working

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Visiting Copenhagen and PLDC? Welcome to the Fagerhult Creative Lab™!

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Creative Collaborations How the tales of lighting come true

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Light and art in the Artipelag An unique piece of architecture

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Electric Light – The fairy of art Electric light as art

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the innovator


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Photo: Adam Mørk – 3XN

No compromise – The Blue Planet

The Blue Planet is the largest aquarium in northern Europe, with more than 20 000 animals living in 7 million litres of water. From the outside, it’s all about organic, curved lines beautifully enhanced by the lighting. The lights attract the visitors, leading them through the vast parking space surrounding the sphere. It's a conspicuous landmark, effective but still carefully lit up not to conflict with the nearby airport. original text helle hartmann nielsen | photo tom jersø and adam mørk | published in the magazine “byggeri & arkitektur” #51

when the blue planet in Kastrup, north of Copenhagen, was projected lighting was integrated as a central element of the architecture. The impressively lit exterior was created in a collaboration between lighting designer Jesper Kongshaug and Fagerhult. The aim was to use innovative lighting technology and turn it into an artform – with exceptional functionality. close collaboration Fagerhult’s lighting consultant Jeannett Kristjánsson tells the story of this intriguing project: ”It’s been a fantastic experience to work with this beautiful and demanding prestigious development. It’s been a long but exciting process and I’ve found the collaboration with Jesper Kongshaug Architectural Lighting most inspiring. The lighting plays an important role inside and outside the aquarium, an

no compromise – the blue planet

essential element in forming the overall impression and for the visitor’s experience – it sends a clear signal to the surroundings. But it also plays an important part in the building’s functionality and facilitates every day work.” swirling geometry The 600 parking lots are illuminated by 3,5 metre high Column bollards from Italian brand SIMES, whose products Fagerhult represent in the Nordic countries. ”Bollards usually have the height of one metre. Here, to avoid glare, we have been forced to think differently. We didn’t want the masts to draw attention from the building. We have also provided a range of low bollards at knee height to the outdoor area. Along the access ramp to the main entrance, we have used built-in lighting fixtures in the low concrete walls”, continues Jeannett Kristjánsson.

”Finally, we have delivered lighting solutions to the four pylons that shower the Blue Planet in light during night time. It’s a special combination of blue and white light that enlightens the charismatic architecture and swirling geometry; creating an illusion of flowing water in blue and white. Without causing glare or being overwhelming. Here, we have used 400 watt metal halides and LED spotlights; 'Focus' also from SIMES.” advanced tools The entire exterior lighting was grounded in the lighting designer's creative vision. The solutions have been carefully evaluated in advance, in collaboration with Fagerhult – using powerful 3D visualization. For less complex projects it might sometimes be enough to make a simple light calculation, product selection and implementation”, explains Jeannett.


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Photos on this page by Tom Jersø.

no compromise – the blue planet


x6 ”The Blue Planet” demanded very advanced tools, as we wanted to experiment with different ways to match the lighting designers desires and thoughts. We also needed these tools to come up with a solution that met the functional requirements and that did not bother the air traffic in the area or create light pollution in general.” architectural lighting Good teamwork was required, within Fagerhult as well as with the lighting designer. Jesper Kongshaug has been deeply involved in the process, from planning to implementation. ”Indoors, Fagerhult supplied 'Ray', a luminaire in a customised design which is integrated into the beautiful lamella ceiling from Tripplex. In the corridors we have used downlight fixtures from our Pleiad series. The luminaires are invisible until the moment they are switched on.” Jesper Kongshaug is focusing on architectural lighting, and in addition to the outdoor lighting design he created a variety of solutions and light experi-

Photos on this spread by Adam Mørk – 3XN.

no compromise – the blue planet

ences inside the aquarium: ”The developer and the architect made it clear from the start; this project was not to be visually compromised in any way”, he underlines. ”It has been a rewarding assignment and also one of my longest – stretching over four years. The developer prioritised costs in the lighting solution but without compromising on the way it combines sustainability with energy saving, functionality and expression. For example, in the middle of the process we realised just how expensive good quality lighting LED-fixtures are – they didn’t even exist when the project started. Anyway, the developer assigned the funds. The outdoor areas and the character of the building made it imperative for me to find non-glare luminaires. They should also be able to withstand the prevailing weather conditions and the salty sea air. My lighting design for the facade is dedicated to shield off and to cut off the angles so that the curved shape and

the whole dynamic of the architecture and the materials are highlighted and balanced. In this process it has been a pleasure to work with Fagerhult. It has added a lot of value and has improved the quality of both the process and outcome. It was a great help to be able to use their simulations and visualisations of my thoughts to the outdoor lighting. Actually, the outdoor lighting is planned in three different layers, following the different needs over a day.” indoor solutions Indoor, Jesper Kongshaug created several exciting and dynamic light-oriented solutions. For instance, immediately after coming into the building you get the feeling of being deep under water. In the area of the puffin-experience a daylight scenario has been created which actually makes you believe that you are looking out over the Faroese mountains. Several sites are also using short films and lighting illusions on walls and floors.


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no compromise – the blue planet


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light and colour are software for the brain


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Light and colour are software for the brain Throughout time, all life forms on our planet have had a strong relationship with light. From single-celled organisms, to algae in ancient seas drawn to sunlight at the surface, through millions of years of evolution and now we ourselves still crave light and colour in our everyday lives. ”Our hormonal and emotional cycles are closely linked to the qualities of the ambient light. Creativity in a world without colours would be unthinkable,” says psychologist Karl Ryberg. text amelie bergman | photo jesper anhede

having initially trained as an architect in the 1970's Karl became disillusioned with, as he describes, the dehumanized military architecture of the time and turned to psychology, becoming one of the pioneers in light and colour therapy. ”Actually, it did cause some hullabaloo. At this time psychology knew little, if nothing, about light and its impact on the human psyche. Academia didn’t show any real interest in the subject until Norman Rosenthal discovered seasonal affective disorder (SAD) in the mid-80’s”, Karl explains. a breakthrough for science White light treatments were developed to address the issues of SAD, with mixed affects. ”It worked, but it was also pretty ineffective. For a successful treatment, the patient had to spend two hours in the treatment room, daily, for two weeks. And let’s be honest – who’s got

the time or money for that?” The biological correlations between light and wellbeing alluded scientist up until 2002 when researchers at Brown University discovered a “third receptor” on the retina. The existence of two receptors, rods and cones, was already in the scientific consciousness. The rods are sensitive to light, perceiving the intensity but not colour, while the cones have the ability to see different wavelengths of light and code them as colours. Working in combinations they allow us to define shapes and colours and see light. What they can’t do, however, is communicate to the part of the brain that controls our “biological clock”. This is the reason why the light treatments were so time consuming. ”The third receptor changed the parameters of our understanding. It consists of ancient cells, known as ganglions. These are extremely sensitive to blue coloured light, and are directly

Creativity according to Karl Ryberg ”The Latin definition! Ability to create.” Karl Ryberg is an architect, author and psychologist. He will be present at PLDC and talk about his research "Ergonomic light to alleviate dyslexia".

light and colour are software for the brain


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”The human brain is a super computer, a highly competent hardware demanding advanced software. It needs colour and light for stimulation and nutrition, otherwise it gets bored.” Karl Ryberg, Author, Architect & Psychologist

connected to the brains production of the sleep hormone melatonin.” relief for reptiles The ganglion cells stem from the time when we were still algae in the seas.   ”When the crisp, blue light hit, we instinctively knew it was daytime and rose to the surface to indulge in sunlight and nutrition. As the light faded, turning into a red hue, we knew night was coming and retreated.” These cells have been preserved on the human retina, giving an instant response to what Karl Ryberg refers to as monochrome super colours. ”These are the kind of intense colours that you can see in a rainbow, in the feathers of a peacock or the shell of a scarab. It’s like an instant flash of pure light and colour, and it has a deep effect on the human psyche. Our reptile brains are extremely sensitive to this kind of light. A 15 minute treatment with monochrome blue light has the same effect as two weeks of white light therapy”, says Karl who today is using

light and colour are software for the brain

these supercolours to treat conditions including psychosomatic illnesses and jetlag. In addition to his business Monocrom, he is also a founding member of the International Light Association and has a close cooperation with the Professional Lighting Design Association. junk food for the brain This kind of light and colour treatment is strictly therapeutic and not applicable to our daily office-lives. However, high quality artificial light can improve working environments and affect our alertness and well being in a positive way. ”It is like food. If you feed the system with rubbish, you don’t get much energy out of it. Actually, it is kind of stupefying, says Karl. ”When you’re approaching someone behind their office desk, he’s there in the flesh. But when he looks up to answer you, you can tell that no one’s home.” Lighting ergonomics are as neglected now, as ergonomics were in the 50’s.

Today an ergonomist will make sure that your working chair is adjusted in an angle to fit your personal preferences. But no one seems to reflect over the fact that every individual reacts different to light and colour. ”It’s not rocket science! Install high quality artificial lighting in the office and supplement it with desk lights that can be individually adjusted. It’s common sense!” Of course, the industrial imitation of white light is only a pale imitation of natural light. Or, as Karl Ryberg puts it; ”You can’t hang a star in the ceiling”. Another way of improving working environments is to re-introduce some colours in public interiors. Neutral, white walls may be stylish and suit all, buts it's junk food for the brain. ”The human brain is a super computer, a highly competent hardware demanding advanced software. It needs colour and light for stimulation and nutrition, otherwise it gets bored.”


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Karl in his light dome. By remote control he can slide through the rainbow sequence and choose any desired wavelength. The combinations are virtually endless.

light and colour are software for the brain


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The indoor atrium, showing the richness and variation in colour. The absence of a system contributes to a truly varied experience. Office lighting, Avion from Fagerhult and sound absorbing screens based on artist Lisa Gerdins artwork ”Air Brick”.

Centre of Psychiatry; Creative colourwork Do you associate psychiatric care with clean, white walls? When entering The Centre of Psychiatry in Uppsala you will be in for a surprise. A dynamic experience made of colour and light, green, purple, turquoise and orange, makes this house a happy place. text amelie bergman | photo jason strong

the centre of psychiatry is a unique project built with the ambition of creating Europe’s most advanced psychiatric centres, combining outpatient and inpa-

centre of psychiatry; creative colourwork

tient care under one roof. Located within the Uppsala’s Academic Hospital Campus in Sweden, it hosts 1,100 patients and 500 employees. The interior design

is created by Indicum Architects, who were responsible for wards, administration and offices.   ”In psychiatry, the environmental


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experience is absolutely crucial. There’s a close connection between colour and human wellbeing. Aesthetics and ergonomics are two sides of the same coin. In the centre, some environments are supposed to be stimulating, while others should have a calming effect on the patients. Our overall goal has been to create a varied and harmonious environment based on colour”, explains Kristin Östberg, architect and partner at Indicum.   Comprising of almost 33,000 square meters, it’s a sizeable project, equipped with a large number of surfaces in white, black and glass pared down with a grey floor. ”We immediately felt that we wanted to create intimacy and add some variation to the experience. Our starting point was a vivid green colour that had already been prescribed in the project

– probably inspired by the leafy greens outside the windows.” Kristin and her colleagues decided to add four more colours: another green in a fresh pea pod hue, purple, turquoise and orange. The colours were chosen for their playful, yet stylish appearance, a mature colour palette that underlined the seriousness of the premises. ”Then we went all in! All rooms are furnished in one of these four colours – in every detail. We’ve tried to maximize the colour experience. If a room is green you will find this hue on everything from curtains to carpets, cushions and chairs.” To avoid monotony, the room colours are mixed independently over several floors and functions. Walking through the premises you cannot anticipate what colour is coming up next. ”We have no system according to

Creativity according to Kristin Östberg ”To me it's all about the ability to think innovative. To see the connections that aren't obvious at the first glance.”

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Two variations of the open space offices – a green office and an orange office.

floor plans, quarters or cardinals. We’ve strived for a truly varied experience.” Light plays an important part in all interiors, Kristin stresses, especially when working with bold colours. Natural light, flooding from the generous glass sections, is supplemented by artificial light with good colour rendering. In open plan offices, the colour scheme is taken to a new level. The idea is to give employees working in, for example, a green office the experience of variation within the green colour range. The architects also included carpets and furniture

centre of psychiatry; creative colourwork

in some of the other contrasting colours. Inspired by one of the art works in the building, ”Air Brick” created by Lisa Gerdin, Indicum translated the pattern to sound absorbing screens. The screens are produced in three different shades of each colour accent – all in all 12 variations. ”A ‘green office’ has screens in three green shades. This adds a sparkle of personality to the open plan office. As an employee you can easily find ‘your’ screen and you never feel that the whole office is cast in the same mould.”


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labelling the light

Fagerhult luminaires Tibi, Clarico and Notor.


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”So please, let yourself be inspired by Fagerhult’s 'light labels' and set the emotions free in your next lighting dialogue!” Henrik Clausen, Director at the Fagerhult Lighting Academy.

Labelling the light The six emotions of lighting design Communication is vital when creating innovative and functional lighting design. When things go wrong it is normally caused by misunderstandings. text amelie bergman | images fagerhult

”Professionals love to talk lumen, louvres and candela… To most people our lighting language is mumbo jumbo – they simply just can’t relate to the jargon”, says Henrik Clausen, director at the Fagerhult Lighting Academy. ”Architects, interior designers, property owners and users prefer to translate their visions and needs into emotions. Using different feelings and experiences as a starting point in a lighting project is the secret of success.” To help facilitate communications across all stakeholders, Henrik Clausen and the Fagerhult Lighting Academy have designed a creative lighting manual based on six different emotions. ”It’s common sense. When visiting a lawyer’s office, you have certain

expectations. It should express power and expertise. At the funeral home, on the other side, the expression has to be more compassionate, more private but still serious.” At the Fagerhult Lighting Academy, the six lighting emotions are used to define different projects. ”Of course, the stakeholders seldom communicate only one emotion. A creative lighting design is often a mix of several emotions. They’re a way of improving communication – by labelling the light. But it’s not the law…”, Henrik Clausen emphasises. So let yourself be inspired by Fagerhult’s ”light labels” and set the emotions free in your next lighting dialogue!

Creativity according to Henrik Clausen "Creativity is the phenomenon whereby something new is created which has some kind of subjective value such as a painting, a musical composition or a lighting design. It is the qualitative impulse behind any given act of creation, and it is generally perceived to be associated with intelligence and cognition."

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festive Welcome to the carnival! This type of lighting design brings out your inner child as it sprinkles your world with bright colour and an abundance of bright lights. The emotion is created by countless small, bright light sources forming a starry sky. Contrasts and shadows are sharp, and the light is almost blinding. This festive vibe is designated for every carefree environment, radiating joy, confidence and wealth. Shopping, anyone?

calm It’s like entering a cathedral. A heavenly light is hovering, reminiscent of a slightly overcast sky. Natural light, flooding from the windows is supplemented by heavy chandeliers. This emotion is created by large lit, pendant opal surfaces. The setting is less dynamic, more serene and almost devoid of shadows. Be careful to create variety and be generous with the light on the walls. Otherwise you might be bored or, even worse, fall asleep…

formal After the CT scan you are invited to the doctor’s office. It’s a personal conversation but not to private. Pendant lighting underline the professional situation without being too harsh. A well-thought combination of cool light temperatures and shadows keeps you alert through­ out the conversation. When visiting the lawyer’s office expect the contrasts to be even sharper, with higher angles and cooler light levels to emphasise power and purposefulness.

labelling the light


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private You wanna marry me? The candle lit dinner is not far away. This setting is characterised by warm, pendant lighting. Good colour rendering is important with light sources close to ones face. This is a private moment that opens up for dialogue – perfect for restaurants and cafés. For meetings that are still private, but of a more formal nature – for example at the funeral home or in a small chapel– try mixing ”Private” with ”Formal”.

public This is the most mainstream lighting environment of them all. Designed to suit anyone and anything in any situation. Direct lighting, recessed downlights or surface mounted opal luminaires are common, often with light temperatures around 4000 K. Safe and spotless but also a bit impersonal and, to be honest, dull. Make sure you work with indirect lighting and vertical light on walls. By modelling the room with light you get a more interesting environment, and it’s easier to recognise and read the faces of the people you meet.

effective No time for chitchat! To support efficiency and production focus in offices and production facilities, lighting should be efficient as well. High lighting levels combined with cool light temperatures, stimulates human alertness. But please keep in mind that the most effective and attractive lit environments are created with a splash of vertical light. Only a light shower from above just won’t do! Actually it’s quite easy to fix this kind of light with the help of ordinary fittings. Just add an extra row of luminaires to your planning and put the luminaires a bit tighter together – and closer to the wall. By choosing energy efficient ones, the improved working environment won’t cost you at all.

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Prepare to be open-minded

The Creative Class is here to change the game For the first time in human history, more people are living in cities than in rural areas. We are travelling the world, learning more about foreign cultures, broadening our horizons and raising our standards. The people of the 21st century are enlightened Renaissance men. How does this affect society and our way of life and work? And how can companies prepare for a new, dynamic generation? One of those with a firm hold on the crystal ball is Charlotta Mellander. text amelie bergman | photo anna hållams

charlotta mellander is a professor in Economics at Jönköping International Business School, Sweden, and research director at the Prosperity Institute of Scandinavia. Internationally renowned for her research on regional attractiveness, Charlotta is a close collaborator with Professor Richard Florida at the Martin Prosperity Institute in Toronto, Canada, embracing his concept of the “Creative Class”. a new class is born Richard Florida’s theory of the Creative Class asserts that metropolitan regions with high concentrations of creative workers, exhibit a higher level of economic development.

the creative class

”We’re not talking ‘artists’ in the traditional way. The Creative Class is the increasing group of people being paid to think creatively at work”, explains Charlotta Mellander. How do we measure human capital? The concept of the Creative Class is one possible response to that question. ”A traditional way is to compare the proportion of workforce with higher education. But this system only tells us what we know – nothing about what we do. Richard Florida’s Creative Class is a system to define how we use knowledge and creativity to create growth and prosperity. The profession is more important than what we’ve studied. “ According to Richard Florida, the

Creative Class fosters dynamic urban environments that attract other creative competences, businesses and capital. It’s like a positive upward spiral. Individuals and surroundings reinforce one another. ”But bear in mind, the Creative Class is not the only important group, though regions and companies are likely to have a stronger development if they have access to this kind of people”, Charlotta Mellander points out. geography matters In return for its innovativeness, the creative class demands flexibility and open-mindedness. ”A high salary is no longer a certain


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way to attract new expertise. As a company you have to offer an attractive habitat and a flexible way of working. Companies have to be more conscious about geography as people won’t settle down anywhere. In history, labour willingly followed the companies to find jobs, today the wheel has changed direction.” Fixed working hours are an abomination. The Creative Class wants flexibility. As reward the employees get even more work done, in a more effective way. Also, the traditional office is passé. Due to our new way of life and working, and because of new technology, work can be done everywhere. ”Of course, manufacturing has to be

made in a factory, but certain operations – for example design departments – are expected to live their own satellite lives. Often in collaboration between several different companies.” The employers’ willingness and ability to listen to their co-workers are crucial to their ability to retain the workforce. But we can still expect people to change jobs more frequently, says Charlotta Mellander: ”This is not necessarily bad news for companies, as they benefit from the exchange of creativity and ideas.”

Creativity according to Charlotta Mellander ”To me, the word creativity is synonymous with the ability to use knowledge in a new innovative way.”

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A B O. The three letters of the future workplace Times they are a changing. Generation Y, or the Millennials, are characterised as technological savvy and digitally dependent. They are also one of the fastest growing sectors in the employment market. So how will this demographic influence the way we work and office design? Petteri Kolinen, design director at furniture company Martela, put’s down his smartphone to give us some insight. text amelie bergman | photo martela

Creativity according to Petteri Kolinen "The core of creativity is the ability to "think out of the box". To challenge traditional models and thinking. It’s about not taking anything for granted... it can sometimes to be a bit annoying when everything is challenged. The outcome of creativity is often new thinking, ideas and new design language."

a b o. the three letters of the future workplace

who are generation y? ”Generation Y, born 1980–1995, will enter the working life in big scale. These 'webnatives' will change corporate cultures as they start to reach the leading positions in companies. Their values have already started to influence the working life, being more liberal, social and responsible than the previous Generation X. Eventually the traditional tools will change into new ones. E-mail disappears and is replaced by instant communication tools. Working environments will be tailored for different kind of socialising, communication and creative needs.” what are the technological trends? ”A new way of working will speed up during the coming few years. With good coverage of WiFi networks, employees are even freer to choose their working environment. The merging 4G-network will make the working culture dispatched from location. As the mobile connections improve, all documents and material will finally move to the Cloud. There will no longer be any need to go to the office for a fast connection or to collect documents from drives. The next steps of the ABO will emerge.”

what does this mean for office design right now? ”WiFi networks, wireless broadband and cloud service have already started to make work independent of time and place. This means that the role of the traditional office is changing radically. The office environment has to fulfil the needs of the new working life and the solution is called the Activity Based Office – ABO. The ABO is user driven, and the layout is based on user needs, not on the organisational chart. When employees are travelling extensively, working from subsidiaries, hotels or from home, workstations need to be flexible. The same rules apply for people that actually do work in the office. A lot of time nowadays is spent in meetings, in conference rooms or in other situations that don’t actually involve an office desk. Therefore, the ABO includes very few 'owned' working tables. When giving up their own table, people get multiple options in return. By smart planning, the office space can be used in a creative way to fulfil the user’s need in a flexible manner. This includes a combination of open space working areas with working desks, 'quiet


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�New, more flexible ways of working will appear. The working environment has to be inspiring for up to four generations at the same time.� Petteri Kolinen, Design Director Products & Communication at Martela

a b o. the three letters of the future workplace


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rooms' for tasks with high demands on concentration, as well as rooms for meetings, conference and socialising. At Martela we work the Activity Based Office in three different zones; public, semi public and private. Actually, we’ve walked the talk by planning our own head quarters in Helsinki this way – and people love it!” who benefits from the abo? ”It is really a user driven phenomenon that inspires to a more creative working environment, that supports different tasks. But one shouldn’t underestimate the benefits for the companies. The ABO offers space efficient planning, giving the opportunity to save a lot of money

on valuable office space. Used in the right way, the ABO also strengthens the company brand and helps to attract new co-workers.” how do designers meet this challenge? ”At Martela, we have chosen to work with a holistic perspective, including more than just office furniture. We are offering 'Inspiring Spaces'. It is vital to think about the complete space experience; the lighting, sounds, physical ergonomics and the inspirational factors of the space. In the future we can expect hybrids of different furniture and functions. Office desks that are integrated with computer networks

and lighting for one example. Just think about the smart phone; it is the perfect hybrid of a telephone, a camera and a computer. For a designer it is very inspiring to imagine the new possibilities this type of new phenomena brings. Personally, I also find it inspiring that the user needs play such an important role.”

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Creative Collaborations – making the tales of lighting come true Lighting is the most complex of expressions. Every successful lighting project has a saga of it’s own, telling the tale of a special experience. It is a play with light, intensity and colour. All means are permitted but some are not to be neglected; human aspects like ergonomics and wellbeing, energy efficiency and environmental impact. In this, all stakeholders in a project have a creative, social and environmental responsibility. But where does it all start? What comes first? The chicken or the egg? And does it really matter? Meet four creative lighting collaborators; the architect & luminaire designer, the design engineer, the lighting designer and the customer lighting advisor.

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The Industrial Designer:

Christian Andresen Henning Larsen Architects is a “Great Dane”; a high-profile architectural firm with 210 co-workers and still growing. The company has its head office in Copenhagen, of course, and satellites in Oslo, Munich, Istanbul and Riyadh. One of Henning Larsens most exciting projects right now is the European Spallation Source, ESS, a new research centre with a full scale neutron source, to be completed in Lund in 2025. Christian Andresen has worked as an industrial designer for 25 years, the last 7 of them as design department team leader at Henning Larsen Architects. He’s also behind the design of Fagerhult’s new, innovative recessed LED-luminaire Clarico. text amelie bergman | photo henning larsen

an architect office with a design studio? ”It’s part of the Danish design heritage. Danish architects are well known for their holistic approach. When working on a project, they want everything to

communicate; furniture, door handles and lighting. Arne Jacobsen is perhaps the most famous of them all. It’s become almost the norm for Danish Architectural Firms to have industrial design in house competence and at

Henning Larsen we embrace that tradition. At the design department in Copenhagen we are 6 designers, working as a team.”

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”Clarico is anything but square. It’s soft, yet expressive. Our ambition was to create a congenial luminaire that harmonises with different lighting cultures.” Christian Andresen, Industrial Designer

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is the co-operation with fagerhult a bit different? ”Usually we design products to be integrated in an architectural project, in collaboration with different producers. This time, we designed the Clarico luminaire especially for Fagerhult, as they wanted a new take on a recessed LEDluminaires. We have a lot of experience working with Fagerhult on different projects and somewhere along the way, the idea of creating a concept luminaire was born. Actually, Clarico is a mutual attempt to achieve the impossible.” the impossible? ”Yes. The recessed luminaire of our dreams was slim, thin with an interesting form; energy efficient and with an excellent lighting quality. To create this dream we had to design a luminaire distributing light in several angles; direct on the floor, vertical on the walls and indirect in the ceiling. Really, with a recessed luminaire, that’s impossible. But we came pretty close!” what’s the trick? ”Most recessed 600⊗600 LED luminaires look the same. Square and flat, with opal surfaces. Clarico does not align with the ceiling; it actually drops down, but it’s almost invisible to the eye. By playing with horizontal and vertical lines, as emphasised by the element in the centre of the luminaire, we’ve been able to distribute light in different directions. Clarico even gives a small amount of light to the ceiling.”

how would you describe the creative process? ”It’s a great advantage to work in the creative environment of an architectural agency. We started out interviewing our colleagues to find out what they need and want from this kind of luminaire. We also had a dialogue with Fagerhult’s brand and development organization and the company’s sales staff. The co-operation with Fagerhults design department and product manager Lars Eriksson has been intense. Ideas, sketches and proposals were discussed. To me, the creative process is all about the dialogue, and industrial design is teamwork. I remember exactly the moment when the project transformed into something unique. We got the idea to combine the opal surfaces with microprism louvres. That’s when the Fagerhult technicians got really excited!” it’s a unique combination of materials? ”In this kind of luminaire. We’ve put microprisms on the horizontal surfaces while the vertical surfaces are opal. As the microprisms works the light in an angle of 65°, we achieve a very pleasant lighting experience, while still taking advantage of the efficient LED-technology.”

difference in expression. When asking people, 50 percent prefer one version and the other 50 percent prefer the other one. First, we had this crazy idea to make the louvre reversible. It turned out to be impossible, as it would totally mess up the way light refracts in the microprisms. So we decided to put both versions into production.” would you combine them? ”In a project, yes. For example, I would switch between the versions in different parts of the building.” what’s your favourite clarico-feature? ”The softness. The way that it is overstepping all kind of squareness that is normally associated with this kind of luminaire. Squares and sharp angles easily remind us of parking decks and endless, underground corridors. Clarico has a gentle, human touch. It has a strong character without being overwhelming or competing with architecture. The way it distributes light on vertical surfaces is also important as it really affects the quality of work and wellbeing. The public discussion on lighting quality in schools, offices and health has just begun. We see a lot of opportunities to use Clarico in our own projects.”

there are two to choose between? ”Clarico comes in two versions – one convex and one concave. The lighting quality is the same, but there’s a slight

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The Design Engineer:

Andreas Gustavsson There are always ideas buzzing around in his head. It’s for better or worse, says Andreas Gustavsson, as he’s unable to let an idea go before he’s evaluated it from every angle. Trial and error is his game; ”you can’t always play safe if you want to get forward”. With this approach he’s a perfect match for Fagerhult’s innovation team, a group of designers, engineers and lighting specialists working together to find those seminal solutions that no one’s thought of before. text amelie bergman | photo marie peterson

is it all about finding the right one? ”Yes, in a way. All innovations, big or small, are one step closer to an even better luminaire. It’s a combination of the right function, the right quality and the right price. And it can be done in so many ways. For example; by designing a thinner plate for a louvre, you can create new advantages; better light distribution and energy efficiency and less material has a positive impact on the environment and the customer’s economy. Whatever we do it all comes down to this – giving the customer the perfect solution at a perfect price.” how do you feed your creativity? ”I find inspiration anywhere. Mostly, I’m fascinated by smart solutions from product fields outside of lighting.

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When I see something interesting, I immediately start to ponder how it can be applied to a lighting fixture. The installation spring on the Pleiad G3, our LED-downlight range, is one example. It started with a slap wrap reflex – you know, the ones that attach automatically round the arm when you snap them? I dissected one of them a few years ago, and when the Pleiad G3 range came up on the table, I knew it was time to try the idea. It took a lot of work and stubbornness to make the construction work, but I never gave up – I knew it had potential. The result is an extremely fast – and safe installation. The spring is flexible enough to put itself in place with easiness and can be used in all ceilings with a thickness up to 50 mms. Still its strong enough to hold

the fixture firmly in the ceiling. Once installed, it never falls down. The design is developed in collaboration with two of our subcontractors; Zinkteknik and Lesjöfors.” collaboration with subcontractors? ”In a business where development of technology moves with the speed of light, you need to be flexible. The light source of today might quickly become the light source of yesterday. To keep in touch with, and to develop solutions together with our subcontractors, is one of our most important responsibilities. Developing projects with LED-producers, for example, is crucial to keep one step ahead in our ambition to offer our customers the best and most effective lighting solutions.”


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”It started with those reflex slap wraps – the ones that attach automatically round the arm when you snap them.” Andreas Gustavsson, Design Engineer

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�Imagination is 10 %. The rest? Communication!� Robert Jan Vos, Lighting Designer, PLDA

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The Lighting Designer:

Robert Jan Vos

Dutch lighting designer Robert Jan Vos has dedicated his career to light and lighting design. 27 years ago, he started off as an electrical engineer, working with light installations, moving into TV where he created light settings for different shows, following stints at Erco and an independent consultancy, his journey was completed four years ago when he opened his own venture. text amelie bergman | photo private

he’s one of the brightest stars on the Dutch concept market, responsible for the lighting at the restored Hermitage in Amsterdam – in cooperation with concept lighting designer Hans Wolff – and one of the contracted lighting designers at The Jewish Historical Museum. He has also developed energy efficient lighting guidelines for the public railroads: ProRail. Robert has taken this spirit of collaboration to Fagerhult, where he is training the team in Holland in the craft of creative light planning. For the moment, Robert is collaborating with Fagerhult Holland, training the co-workers in creative light planning. collaboration with a manufacturer? ”If Fagerhult’s co-workers understand the thoughts of a lighting designer, they can do a better job supporting us in our work. If I understand the thoughts of an architect, I’m better equipped to help the architect fulfil their quest. If everyone involved in a project has some insight into each other’s different roles, we can work together in our aim to create better lighting for people and societies that everyone will benefit from it. That’s a vision of mine. My mission is to help architects in realising their vision. Architects often have a holistic approach and a clear idea, but they seldom have the detailed technical knowledge when it comes to lighting. I like to be the interface between dreams and facts.”

the project process? ”Imagination comes first. You have to be able to imagine the visual results. Which story is to be told? What are the different needs in the lighting project? What kind of materials, textures and colours will be reflected? Finally, it´s all about the atmosphere: what are the visual effects of light colours, shadows, brightness and directions of the lighting? What will happen when the lights are switched on? Once you’ve imagined, you have to create it. That’s the second part, and maybe, the easiest. It’s mostly about technology – fixtures, light sources and lighting control. In a successful project you even manage to add some new values to the vision, before you are asked to.” what trends affects your work? ”Above all – sustainability. We’ve finally reached the point where it has become natural to make environmental sound decisions. Money is still pretty important, but it’s not the only important thing. And when it comes to lighting its quite obvious that energy efficient and sustainable solutions can save a lot of money. Another trend is the new way of working, the ‘Activity Based Office’. When people are working more ’out of the actual office’ than in it, we need to develop alternative solutions.” what do you need from the suppliers? ”They have to offer well-designed and

functional luminaires and have an innovative and open mindset. In situations where a project turns into a dead end, a direct collaboration between the lighting designer and a manufacturer is the solution. Together we can create new, ground breaking lighting.” what is creative lighting to you? ”Creative lighting is illusion, you have to be aware that the human brain can be fooled and, sometimes, use it to your advantage. Creative lighting is knowledge, for example you need to know how indirect lighting creates a different atmosphere from direct lighting. Creative lighting is dynamics: balancing what is happening and what is not happening in a room.” do you ever make compromises? ”I wouldn’t call it compromising. I have to sell my idea, it’s part of the game. If I don’t succeed, there is always the possibility to tune the concept or to present it in a different way. Money is often an issue in a project, but there are a lot of ways to work creatively with standard fixtures. Actually, 90 % of a lighting project is communication. You have to be able to explain what you want to do, to others in the process. New technology has made lighting very complex. We have countless alternatives and billions of details to navigate between. To do this, we need to have knowledge and experience – and we have to be able to communicate it.”

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The Customer Lighting Advisor:

Jeannett Kristjánsson As a customer lighting advisor at Fagerhult A/S in Denmark, Jeannett Kristjánsson is the bridge that unites the different parts of the project. Taking a holistic approach when developing solutions she has to speak the languages of architects, lighting designers, consultants, installers and developers. Call it lighting Esperanto if you like… text amelie bergman | photo private

what’s your role in the process? ”I’m on the customer’s side. My job is to focus entirely on the customer’s needs , problems and possibilities alike. I spend a large amount of time with customers, at their planning table or on site at different projects. I have to be responsive and solution orientated, there’s a big difference between customer’s needs depending on type of project and the customer’s assignment. I work with both lighting consultants and lighting designers. Sometimes the customer is calling just to ask a simple question, sometimes I’m requested to propose a complete lighting solution for a project.”

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the most common questions? ”Most consultants have to think a lot about standards and lux. I can help them to meet the standard requirements, but also to focus on the lighting experience, and to think more creatively. It’s important to have a holistic approach – ergonomics, energy efficiency and human wellbeing should be considered in every solution. Visualisations in DIALux and different calculations are excellent tools in this work.” the most creative part of your job? ”Definitely the dialogue. No matter how complex the project, it’s great fun

working together towards the solution. Everything can be solved. But I also have a responsibility to share my knowledge with the customers, to help them think outside the box, so to say. If someone is working with a school or an office, for example , I will suggest they work with ambient light as a complement to direct lighting – as it’s proven to favour mood and performance. Fagerhults involvement in research gives me a lot in my job. It’s important to be able to explain why we do things in a certain way. That we’re working with facts and not just opinions.”


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”It’s important that we’re working with facts and not just opinions. Fagerhult’s research has a practical application in my daily work.” Jeannett Kristjánsson, Customer Lighting Advisor

Photo: Adam Mørk – 3XN

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N 59° 18´ 04", O 18° 20´ 07"

Light and art in the Artipelag You can take the bus, the car – or the boat. Artipelag is a new international venue for art, food, events and activities all beautifully set in the Stockholm Archipelago. Just 20 minutes away from the bustle of the city centre you’re embraced by the tranquillity and light of Swedish nature. text amelie bergman | photo charlie bennet

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the name artipelag is a combination of Art, Activities, and Archipelago. Inaugurated in 2012, Artipelag has quickly realised its ambition of becoming a destination of high international quality – with boundary-crossing art exhibits, inspiring activities and good food. Artipelag is a meeting place and a unique piece of architecture, created by the late Johan Nyrén. It combines many experiences, not least the art exhibitions under the direction of gallery manager Bo Nilsson. Artipelag also focuses on a high class cuisine, run by the chef and former coach of the Swedish national chef team, Fredrik Björlin. It has two restaurants and, of course, a shop. Here you can find posters and catalogues from the exhibitions and selected items like ceramics by Siri Seger. The shop also stocks unique design items from BabyBjörn.

Actually, the famous Swedish baby brand was the beginning of this enterprise. In 2002 Björn Jakobson, founder of BabyBjörn, came up with the idea of creating a beautiful building for art and cultural experiences in the Stockholm archipelago. After many profitable years in Swedish business he saw an opportunity to manifest his own deep interest in nature and to combine it with his wife Lillemor’s background in art and design. Artipelag is an archipelago of its own covering around 32,000 square feet of land which the Artbox – an enormous concert-, event, and studio hall – equates to 13,000 square feet. Extensive yet still intimate; architect Johan Nyrén has managed to design a building in harmony with its natural surroundings. Artipelag is dressed in bevelled pitchedpine planks, and carefully located between the pine trees and the cliffs with a magnificent view over Baggen’s Bay.

Enlightened by Fagerhult The general lighting solution within the Artipelag is provided by Notor, a slim, minimalist luminaire offering excellent efficiency and colour rendering. The fitting is available in recessed, surface or suspended variations, which can be easily interlinked to create long light lines without disruptions.

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One of the fundamental ideas was that as soon as a visitor came into the entrance hall, he or she would be met by the four elements: fire crackling in the fireplace; earth and the rock on which the building rests; the clear air and the sparkling water that surrounds and frames the site. Nature and natural light plays an important role in the architecture. The main gallery stretches 65 meters facing Baggen’s Bay and is supported by another four exhibition rooms, called ”The Johan Nyrén Rooms”. These rooms have a special archi-

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tecture with sensuously designed walls. They are located to the north, which ensures a beautiful natural light on the works exhibited. The premises meet the latest standards concerning climate, security and functionality when displaying art. The lighting solutions incorporate top-notch technology, flexible enough to support art exhibitions as well as events and recordings. The observation deck at the roof offers an extra treat at night, with an undisturbed view for stargazers as the artificial lighting is designed not to interfere with the stars.


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Electric Light – The fairy of art LED, traditional light bulbs, fluorescent tubes and neon… One of the first exhibitions at Artipelag was dedicated to electric light as an art form. ”Enlightened” included works by great names such as Joseph Beuys, Tracey Emin and Isamu Noguchi. text amelie bergman | photo jean-baptiste beranger

Dan Flavin "Monument For V. Tatlin No.11" 1964

Monica Bonvicini "Light me Black" 2009

enlightened was on display during the winter months 2012– 2013 – a sharp contrast to the Nordic winter darkness outside the Artipelag windows. ”Light has always played a central part in the history of art. As the traditional bulb is being replaced with more environmental friendly technologies, it felt adequate to pay attention to the artificial light”, says Frida Andersson, Assistant Curator at Artipelag who worked with the exhibition. "Enlightened" comprised selected artwork featuring electric light by some of the world’s most influential artists: Christian Andersson, Christian Boltanski, Joseph Beuys, Monica Bonvicini, Angela Bulloch, Tracey Emin, Spencer Finch, Dan Flavin, Sylvie Fleury, Felix González-Torres, Mona Hatoum, Jeppe Hein, Jenny Holzer, Joseph Kosuth, Annika Liljedahl, Bertrand Lavier, Mario Merz, Isamu Noguchi, Jason Rhoades and Dan Wolgers. One of the forerunners in light art was the Zero-group, active in the 1960’s. Enlightened also displayed works from three of it’s members – Otto Piene, Gunther Uecker och Hans Haacke. a visual voyage It was a visual and intellectual voyage through the art of the 1960s to the present, and an impressive display of various lighting techniques. LED, fluorescent tubes, neon and traditional light bulbs in one wonderful light fair – one example is Corona Borealis by Otto Piene, consisting of 400 bulbs. From a lighting design perspective; how do you hang an exhibition consis-

Otto Piene "Corona Borealis" 1965

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ting of so many different light sources with different colours and intensity? ”We shut off the artificial light. But we decided to keep the flow of natural light from the windows. The result was an exhibition transforming with daylight. A dark autumn night or a clear, crispy winter’s day – the experience was totally different”, Frida Andersson explains. lemon and light Lighting technology and artistic expressions have been under constant development since the 1960’s. ”Light as a medium is still highly interesting. The development within lighting technology is also reflected in arts as many artists embrace the LEDtechnology. One of them is Jenny Holzer, whose Lustmord, Erlauf, Arno, Blue from 1999 was included in the exhibition. It is a LED sign with scrolling text sequences. But it’s noteworthy that artists of today still choose bulbs and fluroescents, maybe for nostalgic reasons.” Frida’s own favourite is Joseph Beuys’ Capri Batterie. ”Talking actual size, this is the smallest work in the exhitibion: a yellow bulb on a socket, plugged into a lemon. Beuys created this during his recovery from pneumonia at Capri. It represents his ecological thinking and the utopian idea of an ecological society that’s able to take its energy directly from the sources of nature. It's a nice thought, and it is very up to date in times talking environmental responsibility and energy saving.”


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Bertrand Lavier "Black Adder II" 2005

Jason Rhoades "Chandelier #6 (Fancy Bit, Between, Amulett)" 2005

”We shut off the artificial light. But we decided to keep the flow of natural light from the windows. The result was an exhibition transforming with daylight.” Frida Andersson, Assistant Curator at Artipelag

Joseph Beuys "Capri Batterie" 1985

Tracy Emin "Legs II" 2007

Monica Bonvicini "Kleine Lichtkanone" 2009

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Jason Bruges: Creative light-artist From cinematography and photography, through to drawing and painting, light plays an integral part in many forms of art. Since the invention of electric light sources it has evolved into a medium in its own right, with artists using light as their primary source of expression. text scott allen | photo jason bruges studio

what happens when light art gets taken into a commercial context? London-based light artist and designer Jason Bruges takes us through the processes of how his studio collaborates to create interactive spaces which engage people with their environment. Bruges trained with the architect Foster + Partners before joining Imagination, the creative communications agency, and the two cultures merge in

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Jason Bruges Studio (JBS). Its projects can take from weeks to years to come to fruition. ”One thing that has frustrated me about architectural projects is waiting a very long time to see things happen but at Imagination it could be just two months,” he says. ”We have both types of project: big construction projects which we’re several years into and still have a few to go, and some that are just six weeks away”.

childs play When Great Ormond Street Hospital was looking for a way to calm and engage children on the way to the anaesthetic room, Bruges transformed the corridor walls into a digital, animated canvas. Sensor-driven LED light panels embedded into the wall surfaces behind bespoke wallpaper are set at various heights to match the different eye-levels of patients and passers-by.


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The animals move when people, big or small, are near. Called Nature Trail, the work is not just clever, but clever in a multidisciplinary way. First there’s the graphics. ”It was tricky to find something that would work with a two-year-old and a 16-year-old,” says Bruges. ”It had to be a cartoon-like animal but also a bit “gamey” with a slightly technological, Tamagotchi aspect to it rather than fluffy-Disney.” Then there’s the wallpaper, specially printed to match the resolution of the LED matrix, and peelable so that the LED panels can be accessed. And the electronics: a network of 70 panels containing a total of 72,000 low-powered, monochrome, amber LEDs that run cool so that heat does not build up inside the walls and which ramp down when no-one’s around, to save energy. ”Nature Trail was hard work,” says Bruges. ”In a hospital environment, there are stringent regulations around cleaning and sterilisation and dirt traps. They needed to know that the technology would have an appropriate lifespan and, above all, we had to be sure the design was not confusing, but was reassuring.” creative collaboration The design process at JBS is much the same as an architect’s – concept development, feasibility study, scheme design, detailed design, construction information and tendering – but teams span a greater range of skills. ”Somewhere like Foster + Partners

gives you an incredible training in the production of architecture and there is a lot of that in the way we work. It’s quite architectural in terms of how we are site-specific, and how things are specified and drawn,” says Bruges. ”Imagination was more theatrical and some of the rules were slightly different because you built things quickly, to different tolerances. And instead of working beside a mechanical and electrical engineer, a quantity surveyor or a structural engineer, you might be alongside a R&D specialist or a projections specialist or a graphic designer. ”We have teams and everyone is instrumental in making things happen; we are more of a collective primarily. Obviously, my vision and creative direction play a part in things but everyone is instrumental. There are some projects that I have more or less to do with depending on the individuals, the ideas and the amount of work we have.” Bruges cites the light artists Dan Flavin, James Turrell and Jim Campbell and the English architect Cedric Price among his chief influences. But he also draws on ”science, technology, innovation, computer science, interactive design, cybernetics, industrial systems, natural phenomena – everything from clouds to water to weather systems – systems in general, ways of organising things, classification (a very English way of organising things), basically all of those things,” and he contends that ”healthy curiosity means you won’t run out of ideas.”

Inspiration comes from many sources. Jason Bruges has taken his architectural training and  applied it to an array of art installations using light as the primary medium of  expressing a narrative.

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”We have teams and everyone is instrumental in making things happen; we are more of a collective primarily.” Jason Bruges, Light artist

interactive design Bruges designed Arial Dynamics, the ”living, breathing”, interactive light installation at Coca-Cola’s Beatbox pavilion in the Olympic Park in 2012 ”with a broom handle and handful of polypropylene strips.” His invention was introduced to the pop-drinking visitors as 180 individually controlled mechatronic ”bubbles” that glowed with brand-enhancing red and white

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LED light in response to bottle clinking. ”People often come to us because they know how we work: innovative, artistic, quite unusual in our response to things compared to where they might usually go for a spatial or brand expression,” says Bruges. ”But every project has a brief, even the most fluid artistic commissions.” Those are the best, he adds, ”because you are exploring something different, things you are interested in

and want to study and evaluate – the blankest canvas without any boundaries is the most challenging.” One of Bruge’s best-known interactive works is the deceptively simple installation at Sunderland station, in the north-east of England, known as Platform 5. A 144 m-long piece presents a virtual platform populated by ghostly passengers apparently moving behind a 3 m-tall glass block wall containing


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a low-resolution video matrix. There is a real but disused platform behind the virtual platform. And in London’s Leicester Square, the illuminated facade of the W Hotel responds to changes in the skyline recorded by rooftop cameras and translated into coloured light from LED battens that diffuse through fritted glass to create a an energy-efficient landmark/artwork. ”Interaction with the audience is very important and becomes part of the work, with Platform 5 we ramp up in response to the train, not the people. And in Leicester Square the building is performing to the people around it

but it responds to the day’s weather essentially.” story telling While they are all interactive and lightbased, what links Nature Trail, Platform 5 and the Leicester Square installation is narrative. Nature Trail magically and directly transforms each viewer’s short journey. The figures on Platform 5 are the forms of real local people. The Leicester Square installation speaks of continual change, of comings and goings. ”You want to tell a story, so the other way we work is very much as an art studio. When we are commissioned to

build something for someone and build it on site, it’s a labour of love and a piece of artistic expression. If there is a strong contextual, site-specific narrative a work stands a much better chance of having relevance, and the elegance and timelessness that goes with that,” he says. ”The technology you use may or may not still be fashionable but it is about design intent. Even with Dan Flavin, who is long gone and can’t be there to direct an installation, gallerists follow the design intent from sketches in the most truthful and representative way they can. It’s a way of working that is more about an idea and a narrative

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than technology. You avoid cliché if you are more interested in the idea.” light expression Light fits naturally into Bruges palette of ”very ephemeral, mixed media. It has a big impact through relatively “light” usage; it’s very accessible, very powerfull within a scheme or a landscape or a facade or environment, but we don’t use it alone. We are led by concepts and the opportunities the technology offers. Digitally controlled technologies such as LEDs have become very useful as a medium but mainly because as the technology changes and grows, its

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use is less defined by the factory or the industry than by us. And its effect can be surprising.” Bruges recalls designing an interactive dado rail for Three Ways School, near Bath in south-west England, in collaboration with sound designer Martyn Ware of Illustrious. As pupils run their hands over the rail’s sculpted surface it creates sounds, including animal noises, and it generates vibrations and a shapeshifting, blue light that runs across the rail. ”It was a small intervention used to teach to children with special needs to maintain awareness and concentrate. In some cases, where they were

in a locked-in state, they came out of it briefly, and we were quite astounded by that,” he says. ”Seeing people’s reactions – delight, interest, curiosity – is the best moment on any project for me. I always joke I’d like to do something that is seen from space. That’s not an ego thing, I’m just intrigued by scale. The dream project would be one that has a proper benefit, as the Great Ormond Street Hospital installation, things we have done for schools, something like that, at a larger scale. And if you could see it from space that would be great.”


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Light planning with opal surfaces LED-technology offers possibilities we couldn’t have imagined just a few years ago. Armed with LEDs, luminaires with large opal surfaces can be used in every imaginable way. Placed in ceilings, walls or floors, in any pattern or angle you may fancy. Requirements on performance, light ergonomics and energy efficiency are fulfilled whatever you choose to do. Just remember to supplement with vertical lighting for variation. Otherwise, even the most spectacular solution might be experienced as ordinary. text amelie bergman | image fagerhult

Three Fagerhult luminaires for creative light planning; Freedom, Tibi (pendant) and Pozzo (wall).

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irregular patterns Use opal surfaces to break the traditional linearity. Irregular patterns surprise and stimulate imagination. Why not use circular luminaires and treat them like grains of sand? Take a bunch in your hand and ”throw them”. The pattern created can be used on walls as well as in ceilings.

the sky is the limit Create your own sky – or wall of light – by mounting luminaires with opal surfaces tight together. The small dimensions of the LED-luminaires make this kind of project easy to realize and install, especially when compared to old fashioned light ceilings based on fluorescents. The ease with which LEDs can be tuned in different colours opens up many new creative ideas.

standard is the new special For a long time, creative lighting solutions have been considered the result of special solutions. This is no longer the case. New energy and size efficient light sources have made anything possible. Each and every other standard luminaire can be mounted in all imaginable patterns and installations, without requesting any extra arrangements.

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catching fire

Photo: Mats Andersson


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Catching fire Fagerhult in creative collaboration with Ingegerd Råman The ”Spira Lamp” is a piece of art. It is the vision of designer and artist Ingegerd Råman, realised by Fagerhult in collaboration with skilled partners and subcontractors. text amelie bergman

it's like a gigantic votive reflecting in the cold waters of a Nordic lake. The culture and concert hall Spira in Jönköping is all glass and light – crisp and bright during the day with a warm glow at night. Created by Gert Wingårdh, one of Sweden’s best known and successful architects, in collaboration with Jonas Edblad, Spira took its inspiration from the local heritage. The long tradition of glassmaking is evident throughout, while the orange tinted glass panels pay tribute to Jönköping being the home of the Swedish match. This 15,000 square meter centre of culture has four stages and can host up to 1,700 visitors. From theatre and dance to classical music and jazz, Spira collates a wide repertoire of performing arts throughout the region.

The public areas, offices, corridors and storage areas are illuminated by a selection of Fagerhult luminaires. A versatile lighting project, crowned by the gigantic post modern chandeliers in the foyer – the ”Spira Lamp”. a different scale ”When Gert Wingårdh asked me to get involved I was honoured, exited – and a bit scared”, admits Ingegerd Råman. ”Although glass is my element, I’d never worked with artificial light and luminaires before. Not in this way. The real challenge was the difference in scale. It’s so big. I’m used to work with millimetres, but this time the proportions were quite different”, she explains. As the queen of Swedish crystal,

Press photo Orrefors.se

Creativity according to Ingegerd Råman ”It's difficult to differentiate creativity from life itself. It's my work and it's my way of being. I think it is the same for all human beings. We are all creative, it is a way of surviving.”

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Istvan Magyarovari, Engineering Designer at Fagerhult. Photo: Marie Peterson

famous for her collaborations with leading crystal brands, she knows her material. In 1995 she was granted a professor’s title by the Swedish government, in praise of her unadorned and functional design that always has a silver lining. She has collaborated with Wingårdh before, in a project for the Swedish Embassy in Washington and knows the drill. ”Gert had given me free reign, only saying that he wanted luminaires ins-

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tead of traditional art work. I was very clear in my vision; I wanted the luminaire to be a piece of art in speaking with architecture. Spira is a building with a strong expression – the trick was to find my own formulation without opposing the house.” At an early stage, Ingegerd was introduced to Istvan Magyarovari, Engineering Designer at Fagerhult. Inspired by the new LED-technology he presented an innovative material solution.

”Glass is extremely heavy and hard to handle in those kind of large scale installations. By using acrylic sheets with milled grooves, we could combine excellent light performance with the artistic expression”, says Istvan Magyarovari. The LED-modules, hidden in – and by – Ingegerds design, distributes the light through the grooves in a way that reminds of cut glass.


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Photo: Mats Andersson

Photo: Johan Werner Avby

”It’s almost like magic. When standing under the luminaire you have a child’s perspective – looking right into the luminarie. But there’s nothing there but stripes and light.” Ingegerd Råman, Designer and Artist

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Photo: Mats Andersson

like magic ”The hard part was to achieve the simplicity of the light lines. With this solution the light blends naturally with the fittings. With the LEDs hidden in the construction it is possible to look directly into the light without being blinded”, Istvan concludes. Ingegerd Råman is delighted with the result and how the four luminaires have developed, creating streaks of light, moving as you walk through the room. ”It’s almost like magic. When standing under the luminaire you have a child’s perspective – looking right into the luminaire. But there’s nothing there but stripes and light. When realising a project like this – balancing on the edge of new technology, exploring new materials and designs – collaboration is crucial. For Ingegerd

catching fire

and Istvan, who both are used to work with industrial serial production, the Spira luminaire was a true challenge. When combining their skills and experience they stretched the boundaries of what’s possible. Although aesthetics was the main object, practicalities such as safe installation and operation couldn’t be overseen. Together with involved partners and subcontractors every detail was formed to perfection. ”I’m known to be quite stubborn”, Ingegerd laughs. ”I wont take ‘can’t be done’ for an answer. It’s the designer’s objective to make the participants in a project go that extra mile. Of course, you have to be responsive and humble to other professionals – and you have to know the limits – but in a project like this, old truths should be challenged.”

innovative technology In this case, Fagerhult actually formulated a new, innovative lighting technology. The principle of beaming LED-light into a reflector sheet, creating big, even surfaces of light, has been applied to the award winning Appareo-pendant. ”To succeed with this kind of project – and now I’m talking both about the Spira luminaire and about the actual building – you need to have a foresighted project owner. A person with visions and the guts to stand up for it. This person existed in the Spira project in form of property manager Erik Pålsson”, explains Ingegerd Råman. ”It’s people who dare, who make the difference.”


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Photo: Lars Kroon

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light increases creativity


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Light increases creativity If only subconsciously we all know it. Light makes us feel good, makes us happy and feel more creative. But what is the connection? And how can artificial light help create happier and more creative academic or working environments? Tommy Govén, Head of Research at Fagerhult, has identified the link between light and creativity. text amelie bergman

our research projects have shown that if you light your premise in the right way, you can achieve a working environment in which people feel at ease and perform better. All you need is knowledge and good luminaires. But does light really make us more creative? Yes it does! ”In 2009, we conducted a study at a primary school in London, in partnership with University College London and the Faculty of Engineering (LTH) at Lund University. We weren’t satisfied with simply finding out how the pupils felt, but also gathered biological evidence

in the form of cortisol measurements”, explains Tommy Govén. ”The results showed that the pupils in the classrooms which were lit with a higher proportion of ambient light, more light on the walls and ceiling, actually performed better and got higher marks. In a room which is perceived as being bright but not dazzling, we become more productive. Even if productivity shouldn’t be confused with creativity, the link is obvious. In a room with poor lighting, which is inadequate or harsh on the eye, the opposite is true.

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We become tired, unproductive and – in the worst case scenario – aggressive.” inspired by nature The key theme we can take from this study is the importance of ambient light in planning creative and inspiring environments. Its influence is linked to our experience of natural light, which is in itself a form of ambient light. The ”light norm” of humans is the celestial sphere, which extends from the ground towards the horizon and then upwards. We rarely look at the sun as its blinding and we are dazzled by the glare. Instead, we absorb the light which arrives vertically, from the side and just above us. By planning the artificial light in an office in a similar way – allowing it to bounce off indirectly from walls and ceilings – we can achieve the same effect. creativity for free The emergence of LED has made this

light increases creativity

approach a whole lot easier. Over the last few years the technology has undergone incredible developments in terms of, not only light quality, anti-glare and efficiency but also price. ”Now the technology has matured and we wanted to find out what people think of LEDs compared to a traditional T5 light source”, says Tommy Govén. ”In our latest study with the Faculty of Engineering (LTH), at Lund University, we built two identical office rooms which were both equipped with direct light above the workstation and supplementary ambient light on the walls. In one of the rooms we used LED and in the other T5. The result was very clear: the light from the LED was perceived as being brighter and more pleasant with ambient lighting of 100 cd/m2, a feeling which persisted right up to 300 cd/m2. Consequently, when using LED lighting in an office you can achieve a brighter and better working environment while at the same time reducing your energy

consumption. You could say that you get creativity for free!” coloured light In addition to creating a well lit environment which is perceived as being more attractive, LED technology offers the scope for a greater level of variation and style. The colour of the light can be altered within the white field, often referred to as ”tuneable white” over the course of the day dependent upon the daylight outside or according to your own regime. With LED it’s possible to use an ”equaliser” for the light, just like with music, following the same principle that every office and space can have their own, individual tone. ”Another clear advantage is that you can work with coloured light and create accents and effects in the office design and also project different types of images. With LED the light really does become an integrated part of the interior design.”


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new research led vs t5 in schools An on-going study based on previous findings where we compare LED lighting with normal T5-lighting in a upper secondary school. Since we have found that increased ambient light makes students perform better and that LED is perceived brighter that T5 we wanted to explore this in a field study. The results are to be presented beginning 2014. the effect on led-lighing on elderly The world’s population is aging. The lighting standards for today are written for people aged between 30–40 but we know that people have to work longer, so do we need to plan differently for elderly people? This study investigates how elderly people perceive LED.

Tommy Govén, Head of Lighting Technology & Research at Fagerhult and Torbjörn Laike, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lunds Technical University. Photo Teddy Strandqvist, Studio e.

”When using LED lighting in an office you can achieve a brighter and better working environment while at the same time reducing your energy consumption. You could say that you get creativity for free.” Tommy Govén, Head of Lighting Technology & Research, Fagerhult

Read more about research where Fagerhult participated: Preferred luminance distribution in working areas – T. Govén et al 2002 The background luminance & colour temperatures influence on alertness & mental health – T. Govén et al 2007 The influence of ambient light on the performance, mood, endocrine system and other factors of school children – T. Govén et al 2011 The impact of lighting controls on energy consumption of lighting in classrooms – T. Govén et al 2011 The experience of ambient light from common light sources with different spectral power distribution – Light emitting diodes (LED) vs. 3-phosphorus fluorescent tubes (T5) – T. Govén et al 2012

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Creative lighting without limits Welcome to the fast lane! Lighting technology is developing rapidly, creating exciting opportunities for light planning. Fagerhult’s broad range of LED luminaires, innovative fluorescent fixtures and downlights offers the opportunities for new, unique expressions. With aesthetics and sustainability as starting points, we offer creative lighting solutions for every kind of project.

Photo: Jakob BĂśrjeson

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väla gård, skanska, helsingborg, sweden In October 2012 the project development and construction group Skanska finished their greenest building ever. Their new local office in Helsingborg is built as an energy neutral building, lit with Fagerhult’s latest luminaires. Photo: Lars Wareby

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kilden, kristiansand, norway The Performing Arts Centre looks like a big wooden wave rising over the sea. Fagerhult’s light covers the different areas in the centre – with functional light in the hallways, concert halls, dressing rooms and offices to pure beautification around the centre, enhancing the wooden walls and colourful settings.

Photo: Halvor Gudim

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sweco office, stockholm, sweden The office was rebuilt and reopened in 2013. Consultant company Sweco found that the two open entrance halls was an excellent area to sketch light lines with Freedom. The shape flows nicely in the architecture, framing the location.

Photo: Ă…ke E:son Lindman

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un city, copenhagen, denmark UN's new headquarters is shaped like a star with a unifying center. The daily life springs from the central atrium with a grand staircase that extends up through the entire building and opens up to all levels. Notor, Ray, Pozzo and Pleiad from Fagerhult illuminates most of the construction. Photo: Adam Mørk – 3XN

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arag legal expenses insurance, leusden, the netherlands This building consists of two parts, built in 1985 and 1992, and has been completely renovated. The interior is fully adapted to the so called “ABO� concept. A mix of Fagerhult LED, T5 and compact fluorescent fixtures, often in combination with an intelligent DALI system.

Photo: Iemke Ruige

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Visiting Copenhagen and PLDC?

Welcome to the Fagerhult Creative Lab™! Are you visiting the PLDC in Copenhagen? There are a number of things you can’t miss when in Copenhagen, some really interesting architecture, the Little Mermaid, Tivoli and of course the Creative Lab at the Fagerhult stand at PLDC.

www.copenhagenmediacenter.com,

photo: Cees van Roeden

text amelie bergman | photo cecilia selvén, cees van roeden & fagerhult

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"Together we have got hundreds of years of experience in lighting at Fagerhult" Henrik Clausen, FLA Manager/Business Development Director, Fagerhult

pldc stands for Professional Lighting Design Convention and is held in Copenhagen from the 30th October to 2nd November. To Fagerhult Lighting Academy’s devoted leader and inspirer, Henrik Clausen, it was obvious that Fagerhult should support the PLDC-event. ”We are building our future visions of light, lighting and lighting design on inspiration from young students spiced up with facts based on research

will present his latest findings. Personally I will be presenting the speakers on the Research track all Friday and to bring the event to a close we will gather a nice group of lighting professionals around our table for the Saturday night Award show and closing Gala dinner. As icing on the cake, Fagerhult has also been shortlisted in two categories for the Professional Lighting Design Recognition Award 2013. Tommy Govén

rooms for creativity by using existing products in new innovative ways. On top of that we share some inspiring projects and updates on trends and research. We strongly recommend that you don’t miss this!” says Henrik.

results and many years of hard earned professional experience. That’s exactly what the upcoming PLDC event captures under one roof! Here you can meet young and old – newcomer and highly experienced lighting nerds. We wouldn’t miss it for the world!” says Henrik Clausen, Director of Fagerhult Lighting Academy (FLA). The 2013 PLDC tracks Lighting Applications Research, Lighting Application Case Studies, Professional Practice Issues and Sustainable Lighting and Design; all areas in which Fagerhult has vast experience. ”Fagerhult will be highly visible during this event. We will launch a new Creative LabTM concept at our stand, and our Head of Research, Tommy Govén,

in the Research category and Fagerhult as a company in the Best Partner in Industry category”, says Henrik with a large smile on his face.

for knowledge about light came quite naturally. The Fagerhult Lighting Academy trains and educates employees as well as customers by interacting with light and lighting solutions. ”Our main strategy is working with light in every way, and with a clear focus on a constant effort in creating the perfect light”, says Henrik Clausen. Virtually every Fagerhult employee is a part of our Academy. ”Fagerhult has got an enormous pool of highly qualified people, and together we have got hundreds of years of experience in lighting. We in FLA are the caretakers of this knowledge, we gather and structure, we evaluate and distribute!”

creative labTM As mentioned before, Fagerhult will launch the Creative Lab™ at the stand at PLDC and we have to ask; what is that? ”Creative LabTM is a workshop that really boost your creativity. It’s about to take a step back and think in a different way to clear your vision, so to say. We want to be a partner in the creative process and with all our experience we really think that we can contribute to better lighting for a light loving world. We look at the creative process and some examples of design and lighting

fagerhult lighting academy Light means energy, safety and wellbeing for people. Light also needs energy. That’s why the idea of creating a centre

welcome to the fagerhult creative lab™!


www.fagerhult.com

Innovator #3  

Creative perspective on Indoor Lighting Solutions

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