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no.9 future perspectives on retail lighting solutions

INTERACTIVE FABRIC

Malin Bobeck connects through fibre and thread

Have Nudie Jeans created a new retail category?

VIRTUAL REALITY

Enhancing the shop experience

OMNICHANNEL RETAILING

smart shops digital friends lighting controls

futuristic Retail


The future is here Dear reader, These are exciting times! Looking ahead to the future today makes you realize that in so many ways the future is already here. Consider all that is new in technology and digital development in a market that it is continuously evolving. The digital transformation is here with new types of innovation and creativity that affects the whole of society. Therefore we wanted to dedicate this issue of The Innovator to digital innovations and the future of retail.   Read about intelligent shops and companies embracing the ideas of an omnichannel model using RFID, Beacons, Internet of Things, VR and AI to improve the customer experience, as well as the use of adaptable lighting controls in other ways.   Be inspired by shop designs or read about how to create a sustainable retail; how the jeans manufacturer Nudie Jeans could be starting a new retail category with their “repair shops”.   In this issue we have also spoken to creative designer Malin Bobeck who makes art pieces of interactive fabric and Erik Johansson, who takes new roads with his Photoshop art.   As a retail partner we believe it is important to follow and understand the latest trends and embrace new ideas when we create lighting solutions for retail. Here is a glance of the futuristic retail. Enjoy your reading!

Monica Weinitz Managing Director, Fagerhult Retail AB

publisher:

Fagerhult Retail AB Rinnavägen 12 SE 517 33, Bollebygd, Sweden Phone: +46 33 722 15 00 www.fagerhult.com/retail

editorial:

Elin Nilsson, elin.nilsson@fagerhult.se Johanna Bergström, johanna.bergstrom@fagerhult.se Amelie Bergman, Petah Marian, Marianne Trotta, Vasilina Chernovalova

graphic design:

Elin Nilsson, elin.nilsson@fagerhult.se

cover photo:

Kenn Busch


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In this issue NO. 9, 2017

Digital Transformation Future of Retail 2017

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Circular future for fashion Mistra future fashion makes fashion sustainable

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The Dandy Lab Exploring the future of retail

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Repair shops – a new retail category? Nudie Jeans sustainable work

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Amy, Andrew, Alexa, Siri & M… ...Say hello to your new digital friends!

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Booster Pro Lighting for a premium shop experience

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Storytelling in a Virtual Reality Digital agency Valtech about VR

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Conceptual tubes Bik Bok's new conceptual lighting solution

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Outlooks on the future Amazon Go, Mood tail and a Bio hacker

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The power of beauty L'Oreal NYX's make up shops

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The road not taken Erik Johansson and his unique pictures

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The Mobile Store of the Future is here O2 created by Dalziel and Pow

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Connecting through fibre and thread Malin Bobeck’s interactive fabric

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The many lives of Dino PettersonRudberg's latest creation

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Light – the soul of Electronic Dance Music Alexander Hesse illuminate Kygo concerts

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How to illuminate with style The story of the new spotlight Touch

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Exploring in adaptable light Lego's Little Explorers in Dubai

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Get the Look! Find inspiration in the Fagerhult Lookbook

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Lighting controls in retail Attract, guide and save

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digital transformation


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Digital Transformation:

Future of Retail 2017 2017 will be the year that retailers need to make true omnichannel retailing a reality, as Amazon’s recent announcements around Amazon Go will mean that consumer expectations will only continue to increase. Petah Marian, Senior Editor of Retail Intelligence at the trend forecasting agency WGSN, gives her input on what digital trends to expect in 2017. text petah marian | photo istock/pixdeluxe, petah marian

in the past, omnichannel retailing was focused on creating ways to get products into the customer’s hands however they chose across channels, leading to the creation of channels such as click and collect. However, consumer expectations are rising, and in order to remain relevant, retailers are increasingly finding ways to implement more online strategies in a physical setting.   For retailers to make this a reality, getting the back end in order will be key – a single view of the customer, and accurate inventory levels will be essential to making any of the cool innovations that will become consumer expectations a reality. single customer view One retailer taking the best elements of the online experience and bringing them in store, is True Religion, which

has implemented a system that notifies sales staff when one of its key customers enter its NYC or London stores with an alert Apple Watch. For shoppers that use the brands app, staff members can see their previous purchases and any products that may have been put into their basket, and then abandoned. Shop assistants also have the ability to push notifications to the shopper’s app, suggesting products that might be of interest, while the customer is in store – creating that personalised shopping experience that consumers love online, in a physical space.   Beacons are another tool personalising the physical retail experience, but in a more hands-off way. In the US, Barneys, Target and other retailers are using information they have gathered from the shoppers app – sending notifications and discounts based on what’s in

stock and also in users’ mobile shopping bags or wish lists.   This is likely to capture consumer imagination. Aldo recently launched a new connected store functionality across its top tier stores, giving associates access to much more product information as they service customers in store. Gregoire Baret, the retailer’s senior director of omnichannel says:   “Customers usually have specific products and a specific destination store in mind. We also found that up to 30 % of customers prefer to use their smartphone to obtain product information before interacting with a sales associate.”   So retailers able to delight and inform the customer before they interact with the sales associate are more likely to meet with success.

digital transformation


x6 wgsn – is the world's leading trend forecaster for fashion and the creative industries, offering design validation, consumer insights and big data retail analytics.

While this is a highly sophisticated system, and more suitable for higher-end brands, mass retailers are tying together the online and offline experiences using technologies like RFID for in-store product availability. inventory accuracy Serving this customer who wants to know about a product before shopping in a store is more difficult than it may seem.   Andy Robson, Supply chain solutions manager at not-for-profit organisation GS1 UK, which sets industry standards for unique product identification used in barcodes and RFID tags, says that without RFID, inventory availability accuracy is around 63 %.   This has meant that product availability prediction has been a challenging process – because the risks of getting it wrong are so high. But with RFID implementation that accuracy increases to 95  %, which means that the likelihood of a bad customer experience plunges.   M&S has managed to get around this by implementing RFID tagging on all garments in its stores, improving inventory accuracy by up to 50 % and reducing out of stocks by 30–40 %. taking friction out of checkout The attention given to Amazon Go, even before it launches is going to require retailers to continue to innovate operationally and look at ways of reducing

digital transformation

friction from the payment experience.   Retailers will need to size up the opportunity to create something that will resonate with their customer-base, particularly as you go up the price architecture.   But this doesn’t mean that luxury retailers shouldn’t experiment. Rebecca Minkoff has unveiled a self checkout system in its US stores, using an RFID security tag that attaches to all items in a store. When placed on a checkout table, the item appears on an iPad screen, allowing the customer to pay. And once they pay, they place the tag onto another table, which unlocks the tag from the merchandise, allowing the shopper to go on their way.   As consumers expect an increasingly connected experience from their online and offline shopping journeys, retailers will need to step up and innovate to create new digital experiences in store, but in order to do so, will need to invest in their back end, around a single customer view and inventory accuracy to make this a reality.

“When placed on a checkout table, the item appears on an iPad screen, allowing the customer to pay.”


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“A single view of the customer, and accurate inventory levels will be essential to making any of the cool innovations that will become consumer expectations a reality.” Petah Marian, Senior Editor of Retail Intelligence, WGSN

omnichannel – a seamless approach that joins together the online and offline shopping experiences.

rfid – Radio-Frequency IDentification – uses electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects.

beacons – technology that alerts apps or websites (that the user has opted into) when someone approaches or leaves a location. It is technology that allows venues to detect where a customer is at any given moment and communicate with their mobile devices.

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The Dandy Lab:

Exploring the future of retail

Smart cities, smart homes and now – smart shops. Hyped London pop-up store The Dandy Lab explores the Internet of Things in a physical retail environment. text amelie bergman | photo the dandy lab

connectivity has been the talk of the town for several years now. Within the retail industry, the Internet of Things has mainly been applied on the supply chain and back office. Now the time is ripe to explore how to implement online strategies in a physical setting. New technologies inspire to creative retail solutions with user-friendly interfaces.   Though no longer trading, The Dandy

exploring the future of retail

Lab, at first glance a men’s lifestyle shop, was actually a state of the art laboratory for retail technology, merging the digital and the physical shopping experience. At The Dandy Lab, the Internet of Things was used to create a smart shop that informed and interacted with its customers. To tech companies, this explorative shopping environment was also a constructive way to evaluate their

innovative technologies IRL.   The Dandy Lab was created by designer Julia Bainiaksina and fashion product developer Peter Jeun Ho Tsang: the idea was to offer British luxury brands a new and effective way to sell their products and to communicate with their customers.   The Dandy Lab Concept took storytelling to a new level as it combines


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“New technologies inspire to creative retail solutions with user-friendly interfaces.” products and social media, offering the customers to discover, interact, shop and share.   The shop was packed with new technology, for example an NFC-platform with a display. Placing whatever the item you were interested in on the platform, it would display the story of the product, the designer and other products from the brand sold in this store. A video conference system provided by Cisco even invited the customers to meet and talk to the designers in real time.   A virtual showroom allowed customers to easily explore what the store had to offer – to find new garments and to mix and match an outfit. For those who

wanted to pick up some style advice from friends and share their shopping experience there was of course a social media café with connectivity on the menu.   The Internet of Things technology was effectively used to create a more personalized shopping experience, focusing on the customers’ individual needs.   Obviously this technology creates opportunities for increased customer satisfaction, sales and loyalty to the brands. It also allows collecting of big data that can be used to analyse customer behaviour. When visiting The Dandy Lab, customers generated information about how they were interacting with

different products and brands, how much time they spent in the store and which route they chose. The data can help in creating an understanding of customers’ behaviours and to foresee upcoming trends. Not only valuable when creating personalized sale offers, the data can also be used strategically when purchasing and to control stock levels in a more effective way.   So, what if the shop was closed when passing by? No problem, The Internet of Things made sure the customers got the information they needed. The interactive mannequins in the window helped them out.

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Amy, Andrew, Alexa, Siri & M… say hello to your new digital friends! The digitalization of the buying process is picking up speed – spilling over from the Internet into the physical store environment. The faster check out, the better. Automation is a megatrend, says Kristin Heinonen, Digital strategist and Trend analyst with a focus on consumer trends and customer behaviour. text amelie bergman | photo istock.com/ldprod

the rapid digital development accelerates new customer behaviour and demands, Kristin Heinonen explains.   ”Today, customers expect that there’s always someone around to answer their questions 24/7. They want quick answers and a fast buying process.”   One of the hottest trends in retail is chat bots. A bot is a small computer program that can be compared to a digital ”mini assistant”, operating at platforms like Messenger and Kik. The brands H&M and Sephora are forerunners, offering highly functional chat bots that have attracted many users in a short time. In many ways, the chat bot has the character of the traditional sales clerk. It says. ”Hello”, ”How can I help you?”, ”What are you looking for today?”. If you are in the mood for a red sweater, it will present the options available, in the right size.

future say hello of to retail your 2017 new digital friends

”Chat bots are perfect examples of how digital marketing channels are becoming more focused on individual needs. Traditional marketing communication is far too broad; it doesn’t stand up to the customers’ personal, unique demands in that particular moment. But the chat bot can do just that”, Kristin says.   A bit tricky to solve? Not at all, says Kristin.   "You don’t have to be an international brand with a huge budget to create a chat bot. If you are a small company with some technical expertise you can easily create and implement a chat bot. In fact, the chat bot is easier and more cost-effective to develop and operate, as it is operating on only one platform. A traditional app, however, has to be adapted for all kinds of phones, tablet devices and interfaces", Kristin says.


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Chat Bots can be simple creatures (if that’s the case, customer service often serves as back up, ready to step in) – but there are also examples of advanced chat bots equipped with an AI, artificial intelligence. AIs are self-learning programs that evolve with experience, and can be used in a broad range of applications. For example, they can be used as ”virtual assistants” to run your errands and save you time.   For the moment, X.ai's virtual assistant ‘Amy’ is the talk of the town. Amy is a program synchronized with your mail and calendar. When you receive a request for a meeting, you just hand it over to Amy who will handle all further contact until the reservation in your calendar is made.   ”When creating Amy a lot of effort has been made to give her a manner and a language that’s credible. It seems to have paid off. Actually, people think she’s a real human. There are several stories about how people have called the office asking for Amy or have sent her chocolate. And yes, for those who prefer to have a male virtual assistent there’s an Andrew…”, Kristin says.   If Amy and Andrew are specialized in professional life, there are AIs offering a wider range of services. Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa are both examples of voice-activated virtual assistants playing your music, providing information, checking the weather report and controlling home technology on your command.   "One of the most anticipated virtual assistants is Facebook’s M which is currently under development. For example, if you are chatting on Facebook with a friend and you decide to meet, M can act as your personal butler, booking a table at your favourite restaurant”, Kristin says. the important point? ”For the moment, M has a traditional ‘internship’. Real people are doing the work while M is studying how it’s done. When M is ready, the program is supposed to take over”, Kristin says.   ”All these digital novelties will probably not survive. This is an era of trial and error. We are figuring out what will work and what will not. And things that don’t meet the expectations, will be weeded out”, Kristin concludes.   Customers will see to that. say hello to yourfuture new digital of retail friends 2017


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Storytelling in a Virtual Reality The consumer won’t buy what you are doing. They buy why you are doing it. Virtual Reality is the new, intriguing way to tell that story. ”It’s so real, that it’s scary”, says Katharina Borgenstierna at digital agency Valtech. text amelie bergman | photo valtech, istock.com/ marco_piunti

in the 1990’s, Virtual Reality was, literally, Science Fiction. Watching Arnold Schwarzenegger going on a virtual vacation to Mars in ”Total Recall” we really didn’t think it would happen, for real. Writing 2017 VR is all reality, soon in a store near you.   One of the forerunners within VR adaptions for retail is Valtech; a new breed of digital agency designed to help business leaders succeed in the new digital economy. Present on five continents the company addresses multiple industries – automotive, healthcare, financial, travel, hospitality, media, entertainment and retail – to bridge that dreaded gap between physical reality and digital experience.   ”We’re focusing on business transformation using the latest digital platforms, offering overall solutions – from strategy to concept and design”, explains Katharina Borgenstierna, Strategic Planning Director at Valtech’s Stockholm office.   ”To us, VR is one of many interesting

ways to enrich the interaction with the customers. It’s a very empathetic medium, easy to take in. When you put those VR-glasses on you enter another reality, experiencing that you are really there, interacting. It’s so real, that it's scary. Actually, Singularity University in California did a study on three-year-olds, showing that the kids weren’t able to differ VR from the real world", Katharina says.

Katharina Borgenstierna, Strategic Planning Director and Mattias Malmer, Marketing Manager and heading the VR-offer at Valtech Sweden.

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A VR prototype at Valtech Store in Stockholm.

Canadian home renovation center BMR is one of the pioneers with its VR Commerce Platform, developed by Valtech.   ”The experience sets the participants into a full Room-Scale VR experience where they can design their new kitchen or outdoor patio with products that BMR and its partners carry. The total number of possible combinations for the 18 interactive products is over 16.000!”, Katharina explains.   The VR-platform allows the customers to freely move into the environment and to view the product in 360 degrees and real dimensions. It is also possible to apply different material and color choices. Like ”virtual painters” customers can paint the room and see how different shades look on the wall. Finally, they can purchase the desired products from within the experience.   ”The pilot has been tested IRL with both customer and dealers. The possibility of integrating a large number of

storytelling in a virtual reality

products and variations is the unique selling point of this solution. We believe that it can provide great benefits both from business to consumer and from business to business. For the purposes of inventory in the case of the latter”, Katharina says.   ”VR has a lot of advantages. The customer can experience products and services in a way that would otherwise not be possible, meaning an increase of sales. You can cut down on expensive square metres at your high street showroom. You also get a new flexibility in the relationship with your customers. With VR the customers don’t have to visit the car dealer’s showroom. The car dealer can go to see them offering a grand driving experience via VR. For manufacturers of large scale products like houses and furniture – or for realtors selling not yet built apartments – VR is a great opportunity”, says Katharina who also likes to highlight the environmental

aspects of VR.   ”We don’t buy what you are doing. We buy why you are doing it. VR is a new captivating way to tell the story of a brand, without travelling. Customers can experience and buy your products without driving to a store. They can visit your plant or headquarters without getting on that plane. Imagine the climate impact”, Katharina says.   However, it does sound to be a bit advanced – and expensive?   ”It doesn’t have to be. When producing content for VR, you can choose your level of ambition. Of course, there’s expensive top-notch technology out there, but also more affordable options. We did an inspirational sports gear film on a parkour-theme, filming with a Samsung 360 camera. We had the local parkour team playing around in different clothes and the result was great. With planning, filming and development we had a lead time of 14 days”, Katharina says.


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In the full Room-Scale VR experience you can design a new kitchen or outdoor patio with products that BMR and its partners carry.

”As said before, VR is only one of many different trails. I’d like to encourage companies to be more exploratory and experimental. Things are changing so fast, that you cannot afford to sit, wait and see what others are doing. The three-year-plan doesn’t exist anymore. You have to deliver that ‘why’ otherwise no one will listen”, Katharina says.   According to Katharina, adding trial and error to the business strategy is a way to gain market shares in an era of constant change.   ”This demands organizational change as well. You need to create an innovative and permissive corporate culture where failing is accepted. Otherwise, people don’t dare to try. All birds will not fly. And that’s OK”, Katharina concludes.

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Outlooks on the future text amelie bergman | photo hannes sjöblad, amazon go, istock.com/vilches

the bio hacker’s guide to the future Hollywood loves to give us dystopian visions of the future – of Terminators, Robocops and the Matrix. But we must not fall for these powerful narratives as true and fair pictures of what awaits. Instead, we should look at the real world, and see the enormous benefits that technological progress has brought to humanity. We live in amazing times. For example, with the help of the latest biotechnology, we can today make deaf people hear again, blind people see again, and lame people walk again.   Hannes Sjöblad, entrepreneur and body hacker, abandoned an international business career for a future in biotechnology. Now he works as innovation manager at Epicenter Stockholm, drives the Swedish bio-hacker movement and is a faculty member at Singularity University. He is also one of Sweden’s most popular lecturers on the impact of emerging technologies. These are his top three outlooks. 1. virtual reality and the new

internet "Today we find the big and clumsy cell phones of the 1980’s amusing. Soon,

outlooks on the future

we’ll feel the same about the two dimensional, flat internet we currently use. Thanks to the ongoing explosion in Virtual Reality, the internet of tomorrow is three dimensional. Instead of presenting information in the form of flat texts and pictures, the internet will be a world with room and space. Instead of studying abstracted reports and models, we’ll be able to immerse ourselves in virtual experiences that will give a much deeper understanding." 2. intelligence augmentation beats

artificial intelligence "There is a well-founded worry in many circles that smart computer systems will take over a lot of jobs that are currently performed by humans. That computers beat humans in chess is old news, but a team of a human plus a computer beats even the best computer player. When humans use computers to augment our intelligence, we become even better at doing things. Just like cars and cranes make us humans faster and stronger, so too, mechanical learning systems make us smarter. The future belongs to the human-computer team."

3. affordable dna technology

"One of the most powerful transformative trends, on a civilizational level, is that biology is becoming digital. The price for reading DNA is falling exponentially. Even better, we also have the capacity to cheaply and with good precision edit the DNA of living organisms.   A couple of decades ago, this was only possible in expensive labs at large pharma companies and universities. Today a couple of students can do it in a dorm room using open-source equipment purchased online for a few hundred dollars. Using easy protocols available online, middle schoolers can edit the genome of bacteria to make them glow in the dark or smell like strawberries.   This has enormous implications for the opportunities to innovate and experiment with the uses of biotechnology. This will transform how we treat disease, how we produce our food and ultimately the very makeup of the biological ecosystem. So do not be surprised when the first mammoth calf is born in a zoo somewhere in the coming decade. It is just the beginning of a new stage in the history of biological evolution."


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just grab and go! Planned to open early in 2017, Amazon Go is the talk of the town. There will be no checkouts and no cashiers – you just go in and pick up what ever you want. Amazon Go’s ”Just Walk Out Shopping Experience” is using the same technology as self-driving cars: computer vision, sensor fusion, and deep learning. The technology automatically detects when products are taken from or returned

to the shelves and keep track of them in a virtual cart. To use it you need an Amazon account, a smartphone and the Amazon Go app. After leaving the store, your account will be automatically charged accompanied by a receipt. Focusing primarily on food, Amazon Go is intended to facilitate and save time for customers in their everyday lives. The extensive ready-to-eat section

offers a wide selection of dishes for snacks, breakfast, lunch and dinner and the grocery section covers the whole range – from staples like bread, butter and milk to exclusive delicacies such as artisan cheeses and chocolate. Out of ideas? Just pick up one of the chef-designed Amazon Meal Kits, with all the ingredients you need to make a meal for two in about 30 minutes… Bon appétit!

what's your mood? Shopping is an activity based on feelings. Our mood decides whether to buy a product or not, or maybe to head for another option. That’s nothing new. But getting access to those feelings has been the tricky part. Now, with the help of innovative, digital technology – once again, it is all about ”big data” – it is actually possible to get that kind of information.   The concept of ”Mood Tail” means

asking customers how they feel about different products. Based on the information and data they share, customers are presented with products based on those particular feelings. One of the retail brands exploring the possibilities is, fresh handmade cosmetics company, Lush. Instead of focusing on a linear and fast purchase process, their app encourages the customers to share their feelings about the different products.

A bit hard to express your feelings? Why not turn to exclusive car brand Bentley? Big Data ”Face Tail”-technology can register your facial expressions to measure emotional responses. Bentley’s smartphone ”Inspiration Application” is using the latest in emotional recognition technology. Based on your measures of engagement a bespoke Bentley Bentayga SUV can be recommended for you. Feel the speed!

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The road not taken A picture is worth a thousand words. An established notion that certainly applies well to Erik Johansson's unique pictures. They are a mind twist and at the same time liberating to look at. A surreal world beyond ours is presented. Although it is just one picture you see, there is more to it than meets the eye. text johanna bergstrรถm photo erik johansson

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the road not taken


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erik johansson's high dose of patience and confidence in his work has put him on the world map as a Photographer, Photoshop artist, Visual artist, Surrealistic photographer – the efforts are numerous to define his line of work. In his recently published book Imagine, he has assembled his nine years of work as a professional photographer.

Some might say Erik is not an ordinary photographer because after a picture is taken he embarks on a journey with his friend Photoshop and creates version 2.0 of the picture. The original picture is somewhat distorted and a surreal, alternative world is enhanced. how did it all start? “Drawing was a big part of my child-

the road not taken

hood growing up on a farm in the countryside of a small town, Götene in Sweden. As a boy I expressed myself a lot through my drawings and I loved to create make believe and alternative worlds. My interest in computer games influenced me just like the possibility to be drawn into other worlds. When I was fifteen I got a digital camera which by just a push of a button froze the moment in time and a photo was ready instantly. Quite early on I felt that this wasn't completely fulfilling for me. That´s why I started to “manipulate” the pictures on my computer and I found myself doing what I loved to do as a child, which was to create alternative worlds”, Erik says.   Erik's hobby was for a long time just considered a hobby. He never thought it could be a way to support himself. So, in order to get a “proper” job he started to study Interaction Design at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg. Along his studies he continued to work with his hobby and sharpened his Photoshop and photography skills. Erik published the results online and pretty soon his work started to create a buzz.

This led to more and more incoming job requests and he never had the time to apply for that proper job. He spent a couple of years in Berlin before moving to Prague where he lives today, working with both his own personal projects as well as with commissioned projects. who are your clients and what is the most common request you get? “It is very widespread. Most often companies contact me because they want to buy a picture from my personal projects. They interpret a message in one of my pictures that suits their company values. However, I want my own projects to stand alone and not to be connected to a brand or product. Instead I offer the possibility to create something unique for them – if they like. Among the clients are Google, Adobe, Volvo and Microsoft to name a few and the proportion between private project and commissioned projects are more or less 50/50”, Erik explains. Creating one picture is time consuming.


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“Light is very important in my pictures in order to create a realistic result when combining the photos in Photoshop. I'm not looking for a studio feeling, I want it to be the real thing.” Erik Johansson, Photographer

From idea to planning, finding the right location, to the last part of “photoshopping” can take several months. During a year Erik works approximately on 6–8 pictures. In addition to these are the commissioned photos. does every picture convey a message? “Sure, there is a fundamental idea with each picture of what I want to communicate. Sometimes it is reflected in the title of my pictures but I prefer that the viewers make their own interpretation. During my exhibition at Fotografiska Museum in Stockholm last year, I walked among the visitors and eavesdropped – no one recognized me, one of the perks

the road not taken

of being a photographer – and I got to hear almost as many versions as there were visitors. I enjoyed this a lot and I really feel this is the best way to view my pictures. A computer screen doesn´t always give justice to all my details and the hard work I put into every picture”, Erik says. you work a lot with lights and shadows in your pictures to create unique experiences. could you explain how you take on such a task? “Light is very important in my pictures in order to create a realistic result when combining the photos in Photoshop. I'm not looking for a studio feeling, I

want it to be the real thing. The different photos I take has to have the same angle of light. Therefore, I constantly keep the lighting in mind such as colour temperatures, how to mix lights, complement colours, contrast and so on”, Erik explains. where do you see yourself in a couple of years from now? “Working more with my personal projects and exhibitions both back home in Sweden and in other countries. It took me almost ten years to write my first book so hopefully I will have time to write my second one a little bit faster”, Erik concludes.


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In our world today where the line between real and unreal gets more and more diffuse Erik's work inspires us to see beyond what is possible. Like the poem “The road not taken” by Robert Frost, Erik chose his own path, took the road less travelled and made wonderful worlds appear – and he keeps pushing the limits of what we think is possible. That has made all the difference. upcoming Erik will have an exhibition at Dunkers Kulturhus in Helsingborg, Sweden 17 June to 8 October 2017. web erikjohanssonphoto.com instagram erik.joh facebook Photographer Erik Johansson

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Interactive fabric:

Connecting through fibre and thread Conventional woven handcraft meets modern lighting in Malin Bobeck’s art pieces. As a Textile designer and artist she creates using optical fibre textile that interacts with the visitor, creating an experience, a magical world communicating something that differs from our everyday lives. text elin nilsson | photo peter claesson and emma clayton

combining her background in industrial design and a passion for fabric 30 year old Malin found something between the two crossing boundaries by joining traditional handcraft with lighting.   In her art pieces “Those who affected me” and "Tactile refuge" she made interactive light emitting textile art installations. Using a traditional woven technique she weaved in thin electrically conducting copper treads together with optical fibre treads. Then she connected the programmable colour LEDs to a micro computer. a self-portrait In the four winged structure in “Those who affected me”, with 11 metres of textile of 1,5 m x 2,5 metres in diameter, the copper treads are touch sensitive. When someone touches the textile it reacts by with the visitor.   “It is a kind of self portrait, it is a reflection of how people around me always affect me and who I am in the same way as touch affects the installation”, Malin says.   Her latest piece "Tactile refuge" is created to escape to an alternative reality, a tactile world shaped by your touch.

interactive fabric

launched at the Heimtex fair at Frankfurt 2017. The piece is made by 12.000 metres of optical fibre fabric combined with Pemotex yarn. "Tactile refuge" was inspired from the curious worlds under the Earth's water where participants can submerge themselves in another world of glimmering LED lights.   "I am trying to create spaces where you can share experiences with strangers in an open and vulnerable way. I do so by twisting the perspectives, and creating fantasy worlds using interactive textile materials and animated light. Hopefully you will come out of it smiling, taking the experience with you and letting you see the regular world in a new glow", Malin says.


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“The driving force is to create some kind of alternate reality, create places where you can be carried away by something other than your everyday life.� Malin Bobeck, Textile designer and artist

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fabrics at heart Malin has been interested in fabrics since she was young working with them in many ways as, for example, a costume designer for theatre or making intelligent fabric for car seats where the colour changes when the car accelerates. smart textile design When she got her Textile Design bachelor at The Swedish School of textile in Borås she found her interest in smart textiles testing new methods, and that was when she discovered the fibre optic. It gave, and still gives, her a great challenge since it is not made by weaving.   The concepts of her installations are based on something from within that needs to come out.   “Actually, the driving force is to create some kind of alternate reality, create places where you can be carried away by something other than your everyday life, as a refuge. I want to create a magical place that can embrace you, so combining textile with light becomes very effective”, Malin says.

Her knowledge in lighting is mostly self-taught.   “Light attracts the eye, it changes the texture and textile depending how much light there is. I needed to find a middle ground because if you see the light clearly you can loose some of the texture”, Malin says.   But Malin is first and foremost a textile designer and artist who loves weaving.   “I have been working with weaving for a long time, long before fibre optics, I think the meeting between these two are very interesting, the traditional and genuine that has been around for a long time, alongside new techniques and material. They have not been natural partners. But thinking about it they have much more in common. When weaving you use a kind of weaving language controlled by a “chain of cards” much like programming with ones and zeros. They say that the power Jacquard loom was an important step in the history of computing hardware”, Malin says.

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malin bobeck – has been awarded with many scholarships such as “Encouragement of research” from the Swedish Sten A Olsson foundation, “Innovativ kultur” for the project “Interactive light emitting textile art” and in November 2016 she received the Stockholm Innovation Scholarship handed out by the City of Stockholm in the category Cultural & Creative Industries.   She has exhibited at Heimtex at Frankfurt, Stockholm Furniture Fair, Gothenburg Museum of Art, Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, National Taiwan Craft Research and Development Institute in Taiwan amongst other.

The art piece "Tactile refuge" reacts through touch.

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The art piece "Those who affected me" is a four winged structure suspended in mid air.

The art piece "Tactile refuge" has a handtufted centerpiece in wool.

tech fulfils visions Malin is continuously keeping up with latest technical development and digitalisation to find new expressions. She tries different new techniques, follows the latest innovations and connects with technical consultants to realise her ideas and vision.   “The technical development is moving rapidly, it is a constant process, to keep yourself updated with what is new. A thought that keeps coming up the more you work with art and art pieces is the realisation that the pieces will not live forever, it takes a few years then it is out of date. You allow for that when

creating. But I think it is rather nice, the temporary is beautiful and everything that exists has to end”, Malin says.   tactile data Malin sees great possibilities in the future making combinations of textile, technique and tactile material, things that are still pretty unique. She can see herself work with companies to create intelligence in installations and interiors by collecting data from example social media, adapting the feelings of the room through sensors.   “It would be nice to make information more understandable by translating

feelings to a tactile object. For example the VR-technique that comes on big now, it would be interesting to create a virtual world that could be totally magical and combining it with tactile material to further enhance the experience", Malin says.   And experiences is truly what Malin provides connecting people through fibre and thread, a meeting between senses and integrating through touch, with the idea of that the more people that interact with the piece the more you get out of it.   "I think that idea suits the world we live in today very well”, Malin concludes.

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”When attending this kind of event, you’re not there for the artist only – you want more. You want lights, moving pictures, special effects and pyrotechnics. You want an experience that blows your mind.” Alexander Hesse, Lighting designer and Director

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Light – the soul of Electronic Dance Music With his Cloud Nine-tour, artist and producer Kygo has taken musical entertainment to a new level. The creative force behind Kygo’s spectacular light show, Swedish Lighting designer and Director Alexander Hesse, is part of the success. text amelie bergman | photo olav durebbets, duncan abdelnour

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”I started working as a light technician ten years ago. Back then this kind of music-light- experience integration was part of the rave-related underground scene. Today it’s entertainment for the general public – it's the pop music of our time”, Alexander Hesse says.   At the time, future DJ-stars like  Kygo, David Guetta and Avicii had just started off their careers – Alexander discretely admitting that he’s worked with ”most of them”.   ”It’s been teamwork all the way, with friends and colleagues specialising in different disciplines. Together with the artists we’ve explored the creative possibilities of our mediums, taking their performances to the next level”, he says. to entertain No matter if it's a one off show or a mega dance festival – the crowd is there to be entertained.   ”Traditionally, if you’re going to a concert with, for example, Bruce Springsteen, you’re there to see and to hear The Boss. That’s it and you’re happy with that. But when attending this kind of event, you’re not there for the artist only – you want more. You want lights, moving pictures, special effects and pyrotechnics. You want an experience that blows your mind. That’s why I don’t call them DJs, I see them as producers and directors”, Alexander says.

lighting as a part of the orchestra Coordinated lighting is the key to the EDM-genre. Music and lights are to be perfectly synchronized, facilitated by the digital format and demanding advanced programming.   Lighting and other effects are carefully orchestrated to enhance the music and it’s elements. Shows are directed and programmed by Alexander and his colleagues in the production team.   The creative lighting design process takes place in close cooperation with the artist.   ”We usually start with a creative meeting, discussing the artist’s vision. It’s an incubation process where I show pictures and movies from other performances and introduce new ideas

light – the soul of electronic dance music

and concepts. I usually draw my projects in CASTs Wysiwyg, allowing me to programme the lighting in a sartorial environment, complete with stage and everything. I edit in Photoshop and I also work with Vectorworks and SketchUp”, he explains. led gives new possibilities The rampant development of LED  technology has brought new possibilities to create spectacular light shows. When directing Kygo’s two-night sell out at the famous Hollywood Bowl, Alexander had 188 moving LED fixtures in action dispersed over flown trusses.   ”LED has made it possible to use both fixed and moving fixtures in an innovative way. With its high output and low weight, LED fixtures allow me to work with a large number of luminaires and high effects, and its still manageable. Creating these effects with traditional fixtures was impossible. They were too heavy to handle – and trussing was out of the question”, he says.   ”Also, LED walls have developed a lot over the last ten years. They have extremely good resolution, they are much larger and you can work with them in a completely different way”, Alexander says. including audience Integrating the audience is a matter of course – and gone are old-fashioned lighters and smart phone flashlights. Interactive LED-wristbands are the hottest accessory.   ”For Kygo’s show in LA, we used interactive LED wristbands. The wristbands, handed out to the audience on arrival, were controlled by an infrared signal to synchronize with the music”, he says.   So, where to head to have that mind-blowing EDM-experience?   ”Of course, I’d say a Kygo-concert – or one of the many festivals worldwide like Amsterdam Dance Event, EDC Music Festival or Ultra. All the events taking place during Ibiza’s summertime are great. For a more traditional band experience? Coldplay. They tick all the boxes", Alexander concludes.


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exploring in adaptable light


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Little Explorers at Marina Mall in Dubai:

Exploring in adaptable light Lego is one of the most popular children’s toys in the world. No wonder that, alongside Little Explorers, Majid Al Futtaim Holding have based a serious child entertainment facility around the famous Lego bricks. Working together with Khansaheb, Fagerhult were entrusted to deliver a lighting design from scratch combining a fully integrated lighting control system and 21st century LED technology. text vasilina chernovalova | photo bjoern lauen

quick facts Exceptional energy efficiency and energy reduction (with over 300 pcs of 21 W spotlights utilized in the store) while achieving the required high lux levels (over 1000 lux) and retaining the highly recognizable Lego store look. DALI controls for setting up various lighting scenarios giving varying light levels, creating added interest and increasing energy efficiency.

the brief was to create two separate, clearly defined spaces, one for Lego and one for Little Explorers. The key challenge faced by Fagerhult was a strong requirement for high lux levels, which was problematic to achieve due to power constraints on site. The store is generally operated at over 1000 lux, but with lighting controls, the end user is able to adapt the lighting levels as and when they wish. efficient solutions Fagerhult’s Marathon Midi LED track light at 21 W delivers circa 3000 lm unlike many alternatives on the market which need over 30 watts to provide a comparable lumen output. With over 300 track spotlights on the project, utilizing the high lumen per watt, the Fagerhult luminaires saved a considerable power load. by the press of a button By using a DALI control system, the power of illumination is firmly in the

hands of the user. Each individual spotlight is addressable, thus allowing completely unique scene settings to be created. From the night setback mode, all the way through to the Little Explorer’s ‘main play’ setting, the light levels can totally change with the press of a button. combining various ´blocks´ In Little Explorers, the lighting plan was to concentrate on functionality and subtle lighting while retaining the quintessential look and feel of a typical Lego store. The juxtaposition of a uniformly bright store in Lego with the contrasting play area in Little Explorers clearly demonstrates Fagerhult’s ability to deliver on the brief.   Just like the toys, this job required Fagerhult, literally, to build the project from the ground up, combining the various ‘blocks’ of design, supply, lighting control and commissioning to achieve a truly unique piece of retail lighting design.

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Lighting controls in retail:

Attract, guide and save How can you make light personal? To attract customers in a shop, creating an inspiring atmosphere and at the same time increase both sales and energy savings? Use lighting controls. Linus Hall, Product Manager at Fagerhult tells us about different lighting control solutions he believes are a natural part of future shop concepts. text johanna bergstrรถm | photo joel dittmer, albin sjรถdin

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“We found it necessary to offer our customers an easy to understand application for lighting control.” Linus Hall, Product Manager at Fagerhult

lighting in a shop can make you feel inspired, comfortable and welcomed. A good lighting design contributes to creating successful shops, illuminating the merchandise in an attractive way. Side by side with other technology the lighting technology continuously evolves. This gives great possibilities in the future shop, LED lighting for example enables us to control the light, which can improve the shop experience even further.   “Lighting control is an effective tool to create a dynamic atmosphere to maintain customers interest”, Linus Hall explains.

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e-sense customised retail There are many ways to control the light and many control systems out there.   “Most people are aware of the purpose of lighting control and what effects it could achieve. However, you tend to lose customers' interest a bit when you explain the technical details. Also, although it is often perceived as expensive you have to think of it as an investment for the future the great savings to be made in energy costs and the fact that lighting control is continuously getting easier to use”, Linus says.   e-Sense Customised Retail is Fagerhult’s new lighting control package where the applications Window, Fit, Focus and Atmosphere enable specific solutions for different purposes in a shop.   ”This application was brought to life because we found it necessary to offer our customers an easy to understand application for lighting control. The packages are adjusted to fit the customer’s specific needs. It is supposed to be a practical tool and you should consider what you want to achieve instead of which technical components you should use”, Linus says.

window The shop window is all about drawing attention. Presence sensors react when people pass and can project vivid and interesting light scenes. You can also regulate the intensity of the lighting, for example when no one is near, you can dim all or some of the luminaires to save energy usage.   “Or why not adjust the lighting level in relation to the natural light outdoors?”, Linus says.

lighting controls in retail

fit Imagine a changing room where you can choose between different light scenes depending on what type of clothes you are wearing. For instance, wearing a shirt for work demands one type of lighting, a dress for a night out another and a pair of shorts for a day on the beach a third. Let the shop owner or the customer change the lighting scene using a touch panel or an iPad.   “Adjusting the light sources, colour rendering and colour temperature makes the customer feel comfortable and hence more inclined to buy”, Linus says.

focus You can also put focus on different areas in your shop, creating islands of interest letting light lead your customers around.   ”If you have a specific campaign or focus area with the latest offer you can work with lighting control in this area to create interest, for example changing light temperature or increasing light when someone is approaching”, Linus says.   It is also scientifically proven that elderly people need more light than younger. Depending on the person standing at the cash desk you can adjust the lighting in order to create a good work environment.

atmosphere Atmosphere is about intensifying and strengthening what the shop has to offer, making the ambience in the shop reflect the brand.   “For example, creating a specific atmosphere for specific events, prolonged opening hours where you can change the atmosphere in the shop by working with RGB colour system and set different light scenes. This arouses interest and curiosity”, Linus says. the technique behind Along the e-Sense Customised Retail application you need to have the necessary basis for lighting control that is a track and luminaires that are DALI compliant. The control unit fits in a 20x10 cm box and is programmed on site in your shop according to your needs.   DALI is a protocol for the digital communication between components of the lighting installation and includes the luminaires, the sensors and the control units. DALI is the primary condition for enabling the e-Sense Customised Retail concept. By using DALI the lighting can be dimmed, switched on and off. It also enables the recall of lighting schemes, time-controlled changes and the possibility of adjusting luminaires individually. If sensors and motion detectors are included in the system you can create responsive lighting solutions.  


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wireless control track gear If you just want to set different light levels at just one specific area in a shop Linus have another solution called Wireless Control Track Gear.   “Wireless Control Track Gear is a simple plug and play system where you plug in the lighting control components in the track and then you can dim the lighting up and down and turn it on and off. In this solution you work with small isolated islands instead of programming the whole or different areas in a shop in which everything is connected together, program, lighting scenes etc.”, Linus says.   The whole idea with Wireless Control Track Gear is that there is no programming. You can easily mix the luminaires that offer a general lighting, that you do not want to dim, with the controllable luminaires with which you simultaneously control the light levels up and down or on and off.   “This will be a creative and easy to use tool for stylists and decorators working in a shop”, Linus says.

The basis for Wireless Control Track Gear is a Control track. Then two units, one power supply and a wireless receiver, with the look of shark´s fin, are plugged into the Control Track and immediately all DALI luminaires can be turned on and off and dimmed up and down simultaneously.

Linus demonstrating the Wireless Control Track Gear where the units are plugged into the Control Track. “Extremely user-friendly, simply plug and play”, Linus says.

By using a Switch Cross panel with the Wireless Control Track Gear application you can easily dim the lighting up and down and turn it on and off.

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Lighting Controls

control the light via an app Fagerhult are constantly looking at different lighting control alternatives.   “One that attracted our interest is the Casambi app”, Linus says.   Casambi is one of the leaders in modern wireless lighting control based on Bluetooth Low Energy, BLE.   “The Casambi app has a very userfriendly interface (BLE) that can be integrated into luminaires, LED drivers and within LED modules or bulbs. The application makes it possible to set the light intensity on each individual luminaire, create groups and create scenes easily directly using the app. If you are connected you can also have remote controls”, Linus says.   Creating scenes and setting light intensity is possible with DALI equipment but DALI demands a higher level

lighting controls in retail

of programming expertise and hardware. In the Casambi app there is only a small added module.   The technology is placed in the luminaires instead of in a cabinet on the wall.   The Casambi app stands for ease of installation and functionality with very little additional hardware and deployment costs. It can be downloaded and installed from the Apple App Store for iOS devices or from the Google Play Store for Android devices. the future of lighting control according to linus “Within the near future we will see systems where every unit communicates with each other. For example ventilation, heat and presence. If the sensors in the luminaires can cooperate and register how many people there are in

a room the ventilation can be raised or lowered depending on the number of people and consequently contributing to energy savings. At the weekends it can also be lowered to save energy. Imagine if the luminaires in a parking garage could detect where there are available parking’s spots and certain luminaires can be lit in order to guide the driver to that certain spot”, Linus says.   A challenge with lighting today is that there are several standards available on the market but none are accepted.   “We cannot lock ourselves into just one single standard. We must work with them all, because eventually, and hopefully, there will be just one standard to rule them all, and when that happens it will happen fast. And you don’t want to miss that train”, Linus concludes.


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“Within the near future we will see systems where every unit communicates with each other. For example ventilation, heat and presence.� Linus Hall, Product Manager at Fagerhult

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“You need to go from a linear model, such as taking resources, create and throw away – to a circular model, to optimise the resource at each step in the value chain.” Sigrid Barnekow, Program Director at Mistra Future Fashion

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Circular future for fashion Never before have so many initiatives and projects been made to find new sustainable solutions and innovations that develop the retail industry. Mistra Future Fashion is a research program that has picked up on this and is carrying out interdisciplinary research with a large number of companies from the retail industry. The goal – to generate knowledge and innovations that enable a systematic change in fashion, via closed loops and an innovative mind-set, to reduce the environmental impact created by the fashion industry. text elin nilsson | photo istock.com/smileseafox and baona, mistra future fashion

there are large powerful industry players that are to the fore on the subject of sustainability – a subject that has never been as popular as it is now, not only companies but also consumers and authorities.   “The whole fashion industry is facing many challenges in the future such as energy use, environmentally demanding cotton production and an expected growth in middle class population that will draw on the earth’s resources”, Sigrid Barnekow, Program Director at Mistra Future Fashion, says.   The vision at Mistra Future Fashion is to enable a system change.   “To generate a sustainable and longterm solution you need to go from a linear model, such as taking resources, create and throw away – to a circular model, to optimise the resource at each

step in the value chain, with environmentally smart processes and recycling of all material during the process. So that nothing goes to waste”, Sigrid says.   But it is not that simple; to make a system change takes rethinking and new processes throughout the whole chain.   “The change must be made in a coherent way including all the players in the value chain and its system. New innovations are needed, to create a smarter production process, functioning recycling and regeneration of fabrics. But in the short term it is about trying to make your production as sustainable as possible, to make demands on the production of your products, so fabrics use green energy, incorporating water treatment plant, regulating chemicals and so on”, Sigrid says.

concluding challenges in fashion Initially a large part of the research at Mistra Future Fashion focused on identifying and concluding the challenges the industry is up against. And it was from those conclusions the research at Mistra Future Fashion was made.   Mistra Future Fashion was started in 2011 and is led by RISE (which is the former SP) Swedish technical research institute, together with 11 research partners including research institutes and universities and approximately 35 industrial partners. Their targets are all the main players within fashion and textile, the producers, suppliers, sellers, consumers, recyclers, authorities, industries and second hand sales etc. Some of the brands they are working with are Houdini, H&M, KappAhl, Filippa K, Eton, Nudie Jeans and Lindex.

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“We are focusing on four themes; how to design for a circular economy, how to enable a more sustainable production and supply chain, how we get the customer to act in a more sustainable way and how we can increase the recycling of textile fibre”, Sigrid says. many initiatives The work includes life cycle analysis, business models, resolutions, consumer studies, chemical science and processes.   ”We are seeing many new ideas from apps, an expanding second hand business or sustainable textile fibre – to store information in merchandise with transparency, so that its origin and journey can be traced, from production to end user. The impact of social media is also an important factor when people engage and ask for information. And the digital transformation will have an affect both in production and consumption, soon the fashion industries Tesla will show up”, Sigrid says. concrete sustainable tips The program will be finished in 2019 but within the evident growth and interesting advancements lies potential to extend the program within the network with the structure and platform already created, further building on the good relations the program has generated up to now.   “Our aim is to present several years work into something concrete and easy to comprehend – that is what we mean by a sustainable fashion and a circular system”, Sigrid says.   It will express itself in concrete clothing, new foundations and knowledge which forms a foundation for a circular system, to also guide authorities, politicians and companies in their decision-making.   “We will offer concrete information on which material and processes that are truly sustainable – quantitative data that is new and exciting. That will give fashion companies a better tool to make the right decisions for the future”, Sigrid concludes.

circular future for fashion

mistra future fashion is a program initiated by Mistra an environmental strategic research foundation. In 2010 they made a call to action to create an immersive research program to help making the fashion industry more sustainable. The program is a part of amongst other Sustainable Apparel Coalition and sup­ports the European Clothing Action Plan (ECAP). Get more information: www.mistrafuturefashion.com


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“We are seeing many new ideas, from apps, an expanding second hand business or sustainable textile fibre – to store information in merchandise with transparency.” Sigrid Barnekow, Program Director at Mistra Future Fashion

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repair shops – a new retail category?


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Repair shops – a new retail category? Behind that rough and eye-catching shop concept there is an underlying sustainable mind-set for every choice and decision, from walls to the type of floor. Nudies ambition is to create an over the counter type of shop culture where there is a purpose to the customer’s visits. A purchase, a repair or maybe just handing in a pair of old jeans for reselling. Eliina Brinkberg, CSR Manager and Ida Toll, Retail Design and Development Manager at Nudie Jeans head office in Gothenburg answered questions concerning sustainability and what changes they believe lie ahead regarding retail. text johanna bergström | photo nudie jeans co

eliina brinkberg is the Corporate Social Responsibility Manager at Nudie Jeans and have the overall responsibility to develop Nudie Jeans CSR work and to communicate it both externally and internally. how does nudie jeans define sustainability? "Sustainability is for us to be responsible for the impact that our business makes on the environment. This includes everything from choosing the right type of material, which producers we work with to our offer of free repair service and our reselling of old jeans. Since 2012 we have a collection of denim made

Ida Toll

of 100 % organic cotton. We are very careful when we select suppliers and we demand high standards regarding their environmental and social conditions policies", Eliina says. how do nudie jeans communicate their vision? "One way to communicate our philosophy is the fact that we call our shops repair shops. Consumers should use their jeans for a long time, take care of them and repair them instead of throwing them away and buying new ones. We also communicate our CSR work and the fact that it is possible to produce clothes in a sustainable way

through our website and on social media. We regularly visit universities, attend branch meetings and talk about our approach to sustainability. We hope this inspires and contributes to future developments in the fashion industry", Eliina says. how can existing and future technology contribute to sustainable solutions within the fashion industry? "We are very eager to see what technical development concerning recycling of cotton and other textile materials can bring", Eliina says.

Eliina Brinkberg

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Recycling cottonfibres from denim to new denim is today possible but the quality aspects are the challenging ones. Recycled cotton have shorter fibres which lower the quality and the durability of the fabric. We hope that technology will improve and meanwhile we keep collecting customer’s old jeans so by the time technology is in place we have resources to use.   Within the fashion industry there is a rapid development of resource-saving technologies, for example recycled water, energy efficient machines and a larger part of recycling “left over” materials.   I personally believe in a combination of a more sustainable consumption and a technical development that enables a much more environmentally adapted textile industry", Eliina concludes.

is responsible for Nudie Jeans' shop concept globally. tell us how you activate sustainability in your shops? "The most important and easiest way to explain it, is that we strongly believe that quality is equal to sustainability. We choose sustainable materials which have the capacity to be reused and recycled. Furthermore, we use vintage furniture in our shops to save resources and our lighting installations are, apart from vintage, exclusively LED in order to reduce energy. Perhaps the most sustainable energy and resource consumption is to avoid unnecessary refurbishing. When we set up for a new shop we do it with the ambition to save as much as possible from the original facility. New floors and painting walls are not always necessary", Ida says.

ida toll is the Retail Design and Development Manager at Nudie Jeans. She

“Personally, I think we will see more attempts to engage customers by offering a greater physical shopping experience. Not by doing the reality more digital – on the contrary – it needs to be more analogue.” Ida Toll, Retail Design and Development Manager at Nudie Jeans

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how do you involve your customers in your ideas? "We recommend our customers avoid washing their jeans! Our washing habits contribute to a major part of the energy consumption. Jeans that have not been exposed to any kind of pre-abrasion from the factory age most beautifully if they are worn for at least six months before they are washed. Not only do they last longer, the movement patterns appear as abrasions and wrinkles and the jeans becomes like a second skin. We recommend customers to wear their jeans for a long time, have them repaired and return them to the shop", Ida says. we see tendencies that digitalization is challenging retail. how do you think the future of retail will change? "The hunt for omnichannels is constant. Omnichannel means putting the customer in focus making sure that the customer receives an equally good experience regardless of which channel he or she chooses in contact with the brand. The purchase does not only take place in the shop or online, but both. I believe that we are going to see more and more touch screens in the shops, offering consumers an increased number of choices.   In the physical shop it is possible to create experiences that evokes several senses at the same time in order to enhance the brand. Temperatures, humidity, sound, light and scent are some examples of this. However, this is still at the experimental stage and maybe not something that many brands are up for yet.   Personally, I think we will see more attempts to engage customers by offering a greater physical shopping experience. Not by doing the reality more digital – on the contrary – it needs to be more analogue. In a shop you can twist and turn a pair of jeans and feel the fabric instead of the ones the web shop has decided to show you. It will be an undirected shopping experience putting the consumer in command instead of a directed version. A higher level of awareness from consumers place higher demands on the fashion industry to produce sustainable high quality products", Ida concludes. Learn more at: www.nudiejeans.com

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Booster Pro:

Lighting for a premium shop experience In the Stockholm based Mall of Scandinavia (the largest shopping centre in Scandinavia) the Norwegian cosmetic company Booster Pro opened a shop with a very unique look that sets it apart from many other similar shops. text johanna bergström photo shimon weitsman/studio maayan

anders aspling, project leader at Nordic Project Solutions AB, a Project Management Company, led the Booster Pro project in everything from planning, design, production, logistics, lighting, warehousing to the final assembly of the shop.   ”Booster Pro had a very clear vision of how they wanted the lighting to be,

booster pro

our job was to find the right partner to realize it”, says Anders Aspling.   Anders contacted Fagerhult and together with concept developers Erik Torstensson and Paul Esplana, Fagerhult delivered a lighting solution that met Booster Pro’s expectations. After studying 3D visualizations from Booster Pro, the concept development team

put together a lighting calculation and a visualization in Archi CAD (a design software and basis for renderings). The lighting calculation shows the luminaires in the shop with their estimated per Lux (lumens per square meter) light levels and also offers a sense of how the lighting will function.


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The software can also calculate the energy consumption for the chosen solution. Creating a visualization of the shop gives the customer a view of how the lighting will be in real life.    ”The design for Booster Pro is in a way very architectural, it is all about straight lines and squares. They use almost exclusively black and white colours in the entire shop. We used recessed luminaries throughout the shop ceiling

booster pro

with a white light and good colour rendering making it feel even whiter and giving the shop it's clean and premium atmosphere”, says Erik Torstensson.   Providing the right environment is important for a shop owner in order to get customers in the right mood for shopping. In retail, lighting is almost as central as the architectural and interior design. Fagerhult's approach is to offer the customer guidance and advice on

“Creating a visualization of the shop is to give the customer a view of how the lighting will be in real life.” how their lighting solution can support and enhance their brand’s personality. Just imagine the effect if the wrong colour temperature was used in Booster Pro's shop. A warm lighting tone would not enhance that pure and exclusive look that has now become such a part of this brand’s identity.


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Fagerhult's road to find a lighting concept photo albin sjรถdin, paul esplana

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™

Fagerhult O.D.D – On demand design is a function at Fagerhult where our product developers create custom-made applications to a specific customer and concept. It can be a LED control system, a luminaire design or a special solution for a project.

Conceptual tubes Bik Bok is an international fashion destination for young women that lives fashion and gets inspired by the latest trends. The Bik Bok shops have a modern and hip concept that adds to their trendy brands value. Just as you can find your own individual look you can get inspired by the individuality of the surroundings of unique lighting installations of conceptual tubes throughout the whole shop design. text elin nilsson photo paul esplana

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key account manager Kristian Renström and Lighting Designer Therese Düring at Fagerhult continuously work closely together with the conceptual team at Bik Bok to find lighting solutions that suits their style.   ”We are very happy to have a close and good relationship with Fagerhult and we depend on having good communication with all of our suppliers. Fagerhult is an expert in its field, lighting. We have high standards and often want to make changes, we are therefore very glad that Fagerhult is solution oriented and helpful in the process of finding a new lighting concept”, Camilla Skavern, Creative Director at Bik Bok says.    For Bik Bok it is important to continuously evolve.    “At Bik Bok we keep ourselves updated in everything from lighting, furnishing, decoration and interior to what´s currently on the catwalk. We do so because we have a target group that is constantly changing, and we need to keep up”, Camilla says.   With a shared idea phase a new eye-catcher was created – the lighting installations of T8 lookalike LED tubes.   “With inspiration from the old T8 tubes we wanted to keep the feeling but add modern LED lighting technique. By adding a brass end to it we got a very cool looking luminaire”, Kristian Renström says.   The tubes are now a part of Bik Bok’s fresh lighting concept together with Marathon spotlights that are used as accent lighting.   New for the Bik Bok flagship at Fredsgatan in Gothenburg was an original art installation of tubes in a intriguing pattern on the wall.   “We wanted to create a nice looking eye catcher when walking through the doors and we also made a special floor luminaire for the lounge area”, Kristian says.   The tubes became reality through Fagerhult’s on demand process, Fagerhult O.D.D – a function at Fagerhult in which Fagerhult’s product developers create custom-made applications to find unique solutions that suits the customer’s brands.   “We are very pleased with the solution, it suits us well in time and has a cool and simple touch, something we were trying to achieve”, Camilla concludes.

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The power of beauty Who ever you are, wherever you are from the power of beauty lies in each and every one of us. This is what L’Oreal believe making beauty their business for more than a century – to enable individuals to express their personalities at the different stages of their lives. Their NYX Professional Make up shops focus on teenagers. The shop is named after a Greek goddess who ruled the night, having an exceptional power and beauty. text elin nilsson photo © jalila dahane

nyx concept empowers teenagers making them bloom in a shop made from a palette of dark and contrasting colours, highlighted lighting solutions and fashionable pink.   With their headquarters in the heart of Los Angeles, NYX is a global brand that can be found in over 70 countries. Throughout 2016 a lot of NYX shops were opened across Europe, from cities like Valencia, Toulouse, Barcelona, Zagreb and Paris.   Fagerhult in France were chosen to

the power of beauty

follow on that journey providing lighting solutions to each and every shop. To date Fagerhult have completed about 50 projects around Europe.   “Being an international retail lighting company we can follow our customer’s expansions and are dedicated to enabling those customers achieve their objectives”, Mats Jensert Salomonsson, Business Development Director at Fagerhult says.   With a focus on communicate beauty and providing professional make up

at affordable prices NYX has a dark and contrasting shop concept with a discreet design of the lighting solution. Black LED spotlights of efficient Marathon G2 were chosen because of their contemporary look that blends well into the matching black interior and ceiling   To enhance the different products Barndoor accessories were used to cut off the light, giving a comfortable and enhancing light to the colourful make up.


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“The shop is named after the Greek goddess Nyx who ruled the night, having an exceptional power and beauty.”

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The Mobile Store of the Future is here The O2 concept store in Manchester, designed by Dalziel & Pow, reinvents what you expect from a mobile phone store. From technology and promotional showcase to lounge areas with hot drinks, engagement and interaction are at the forefront of O2’s new design proposition. Fagerhult was chosen as the lighting partner to fulfill this new vision for the mobile giant. text marianne trotta | photo o2

situated in manchester's busy Market Street, the O2 store represents a new strategy for the mobile provider. Through modern design and interactivity, seeks to differentiate itself from competitors by providing a shopping experience as opposed to concentrating on promotional offers.   To enhance the experience and time spent in store, different zones were created with lighting being used to

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enhance each space individually. In the ‘inspire zone’ where new product launches and campaigns take place, flexibility to change the displays was key. In this area iTrack coupled with Marathon spotlights and custom-made attractive light sheets highlight the hero products.   In the ‘explore zone’ where the majority of phones and accessories are displayed, pendant luminaires provided

the light source. Ambient lighting is provided by projectors that throw images, such as the Manchester skyline, on to the walls, further adding to the interactive feel of the shopping experience.   The result is an exemplar mobile store where experience is king and where lighting plays a key role in keeping engagement and interest high.


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“The result is an exemplar mobile store where experience is king and where lighting plays a key role in keeping engagement and interest high.�

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The many lives of Dino Is it a cat? Or is it a chameleon? Architects Lars Pettersson and Morgan Rudberg are the masterminds behind Dino – the luminaire with a versatile character and nine lives. text amelie bergman | photo joel dittmer, johan knobe

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“One of the latest designs from PetterssonRudberg is Fagerhult's versatile LED-engine Dino.”

petterssonrudberg is an interdisciplinary design and architecture consultancy working with projects on various scales. Dynamic architect duo Lars Pettersson and Morgan Rudberg design smaller objects, such as furniture and products, up to larger scaled villas, commercial- or industrial buildings. As experienced interior designers they are proud creators of innovative retail concepts for customers such as Whyred and Helly Hansen.   Pettersson and Rudberg have specialized in sustainable design, with the aim of finding the social- and ecological solution in every project.

”80 percent of a product’s environmental impact is decided in the design process. The design affects everything – from material to production methods and recycling. With a well thought out design strategy it’s a win-win – for environment, society and our customers”, says Lars and Morgan who has experienced a change of attitude in the market:   ”Sustainability is a top consideration. Customers embrace the challenge, accepting that the process might be a little bit more complex. That was not the case just a few years ago.”   By focusing on materials, they often

find new ways of combining innovative design with sustainability benefits.   ”When it comes to choosing materials, the truth is often complicated. A material that – at first glance – seems to be a bad choice from an environmental point of view, might end up to be the one that makes sense”, Morgan explains.   One of the latest designs from PetterssonRudberg is Fagerhult's versatile LED-engine Dino. Designed with a circular perspective in mind, this luminaire has the prospect of living many lives.

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By combining different sizes, light outputs, colours and shades Dino offers freedom to get the light and expression you strive for, no matter what the project.   Dino has its own universe. It’s a whole system with different shades in different materials – textile, glass and metal – that can be combined to fulfil various lighting tasks and to create various moods in almost any application. From a retail shop, to an office, to a comfy hotel room…   The cooperation with Fagerhult has been a mutual process where both parties have had the opportunity to develop and deepen their sustainability design strategies.   ”It’s been kind of a ping-pong match –

and both sides are winners”, Lars laughs.   ”For our part, it was an experience to work on a product with such good environmental properties, as this LED engine is highly energy efficient. Fagerhult is its own producer and supplier of LED modules, meaning we had the chance to design the luminaire’s heat sink. That’s a rare opportunity for a designer”, Lars says.   ”From Fagerhult’s point of view the cooperation with Lars and Morgan has resulted in a new kind of product and offer”, Peter Björkman, Product manager at Fagerhult says.   ”With Dino, we can meet customer’s needs for flexible and decorative luminaires that are easily adapted to creative and unique interior designs. It’s been a

fortunate non-prestigious project with customer benefits and sustainability as beacons”, Peter continues.   Dino is a powerful light source with a very long life span. At the same time, the cycles for interior concepts are getting shorter as brands and customers demand constant change.   ”By adding the possibility of keeping the LED engine and simply change the shade – and by carefully choosing the materials from a recycling perspective – we’ve replaced a linear design model with a cyclical one”, Lars and Morgan concludes. Long live Dino!

“Dino has its own universe. It’s a whole system with different shades in different application.” The LED engine comes in two different sizes for different expressions and ceiling heights.

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How to illuminate with style Touch is a stylish and timeless luminaire that will fit smoothly into any retail environment. As versatile as a “little black dress” or a fitted suit, always ready to put on a great performance no matter what the application. Get the story behind – the idea of Touch. text elin nilsson | photo örjan henriksson, 3dvision, joel dittmer, david holmqvist

when the product and application manager Peter Robertsson at Fagerhult started to think about a new spotlight series he and his team had an idea, allowing them to remove the very common external driver box.   “We wanted to create a spotlight that gives a clean geometric look on the ceiling, a spotlight with a design that enhances the shop experience and doesn’t have a lot of driver boxes pointing in various directions at the ceiling”, Peter says.   So the Fagerhult retail team in Bollebygd worked closely together with the product development team at Fagerhult in China to find the right solution. One of Fagerhult's retail customers was also a part of the process to get it just right. the result? “With the help of technical advancements in electric components we could integrate the driver into the housing, creating a luminaire with a clean cylindrical shape and a proportional design”, Peter says.   Another benefit was the effect on light distribution as the reflector used is deeper.

“This creates a very good lighting comfort as there is less glare from the luminaire. You can also add several accessories to get the right light where you need it”, Peter says.   The luminaire was named Touch and is now a whole spotlight series, offering track-mounted spotlights in various sizes, depending on ceiling height and the impression you want to make – also available for different tracks. There is also a wide choice of recessed luminaires in single, double and triple versions.   “With this wide assortment you can achieve a unified and stylish look in a shop and the balance of Touch is perfect, so there is no problem aiming all spotlights to one side on a pendent down track”, Peter says.   The LED module chosen for Touch has a pure white light colour, very well suited for illuminating retail merchandise, and the colour rendering is very high, above CRI 90.   “We hope this luminaire will fulfil the retailers need for great shop lighting. The family is continuously growing, so stay tuned for more versions”, Peter concludes.

uct and Peter Robertsson, Prod at Fagerhult Application Manager

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hemtex One of the first projects with Touch were the Hemtex shop in Sisjรถn, Gothenburg. Hemtex is one of the Nordics leading retail shops that offer home textiles such as pillows, blankets and linen. When their shop needed a face-lift and visual upgrade the choice landed on the stylish spotlight Touch Midi in a white version. The luminaires contribute to a unified and clean look on the ceiling, with light that complements the fresh and subtle merchandise on display, creating a comfortable shop where you want to linger.

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Get the Look Fagerhult want to inspire fashion retailers to use lighting as a way to express their brand and personality, like consumers use fashion to express theirs. In the Fagerhult Lookbook you find four personalities with distinctive and diverse characters, fashion preferences and styles. They have each been given a shop that matches their character and a shop concept with suitable lighting design for each one. Have a look at: fagerhult.com/lookbook

fagerhult lookbook


retail main office: Fagerhult Retail AB, Rinnavägen 12, SE 517 33, Bollebygd, Sweden, Phone: +46 33 722 15 00, www.fagerhult.com/retail


www.fagerhult.com

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