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december 2017

AN INTERVIEW WITH

LANDSCAPE PLANNING GROUP LTD ARB KIT NEW FOR 2018

STAGE V EMISSIONS

PETROL OR DIESEL? POWDERY MILDEW

BREAK THE MOULD

HOME TO ROOST BAT CONSERVATION FOR ARBORISTS

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NEWS 04 AGENDA

Will impending changes to engine legislation, such as the EU’s Stage V emissions legislation, have a positive impact on the arboriculture industry?

06 NEWS

A roundup of industry news

09 RFS FUTURE FORESTERS Reporting on the Future Foresters New Technology Day

11 13

30 UNDER 30 WINNERS

Winners from the arb industry

THE NATIONAL TREE OFFICERS CONFERENCE Looking back on this year’s event

FEATURES 15

AN INTERVIEW WITH

18

A LOST LEGACY

21

COMING HOME TO ROOST

25

26

Landscape Planning Group Ltd

The hidden history of Manchester’s nowdefunct Royal Botanic Gardens Avoid breaking the law when it comes to arboriculture and bats

OPINION

Rob McBride tells us about his experience at the IX Fiesta del Chopo Cabacero

DIESEL VS PETROL

With Stage V emissions standards on the horizon, we weigh up the options

28 FUTUREARB DEBATE

Jonathan Hazell reviews the FutureArb debate from this year’s FutureScape

CONTENTS

WELCOME DECEMBER 2017 • VOLUME 4 • ISSUE 12

T

his month started with an eye-opening trip to the National Tree Officers Conference, which we report back from on pages 12-13; what stuck with me was the anxiety felt throughout the conference’s attendees and speakers. Budget cuts, lack of job security and the decline in tree care were all mentioned frequently, but as the day progressed we saw more tree officers taking up the gauntlet to make progressive changes in trying times – young people such as Thomas Campbell, the inventor of the Treecycle and one of this year’s 30 Under 30 winners, who are using their environmental interests to change their roles. Environmental concern has been the catalyst for a lot of change recently, with impending changes to engine legislation causing a stir in their own way – this month’s Agenda question (pages 4-5) sees industry figures discuss whether these changes are a good thing for arboriculture, while Först director Doug Ghinn weighs up the benefits of diesel and petrol engines in our article on pages 26-27.

The feature I enjoyed above all others this month was our conversation with Naomi Webster of the Bat Conservation Trust, discussing how arborists can avoid breaking bat conservation laws if they come across a roost while working – find it on pages 21-23. It was a great opportunity to expand my minimal knowledge of bats, particularly when researching our bat facts, which are scattered throughout the feature. My personal favourite was finding out that bats are more closely related to humans than they are to mice. Until next time,

ASHLEY LAMPARD

29 TOP 10 TIPS

Recruitment advice

30 PESTS AND DISEASES

KIT

Combating powdery mildew

32

TRAILERS

Safety and security features

33 35

STUMP GRINDERS How they’re evolving

PRODUCT DNA Makita DUC302Z Twin 18V chainsaw

36

ARB KIT

38

TOOLBOX

All the latest kit Westbeams Tree Care

REGULARS

40 ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

Veteran Ash, Lyscombe and Highdon

41

MEET THE SUPPLIER Isuzu UK

ALL ENQUIRIES Tel: 01903 777 570 Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA EDITORIAL Features Editor – Ashley Lampard ashley.lampard@eljays44.com Editorial Assistant – Ellie Foster ellie.foster@eljays44.com Production Editor – Charlie Cook charlotte.cook@eljays44.com Subeditor – Kate Bennett kate.bennett@eljays44.com ADVERTISING Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Deputy Sales Manager – Jessica McCabe jessica.mccabe@eljays44.com Account Manager – Natalie Ross natalie.ross@eljays44.com Horticulture Careers – Laura Harris laura.harris@eljays44.com

PRODUCTION Design – Mandy Armstrong Printed by Pensord Press Ltd Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd CIRCULATION Subscription enquiries: emily.maltby@eljays44.com Pro Arb is published 12 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2017 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts.

FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Ashley Lampard at ashley.lampard@eljays44.com

MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson

43 LITTLE INTERVIEWS Pro Arb | December 2017

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

AGENDA

WILL IMPENDING CHANGES TO ENGINE LEGISLATION, SUCH AS THE EU’S STAGE V EMISSIONS LEGISLATION, HAVE A POSITIVE IMPACT ON THE ARBORICULTURE INDUSTRY?

NICK EDDISON

PAUL HICKS

OLIVER RICKMAN

Arboriculture manager, G.Burley’s

Marketing and product manager, Stihl GB

Director, Westbeams Tree Care

“It’s all about implementation, and our authorities having the necessary resources to enforce the legislation”

“Emissions legislation is helping to drive the advancement of our battery technology, which continues to be popular”

“While it is a progressive move for the environment, it won’t be positive for the industry until flaws have been ironed out”

I feel that the new EU legislation should have a positive impact, as it will remove the older vehicles and plant from our roads. This possibly will impact the smaller ‘one-man bands’ and encourage them to utilise better performing, newer vehicles and plant. A word of caution, though – it’s all about implementation, and our authorities having the necessary resources to enforce the legislation. I do feel that in more rural areas the industry can tend to utilise the ‘Forestry and Agriculture’ loophole, but to be fair, the highest levels of pollution are in towns and cities. The issue deserves to be taken seriously, as the damage to health and the associated cost to society is huge. Compliance should be a priority, though I fear it’ll be down to the larger and medium size firms and the ‘usual suspects’ may not be so proactive! Anything that encourages the advancement of the professionalisation of the industry as a whole, as well as making it more challenging for ‘rogue traders’, must be a good thing, and should be welcomed.

The key to our position in the marketplace is our ongoing commitment to extensive research and development, and upcoming stringent legislation only helps to enhance this process as we constantly strive to develop technology that is more efficient. For example, not only are we in the midst of making significant developments to our M-Tronic engine management system technology, but we will also be bringing to market the MS 500i – the world’s first fuel injection chainsaw, which will have improved throttle response and acceleration and optimised performance. Emissions legislation is also helping to drive the advancement of our battery technology, which continues to become more and more popular with the professional user. By using powerful cordless tools that meet the needs of the professional market, operators can have a significant impact on the long-term environmental protection of their surrounding work environment, and ensure even the toughest emissions regulations are met.

I don’t believe it will have a positive impact on the industry initially, but it is a positive step forward for the environment. If you’re in the industries that are impacted, however, you must stay on top of the trends and developments, and listen to other people in the industry. I was told by a leading wood chipper manufacturer that if I bought a chipper with a diesel engine, I’d get better value by the time the legislation comes into effect in 2019. I also read a complaint online from an individual who stated that the same manufacturer had sold them a diesel chipper in June, then sent them a marketing email for its new petrol chipper, which meets the industry standard. The email also mentioned that the diesel chipper is going to need an expensive engine add-on to meet the new regulations. I think that, while it is a progressive move for the environment, it won’t be positive for the industry until flaws have been ironed out and new petrol machines have been tried and tested. Until then, it will reflect poorly on the people who have bought diesel chippers, like ourselves.

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

PAUL GEORGE

Managing director, Landmark Trading

“Changes to engine legislation could act as a catalyst for producing equipment that is cleaner and more fuel efficient” Long-term, I would agree that the impending changes to engine legislation, mandated by the EU, will have a positive impact on the arboriculture industry – but in the short-term, both arborists and equipment manufacturers will have to work through some complex related issues first. With the implementation of Stage V, manufacturers of non-road machinery with engines smaller than 19kW and larger than 560kW will be impacted for the first time – without existing after-treatment technology. The impact on engine subsystems could result in decreased operating temperature during work cycles and thereby temperatures that are too low for reliable regeneration. Alongside this, more complex operational and maintenance requirements will be needed. However, you’ll see across the industry that manufacturers are already successfully

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meeting Stage V regulations with easy to install solutions, reducing the need for high-temperature regeneration and reducing operational temperatures. While initially the changes to engine legislation may throw up a challenge, the manufacturers of the arborist industry are more than equipped to meet it, and it could act as a catalyst for producing equipment that is both cleaner and more fuel efficient.

SAM TITCHARD

Arborist mechanic, Dartmoor Tree Surgeons Ltd

“As all manufacturers will have to comply, the market for nonroad mobile machinery should become fairer for traders” The impending changes to legislation regarding emissions in non-road mobile machinery will have a variety of effects in the arb community. First, by protecting the environment we can expect an improvement in the quality of the EU’s air. Second, as all manufacturers will have to comply with this legislation, the market for non-road mobile machinery should become fairer for traders

and weed out those who seek to profit on noncompliant, low cost machines. However, the addition of the diesel particulate filter (DPF) will cause an increase in both size and cost of machinery, which could be problematic to anyone seeking to purchase new equipment; small businesses are particularly at risk. The other worry is that legislation will later appear to retro-fit DPFs to all non-road mobile machinery. Alternatively, the DPF could be downsized, with a compulsory filter service at approximately halfway through the emissions life of the system. This could reduce cost and size of new machinery, but will add the additional costs of servicing the filter regularly. Some manufacturers have seemingly marketed petrol machinery to avoid this legislation and the increased costs to them and the buyer. The overall impact of these changes is yet unclear, and at present there is a lot of speculation around the topic.

NEXT MONTH: WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM CURRENTLY FACING TREE OFFICERS? Email your thoughts to ashley.lampard@eljays44.com

Pro Arb | December 2017

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

NEWSBEAT

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

RFS LAUNCHES EXCELLENCE IN FORESTRY AWARDS 2018 The RFS has announced the launch of its Excellence in Forestry 2018 Awards, which will be held across the West and South West of England, from Cheshire in the North West to Cornwall. “It’s only through ensuring high quality woodland management and talking about it to a wider world that we will help people distinguish between excellence and exploitation in forestry,” said Rachel Thomas, who is the coordinator of the awards. “Woods and forests provide a huge range of benefits that society sometimes takes for granted. Although well understood within the forestry sector, they are not necessarily appreciated outside. “I really would like to encourage more woodland owners, from all parts of the forestry sector, to enter the Excellence in Forestry awards, in those sectors where they already excel – be it silviculture, farms woods,

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GRISTWOOD AND TOMS AWARDED TREE SERVICES CONTRACT FOR BEDFORD BOROUGH COUNCIL

community or education or allround excellence and resilience – and also in those categories where they might not be considered the ‘usual suspects’. “For me, the RFS Excellence in Forestry Award is a great opportunity to showcase to the forestry sector, and also to the wider world, the benefits that society derives from excellent woodland management.” There are five categories: Resilient Multipurpose (Duke of Cornwall’s Award), Silviculture, Small and Farm Woodland, Community Woodland, and Education and Learning. The closing date for entries is noon on Tuesday 6 March 2018. Details are available at www.rfs.org.uk/awards/ excellence-in-forestry-2018/ The awards will be presented at the National Arboretum at Westonbirt on 13 July. www.rfs.org.uk

A comprehensive range of tree services across Bedford Borough will be provided by Gristwood and Toms, following a tender exercise by the Borough Council. The award follows a six-month run of wins for Gristwood and Toms, with clients including Islington Council, City of London, Waltham Forest, Hertfordshire County Council, University of Bedfordshire and Curo Housing. The new contract to provide tree works across Bedford and Kempston, including the rural parishes, went live on 1 November, and will run for up to five years. It includes trees on the urban and rural highways, as well as within parks and open spaces. Gristwood and Toms has established a new depot and office in Bedford so that services can be delivered efficiently and locally, reducing carbon emissions and congestion. Dedicated teams have been set up with new vehicles and equipment, and work is already underway. In addition to tree surgery, the contract also includes tree planting and aftercare. Dedicated tree planting teams are already in the borough, planting many new trees for residents to enjoy. “Given our experience of quickly mobilising and delivering tree services to local authorities across the UK, we are ideally positioned to service Bedford Borough,” said Christ Partridge, the arboricultural manager responsible for Bedford. “Within a few days of award, we had secured a local base, ring-fenced the teams and purchased the new equipment needed. This meant that we could hit the ground running on day one. We look forward to building a strong partnership with Bedford.” www.bedford.gov.uk

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

PIONEERING TREE HEALTH PARTNERSHIP TO CONTINUE THANKS TO FUNDING BOOST

An award-winning partnership that has identified 1,046 cases of tree pest and disease across the UK is set to continue. Launched in spring 2015, Observatree trains volunteers to help protect the UK’s trees from pests and diseases. So far, 235 volunteers have been trained, led by Forest Research and supported by the Woodland Trust, Forestry Commission England, Defra, Fera Science Ltd, the Animal & Plant Health Agency, the National Trust, Natural Resources Wales and Forestry Commission Scotland.

SALFORD CELEBRATE NATIONAL TREE WEEK BY PLANTING 170 TREES Salford has decided to add more greenery to its environment, planting 170 new trees in partnership with City of Trees. Of these, 25 will be replacements for Light Oaks Road, where diseased trees have recently been removed. “People appreciate that trees improve the landscape and provide homes for wildlife, but they have many other benefits too,” said Cllr. Derek Antrobus, lead member for planning and sustainable development at Salford City Council. “Research shows that trees filter air pollution, help soak up heavy rainfall and reduce wind speed around buildings, as well as providing shade and shelter. Trees can raise property values by as much as 15%, and they play a vital role in climate change. In one year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles. Salford’s tree coverage is at 16%, compared to the national average of 11%, and we never remove a tree unless it is dead, diseased or dying.” www.salford.org.uk

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More than 3,000 sites have been surveyed in a little over two years, with over 600 ‘priority’ pest or disease cases being confirmed. As part of this, 11 of the 21 priority pests and diseases already in the UK have been recorded. A group of volunteers also verifies cases of tree disease recorded via the Forestry Commission’s Tree Alert, an online tool that allows anyone to report trees that show signs of ill-health. The project will continue with funding of £231,000 per year, and additional support from a

wide range of conservation and government bodies. “The threat that diseases and pests pose to our trees is a real concern for wildlife, the landscape and our economy,” said Defra’s Minister for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity, Lord Gardiner. “That is why we have pressed at EU level for increased protections against Xylella, and these were approved in October. By supporting the Observatree project, we hope to identify and fight these threats.” www.observatree.co.uk

MAJOR PRODUCTIVE PLANTING SCHEME APPROVED IN ENGLAND The largest productive tree planting scheme in England for more than 25 years has been approved for a site on the fringes of the Lake District National Park. More than 213,000 trees will be planted this winter over 170ha at the Lowther Estate in Cumbria, with more than 120ha to be planted with productive softwood species. “We are excited to have gained consent for the largest conifer planting scheme in recent times,” said David Bliss, estate manager for the Lowther Estate. “The successful application is down to Ian Jack. Woodland Creation Planning Grant funding helped him plan and gain approval for this commercial woodland, which will, in the fullness of time, support many local jobs and associated forestry businesses.” Confor calculated that, unless large-scale planting schemes start to be approved, the UK Government’s target to plant 11m trees by 2020 was more than seven years behind schedule – with 2016 the worst year for new

planting on modern record. Confor secured a Westminster Hall debate and prompted an inquiry into forestry by the Westminster EFRA select committee. “We have seen productive planting plummet to its lowest level in a generation,” said Caroline Harrison, Confor’s England manager. “But Confor has continued the fight to turn the tide – and now we are hopeful of really gathering some momentum behind new productive planting, to help protect and create jobs and investment in our rural communities, have a positive impact on climate change targets and the wider environment, and provide a great raw material for future generations to build with.” www.lowther.co.uk

Pro Arb | December 2017

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

BRITISH MEP ANTHEA MCINTYRE SPEAKS UP FOR GLYPHOSATE IN BRUSSELS PETITION DEBATE Anthea Mcintyre, Conservative MEP for the West Midlands and a member of the European Parliament’s Agriculture Committee, has said that calls for a ban on the herbicide were based on false science, and threatened the environment and biodiversity. The petition ‘Ban glyphosate and protect people and the environment from toxic pesticides’ calls for a ban on the herbicide, a reform of the pesticide approval procedure and EU-wide mandatory reduction targets for pesticide use; it has collected over 1m signatures. ECI representative Mika Leandro argued for a ban because an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) study from 2015 concluded glyphosate was a ‘probable human carcinogen’. During the debate, the MEP described the letters she gets from farmer constituents, saying: “One very typical one says: ‘As someone with a scientific training I am appalled how scientific results are being corrupted for political ends with blatant and invalid selection of data to try and establish false arguments for biased organisations. It’s time to take a lead and tell the public and decision makers alike that glyphosate has been safe for 40 years and remains safe.’ “Hundreds of independent, peer-reviewed studies have proved this to be the case. Earlier this month, yet another independent and longterm study from the National Cancer Institute found no association between glyphosate and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. “Without glyphosate, farmers will return to mechanical weed control. That would mean 25% increase in greenhouse gas emissions, a significant impact on farm bird life – skylarks, partridge, lapwing. So I really wish that the people that are advocating a complete ban would look much more sensibly at what we really want to achieve which is better soil conservation, better farming methods.” www.europarl.europa.eu/committees/en/agri/ home.html

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YORKSHIRE NURSERY PLAYS KEY ROLE IN BOOSTING UK TREE POPULATION A horticultural nursery has grown and supplied more than 2.5m trees over the ast 12 months, placing it as one of the UK’s biggest net contributors to the nation’s tree population. Johnsons of Whixley, a family-run plant nursery based in North Yorkshire, has published the figure, which includes smaller hedging plant trees, to coincide with the start of National Tree Week on 25 November. Organised by the UK Tree Council, National Tree Week marks the start of the winter tree planting season, and aims to encourage communities to do something positive for their local treescape. Just 13% of the UK’s total land area is covered in trees, compared with an average elsewhere in the EU of about 35%. In England, the figure is just 10%. Estimates suggest that the firm has grown and supplied a total of 110m trees and hedging plants since chairman John Richardson purchased the business in 1964. The trend shows no sign of slowing, as Johnsons continues to supply trees to high-profile projects up and down the country. Johnsons is one of the largest commercial nursery businesses in Europe, and supplies plants and trees to the amenity sector, alongside thriving Garden Centre Sales and Cash and Carry divisions. www.nurserymen.co.uk

GREEN-TECH LAUNCHES SEASONAL TREE PLANTING PACKAGES Green-tech, the UK’s largest stockist and distributor of tree planting products, has launched its Winter Tree Planting Packages. The brochure is packed with everything needed for tree planting, from tree shelters and spirals to planting accessories and essential soil conditioners – all keenly priced to meet customer demand. Green-tech has announced that the tree planting season has kicked off slightly earlier than normal, with an unprecedented 1m spirals going out in just one day. October closed for Green-tech with £1m of sales completed, another record for the company. The company has substantial stock holding facilities and currently has more than 2.5m tree shelters and spirals in stock. It also holds vast stock quantities of everyday equipment, from tree belting and stakes to higher specification anchors, grilles and guards. New for this season is TerraCottem Arbor, a soil conditioner developed specifically for tree and shrub planting. It provides the plant with critical support over the first two years after planting, to give improved survival rates. The increase in root and plant growth reduces the need for irrigation and reduces the user’s input costs and need for replacements. Earlier this year Green-tech announced that it now holds FSC certification on square sawn softwood stakes and machine round stakes. FSC sets the standards for what is a responsibly managed forest, both environmentally and socially. When timber leaves a certified forest, it ensures companies along the supply chain meet best practice standards. www.green-tech.co.uk

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rfs future foresters new technology day

N

ovember saw the first Future Foresters New Technology Day, with arboricultural students gathering to learn about the future technologies developing in their industry. The conference attracted more than 200 forestry and arboricultural students, recent graduates and apprentices. Jez Ralph of Timber Strategies told them: “There is a new future and it is digital – and it is going to come very fast. You are the people who will take up that challenge.” In his talk, Jez spoke of his belief that forestry in the UK has been lagging behind other sectors – but that is starting to change, fuelled by developments in robotics, data acquisition,

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scanning, and acoustic, sonic and microscopic technologies all becoming more cost effective to use in the field. He told attendees that anyone entering the sector today needs to ensure that they are up to date with the technological opportunities that are developing across planning, planting, harvesting and using timber. Jez observed the thriving sector of locally sourced and technology enabled timber supplies that meet the precise needs of end users in the UK. Dan Ridley-Ellis from Edinburgh Napier University reminded students that, while technology is making aspects of the industry quicker and easier, it is not just

about the gadgets – it is also about the efficient and intelligent application of data; creating good timber is a collaboration between tree and arborist. Phil Wade from Sorbus International described how new tree assessment technologies, such as sonic and electrical resistance tomography, are enabling people in the industry to make better decisions. Technology, he said, can be viewed as ‘tree saving devices’, giving detailed data that can more accurately inform decisions on whether to retain or fell a tree. Jonas Wikner from Haglof talked about how the company is developing solutions that reduce the need for pen and paper in the forest – such as computerised callipers that download data directly from the forest to office reports, speeding up the process of measuring woodlands. On a practical level, Nick Pott from arbjobs.com told the students how the skill sets demanded by employers for forestry and arboriculture careers are changing. “My advice to you

New technologies are impacting on the way we plan, plant, harvest and market our woodlands and our timber

PRO ARB REPORTS ON THE FIRST ROYAL FORESTY SOCIETY FUTURE FORESTER’S NEW TECHNOLOGY DAY, WHICH EXAMINED HOW TECH IS CHANGING THE INDUSTRY

is to get into the scientific stuff to get ahead,” he said. “The industry has moved so quickly in the past 25 years, and that is only going to speed up.” “There is a real buzz about forestry and arboriculture today,” said RFS Future Foresters Officer Adam Todd. “New technologies are impacting on the way we plan, plant, harvest and market our woodlands and our timber. Our Future Foresters Technology Day proved just how exciting a sector this is for those coming into it, and our thanks go to our speakers and to the 25 exhibitors who have been so enthusiastically engaged with so many students. The future for our sector is looking positive.”

Pro Arb | December 2017

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29/11/2017 15:26


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

This year’s 30 Under 30: The Next Generation was awarded at the 2017 FutureScape event at Sandown Park Racecourse, Esher, Surrey on Tuesday 14 November. The standard and number of entries has risen dramatically year on year and many previous winners have gone on to use the acknowledgement of the award to forward their career. The class of 2017 were presented with a plaque by Pro Landscaper editor Lisa Wilkinson and Mike Brunskill from Glendale, the sponsor for this year’s awards.

30 under 30

Four of this year’s winners stood out in the arboriculture industry for their fantastic, forward thinking work: Anthony Harper, contract manager at Glendale; Joanna Hill, marketing manager at Glendale; Mark Browne, key account manager at Green-tech and Thomas Campbell, senior/principal arboricultural officer at London Borough of Hackney Council.

Anthony Harper

Joanna Hill

Mark Browne

Thomas Campbell

Glendale

Glendale

Green-tech

London Borough of Hackney Council

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

the national tree officers conference 2017

T

WE REVIEW ALL THE DEBATES

AND DISCUSSIONS FROM THIS YEAR’S EVENT

he build-up to the National Tree Officers Conference promised an examination of ‘the real issues facing today’s tree officers and how they need to adapt to meet these challenges’. The goal of the conference was to highlight lingering concerns about the future of tree officers, which hung around throughout the day whenever anyone mentioned how tightened budgets and a lack of staff are leading to a drop in quality of public tree care. Ann Currell, principal planning officer for the London Borough of Barnet, opened the conference with her talk, ‘How are tree services being delivered in London boroughs?’, which addressed many of these issues. She spoke about the results of her 2016 survey of those who work for council tree services in the capital city, which showed a ‘clear drop in morale’ due to a 43.2% fall in funding in London boroughs between 2010-11 and 2015-16. This has led to some clear outcomes: a lack of staff and budget means it is now very hard to keep up with tree care, leaving boroughs unable to maintain

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even the current tree stock. On a more positive note, Ann pointed out that street tree numbers are climbing, albeit slowly, by 1% per annum; councils’ ways of working with tree contractors have also improved, and a there is continuing focus on protection for frontline tree services. Jon Ryan, arboriculture manager for the London Borough of Islington, gave the next presentation, ‘Effecting positive change in planning’. He told attendees that they needed to accept that change is inevitable, and that, to protect themselves in the future, they needed to create tree officers’ working parties – where tree officers meet to talk about their current working problems and discuss best practice going forward. A highlight of the conference was two young tree officers talking about two very different initiatives. First, Margaret Wright of the London Borough of Sutton demonstrated her case study, ‘Attitudes and approaches to the use of photographic records in the maintenance and management of Tree Preservation Orders’. Margaret spoke about how she developed

the idea for a photographic database, telling the audience, “the technology exists, we just don’t have the time to do it.” Next, Thomas Campbell of London Borough of Hackney showed the audience what an under-pressure tree officer can achieve in this period of evolving roles, speaking about his Hackney Treecycle. The Treecycle is a bicycle with a large wagon on the front that Thomas uses when carrying out his duties; Thomas

told the conference how he started out collecting wood in his backpack, then using a bike with a tub on the front, finally pitching his uniquely designed bike. The London Tree Officers Association chair John Parker closed the event, acknowledging the fact that, despite being the most capable people to manage public trees, those present feel under attack – like so many in the public sector at present. “I hear a lot about the problems

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tree officers will have to work collaboratively both inside and outside of the industry to justify the importance of trees and those who manage them, as well as promoting the progressive work that tree officers do. He closed by encouraging tree officers to be more community-minded, asking them to join local tree officers’ groups and working parties, and to attend events. “You do an amazing job,” he told those gathered. “You

are multi-skilled professionals managing multifunctional infrastructure. Promote yourselves! Sell yourselves! Go back to your local authority and tell them what you have learned today. Go back to your local authority and tell them that tree officers are doing and sharing incredible work, and that you are a part of it. We will always be stronger when we stick together – we need to make sure that we continue to do so.”

trees are now widely seen as being important, but the people who manage them – not so much

faced by nurses, prison officers, firefighters and the like,” he said. “But never anything about tree officers. The public doesn’t lament the plight of the tree officer. Trees are now widely seen as being important, but the people who manage them – not so much. I’ve therefore come to the conclusion that if we are to be saved, we are going to have to save ourselves. Nobody else is going to come riding to the rescue.” John moved on to explain that

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29/11/2017 15:28


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

AN INTERVIEW WITH

landscape planning group ltd

we all understand the good that trees bring, but as an arborist, you need to be able to stand back and say that trees can also cause harm

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Can you start by telling me a bit about yourselves? Paul Allen: I’m the head of technical services and I’ve been in that role here since 2015. I was originally here as an arborist in 2004, starting at the same time as Margaret; Margaret stayed here, and I went and “did the rounds” as head of department at three other consultancies, ending up back here 10 years later. I’m essentially in charge of the operational running of the business, overseeing planning and the ecology team. Margaret MacQueen: I’ve been here now for almost 14 years, and before that, I worked for 14 years in local government, with 12 years in estate management prior to that. I’ve been managing trees all my life, whether in the public, private or voluntary sector. Michael Lawson, our director, once challenged me to compress my job into one sentence, and I felt it was best summarised as: “The harm caused to, or by, the tree.”

Can you explain what you mean by that? MM: We all understand the good that trees bring, but as an arborist, you need to be able to stand back and say that trees can also cause harm. Decisions about trees must be dealt with objectively and rationally, and must include an evaluation of the pros and cons in each situation. We would like to say that we are people who can shoulder these difficult questions and make objective decisions, and sometimes the decision is that tree removal is actually the greenest approach. We all understand that issues of visual amenity are highly subjective – there is no definition of visual amenity in planning terms – and people often struggle to see that a tree could be having an impact on private property equity. You might have a situation where a family is experiencing distress from people lecturing them on the attributes of è a tree that they privately own, but which affords

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

if someone is out there with a problem arising from a difficult decision, bring it to us. we will unpick it and we will give the client a cogent solution

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public amenity. When, for example, you’re trying to remove a neighbour’s tree’s roots from the underside of your foundations, and common sense tells you that the roots are damaging your boundary wall or house foundations, but there is somebody telling you that the tree is an amenity and that you should keep it. PA: Trees can also cause direct harm – during storms, trees fall on cars, and can even cause death and injury. Though the probability is low, it does sometimes happen. How do you think Landscape Planning Group stands out as a company? PA: I think it is our willingness to take on the difficult cases. We have a passion for problem solving and for finding different solutions, particularly in planning terms. We also try to keep up to date and give easy, good value solutions for tree management to estate holders, whether they are responsible for a private estate, a housing association, a racecourse or a

university. We’ve recently updated all of our tree risk assessment management policies, for example, in order to ensure that they align with current case law. I think innovative, passionate solutions to problems is what we’re good at. We have developed our own bespoke software, which services all of our surveying requirements, and we’ve also refreshed our staff and our hardware, so we’re in an ideal position to break into the markets. When I sit in front of a client and show them the software and the policy, I can say to them that we are going to provide better value for them over a certain period – and this really matters, because all housing associations and estate managers have shrinking budgets. There’s no use trying to sell a platinum-plated, mega-expensive solution, because they’re going to look at it and say that they can’t afford it. MM: If someone is out there with a problem arising from a difficult decision, bring it to us. We will unpick it and we will give the client a cogent solution. Our

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Have you noticed an increasing interest in larger canopy cover? PA: People are thinking about where they can get decent sized trees into spaces crammed with offices, tunnels and pavements. With the innovative solutions that are out there, you can use underground root chambers or suspended pavements to create the rooting volumes that can sustain large trees. We used to talk about how it’s better to plant young trees, and often it is, but they can be vandalised in urban environments, and they don’t always have the impact that the client wants. It’s that impact, volume and design at an early stage that has always been important. Suddenly, whether it’s the latest mayoral edict, or whether it’s about carbon pollution absorption, canopy cover is starting to seep into that original design. Instead of cramming houses around the tree, we’re being asked about how we can fit in big trees to keep the canopy cover on-site. Does this change the original plans? MM: It reflects the guidance in BS5837. Instead of tacking the trees onto the plan months down the line, arborists should be there at the site walkover. Often, the development manager meets the land manager or asset manager on the walkover. As a separate profession, however, we are the people who understand tree physiology and what trees require. We are the people who should talk about the potential of the site at the land buy walkover stage and classify what should be retained. PA: We have what we call a ‘Stage One Walkover’, where we’ll assess the land and map the constraints for the developer, pointing out what could be, for example, reptile habitats, water body issues or the likelihood of bats being present. By far, most of the work we do is providing a tree or ecology survey and report for a design, or to support an application for a design that’s already been put together. By then, it’s often too late. MM: You ask yourself, who has stopped to read the opening paragraphs of BS5837, which state that the arborists should be on-site right after the

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topographical survey? The arborist’s constraints plan should underpin everything that comes afterwards. Each profession seems to bring in its own base plan, and it’s the arborist’s plan, on top of the topographical survey, that should be the single base line for everyone else. What would you say Landscape Planning Group’s values are? PA: We asked Michael this, and he said: “Profit through professionalism”. This is a learning environment, and we have trained around 200 people in our business in the last year, who have gone onto bigger and better things. We don’t just ‘churn them out’, though – we advertise for training and graduate training programmes. A lot of the people we’ve employed over the years have been graduates straight from university. You learn over your entire lifetime, and there is always new information available, which is really quite exciting. There is new case law coming out all the time, which you need to be abreast of, and we share it to everyone as soon as it comes out. We work closely with solicitors, other professionals and the wider industry. How do you stay up to date? PA: We continually look at our templates to make sure they’re up to date – not just legally, but also biologically and professionally. There is also new equipment out now that wasn’t around even five years ago. We’ve just purchased some new equipment that can stress test trees, for example, and we’ve been using it on trees on development sites that have been damaged. By testing the trees, we can tell the client whether they show signs of vitality. On one site that we’re working with, the trees are currently showing some signs of stress, and we plan to test them again next spring to make sure they’re recovering. MM: We’ve working on a case now in central London where we will be using ground penetrating radar. There are listed garden walls on the site that are going to have to be taken down and re-erected, with zero tolerance for damage to the adjacent trees, the insured’s front garden and the neighbour’s front garden. Everybody understands the need to not impact the trees, and I’m very pleased to say that the people involved in rebuilding the walls have taken our advice and will be commissioning ground penetrating radar studies of both trees, to support the re-erection of the walls.

you ask yourself, who has stopped to read the opening paragraphs of bs5837, which state that the arborists should be on-site right after the topographical survey?

managing director often says: “Development properly planned is a civil good.” PA: We are at the cutting edge of technology, advising landscape architects and architects on different solutions that are in line with both current thinking and mayoral planning policies. We have the ability to supply those solutions in-house.

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30/11/2017 10:21


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Manchester’s Ro Botanic Garden a lost legacy:

TRIANNA ANGELE, OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHARITY CITY OF TREES, UNCOVERS MANCHESTER’S FORGOTTEN BOTANICAL HERITAGE

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If you have ever taken a trip past Manchester United’s football ground or driven between Salford and Old Trafford along Chester Road, you may well have seen a striking white archway – seemingly a gateway to nowhere. This puzzling Grade II listed gateway currently sits quietly alongside the White City Retail Park shopping complex and a busy multi-lane roundabout known as the White City Circle. The names of these two places are the only noticeable legacies of this remarkable area’s past. Beneath the retail park’s well-used concrete car park lies a rich and fertile history. Some 186 years ago, the large striking white columns that stood either side of the gateway guided people into what was originally Manchester’s very own Royal Botanic Garden – at the

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time, one of just three in the UK (the other two being the surviving gardens in Kew and Edinburgh). The history of these gardens is a curious and turbulent one, beginning in 1827, when the Royal Botanical and Horticultural Society of Manchester and the Northern Counties was founded during a meeting at the Old Manchester Town Hall. A committee was selected from associates of small local botanical groups; its job was to gather members, who would pay an annual fee. The society aimed to create a garden that would not only be used for the study of botany, but also provide the citizens of Manchester with a place for recreation and access to clean air; to this end, it bought 12 acres of farmland on the outer edge of the city. From members’ fees, the society would buy plants, and build glasshouses and large flower beds. The industrial nature of Manchester in the 19th century meant pollution was widespread, and with the Napoleonic Wars having only recently ended, in 1815, unemployment was high and economic conditions were poor. People were frustrated, political unrest was common, and the Botanic Gardens were seen as a way to address many social of the problems at the time while also providing a place for people to escape the harshness of daily life. The gardens increased employment, too, as large workforces were needed to build the vast planting areas and the huge surrounding brick walls – including making and firing the bricks on-site. The committee also created apprenticeships, recruiting young people to train under the gardeners.

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

A bright beginning The next step for the committee was to source trees and flowers, which, for many botanical gardens, would have come as gifts and donations from different horticultural societies. The Duke of Bedford made the first donation of various willow trees in 1830; this was followed by flowers, cuttings and a vast array of seeds from both national and international donors. No detailed drawings of the garden plans survive, but it is known that a large variety of plants, in particular a spectacular range of trees, was planted. These created orchards for the fruit garden and an arboretum, as well as individual specimens within the lawns. The committee minutes of December 1830 detail that the London Horticultural Society donated 40 apple trees of different species, 13 pear trees, three plum trees and four cherry trees for the fruit gardens. It also pledged to send cuttings of a further 30 apple trees, 14 peach trees, 19 pear trees, five plum trees, five nectarine trees, four cherry trees and six apricot trees in the spring, when the weather was suitable. Nowhere else in Northern England could such a huge array of exotic fruits be found. A February 1831 order by the committee to Caldwell’s Nursery of Knutsford survives today, showing that 622 trees, both deciduous and evergreen, were to be planted in the gardens prior to opening. The official opening took place in June 1831, a grand event that unveiled the garden’s striking buildings, walled gardens, and beautiful displays of flowers, plants

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What can be a more delightful relaxation to a Lancashire Mechanic than an hour or two in a garden; what an escape from the pestiferous politics of the times

Royal ens

Extract from the minutes from The Archive of the Royal Botanical and Horticultural Society of Manchester and the Northern Counties

and trees that many people would never have seen before. Due to lengthy decision-making and different opinions within the committee, only the outer wings of the glasshouse for exotic plants were complete for the opening. The 35ft-high central glass dome was missing, as construction ran behind schedule. The gardens were the talk of Manchester and people came from near and far to visit. Many historians and researchers have been unable to find illustrations or photos of the large glasshouses and gardens from this time, but a postcard showing the inside one of the great glasshouses – collected by Ann Brooks, author of ‘A Veritable Eden’: The Manchester Botanic Garden, A History – survives today. The committee continued for many decades to push for the very best and highly regarded plants to be brought to the gardens, creating an oasis within the City of Manchester. A huge selection of trees, from both Britain and abroad, continued to be sent – in 1851, for example, it received 11 species of hawthorn, a Bosnian maple and an African tamarind (Tamarindus indica), ensuring it remained at the pinnacle of horticulture. However, the housing and maintenance of such plants continued to create a lot of overspend and debt. Running into trouble During the mid-19th century, many of the upper middle class residents of Manchester moved out into the countryside, affecting the number of paying subscribers – the gardens’ financial backbone. In 1856, an è

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

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In 1907 the debt became too much and the bank needed paying, so the decision was made to lease the Botanic Gardens to John Calvin Brown of Heathcote and Brown Ltd, who founded the company ‘The White City, Manchester’. This name was added to the top of the white gateway we see today. Decline and fall John Calvin Brown was an international entrepreneur who specialised in creating spaces for public entertainment, including large communal gardens, amusement stands, ice rinks, concerts and fairground rides. By 1908 he had already started to reinvent the gardens and attract people back. He applied to Trafford Council to build miniature train rides, and as the years passed, further additions were made, including ice rinks, water chutes, performance stands, bandstands and a small zoo. Many plants and glass houses remained as stunning features within the amusement park, and architects such as Basil and Vivian Pendleton were commissioned to build grand constructions, such as a 75ft ‘Tower Swing’ and a ‘Joy Wheel’. The fate of the Botanical Gardens was always tied into its finances, and in 1912 The White City went bankrupt and left the site. The First World War started in 1914, and the Botanical Committee held the garden’s last ever exhibition, ‘The Garden in Wartime’, in 1916. The committee had worked tirelessly though many decades of financial hardship to give the people of Manchester an escape from the smog and grime of the industrial revolution, providing jobs, education and a place to relax. However, in 1927, it decided to sell the land, which became a greyhound racing track – a truly lost legacy to the city, its people and visitors.

A garden is health, a garden is wealth, a garden is happiness

Art-Treasures Exhibition was held to bring the Botanic Gardens back into the public eye and raise funds. Magnificent glass buildings were built to house paintings, sculptures and even more exotic plants. Unfortunately, a disagreement between the committee and the director of the catering, Mr Donald, over the use of temporary tents led to the exit of all Mr Donald’s staff and the refreshments. The tickets for the event were for one entrance only, so when people left to get food, they could not return. This was a disaster for the garden, and the committee fell into financial trouble. In 1857, the garden’s curator of 25 years, Mr Cambell, was charged with ‘gross ignorance and mismanagement’ for pruning at the wrong time of year, damaging many trees and plants in the gardens, and asked to leave. Mr Cambell fought back and proved that the committee had ordered the pruning. Despite this, Mr Bruce Findley replaced him in 1858, and a new, larger committee was elected. Findley’s motto was ‘A garden is health, a garden is wealth, a garden is happiness’, and his dedication and debt management meant the gardens were back on track by 1865. For many decades thereafter, Manchester’s Botanic Gardens flourished, holding great international flower exhibitions and many prestigious shows. In 1896, Findley passed away, and by the end of that year the committee had decided to clear all the garden’s underlying debts by handing the land deeds over to the bank. During this time, neighbouring land was bought by local businesses, factories were built, and visitor numbers dwindled, leading people to worry about the garden’s future. Stretford District Council offered to buy and pay for the management, but the committee would not allow free access to Stretford residents, so the deal was called off.

Bruce Findley

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30/11/2017 10:37


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

the bat conservation trust

A

WE SPEAK TO NAOMI WEBSTER, TRAINING AND CONFERENCES MANAGER AT THE BAT CONSERVATION TRUST, TO FIND OUT WHAT ARBORISTS SHOULD DO WHEN THEY FIND BATS DURING TREE WORK s the weather gets colder and insects scarce, bats will be hibernating – roosting in small groups in cold and quiet places such as disused buildings, caves and old trees. It’s not unheard of for arborists to come across a roost that an ecology survey has missed, and you should always contact a specialist on the rare occasion that this does happen. The Bat Conservation Trust has been running ‘Arboriculture and bats: Scoping surveys for arborists’ for more than 10 years. The Trust itself works with more than 80 local bat groups and thousands of

volunteers, who monitor bat populations, create batfriendly gardens and answer questions. As mammals that are rarely seen or heard, bats are under threat, with the population having declined considerably over the past century. This is partly due to the continuing destruction of their habitats and the loss of hedgerows, which serve as their commuting routes. Bats also face problems from wind turbines, streetlights and attacks from domestic cats. Bats account for more than a quarter of the UK’s mammal species, but have faced a variety of problems in recent years. Naomi Webster, training è

If there is an unforeseen bat or roost, all work should stop, to make sure no bats are injured

arborists and bats: coming home to roost

d you kid now? Bats u sually

one ba only ha by, hav e been ve to live know for and so up to 41 year n me sp s, fly at s ecies can peeds of up to 1 00mph

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NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

Staying vigilant Being surrounded by nature throughout their day jobs is a great start for arborists interested in bat conservation, but Naomi tells us that a lot of arborists can start to see it as a bit of a chore. “They see it as being, perhaps, a bit bureaucratic,” she says. “But it isn’t always a complete no-go area once you’ve seen a bat.”

bat facts...

Bats are important nocturnal pollinators; plants that they help pollinate in the tropics include date palms, vanilla orchids (which give us vanilla), bananas, breadfruit, guavas, Iroko and balsa trees (popular for their timber) and agaves (giving us sisal and tequila) Bats are more closely related to humans than they are to mice Though the majority of the world’s bats eat insects, some have evolved to also eat fruit, flowers, frogs, fish, blood, and even other bats Insect-eating bats can find their prey in the dark by making high-pitched shouts (inaudible to most people) and listening for the echoes

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Like many mammals, bats have a regimented lifecycle, and some times of the year are particularly sensitive for them. The Bat Conservation Trust tries to help arborists understand when the bats will be having their young and when they’re hibernating – which can be important, as disturbing a roost can have a serious impact. There are times in the year when they are less sensitive; the Bat Conservation Trust recommends carrying out work in September and October, which avoids bats’ maternity and hibernation seasons. Bats are protected by both EU law and UK law; building up a good knowledge of bat conversation can ensure that arborists avoid accidentally breaking those laws. “These laws are there to make sure the individual bats don’t get injured, killed or captured, that their roosts are protected, that they can’t be damaged or access to them obstructed, and nothing is done deliberately or recklessly that would disturb the bat or impair its ability to breed, rear its young, hibernate or affect the abundance of the species or their distribution,” Naomi says. Courses of action Once it becomes apparent that there is a roost in a tree, it is then important to get an ecologist involved, who will help you understand what to do next and go through any options. If the work is unavoidable, an ecologist can advise on whether there is any mitigation or compensation, or can help you get any required licences from the appropriate Statutory Nature Conservation Organisation, such as Natural England. If there is an unforeseen bat or roost, all work should stop in order to make sure no bats are injured. In this situation, it is best to get an ecologist involved, but if the bat is grounded – which does happen at certain times of the year – Naomi recommends calling the National Bat Helpline (0345 1300 228). There are volunteer bat carers throughout the country who help rehabilitate bats for release back into the wild. It could just be that the bat needs some rest and will take off again in the evening, but the helpline can explain how to keep the bat safely in a box with air holes and water until it can be released. December may not be the best time of year for bat spotting, but moving into spring and summer, Naomi suggests looking outside at dusk and into the evening, and getting in touch with local bat groups – a list can be found on the Bat Conservation Trust’s website. Bat groups run bat walks and can be a great introduction to local bats. Anyone interested in bat conservation can consider introducing plants that attract bugs to their gardens, and keep cats indoors at dusk.

Bats are protected by both EU law and UK law; building up a good knowledge of bat conservation can ensure that arborists avoid accidentally breaking those laws

and conferences manager at the Bat Conservation Trust, tells us that, for arborists who want to help prevent any further destruction of bat habitats, there are a few simple steps that can be taken. “When starting to work on a tree, take the time to undertake a scoping survey to work out whether or not this is a tree that has any potential for bats,” Naomi says. “Make sure there is nowhere that they could potentially roost. There are some key features in a tree that can make nice roosting spaces, which arborists should look out for. “If they take the time to arm themselves with the correct information, arborists can make informed decisions about what work will definitely need to be done, and whether it can be done in a way that avoids impacting bats.” This can include getting a tree expert involved, who will decide whether the work really needs to be done.

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30/11/2017 14:11


did w? no you k gest bats are

r rld’s la xes’ The wo s or ‘flying fo s t fruit ba e in the tropic liv h ic h w n have and ca ns of pa wing s 6ft o alm st

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

The Trust’s ‘Arboriculture and bats: Scoping surveys for arborists’ events started as a way to educate arborists and other people who work with trees on how to do scoping surveys and stay inside the law, and how to tell whether bats are roosting, whether a survey is needed, and when specialist advice is required. “I think the great thing about this course is that it is going to upskill arborists and give them a greater knowledge of bats, but also an understanding of how they can work effectively with the bats without breaking the law,” says Naomi. “It will make arborists much more confident about being effective when working with trees and bats.” The Bat Conservation Trust is currently in the

process of adding more events to next year’s calendar, with its specialists currently trying to identify the best places to hold these courses. Naomi recommends contacting her for further dates, or checking the trust’s website soon.

ABOUT Bat Conservation Trust www.bats.org.uk enquiries@bats.org.uk Emergency bat helpline: 0345 1300 228

d you kid now? During winte

r, energy by hibe bats save r nating. can su The r tempe vive very low y ratures , and even b een fou have nd with sn ow on them

roosting habits

There are a number of features that mean a tree is likely to have ‘bat potential’. What seems like a minor feature can be a perfect roost for a bat – woodpecker holes, loose bark, cracks, branch splits, cavities, hollow trunks and dense ivy are ideal for roosting, while the tops of trees are perfect for foraging, navigation and protection during bad weather. In addition, different species prefer different roosting features:

Pipistrelle bats: A crevice dwelling bat, the pipistrelle can be found behind loose bark or within splits and rot holes. They cover a variety of areas in both urban and rural habitats. Brown long-eared bat: Roost can be found close to the ground, and are often cluttered with vegetation. It prefers to forage in deciduous woodland, gleaning insects from leaves and bark. Noctule: Primarily a tree dweller, the UK’s largest bat can be found in rot and woodpecker holes. The male will protect the roost during mating season to attract females. The noctule can forage up to 20km away from its roost.

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Barbastelle: A fast and agile flyer, the barbastelle roosts year-round in tree splits or behind loose areas of bark. They prefer deciduous woods with substantial understorey. Bechstein’s bat: Records indicate that oak and ash trees are important to the Bechstein’s bat, preferring wet woodlands with stream and denser vegetation.

A tiny pipistrelle bat can eat up to 3,000 insects in a night

Natterer’s bat: Another crevice dwelling bat, found roosting in both deciduous and coniferous woodlands.

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29/11/2017 15:31


OPINION

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

ROB MCBRIDE RECENTLY VISITED THE IX FIESTA DEL CHOPO CABECERO, CELEBRATING THE BLACK POPLARS OF ARAGON, SPAIN

I

n my August piece I spoke about the black poplars of Weaste Cemetery in Salford, comparing them to the black poplars of Aragon – the ‘chopo cabeceros’ as they are known there. My recent trip to the tree fiesta – possibly the largest tree party in Europe – was my fifth time visiting the chopos. The last time I was here, in February 2015, I was promoting Spain’s first ever entry into the European Tree of the Year contest. My host, Chabier de Jaime, and the El Centro de Estudios del Jiloca worked extremely hard, finishing with a creditable third place. This year’s Fiesta del Chopo Cabecero was held in two small Aragonese villages, Jorcas and Allepuz, amid stunning mountain scenery. Around 400 people travelled from far and wide to attend. The weather was typically sunny, which enabled the skilled arborists to safely pollard some out-of-cycle trees for the assembled audience – to much applause. This trip was a humbling experience for me personally, as, this year, I am extremely honoured to be able to say that I was presented with the ‘Amigo del Chopo Cabecero’ award. The trophy is just stunning, being a handmade depiction of a black poplar pollard in metal. I can just about lift it! I arrived early in the week, and was fortunate enough to be taken to a few of the more remote ‘tree treasure’ villages. At one in particular I met with Mohammed the shepherd and his 1,000 sheep, which roam around the pollards and hills. The previous day I had the pleasure of teaching four classes of Spanish teenagers about trees, and especially about ancient trees and the Sheffield situation. Teaching was tiring but fun – especially break time, when I came out champ at table tennis! Think Competitive Dad from The Fast Show! I took a STAG T-shirt with me, which was passed around many students to wear for photographs to be sent to the Sheffield tree campaigners. Later, on the Saturday evening, it was also worn by a rock singer at the tree fiesta after-party, late into the night – the film is brilliant. As we head into 2018 I have just received the great news from Chabier that a consultation document for a tree-focused cultural park in Aragon has just been launched – a first for Aragon, and perhaps for the whole of Spain, too. I am so chuffed to be a part of this process, and to see all the hard work of my Aragonese tree friends now coming into fruition. I can heartily recommend a trip over to this friendly and special part of Spain; for anyone contemplating visiting for next year’s fiesta, details can be found at www.chopocabecero.es . All that remains for me to say is that I hope that you all have a ‘treemendous’ Christmas, and a happy New Year.

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Opinion Dec.indd 25

ABOUT Rob McBride, ‘The Treehunter’, is a campaigner for ancient trees. www.treehunter.co.uk

Pro Arb | December 2017 25

30/11/2017 10:42


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

diesel petrol vs

WOODCHIPPERS USED IN THE ARBORICULTURE INDUSTRY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN PREDOMINANTLY POWERED BY DIESEL ENGINES, DUE TO THEIR POWERFUL PERFORMANCE AND COST-EFFECTIVE OPERATION. WITH STAGE V EMISSIONS STANDARDS COMING INTO FORCE IN 2019, THOUGH, PETROL ALTERNATIVES ARE BECOMING SERIOUS OPTIONS FOR INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS. DOUG GHINN, DIRECTOR AT FÖRST, TELLS US WHY DIESEL HAS LONG BEEN THE INDUSTRY STANDARD – AND WHAT THE POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF A PETROL MACHINE ARE Stage V ready As we progress towards 2019 and the enforcement of new EU legislation, many manufacturers have several strategic considerations to make when introducing new machines to market. Stage V regulations will bring a number of important changes that engines must comply with, so understanding the benefits of both diesel and petrol-driven machines is vitally important. Many manufacturers already have plans in place for Stage V. Much of this involves fitting their current diesel engines with a diesel particulate filter (DPF) to ensure that the new emissions standards are met. Although this is an effective method, this process can add cost and weight to the machine – so looking to a petrol alternative is definitely an option. Diesel or petrol? Diesel engines have always been standard in the arboriculture industry because, traditionally, these machines have been more powerful and robust. As technology and engineering has continued to progress, though, arborists have started to look at petrol machines. Petrol machines are lighter, quieter and more environmentally friendly than diesel machines, and for certain sizes of machine they are now able to match the performance of diesel woodchippers. Another important factor for arborists to consider is the type of environment they usually operate in – if it’s a residential area, a quieter petrol engine may be a

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30/11/2017 10:43


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

Petrol advances In 2013, the DVLA announced new legislation for driving a vehicle with a trailer. The entitlements changed so that if a driver passed their driving test on or after January 1 1997, they must obtain DVLA category B+E on their licence by passing additional tests before they can tow trailers that weigh more than 750kg. As a result, there are now more hurdles and costs involved in utilising heavy machinery – for both young arborists starting their careers, and companies who employ arborists. One of the main differences between petrol and diesel engines is that petrol engines are much lighter, allowing chipper manufacturers to produce machines weighing less than 750kg while maintaining the quality and performance levels required for the tough jobs they carry out. Först’s ST6P is a strong example of this; with its 37HP V twin

petrol engine, the ST6P compromises nothing from a quality perspective, despite its 745kg weight – and it offers strong chipping ability. The machine utilises the FörstGrip feed roller and Open Flywheel systems, making for a high performance chipper. With autointelligence control, a clear 30L fuel tank and a threeyear warranty, the ST6P is Stage V ready and offers a good indication of where the industry is heading. With petrol engines advancing, arborists can now operate machines with the same level of durability and performance as most diesel woodchippers while reaping the benefits of a lighter machine, and without the need to incur additional licence costs. That said, diesel machines are and will remain popular within the industry, continuing to offer many benefits to arborists. What’s interesting about the new technological advancements in petrol-driven machines is the choice it now gives arborists. Whether it is diesel or petrol that is preferred, it is essential that the woodchipper you choose has the required levels of productivity, durability and reliability.

• • • • • • • •

FÖRST ST6P

37hp V twin petrol engine Auto-intelligence control Clear 30L fuel tank Easy access anvil Folding hopper Först Flywheel system Touch button feed control FörstGrip feed roller system • Three-year warranty

with petrol engines advancing, arborists can now operate machines with the same level of durability and performance as most diesel woodchippers

more suitable option. If it’s a remote location, that’s one less thing to worry about. The larger diesel machines hold their own on bigger, more industrial applications, such as utility arboriculture, clearance projects or work on commercial properties. Diesel is also the preferred choice for clients who choose to store fuel in bulk.

ABOUT For more information on Först’s woodchippers, or to book a demonstration, visit www.forstwoodchippers.com, or call 01264 721790

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30/11/2017 10:43


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

futurearb

debate

JONATHAN HAZELL REPORTS BACK ON THE WIDE RANGING FUTUREARB SESSION NCP car park in Milton Keynes THAT TOOK PLACE AT THIS YEAR’S FUTURESCAPE EVENT

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Pro Arb | December 2017

Jonathan Hazell Dec.indd 28

of pollution, what sort of tree, how close to the emissions and so on. A second, broad ranging and discursive thread had money as one of its themes, and tried to explore how emotions could be used to inform tree value and be brought into play when deciding the optimal time to remove a tree – be that a street tree or a feature in a park or historic landscape. The merits of a range of valuation systems were considered, such as CAVAT, iTree and Helliwell, but it had to be acknowledged that none was universal, nor did any hold sway at enterprise level – although localised victories could be secured and individual trees saved using one system or another. The third thread touched upon training and certification, and the patchy success of the apprenticeship scheme – I know from contractors local to me that the scheme works for them, but Gary had reservations, despite giving the scheme his best shot. Near me, the take-up appears to be good, with mentoring

I

recently moderated a very interesting morning session at FutureScape that dealt with a range of topics of interest. Huge thanks to my panellists – in no particular order: Stuart Phillips, senior product manager at Lantra; Craig Ruddick, the arboriculture manager serving Richmond and Wandsworth Councils; Alastair Durkin, senior tree officer at Tandridge District Council; and Gary Scammell, representing Gristwood and Toms. The audience ran the whole range of arboriculture roles, from contractors and consultants to students, but there were unfortunately few from the landscape fraternity – the market that arboriculture really needs to reach out to in the coming years. The first topic to be tossed and thrashed around was the role that trees can play in trapping pollution, such as the particulates from vehicle exhausts. Unfortunately, we couldn’t do much with the topic, as it’s a huge and multi-faceted subject – for example, what sort

the audience ran the whole range of arboriculture roles, from contractors and consultants to students, but there were unfortunately few from the landscape fraternity – the market that arboriculture really needs to reach out to in the coming years

going well and those on the scheme enjoying the experience; for Gary in the South East, the concern was that entry-level training could only command a wage that was unsustainable. The fourth thread revolved around the place of women in arboriculture, and I was very pleased that a couple of students took a very active part in the discussion. I’ve never really understood why arboriculture is not an attractive career option (in general, not just for women) and I remember some very capable women in the teams that I used to manage. Did the debate do what I, as the moderator, wanted? I’m not sure that it did – I don’t think we reached out enough to the host audience swarming around the venue, but that is based on my assumption that there will be no place in future for an arboricultural industry sector. Yes, there will be a need for the arborist, but he or she will simply be a properly trained part of the wider service sector. www.jhazell.com

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30/11/2017 10:28


top 10 tips for recruitment

DANIEL GREEN, FACILITIES MANAGER AT CHRISTOPHER HOARE TREE SERVICES, OFFERS ADVICE ON ATTRACTING EMPLOYEES

1

CONSIDER APPRENTICESHIPS

2

STAY SOCIAL

3

LISTEN TO RECOMMENDATIONS

4

TIME TO TRAIN

By having a close relationship with colleges that teach arboriculture and forestry, we can offer candidates practical work experience within the industry while allowing them to further their education. Employing somebody as an apprentice gives us the freedom to mould them into an efficient worker with clear goals, while ensuring we get the type of employee we require.

Having a strong social media presence allows potential employees to see the variety of work we do in greater depth before they approach us. From our YouTube channel showing an in-depth look at individual jobs, to our Instagram account demonstrating different work sites, being able to see the variety of work we do helps people know if we are right for them.

Having been in the arboriculture industry for many years, we are often approached by associates recommending up and coming people that may require a level of guidance and further extensive work experience to get the best out of them. Much like our apprentices, we can create a safe and structured work environment to help people fulfil their true potential.

Offering a structured training regime to new employees is key to ensure they know that we want to further them as an individual and as a worker. Over the many years, it has become quite common for people with only basic experience to steadily work up the company hierarchy, with hard work and time. CPD is a key focus for us, as a growing company.

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Top10tips_Dec.indd 29

5

RECOGNISED RECRUITERS

6

REPUTATION MATTERS

7

OFFER VARIETY

8

ALWAYS BE APPROACHABLE

When time is against us and we must fill a position that requires experience and knowledge in a particular sector, it is always useful to be able to recruit from an industry recognised recruiter. In the past, we have used websites such as Arbjobs to advertise roles, with great success in finding the correct candidates to meet our needs.

Word of mouth can be a powerful influence on somebody who is trying to decide if we are the right company to approach for employment; it is easy for people to verify standards by looking on websites such as Checkatrade. By aiming for the best standards and acting in a professional manner, we often attract workers with personal goals that match up to those of the company.

An attractive prospect for potential recruits is the variety of experiences we can offer, regardless of their experience and qualifications. We offer the chance to work in both the domestic and utility sectors of arboriculture. Following this, employees are encouraged to work hard and progress to the next level, whether in team leading, surveying or consultancy.

Being an approachable employer is key to get the best out of staff. While it is important to maintain a management hierarchy, we encourage all staff to talk openly to management about problems at work or at home that could affect their ability to work. We started life as a family run business and, despite growing in size, we aim to maintain our personable touch.

9

EXTRA CREDIT

When a company achieves industry-relevant accreditations, potential employees can see early on in their research that the company strives for the level of excellence and professionalism that is so important in arboriculture. It helps them see that health and safety of staff are paramount and that the company takes genuine care when maintaining vehicles and equipment.

10

KEEP IT COMPETITIVE

Money talks, and offering a competitive salary with benefits that meet and beat the statuary holiday allowance in the UK means that we can offer much more than many small-to-mediumsized companies. As with our CPD, there is every opportunity, through determination and hard work, for employees to climb the pay scales and earn further rewards.

about

Christopher Hoare Tree Services Ltd is a New Forest-based tree services that has offered tree surgery, consultancy and utility arboriculture for nearly 20 years. It covers Hampshire, Dorset and Wiltshire, and offers services to both the commercial and domestic sectors. www.chtstrees.co.uk

Pro Arb | December 2017 29

30/11/2017 10:44


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

powdery mildew BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS ADVISE ON COMBATING THIS FUNGAL DISEASE

1

& PESTASE DISE

P

owdery mildew is a foliage disease that occurs on virtually all species of ornamental plants, with rose, oak, hawthorn, lilac, sycamore, laurel and crabapple commonly affected. Heavy infection can cause premature defoliation and growth reduction, and renders the host aesthetically displeasing. Powdery mildew may occur at any time during the growing season, but it is usually most severe in the late summer months. Unlike most foliage diseases, powdery mildew is inhibited by extremely wet weather.

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Pro Arb | December 2017

Bartlett Dec.indd 30

2 Symptoms Foliage, stems and flowers become covered with a whiteto-grey powdery growth (Figures 1-2). Stunting and distortion of developing leaves and stems usually accompanies these symptoms. Leaves eventually become chlorotic and fall. Causal agents Six genera of fungi cause powdery mildew on plants. The fungi overwinter as mycelium in the bud or as spores on fallen leaves, and initial infections occur directly from these overwintering mycelium or windblown spores. Under favourable climatic conditions, the fungus develops on the surface of host tissue, producing a mat

of white mycelium. It obtains its nutrients by producing specialized peg-like projections called ‘haustoria’, which puncture host cells and absorb their contents. Spores produced on the mycelium impart the powdery appearance to infected plant parts, and are responsible for secondary infections. Control The incidence and severity of powdery mildew can be reduced through various cultural practices. Extremely susceptible species should be planted in partial sun, and pruned periodically in order to allow light and air penetration. Fertilisation in the dormant

season (i.e. winter) will prevent excessive late-summer growth, which is susceptible to damage by powdery mildew. Destroy infected leaves in the autumn to reduce the amount of inoculum available the following year. Fungicide sprays will effectively control powdery mildew if applied regularly, beginning when infection first occurs – usually around late June and early July. If fungicides are not an option, phosphite sprays and/or soil drenches are recommended, to stimulate tree vitality. Bartlett research trials conducted at the University of Reading showed phosphites useful in suppressing this disease. www.bartletttree.co.uk

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30/11/2017 11:11


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30/11/2017 10:00


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

pulling together

T

ake a look at any Ifor Williams trailer and you’ll find that safety, flexibility and ease of use are built in. The tipper is no exception, providing a robust and versatile solution for industries such as building, landscaping, tree surgery and agriculture. The security element has been considered in all aspects of the trailers’ build, with each one fitted with an ID plate that has a unique serial number etched on it. Additionally, the drawbar for each trailer has a different unique number cut through it, which is virtually impossible to change without noticeably affecting the appearance of the numbers and its galvanised finish.

The coupling head lock has been designed and manufactured to resist attack, and uses toughened steel and high security barrel lock mechanisms. In rigorous security testing, the lock has been awarded the Gold Standard by major UK test house Sold Secure. The coupling head lock is plated all over and, in addition, the upper section is powder coated. The internal elements of the lock are made from non-rusting materials, while a convenient weatherproof cover is also provided, covering the whole lock to give additional protection. A spare barrel lock is supplied, giving the user the option of replacing the lock on the coupling head of the trailer, which enables

JAS P WILSON

Botex Hooklift trailer • Bodies include skip boxes, flatbeds, forestry spec with pins etc • Gross capacity: 12T • Chassis weight: 2.3T • Max hook load capacity: 8.1T • Load capacity including skip: 10T • Four-wheel hydraulic brakes

32

them to use the same key to open both locks. The coupling lock comes with a total of four keys. Finally, when you register your new trailer, it is automatically registered with TER (The National Plant and Equipment Register). Its mission is to combat plant theft and fraud in the UK and Europe; by registering ownership, both technical and marking details can be made available to international police forces through TER. All Ifor Williams trailers include free registration to TER once your trailer is registered by your distributor, thus ensuring arborists can feel confident of their trailer’s security at all times. For further information on TER, please see its website at www.ter-europe.org

IFOR WILLIAMS TRAILERS LTD TT2515/TT3017/TT3621

• • • •

Galvanised steel chassis and drawbar Strengthened aluminium floor as standard Mounting bracket and spare wheel Strengthened steel dropsides and headboard as standard • Improved design tailboard is hinged at the top and bottom for added convenience

The security element has been considered in all aspects of the trailers’ build, with each one fitted with an ID plate that has a unique serial number etched on it

trailers

LEADING TRAILER MANUFACTURER IFOR WILLIAMS TRAILERS TELLS PRO ARB ABOUT THE INNOVATIVE FEATURES THAT HELP TO ENSURE THE SAFETY AND SECURITY OF ITS PRODUCTS

INDESPENSION LTD

FTL35166TRD (flatbed trailer product code) • • • • • • •

3500kg gross weight 891kg unloaded weight 2,505kg payload Tri-axle Internal dimensions – 16ft x 6ft 6in 8in steel ramps including prop stands Dropsides including headboard

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Price: From £2,465

Price: £5,520

www.jaspwilson.co.uk

www.iwt.co.uk

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Pro Arb | December 2017

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30/11/2017 10:33


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

stump grinders stump to it

W

ith legislation being rolled out to limit emissions, Predator has worked hard to place innovation at the centre of stump grinder design. Our objective has been to pack more performance into every single horsepower, and though we have been fortunate with the low scale impact the regulations will have on our range, we recognise that the market is changing and there is room for more innovation. We already have the semi-electric hybrid Predator 460, and we see a niche for more efficient stump grinders that can challenge the performance and capability of high-powered machines.

Horsepower is by no means the sole element that determines how well a stump grinder performs. Compact design, low operator fatigue, fuel economy and cutting system all play critical roles. We’re working to challenge the ‘bigger is better’ mindset that makes a 40hp machine more appealing to operators than a 30hp machine. With the right design, 30hp can be much better – and cheaper to run! In many cases, simply modifying a stump grinder so as to decrease the operator’s fatigue level can almost double its productivity. With this in mind, we’ve made progress in upgrading some of our existing machinery so that it is more efficient. The Predator 460 is

GLOBAL RECYCLING SOLUTIONS LTD

PREDATOR POWER

Bandit ZT1844 tracked

Predator 460

• • • • • • •

Hybrid electric drive Electric start 25hp Kohler petrol engine 30in width 48in cutting slew 14in cutting depth 24in cutting height

one of our most recent examples – while powered by the same 25hp Kohler petrol engine as its hydrostatic equivalent, the electric drive allows for lower emissions and greater fuel economy. This, combined with its wide slew pivot, means it can remove stumps that many operators wouldn’t have dared tackle without a fourwheeled or tracked alternative. By introducing the central pivot system to our smaller pedestrian and self-propelled models, we have challenged the ‘bigger is better’ consensus, seeing demand increase for smaller petrol-powered kit under 25hp. In fact, we plan to introduce a 23.5hp machine that does the same job at the same

• • • •

26.5hp or 38hp Kohler EFI engine options 18 diameter Bandit cutterwheel, fitted with Greenteeth 29in width Swing-out console operation from both sides of the machine and rear • 700kg • Choice of four colours

SIMON BRADSHAW, PREDATOR UK HEAD OF SALES, DISCUSSES DEVELOPMENTS IN STUMP GRINDERS

speed. It may not sound like much of a change, but rolled out across our whole fleet, this contributes to a significant emissions reduction. There is more in the pipeline. Predator sees an opportunity to redesign stump grinder attachments for chainsaw engines under 125cc, allowing customers to use their existing saw as a power pack while grinding faster and more easily than ever before. This can only be a good thing for smaller firms that lack a standalone stump grinder and seek to reduce their hire and subcontracting costs – and for minimal outlay. We see these regulatory changes as a great thing – after all, the planet matters more than anything else.

DANEQUIP UK LTD 27SP

• 28in working width, can narrow down to 26in • Hydrostatic drive • Electromagnetic clutch • Disc brake system • 227kg • 14in cutting depth

Price: £8,394

Price: £13,500 (26.5hp) / £14,300 (38hp)

Price: From £6,600

www.predator-mfg.com

www.globalrecycling.eu

www.danequip.co.uk

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30/11/2017 10:31


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30/11/2017 10:03


product dna

KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

makita

DUC302Z Twin 18V Chainsaw 300mm LXT

1. Battery indicators and the battery warning lamp show the state of charge of both batteries. When insufficient charge is available, the machine will stop rather than continue to operate with dwindling power, which risks damaging the motor and the chain drive mechanism. The charge in each battery is indicated, and the operator can decide to replace either, or both, depending on the amount of work they estimate there is to do. 2. Tool-less chain adjustment via an easy-to-operate single lever on the side of the housing. It eliminates the need to slacken off two locking nuts with a spanner and adjust the chain tension with a screwdriver. It is much simpler to have a tool-less system where you simply slacken off the lock, adjust the tension with the same rotating key that is attached to the machine, and then lock the bar in position and carry on operating the saw. 3. The Makita twin 18V platform utilises the vast inventory of 18V Li-ion batteries that have been supplied to the market since Makita led the way with Li-ion introduction in 2005. If a customer already owns Makita tools and 18V batteries, they can buy ‘body only’ machines and use the batteries already owned. The Makita charging system is the fastest in class, with 22 to 60-minute charge times depending on the battery ampere capacity. Batteries are available in 3Ah, 4Ah, 5Ah, or 6Ah variations. 4. The electric chain brake on Makita saws not only cuts the motor drive power the instant the trigger is released, but also reverses the motor polarity to stop the driveshaft rotation.

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Makita DNA.indd 35

7

8

5

Technical specifications • Equivalent to a 32cc petrol twostroke saw • Max output: 800W • Bar length: 300mm • Bar type: sprocket • Chain pitch: 3/8in • Chain gauge: 0.043in • Chain speed: 8.3m/s • Net weight: 4.7kg • Chain oil capacity: 85ml (cm³) • Noise sound pressure: 84.4dB(A) • Noise sound power: 95.4dB(A) • Noise K factor: 2.5dB(A) • Vibration K factor: 1.5m/sec² • Vibration (cutting wood): 6.3m/sec²

9

4

2

1 3

6

5. Kickback brake: With the operator’s leading hand gripping the forward control handle, if the chain kicks back and lifts the machine up, the kickback brake will strike the forward hand and apply the brake. The brake is a sensitive safety control and operators will develop a wrist movement that will operate the brake while still maintaining grip on the forward bar. 6. Chain oil level window: A visual inspection of the oil level through the window removes the need to unscrew the oil reservoir cap to check the contents. This enhances productivity and encourages regular inspection, to be certain adequate oil is available to enhance chain performance and longevity. 7. Ergonomic soft grip handle for user comfort, which follows the vibration damping and machine control principles used in many Makita machines.

8. Soft start: With 800W motor output, a high initial torque load is immediately generated when the control trigger is depressed. From stationary, this could rotate the machine body, with the potential to twist the machine out of the operator’s grip. The ‘soft start’ system controls the motor’s acceleration from standstill to maximum torque, removing the twisting torque risk to operator and machine. 9. Automatic chain oiling system delivers a constant flow of protective oil, whatever the temperature or oil viscosity, while reliability and cutting performance are enhanced.

ABOUT Makita (UK) Ltd 01908 211678 sales.orders@makitauk.com www.makitauk.com

Pro Arb | December 2017 35

30/11/2017 10:35


ARB NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

KIT

a roundup of the best new products for 2018

HAIX SAFETY FOOTWEAR

GREEN-TECH

• 100% waterproof and breathable, thanks to GORE-TEX Extended Comfort Technology • EN20345:2011 safety footwear for professional use with S3 classification • Shock absorbent sole insulates against heat and cold • Lightweight, with 1.8mm thick durable leather upper • SRC slip-resistant outsole Price: £144.90

• • • •

Black Eagle Safety 50 Mid boot

www.haix.co.uk/workwear/

GT tree anchoring kits Developed in partnership with Anchor Systems (International) Ltd Wire and strap fixing kits, suitable for trees up to 12m high Manufactured in the UK from high quality SG iron Range includes gt Rootball wire fixing kit, gt Rootball strap fixing kit, gt sleeper and kerbstone anchoring kit, gt containerised rootball fixing kit and gt guying kit • Technical data available, as well as CPD seminars • On-site installation assistance offered Price: Starts from £16.75

www.green-tech.co.uk

HUSQVARNA 562XP chainsaw

• Optimised ergonomics – compact design with Low Vib • Highly efficient, reliable and powerful X-Torq engine • Autotune ensures maximum performance • High productivity, high power to weight ratio and high capacity air filter • Less down time – Air Injection increases long term durability • Efficient limbing – RevBoost and lightened flywheel for instant acceleration • 3/8in pitch, 1.5mm gauge large bar mount • Suitable with X-Force bar and X-Cut C85 chain Price: £870

www.husqvarna.com/uk

BEAR VALLEY COMPANY

BVC Exo Alpha jacket • • • • •

Dovetail High collar Cordura High Abrasive material on arms Underarm zip vents High pockets for easy use with a harness

Price: £70

www.bearvalleycompany.co.uk 36

Pro Arb | December 2017

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unfogable mesh eye protection • SALES • SPARES • REPAIRS

● Eliet Green Waste Shredder ● Toro Stumpgrinder ● Timberwolf Chippers ● Supplier of Husqvarna, Arbortec, Treehog, Marlow, Silky Saws, Stein, Petzl ● Chain and chipper blade sharpening ● Sales, service, spares for all makes and manufacturers

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Tel: 01981 590224 Fax: 01981 590355 enquiries@silkyfox.co.uk

Visit silkyfox.co.uk to find your local stockist

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29/11/2017 15:45


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

TOOLBOX PRO ARB TALKS KIT WITH OLIVER RICKMAN, DIRECTOR AT WESTBEAMS TREE CARE COMMERCIAL VEHICLES AND TRAILERS

CHIPPERS

With chippers, you need to have a decent supplier nearby. I find that Först ticks all the boxes – the company seems to put all the best things into its chippers, and they have a three-year warranty. Everyone seems to be going for them. We went for a 6in chipper; we could have gone bigger, but when we do firewood we’re not chipping anything bigger than that. I would definitely buy from Först again.

Quite a few tree surgery firms go for the 7.5T trucks, which comes in handy for the bigger jobs, but what I found when I started working in the industry is that, when you’re working with domestic properties, the Transit tipper van is the way to go. There are so many of them, and there are masses of parts all over the place if you need to repair or replace. As the workload increases, you start to wonder how you ever managed without two transits and then you get to the point where you think you could really do with a bigger truck. That’s where the 7.5T vehicles come in – but if you get a 7.5T lorry and you’re a business, you have to have an operator’s licence, and there are so many more restrictions. You have to have six-weekly checks, the MOTs are strict and you have to take them miles away to have them done. I was toying with the idea of getting one, and then just decided to go with a third transit. I bought some Ifor Williams cage trailers that we can fill with woodchip, and as far as off-roading is concerned, we’ve got the 4x4 Land Rover and the Hilux pickup. We’ve also got a couple of cherry pickers, which helps speed up tree work, hedge reductions and trimming. When you’re transitioning from being a medium-sized to a larger company, it’s all about finding that balance, figuring out what is essential and where you should put your money.

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KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

CHAINSAWS

The majority seem to go for Husqvarna or Stihl chainsaws. I think they’re both great, but I’ve found Stihl saws easier to work with – they’re more robust. We use our saws for logging and tree work, and I find that they get put under far more stress while logging.

SKID STEERS

We have a Boxer skid steer loader. I feel it’s a good machine, so will be happy to stay with it.

STUMP GRINDER At the moment we have a Predator stump grinder. When I’m thinking about buying a new piece of machinery, I tend to speak to other people in the industry who have it. Our next machine is going to be a Bandit tracked stump grinder, which is coming next month.

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30/11/2017 12:01


the ANCIENT TREE

column

Each month we feature an ancient British tree. This month the Ancient Tree Forum introduces us to...

Veteran ash, Lyscombe and Highdon, Dorset

T

his veteran ash tree, with its beautiful heart-shaped form created by cambium curving round the decayed hollow, can be found towards the bottom of a chalk downland valley in North Dorset. With its hollow trunk, deadwood in the crown, rot holes and cavities, the tree has many veteran features, and is hugely valuable for its biodiversity as well as its aesthetic appeal. It supports many species of lichens and bryophytes, some of which are almost entirely dependent on veteran ash trees due to the unique characteristics of the bark. These include the (UK) priority lichen Bacidia incompta, and the nationally scarce Bacidia delicata and Caloplaca ulcerosa. In addition, the white-rot wood decay in the trunk provides a decaying woody habitat for a whole range of saproxylic invertebrate species. The effect of Chalara dieback of ash (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus) on open-grown trees such as this ash was one of the subjects of discussion at the Ancient Tree Forum’s autumn field event at Lyscombe Farm, which is within the Lyscombe and Highdon Site of Special Scientific Interest. Many of the older trees on the site are showing signs of dieback, but the effect so far appears to be much

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greater on some of the younger trees, particularly those that have been coppiced in recent years. The impact of dieback on this area of Dorset and other parts of the country where ash trees are prevalent could potentially be devastating, but in line with best practice, the veteran trees at Lyscombe are being left standing for as long as possible. Some ash trees appear to be more susceptible than others, but even if those infected die as a result of the disease, this could take many years, and the trees will remain valuable even following their death, due to their scarcity and high habitat value. They are also a potential source of resilient material for the breeding of a new generation of Chalararesistant ash trees. Those attending the ATF’s event were urged to record all ash trees with a diameter of 1.5m or more on the Ancient Tree Hunt inventory (www.ancient-tree-hunt.org.uk), so that, in future, there will be a record of which trees have survived Chalara and which haven’t. In 2014 the Ancient Tree Forum produced a position statement on managing the threat posed by Chalara to ancient and veteran ash trees, which can be downloaded from its website.

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and provides advice on their value and management at www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

30/11/2017 10:16


MEET THE

SUPPLIER

richard waterworth head of sales, Isuzu Truck UK RICHARD WATERWORTH OF ISUZU TRUCK UK TAKES PRO ARB BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE POPULAR TRUCK BUSINESS Can you tell us a little bit about the company? Isuzu Truck UK is a wholly owned subsidiary of Isuzu Motors Japan (IMJ). IMJ is one of the largest vehicle manufacturers in the world, producing about 640,000 commercial vehicles a year. What are the key selling points of your products? Our trucks have a reputation for reliability, excellent payload capability and affordability. They have a compact footprint, allowing drivers to access housing estates, narrow lanes, driveways and other small spaces. Our vehicles are also rear wheel drive, which makes them easy to handle off-road. Which are your bestselling products? Our 7.5T range is our bestseller, but our 3.5T Grafter range is not far behind. Our 3.5T Grafters are popular with arb companies – we’ve developed a large and loyal following of arborist customers. What kind of aftersales support do you offer? We have a network of around 60 dealers in the UK, covering Scotland, Wales and almost every key town or city in England. All have commercial vehicle service

WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

Meet the Supplier Dec.indd 41

agents, so we have a fast-acting network that understands commercial vehicle needs. We realise that a large number of people can’t work if their vehicle is off the road, so a lot of our dealers work out of hours as well. Our trucks come with a three-year unlimited mileage warranty, which includes roadside assistance; this shows our confidence in the reliability of our vehicles. How do you market the business? We’ve just launched a new website with revamped spec sheets, to make it easy for customers to find the information they’re looking for. We do a lot of trade journal and magazine advertising, mainly in sectors such as arboriculture, landscaping, construction and recovery. We are also planning a digital campaign and try to be as active as possible on social media. Our sales team is one of our most effective marketing assets, as they can help customers to map out the specifications of the vehicle they want. This ensures customers get a purpose-built vehicle that suits their needs, along with a finance package that works for them. Our finance partner is BNP Paribas, who can tailor packages to suit customers’ requirements.

What are your lead times? The vehicles are built in Tokyo and assembled at our European plant in Verona. We work with the UK’s leading bodybuilders to produce a range of ‘driveaway’ trucks that are available at short lead times, which makes a big difference to customers who need their vehicle as soon as possible. Arb bodies are often a bespoke build to meet the customer’s individual requirements, but our lead times on 3.5T tippers and dropsiders is much shorter. How do you ensure the quality of the products? In the plant, they have meetings every morning on the line where they do random checks on the vehicles. There is also a huge research and development building on-site, which manages the planning and legislation the vehicles need to comply with.

Are you releasing any new products in the coming months? Yes; we’re in the process of introducing a new 13.5T range, and we have a new 3.5T vehicle coming out in the near future, which is a new Euro 6 product. It’s being introduced into the UK at the moment, and was driven by the need to reduce engine emissions levels. As a result, we have new, cleaner engines coming out, with lighter chassis. We’re also looking at launching a 3.5T Crew Cab. On a technical note, we’re introducing a new Health Check service to our dealer network, which uses telematics to monitor your truck’s performance. It lets us see the history of how the vehicle has been driven, so we can help owners and operators get the best performance out of their truck. It’ll be a free service for any customer who uses the Isuzu truck dealer network for vehicle servicing.

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30/11/2017 10:38


NEWS | FEATURES | KIT

For full details on all jobs, please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

Call 01903 777 580 or email laura.harris@eljays44.com with your vacancy

ARBORICULTURAL OPERATIONS MANAGER

TRAINEE AND EXPERIENCED CLIMBERS

An established tree care company on the Oxfordshire/Buckinghamshire border is looking for an experienced, qualified climber who is wanting to move off the tools and into a managerial position. You will be involved in a varied role for a mixture of domestic and commercial clients. Previous experience in the arboricultural industry is an absolute must, preferably as a lead climber or foreman. This role will be a mix of pricing and tendering, site visits, admin, training, H&S compliance, client liaison and much more. This position would also suit an older freelance climber who is looking to take on a stable full-time position.

Due to expansion, Advanced Tree Services is seeking to employ full time trainee and experienced climbers. Ideally you should hold the relevant NPTC or Lantra units (use of a chainsaw in a tree and aerial rescue as a minimum). Driving licence and access to your own transport are desirable but not essential.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

EXPERIENCED CLIMBERS

SITE OPERATIVE

Bartlett Tree Experts is recruiting experienced arborists with a proven track record for its offices in the UK and Ireland. The role will involve performing ground and climbing duties, pruning, identifying basic trees and shrubs, demonstrating sound risk assessment skills, an understanding of plant healthcare services and a focus on providing a high level of customer service. Applicants must have minimum of CS30, CS31, CS38 and CS39 (or equivalent) and a full driving licence.

Greenfields Countryside Ltd is looking for a site operative, who will be involved in all aspects of forestry and landscaping maintenance, including grass seeding and cutting, weeding, pruning, turfing, planting, felling, spraying, fencing and all other general forestry maintenance operations. You will be expected to carry out practical skilled maintenance and new work operations to set standards and schedules, using petrol and diesel fuelled machinery such as strimmers, mowers, hedge cutters and chainsaws. You will be involved in, and carry out, regular maintenance checks on vehicles and machinery.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

HORTICRUITMENT Location: Aylesbury

ADVANCED TREE SERVICES Location: Dorking

BARTLETT TREE EXPERTS Location: Nationwide

GREENFIELDS COUNTRYSIDE LTD Location: Leicestershire

IT WORKS 20,000

OVER JOBSEEKERS VISIT OUR SITE A MONTH

OVER

450

cvs online to browse cv

48,000

OVER emails are sent to candidates monthly

5

strong candidate APPLICATIONS per job on average

● Weekly jobs mailer ● Feature jobs inside relevant print magazine ● Jobs featured on weekly news and round up emails ● Different solutions to secure quality applicants

official job board:

visit the website at horticulturecareers.co.uk call Laura today on 01903 777580

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30/11/2017 10:27


KIT | FEATURES | NEWS

the

little

INTERVIEW PRO ARB’S LITTLE INTERVIEW IS FUN, THOUGHT PROVOKING AND GIVES AN INSIGHT INTO THE PEOPLE WHO WORK WITHIN THE INDUSTRY

For your chance to appear in a future edition of the magazine, simply answer the questions below and return them, along with a head and shoulders photo, to: claire.maher@eljays44.com. It’s as simple as that!

jessica mCcabe

Deputy sales manager, Pro Arb

What’s your go to reference book? Pro Arb! Favourite species of tree? Seeing as it is December, I would have to say a fir tree. If you had to work in a different industry, what would you be doing? Fashion.

One piece of technology you couldn’t live without? My iPhone. Favourite sandwich filling? Chicken, bacon and avocado.

Best moment in your career thus far? Getting to attend and help with FutureArb 2017.

Karaoke song of choice? How Will I Know? by Whitney Houston.

©Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock.com

Don’t think too deeply, just fire back your answers and look out for yourself in a future issue. Thank you in advance for your participation.

jimmy mabey

Owner and climbing arborist,

Who would play you in a film of your life? Meghan Markle. Favourite sporting memory? Man United winning the treble. Top of your bucket list? To visit every continent.

Special Branch Tree Services

Favourite species of tree? Tulip tree.

What’s your go to reference book? Claus Mattheck – Field Guide For Visual Tree Assessment.

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Little Interview Dec.indd 43

If you had to work in a different industry, what would you be doing? Bat ecologist.

My coffee machine...

Best moment in your career thus far? A year climbing out in the USA.

Karaoke song of choice? Lithium by Nirvana.

One piece of technology you couldn’t live without?

Favourite sandwich filling? Egg and cress.

Favourite sporting memory? Andy Murray winning Wimbledon. Top of your bucket list? To buy and own a crane!

Who would play you in a film of your life? Johnny Depp.

Pro Arb | December 2017 43

30/11/2017 10:34


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