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no. 7 tasteful perspectives on retail lighting solutions

The foodie issue

Convergence: Restaurant Noma in collaboration with Club Monaco

INTERVIEW:

Studio Streck about inventing a bakery concept

Fresh foodie technology Delicious cinemagraphs

FOOD TRENDS efficient store designs rfid: innovative retailing kitchen is the ď ™ of the home


The ultimate foodie experience Dear reader, This magazine is all about presenting innovation and trends that will spark your imagination. Previously we have had different themes and focus areas. This issue is dedicated to different food sectors like hypermarkets, convenient stores, restaurants and cafes.   Food and health are becoming increasingly important in our lives. The term “foodie” has been used for some time now and social media is exploding with different food experiences. A foodie is a person who has an ardent or refined interest in food and seeks new food experiences rather than simply eating out of hunger. Our passion for light is equivalent to the foodies passion for food!   Trends in society will influence the way we shop, what kind of shops consumers like and consequently what kind of lighting is used within these particular shops.   As a retail partner we prepare for upcoming trends and develop suitable lighting concepts with our customers target group in mind. In this issue you will find the process which takes us to what we consider the best possible solution for our customers.   We also present our latest products and projects within food, whether it is creating the perfect atmosphere or reducing energy consumption to a minimum.   I hope you will enjoy this magazine and find inspiration for your upcoming projects.

Monica Weinitz Managing Director, Fagerhult Retail AB

publisher:

Fagerhult Retail AB Rinnavägen 12 SE 517 33, Bollebygd, Sweden Phone: +46 33 722 15 00 www.fagerhult.com/retail

editorial:

Camilla Hult, camilla.hult@fagerhult.se Elin Nilsson, elin.nilsson@fagerhult.se Sofia Forsander, sofia.forsander@fagerhult.se Amelie Bergman

graphic design:

Elin Nilsson, elin.nilsson@fagerhult.se

cover photo:

Ted Olsson


Kitchen Ghosts is cooking delicious cinemagraphs. //

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In this issue NO. 7, 2016

Lifestyle choices and their effects on the food industry Food trends

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No magic, just hard work Studio Streck creates retail concepts

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Tying the knot Noma in cross over collaboration with Club Monaco

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How to find the right retail shop A shop concept is brought to life

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Finding innovative retailing Retail research

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4 ways to an efficient store Sustainable tips

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Kitchen Ghosts Cooking delicious cinemagraphs

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Lighting recipes Luminaires for the food store

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Kitchen – the ď ™ of the home Whats is cooking?

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Efficient store designs Showcasing references

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Fresh foodie technology There are 2000 chefs lined up in your kitchen

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Finding everyday items at Spar in Sundvollen A store example

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Food experiences Tongue Twister

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Enhance colours with light Rich and glow functions

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Grocery shopping at Lithuania's new attraction point Rimi Hypermarket

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Welcome to a world of retail lighting Creative Lab Retail and showrooms

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the innovator


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lifestyle choices and their effects on the food industry


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”People are tired of losing their bodies and minds to the minimal physical effort of office work.”

Lifestyle choices and their effects on the food industry Strong is the new skinny, LCHP instead of LCHF, dieting with Instagram and slow food instead of fast food. How will these trends effect the food industry? text camilla hult | photo savu-kari, istock.com/henk badenhorst, scyther5

there is a large wellness trend moving across the world. People are tired of losing their bodies and minds to the minimal physical effort of office work. They want to get back to our ancestors when it comes to movement and exercise, taking physical activity to new extremes.   A lifestyle with exercise and healthy food choices will define them and as the social landscape of different social media platforms will make it easy to both inspire others but also make their choices define them through sharing their activities and values.   Exercise seems to trend towards more basic and easy but still very hard

training. Gone are the fashionable gyms where you went to show off you latest training outfit.   Signing up for hard races seems to be the best way to challenge yourself, and your social media followers. Boutique gyms tailored to specific needs are getting more common, where being part of a community rather than large mass of people trying to lose weight, is more interesting.   Of course, to be able to perform at the

to eat and what not to eat in order to achieve their goal. A few years ago LCHF (low carb high fat) was the trend to follow, while today there is more focus on LCHP (low carb high protein).   For women there is a saying that “strong is the new skinny”. Even if lots of women still go to gyms to lose weight there is a shift towards using lifting weights instead of cardio to reach their goal. This means a more achievable goal for many women and the focus

top you also need to eat a lot and to eat well. Gone are the days of diets on plain salad. Todays consumers are updated on what protein intake they need every day. They have a very clear idea of what

has moved from achieving the skinniest body to the healthiest. Health has been a frequent hashtag in social media even though a skinny ideal still exists.

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social media and transparency A British woman lost over 50 kg by posting images of her food and her progress in weight loss on Instagram. Instagram helped her find people who recommended suitable healthy dishes. She also got a lot of followers that gave her encouragement when posting pictures of herself and her weight loss.   The important thing here is that, through these new healthy ideals sparked through social media, food is a common factor. Because to be healthy you need to eat healthily. What you eat is important! And here the food and restaurant industry have new consumers to relate to. Not only will they need information about what is in their chosen products but they will also have demands as to whether it is organic or not and where the product comes from.   Transparency for food retailers is becoming increasingly important. With the support of social media the message of both positive and negative information is quick to circulate. But retailers are sometimes cautious about delivering messages on successful CSR work, due to the fear of being analysed by media on all levels finding areas where their work has not been so successful and therefore bringing down the whole company. This is called green hushing, playing on the word green washing which is a term to explain corporations eager to present social responsibility but not doing it with a holistic perspective.   Coop Italy completely redesigned its brand communication and image starting by the redefinition of its brand directions, that is its brand principles and rules. The new communication paradigm was first implemented in the Point of Sales and then coherently conjugated on their web site and in their presence on the social media.   Coop Italy is in fact a cooperative owned by their consumers’ members.

lifestyle choices and their effects on the food industry

”Transparency for food retailers is becoming increasingly important. With the support of social media the message of both positive and negative information is quick to circulate.”


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That means that it is a social enterprise that has social responsibility inscribed in its foundation statute. Its new brand communication is therefore based on transparency and it therefore represents a paradigmatic model of social marketing.   All Coop private label products are in fact communicated as heros that are fighting on the battle field of fairly traded goods, not tested on animals cosmetics, FSC certified paper, sustainable fishing, compostable or recycled packaging, animal welfare granted breeding,

no food chemical colouring. Coop social commitment is the nutshell of its brand identity and of its values-based offer. That also implies to sacrifice commercial benefits when it is needed. Coop brand directions are for example banning foie gras from their assortment even if that can result in a sales’ declining.   This strategy was a way to raise brand awareness and value based benefits, sometimes having to sacrifice commercial benefits. For example within the animal welfare campaign they made a decision to exclude foie gras from their

assortment resulting in declining sales but making a strong brand statement.   The Food Babe Army is an organisation in the US that was started by a woman that was hospitalised because of bad food habits. Today the organisation tries to change the way of the large American food companies, abandoning chemicals for example. The Food Babe Army is very active on social media. Recently the Food Babe Army got Subway to commit to only using animals raised without antibiotics.

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”A foodie is a person who has an ardent or refined interest in food and alcoholic beverage. A foodie seeks new food experiences as a hobby rather than simply eating out of convenience or hunger.” Wikipedia.com

the foodie culture The large attention food gets in our everyday life through conventional media and social media is of course something food retailers have taken advantage of.   In the seventies and eighties food was supposed to be ready-made and time saving, today the focus is on organic, high quality and locally produced. To really come across as this healthy option brands need to focus on marketing and brand building to make it worth the investment of making really good quality food.

lifestyle choices and their effects on the food industry

Focusing on one ingredient, doing it really well, rather than offering everything the customer could possibly want is one expression of the foodie culture. An example of this is the caviar bar the Finnish company Savu-Kari that offers a wide range of fish and roe products, with the focus on premium quality products and their origin. They opened a champagne-caviar bar on one of the most exclusive locations in Helsinki where the customers are served firstclass caviar together with champagne or fine spirits.   In Amsterdam there is a food chain

called de Clercq that has a really interesting concept. Each week the store features 14 recipes incorporating seasonal, local ingredients, presented on separate stands in individual portions, with recipe cards for shoppers to take home. Each stand also includes a suggested wine to go with the meal, while the space itself includes a cafe and bakery. Perhaps an adaptation of the seventies and eighties fast food trend but with present day ideas of healthy ingredients and slow-food?


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Savu-Kari's caviar bar.

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Tying the knot. Noma in cross over collaboration with Club Monaco What is your industry? Retail? Restaurant? Interior Design, Hospitality or Entertainment? And does it really matter? In The Convergence Economy brands are trans boundary, embracing collaboration and cross over projects. text amelie bergman | photo noma, istock.com/floortje

tying the knot


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tying the knot


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tying the knot


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”Expanding the business and brand into new territory – solely or in collaboration with other brands – is a macro trend sometimes described in terms of The Convergence Economy.” as long as a brand is responding to the desires of a certain lifestyle, the borders between different industries are less important. Expanding the business and brand into new territory – solely or in collaboration with other brands – is a macro trend sometimes described in terms of The Convergence Economy.   Swedish interior giant Ikea, for example, is one of those stretching, bending and blurring its concept. When the Salone del Mobile opened up in Milan this spring, Ikea surprised with a preview of its new pop-up restaurant ”Ikea Temporary” in Milan. Add to this a 4000 square meter exhibition with products and kitchens styled by famed designers, it was hard to tell whether Ikea is into Billy bookshelves, meatballs, hospitality, entertainment or art. time and place Another brand that is successfully expanding its universe is Michelin

starred Copenhagen restaurant Noma (four times winner of the ”World’s Best Restaurant Award”).   Some ten years ago, Noma reinvented the Nordic cuisine and became world famous for its innovative, yet basic approach. Focusing on ”time and place” Noma works solely with produce from the region and every dish is carefully composed with regard to what is in season; the ”Weather Recipes” including dishes like ”Snowman”, "Birch Wood Dessert” and ”Blueberries surrounded by their Natural Environment”.   However, the creative team under celebrity chef René Redzepi shows no fear of unconventional collaborations or crossing borders. When invited to a guest appearance at the Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo in January, the team reinvented the Noma concept – moving the entire staff to Tokyo but leaving the ingredients at home. Instead, the Noma team went off to explore the winter

produce of Japan and created a menu for this particular time and place. knotted together In the same hospitable spirit, Noma recently opened up its own premises at a trendy Copenhagen location for new collaborations. For a couple of weeks Noma’s restaurant space was transformed into a lifestyle concept store by Club Monaco, featuring a curated boutique of women’s and men’s clothing and accessories, homeware and Noma dishware as well as vintage pieces and books.   The pop-up's design was made to match the vintage items for sale, and featured woven art installations and hand crafted wooden tents. The installations were, of course, available for purchase.

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The experience was completed by the guest appearance of Swedish coffee bar Koppi Kaffe and resident wine bar Ved Stranden 10, offering shoppers drinks, pastries, snacks and tasting events accompanied by live music.   The collaboration was cleverly named ”The Bowline” after the ancient, ingeniously simple knot that is used to form a fixed loop at the end of a rope. Sometimes referred to as ”King of the knots” the bowline is easy to tie and untie, especially after being subjected to a load. In many ways the perfect symbol for a temporary collaboration where brands are seamlessly united and separated.

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”The collaboration was cleverly named ”The Bowline” after the ancient, ingeniously simple knot that is used to form a fixed loop at the end of a rope.”

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Finding innovative retailing Research within Retail is a commonly discussed subject. How can we sell more? What do customers want? How can we keep up with new technology? But also, how can we actually prove that activities or technology will increase sales? text camilla hult | photo university of borås, istock.com/pjphoto69

the research and development programme SIIR, at the University of Borås Sweden, aims to deliver research resources and research environment to the retailing field, the retail industry and to society as a whole. They do so to contribute to innovative and sustainable retailing. Research is being conducted in several different fields such as IT, logistics and sustainability, but the common denominator is that it is all connected to retail. testing ideas to increase sales In the laboratory different ideas are tested based on what the companies in their network want to know. Presently there are a lot of tests based on new technical solutions that could make a more service-filled experience, and of course, in the end, increase sales. Plenty of new technological advancements can be used in both food and fashion shops.

Pia Johansson and Camilla Carlsson at Borås University.

finding innovative retailing

Most experiments in the lab are related to IT and information, presenting new ways to use IT that allows the customer to get better service without having to increase the staff. adding information One interesting “experiment” is called the info-shelf that gives the customer additional information on merchandise with the help of RFID-tag and a screen; either a separate screen in the shop or the consumer’s mobile phone.   The information the consumer gets from the tag is text, images and videos. This kind of information could be a product guide, specific information about the product and/or matching products. The potential for this technology has no limits.   Perhaps you can scan a food product, get additional information such as a recipe in which you can use this product, and other merchandise needed to make

a complete recipe. You could also get information about the products content if, for example, you have an allergy. helps making choices This technology is also used in dressing rooms. The customer brings a garment into a dressing room, equipped with an RFID-tag. The dressing room is equipped with a screen, which has the capability of giving additional information about the item.   Perhaps the size does not fit or you want to see if the clothing is available in another colour. Maybe you would like to get suggestions on a whole outfit including a specific garment.   There are even possibilities to make a purchase right there and then, avoiding a loss in turn-over should a customer change their mind on their way to the cash desk. on-going experiments SIIR also has several on-going experiments useful for online shopping. One is called eye tracking where an advanced camera measures eye movements across a screen. By combining the eye tracking with an interview with the test person a holistic picture of the customer’s experience of the retailer’s web appears.   This is a vast expansion of the possibilities to develop the retail business in different areas. The investment of RFID might be substantial but definitely seems to be one of the ways forward.


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RFID – Radio Frequency Identification, is now a common term used to describe a technology that uses radio frequency waves automatically identifying objects and gathering information. RFID-tags can be described as a product DNA which can be supplied with various types of information that is unique to the particular article.

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Daria Khoroshavina.

cooking delicious cinemagraphs


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Kitchen Ghosts:

Cooking delicious cinemagraphs Kitchen Ghosts is a duo that has taken the foodie culture to a higher level. By focusing on displaying homemade food and its handcraft in a tasteful way their stylish imagery has caught the attention of foodies all over the world. To find out more about them and their interesting work, we asked them a few questions. text camilla hult | photo kitchen ghosts

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�Surprisingly people liked it and I started getting lovely notes from new followers. So we kept on shooting and improving, shooting, analysing feedback, learning and improving.� Daria Khoroshavina, Photographer Kitchen Ghosts

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who are you? ”I am Daria, a 25-year-old photographer from Russia, Olga is my assistant, stylist and model and we created and work on the Kitchen Ghosts together.” what is your occupation and background? ”I started working as a photographer almost right after I graduated from university. I did a lot of portraiture at first, but I always liked to experiment

and try new things, so when I saw a cinemagraph I immediately decided to join the club.   Olga is a friend of mine, she was a stay at home mom and was looking for a part time job, so she started assisting me on the shoots. She has a designer background so she really helps me a lot with styling and compositions.” what is kitchen ghosts? ”We started this project with a simple

soup recipe that we did as an experiment. The result was fun, we giggled a bit and uploaded it on Tumblr. Surprisingly people liked it and I started getting lovely notes from new followers. So we kept on shooting and improving, shooting, analysing feedback, learning and improving. I always try to make my cinemagraphs look not like gifs but like real photographs. Editing a 256-colour photograph is a lot of pain sometimes, but I have learned a few tricks by now.”

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how did you get the idea for kitchen ghosts? ”I like the moody and catchy feeling of cinemagraphs, I think I have finally found my thing. The idea was simple, I wanted to combine cinemagraphs and food photography, because cinemagraphs needs precision and time and food photography does not require a large crew and models. So basically it is a thing I can experiment with when I am alone at home, which is perfect for me.” who are your customers? ”We are lucky to see that more and more brands are becoming interested in cinemagraphs, and not only the food related ones. We are happy to expand our

portfolio with more lifestyle imageries; I think we can turn pretty much anything into a cinemagraph now!” what are your views on the foodie culture, that food has become more visible and important in our every day lives? ”I love that people now have a habit of sharing photos of their food and I don't understand those who hate on it. I mean, food is good for you; it evokes good emotions even when you see it on the picture, brings positivity, and inspires you to try new things and even make healthier choices. I love foodies. And food. It is about magic in the everyday life.”

cinemagraphs – Cinemagraphs are still photographs in which a minor and repeated movement occurs. Cinemagraphs, which are published in either animated GIF format or as video, can give the illusion that the viewer is watching a video. Source: Wikipedia.com

See the cinemagraphs on: www.kitchenghosts.carbonmade.com

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cooking delicious cinemagraphs


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Kitchen – the  of the home Our interest in cooking, crafts and creativity got a reboot when we entered the 21st century and the kitchen became the place where to gather, work and create. We basically returned to the basics where family and locally produced products come close to our hearts. text sofia forsander | photo vedum, istock.com/chris gramly

the past decades have transformed
 the kitchen from the room in the back to an open space for everyone to share and enjoy. And when a lot of TV chefs and food shows entered our lives, we changed, opened up the kitchen and reinvented ourselves as pros and master chefs. We can say that the kitchen is our new status symbol, with our growing interest in food. We buy a mincer, mince the meat, bake the sourdough bread and invest in a double boiler for our Friday dumplings. redesign and personalise Together with the bathroom, the kitchen is at the top of our renovating “to do lists”. When buying a new residence we look carefully at the kitchen and, since food is our largest shared interest, how best to personalise it. Refurbishments are costly and a well-designed interior can be important when it comes to selling a home. It can pay off to have more traditional furniture and instead a personalised décor. gather together Who doesn’t need a kitchen where you can gather and have big family dinners, invite friends for brunch and

kitchen – the  of the home

where children can prepare for school? We gather around food. There is a trend towards basic food with a touch of added luxury; simple food such as hamburgers and pizza have gone from being a fast food to something really exclusive. This kind of food also needs many basic ingredients, locally as well as ecologically produced, which is an ever increasing market today. share Of course we want to share our own meals and recipes regularly around the table. With the digital age came social media such as Facebook and Instagram, places where food lovers search and share new experiences. Basically you can invite whomever you want into your kitchen. Who makes the best sour dough bread? Find out under #instafood at Instagram. next step So, how would the future kitchen be? Back to basics or will the technology take over this beloved place? Perhaps the bedroom is the next place to focus on? Even if our food passion changes, the kitchen will still be personalised and the heart of the home.


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What is cooking? light up your kitchen Apply the latest LED technology and luminaires in natural materials to your kitchen. Without light there will be no perfect Instagram images and no “likes”. By combining different materials and using luminaires in clusters the kitchen lighting is more dynamic and attractive to you and your friends. Copper coloured luminaires in circular shapes draw attention to certain focal points. Luxury decorations and beautiful chandeliers can give that extra touch to the kitchen.

an open work and social area Our homes have gone from closed plan to open floor plan, the epicentre of the home is the kitchen. Create an open space where we can be both social as well as productive.   A lot of people are running their business from home, surely often from their kitchen table. Creating a space that is inviting, where everyone can work, eat and socialize, can set the tone for the entire home.

make it white A white kitchen is like the perfect black dress in your wardrobe, it is easy to redesign and add the latest trends. Use painted colours, cabinets and structures as accessories to create new looks. Combine with several shades of white or grey to give a truly amazing look.

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you and your inner masterchef See yourself as the masterchef and get the kitchen you deserve to create fantastic meals. Look around and see what happens in the commercial sector, TV shows and magazines, get inspired, and take it to your home! Clean lines and open airy shelving together with classic materials such as tiles, stainless steel and fresh herbs can bring out the right timeless look. And do not forget to have the best kitchenware to make your delicious meals!

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uniqueness with textures Personalise the kitchen with different textures and materials. Wood, grained laminates and unusual finishes such as metallic, will balance the past years of high-gloss finishes. Matte black, bronze and brass highlights or oil rubbed bronze fixtures will add interest in the kitchen. Clean elements with contemporary accessories and lighting will create an industrial feel and a unique kitchen.

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�Home cooks can get professional advice in their own kitchen. Professional chefs get an excellent opportunity to build a social media brand while at the same time earning a little extra money.�

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Fresh foodie technology:

There are 2000 chefs lined up in your kitchen! After spending hours – and probably a small fortune – searching for the right ingredients, there’s no excuse for bad cooking. So what to do when the results don’t turn out as planned? Talk to a chef! text amelie bergman | photo elin nilsson, talk to chef

the digital revolution has stirred the pots of the culinary world. With foodies reviewing their meals on blogs and restaurant forums creating new conditions for food trucks and starred Michelin establishments alike, the distance between foodies and celebrity chefs is ever decreasing. One-way communication has turned into dialogue. In fact, nowadays any serious home cook is only a video call away from professional guidance. cuisines from a to z TalkToChef is the first micro-consulting platform to connect home cooks and foodies to professional chefs via video chat. Using two-way streaming video technology, the service allows instant communication in real time, without

interrupting the whipping of the hollandaise. All you really need is a computer or a smartphone (there’s a freshly baked app waiting in the oven) and an idea of what you want to do.   More than 2000 chefs worldwide are participating, representing different cuisines and cultures. You can choose between almost 50 different cuisines – from African and native-American to Moroccan, Korean or Scandinavian – and just wait for a chef to respond your call. If you’re into raw food or any other regimen you can also choose between different methods or diets.   The very idea of culinary advice is hardly new. In the US there are plenty of thanksgiving and holiday cooking hotlines for chefs in need. But this video chat service opens up new possibilities

for a relaxed one to one conversation, in the home, while cooking. For amateur cooks seeking new inspiration, the vast network of professionals and different cooking cultures the possibilities are endless.   ”Initially, our plan was to connect home cooks with each other to help with the cooking routine, but then we quickly found out that customers are more interested in speaking with professionals rather than themselves. We see that people are becoming more and more innovative with food and looking to try new recipes that are outside of their local area. That's why international chefs are becoming more popular with our users”, Daniil Brodovich,
Co-founder and CEO of TalkToChef explains.

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uber for culinary advice After the video consultation you can rate the chef and make a voluntary donation. TalkToChef has been described as an "Uber for culinary advice", beneficial for both parties. Home cooks can get professional advice in their own kitchen. Professional chefs get an excellent opportunity to build a social media brand while at the same time earning a little extra money.   TalkToChef is now accessible from any part of the world provided there is good internet connection.   ”We are entering the European market right now, and so far it's been spreading mostly by word of mouth. It's surprising, but it's catching on pretty fast in Britain. I guess it is because of the

there are 2000 chefs lined up in your kitchen

popularity of Jamie Oliver and his food revolution. More British are looking at new ways to improve their diets and at the same time a lot of chefs are dream of becoming celebrities like Jamie”, Daniil says. rising food consciousness According to Daniil Brodovich, the increased awareness among customers is an important reason for TalkToChef’s success.   ”When you spend so much time on researching, buying and preparing you want your meal to be one of the best. So why not consult with an expert to make sure you wouldn't mess it up – or to make it even better? We believe that with rising food awareness and innova-

tion in preparing our meals, there will be increased demand for high quality support in culinary space.”   ”At the same time, there is an increase in food restrictions due to allergies and health related problems due to unbalanced diet. This presents another big opportunity to help people. We believe that with modern technology everybody should have an opportunity to consult a professional regarding a particular question, especially if it is related to food”, Daniil says   There’s good reason to believe that consumers will increase demands on their grocery store even more, looking for fresh, local produce and new culinary experiences. Now they’ll know what to do with it.


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”There is an increase in food restrictions due to allergies and health related problems due to unbalanced diet. This presents another big opportunity to help people.” Daniil Brodovich,
 Co-founder and CEO of TalkToChef

TalkToChef team in San Francisco.

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Food experiences with Tongue Twister Have you ever thought about how complex food is? We used to say that we eat with our eyes, but are there several key factors to finding stunning flavours? Westfield and Condiment Junkie in London brainstormed further and presented a temporal installation in Westfield shopping centre in London and Stratford City as a part of their food sensation campaign. text sofia forsander | photo condiment junkie

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with the passion for food in mind, the British shopping centre Westfield launched a multi-sensory tasting popup event to celebrate their 2015 food sensation campaign. The campaign was launched in cooperation with Condiment Junkie, masters of multi-sensory design, to promote and highlight the two London shopping centres, Westfield Stratford City and Westfield London.   Condiment Junkie was asked to devise a unique multi-sensory food and drink experience for their customers and the result was Tongue Twister. Tongue Twister is a free experience in a colourful workshop area, based on scientific research that teaches customers about how sounds can bring out new flavours and how colour as well as taste can impact on humans. cleanse and prepare The first room Pure was designed as a cleansing area where guests are prepared for the subsequent rooms. By using a taste test, sensory experts can discover what kind of taster the customers are based on the sensitivity

of their taste buds. Super-, medium-, or non-tasters all have different tolerance to bitterness, spice and bolder flavours giving varied results in the subsequent rooms. Customers wash their plate, clean and prepare for the first experience room. taste and sound Sounds lead the customers into the next room, inside the belly of a strange living musical instrument. Is it possible to match taste to a sound? Different sounds can influence your taste, how much crunchier will the food be if you are listening to yourself eating crunchy food? And is it possible, through sound, to turn sweet into sour? Here you will find out. colour impact In the next room sight shows how we taste with our eyes. It was built as a rainbow laboratory to explore if colour impacts taste. Can you guess the flavour of what you see before tasting? Does a strawberry drink taste the same even if it’s blue? Or will your eyes delude you?

Tongue Twister also displayed a glowing fresh herb garden in this room, but do the herbs taste the same when under a purple UV light? smell it In the last sensory room the visitors’ sense of smell and perception of flavour is tested. By eating jelly beans while at the same time smelling a different scent from the pink smell trumpets, will give both expected and unexpected results. A banana-flavoured jelly bean with the coconut scent is an expected and winning concept. But how does the banana flavour taste inside the curry smell trumpet?   This pop-up event gives the customer their own test result and the opportunity to continue to Westfield’s restaurants to satisfy their taste buds even more. We used to say, we eat with our eyes, and maybe this event confirms this statement to be true.

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Grocery shopping at Lithuania's new attraction point Retail trends are fast and flexible. And so are the trends within food. Middle age, young people and early adopters, they all desire the latest and best primary products as well as new experiences in the store. Is it possible to reach these demands with the help of lighting and track systems? The answer is yes. Rimi Hypermarket at Nordika shopping valley in Lithuania is a great example. text sofia forsander | photo siim saadoja

never before have we been as interested in food as we are today, we embrace new ingredients and concepts as if they were our own inventions. Supermarkets and hypermarkets, stores with large areas and long opening hours, have a lot of time and space to inspire their customers to purchase groceries. nordika shopping valley At the new Nordika shopping valley in Lithuania, near Vilnius International Airport, the retail chain Rimi opened
a new hypermarket in late 2015. Nordika shopping valley is predicted to be a fast developing area and a new attraction point both for Lithuanians and people from neighbouring countries. These factors made it a perfect choice for Rimi, part of ICA group, as one of the leading retailers in the Baltic States to open a new store.

grocery shopping at lithuania's new attraction point

Rimi has an impressive 5500 square metre large shopping area with fresh fruits, vegetables, newly baked pastries, meat and dairy products. They have a wide range of products and followed some of the latest retail food trends, like opening their own sushi and juice bar at the store, to meet their customers’ requirements. efficiency effort One of the main demands for stores today is energy efficiency. It is important to put every effort into future proofed solutions, thinking outside the box, for the environment and to make significant energy savings.   Rimi Nordika was thinking environment-friendly from the beginning, from efficient heating and cooling but also regarding lighting.


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Mindaugas Survilas, Project Manager at Rimi Lithuania tells us about the building’s heating system at Nordica shopping valley, a modern and economical future proofed solution. Rimi continued on the same path and used a heat recovery system from their cooling system, but also a flexible lighting solution with the iTrack system from Fagerhult. The chosen lighting solution reduces the energy bill without affecting the lighting effect in the store. the track system Large areas, such as a hypermarket needs sufficient general lighting for both sales and aisles. The right lighting will guide the customer in the aisles while at the same time highlighting the merchandises. An iTrack solution makes this possible. iTrack allows numerous luminaries to act in unison making it

grocery shopping at lithuania's new attraction point

suitable for large areas such as supermarkets. The robust track enables an installation in a long line along the large aisles in the store.   iTrack is designed for fast and efficient installation and cuts time by 80 % compared to a traditional hard wired system.   Dupio luminaires installed in a approximately 1500 metre iTrack system create an even light in the store while at the same time having the option to easily aim the lighting at merchandise in the aisles. finding flexibility Mindaugas Survilas at Rimi Lithuania continues by saying that the best thing with this lighting solution is the flexibility.   “The flexibility in the lighting is important: to have the freedom to cover

the store with light wherever you like to. It is also important that it creates the right feeling that is specific for the brand Rimi Lithuania. I think the fact that we are using luminaries from Fagerhult in all new Rimi Lithuania stores – proves our trust in Fagerhult products and creates that special working relationship.”   The final result is low energy and maintenance costs minimizing the environmental impact and helping to increase sales in store. The store measures 20 W/m2.   With new positioning of interior or activities within the area this solution can be easily and quickly adapted accordingly. By using the iTrack system it is also
easy to add new luminaires, controls, emergency lighting and speakers in the future.


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�The flexibility in the lighting is important: to have the freedom to cover the store with light wherever you like to. It is also important that it creates the right feeling that is specific for the brand Rimi Lithuania.� Mindaugas Survilas, Project Manager at Rimi Lithuania

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Studio Streck create concepts:

No magic, just hard work When the interior designers at Studio Streck create a shop concept it is always based on the customer’s brand and perspective. This is something they incorporated when devising Cederleüf & Svenheimer’s new bakery concept; connecting craftsmanship, tradition, caring and sustainability in one and the same shop concept. text elin nilsson | photo paul esplana, ted olsson

“initially you learn that all customers are different, design is not magic and there is no universal creative process that suits all projects. The creative process is always based on the customer’s perspective and the customer’s brand”, Lars Alfredsson says, one out of two interior designers at Studio Streck; a design agency in Gothenburg, Sweden.   Studio Streck creates retail designs, commercial projects and private residences and work with brands such as Telenor, Brothers, Morris, Thomas Sabo and Kappahl. It was in the summer of 2014 that Studio Streck, came in contact with Pontus Svenheimer and his ideas of how their family business could evolve in the future. Cederleüf & Svenheimer has the wisdom and knowledge of three generations and they produce locally baked pastries in the Gothenburg region.   “We started talking about their sales channels and formed a mission based  

no magic just hard work

on designing a new interior concept and applying it to their bakery situated in the Allum shopping centre outside of Gothenburg” Lars says. creating an image In the autumn of 2014 they started analysing and generating sketches of the concept together with the customer.   ”For us it is important that the customer is involved in the process. If made to feel involved he or she will most likely also be pleased with the result. It is also important to listen to the customer and try not to fulfil oneself by using only your own ideas “, Lars says.   When working with a concept Studio Streck start by creating an image of what the customer wants and what they can achieve.   “It was very important for us to get to know the company and the people running it”, Martin Häger, the other interior designer at Studio Streck, continues.

Lars and Martin learned about the company, how it all started, what has happened on the way, what they do well and less well.   “When creating a concept with a customer it is crucial to be able to adjust the project to the customer’s organisation and resources and also to define the mission”, Martin says.   Much of the knowledge used when creating the concept came from the sketches, watchwords and input from those meetings. 3D-programs such as ArchiCAD were also used to visualise the result.   “We discovered all the history that defines a family owned company”, Lars says.   “It was always clear that the tradition and craftsmanship, that has been in the company since 1962, were strong brand values”, Martin continues.


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”When creating a concept with a customer it is crucial to be able to adjust the project to the customer’s organisation and resources and also to define the mission.” Martin Häger, Studio Streck

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”It was always clear that the tradition and craftsmanship, that has been in the company since 1962, were strong brand values.” Martin Häger, Studio Streck

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the result “The process that leads to the finished product is mostly just as important as the result. Economy, time and quality are often high priorities”, Lars Alfredsson says.   After analysing the brand a rather usual process proceeded with sketches and suggestions that slowly but steadily shaped a whole that could be defined in drawings, requests and production.   “As I said, no magic, just hard work”, Martin says.   One challenge in the project was the position of the shop.   “It is situated in a fantastic location that has great potential in the shopping centre. It is also an unusual position as it is partly situated in the walkways which means it is partially open plan”, Lars says.   Studio Streck are very pleased with the result. The new concept presents a more open space in which you come closer to the products and the customers can pick and choose their merchandise themselves, which was one of the customer’s requests.   It was also important that the knowledge and eco consciousness of the brand were reflected in the store, from materials and colours to luminaires. The redesign should stimulate sales and make the pastries and bread look even better.   Cederleüf and Svenheimer is now a comfortable bakery where it is easy to grab a coffee or just buy something tasty to bring home after a shopping spree.   Lars and Martin also got the opportunity to develop the customer’s graphic identity and included Ola Ingvarsson from the company OID to be a part of the project team; a team that later on also included key suppliers for the construction, interior design and lighting.

no magic just hard work


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important illumination When it comes to lighting all the regular stated criteria were fulfilled in the project, such as reliability, good lighting comfort, at the right price.   “It was important to create a safe and comfortable ambience with lighting. Due to the open plan layout it became a challenge to create an atmosphere in the bakery while not being affected by the harsh general lighting of the shopping centre”, Martin says.  Fagerhult delivered a lighting concept with the medium beamed LED-spotlight Marathon. The spotlights provided both Lars Alfredsson, general light as well as highlighting the displays and cashier area. To avoid glare in the cashier area honeycomb accessories were used.   Studio Streck has a good experience of Fagerhult’s lighting from earlier projects.   “The combination of products and knowledge is very high. We trust Fagerhult to consider the customer and the

interior, as well as delivering the best light for the project”, Lars says.   Lighting is a very important part in a project for Lars and Martin.   “It is two sides of the same coin, when you illuminate something it stands out but you must also have something to illuminate, to make good use of the lighting. When designing furniture or an environment you often consider how the lighting should be used to create the right atmosphere. This is when it is beneficial to include a lighting designer early in the project to include that expertise. The luminaire is also a piece of “furniture” that needs to be designed like Studio Streck any other interior”, Lars says.

”One part of sustainability lies in the design, one part in the production and one part in the administration.”

no magic just hard work

outlook on the future The switch from traditional fluorescent lamps to LED lighting is one way to make important energy savings with the help of lighting. They also focus on making sustainable design by not following too many trends but rather by adapting the project to the customer’s existing and prospective needs.

“One part of sustainability lies in the design, one part in the production, and one part in the administration. Generally it is hard to affect the whole chain. We focus on sustainability in those areas where we can make an impact”, Lars says.   Lars and Martin think that sustainable awareness will increase, just as it does in other businesses.   “The talk of changing concept is getting more and more unusual; instead you talk about developing and changing. Perhaps it is because of this that you work more with sustainable design today”, Martin says.   They both see an interesting future to come.   “It will be interesting to see how online shopping will work alongside the physical store. Today that is a rapid development, though a rather young phenomenon, that will probably increase in the future.” Martin says.   Now Lars and Martin will continue working with developing concepts for the future.   “We think Cederleüf & Svenheimer have a unique interior that still has a high degree of caring and recognition, which remains important for Cederlöf & Svenheimer and their customers”, Martin says.   “The next step is to roll out the concept in the other stores, something we are working on right now, Lars concludes.


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no magic just hard work


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how to find the right retail shop concept


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How to find the right retail shop concept There is a lighting solution for every brand. But how should you proceed to find exactly the right lighting for your shop? At Fagerhult we put a lot of effort into finding the right concept for different shops. This is the creative journey of how a shop concept is brought to life. text elin nilsson photo elin nilsson, istock.com/gpointstudio/rakicn/peter booth

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knowing your brand Tell your brand story! Knowing the brand and its story is of most importance when finding the right lighting concept. Lighting can set the scene for your brand and enhance the feelings you want to evoke. Light set up the “stage” so that the shop can deliver a real brand experience. During the concept process we are keen on listening to you and your particular brand story.

creative lab retail To find the right lighting concept for your brand we have developed a creative workshop format ”Creative Lab Retail”, where we discuss the latest retail and lighting trends which gives inspiration and ideas to your future concept development. Together with you we make an inspiring step by step analyse of your needs and demands and the result will be the very best lighting solutions that suits the project and brand. Read more about Creative Lab Retail on page 66.

”Lighting sets the scene for your brand.”

focusing on the target groups It is not only crucial for us at Fagerhult to know your brand, we also want to understand the people shopping in your store, your customers. We want them to have a positive experience in the shop which is enriched by an effective lighting design. Who are they, what attracts them, how do they shop? How can we use lighting to enhance their shopping experience?

finding the trend connection The retail landscape is constantly changing. We carefully monitor trends in retail as well as interior and consumer trends. It is important for Fagerhult to have a clear understanding of the retail landscape and how it affects not only the product design but also the lighting solution.

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customer specification Your request and specification is important to us. You might have a clear view of what you want or have specific energy restrictions – or you have an open mind and want to generate ideas together with us. We pay close attention to your request and always try to provide the best possible solution.

unleashing creativity All of the steps are now taken and considered, the creative process has started and ideas come to life. Mood boards, sketches and visualizations are made to capture the feeling of the lighting concept. If requested Fagerhult can try out different solutions and different light settings. Perhaps there is a need for a custom made solution? What sustainable solutions can be made? Can we work with lighting control to further enhance the experience and save energy? These are all considerations in the creative process.

enjoying the solution After ideas are generated and confirmed Fagerhult present a complete lighting solution with suitable products, light settings, colour temperatures and lumen packages. A retail concept is created and the first store is delivered. In time Fagerhult will follow up to ensure that the concept was realised to the client’s satisfaction. After closely monitoring the result we work together to implement the concept in more shops, suitably adapted to the concept, location and demands of the next specific project.

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4 ways to an energy efficient store Energy efficiency is one of the most important requirements of grocery stores, since the facilities are often quite large and opening hours typically long. More retail brands are working to towards the environmental goals in LEED and BREEAM. Kristian RenstrÜm, Key Account Manager at Fagerhult has gathered four of his best tips to create an energy efficient store and sustainable future proofed solutions. text elin nilsson | photo elin nilsson, helen sarapuu and agnes männiste

Crystal Clear is Fagerhult's environmental initiative. It's our way of emphasising the importance of working in a way that leaves behind the least possible environmental impact.

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Biomarket in Estonia.

1. light levels

give light a purpose with smart lighting design. Accentuated lighting creates a dynamic store. Lower the light levels and illuminate a food store like you would illuminate a fashion shop. Why? A store has different areas of importance. When identifying the main areas and providing them with accentuated lighting an interesting store is created and you can reduce the energy usage.   When light levels are chosen after the expression in the different sections of

a store something interesting happens, eye catching spaces are created to which customers are drawn. For example increase light on fresh merchandise such as fruit, vegetables and bread. Or decrease the light levels at the household utensils to create a more homely feel.   “The light can be adjusted to specific merchandise. Why not also use tuneable luminaires in which you can change colour temperature on certain displayed or seasonal items.”, Kristian says.

LED also enables you to lower the light levels, which further saves energy and usage. When the light output is not 100 % it reduces wear and tear on the luminaire.   “Combine the general light with integrated lighting to further lower the general light, this also creates a sense of space. This is one way to save energy, using less luminaires and only light where you need it”, Kristian concludes.

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2. led

led lives longer. The choice of light source is of most importance when creating sustainable solutions. An efficient LED lighting solution makes a great difference when it comes to saving energy in a store – and the technology is continuously improving.   LED-manufactures constantly improve the components in the LED-modules. The LES (Light Emitting Surface) is getting smaller which enables new slimmer luminaire design but without compromising on the lumen output and glare reduction. The system efficiency is also getting better and the drivers more efficient. LED is also a light source that offers more lumen output from the luminaire and the output is also continuously improving.     “So we are living in a flourishing changing LED lighting landscape with new upcoming solutions approaching in a faster rate”, Kristian says.

4 ways to an energy efficient store

The life length with LED is much longer than other light sources. The manufacturers of LED’s and their drivers claim as much as 100 000 hours compared to a metal halogen lamp that has about 12–15 000 hour. The need for maintenance and replacement of light source should also be considered.   ”When Fagerhult designs products it is with a constant focus on getting the LED-technology just right, to soften the intensity of the light and to create a harmony between efficiency and comfort, because LED light can be harsh on the eye. This is why the reflector used in a luminaire has a very important function: it is what maximises efficiency and orients the light in the right direction”, Kristian says.   The use of anti-glare protectors also helps to steer and screen off the light so that the eye is not dazzled.     ”You can say, the better the material,

the higher the efficiency and the lower the luminaire’s environmental impact”, Kristian says.   When the light output (lumen) is improved it allows us to reduce the amount of luminaires. You can increase the distance between the luminaires but still retain the same light levels.   “LED also enables us to do more with lighting, to illuminate and change light setting, such as using a tuneable white luminaire that enables you to change colour temperature on a specific diplay area or item", Kristian says.   The LED module also likes cold environments, of which there are plenty in a grocery store.   ”So even though a LED system can be a more expensive investment at the time, the lighting will last longer and the cost will be pay off in the long run”, Kristian concludes.


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3. lighting control

led enables us to use lighting controls in a store, which makes the lighting far more efficient. Controls can help to save energy, decrease the store's energy usage and also create dynamic lighting effects that enhances the experience.   There are many ways to control the lighting to save energy, and the right way to do it depends largely on what kind of store you have.   “The lighting installation does not need to be on full power all the time if you can control it. If a luminaire is dimmed by 20 %, it is hardly detectable to the human eye but it will create energy savings of 20 %”, Kristian says.   Presence detectors that detect movement are another way to save energy and to create a dynamic store.   “By increasing light when someone enters a specific area you create interest and attention to the various areas in a store. At the same time you can lower the light when no one is there – and save on the energy usage”, Kristian says.   During times when the store is less busy, you might want to save energy by decreasing some of the lighting. Perhaps you need less lighting before

opening or early in the day when the shop is less busy.   “This can be achieved by using sensors connected to a system that dim the light when there are no customers

cific night scene to the store. Or why not create contrast by adjusting the lighting depending on the time of day, if it is dark outside you can create a welcoming contrast or you can adjust the lighting

around, but you can also set different lighting scenes that can be changed easily. The scenes can be controlled by timer or manually”, Kristian says.   Daylight sensors can also be an efficient way to take advantage of the natural light and avoid using lighting when it isn’t needed.   “If the store is visible from the outside during closing hours you can add a spe-

in the store according to the amount of sun outside”, Kristian says.   An investment in a solution with controls is justified by the large potential for energy savings. Lighting control can bring significant energy savings to any application.

For example, a project where we could switch from old T8 flourecent tubes 2x36 W to a 1x47 W LED luminaires we can reduce the amount of luminaires from 135 pcs to 72 pcs and from 270 pcs of light sources to 72 pcs.   The total energy consumption per year will decrease from 60,8 MWh to 16,9 MWh. This will reduce the CO2 emission per year by 72 %. Also there is

no need to waste money on changing light sources and maintenance. So even though there is an investment cost in making the switch to LED the cost will break even within about two years

4. light calculations, life cycle cost

and investment sometimes you have to see it to believe it. Discover the links between investment cost, your choice of lighting solution, energy consumption and the environmental impact of your particular project. Fagerhult Life Cycle Cost Calculation is a program for life cycle cost and pay off calculations.   “When planning a project we present a LCC (Life Cycle Cost) that compare the new lighting installation to the old one. We know the importance of low competitive investment costs for the lighting system for sure. By doing a LCC we can calculate a pay off time and also see how much maintenance cost, life length of luminaires and energy consumption will decrease over time,” Kristian says.

depending on project.   “This is a good way to see what difference lighting and lighting design can make in a project,” Kristian concludes.

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Lighting recipes Multilume Function LED for functional ceilings or track mounting.

General ligh ting

Tibi LED pendant.

Lighting enab les the visito r to see the m between unif erchandise pr orm lighting operly. Choos in the whole st e or mounted or e, re ce ssed, track m on functional ou ce nt ili ed ng . Achieve a m a variety of lig ore dramatic hting, colour lo ok w te ith mperatures depending on and focused store concep accent lightin t. A g dd ing pendants different area can further en s. hance the   Introduce LED to the en tire store. Mul ample a com tilume Functi fortable gene on LED is for ral lighting lu exwhich provid m in ai re ; it s design redu es a comfort able store. iT ce gl are flexible iTrack rack Line LED is designed fo system which r offers quick in the   To further stallation tim boost the sh e. opping expe rience and sa intelligent lig ve energy, in hting contro stall an l system incl sensors, man uding presen ual controls ce de te ct or s, daylight or pre-set pr ogrammed co ntrols.

Iceberg LED pendant.

iTrack Line LED. lighting recipes


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t h g i l t n e cc

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Spot hop. s c i s a are ynam sad ching e t c a o c u , las t eye prod ondo t and light g s d k d e r e c n t e a int ys a a tr ntua ispla rease G2 is d Acce c s o n cient i v a E h one s can an effi Z s suc s . a r n e e r light ta raw t off for eren are d t tha oice in diff tligh mers er ch o o h t p t s s ylish o u sed hc . An , a st whic reces n G2 hting r o g o i h aral t d a M nte Mar ign. e LED l s s i b e a mou a e d t s r ndi or as lean omfo light ical c ercha t r o d m and c p y n g i s in s. B cyl ed light kage ith a ount e high n pac ck m ght w e a i r l creas t t m n o a u i l sp ther rent r ble in e LEDu a l f ff i i a n ca ith d is av s you on w thon sorie versi s d e lare. c e g c s a duce reces rent e r e ff d i t an ng d effec addi amic n y d the

Zone Evo II G2.

Marathon Midi G2.

e t a r g e t In

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real es a k a m ore. ing a st ight isles in l with d ting r ate ea r h h g g i t e l we Int e in eral n lo renc ng gen u ca asing o i diffe y n i g cre omb lightin ls in eel By c leve aisles f ted a t r h g g e i e l t l s h n i era ce. T he item gen spa t f sa d o the an se ne i ing sen mili m u o L the . c able el ible fort ew two e vis rs com r mor o le in n be m at offe ilab l a l nd i i v h w es a g. A r n rip t i u t t t D s era ligh e LE LED ted e th emp t s a r r r u g ot ed o olou inte hy n mount nt c w e r r e D diff hs. O surface ther LE ngt e o a s l a n r e II o t. A fiv at h Spo 2 th Diva I I s G p t i a t i r st po to Div sed lay S relative s e eam e R b c is re row put r t aire a u r n n i rp d fo en o lum lum th a sha igne s h e g i sd em a hi e, w G2 i syst t ll siz pot wn o dan sma Relay S r you , pen . g e d l l n i g i u il an ty, b e ce ibili t th flex ls, a l a gw k. alon trac na o r o

A wide range of accessories.

Relay Spot G2.

Lumiline.

Diva II.

lighting recipes


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Efficient store designs There are many ways to achieve the perfect store; modern interior, comfortable layout, easy navigation or fresh design. But what they all have in common is a need for lighting that will highlight their displays and merchandise. Lighting truly makes an impact, not only when it comes to the experience of the store but also on the energy efficiency. Here are some exciting grocery stores that offer both. text elin nilsson | photo paul esplana, david holmqvist, kaarel langemets, helen sarapuu and agnes m채nniste

azbuka vkusa The premium food store chain Azbuka Vkusa has opened a new special supermarket in Moscow focusing on creating a fun experience especially for the children visiting the store. The mix of efficient LED lighting and unique store design provides a comfortable and inviting shopping experience.

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kaubamaja food department The Food Department at Kaubamaja in Tallinn Estonia, offers exclusive and organic labelling on both food and drinks. The store is an actual proof that it is possible to use fewer luminaries while still retaining the same light level – and saving energy. The 2000 m2 large food department has decreased the energy consumption from 17,5 W/m2 to 10 W/m2 and decreased the number of general lighting luminaries from 386 to 186 – while still retaining the same light level.

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biomarket Lighting can make a true impact in a store. Biomarket in Viimsi Estonia offers an assortment of eco, health and wellness products. By using the right lighting they wanted to increase the feeling of their eco conscious brand. By focusing on mainly illuminating the merchandise and signs with LED spotlights they achieved a dynamic and energy efficient store with comfortable contrasts.

efficient store designs design

Fagerhult presented a solution using track mounted Zone Evo with an efficiency of 15 W/m2. In future stores numbers as low as 13,5 W/m2 could be achieved with Zone Evo G2. By choosing LED luminaires the store has at least 50 000 maintenance-free hours and the store's eco consciousness is reflected in this lighting solution.


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holy greens Holy Greens present new salads and juices every season, giving the customers a flexible and nutritious menu and the possibility of having a constant relationship with local farmers.   The primary products are illuminated with Marathon spotlights with a glow function. Glow brings out warm tones in the store, which is ideal when illuminating healthy salads and juices. The glow function is also used to highlight the menu, wooden interior, green plants and the white crisp tile, creating a warm feeling throughout.   This concept gives the store a dynamic lighting solution, which is complemented by the large amount of daylight coming through the windows.

hypermat The large supermarket Hypermat on the border between Norway and Sweden is the existing proof that light comfort and energy efficiency go hand in hand. With the use of smart lighting control their energy consumption decreased by about 35 % while creating a comfortable ambience.   When the light levels were set the lux levels were chosen on how the lighting at each area was perceived. When the levels felt right, it was not 100 % output, but levels of between 50–90 %. This became an important factor in further lowering the energy usage.   The final result – a glare free, uniform, comfortable, and most of all, sustainable store.

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Finding everyday items at Spar in Sundvollen Spar is one of the world’s largest supermarket chains with more than 14 300 stores in 40 countries. In Norway there are 281 stores and Spar in Sundvollen is one of those. On the 26 of November 2015 the gates were opened to the brand new convenience store in Sundvollen, a village northwest of Oslo. The new store offers an assortment of fresh food, bread, pastries, fruit and vegetables and merchandise from local producers. text elin nilsson | photo halvor gudim

finding everyday items at spar in sundvollen


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this spar store focuses on offering everyday items near your home, functioning as the convenience store around the corner. In Sundvollen Spar is located close to urban and residential areas.   When illuminating a grocery store it is important to use efficient modern lighting solutions due to the stores long opening hours. Therefore efficient LED luminaires are extensively used in the store. Accent lighting in suspended wooden modules were needed and a track system providing general lighting in the whole store offering comfortable lighting between the racks.

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accent light Recessed Marathon spotlights were made in grey for the wooden modules, properly aimed towards the fresh fruit and vegetable section. Marathon has an efficient LED module and a good colour rendering of RA 90 making the merchandise look its best. flexible track system As for the general lighting Fagerhult’s latest linear LED luminaire for food stores were used. ITrack Line LED is an energy efficient luminaire developed specially for the iTrack system.

finding everyday items at spar in sundvollen

iTrack is a flexible system that combines all the functions needed in a store – in one single track system: general lighting, accent lighting, DALI controls, emergency lighting and speakers. Its robust track design also enables installation of luminaires in one long line. iTrack’s quick connection system can also cut installation time which enables stores to achieve their opening date sooner.   ITrack Line LED has a design without adaptors, which makes the luminaire align delicately to the track, giving it a clean look.


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for those hygiene demands For other functions in the store such as the more stringent hygiene areas recessed Multilume Hydro is used. Not only does it provide professional work lighting, it also simplifies maintenance, as it is easy to service and clean.

illuminating outdoors Evolume, an energy efficient LED luminaire for streets and roads, illuminates the outdoor parking. The luminaire is a cost efficient solution that offers great light quality and longer life length. The outdoor lighting combined with illuminated signs and logotypes makes the store a welcoming place to shop.

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Enhance colours with light The look of meat, fish, cheese and deli is affected by the quality of light. There is no need for coloured filters; Fagerhult have luminaires with rich and glow functions, specially developed lighting to enhance products in these areas. Combined with general lighting a fresh environment can be achieved. text elin nilsson | photo halvor gudim, istock.com/roberto a sanchez/franckreporter

rich is equipped with a LED module that brings out the colours in the blue, red and white spectrum which makes it suitable for illuminating fish counters that display both red fish and seafood, such as salmon and shrimps, but also ice and silver skinned fish types. In the meat section it makes meat look appetizing too.

Before 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 380 400 420 440 460 480 500 520 540 560 580 600 620 640 660 680 700 720 740 760 780

After

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glow is tailor-made for the bread, cheese, fruit and vegetables sections and

is equipped with a LED module that is specifically selected and tested for illuminating such foods. The spectral curve is strong in the warm coloured spectrum, which brings out the warm tones in these groceries.

Before

After

12 10 8 6 4 2 0 380 400 420 440 460 480 500 520 540 560 580 600 620 640 660 680 700 720 740 760 780

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Welcome to a world of retail lighting Fagerhult are happy to share our knowledge of commercial retail lighting with you in our various showrooms. Lighting knowledge is close to our heart and we gladly invite you to our showrooms. Our largest retail showroom is located in Bollebygd, Sweden and offers opportunities for both general lighting knowledge and lighting concepts, testing different settings and light scenes to find out what is suitable for your shop concept. Contact your local Fagerhult office for more information.

Fagerhult Creative Lab Retail:

Dedicate a moment to creativity

”Discover the secrets of light!”

Do you want to work creatively together with us at Fagerhult to find the best lighting solution for your brand? We can create great lighting concept solutions for your brand. Therefore we have developed a creative workshop format ”Creative Lab Retail”, where we discuss your brand in relation to the latest retail and lighting trends that will lead to inspiration and ideas for your future shop concept.    Together we make an inspiring step by step analyse of your needs and demands which results in the best lighting solutions that suits your project and brand.   Welcome to a different kind of workshop at a Fagerhult office or we are happy to visit you and arrange a workshop where it suits you.

get inspired

retail lig

hting sol utions


retail main office: Fagerhult Retail AB, Rinnav채gen 12, SE 517 33, Bollebygd, Sweden, Phone: +46 33 722 15 00, www.fagerhult.com/retail


www.fagerhult.com

The Innovator #7  

This magazine is all about presenting retail innovation and trends that will spark your imagination. This issue is dedicated to different fo...

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