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PROARB R E C O G N I S I N G E XC E L L E N C E IN ARBORISTS N E W C AT E G O R I E S I N P R O L A N D S C A P E R B U S I N E S S AWA R D S

J u ly / a u g u s t 2 0 1 8 PROFESSIONAL TREE CARE FOR T REE SURGEONS

RICHES OF R I C H M O N D PA R K A SANCT UARY FOR HISTORIC T REES

U P D AT E Y O U R KIT ESSENTIALS BOOTS AND PRUNING S AW S S O R T E D

KNOCKING OUT BOX BLIGHT FIGHTING TALK FROM GLYNN PERCIVAL

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WELCOME

PROARB

PROARB R E C O G N I S I N G E XC E L L E N C E IN ARBORISTS N E W C AT E G O R I E S I N P R O L A N D S C A P E R B U S I N E S S AWA R D S

J u ly / a u g u s t 2 0 1 8 PROFESSIONAL TREE CARE FOR T REE SURGEONS

RICHES OF R I C H M O N D PA R K A SANCT UARY FOR HISTORIC T REES

J U ly/ a u g u s t 2 0 1 8 • Vo l u m e 5 • I s s u e 0 6 U P D AT E Y O U R KIT ESSENTIALS BOOTS AND PRUNING S AW S S O R T E D

KNOCKIN G OUT BOX BLIGHT FIGHTING TALK FROM GLYNN PERCIVAL

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elcome to the August edition. Are you enjoying this long, hot and seemingly endless summer? Those working outside need plenty of sunscreen and water and carrying heavy equipment – as arborists are prone to do – can be challenging. What’s been your experience? We’d love to hear it. But, whether you love the heat or not, it seems conditions may also be leading to more sudden falls of tree branches. Clearly, being hit by one could be extremely serious, but equally, there’s a positive side in that there seems to be plenty of call-out work at present especially from local authorities (page 7).

ALL ENQUIRIES Tel: 01903 777 570 Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA EDITORIAL Managing Editor – Joe Wilkinson Joe.Wilkinson@eljays44.com Features Editor – Rachel Gordon proarbeditor@eljays44.com ADVERTISING Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Sales Manager – Jessica McCabe jessica.mccabe@eljays44.com

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That winning feeling This sector contains many outstanding firms, both large and small, and winning business based on recommendation and being seen to be a trusted operator matters. We want to encourage this further and this month, we are highlighting the fact that the Pro Landscaper Business Awards now has two new categories, aimed at the professional arborist community. You can find out more in our interview with organiser Jim Wilkinson (page 15). Be sure to enter, not only is the event a fantastic experience, winning also earns your firm huge kudos. This month we also feature an update on Glendale (page 18) and on the stunning

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Richmond Park (page 21), setting for some of the capital’s most beautiful and historic tree specimens. Our kit pages focus on appropriate footwear (even if it’s tempting to wear sandals) and with a nod to autumn, pruning saws. I look forward to catching up again in September, when leaves may be falling and temperatures are cool, but there will also be plenty of energy, activity and networking at APF. See you there.

information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts.

CIRCULATION Subscription enquiries: chris.anderson@eljays44.com

MANAGEMENT Managing Director – Jim Wilkinson Editorial Director – Lisa Wilkinson Business Development Manager – Jamie Wilkinson

Pro Arb is published 9 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2018 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and

FOLLOW US ONLINE www.proarbmagazine.com Follow us on Twitter @ProArbmagazine Like us on Facebook Proarbmagazine Connect to our LinkedIn group Pro Arb UK

For careers in arboriculture and horticulture go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Every week we send out ‘Pro Arb: The Tuesday Recap’, in which we highlight the most popular news stories from the last week. If you aren’t subscribed to The Tuesday Recap but would like to be, please email Amber Bernabe at amber.bernabe@eljays44.com If you would like to send us press releases to post online and potentially feature in The Tuesday Recap, please email Max Dodd at max.dodd@eljays44.com

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Forestry work is among the activities characteristic of rural areas, one of the most dangerous and where there are many serious accidents. In previous years there have been accidents at the level of the lower limbs in forestry operations, particularly to the feet, which involved the use of brush cutters and other manual cutting tools, and thus require special safety measures. The most common accident causes using brushcutters are: - Projection of variable size particles (less than 5mm diameter) with velocities in the order of 200m/s, resulting from the fragments of cutting discs’ wear; - Projection of steel fragments (with several dimensions and random directions) with velocities around 200m/s due to the impact between the disc and anthropogenic materials and/or natural materials, such as rocks in the ground; - Projection of anthropogenic materials namely wires that are used in agricultural infrastructures such as in wire fences. The wires when rolled into disks and/or sickles reach rotation speed of 200m/s extending it according to their section, usually less than 4mm diameter.

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s t n e cont CONTENTS

t s u g u J U ly / A 2018

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35 18

10

news & views 7 > NEWS update

All the action from the arb world

10 > Apprenticeships uncovered

A progress report on the arborist apprenticeship from Berkshire College’s DC Vickers

11 > Tree Protection Orders

Consultant Jonathan Hazell looks at what constitutes relevant criteria

12 > Business investment strategies

The right equipment and machinery matters, but what are the priorities? Accountant and arborist Edward Morrow advises

14 > Pest & Disease Watch

features

kit

15 > The Interview – Jim Wilkinson

26 > APF Exhibition preview

You’ve got to be in it to win it! The organiser on the Pro Landscaper Business Awards, which now has two new categories for arborists

18 > Glendale goes for growth

They are major players in the market, so what’s happening with their recent re-organisation?

21 > Exploring Richmond Park

The largest of the royal parks is a beautiful setting for some of oldest trees in London

Outlining the must-sees at this huge event, which takes place on 20, 21 and 22 September

28 > Insight into Isuzu trucks

Check out the rugged and reliable Grafter Green

30 > Boots on parade

Make sure your footwear can do the job

33 > Handy handsaws

Pruning tools for the professionals

35 > Ancient Tree Forum – Jack of Kent’s Oak

Head to Herefordshire to meet a specimen that could be more than 1000 years old

Plant physiologist Glynn Percival explains how to tackle fungi which attack box

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07/08/2018 11:20


NEWS & VIEWS

news ROUNDUP

LONG HOT SUMMER CREATES RICH PICKINGS FOR ARBORISTS

The summer of 2018 could be the hottest on record, but it is also having an impact on trees, resulting in more cases of ‘summer branch drop’ (SBD) syndrome. For arborists, this could be good news, with more call outs to deal with debris and to ensure safety. The exact cause of SBD is unknown, but it is thought to be connected to trees becoming stressed through lack of water and so shedding their branches. Although SBD is hard to predict, it could well lead to extra work from local authorities concerned

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about their duty of care to protect the public and private customers who may have at risk trees. The Arboricultural Association has already noted the phenomenon and its technical o cer, au mith, said beeches, oaks and horse chestnuts were particularly susceptible. According to Duncan Slater, senior lecturer in arboriculture, at Myerscough College: “There’s been insu cient scientific investigation into summer branch drop syndrome to satisfactorily determine the mechanism by which the branches are actually shed. We have numerous, and at times contradictory, suggestions in arboricultural literature, but no evidence-base and no clear means of identifying branches at risk of this form of failure. “This long dry period presents an opportunity for closer

A ROUNDUP OF ALL THE LATEST ARBORICULTURE NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK. FOR MORE STORIES VISIT WWW.PROARBMAGAZINE.COM

ALMOST HALF OF VISITORS TO APF ARE ‘TREE PROS’ Almost half of the 23,000 visitors to this year’s APF Exhibition will be professionals from the arboricultural and tree care industry. The biannual event takes place over three days from 20 -22 September at Ragley Estate, Warwickshire. With around 320 exhibitors, and some £50 million of equipment on show, there will also be a forest worker zone, an extensive speaker programme and educational seminars. Many visitors will be staying in nearby

examination of failed tree limbs that exhibit this form of failure, and also a chance to collate data on what branches such as position, length and diameter and in what tree species have failed during what weather conditions. These opportunities should not be missed.” Recent SBD examples from across the UK include: • Cheshire West and Chester Council has reported an increase in the number of calls it receives about fallen tree branches. • In Aberdeen, picnic fans have been warned about sitting under branches in parks. Signs have been put up warning of possible unpredictable falls. Two trees in the city’s Hazlehead Park have had major boughs falls recently.

hotels, however, there is also a low-cost option with an onsite campsite. See page 26 for more information and full details are available at www.apfexhibition.co.uk

• In Milton Keynes, the council has issued a press release, warning of ‘summer branch drop’ and telling residents to be careful about where they park or picnic. There are also many reports of accidents related to tree branches unexpectedly falling in recent weeks, which may be related to SBD. These include a tree hitting a train near Sleaford, Lincolnshire, on 27 July, causing some damage and disruption for passengers, but no injuries. On 29 July, in Guildford, Surrey, a tree branch ‘came out of nowhere’ and hit a car, smashing through the windscreen and resulting in a pregnant woman being taken to hospital. On 1 August, a huge sycamore crashed onto a retirement home complex in Abergavenny, Monmouthshire.

Pro Arb | July/August 2018

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NEWS & VIEWS

HERO HERTS TREE SURGEON ACTS FAST TO CLEAR TREE

An arborist working nearby on another job was able to spring into action when a tree unexpectedly fell across a road in Melbourn, Hertfordshire. James Cantle, owner of local firm hire Tree urgery, as working with two colleagues for a private resident opposite when a holm oak tree suddenly

crashed across the high street. “It was around 9am and children had just been walking up the street to the primary school when there was an enormous crash. The tree as lying across the street – it was also close to a bus stop, so it was an absolute miracle no one was hurt. We ran out and were

NEWS IN BRIEF able to clear it, making the road assab e again. The work took us about an hour.” The debris as then taken away by highways authorities. Branches did, however, hit the remier tores sho , but Cantle says the only damage was to plastic guttering. nce the c ear u as com eted, the hires Tree team returned back to work for the original customer. James added that the tree appeared healthy and there were no obvious signs as to why it fell. hire Tree urgery is a family business, focusing mainly on Hertfordshire and ambridgeshire and o ering hour ca outs. ames ant e took over the business from his father, and has changed the firm to imited com any status.

TELFORD HOSTS NATIONAL TREE OFFICERS EVENT The ationa Tree cers Conference will take place on 6 o ember in Te ord, hro shire. The e ent ocuses on research, best practice and innovation in di erent areas o oca authority arboricultural work. It is hosted by the ondon Tree cers ssociation, unici a Tree cers ssociation and the Institute of Chartered Foresters and is now in its third year. ast year, o er professionals attended and it is

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hoped numbers this year will be even higher. Chartered Institute of Foresters marketing o cer, ester c ueen said There is a ot o in ormation that will interest those working in the arborist community and it is a great networking opportunity to meet tree o cers and other specialists.” Content will include topics such as tree risk management, policy, diversity and professionalism,

New planning rules benefit ancient woods

Amendments to the go ernment s ationa Planning Policy Framework have been introduced, following two decades of campaigning by the Woodland Trust. They i mean greater protection for the UK’s oldest and most important trees from unnecessary development.

Publisher bequeathes £150m to tree planting Proceeds from the will of publisher Felix Dennis, who died in , i be ut towards planting trees and the u kee o , acres that make up the Heart of England Forest in Warwickshire. His aim was to see the land planted with some mi ion nati e broad leafed trees and for it to be open to the public.

Fine for unlawful felling

legislation and protection, biosecurity and data utilisation. The enue is the akengates Theatre, imes oad, Te ord, T . or more in ormation on attending and the full programme, visit www.charteredforesters.org/ event/national-tree-officersconference-2018/

andmark Tree urgeons rom indsor has been fined , or cutting rotected trees in historic woodland. The counci s en orcement team as ti ed o by a member of the public.

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07/08/2018 08:30


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02/08/2018 11:23


NEWS & VIEWS

The apprentices’ progress VIEWS DC V IC K E R S

DC VICKERS, ARBORICULTURE PROGRAMME MANAGER AT BERKSHIRE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, CONTINUES WITH THEIR SERIES ON THE FIRST INTAKE OF ARBORIST APPRENTICES UNDER THE NEW STANDARDS

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t the end of the last article, the apprentices had been enrolled onto the new Arborist Apprenticeship, with training due to begin. So what has been going on? Our role is to deliver the apprenticeship and as a college, we had taken the decision – after talking to employers – to deliver the underpinning training as b ock re ease. ince that first article, we have delivered two blocks, completed some of the ertificates o om etence and are about to start the third week. We have been very lucky to work with our key employers during this apprenticeship, in particular, Bartlett Tree Experts and Maydencroft. These links between the educational sector

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and the industrial sector are so important to the apprentices in providing opportunities that might not otherwise be available to them at this stage. I asked the apprentices why they chose arboriculture and the Arborist Apprenticeship as the route into their career and they were all equivocal about it. “To improve my underpinning knowledge about trees and the industry,” was the common response. Meanwhile, one of the apprentices had originally worked in a garage and was looking forward to working outside in di ering ocations. ince those first days tack ing plant taxonomy and an initial ook into coni er identification, they have covered pollination,

fertilisation and germination as we discussed how a new tree begins its life. This coincided with a visit to the Bartlett Tree Experts laboratory facilities near Reading where we were able to use the labs and equipment for teaching and learning. Being able to show the apprentices close up what a fi ament or sty e ooked ike under a microscope connected to a large screen was a useful exercise. Dr Glynn Percival and the team also spent some time with the apprentices, talking about the research projects taking place at the labs and asking them what they e t the ramifications to the industry might be in 5–10 years’ time – this was a great way of encouraging re ecti e thinking Our apprentices have now gained an appreciation of the early stages of tree growth and had wider thoughts about the

industry, but they have also passed a few assessments including the Emergency First Aid at Work (EFAW+F), woodchippers and chainsaw maintenance and cross-cutting. To achieve this in such a short space of time is to their credit and also due to the support they receive from their employers. In the next article, we will take a look at how we all manage as we move into a distance-learning phase of programme delivery. DC Vickers has been tasked with developing the resources for and managing the arboriculture provision at BCA. DC is a qualified teacher and is also a City & Guilds NPTC assessor covering many of the chainsaw units. For more information contact DC at dvickers@bca.ac.uk or on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/dcvickers

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02/08/2018 09:58


NEWS & VIEWS

VIEWS

J O N AT H A N HAZELL

To protect or not? JONATHAN HAZELL LOOKS AT WHAT MIGHT OR MIGHT NOT QUALIFY FOR PROTECTION, WITH EXAMPLES OF WORK CARRIED OUT WITH TWO LOCAL PLANNING AUTHORITIES

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relatively new business park with a major tenant wanted to increase the car parking provision at the front of one particular building, which is not uncommon. However, from my point of view the removal of the avenue leading to the main reception was unacceptable – the landscape surrounding the building had been carefully designed and implemented and had established well. The trees forming the avenue were beginning to thrive and to

more or less even-aged roadside trees. A felling licence was sought from the Forestry Commission (FC) to remove about one third of the trees, which led to local outrage, and at the same time (to much less fanfare) a grant application was being made to establish an area of new woodland behind the existing trees. The question here was of the balance between amenity and woodland management. The TPO is primarily a lever to protect the

For me, it is the balance of competing interests between people, property and the tree – some days the scales tip one way, and on other days another rise above the general walls of hornbeam, designed to shorten views through the car park and to o er shade. For me, the question of whether to proceed to make a TPO or not, depended on the future amenity that would be lost if the trees were removed and came back to the design-life of the building compared with that of its setting. In another example, an Order had been served upon a line of

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amenity that a tree provides but the role of the FC is to encourage good woodland management and a diverse age structure, and the professional opinion of the FC quite rightly prevailed. A third site involved the revision of an existing TPO that was technically unsound, much of the protection relied upon groups of trees, however the schedule did not make it clear which trees had been considered worthy of

protection when the Order was served. The site was to change hands, and use, and so it was considered important that the level of protection be improved before the diggers rolled in. New documents were drawn up and served, and the objections duly followed, including the rather odd comment that the users of the site – a large educational facility – did not qualify as the general public. As such, the trees were generally of little or no amenity value and therefore outside the scope of the TPO Regulations. In this case it was quite simple; the trees have amenity by virtue of the current and future uses of the site and so an rder as ustified. So what is the lesson here? The presumption was in favour of overall protection, knowing that a detailed planning application for

the site could override retention where there was doubt as to a tree’s arboricultural merit. As a consultant, I always try to consider the meaning of arboriculture when pondering recommendations for a client when a TPO is involved. For me, it is the balance of competing interests between people, property and the tree – some days the scales tip one way, and on other days another. If you want to know more about this and other topics, then be sure to come to FutureScape on 20 November, where the Tree Panel will be ready and waiting to continue the debate!

Jonathan Hazell is an arboricultural consultant. jhazell.com

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06/08/2018 09:11


NEWS & VIEWS

CHOOSING HOW TO SPEND YOUR HARDEARNED CASH ON THE RIGHT MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT IS FAR FROM EASY. EDWARD MORROW HAS SOME USEFUL POINTERS

Invest with insight VIEWS E D WA R D MORROW

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ave you ever struggled with what to invest in next? Should you focus more on the climbing side of your tree care service, or is now the right time to invest in more equipment and machinery? While tree care and tree removal can both be straightforward processes, the beauty lies in the art of the removal. Whether you are a climbing arborist or a user of heavy machinery, there are many technological combinations that can be employed to be an e ecti e and e cient arborist. So let’s take a look at the di erent scenarios and business models that can be used in your operations and, speaking from personal experience, outline the pros and cons of each.

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Climbers come in di erent orms static rope-climbing vs. moving rope systems, advanced rigging vs. chop-and-fall cutting, spurs only vs. rope-walkers. Climbing is an exhilarating experience and is an exercise that engages the mind, body, and spirit simultaneously. This method is definite y an ad antage in tight spaces, or places where cranes and aerial-lifts can’t cut it. It is also an art that has been lost in some areas and this makes it a highly valuable skill. Unfortunately, it can be a time consuming and slow task, due to the setup, rigging and the complexity of the tree project. Serious climbers can quickly accumulate a plethora of climbing gadgets in a short amount of time, which can overwhelm a novice. In my opinion it is easier for a climber to switch to using forestry trucks and lifts, rather than starting with using lifts exclusively and then becoming a climber.

Having heavy machinery can mo e you on and o ro ects uick y. ciency can be increased, while conserving the energy of your team. Financing equipment purchases and being rofitab e enough to ser ice debt payments could be a concern if you are a new company. Machinery can help you scale your operations and take on more jobs, but you have to consider the numbers. Having cash reserves to take care of unexpected emergencies and handle routine maintenance are all key. Machinery can help you expand your operations by allowing you to transition into landscaping projects, but if you are just starting out, then consider the machinery that will give you the most leverage. Do you service clients who have small, manicured lawns and want minimum damage on their property? If so, it may be wiser to invest in a mini-loader like a Dingo instead of a Bobcat. Maybe a forestry truck and chipper combo would be a better

choice than a bucket truck and dump truck? It is wise to weigh up your options. Having advanced climbers combined with the right equipment can help create a tree service that is a force to be reckoned with. So see if you are able to develop or spot a trend with the type of jobs you are receiving. Let this be a gauge for how you should move forward with investing to be a climbingfocused tree service, equipmentheavy service, or a combination of both. There is never a perfect setup, only one that is the most advantageous to your clients’ needs and the way that you operate. Always keep a budget to ensure that you do not overspend and more often than not, the best way to grow is in a steady and consistent way.

Edward Morrow is an author, accountant and arborist. in o a ountsta ers. o

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07/08/2018 11:27


Contact with electricity results in serious injury or even fatalities. This has a far-reaching and devastating effect on family, friends and colleagues.

UK Power Networks distributes more than a quarter of the UK’s electricity to London, the South East and the East of England, using overhead and underground power lines and substations. The company is urging workers to remember that where tree cutting equipment or machinery is used near overhead power lines, the risk must be considered and controlled. The Be Bright Stay Safe campaign supports safe working and behaviours, encourages the sharing of information and knowledge, and highlights the real risks of coming into contact with electricity. The campaign is reminding people to: • Check - look up and around for overhead power lines before starting work • Contact UK Power Networks for maps showing where power lines are situated and mark them on site plans • Assess clearance distances to work safely near overhead power lines. If in doubt, contact the electricity network operator • Ensure everyone working on site (including visitors, contractors and casual workers) are aware of the location and voltages of power lines before starting work • If you are erecting scaffolding, tree trimming or planning any other work close to overhead power lines, always contact UK Power Networks for advice on shrouding or disconnections before starting work • Use spotlights or lighting equipment when working in poor visibility or at night • Find out the maximum height of any equipment and machinery that may be used on site, when all parts of the machinery are fully extended

• Clearly signpost the dangers with high visibility warning notices • Keep overhead power lines in view when moving plant and equipment To download you free safety leaflet and watch our safety animation visit: www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk/internet/en/safety

What to do in an emergency • STOP WORK IMMEDIATELY • Notify UK Power Networks: Dial 105 • Call the emergency services if anyone is injured or there is a fire. Anyone who has received an electric shock should go to hospital as damage may have occurred to the heart • Never go near or touch any broken or fallen overhead electric power lines, or any plant, equipment or machinery that is in contact with an overhead power line • Never try to remove anything that is stuck, or in contact with the cable

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31/07/2018 09:10


NEWS & VIEWS

PDEISSEATSE

&

w at c h

Infected leaves display brown patches

B

ox blights are caused by two fungal diseases known as Volutella buxi and Cylindrocladium buxicola. Together these two fungal diseases form the most cons icuous rob em to a ect bo (Buxus sempervirens) and its cultivars within the UK and Ireland. Both fungi can occur individually or in combination on the same plant. Volutella buxi results in browning of the leaves and dieback of branches leaving bare patches in hedges and topiary specimens. The fungi spread in wet humid conditions and pinkish spores appear on the undersides of leaves and are carried in water splashes to new sites. Fallen leaves carry the fungi over the winter and new spores are produced in the spring. Volutella buxi enters the plant through clipping cuts and other forms of leaf and stem damage. The fungus Cylindrocladium buxicola produces symptoms similar to Volutella with defoliated plants being the end result. The leaves develop dark brown spots which en arge to a ect ea tissue. atches o greyish fungal growth appear on the

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BEAT THE

BOX BLIGHTS GLYNN PERCIVAL ADVISES ON HOW TO TACKLE TWO FUNGI WHICH CAN SEVERELY DAMAGE THE ATTRACTIVE SMALL TREE AND SHRUB

Symptoms of box blight caused by Cylindrocladium buxicola

Live spores have been found in decomposing leaves after almost one year, so any debris should be burnt if possible – never added to a compost heap underside and spores are soon released to further spread infection. Black streaks appear on the stems. Cylindrocladium buxicola requires moist conditions to thrive, spores die in dry conditions. Live spores have been found in decomposing leaves after almost one year, so any debris should be burnt – never added to a com ost hea . a ected branches should be pruned out and burnt along with any fallen material at the base of the plant. When buying new plants, these should be checked for disease. Good air circulation will reduce the humidity around the plants so ensure adequate spacings between them. Another tip is to avoid overhead watering to keep the foliage as dry as possible. If blight is suspected, disinfect implements with household bleach or methylated spirits before using them again. It makes sense to spray with liquid copper towards the end of

the growing season in September, October and November. During the spring spray, an appropriate fungicide should be used. Spraying should take place at two weekly intervals until the problem is under control. Finally, there should be awareness that not all brown or dead patches on box are caused by box blight. So, check for other problems such as dog or cat urine at the base of the plant. Dogs and cats can ‘territory mark’ the same spot repeatedly, which results in scorching the leaves. If the dead area occurs suddenly and not gradually this could be the reason; box blight tends to develop slowly.

Glynn Percival is plant physiologist/technical support specialist at the Bartlett Tree Research Laboratory www.bartletttree.co.uk

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03/08/2018 12:38


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It’s your time

to shine!

THERE ARE NOW TWO NEW CATEGORIES AIMED SPECIFICALLY AT THE ARBORICULTURE SECTOR – JIM WILKINSON EXPLAINS WHY THESE ARE BEING LAUNCHED, HOW TO ENTER AND WHAT WINNING CAN MEAN FOR YOUR BUSINESS

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t’s high time the exceptional standards of professionalism which exist in the arboriculture community receive their due recognition. As organiser, I am hugely excited to announce that two brand new categories, proudly sponsored by Makita, are now included within the Pro Landscaper Business Awards. These awards take place at a glittering ceremony, to be held on 8 February 2019 in London’s Canary Wharf. This prestigious event is in its second year, following an incredibly successful launch in 2018. The Pro Landscaper Business Awards are setting the standards in terms of rewarding expertise and showcasing those who go the extra mile within landscaping and horticultural services. We now want arborists to share in the glory – so for your opportunity to be centre stage, be sure to enter. What makes the Pro Landscaper siness w rds di erent These awards spell out, pure and simple, what makes a great business. You don’t need to have suddenly won a major contract or to have been involved in a huge project. We do not need to see exponential growth – in fact, a steady increase is an equally

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FEATURES

good, if not better, measure. What matters is showing that your business is performing well, despite what are often challenging economic conditions, that your customers’ satisfaction is the priority and they receive service which is second to none. We also want to see that health and safety is central to your business philosophy – indeed that it is vitally important in what can, at times, be a dangerous industry if there is insu cient a areness or training. This means making sure your employees

Matt Loader of Gristwood and Toms and Rod Pooley of Bristol City Council with Jamie Wilkinson

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are competent, well-trained and committed to managing risks. Overall, the watchword for the Pro Landscaper Business Awards is ‘consistency’ and this is what our judges – there are two panels to include internal and external experts – will be looking for. The new categories in depth As the organisers, we want to ensure that both large and small arboriculture companies can enter. As such, the criteria

for each category covers: • Best Arboriculture Company with a turnover of less than £2 million eing com act in si e can be beneficia and this category is for businesses that make the most o this, by o ering high standards of personal service and equally, ensuring their people are well trained and highly professional. Being smaller can mean more of that all-important personal touch and it could be that senior people are closely involved with the day to day running o the firm. Your entry shou d out ine what makes the business special, how you look after your customers and what your people provide in terms of services and any specialisms. Please note that you need to have been established for at least two years and to be VAT registered. Other than that, the oor is yours, so et your entry te us what sets you apart! • Best Arboriculture Company with a turnover of more than £2 million What makes your business a brilliant big hitter This category is aimed at arger firms and a o s you to sho o the u sco e o hat you can do. You can te us hy you take professional development, recruitment, retention and training seriously. This is

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FEATURES

a so the ace to sho o your marketing prowess by explaining how you reach new and existing customers, whether online or possibly via sponsorship, to ensure the business is well known and viewed as a trusted brand. You may be involved in community initiatives or even with a local college. Perhaps you have expanded by acquisition or expanded solely through organic growth – whatever route, these awards are about saying why you’re a force to be reckoned with, so enter now and get ready to oin our inners ist The low-down on entering Entering is straightforward, and to take part, simply visit the dedicated website at www.prolandscaperbusinessawards.com, register and follow the instructions on what information to provide. We aim to make entering an easy and intuitive process and our friendly team is also on hand if you have any queries. But, don’t hang around too long – the deadline is 1 October 2018.

Host Declan Curry

The benefits of winning Being recognised at the Pro Landscaper Business Awards is a superb achievement, whether you win or are highly commended, and this can be used to generate publicity via press releases and also as part of your marketing collateral. You will be recognised as an expert within your fie d by the ho e industry and not ust your peers. And because we are so focused

on consistency, the message is crystal clear that you are a business that is committed to the long term – this is a key issue for your present and future customers and suppliers. There can a so be benefits in terms of attracting new employees – everyone wants to work for a winning company with an excellent reputation. Furthermore, the awards event is also a superb networking opportunity and a chance to connect with customers and suppliers. What could be better than having them share in your success by inviting them to the awards and taking a table – or two! We look forward to reading your entry for the Pro Landscaper Business Awards and to welcoming you to the event which promises to be one of the highlights of the year. The arboriculture sector can appear crowded and competitive, so these awards will give those who are shortlisted a real advantage. You may often be top of a real tree at work, but why not win the award that lets everyone know your business has achieved that same place as one of the very best? We wish you every success!

Jim Wilkinson is managing director of Eljays44, publishers of Pro Arb and organisers of the Pro Landscaper Business Awards

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FEATURES

Glendale goes

for growth FOLLOWING A RESTRUCTURE, PRO ARB DISCOVERS WHAT PLANS ARE IN PLACE FOR THIS WELL-ESTABLISHED BUSINESS AS IT SETS OUT ITS STALL FOR THE FUTURE

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lendale is one of the UK’s leading horticultural services businesses and also an active player in the arboriculture sector. However, in recent months, Glendale has been dealing with change after the untimely death last December of Tony Hewitt, the executive chairman of Glendale’s parent, Alston n estments, ho had s ent years ith the business. His loss meant reorganising and bolstering the senior management team; the new strategy is being led by three of the directors, Alex Paterson, Mike Brunskill and Adrian Wickham. Alex comments: “Tony was unparalleled in terms of his energy, enthusiasm, desire, and ability to spin lots of plates at the same time.” He was also renowned for keeping the business moving forward and over the past two years the management team has been working on the business strategy and future direction. ston n estments has no sim ified the overall structure of the company by grouping its array of businesses into related sectors. The business strategy for Glendale is primarily based around moving the company, predominantly a public sector business, to one with a more balanced outlook in terms of clients. The new Glendale business, which has been driven by the agreed strategy and reshaping of the overall Alston Investments

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Group, means the grounds maintenance work on pests and diseases and and arboricultural enterprise is now joined educational support to local communities. by landscape architects, has a design enda e aims to o er com ete so utions and build capability, and is working on and is also committed to covering as major infrastructure projects and urban much o the as e cient y as ossib e, redevelopments. as Alex says: “Previously, the business “The restructure is partly down to the additional companies that have joined the brand, which is where Glendale wanted to get to,” says Alex. “Of course we recognise that public sector work is decreasing and being replaced by the private sector. e can no o er the u service: design, build, operate and maintain.” In terms of arboriculture, enda e o ers tree care, surgery such as pruning, crown raising, thinning and felling, stump grinding, dangerous removals and compliance inspections and surveys. The company also provides services for health and safety An arboriculture apprentice about to management and o ers a get to work in a Rotherham cemetery hour emergency response along with supplying trees, planting and after care. Consultant services include planning applications, submissions and appeals and advising on conservation and environmental projects, diagnostic

was based on four regions – this has now been integrated into two regions with the two managing directors, Mike and Adrian,

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FEATURES

managing the geographical areas and pulling together the sales and operational aspects of the business. This gives us the opportunity to build on our presence in each region, allowing us to better serve our customers. t a so a ords us the abi ity to change, di ersi y and gro e cient y in response to regional variations in our market, and the sales opportunities those variations might present.” Mike Brunskill has been with Glendale for 22 years and heads up the north, and Adrian Wickham is now managing director for the south. Adrian is coming up to 20 years with Glendale and his progression within the organisation is testament to its internal management system.

Planting trees at a prestigious racecourse

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Alex joined Glendale just under three years ago as operations director, and now directs the whole of the business. Joining Alex, Mike and Adrian as directors are Larry

to run the North and the South as subsidiary businesses because of what already has been, and what will be, added. While the business grows, it’s really important to have

Today’s staff also need to have the right equipment and systems – again this is an area in which Glendale continues to invest and improve Jones (previously managing director of MITIE and Glendale) as non-executive board member. Alex explains: “We intend

senior leadership, and with the loss of Tony and the complexity of the group, this is even more important. Working this way also gives each region a focus, and both Adrian and Mike will add drive and determination to move the business forward in their respective areas.” The organisation will continue to put high priority on recruiting and developing its workforce, and there will be a continual push to develop the apprenticeship scheme, as well as Glendale’s internal management development programme. “We value our people, engage and empower our brightest, and create an open and transparent en ironment here the sta take ownership and responsibility,” says Alex. Today s sta a so need to ha e the right equipment and systems. Alex believes it is aramount that their systems remain fit or purpose. He says: “We have also changed the way we reward and incentivise the team, our focus on health and safety, sales quotes looking outside the common territory, and of course growing the business. We want to make sure our teams are e ib e, agi e and not constrained by one si e fits a . Glendale will also continue to play a role within the wider industry, supporting BALI, GoLandscape and the National Contractors Forum. “The idea that collectively we are strong should enable the industry to help push to develop the correct legislation,” says Alex. Glendale’s transformation is clearly presenting the business with exciting opportunities, which its directors intend to capitalise on to ensure they remain at the forefront of green services in the UK.

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30u30 FULLPG last call PA.pdf

3

11/07/2018

15:07

Are you under 30 and deserve industry recognition? (Or know someone who does?)

If so, then this is your

LAST CHANCE to enter

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Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: 1 SEPTEMBER 2018 Head to www.prolandscapermagazine.com/30u30 to find out more

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recognise the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading young arboriculture professionals The rules are simple: You must have been aged 30 or under on 1 January 2018 and must currently work within the horticulture sector. You can nominate yourself or a colleague and the competition is free to enter. Head to our website www.prolandscapermagazine.com/30u30 to find details on how to apply. Applications will close 1 September 2018, before being passed on for judging. Shortlisters will be contacted if they have been successful and will feature in the November issues of all supporting magazines.

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FEATURES

Living history in Richmond Park AS PRO ARB DISCOVERS, THIS FAMOUS SITE IS HOME TO SOME OF THE MOST ANCIENT AND BEAUTIFUL TREES IN LONDON, SO NO WONDER THIS WAS A FAVOURED PLACE FOR HENRY VIII AS WELL AS COUNTLESS VISITORS TODAY

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Sidmouth Woods

©Giles Barnard/The Royal Parks

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nyone wanting to see examples of some outstanding historical trees, should head to Richmond Park. There are around 1,300 veterans recorded on the Ancient Tree inventory and one of the most impressive is the Royal Oak, believed to be at least 750 years old, and possibly even older. The tree has been pollarded many times over the centuries, but retains a large crown and it has a massive trunk with a hollow that a ch d can fit into. Trees ere common y pollarded so that locals could obtain wood and prevent damage by deer, this is also seen as a way of extending the lifespan. Richmond Park’s trees host a diversity of fungi that help to create hollows and cre ices, these o er homes or a ide range of wildlife, such as insects, birds and bats. When decayed wood falls from trees, this provides further support and for example, over 1,350 species of beetle have been recorded in Richmond Park. Threatened species which exist there include the rusty click beetle, the cardinal click beetle and the stag beetle. The latter can grow up to 7cm long and stag beetle grubs feed on decaying timber and need to be left undisturbed for between three to seven years before they pupate and emerge as adults. ta in o ed in tree care ithin Richmond Park are now mindful of the need not to remove decaying wood and to leave it undisturbed as part of the woodland ecosystem.

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©Giles Barnard/The Royal Parks

FEATURES

Fallen tree in Kidney Wood

Richmond Park is located in the London borough of Richmond upon Thames and is one of eight so-called royal parks. It was created as a sanctuary from the plague – it also became the favourite hunting ground of Henry VIII. The park is enclosed by walls and at just under two and a half thousand acres is the largest of the royal parks. British royals formerly used the park primarily for hunting deer, a national nature reser e, a site o s ecia scientific interest, and a special area of conservation. Richmond Park is also included on England’s Register of Historic Parks and Gardens, and is Grade 1 registered. As Sir David Attenborough said in a documentary about the park’s role as a nature reserve: “Until morning, it’s the darkest and quietest place in the capital. This magical space provides peace and tranquillity for millions of Londoners.” Adam Curtis, manager of the park, is responsible for the upkeep and management and says: “The park was originally enclosed by Charles I, who

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built a wall around it sometime around 1637, compulsory purchasing whatever small farms were in the area. “He created it primarily for deer hunting, subsequently moving his court out to Richmond Palace and commuting up and down the Thames. There is also a royal residence on the park – known as the White Lodge – which is now occupied by the Royal Ballet school.”

intents and purposes the government is now the landowner.” As has become an increasingly common theme nowadays, the royal parks have been hit just as hard by recent government austerity measures as other publicly-owned green spaces, with centralised funding reduced from 90 to 30 per cent of its overall budget since 2010. According to Adam, this shortfall has been made up through judicious use of the land itself, thereby taking advantage of a plethora of commercial opportunities. As Adam explains: “We’re currently involved in putting on a variety of massive events, such as pop concerts and things like Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park, which are all big-ticket items. We’ve also got a lot of domestic lodges – originally used by arks sta hich are no being rented out in the most commercial market possible. Other sources of income include the icensing o fi m units to use the arks as locations, as well as ‘sweating’ our catering concessions a bit more than we used to. We’re doing incredibly well out of those.” He continues: “Thinking of Richmond Park in particular, a major source of income is Pembroke Lodge which we believe to be the busiest wedding venue in the country, hosting 350 events a year. Again, we’ve also got a variety of on-site catering options for visitors wanting anything from a bacon roll to Sunday lunch. They’re pitched in particular to

Threatened species which exist there include the rusty click beetle, the cardinal click beetle and the stag beetle He continues: “In relation to its use by the ritish eo e, the most significant development took place in the mid 1800s when an act of parliament decreed that the royal parks should be run with public funds or the benefit o the ub ic. The reeho d is still held by the Crown to this day, but for all

users of the park itself, and while not quite Pembroke Lodge, they still operate at a high standard. “The last visitor count was made about four years ago, and the total as something ike fi e and a ha mi ion people a year. If anything, the park now

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FEATURES

feels even busier than it did back then, with popularity almost doubling every 10 years or so. It’s marvellous that people are now going for walks in the countryside and ha ing ami y time together, rather than ust spending time in the pub or sitting at home. The park is somewhere people can walk, relax, contemplate, commune with nature and so on – it’s incredibly valuable.” Richmond Park is one of the prime locations in the capital for those looking for a relaxing day out and an integral part

the maintenance team use shire horses to roll the ferns. One particularly famous area of the park is a 40-acre woodland garden known as the Isabella Plantation. Set within a Victorian woodland originating in the 1830s, it is best known for the evergreen azaleas, which are positioned around several extraordinarily lovely ponds and streams. Alongside these are also the national collection of Wilson 50 Kurume Azaleas, alongside rhododendrons, camellias, and many more.

Adam comments: “The most popular time for the Isabella Plantation, is around late April and early May when the azaleas are at the eak o their o er. eo e come from all around the world at that time – it really does feel quite magical there. There’s an area near the Lodge called Poets Corner, where things like the Ian Dury bench are located. We previously had some irises

there, but the lady who managed them moved to another site and took her iris collection with her. “What we always have to remember is with areas like Pembroke Lodge, everything has to be kept in top condition because it’s a rea ront o house stu , not ust or us but for the country. The Royal Parks also manage the gardens at Number 10 Downing Street, and of course it’s the same principle at work there.” In terms of crewing, Adam manages t o teams o gardeners, ith fi e situated in Pembroke Lodge and six based out of the Isabella Plantation. On top of this, the estates team has fi e eo e a ongside a seven-person litter team to deal with the site’s 140-odd bins. The park also maintains a se arate contracted arboricu ture sta , with several crews of at least two people each working through both the summer and inter, hen a orester a so oins the team. ichmond ark is one o the true e e s in the crown when it comes to Great British parks, boasting everything you would expect from a modern green public space, on a massive scale. It is a true idyll in the middle of the urban sprawl, attracting both oca isitors and those rom urther afie d time and time again.

©Darren Williams/The Royal Parks

©Tony Buckingham/The Royal Parks

The park is somewhere people can walk, relax, contemplate, commune with nature and so on it’s incredibly valuable of the pleasure comes from the sheer ariety o ora and auna on dis ay, ith di erent en ironments ithin the site including a newly-planted rose garden as well as an ‘elm walk’. Adam says: “We’re nationally and internationally designated for wildlife, and we’re incredibly good for that. We’ve got over 1,000 veteran oak trees in the park – many of which are 700 years old – as well as lots of bird species. We’ve also areas of unimproved classic grassland, with around 400,000 ant hills which in themselves are over 200 years old. “Regarding how we’ve started to cultivate wilder areas in particular, we’ve allowed a certain amount of bramble to establish. That in turn is quite good at protecting hawthorn, which then enhances the landscape for birds and other wildlife. We’re very much a contemporary nature reserve in that respect, despite the park being originally created as a royal hunting ground for venison.” As well as bramble and hawthorn, an amount of bracken has also been allowed to proliferate over the years, which in itself is good for the deer which still inhabit the park, as well as some species of birds. The trick says Adam, is not to compromise the grassland, which is why

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26 > APF Preview – get ready for the big one!

It’s the UK’s largest forestry, woodland, arboriculture, fencing and biomass show, see what’s taking place on 20, 21 and 22 September

28 > Isuzu Trucks – gear up with the Grafter Green

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KIT

8 1 0 2 F P A view pre

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an you a ord to miss it o in its rd year, the three day hibition takes ace at ag ey state, cester on , and e tember. t s an e ent on a ast sca e, attracting more than e hibitors and some , isitors, ith a huge amount to see and do or those in the arboricu ture sector. hether buying, se ing or catching u ith contacts, is a about doing business. ut, hi e there are s atches o ant and machinery, together ith a kinds o hi tech kit, there are a so enty o acti ities and entertainment going on. These inc ude o e c imbing, chainsa car ing and umber acks taking art in timber s orts e ents. There is a so the or arder ri ing ham ionshi s, set to test the

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It’s

showtime!

THE UK’S LARGEST FORESTRY, WOODLAND, ARBORICULTURE, FENCING AND BIOMASS EVENT IS ALMOST WITH US – BE THERE AND BE A PART OF THIS INCREDIBLE EXPERIENCE

ski s o or arder o erators to the ma ith a cha enging course in a ood and setting. e t take a breather in the ood and cra ts area, hich is no the argest dis ay o these traditiona cra ts to be ound in the and inc udes trugs, seating, corac es and many more handmade items. There is a so enty o o ortunity or isitors to ha e a go themse es at cra ting. isitors can then tra e back in time by isiting the intage machinery area, hich i ha e a host o e ui ment such as steam dri en sa mi s in action to sho ho arboricu ture as done in bygone days. ean hi e, the encing in the st entury arena i be or ard ooking, since it is dedicated to the atest in encing techno ogy and e ui ment and inc udes demonstrations and eatures u to the minute too s, materia s and techni ues.

so unmissab e is the orest orker one, an interacti e and ractica area aimed at the those orking at the shar end. ducation is a core theme and this consists o short dai y interacti e resentations on sub ects as di erse as hysica e are, chainsa maintenance, taking out a oan and hea th and sa ety and training. no edge is a so e tended at the eminar Tent, here there is a dai y rogramme on sub ects current y a ecting the ood and, trees and timber industries resented by e erts in their fie d.

e resentati es rom the ro rb team i be isiting , so ook out or us, and i you ant to find out more in ormation inc uding u rogramme detai s, ease isit .a e hibition.co.uk

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KIT ISUZU’S NEW GRAFTER GREEN VEHICLES WILL BE ON PARADE AT THIS YEAR’S APF SHOW IN SEPTEMBER see models at the forthcoming APF Show. The next event in this series of product launches is the APF Exhibition in Warwickshire in September, which is traditionally recognised as the UK’s largest forestry, woodland, arboriculture, fencing and biomass expo. As Richard Waterworth, head of sales at Isuzu Truck UK, says: “The APF show caters not just for the forestry, woodland and tree care industries, but also for the fencing and farming industries, featuring machinery and equipment designed for small woodlands and other green spaces. This makes the show an ideal platform for the 2018 Isuzu truck range, and we believe there i be significant interest in our ne Grafter Green vehicles, which are making their debut at APF.” Since Isuzu launched the Grafter Green range earlier this year, the company has e erienced a significant u i t in demand for its 3.5 tonne trucks, especially from companies in the arb and horticulture industries. With a choice of single and twin rear hee configurations a ai ab e, the ra ter

Raising the bar

V

ehicle performance and reliability is key for any business in the forestry, landscaping and arboriculture industries. Commercial vehicle manufacturer Isuzu Truck UK understands this and continues to develop new vehicle technology to im ro e o erating e ciency or com anies and eets o a si es. Earlier this year, Isuzu announced the launch of its new 1.9 litre 3.5t Grafter Green truck to complement its 3.0 litre N35.150 Grafter model. Throughout 2018, the atfie d based manu acturer has been demonstrating the Grafter Green range at trade events and exhibitions across the UK and there will be a further opportunity to

28 Pro Arb | July/August 2018

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reen benefits rom im ro ed er ormance, significant eight sa ings and better a round ride quality. Perhaps most importantly, the addition of LNT technology means the vehicle is Euro 6 compliant without the need for AdBlue. Richard Waterworth continues: “The Grafter Green utilises LNT technology and a number of other changes that will improve the vehicle’s overall performance. We have listened to customer feedback over the

years and their suggested changes have now been incorporated into the Grafter Green range for the UK market.” The Isuzu Grafter Green features new technology and also houses a our cy inder uro diese engine, hich produces more power and torque than its predecessor despite its smaller size. The new model also features an improved s eed manua gearbo and ne independent front suspension, which has improved driveability to produce a more com ortab e, car ike ee . erha s the most significant ne eature of the truck is the reduced weight of the chassis. Building on Isuzu’s reputation for excellent payload capacity, the single rear wheel SWB chassis cab is 152 kgs lighter than its predecessor, while the twin rear wheel LWB Grafter Green weighs in 150 kgs lighter than the previous model. According to Richard: “The new Isuzu Grafter Green is not only a grafter by name. The changes and improvements will provide

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KIT

arb, andsca ing and orestry o erators with a truck that is hard-working, versatile and can take any ty e o ob in its stride. e be ie e that ith our ne ra ter reen, su u i continue to be a ma or su ier o . tonners to the arb, andsca ing and orestry industries or many years to come. The UK commercial vehicle market continues to see changes in customer buying habits, and in the ast e years there has been a significant shi t to ards re bodied ehic es. To meet this gro ing demand, Isuzu Truck UK has partnered with some o the country s eading bodybui ders to develop a range of pre-bodied trucks at both . tonnes and . tonnes. ince e aunched our ri ea ay rogramme se era years ago, it has

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proved to be a successful route to market, providing customers with significant y reduced ead times. e e ect a significant number o ne ehic e sa es to come rom our ri ea ay range o er the coming years, says ichard. Isuzu has added a selection of the latest Grafter Green vehicles to its ri ea ay range, ith ra ter reen trucks available in both single and twin axle versions, with either tipper or dro side bodies. so added to the ri ea ay range or the first time, is a Grafter Green Utilitruck, which has a T ti er body and secure too od or storing too s and e ui ment. ithout doubt, our ri ea ay rogramme has ro ed to be incredib y

o u ar ith customers. y consistent y adding new models to the range, we now have a comprehensive selection of the most sought a ter ehic e s ecifications in various weight ranges, enabling customers to reduce the lead time and costs or re acements and additions, conc udes ichard.

For more information, and to see the Isuzu Grafter Green range for yourself, visit Isuzu Truck UK at the APF Show from 20-22 September 2018. The full range of Isuzu trucks can be viewed on the company’s website at www.isuzutruck.co.uk

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H U S Q VA R N A Technical 24 Chainsaw Leather Boots

MEINDL AIRSTREAM CHAINSAW BOOT The irstream rom eind is a stand out rom the cro d, sty ish and modern ooking ork boot ith many inno ati e bui t in eatures you d e ect rom an estab ished, high ua ity brand. eind boots are sti hand cra ted in the year us ami y o ned actory in southern ermany. This ass chainsa boot has a ore Te ater roo and breathab e ining and a cushioned mesh tongue, making it

more breathab e than a standard boot essentia or year round use and com ort. eind ride themse es on de e o ing inno ati e designs and eatures. The im ortant added com ort and fit that the irstream en oys, comes ith the bui t in memory oam to the hee area, hich ro ides an indi idua com ortab e custom fit to the earer. The eind i fi acing system makes or a secure ootho d inside the boot. ts im ortant ork boot rotection comes ith the high rubber rand bum er around these boots, ronta e ar chainsa rotection, high im act stee toe ca and the re iab e eind mu tigri doub e density so e unit made by amous so e makers ibram. The eind irstream is a recognisab e and o u ar boot or arborists across the country.

These boots o er high e e s o sa ety, being a ro ed sa rotection c ass , m s ith a stee toe ca . The o er arts o the boots ha e a rein orced rubber so e and additiona adding around the ank es, hich makes them one o the sa est makes on the market. om ort is a so a riority and an u dated hee construction and so ter inside ro ide com ort during ong orking days. n terms o stabi ity, the so e has o timised gri to re ent s i ing in co d conditions. hi st aces and hooks ha e been designed to ensure a snug and com ortab e fit. The boots are a so ater roo , being made o made o ym ate a ater roo and breathab e high ua ity materia . RRP: . www.husqvarna.com

RRP: . .meind .co.uk

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runing can be a daunting task for those who want to encourage healthy regrowth. But getting it wrong could cause a tree long term damage, such as allowing pests and pathogens to invade. No wonder it’s a task arborists are required for, and their expertise ensures much loved trees benefit rom the right cuts in the right order. The following are ideal additions to your pruning kit…

STIHL PR 33 C MEGACUT PRUNING SAW • 3-sided Japanese ground blade for fast and precise cutting • Impulse hardened teeth using high carbon, chrome steel for high durability, long-lasting sharpness and corrosion protection • Conical blade width for easy cutting (blade does not get stuck in wood) • Ergonomic two component grip for comfortable work and excellent grip, even during wet conditions • Scabbard for right and left hand use for safe and comfortable use • 33cm in length • Weighs 391 grams RRP: From £60 inc VAT www.stihl.co.uk

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H U S QVA R N A P R U N I N G S AW S

The t o main ty es are the fi ed sa and the o ding sa . enefits o each inc ude

FIXED SAW – HUSQVARNA 300 ST The rigid saw blades with impulse-hardened precision toothing features triple grinding, meaning high, e ort sa ing sa ing performance and a long lifetime. The smooth pulling cut is ideal for fresh and dry wood. A stop at the end of the handle prevents slipping, particularly useful during pulling

FOLDING SAW – HUSQVARNA 200 FO The Husqvarna Folding Saw 200 FO is an easy-to-use all-round saw for cutting back thicker branches and is ideal for all minor sawing work. The hard chromeplated saw blade has impulse hardened precision toothing with triple grinding, ensuring fast results with little use of force, precise cut, and is hard wearing to rust and wear and tear. The saw is easy to carry around in your pocket by folding it and locking it securely or attached to an eyelet

movements. The ergonomic, slightly angled handle shape and soft handle parts lie comfortably and safely in your hand. The straight saw blade allows manoeuvrability in trees with close branches and easier control. Straight blades enable the user to manipulate hinge wood for precision log e ing techni ues and a o an e cient cut. Total Length: 19.7” (500 mm) Blade ength . mm RRP: £39.99 inc VAT

– open it up again using the thumb hole. The lock button holds the saw securely and sa e y in three di erent settings. The ergonomic, slightly angled handle shape and soft handle parts, means it lies comfortably and safely in your hand and it can be used one-handed or two-handed as required. Total Length: 20.9” (530mm) Blade ength . mm RRP: £27.50 inc VAT www.husqvarna.com

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02/08/2018 13:40


ANCIENT TREE COLUMN

OFTEN HIDDEN FROM PUBLIC VIEW, THIS MONTH’S FEATURED SUPERB SPECIMEN COULD BE OVER 1000 YEARS OLD…

column

Jack of Kent’s Oak – Herefordshire

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his July saw the Ancient Tree Forum summer conference visit Herefordshire, a county well known for its veteran trees. The event is a mi ture o ectures and fie d isits ocusing on veteran trees and their management. uring the a ternoon session o the first day delegates visited nearby Kentchurch Court, home of the legendary Jack of Kent’s Oak. Despite being located in a prominent position on the hillside, the Jack of Kent’s Oak is visited by very few due to the sensitive nature of its location, the historic

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deer park. Access to the park is only by prior agreement with the Scudamore family, who have owned the property for more than 1000 years. The family kindly allowed delegates of the conference access to the park and its fantastic trees. With a girth of 12.8m, Jack of Kent’s Oak is one of the largest oaks, not only in Herefordshire, but in Britain. The tree is in great health with a vital crown. Its good condition can most likely be attributed to the continuity of ownership and management at the site. The lifespan of trees span multiple human i etimes, making it di cu t to provide continuity of management over a prolonged period of time. Trees such as this are sensitive to change, having grown in one place for centuries. When managing veteran trees, the Ancient Tree Forum encourage people to think about ‘Tree Time’; a year to humans is a long period of time, however to a tree it’s merely a blink of an eye. Speaking at the summer conference, Aljos Farjon described the various reasons

why Britain has so many ancient oak trees compared to other European countries. Continuity of ownership, and thus management, is one of the major factors. Britain was home to royal hunting forests, medieval deer parks, wooded commons and estates all of which contained trees of varying ages. Whilst a large number of trees have been lost over the years, many still persist today providing a fantastic legacy to current generations of people. As with any old tree, there is speculation over its age, with some estimates being in the region of 1000 years. nteresting y, the first re erence to Jack of Kent appears in the 16th Century; Jack being an English folkloric character known for his sorcery and ability to trick and outwit the devil. Does this mean that the tree is twice as old as Jack of Kent? Perhaps Jack won the tree in a bet, or perhaps outwitted the devil in order to claim the tree? Either way this tree is a fantastic example of the rich historical value our countryside and trees have, and highlights the need to protect them for future generations to come.

The Ancient Tree Forum champions the biological, cultural and heritage value of Britain’s ancient and veteran trees, and promotes best practice. www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk ©Ancient Tree Forum

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