Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

Page 1

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2022

CHARGING FORWARD

ANTICIPATING A NEW ERA FOR THE INDUSTRY

DESIGN + BUILD + MAINTAIN RETHINKING THE JOB

DRAWING ATTENTION

STARTING FROM SCRATCH

TESTING THE WATERS

Finding the purpose in landscape work

Landscape project stuns neighborhood

Plot of asphalt becomes organic orchard

Learning to utilize robotic mowers


THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT FOR OUR USA LAUNCH IN 2021

2

Pro Landscaper USA South Janaury/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


WELCOME

W E LC O M E T

he year 2020 and 2021 shifted the landscape industry as we know it and we’re charging forward into uncharted waters. The year 2022 brings high anticipations, predictions, and aspirations, bringing an equal amount of excitement and uncertainty. Although the future is unpredictable, Pro Landscaper USA hopes to provide a make-shift roadmap for the unclear path ahead. We are learning from leaders and innovators who have big plans for the landscape industry, and sharing what they think all landscape professionals should know. Kicking it off, the leader of a top commercial landscape company in Atlanta shares his secret to business success. He tells people to STOP thinking like a landscaper, and advises where their heads should be instead. Then a San Antonio business leader explains why he wants to run a sustainable, future oriented operation, and the day to day practices that help his team achieve that goal. Then we’ll share details of several projects that were completed thanks to the use of new equipment on the market. Plus, software developers, business consultants, and horticulturists explain the challenges they expect for 2022, and the best ways to respond when those challenges surface.

We have had the most amazing launch year in 2021 – and we owe it to you, our readers, advertisers and supporters – for believing in us. We are so pleased to have received feedback from some of you (but we would love more feedback!). If you could take a minute or two and tell us what you like, what you don’t, and what’s missing, we would appreciate it. The build-up from all the year’s issues (discussions, challenges, concerns) culminates in our yearly FutureScape event – which we are hosting in Atlanta, GA on March 24, 2022 – and we hope to meet many of you in person. FutureScape is an expo and stage that we are planning on panel discussions from Industry Leaders – and time for questions from the audience. Soon the talks will be published on our website (south.futurescapeUSA. com). We want what you want – to celebrate and further improve this great industry of ours. We know that discussions across the sectors of Design + Build + Maintain can result in a better product for our clients and for the environment. Let’s do this…. Team Pro Landscaper

angelique, mary kate & Aimee

Aimee, mary kate & Angelique Angelique Robb Managing Director angelique.robb@eljays44.com Mary Kate Carson Production Editor marykate.carson@eljays44.com Aimee Almaguer Advertising Coordinator aimee.almaguer@eljays44.com

GARDEN INDUSTRIES

COVERING: TEXAS, OKLAHOMA, LOUISIANA, ARKANSAS, MISSISSIPPI, TENNESSEE, ALABAMA, GEORGIA, FLORIDA, NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA, VIRGINIA AND KENTUCKY

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

3


CONTENTS

15

INSPIRE 25 29

INFORM 08 10 12 13 15 18 20

4

32

Self Expression High Prairie Landscape Group Kansas City, KS Monday Night Garage Shades of Green Atlanta, GA

39

Inevitable Intervention Greenview Partners Durham County, NC

News The industry’s biggest news and events Agenda What are your goals or predictions for 2022?

44

Glimpsing into the Future Brooke Inzerella Horticare Landscape

25

Shifting the Business Model Deborah Cole Deborah Cole Connections Let’s Hear it From Jim McCutcheon HighGrove Partners Atlanta, GA Company Profile Scott Anderson Urban Soil - San Antonio, TX FutureScape 2022 Details on the inaugural event

32

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

NURTURE 39 42 44 47

Nursery Focus Garden Industries West Palm Beach, FL 2022 Garden Trends Report Garden Media Group Cutting Edge Robotic Mowers hitting the market A Story from the Future Imagining changes in the landscape workforce Charles Brian Quinn

south.prolandscaperusa.com


CONTENTS

J A N UA R Y / F E B R UA RY 2 0 2 2 E D U C AT E 50 53 54 57 60

Industry Insights with John Conroy Innovators in the landscape industry Four Predictions on The Future of Landscaping Jeffery Scott Evolution of Synthetic Turf Joe Wadkins Ask JW Landscape Design Technology Eric Gilbey Vectorworks

64

See the Difference Lighting that add the perfect touch

42

66

PEOPLE 64

60

south.prolandscaperusa.com

66

The Secret Life of Walter Bone Landscape design takes this architect around the world Little Interviews Five voices of the industry

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

5


WELCOME

CONTR IBU TO R S BROOKE INZERELLA

DEBORAH COLE

Brooke Inzerella is a licensed landscape horticulturist and owner of Horticare Landscape Company in Louisiana. As one of the area’s leading landscape companies, Horticare is known for superior service, swimming pools, landscaping and outdoor living spaces.

P12

WWW.HORTICARELANDSCAPE.COM

As founder and president of a commercial landscape firm with multiple locations throughout Texas, Deborah Cole has learned the importance of peoplecentric leadership. She devotes herself full-time to speaking, writing and consulting with a heavy dose of visual storytelling (photography included).

P13

JOHN CONROY

CHARLES BRIAN QUINN

John Conroy is president, founder and owner of Fish Branch Tree Farm, a family-run company. In 2019, FNGLA awarded him “Educator of the Year” for his work on the state’s grading process, dynamic curriculum for landscape architects and contribution to the Department of Transportation.

Charles Brian Quinn, or CBQ, is the co-founder and CEO of Greenzie. Greenzie’s software and off-the-shelf sensor suite add self-driving to commercial zero turn mowers to reduce the labor cost of lawn maintenance. CBQ lives in a fully automated home in Atlanta, Georgia, with his wife and kids.

P47

P54

WWW.FISHBRANCHTREEFARM.COM

JOE WADKINS

ERIC GILBEY

Joe Wadkins, aka “Ask JW,” is one of the leading synthetic turf experts across the globe. With decades of experience, he is highly sought after on all aspects of synthetic turf, including football, soccer and baseball fields. JW is an inventor with several patents for synthetic turf tools and the author of a monthly online article “Ask JW.”

Eric Gilbey is product marketing manager for the landscape industries at Vectorworks, Inc., where he utilizes his CAD skills to assist in the development, marketing and sales of Vectorworks Landmark. He received an AAS degree in Landscape Contracting and Construction and a BS degree in Landscape Architecture from Ohio State University.

JW@ASKJW.COM

CONTACT ELJAYS44 LLC 323 Polk St. Lafayette, LA 70501 Managing Director Angelique Robb angelique.robb@eljays44.com (337) 852-6318 Production Editor Mary Kate Carson marykate.carson@eljays44.com (903) 283-0513 Printed by Allen Press Inc. www.allenpress.com Published by ©Eljays44 LLC

6

P50

WWW.GREENZIE.COM

WWW.DEBORAHCOLECONNECTIONS.COM

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

P57 Designer Caitlyn Wallace Subeditor Erin Z. Bass Pro Landscaper is a trademark of Eljays44 Ltd. 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)1903 777 570 eljays44.com

WWW.VECTORWORKS.NET

ProLandscaper USA South is published six times a year and distributed to 5,000 qualified members of the green industry. Postmaster: Send address changes to 323 Polk St. Lafayette, LA 70501. ProLandscaper USA South verifies information as much as possible. The views expressed by editorial contributors and the products advertised herein are not necessarily endorsements of the publishers. Reproduction of any part of this magazine is strictly forbidden.

UK Directors Jamie Wilkinson jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Jim Wilkinson jim.wilkinson@eljays44.com Cover image: Kansas City Homes ©High Prairie Landscape Group

south.prolandscaperusa.com


• THE

PROS OF BEING A PRO •

ONE-STOP SHOPPING For contractors, a single visit to SiteOne® Landscape Supply is all it takes to keep work moving. With branches in reach of every job site and a full selection of major brands, there’s no easier way to get the products you need. Combine that with advice from our team of trusted experts, and you can quickly get in, get out, and get on to the next job. It's one more reason the industry's top pros choose SiteOne.

SiteOne.com

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Irrigation I Lighting I Turf & Landscape Maintenance I Nursery Pro Landscaper South January/February 2022 Golf Course Maintenance I Hardscape I USA Pest Control

7


INFORM

INDUSTRY

NEWS

NEW HOURS AND PROGRAMING FOR 2022 EQUIP EXPOSITION

E

DEMAND RISES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS

A

growing number of clients are asking landscape professionals to find solutions to climate change. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) conducted a national survey last October, involving 563 landscape architects, designers and landscape architecture educators in the U.S. Seventyseven percent reported they experienced at least a 10 percent increase in client demand in comparison with 2020. Thirty-eight percent experienced more than a 50 percent increase during the past year. The respondents say people are concerned with the duration and

intensity of heat waves, storms, inland flooding, unpredictable weather and loss of pollinators. Clients want nature-based solutions to climate impacts, with street trees, bioswales and native, drought-tolerant plants in high demand. Sixty-five percent of landscape professionals say they are integrating more sustainable and resilient landscape planning and design practices into “all or most” of their work. They hope “advocacy by design” will also help persuade city, local government and other clients to update climate-focused policies and regulations. www.asla.org

quip Exposition (formerly known as GIE+EXPO) will offer extended hours and new attendee experiences during the 2022 event. The expo launches Tuesday night with a welcome reception in Louisville. Then it will open earlier Wednesday 9 a.m. for dealers and noon for contractors. The TurfMutt Foundation will host a 5K at the Louisville Downtown riverfront and across the Ohio River pedestrian bridge. There will also be a networking breakfast and keynote to close the event on Friday. The redesigned Equip Exposition will happen October 18-21. equipexposition.com

EQUIPMENT BAN UNDER CONSIDERATION

N

ew York and Illionios are considering banning gas-powered lawnmowers. Illinois leaders introduced a bill in 2020 that could ban the operation or sale of gas-powered equipment, but the bill is still under review. New York introduced a similar bill late last year, and it is now sitting in the state senate. California became the first U.S. state to fully ban the equipment at the beginning of 2021. Several other U.S. states and cities have imposed a seasonal ban to cut back on air pollution during some parts of the year. www.cbsnews.com

8

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INFORM

200+ OUTREACH EVENTS TAKE PLACE THROUGH INDUSTRY COLLECTIVE

T

housands of people received food, hygiene tools and school supplies through the Green Industry Community Service Initiative, the Industry COLLECTIVE. Thirty-one landscaping companies from across the country hosted 224 events. They put together 28,370 hygiene kits that were distributed locally through homeless shelters. They also helped disaster response efforts during Hurricane Ida and the earthquake in Haiti. Green Industry Leaders filled 5,736 backpacks full of school supplies for under-resourced kids in their communities to support education. This December, teams also packed meal kits for local kids to help alleviate hunger during the holidays. The Industry COLLECTIVE is a movement of like-minded Green Industry Leaders who are committed to impacting their communities. More information on getting involved in 2022 is on ProLandscaper USA’s website. www.industrycollective.com

NALP SUPPORTS MILITARY OUTREACH PROGRAM

©Rambling Jackson

©Site One

T

south.prolandscaperusa.com

he National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) is endorsing the nationally recognized GreenCare for Troops (GCFT) program. The NALP and Project EverGreen announced this in late 2021. GreenCare for Troops provides complimentary basic lawn care and landscape maintenance services to military personnel with a deployed family member. The NALP’s endorsement expands the program to its 2,800 member companies, representing 200,000 landscape and lawn care professionals, and opens the door for more volunteers to provide services and bring healthy lawns and landscapes to military families in their time of need. Since the program’s inception, more than 7,500 lawn and landscape professionals nationwide have provided free services such as mowing, shrub pruning, fertilization, weed control, fire ant services and other related services to deserving military families. To date, the value of the donated services exceeds $10 million. www.landscapeprofessionals.org

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

9


INFORM

AGENDA

WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS OR PREDICTIONS FOR

Wes Spaniol COMMERCIAL SALES AT VIRGINIA GREEN ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA We are looking to open up more communication lines, improve the look of properties and grow with other landscapers in the northern Virginia region.

Chris Strempek OWNER OF COMPLETE LANDSCULPTURE DALLAS, TEXAS

Mario Cambardella FOUNDER OF SERVESCAPE ONLINE NURSERY ATLANTA, GEORGIA In 2022, I expect to see a greater amount of acquisitions of mature design/build operations due to labor shortage and demand increasing. And I wouldn’t be surprised if smaller design/ builders were rolled up into collaboratives to save on administrative burdens and customer acquisition costs.

10

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

At Complete Landsculpture, we are bullish on the opportunities for 2022. Residentially, we continue to see strong demand activity for all aspects of home improvement, including pools, extensive hardscaping and landscape services. There are some concerns about a potential pullback in the commercial sectors, recognizing that these will be significantly impacted by an increase in the cost of debt and unfavorable tax increases that do not incentify development. As labor and running understaffed is the No. 1 pain point for landscape contractors nationwide and is adversely impacting their ability to grow, we are hoping for some permanent relief to help us with staffing.

Mark Mann OWNER OF TREE MANN SOLUTIONS AUSTIN, TEXAS In 2022, I expect to see a continued trend in development design to truly activate outdoor areas as an asset, investment and a gathering place for quality, safe community engagement vs. simple curb appeal to get folks in the door. I hope it translates to continued valuation of existing tree canopies/ stands and highlights the sense of place they create, in addition to the environmental and economic benefits tree preservation creates.

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INFORM

Danielle Atkins

Carolyn Mullet

Chase Mullin

OWNER & FORESTER AT LAND & LADIES

AUTHOR, CREATIVE DIRECTOR FOR INTERNATIONAL GARDEN TOURS

FOUNDER & CEO AT MULLIN

BRUNSWICK, GEORGIA

TAKOMA PARK, MARYLAND

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

The last two years have been filled with a multitude of challenges, from political divisions and handling health issues and keeping business matters afloat to remote working and reduced childcare opportunities. But, in adversity, innovation can really start to thrive … and in my own business includes development of more innovative digital programs to address the growing need for women to get engaged and involved with their forestlands. In 2022, I expect more innovative approaches to continue to reach forest landowners and more traditional businesses to continue stretching their work-life balance benefits to better meet demands of young and growing families in these “new normal” days.

I would love to see the green industry take a giant leap into greater greenness by designing more plant-rich spaces. This would mean that during the design process, designers would consciously use hardscapes only where needed. I feel it’s time for design/build companies to start breaking their embrace with hard materials in favor of planting more plants of all types. Aiming for 70 percent plants to 30 percent hardscapes in installations not only helps relieve the environmental crisis we are in, but it will also bring more beauty into our clients’ lives. Green and colorful flowerfilled places attract bees, butterflies, and songbirds. The perfect flagstone patio will never do that.

I expect to see continued embracing of technology, as it makes an impact on labor shortages and heightened regulations. While many contractors (us included) are leery of robotic mowers, I believe that we’ll see the technology continue to improve by leaps and bounds. As a result of the heightened desire to spend time outdoors that the pandemic sparked, I believe that residential design/ build companies will continue to see unsurpassed demand for their services despite material and labor shortages and material cost increases. Overall, I believe that 2022 will be another great year for the landscape industry. Two of the things that contractors will need to focus on are price increases and recruiting both labor and management-level team members.

Allysha McClary GENERAL MANAGER OF 37 FARM PLANO, TEXAS One disconnect I have observed in the industry is what plants are being specified on jobs vs. what growers are putting into production. I think this has been highlighted further by the freeze and the plant shortages everyone is experiencing. What product will be available six months from now, or even two years from now is directly related to decisions that growers are making today. There is a lack of communication around forecasting needs in the industry and many of the smaller growers may not have insight to plant trends, or what customers really want to purchase. I hope we will be able to see more collaboration in the industry with landscapers helping to drive what plants they want to see and engaging in contract grows to help alleviate some of the stress on growers.

COMING UP: THE INDUSTRY’S ROLE IN SUSTAINABILITY AND CONSERVATION EFFORTS

E-MAIL OUR EDITOR MARY KATE CARSON AT MARYKATE.CARSON@EL JAYS44.COM TO BE INCLUDED IN OUR NEXT ISSUE.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 11


INFORM

BROOKE INZERELLA GLIMPSING INTO THE FUTURE BROOKE INZERELLA ON LIVING IN THE PRESENT WHILE PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

A

s we begin another new year, we’re compelled once again to predict what this new year will bring. It’s funny, though, isn’t it? Typically, at no other time during the year do we feel challenged or expected to predict what the next 12 months will be like. But something about a fresh, new calendar gives us the desire to predict the future—something I’ve never really been great at. And after the past two years, I’ve resolved myself to the fact that I’m better suited to dealing with the here and now and probably should leave the prognostication to others. I’ll be the first to admit that my “predictions” for the industry and my business, in particular, were off a little in 2021. In the end, we had a record year designing and installing residential landscapes, pools and outdoor living environments, and that was not really something I expected to happen. Revenues were at an all-time high, even though we are still trying to conquer a worldwide pandemic and the aftermath of ravaging weather events. So, coming into this year, I decided to enlist opinions from a few colleagues while on a vendor-sponsored fishing trip in south Louisiana. I thought it would be interesting to see where our opinions overlapped and where they diverged and to find out who was the most right (and wrong) when we regroup next November!

12

So, here are the predictions: Larry* is a regional sales rep for an irrigation supply company. While we both agree that 2021 was a great year for both residential and commercial landscaping, he believes that residential work will level off and slow down in 2022, while commercial and municipal work will increase. Personally, I believe residential work—especially turnkey, all-encompassing outdoor spaces—will continue to rise this year. People may be heading back to the office for work, but they don’t want to lose that connection to home. My pipeline on the residential side is stronger than ever. Mo* works for a national landscape supply wholesaler, and he believes that there will be huge gains and improvements in technology. He thinks customer-facing tech, like wifi driven transformers and controllers and weather programs for irrigation systems, will become even more user-friendly and standard. Whereas, I believe technology advancements are more likely to continue at their current, steady level, he believes in a more rapid rise this year. Curly* owns and operates a commercial and residential landscape company that is very similar in size and scope to mine, and our predictions were similar. We both predict another year of shortages in supplies

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

and materials and, unfortunately, lots of movement in cost of goods. We both experienced labor shortages in 2021 and believe that will continue in the new year but are both hopeful to a lesser extent. On the bright side, we both have more work lined up for this year, so we’re optimistic that the clients will be there, and we’ll just have to continue to face sourcing challenges head on as we had to do in 2021. As for me, I predict that customers will continue to want to beautify their homes’ outdoor environments. My clients are requesting more edibles in their landscaping, want more sustainable and native choices and are gravitating once again toward more organic and less symmetrical designs. Although I didn’t catch many fish that weekend, I did return home relaxed, refreshed and knowing that no matter what the year 2022 throws our way, we’re all in this together. *Names have been changed to protect identities in case their predictions end up way off base.

ABOUT BROOKE INZERELLA Brooke Inzerella is a licensed landscape horticulturist and owner of Horticare Landscape Company in Lafayette, Louisiana.

www.horticarelandscape.com

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INFORM

DEBORAH COLE MANAGING SHIFTS IN THE BUSINESS MODEL DEBORAH COLE ON MANAGING SHIFTS IN THE BUSINESS MODEL

T

he past two years (2020-2021) have created a lot of speed bumps in our planning and execution of any improvements or new processes. We have heard about the “Great Resignation” and may have even experienced it personally or amongst our staff. Individuals have re-evaluated not only their employment and professions, but have also chosen to relocate their homes, their families and their businesses. We might even call this the “Great Life Re-examination.” If you are not a part of the approximately 30 percent of Americans who have made major life and goal changes in the past 24 months, you may have at least examined the structure of your business or the markets where you focused. There are three common shifts to individual business models in the green industry. With each, the important thing is to consider what are the potential wins and the possible challenges as you move into other economic playgrounds. Move from residential to commercial focus (or vice-versa). Has one more angry homeowner gotten on your last nerve because you didn’t deliver a project on the date scheduled or the crew arrived 15 minutes late/early? These are things you might consider as you shift to a commercial customer base rather than residential. Residential profit margins are historically higher. Once you have a residential customer, they typically stay with you without bidding things out, so turnover is lower.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Commercial projects are larger, more involved and require more resources. The margins are slimmer, and frequently there are many more bidders on installs as well as maintenance. Move from HOA work to strictly commercial (or vice-versa). Community managers and board members change regularly and just as soon as you get to know one group, there is a change in staff/ members. The new groups have no idea of your collective history or relationship. Homeowner associations tend to have less experience working with contracts and contractors. HOA managers can be overwhelmed with too many communities to manage and not enough time to meet. Communication is difficult. Maintenance specifications are often non-existent, and profit margins can be slim, needing to be supplemented by enhancement projects which may or may not occur. On the other hand, commercial property managers seem to have a firm grasp of what is required to maintain a property and are used to working with specs and contracts and contractors. Move from installation focus to maintenance focus. These are two very different types of operations requiring different resources, equipment, trucks and staff. There may be a small amount of sharing with enhancements and installation, but maintenance crews need

their own resources. Installation has tight margins with no room for error or correction. Maintenance also has smaller profit margins, with most of the expense involved in labor (requires LOTS of oversight on labor costs). The beauty of maintenance is that if well executed and managed, the revenue is recurring, and a good client/contractor relationship can last for years.

There is value in assessing business models on a yearly basis to determine what opportunities there are for improvement for both business, staff, bottom line and sanity.

ABOUT DEBORAH COLE Deborah Cole is the founder of a commercial landscape firm with multiple locations throughout Texas. She now devotes herself full-time to speaking, writing and consulting. deborahcoleconnections.com

Pro Landscaper USA South

January/February 2022 13


INFORM

YOU HANDLE THE

BUSINESS

WE’LL HANDLE THE

MARKETING High growth for multi-million dollar lawn care and landscape companies.

14

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

For Consultations, Visit or Call https://lawnline.marketing (813) 944-3400 south.prolandscaperusa.com


INFORM

Let ’s Hear it From

JIM M CUTCHEON C

HIGHGROVE PARTNERS

D

isaster, recovery, growth; the timeline we’ve followed since the COVID-19 pandemic crawled across the globe. The impact of the pandemic, and a handful of other world-altering events, changed the way millions live, and many of us are still working to adjust. The year 2022 brings the opportunity to step into the growth phase of the decade, and it is time to build a game plan. Jim McCutcheon is the leader of HighGrove Partners, a $20 million landscape company in Atlanta, Georgia. They design, build and maintain hundreds of properties throughout the area. Roughly $5 million of their revenue comes from design, build and enhancement

south.prolandscaperusa.com

projects for maintenance clients. Jim launched HighGrove in 2001 and helped grow it to what it is today. He credits his success to his ability to take a unique approach to his work with an incredible team. “I used to do a series of talks called ‘Stop Thinking Like a Landscaper,’” says Jim. “It’s about this idea that, yes, we have to do good landscaping work, but what business is really about is finding out how to solve our clients’ real problems. That is how we turn into strong businesses and not just a lifestyle company.” The HighGrove team approaches their work by finding why the client needs landscape work. They ask questions about their life, their business and their goals. Jim says a growing

trend lately is the need to meet “ESG goals.” The acronym stands for environmental, social and governance rights and is a regulation that many public companies are now required to incorporate into their business. The environmental aspect concerns sustainability and similar issues, the social piece topics like diversity, and governance relates to a company’s transparency. ESG reports will likely be a top priority in most real estate companies within the next few years, especially for banks and other investors. Jim believes the landscape is key for a company to achieve their ESG goals and build the value of a property. Another, more timely need for HighGrove clients, is attracting employees back to the

Pro Landscaper USA South Janaury/February 2022 15


INFORM

workplace. Jim and his team work at several commercial office buildings, and the business managers there are ready for their employees to stop working at home full-time. Even Jim says, as a business leader, he knows that remote work makes it difficult to do things like build culture in an organization and train new employees. He also knows from an employee standpoint, though, no one wants to feel stuck in an office all day long. “If they can work outside, get fresh air, they might actually want to be there,” he says. “So we’ve recently built outdoor kitchens for offices, and we’re creating urban farm space with vertical aeroponic towers on commercial properties. We can build towers in lobbies, courtyards, even on rooftops. Then clients can offer employees fresh food grown right on site.” Problem solving has been a key piece of the HighGroves business model for years. It helped the team stand out during a drought in 2007 that forced many other Atlanta landscapers to shut down their irrigation services. HighGrove developed an irrigation education program that taught clients about smart irrigation systems and other water conservation techniques. “Most properties had no water, so we rebranded our services as ‘KnowWater,’” explains Jim. “We showed clients how to save

16

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INFORM

water and money during that time, and in the process we nearly tripled our business. Just because we were thinking about it differently, we were solving their problems.” Jim predicts that in 2022, landscape companies will have to take a hard look at their business model and customer base— and determine if the two align. HighGrove even overhauled its customer base recently to determine who helped the company thrive and who stalled business. In some cases, ties with clients were cut. “There are certain realities facing all industries, but ours in particular, as it relates to labor costs, equipment costs, fertilizers, fuel. People are reluctant to ask for price increases, but they should figure out how real quick,” says Jim. “There is a fear of losing work, but people need to understand that if you’re losing money on that job, it doesn’t help you. You decide if the relationship is strong enough that you can negotiate your way through, or if you are better off taking those resources and finding a more profitable deal.” He says the ultimate key to business is asking questions. Talk to your clients. Understand why someone needs landscape work and what they are trying to achieve, then develop a plan to do that. Talk to your team. Learn what employees need to be proud of their work and their company. Talk to yourself. Determine your own needs and goals. Decide what kind of company you want to have, then have the courage to build it.

C O N TA C T

All pictures are of the HighGrove team working at Atlanta project sites.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

HighGrove Partners Tel: (404) 667–9462 highgrove.org

Pro Landscaper USA South Janaury/February 2022 17


INFORM

COMPANY PROFILE

PURPOSE IN EVERY PIECE A LOOK AT TEXAS TREE SERVICE GROUP

A

n arborist, an adventurer, and an artist. Three ways to describe a San Antonio business leader who is using his creative mind to impact the city. Scott Anderson runs Urban Soil Tree Services, a team of arborists who offer a variety of services to businesses, homeowners, and local government groups. They work on new construction and remodels, or deal with the city’s distressed trees that need nursing back to health. Urban Soil is also a wholesale operation that helps landscape architects choose the right products for their projects. One of Scott’s proudest innovations though is his team’s ability to repurpose everything that comes on-site. “Nothing leaves by the dumpster. We are processing tens to thousands of yards of material, and we have a two-yard dumpster that goes out once a week. It has a couple of boxes and Whataburger wrappers in it,” he says.

18

EVERYTHING ELSE HAS A LIFE BEYOND They process old material as compost, mulch, or even firewood. Scott is pioneering a new way to sell firewood in Texas, inspired by his years growing up in the snowy Utah mountains. He is developing an online store that allows people to research and purchase treated firewood at a fair price. The online service gives buyers quality, professionalism, and credibility that other sellers may not provide. “We outline things like, what is a cubic yard and what is a cord of wood. Knowing these things is very tough. I’ve been doing this for a very long time and I even have a hard time knowing what a full cord of wood looks like on the ground. This leaves a lot of room for sellers to be shady about it,” he says.

sawmill and woodshop. He craftily designs all kinds of products from wood shreds, including silverware, plates, and furniture. He sells his designs to San Antonio locals, often working with the client to create the perfect fixture. “Once you are in the mindset of figuring out what things are good for, then you just figure it out. You have to think it through, and yes, have some failures too. That’s how you figure out what works though,” he says. Scott developed his artistic talents and love for the outdoors in Utah. In college, he led backpacking trips with local teenagers, many of who struggled to behave in more common environments. He hoped to teach them to survive in the wilderness–embracing the outdoors, building fires, creatively utilizing things around them–would help them deal with their problems at home. “When you put down your phone, when you don’t have the distractions of TV and those things, you figure out who you are. And you develop a skill and something to be proud of.”

Scott also repurposes the trees through his

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INFORM

Scott taught the kids to use the forest to build the tools they would need to survive in the forest. For example, the bowls and spoons they carved from fallen logs and branches. This time helped him develop his knowledge as an arborist and outdoorsman. Scott first offered tree services to Moab, Utah, locals. He bought a sawmill, then a woodshop, then a retail store and design studio. He used old trees and stumps to build furniture and other tools sold downtown. After roughly 10 years in the west, Scott relocated to San Antonio and helped launch Urban Soil. Scott and his wife wanted to be close to their family while they raised their three young children. The Texas Hill Country brought many challenges though. One of the biggest was understanding the many tree species scattered across Central Texas. ROOT BALL TABLE

MESQUITE MIRROR

“I felt like in Utah I could identify trees at 60 miles an hour while driving down the road just by looking at the color of the leaves. It has taken a lot of work to get that here. There are things like tropicals, citrus, and many oak species. There are lots of hackberries, which were prized trees in Utah. Here they are fenceline trees and people hate them,” he says. Scott did learn the lay of the land though, and his team of roughly 25 arborists has been a part of several major projects since then. The team has worked with corporations like H.E.B and CPS, helping preserve trees during their headquarters renovations. Urban Soil is also helping the city of San Antonio create the San Pedro Creek Culture Park, a site that embraces and educates people on the city’s culture and history.

PECAN POXY V LEGS

The inspiration for innovation still comes to life inside the design studio though. A favorite design these days, making root ball tables. The team takes an old tree stump, flips it upside down, then fills it with a material like glass or stone. The end product is a table, shelf, vanity or any other structure that is different each time. The tables are an example of Scott’s lifelong commitment to innovatively utilizing the tools right in front of him.

C O N TA C T Urban Soil San Antonio, TX Tel: (210) 796 – 4816 urbantreecompany.com

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 19


March 24, 2022 Atlanta, Georgia

www.south.futurescapeusa.com


JOIN US FOR LIVELY PANEL DISCUSSIONS ON THE FUTURE OF OUR INDUSTRY

CHARLES BRIAN QUINN

CINDY CODE

ERIC KING

JIM McCUTCHEON

Co-Founder & CEO of Greenzie

Executive Director of Project EverGreen

Landscape Architect & Co-Owner of King Landscaping

Chief Executive Officer at HighGrove Partners

JOE LANGTON

JUDD GRIGGS

ISAAC ROBERTS

TONY RICKETTS

President of Langton Group

Head Harvester at Harvest Business Consulting Group

Co-Founder & COO of Scythe Robotics

Founder & Team Leader at LawnLine Marketing

BROOKE INZERELLA

MARC ELLIOT

MICHAEL MAYBERRY

PAM DOOLEY

Owner of Horticare Landscape Company

CEO of GoMaterials

CTO of Level Green Landscaping

Owner of Plants Creative Landscapes

Thank You To Our Headline Sponsors!

JEFF McMANUS Founder & Chief Cultivation Officer of The Jeff McManus Group



INSPIRE

INEVITABLE INTERVENTION

P32

INSIDE INSPIRE THIS MONTH PAGE 25 HIGH PRAIRIE LANDSCAPE GROUP: SELF EXPRESSION, PAGE 29 SHADES OF GREEN: MONDAY NIGHT GARAGE, PAGE 32 GREENVIEW PARTNERS: INEVITABLE INTERVENTION


INSPIRE

Town Hall

®

VINTAGE, STREETSCAPE CHARM THAT STANDS THE TEST OF TIME

Modeled after historic North American clay street pavers, Town Hall is a popular choice for driveways, patios, walkways and more, in either traditional or permeable applications. It’s detailed surface texture is created using Reala™ Technology, with Ultima™ Concrete Technology for superior durability with up to four times the strength of conventional poured concrete. Whether it’s the main paver in your project, or used as an accent band within other pavers, walls or vertical features, Town Hall makes a bold statement. Contact 1-800-UNILOCK to connect with your local Territory Manager or visit Unilock.com for more design inspiration.

Exclusive to Unilock 24

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INSPIRE

PROJECT D E TA I L S Cost $750,000 Build Time 6 months Size Half acre lot

self expression High Prairie lwandscape Group KANSAS CITY HOMEOWNER TURNS HER LANDSCAPE INTO AN ART CANVAS

A

rt is a way each human being reflects their inner thoughts and emotions. Sounds, colors, words, movements; all things that bring to life who we are and who we hope to be. Many showcase that art in and around their homes using items like furniture, curtains, entertainment pieces, even dishes. Selfexpression is what inspired a Kansas City homeowner to completely transform her outdoor spaces with a landscape with as much personality as she had. That is what she got. “It was unorthodox. Most people look at inspirational photos for ideas, but this wasn’t a situation where she wanted to find some pictures on Pinterest. She went about it in a super cool and unique way.” When owner Robyn Schmitz, Senior Designer Joe Lyon, and the rest of the High Prairie Landscape Group crew began working on this $750,000 landscaping project they were given clear instructions. The client wanted a showstopping outdoor space designed for entertaining and impressing. To bring the vision to life though, she said the team needed to get to know her. Before any work began, the

south.prolandscaperusa.com

client invited the High Prairie Landscaping team to spend some time with her in her home. She chatted with the group, showed them her artwork, color schemes, even her curtains and floorboards. She explained her incredible attention to detail, eclectic style, and desire to be unique. The client wanted a home unlike any others, and wanted the team to catch her vision. “It’s the first time a homeowner ever pointed out curtains. It helped us understand what she expected though. She said, ``this who I am, can you imitate this outdoors somehow;”, said Robyn, High Prairie’s owner and CEO. It took a lot of time and problem solving to create this dream home though. The land behind the home drastically sloped into a dark and muddy wooded area and the architectural styles of the front and back of the home did not match. The front had a formal, antebellum look. The back was more naturalized and rustic. The clients also wanted a larger driveway leading into the street, so High Prairie had to solve all sorts of code and zoning struggles. The team found a solution

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 25


INSPIRE

BACKYARD BEFORE

26

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INSPIRE

FRONT YARD BEFORE RENOVATIONS

though hardscaping. They expanded the front car space by adding in a full scale circle drive, using a custom designed stone color scheme. Then they used the colors to install more natural looking stone in the back. This helped blend the opposing looks. Hardscaping also helped balance the 16 foot grade change in the backyard, and was a foundation for stone retaining walls, a fire feature and an eyebrow pergola. The team even helped the homeowners add sculptures and other work from local artists to the backyard. “We had a lot of fun with it. Art is kind of a perception thing, so what one person sees, another person doesn’t. This made it a challenge. She wanted something special and unique, and even though people interpret things differently, it was a very neat process”, says Robyn. High Prairie chose equipment carefully, and planned out when it could be used. With such a large backyard slope they focused heavily on traction control, picking machines that could manage slippery mud or gravel without potentially damaging the project or hurt staff members. They also used paver placing machines to lay more than 4,500 square feet of stone in a matter of days. “Tackling the large square footage while cutting labor were the main game changers. We dealt with a lot of weather changes too. It was a multi-month project and we went through the midwest see-saw. Extremely wet patterns followed by dry weeks. We worked through it all. The saving graces were the

UNILYFT AT WORK

BACKYARD AFTER

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 27


INSPIRE

equipment we started testing”, says Robyn.

STONE WALLS

High Prairie still maintains the home and maintains a close relationship to the customers. Robyn says the finished product not only impressed the homeowners and their friends, but it also captures attention from total strangers. People often knock on the door just to comment on the property and it is well known by everyone who lives nearby. They admire the unique, artistic, and eye-catching landscape envisioned from the beginning. This property is one of the many luxury sites they manage in Kansas City. Robyn founded the business in 2010. For three years she was a one woman show, then began to grow her business to what it is today.

C O N TA C T High Prairie (816) 393 – 2901 www.gohplg.com

PA R T N E R S & S U P P L I E R S Unique Lighting uniquelighting.com Loma Vista Nursery lomavistanursery.com KAT Nursery katwholesale.com Alliance Gator Sand alliancegator.com Fifth Room fifthroom.com Fire pit Warming Trends warming-trends.com Motorized wheelbarrows Muck Truck mucktruck.com Unilyft Unilock unilock.com Mini-Skid Steer Ditch Witch ditchwitch.com Designers Joe Lyon and Robyn Schmitz

28

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INSPIRE

A

vision for the future is at the heart of every project. Imagining what an outdoor space can potentially become is what makes a job successful and the industry relevant. Seeing into the future isn’t always easy, though. An Atlanta design team had to imagine how a plot of thick asphalt and gravel could become a thriving orchard that powers a community brewery. Creating regenerative and sustainable landscapes is their specialty though, so they pulled off the job in a matter of months.

PROJECT D E TA I L S Build time 4 weeks Site of project 1 acre Project value $90,000

MONDAY NIGHT

GARAGE shades of green permaculture ORGANIC ORCHARD BUILT TO POWER ATLANTA BREWERY

Shades of Green Permaculture is a design, build and education firm devoted to transforming outdoor spaces into thriving and organic ecosystems. Led by Brandy Hall, the team focuses on three pillars of regeneration: restoring the water cycle, bringing nutrients to the soil and building plant communities. They often work with public entities to build native pollinator habitats and edible landscapes. Their expertise is why the owners of Atlanta’s Monday Night Brewing asked them to create a one-acre orchard for their development Monday Night Garage. The orchard is filled with seasonal fruits and useful plants that help produce the beers brewed on site. They carefully picked fruit species that produce the right types of yeast that can be harvested for use in the fermentation process to eventually produce sour beers. “The naturally occurring yeast on various fruits gives different types of flavor profiles in the beers,” says Brandy Hall, Shades of Green founder and managing director.

I’M JUST BLOWN AWAY BY THE PROCESS. THERE IS SO MUCH SCIENCE BEHIND IT, IT’S REALLY COOL The site sits in a post-industrial area and was

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 29


INSPIRE

filled with deep asphalt, compact clay and deep gravel sub-base. The team had to knock out the stone and gravel to get down to a subsoil and begin a soil amending process. After that, the team installed pollinator meadows from seed using species that can grow in depleted soils and still attract pollinators for the fruit production, as well as rain gardens around the orchard. The space sits next to a massive pedestrian trail, so during the build process, Shades of Green readjusted the grade to connect the business to a trail entrance. The location of the project was a big consideration in an already challenging design. “We do really extensive research on the existing conditions, analyzing what’s happening with the soil, the water, the light, then examine the patterns of people who will naturally use the space. Then, we integrate those so that the design can respond to the existing conditions and to the humans being drawn in,” says Brandy.

ATLANTA BELTLINE DESIGN

WESTSIDE BELTLINE CONSTRUCTION

THE GOALS AND THE AESTHETICS COMPLETE THESE LAYERS. IT’S REALLY A SIGHT AND NATURE INFORMED PROCESS WORK IN PROGRESS

Monday Night Garage is one of several companies adjacent to the Atlanta Beltline trail. The 26-mile loop used to be a railway corridor until the city began developing it into a multi-use trail. The beltline connects dozens of neighborhoods and has helped spur more than $3.7 billion in economic development. The brewery, as well as many other restaurants, cafés, markets and parks, is accessible by walking, biking and skating. “The beltline is pretty unique in Atlanta,” says Brandy. “It’s ignited a sort of desire for walkability and bikeability. Atlanta is just the poster child for urban sprawl and has never really been a walkable city. Everyone loves things that decrease the need to sit in traffic

30

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INSPIRE

though, and the beltline has really kickstarted that goal for Atlantans.” To build a nearly acre-large commercial space from scratch, Shades of Green had a few weeks and roughly $90,000. Construction on the brewery began in late summer and when crews broke ground, the owners set the date for an opening event one year later. The process stayed on track until a hurricane halted work for several weeks. By the time the interior was completed and the landscape team got started, the opening party was days away. Roughly 10 team members worked day and night to beat the deadline. “When it came down to the wire to get it built, I felt like I was in my high school drama club again, during production days,” says Brandy. “We had to build all the sets right before a show, and we’d stay up until 2 a.m. sometimes working. It was all hands on deck. Finishing the orchard actually was really fun, but definitely a challenge.”

ABOUT SHADES OF GREEN

P E R M A C U LT U R E Shades of Green Permaculture is a design, build and education firm that creates regenerative and sustainable outdoor spaces. From its designs to its online classes, Shades of Green believes regenerative landscapes, no matter the size, can have a positive impact on the environment. Shades of Green is a Woman-owned, Certified B Corporation and member of the Sustainable Site Initiatives founded by Managing Director Brandy Hall. For more information, visit us at shadesofgreenpermaculture.com or on our instagram @shades_of_green_permaculture.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

The project completed successfully, and more than a hundred people celebrated the brewery on opening night. The team still helps consult on project maintenance but says, theoretically, the property will become self-sustaining over time. By design, it will embrace the natural systems and processes, and it will grow into a healthy ecosystem for thousands to enjoy.

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 31


INSPIRE

PROJECT D E TA I L S Cost Approximately $1 million of landscape improvements during 3 – 4 years Size of Park 124 acres Awards NALP Level 1 Gold Award of Excellence

INEVITABLE INTERVENTION Greenview partners NORTH CAROLINA GROUP EMBRACES NEW LANDSCAPING TOOLS

32

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INSPIRE

B CONCRETE WALKWAYS

SMART LIGHTING SYSTEM AT NIGHT

ASF is a global alliance dedicated to developing advanced environmental technology. The German-based company says it “creates chemistry for a sustainable future” through chemical, material, industrial, nutritional and agricultural solutions. Researchers at BASF’s headquarters for the North American crop protection division produce weed and pest control products used in turf, ornamental, forestry, and public health markets. The development campus sits in North Carolina on a 124-acre site maintained by Greenview Partners. The Greenview team works closely with BASF facility leadership to be sure the innovation happening inside the facility is reflected on the outside. Greenview Partners began working with BASF eight years ago. Maintenance teams are on-site three days a week, and contractors work on various projects throughout the year. During the years, Greenview has renovated different areas of the site to implement several sustainability initiatives that would improve the campus aesthetic, support BASF’s research programs and even propel their own landscape technology standards. In 2018, GreenView Partners converted the BASF main lawn area from Tall Fescue to Tif Tuf Bermuda turf, due to the maintenance and product needs. One of the earliest challenges in the process was a customer request to finish the work without distracting any staff members. That meant no noise interference during working hours. Greenview kept things quiet the majority of the time, but the excavation and preparation had to take place starting on a Friday night through Sunday to avoid heavy equipment noise during business hours. The team used several skid steers, excavators, and dump trucks to tackle the bulk of the job in one weekend, working more than 24 hours from Friday to Monday morning. Work continued for several weeks with the same rules. No noise. They were able to update the irrigation and complete the Bermuda Sod installation quietly. To create a “carpet-like” look for the new lawn area, the group installed the company’s first autonomous mower at the event lawn. The switch to autonomous mowers took more research and training than the switch to other electric tools. Teams had to learn the best techniques to use the mowers, from a battery, maintenance and operator

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South Janaury/February 2022 33


INSPIRE

standpoint. Greenview embraced the change though, and the success led BASF to convert the majority of the site’s turf. To date, Greenview has converted approximately 170,000 square feet of turf to Tif Tuf Bermuda

horticulturists all over North Carolina. The state is in what’s called the U.S. transition zone, the area of the country sandwiched between colder and warmer climates. The rapid weather changes in North Carolina, and other level states like Tennessee and Arkansas, are tough on species of flowers, trees, shrubs, even turf.

12- inch caliper maple trees, all with added architectural elements. The process took place over two years. This team also revamped the landscape by adding thousands of new pollinator plants, a natural water feature, outdoor lighting, raised stone-veneer vegetable beds, new site

“Our area has been heating up little by little over the last decades. Fescue used to be really popular, but Bermuda has performed better in the last five years because it’s a warm-season turf. As North Carolina is in the transition zone, plant material doesn’t always grow well. We have big ebbs and flows for years, then all of a sudden the plant that was used for 15 or 20 years doesn’t work anymore,” says Tyner.

at the BASF campus. They also installed nine more autonomous mowers throughout the site. One automower is fully powered by solar, and a second solar-powered automower is in the works. Tyner Tew, a company director, says Bermuda is a solution to a unique challenge facing

Another major change happened to the property’s trees. Thin and weak trees were scattered around the grounds for years, each only about 2'– 4' caliper in size. People called them “Tim Burton” trees because they looked like something from the movie “Nightmare Before Christmas.” The BASF facility manager asked Greenview to bring in larger species that resembled the thick Michigan foliage, where he grew up. Greenview brought in new varieties to add more upright architectural elements, provide shade and even bring fall colors. Some installments are up to

furniture, corten planters, ornamental flowering trees shade trees, and new ADA compliant walkways. The raised vegetable garden beds grow fruits and vegetables for BASF employees to pick and enjoy. Strawberries, squash, bell peppers, rosemary, basil and oregano are just a few of the plants available. They also

TIFTUF CONVERSION

34

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


INSPIRE

During the BASF projects, and the majority of their work, the Greenview team prioritizes long term success. They look for elements that incorporate innovative techniques to make properties sustainable, lasting and functional. “Too often, projects are too short-sighted, even when it comes to picking out the plant material. I’ve seen a lot of new installs fail because of the tree material chosen, or because they are planted within five feet of a building”, says Tyner.

BEING A MAINTENANCE FIRST COMPANY, WE ARE THINKING ABOUT A LONGER TERM VISION The BASF projects are helping create that long-term vision. Tyner expects to see the tools and technology developed for the site in many projects, and not just within his company. “The inevitable thing that will continue to evolve is going to be an autonomous

intervention of our industry. Really, it is already here and being tested. In many locations, like in BASF, it’s working! With the labor shortages that have affected our country as a whole and have always affected our industry, that’s going to be inevitable going forward.” The National Association of Landscape Professionals gave Greenview Partners the level 1 Gold Award of Excellence for their landscape management work at BASF.

A B O U T GREENVIEW PARTNERS GreenView Partners operates in North & South Carolina with commercial landscaping services. It launched in 2010, and now employs dozens of crew members in six locations. The group says they formed their company by bringing together industry leaders and extraordinary talent to offer a level of service and customer-centric approach to landscaping.

PA R T N E R S & S U P P L I E R S

Larger Caliper trees Bold Springs Nursery boldspring.com Plant material, all stone and aggregates, and new Alliance nitrogen infused joint material for the slate pavers. SiteOne siteone.com Stone masonry work and labor at the Herb Garden Setting Sun Patios settingsunpatios.com Tiftuf Bermuda sod and robotic mowers Super Sod supersod.com

Pond building services Springer Pond springerponds.com

greenviewpartners.com

PAVILLION BEFORE AND AFTER

AUTONOMOUS MOWER AT WORK

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South Janaury/February 2022 35


WunderCovers™ seamlessly blend manhole, drain, or utility access covers and vaults

Custom covers, built to order, low volume, any size or configuration

Our covers are made to fit a wide variety of uses

Simply input the surrounding hardscape into the cover

Seamlessly blend into the surrounding landscape

Tel. 775-400-2883 info@wundercovers.com

www.wundercovers.com


N U RT U R E

NURSERY FOCUS

GARDEN INDUSTRIES

P39

I N S I D E N U RT U R E T H I S M O N T H PAG E 3 9 N U R S E R Y FO C U S : G A R D E N I N D U S T R I E S , PAG E 4 2 2 0 2 2 G A R D E N T R E N D S , PAG E 4 4 C U T T I N G E D G E : R O BOT I C M O W E R S , PAG E 4 7 C H A R L E S B R I A N Q U I N N : A S TO R Y F R O M T H E F U T U R E


NURTURE

38

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


NURTURE

NURSERY F0CUS GARDEN INDUSTRIES

David Bache

D

iscovery, education, innovation. These are the three things that drive David Bache to bring new and unique plants to southeast Florida. David runs the Garden Industries nursery in the Fort Lauderdale area. He calls Garden Industries a “boutique nursery,” as the 21-acre space only holds about 1,000 exotic, rare and hybrid plant varieties. The plants come from all over the world and are sold to theme parks, celebrities and other high-end landscapers. Each plant on-site gets lots of special attention. “To grow plants from around the world, especially in an area that gets a little bit of frost, we have a rotation set up,” says David. “For instance, some don’t need or can’t handle our summer rain. Those will go into a greenhouse for the summer and go back outside for the winter, because they’re pretty happy when it’s dry. Then we rotate more

south.prolandscaperusa.com

BOUTIQUE NURSERY DIRECTOR CREATIVELY DEVELOPS AND SHARES THE BEAUTY OF RARE PLANT SPECIES pulp-sensitive plants into the greenhouses. It’s very hands-on.” Garden Industries ships products from California, the Caribbean and even Europe. When a foreign plant comes into the nursery, the team cares for it for at least a year. This lets plants grow through all four seasons and adapt to the weather. It also gives the team the ability to learn how to care for different species at different times of the year. Each plant is pruned at least three times before being sold to ensure they are well-structured and solid-rooted. The group produces its own liners and custom blends soil products that are heavier than traditional propagation mixes. They believe a more natural process results in a higher quality product. Clients seem to agree! David ships plants to clients in major cities across the globe, many who have worked with him for several decades.

PLUMERIA

Pro Landscaper USA South

January/February 2022 39


NURTURE

PHILODENDRON PINK PRINCESS

XANTHOSTEMMON

40

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


NURTURE

COSTUS SPECIOSUS VARIEGATED

David does not use online or brokerage services to sell plants. He does utilize the internet in other ways, though. He regularly shares pictures and detailed descriptions of his unique plants with more than 10,000 Facebook and Instagram followers. David’s social networks are a way to educate people on the vast variety of unique plants available and how to use them. He developed his knowledge base by spending 35 years in the industry, working in nurseries in several states. David also devotes time to reading books and scientific research sites. “I get messages from people all over the world saying they love learning a plant’s information and background,” he says. “People are paying more attention to that, especially since the houseplant boom 30 years ago. They realize the benefits of plants and what they can do with them. Plants aren’t just nice to look at; they are also economically and environmentally helpful. I mean, you could save $100 in your electric bill by just planting something adjacent to your house!”

IXORA MEGA RED

south.prolandscaperusa.com

This online content is designed for people in and out of the industry. One of David’s largest goals is to push landscapers to step away from their main palette and think more outside the box, because there are so many options. Things always change based on weather and supply and demand, so nurseries often add new and different products. He believes the higher interest in plant material

among homeowners is pushing demand for unique plant species. “Because of social media, people who are not in the industry can go home and click through Instagram when they’re having their coffee and see all kinds of new things!” he says. “They get excited about it and then go to a local garden center to find that plant. They want to be able to look outside their window and see butterflies and hummingbirds. They want unique and interesting features around their patio that are different from their neighbor’s—not just the typical plants often used.” David says the best way to diversify a landscape is through education. Read about plant material. Visit trade shows that feature new species and teach ways to grow them. Fill social media feeds with plant-focused accounts. Most importantly, spend time in a nursery. Stay up to date on what is new, get to know the growers who are familiar with a plant and learn how new species can drastically improve a green space design.

C O N TA C T Garden Industries

gardenind.com

Pro Landscaper USA South

January/February 2022 41


EDUCATE NURTURE

F

orecasting trends can be just as important for businesses as sales and analytics. By forecasting trends, companies can stay ahead of the competition, discover customer wants and ultimately drive sales. The 2022 Garden Trends Report "From Crisis to Innovation," from Garden Media Group, outlines the shift in the green industry and beyond. Moving beyond ‘The Great Reset’ of 2021, the 2022 report guides us through the customer mindset to understand the best green products and services needed in this post-pandemic lifestyle. “We’re done holding our breath in anticipation of what will happen to green businesses,” says Katie Dubow, president of Garden Media Group. “Our industry has grown exponentially, and now is the time to make big moves to keep this new customer. The 2022 trends show a bright future for garden brands.” Here is a sampling of the eight trends that will shape the future, according to Garden Media:

CREATOR CLASS In 2022, it will be innovators who emerge ahead of others and maintain the economic recovery. These leaders are the Creator Class, and research shows they are leaving steady jobs for "passion projects" and shaping their future as individuals on their terms. Collaborate with this group on new products and share in their social reach.

FROM CRISIS TO INNOVATION GARDEN MEDIA GROUP’S 2022 GARDEN TRENDS REPORT EXPLAINING HOW CONSUMER BEHAVIOR SHIFTS WILL IMPACT LANDSCAPERS

42

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


EDUCATE NURTURE

SHOPPERTAINMENT

ZONING BOARD Home improvement projects show no sign of slowing down, both indoors and out. Zoning is the latest trend—creating unique spaces pertaining to each need of work and play. And front yards are booming. To react to this trend, position curb appeal services, plants and products suited for front yards.

Flowers are the new hugs. In times where hugging and personal contact is limited, people show their appreciation by giving flowers. The act of both giving and receiving flowers triggers the feel-good hormones in our brains. To capitalize on the cut flower trend, showcase how gardens and lawns can be turned into sharing gardens, teach clients the best flowers for cutting gardens and share cut flower arrangement suggestions.

WILD CURATION New research shows that one in five of the world’s plants—4,400 in the U.S.— are at risk of extinction. Plants and their incredible diversity make life possible. This is why there will be a demand for a renewed focus to prevent further plant extinctions. Growers are vital in helping these plants thrive. Landscapers are key in getting them to the customer. Both rare plant nerds and houseplant tenders flexing on social media are next to bring into the conservation fold. The conservation movement can tempt these gardeners.

The quick change to virtual demanded that everyone adjust and improve. Every sector pivoted, including shopping via social media. Shoppertainment allows companies to sell online using social media platforms to reach new audiences. Landscape companies can similarly drive interest with virtual events, online educational classes and product showcases to inspire and empower customers.

LIVING TELEVISION Many discovered—or rediscovered— birding last year. Sales of feeders and feed are projected to hit $2.2 billion in 2021. Make it easy for new bird enthusiasts by sharing which plants feed birds in all three seasons. Provide plant lists and guides, lead birdwatching walks or simply promote wildlifefriendly gardening.

BRIDGING THE GAP The 18.3 million new gardeners gained during the pandemic need access to basic knowledge, easy-to-grow plants and customizable products. Bridging the gap for beginners, growers, landscapers and green industry leaders will guide new customers to success. Be sure quality is top of mind with this new customer, and don’t overwhelm them with too many choices.

IN LIVING COLOR The most anticipated trend each year is the hue that’s catching the consumer’s eye. This year the color is clover, representing the first sign of spring, renewal and rebirth. Use this trending color in design elements; work shades into new collections, marketing collateral and more.

ON-DEMAND FLOWERS ABOUT GARDEN MEDIA GROUP Garden Media Group has published its highly anticipated Garden Trends Report annually since 2001. The firm offers information about trends in various formats, including a free Annual Report and a YouTube series. www.gardenmediagroup.com

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 43


EDUCATE NURTURE

HUSQVANA The Automower® 430X is a robotic mower that provides perfect lawns 24/7. Designed for medium- to large-sized yards up to .8 acres, the Automower® features cutting-edge technology and an intuitive interface. Obstacles and tight spaces are no sweat and thanks to innovative weather resistance, the Automower works in the rain, too. The 430X model comes with Automower® Connect, featuring an onboard GPS system that creates a map of the lawn, including where the boundary and guide wires are installed. Husqvarna Automower® will then register which parts of the lawn it has covered and adjusts its mowing pattern accordingly. The 430X also features theft tracking, along with LED lights. The 430X carries an MSRP of $2,499.99. www.husqvarna.com

CUTTING EDGE ROBOTIC MOWERS HITTING THE MARKET

GREENZIE Greenzie adds self-driving to commercial zero turn mowers to reduce the labor cost of lawn maintenance. OEMs (such as Wright Manufacturing and Mean Green Mowers) equip Robotic Ready™ machines at the factory with Autonomous Mowing, enabling commercial landscaper fleets to utilize robotic workers on their crews, complete with dealer support. As an add-on feature to mowers, usage is simple: A crew member mows the outer boundary and then simply turns on Autonomous Mowing to let the robotic worker stripe the inner area. While the mower cuts autonomously, the crew can manually address any detailed areas (flower beds, edges). Good properties for autonomous mowing now are sports fields, large flat turf areas, warehouses, military bases, fields and office parks with open areas. For more information, visit greenzie.com or ask your local outdoor equipment dealer.

44

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


EDUCATE NURTURE

AMBROGIO

MODEL L250I ELITE

Ambrogio robotic mowers have been built in Italy for over 20 years by a world-leading robotics and automation company. Offering a full range of models designed for lawns of all types—from simple and flat to complex, with multiple separate areas—Ambrogio lets you choose the exact robot for your specific needs. Whether you have a compact, enclosed urban space as small as 1/20th of an acre, or a sprawling rural lawn up to 5 acres, Ambrogio has the robot for you. Ambrogio is also the leader in high-cut (up to 3.8") and slope-mowing (up to 37°) models, too! MODEL 4.36 ELITE

www.ambrogiorobot.com

SCYTHE

ECHO

Self-driving technology meets commercialgrade equipment. Expand the capacity and performance of your mowing crews with the industry’s first commercial-grade, zero emission, fully autonomous mower. With eight HDR cameras and 360-degree sensors, this all-electric mower safely navigates dynamic environments on its own, identifying and responding to the presence of humans and other obstacles while producing a high-quality cut. The cameras and sensors capture valuable property and mower performance data to help contractors improve workflow, identify upsell opportunities and manage labor costs.

ECHO Robotics TM-2000 Autonomous Turf Mower features five floating cutting heads and an adjustable mowing height of .75" to 4." It can cut up to 6 acres efficiently and quietly for turf that looks manicured and professional all season long. The autonomous mower is self-charging, with a working cycle of two hours mowing to one hour of charge time. With remote command and performance monitoring via a web platform and mobile app, fleet management is easier than ever—giving you and your staff more time to focus on other parts of your business.

www.scytherobotics.com

GRAZE A fully autonomous and electric lawn mower that is controlled via computer, smartphone or tablet to streamline efficiency in commercial landscaping—invest now! •

Machine learning and computer vision allow the mower to map job sites, plan and execute mowing paths, avoid obstacles and collect and apply data to further optimize for precision.

Powered completely by state of the art rechargeable batteries, operators can cut fuel costs and carbon emissions while also maximizing revenue by addressing labor challenges. The mower can run for 6-8 hours before needing a recharge.

The mower is approximately 5'x5'x3.' It has a 60" mow deck and its run flat tires are airless and cannot be popped.

www.echo-usa.com

www.grazemowing.com

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 45



EDUCATE NURTURE

A STORY FROM THE FUTURE CHARLES BRIAN QUINN IMAGINING CHANGES IN THE LANDSCAPE WORKFORCE

Charles Brian Quinn

Hey, this is Bob, one of your customers. Do you have a minute?”

“Sure …” you say, wincing from experience and labor shortages in the past. “I just wanted to say thank you. Your crew that services our property are some of the most caring, attentive, smartest that we’ve ever had. Heck, just the other day your crew saw my neighbor had a big Packers flag out front, so he had your robot mow a big Bears logo in our yard. You shoulda seen the look on my neighbor’s face. I don’t know how y’all do it, but it feels like y’all are always available, never late, my lawn looks great, and I’m so glad you told me about all those other projects I've been meaning to get done. I don’t know how you do it, but I’m a happy customer. Just wanted to tell you.” You relax and thank your customer. Because it wasn’t always like this.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 47


NURTURE EDUCATE

Now, this is a story from the future, but one that’s not so far off. Technology is “eating the world," ushering in advancements in software and productivity from Customer Relationship Management (CRMs), to Route and Fleet Management, to Robotics and Automation— all in service of helping landscapers do their best work. And it starts in the workforce. The future of the landscaping workforce uses technology seamlessly to deliver an incredible customer experience. Breakthroughs come through struggle, and landscapers have been struggling. The National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) reports “the shortage of skilled labor is the major limiting factor” in growth, and we’ve got the second worst unemployment rates (behind construction). The good news is that the market is responding. It’s easy for industry outsiders to give pithy advice like: “Charge more, raise your rates and hire more entrepreneurial millennials who think like owners.” But not when the work hasn’t changed much. There’s a rite of passage i n mowing, trimming and blowing. Doing the daily standup at 5 am. and a 10-hour day every now and then. But what if there isn’t anymore? If an autonomous mower can cut out the middle, our daily standup can be done over Zoom from the road, and software clocks in and out for us, sends quotes and invoices automatically. Do we need to keep repeating the past?

even autonomous mowers taking over some of the repetitive parts of lawn maintenance, how your crews tackle the most important parts of the job creatively will make the difference between a profitable job with happy customers­ or a quagmire. Finally, the landscaper workforce of the future needs to be resilient. Often called grit or a stick-it-out mentality; not the brute force kind, but resilient to change. Those who can adapt and learn will thrive in a future workplace. It takes resilience to adapt to changing conditions, and technology is a change agent.

THOSE WHO FAIL TO LEARN FROM HISTORY ARE CONDEMNED TO REPEAT IT said Winston Churchill. As professional landscapers, it’s our job to level up the workforce of the future. We don’t need automatons who can’t learn new tricks. We can still regale them with the time we had to walk uphill in the snow both ways to school, though, as we sit in our fancy self-driving trucks watching self-driving mowers get the job done.

There are three crucial traits the future landscape workforce needs to have, as automation and software take over the repetitive, rote parts of the job.

ABOUT CHARLES BRIAN QUINN Charles Brian Quinn, or CBQ, is the co-founder and CEO of Greenzie. Greenzie's software and off-the-shelf sensor suite add self-driving to commercial zero turn mowers to reduce the labor cost of lawn

The first is problem solving. Give me one problem solver over five mindless task followers any day. If you could take a crew of three workers down to one with autonomous mowers, perfect edgers and powerful, quiet electric blowers, you could pay that worker 50 percent more and still come out ahead on profitability. The next is creativity. With robo-mowers or

48

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

maintenance. OEMs equip Robotic Ready™ machines off the factory line with Greenzie Autonomous Mowing, enabling commercial landscaper fleets to utilize robotic workers on their crews. CBQ thinks software is the solution to most problems. Just ask his wife and kids, who live in a fully-automated home in Atlanta, Georgia. www.greenzie.com All Photos courtesy of ©Luke Beard

south.prolandscaperusa.com


E D U C AT E

TOPICS, TALENT, FUNDING...

SHOW ME THE MONEY

P5O

I N S I D E E D UCATE TH I S M ON TH PAGE 5 0 INDUS TRY INS IGHTS WITH J OH N C ON R OY, PAGE 5 3 J E FFREY SCOTT: 4 PRE DICTIONS ON THE FUTURE OF LANDS CA PIN G , PAGE 5 4 A S K J W : E V O L U T I O N O F S Y N T H E T I C T U R F , PA G E 5 7 V E C TO R W O R K S : T H E F U T U R E O F L A N D S C A P E D E S I G N , PA G E 6 0 L I G H T I N G I N S TA L L AT I O N S


EDUCATE NURTURE

TOPICS, TALENT, FUNDING…

SHOW ME THE MONEY! DEVELOPMENTS AND RESEARCH IN ACADEMIC CIRCLES WITH FLORIDA GROWER JOHN CONROY

Meaningful research done by universities for the green industry hinges on several key factors:

WITH

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

JOHN CONROY

Success in business and life depends on many variables. Some we control, some we do not. Those that we have a greater measure of control over are called choices. Desirable ends are impacted by prudent choices based on the application of accurate information relevant to the path to success. Research has been essential in establishing foundations for action and providing pathways for advancement. I love predictable outcomes … enter research.

50

Issues worthy of research are clearly identified and aligned with industry needs

Funding is secured

Personnel is sourced and/or assigned

The effective dissemination of findings

Jack Rechcigl and Jeb Fields are two leaders in the green industry that were kind enough to share their thoughts with us on these important that impact the industry and many of us directly.

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

John: Where do research topics come from? Jack: Most of the time, research topics that faculty work on come directly from our growers. Our faculty try to work on relevant issues facing the agricultural industry. It is important for our research faculty to work cooperatively with the people who have real world issues and targeted concerns. The process is best served by our faculty making site visits and keeping lines of communication open with growers and others in the industry. We also partner with various agricultural organizations to stay informed on critical issues they are facing. We have advisory committees made up of leaders from the various agricultural commodity groups, as well as government officials that help ensure we are working on relevant research issues facing the growers. Jeb: I’m an extension specialist for the nursery industry so I get most of my ideas from growers. I like to keep my finger on the pulse, so I go visit them and attend their meetings and listen. I try to keep a balance between what I really want to do and how it can help the industry. If it’s not helping the growers and is not helping to better the industry, then what’s the point of being here, especially being in extension. I must keep that passion for what I do, so I think finding a good

south.prolandscaperusa.com


NURTURE EDUCATE

balance of what I like and that which is impactful and helps the industry is important. John: Where does research funding typically come from? Jack: Funding for research comes from a variety of sources. I’d say our growers associations and allied suppliers really fund most of our research. In my case, the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Association (LNLA) is extremely supportive of our research and extension programming. There are federal and state level monies as well as private and nonprofit organizational funding. Industry stakeholders will often set aside money to fund critical research as well. For instance, FNGLA awards up to $5,000 for each committee-approved project proposal to supplement and extend current research projects. This format allows for FNGLA to pick and choose which proposals will most benefit its members and meet the priorities it has set for the year. All funding is very competitive, and faculty researchers must compete with others across the state and the nation to secure the monies. Many of the grants have very specific criteria attached and grant writers must get “creative” to meet the requirements of the grant as well as craft it to meet the needs of the problem being researched. It is important for organizations to be very active in lobbying to have funding earmarked for specific research. Without governmental funding, research is often very limited. Jeb: I’d say our growers’ associations and our allied suppliers really fund most of our research. I’m at a research station so we get some funding through state and federal programs that helps us set up our small projects to maintain what’s going on at the farm, but most of it is externally funded. I have found from talking to smaller growers that they often don’t know that they can contact their extension research personnel for solutions to their problems. Recently, I was involved in an extensive survey of growers across the nation. We found that

south.prolandscaperusa.com

there was a feeling that, as researchers, we were often missing the mark regarding relevance. Growers want answers that are relevant to their needs and applicable solutions so that’s where our focus should lie. John: How is personnel selected to research industry issues? Jack: Personnel selection is really driven by the nature of the problem being addressed and matching the researcher’s skill set to the project. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) has a broad resource pool of scientists, economists, engineers, soil and water scientists, plant pathologists, entomologists, horticultural sciences, etc. What makes us such a powerful organization is our resources and ability to put interdisciplinary teams of experts together to address and help the industry’s needs.

Jeb: When I get a problem, I look to see if it’s in my area of expertise. I am really good with soils, water and fertilizer. If the issue is outside my skill set, such as plant disease or pest management, I reach out to my network of cooperative extension specialists around the country. Different extension agents have varying skill sets and expertise, and it’s my job to access that person. John: How are the research findings disseminated to the industry? Jack: We use many different media outlets to disseminate our research findings. Our faculty publish their findings in professional journals, as well as agricultural magazines, newsletters, websites, YouTube videos and other digital media outlets. We also have an online system called EDIS that has an endless array of topics that you can print as needed. Our faculty also present their

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 51


NURTURE EDUCATE

findings at professional scientific meetings as well as local industry and commodity group meetings. The faculty also work very closely with the extension service where the extension faculty help to disseminate the information to our growers. Jeb: The main way we disseminate information is by publishing scientific articles on our research. We also write extension publications, industry newsletters and fact sheets, which are limited to a front page sheet and are directly for the growers. We break it down to a few key areas that we think are important for growers and their operation and then we post those on our website. We also share our research at trade shows. Since COVID, my station has developed a website

and we are now starting to post information on the site. I also run our ornamental trial gardens, so we try and put all the data and videos of these plants and how they’re doing on the website as a type of virtual extension. YouTube videos and such are the new wave of extension especially since some people can’t take time away from their job to come visit my research station. John: The research agenda is driven by perceived need, talent and funding. So, if you have issues of broad interest, it is within your power to seek answers. Typically, research only takes place when funding is provided, is relevant only when it addresses the needs of industry and is effective when communicated and subsequently implemented by users.

DE-FEN MOU, POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCHER AT UF/IFAS LAB

Dr . Jack E. Rechcigl Dr. Jack E. Rechcigl is a professor in the Soil and Water Science Department at the University of Florida, Director of the University of Florida Gulf Coast Research and Education Center and the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center. He has worked with the University of Florida for the past 35 years. Dr. Rechcigl is recognized nationally and internationally for his research on the beneficial uses of organic wastes and industrial by-products as fertilizers for agricultural crops.

Dr . Jeb S . Fields Dr. Jeb S. Fields is an assistant professor & extension specialist for Commercial Ornamental Horticulture with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center. Dr. Fields serves as the assistant research coordinator for the Hammond Research Station, where he is also the director of the Hammond Trials and the chair for the Louisiana Super Plants. Dr. Fields’ primary research and extension focus is to support the nursery and greenhouse industry through engineering soilless substrate systems for increased resource efficiency.

52

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


EDUCATE

PREDICTIONS ON THE

FUTURE OF LANDSCAPING BY CONSULTANT JEFFREY SCOTT

H

ow confident are you in the future, especially in these times of change? Based on my research in and outside the industry, here are four predictions that will shape the landscape world of the future. PREDICTION #1 The residential cocooning trend will grow stronger than ever. We have been experiencing a cocooning trend for almost 40 years, and it will continue to grow stronger as working from home becomes the norm. This will drive the residential market for years to come.

Freelance remote services will fill local needs. The immigration issue is a hot potato that I don't expect to get solved. However, these days people can live anywhere in the world and still work for you. PREDICTION #2

You can hire designers, accountants, receptionists, estimators and many more roles from people living elsewhere in the U.S. and around the world. In my community, I am helping landscape entrepreneurs make this a reality. You should be focused on this, too, and start by using freelance websites like Upwork. To bring this point home, by the end of the decade, I predict remotely operated equipment will become a reality.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

PREDICTION #3 More and better employees will enter the green industry. The better companies realize they should recruit the best employees, not the best landscape employees. And with the "great resignation" happening, many office-bound employees are rethinking their priorities. How do you best take advantage of this?

Be willing to look outside the normal greenindustry-skilled employees for future hires. Create a “Values/Skills/Results” scorecard to score the people you are interviewing to make sure you are clear on who you are looking wfor, and to avoid making emotional hiring decisions. Continue to gamify your company, so that the better employees will see how they can "win" in your company. Implement “Train the trainer,” so you have your best people armed to do their best training. Don’t assume good people know how to train. Pick the people who are best at training, and show them how to become expert trainers. PREDICTION #4

The companies that professionalize will own the market. With so much professional money (e.g. private equity) entering the green industry, there is increased pressure to compete at a higher and more professional level. It will be harder in the future for a mom-andpop firm to compete without taking steps to operate their businesses as a professional enterprise. You have to learn to excel in your

professional management approach: numbers, metrics, team-building, coaching, organizing for growth … and, ultimately, in planning for a smooth exit even before you are ready to exit. YOUR CHALLENGE

Take advantage of these trends while remaining nimble as events continue to evolve and new future trends come into view. Discuss these trends with your team and identify the opportunities that exist now for your company to keep growing and improving during these next two years.

A B O U T J E F F R E Y S C OT T

Jeffrey Scott, MBA, is a leading authority on growth and profit maximization in the landscape industry. He grew his landscape company into a successful $15 million, multi-discipline enterprise, and he's now devoted to helping others achieve profound success. His clients on average see a 27 percent profit improvement in their first year alone. He has consulted with over 200 landscape companies and facilitates the largest global peer group of landscape business owners in the world.

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 53


EDUCATE

Evolution

OF SYNTHETIC TURF The evolution of synthetic turf has created a billion-dollar Industry. Since the late 1950s, synthetic turf, also known as artificial grass, has become “the” hot item in the landscape industry. Manufacturers have created better and stronger materials that feel and look like real grass. Architects, designers, and builders are taking advantage of its many uses and services by adding synthetic turf to their portfolio.

54

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

IMPROVED SYNTHETIC FIBER TREATMENT UV inhibitors and complex ingredients combat wear and tear and are environmentally safe.

DEVELOPMENT OF FIBER SHAPES AND COLORS Tan “Thatch” or “dead grass yarn” mixed with green grass colors simulate natural soil and have become homeowner’s favorite for their landscape.

south.prolandscaperusa.com


EDUCATE

WATER SAVING FEATURES

HEALTHIER INFILL GRANULES Are now coated and infused with anti-microbial protection to help prevent the growth of bacteria, mold, and mildew. Play areas are using organics for infill like walnut, cork, pine, and coconut to lower surface temperatures. Clinoptilolite, aka “Zeolite”, a natural volcanic mineral is being used as a “top-dressing” infill to combat odor from pet urine.

We can talk all day about the evolution of fiber, how many uses, or how beautiful synthetic turf is, but the “wow” factor is how it saves tremendous amounts of water. Synthetic turf has become a crucial component in saving water for many states. Several lakes and rivers are at historical record lows. Boat docks are being lowered every week due to the rapid depletion of water that feeds many cities. States have created mandates forcing water restrictions and compensating owners with cash up to $3.00 per sq. ft. by removing natural grass and placing with landscape synthetic turf. Just think of all the pesticides, insecticides, and other poisonous chemicals that are not needed when placing synthetic turf. That alone is crucial to the environment.

The versatility of synthetic turf has allowed manufacturers to design, create, and manufacture products for landscape, golf, bocce, lawn-bowling, tennis, corn-hole, cross-fit, pet facilities, rooftops, balconies, mezzanines, and much more. The creativity synthetic turf offers allows endless hours of sports and activities to be played all year around. Installing synthetic turf is not a complex process. It is a game changer. It is a savior in many ways. It saves water. It saves money. It saves that yard that can never stay green. But most importantly? It saves valuable time that can be spent on more important things, like family and friends.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

ABOUT ASK JW Joe Wadkins, aka “Ask JW” has become one of the leading synthetic turf experts across the globe. With decades of experience, he is highly sought after to consult, design, and train all aspects in synthetic turf including football, soccer, and baseball fields. JW is an Inventor with several patents for synthetic turf tools. He is the proud author of “ASK JW”, a monthly online article that helps contractors build their businesses by offering training, education, and technical support in the most recognized problems in the Synthetic Turf Industry today.

Tel: (888)  846 – 3598 jw@askjw.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 55


EDUCATE

FOR ALL YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS

LEAN ON US

Partner, On and Off the Job Site Your

n

ProAdvantage contractor rewards program (see brochure for details)

n

On time delivery services

n

Field consultations

n

Education and training classes, webinars and resources

n

Project estimating and take-off services

n

Online account management tools

n

And more!

At the Blue Counter and Beyond Ewing’s blue counter has been the cornerstone of how we serve you with supplies, information, camaraderie and a place to lean on after a long day. But our support goes beyond the blue counter. Here at Ewing, whether you’re a new pro or an industry vet, your business is our priority. It’s the reason we’ve been at it for 100 years and why we’ll continue to be here.

EwingIrrigation.com

Scan for ProAdvantage Brochure

Follow us on social media:

DIG FASTER. DIG EASIER WITH THE

ULTIMATE PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPING KIT

Earth Augers and Powerful Digging Tools POWERPLANTER.COM | (217) 379 – 2614

56

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


EDUCATE

THE FUTURE OF LANDSCAPE DESIGN TECHNOLOGY VECTORWORKS

R

ecent technology innovations in landscape design have pushed the industry to a new level, helping designers meet their clients’ needs and elevating their project designs. However, some landscape architects and designers may feel these advances aren’t achievable or applicable to their workflows— but they shouldn’t be afraid to elevate their designs and improve their processes. EXTRACT FROM BIM MODELS

If you’re looking to incorporate some of the industry’s latest innovations into your process, but aren’t sure where to start, here are some key areas of current technology progress to explore. Presentation Technology Today’s clients want advanced presentations that make them feel like they are in their future space.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Though some landscape designers are ready for the virtual reality (VR) challenge, others may feel a bit more hesitant to enter a realm of animated walkthroughs, enhanced 3D visualizations and other animations, and should therefore look for solutions that have many functionalities.

GIS and Mapping Geographic information system (GIS) is a spatial system that creates, manages, analyzes and maps all types of natural and built systems and visualizes previously “unseen” data. Some design and build professionals know

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 57


EDUCATE

that GIS data exists and utilize it, but this wasn’t always true. Access to imagery and other helpful line-work items such as topography, soil maps, utility location and easements can be just a click away in your own design solution or the one you may be considering, so don’t be afraid to investigate. BIM Building information modeling (BIM) has become commonplace in the AEC and landscape industries, changing the game for designers. BIM allows landscape architects to take ownership of their designs and feel empowered to make decisions. Instead of looking at BIM as a specific BIM workflows also allow design partners to collaborate with others, such as architects and civil engineers, with many import/export capabilities available with support for open BIM and IFC. Your process as a landscape designer can be made easier since files from others can be used as a background on which you can add your own design, instead of redrawing everything from scratch. You’ll have better interactions with a BIM solution or any solution that works well with smart objects in 2D and 3D that report to worksheets.

BIM COLLABORATION

Data visualization is also a beneficial part of a BIM solution because it helps you visualize your client’s needs better. For example, if your project needs to account for local water regulations, you can get a visual representation of which plants in your plan need more water versus others. A fundamental benefit of BIM is that documentation comes directly from the model. Schedules, reports and worksheets are all linked to the geometry so that when you make a change in the model, it reflects in the documentation as well. As in any project, it's imperative to consider the views, insights and opinions from all involved parties—from your own design team to external contractors and consultants—and to have a system in place to handle all this information, while simultaneously

incorporating jurisdictional regulations and environmental context. Level Up Mastering the industry’s newest innovations and tools can be overwhelming, but designers should always look to enhance their skills through technical training. There are plenty of online training options, including many free resources, that provide a great starting point for designers looking to try out and perfect a new-to-them solution Remember, you don’t know what you don’t know—asking questions and connecting with other designers opens your eyes to new tools, workflows and efficiencies. Lastly, don’t be afraid to connect with a training team to do one-on-one trainings for the specific needs you have. Asking those questions and learning new skills helps you stand out in multiple ways in the industry.

A B O U T E R I C G I L B E Y, P L A Eric is the product marketing manager at Vectorworks Inc. He received an AAS degree in Landscape Contracting and Construction and a BS degree in Landscape Architecture from Ohio State University. His experience as a practicing landscape architect allows him to help develop industry “best practices."

GIS AND BIM EXCHANGE

58

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

(888) 646 – 4223 www.vectorworks.net/landmark

south.prolandscaperusa.com


TRI-C ORP DECKING - SIDING - FENCING

THE DISTRIBUTOR OF SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR EXCLUSIVE OUTDOOR PROJECTSEDUCATE

SIGNATURE DECKING & CLADDING Green Living with Bamboo

812-455-2371

south.prolandscaperusa.com

www.tricorpcoating.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 59


EDUCATE

BRILLIANCE LED The Mount Rainier Integrated Bollard The Mount Rainier Integrated Bollard is available in powder-coated black aluminum and features a single cutout that casts soft light ideal for pathways, walkways and garden accent lighting. Includes: ·

Integrated Light Source 6W, 400 Lumen, Frosted Mini Beam in 3000K

·

LightingShrink Professional Crimp and Heat Shrink Cable Connector

·

Stainless Steel Impaler Stake

The Mount Rainier carries a 3-year repair or replacement warranty and a lamp life of 30,000 hours. For more information, visit brillianceled.com/mount-rainier or contact your local Brilliance representative listed on brillianceled.com/contact.

SEE THE DIFFERENCE COASTAL SOURCE FLEX Niche Series Microsized yet mighty, this lineup of easy to conceal FLEX Niche fixtures casts high-powered, focused lighting without ever revealing their location. The 100 percent solid brass construction protects the inner electronics. 3W LED modules deliver an impressive output, while remaining efficiently cool during operation. Meticulously crafted to fire high-powered lighting from fixtures that could fit in the palm of your hand, they’re built to be versatile, and the modular, interchangeable parts enable customized assembly needed for the job. The most popular combinations are conveniently available as ready-to-install, preassembled fixture kits. Select from FLEX Niche Bullet Light, FLEX Niche Uplight (6" & 18"), FLEX Niche Director Light (2" & 6"), FLEX Niche Curved Path Light, FLEX Niche Tree Light with Uniball Mount, FLEX Niche Landscape Washlight (2" & 6") and FLEX Niche Director Washlight. coastalsource.com

60

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


EDUCATE

DAUER Silhouette Collection For the environmental revitalization, restoration and re-naturalization of two Summit Metro Parks destinations in Akron, Ohio, Summit Lake Nature Center and the historic Valley View Barn, Dauer’s Silhouette Collection of lighting bollards incorporates the leaf logo, the emblem of the state’s second-oldest park district, into the landscape lighting design. Working in collaboration, Summit Metro Parks’ in-house landscape architect team and Dauer Manufacturing designed the day-into-evening effects to bring in low lighting that creates a subtle, yet distinguishable. brand expression. Celebrating its 100-year anniversary this year, Summit Metro Parks redesigned the landscape lighting for both Summit Lake Nature Center and Valley View Barn as part of a larger beautification project to restore natural habitats during the park district’s centennial. dauermanufacturing.com

LIGHTING INSTALLATIONS THAT ADD THE PERFECT TOUCH

EMERYALLEN EmeryAllen is a privately held company located in Charleston, South Carolina. On a day-to-day basis, they rely on 30-plus years of experience in the lighting industry to bring some of the most technologically proficient and well-rounded lines of lighting products to the market. Over those 30 years, they have established worldwide product development, manufacturing and distribution relationships, which have translated into the highest quality lighting products for customers at the perfect value. EmeryAllen aims to provide customers with not only a collection of exceptional products, but also assistance in selection and aid in any support for the lifetime of the bulb. Whether you are looking to bring warmth and light to a small apartment or illuminate an entire office park, they’ve got you covered! www.emeryallen.com

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 61


Georgia's only premier multi-day horticulture trade show and conference.

To register to exhibit or attend: visit us online at mywintergreen.com or give us a call at (706) 443-1440

JANUARY 18 - 20, 2022 GAS SOUTH DISTRICT DULUTH, GEORGIA

Don't wait - register today, and get ready to network with thousands of other industry professionals from across the southeast. Forge new relationships, and gain the tools and the knowledge to propel your business forward and upward. Let's start growing together... again!


P EO P L E

THE SECRET LIFE OF

WALTER BONE

P64

I N S I D E P E O P L E T H I S M O N T H PA G E 6 4 S E C R E T L I F E O F WA LT E R B O N E PA G E 6 6 L I T T L E I N T E R V I E W S


PEOPLE

THE SECRET life of

WALTER BONE B

SANDS COTAI CENTRAL IN CHINA

orn in Starkville, Mississippi, Walter Bone moved around a lot as a child. His father’s job took the family to faraway places like Southern California and Mexico City, where Walter discovered a curiosity and passion for different cultures. So, once he received his degree in landscape architecture from Mississippi State in 1988, he was ready to see the world.

In 2007, Walter moved abroad, where he spent seven years in Hong Kong and in the nearby luxury gambling mecca of Macao. He managed the landscaping design and construction at Hong Kong Ocean Park—including a threestory shark tank exhibit, “The Galaxy Macao” featuring the world’s largest rooftop wave pool—and the Sands Cotai Central, considered one of the most luxurious casinos in the world.

Walter’s 30-year career has spanned two continents, where he’s designed everything from over-the-top theme parks and casinos to an entire city.

“When working on the landscape, the arrival experience is so important,” says Walter. “You want a design based on the five senses … the sounds of birds chirping, the feel of a gentle breeze, the smells and tastes, colors, textures and contrasts. All these things help make fantasy a reality. People get lost in the design and become part of it.”

But Walter says his strong foundation aided his progression to bigger, more intricate projects. “My first job was residential and small commercial, digging ditches, installing trees and installing lighting in Virginia Beach,” he recalls. “Spending six weeks out with the crews was a great learning experience. When doing much larger projects later, that experience was invaluable.”

64

Walter says he developed a strong interest in landscape design paired with construction early on.

In 2013, Walter left Southeast Asia for an opportunity to work in the Middle East, where projects were booming in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Qatar and Oman. He worked on a variety of theme parks and water parks for Dubai Parks and Resorts, including Legoland Dubai, Six Flags and Bollywood Parks, based on India’s film industry. He was also the lead landscape architect for The World of the Hunger Games inside the Lionsgate Zone at Motiongate Dubai.

“You draw something on paper and can visualize it, but on site, you become part of the process and can ensure the design integrity is maintained throughout the project,” he says.

In Dubai, he worked on Desert Rose, an ambitious $8 billion smart satellite city including homes, businesses, schools and parks. Walter was charged with designing

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

south.prolandscaperusa.com


PEOPLE

the 700-hectare agricultural belt and 1,000-hectare public parks as well as open spaces. He then made his way back to North America, where in Toronto he became the lead landscape architect for the new Universal Studios Epic Universe theme park in Orlando. The project has recently broken ground in Orlando, and Walter is proud to have been a part of the early stages. “No matter if you’re dealing with a large theme park or a small residential project, you want the guest or the homeowner to be immersed into the design,” says Walter.

YOU WANT TO TAKE THEM TO A DIFFERENT WORLD

In 2019, Walter got a call from home that brought him back to reality. His father had become ill, so he moved back to the south to be by his side. His father passed away that August.

closely with so many disciplines throughout my career.”

“I’d been overseas for more than 12 years and only back once a year,” says Walter. “I knew it was time to be closer to home and to family.” Walter’s current role is senior landscape architect at Jacksonville, Florida-based Haskell, where he is leading the LA efforts for both design and design-build projects across the United States. He’s also become an avid artist, working on watercolor ink and watercolor sketching on the side—a hobby he picked up while living in Dubai. “Loving what you do does not feel like work but fulfills certain levels of personal satisfaction and achievement,” says Walter. “I have been fortunate to have been involved and worked

C O N TA CT Walter Bone, ASLA Haskell www.Haskell.com

LEGOLAND WATERPARK IN DUBAI

WALTER BONE

south.prolandscaperusa.com

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 65


PEOPLE

THE LITTLE INTERVIEW

PRO LANDSCAPER ASKS QUICK-FIRE QUESTIONS TO GAIN A SMALL INSIGHT INTO THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UP OUR INDUSTRY. TO TAKE PART, EMAIL MARYKATE.CARSON@ ELJAYS44.COM

66

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022

CHAD DILLER

ERIC KING

DIRECTOR OF CLIENT SUCCESS, LANDSCAPE LEADERSHIP AUSTIN, TEXAS

OWNER, KING LANDSCAPING ATLANTA, GEORGIA

landscapeleadership.com

kinglandscapingATL.com

If you weren’t in the horticulture industry, what would you be doing? Video director or producer. This has been one of the most exciting parts of my current role and I love it!

What inspired you to get into the industry? I love being outside and working in nature.

One thing that would make the industry better? Telling more meaningful stories. I’ve seen so many lives transformed by both the spaces and careers we create. We’re only scratching the surface and the world needs to know more about this industry! Who inspires you? My wife. She has developed so many meaningful, deep relationships with others through her selfless, empathetic pursuit of people. And despite many of life’s challenges, she remains a hopeful, positive force. I’m a better man because of her. Best invention in recent years? The smartphone. Seriously, think how many devices and tools this thing has replaced. Your favorite joke? (As I read a fortune cookie every time in front of my kids) “Help! I’m trapped in a fortune cookie factory.”

Other than the U.S., which country’s landscape inspires you the most? New Zealand. It’s a whole contintent’s worth of amazing landscapes crammed into one island. And it has hobbits. What would you blow your budget on? Vinyl records and a VW Microbus The one person in the industry you’d love to meet? Martha Swartz. She has great designs and seems to have fun and love what she does. One thing that you think would make the industry better? Learning more about the natural world and its processes. Newest gardening trend in your opinion? Porcelain pavers for patios What advice do you have for those starting out in the industry? Work for the best firm that will hire you and work in all the departments they will let you.

south.prolandscaperusa.com


PEOPLE

EREZ BAR

DANIELLA FERNANDEZ

JENNIFER MYERS

MANAGING PRINCIPAL, LANDSCAPE DESIGN WORKSHOP FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT WASHINGTON D.C./BALTIMORE AREA

LANDSCAPE DESIGNER, NATURE’S DREAM LANDSCAPE INC. MIAMI, FLORIDA

landscapedesignworkshop.com

landscapeprofessionals.org

naturesdreamlandscape.com

What inspired you to get into the industry? The love for the outdoors. The visceral enjoyment that you feel when experiencing a forest or the ocean, a river or a desert. I grew up in an urban environment and early on I realized that this feeling of visceral enjoyment can extend to urban spaces, a courtyard or the spaces between buildings.

If you weren’t in this industry, what would you be doing? Coaching women’s college basketball. I’ve coached girls from 5 to 15, as either a volunteer in rec leagues or as a paid high school coach. If I hadn’t found this industry I love so much, I would have seriously considered coaching as a full-time job.

What inspired you to get into the industry? I have always been fascinated with the landscape. Both my grandmas are bonsai enthusiasts and I was raised on an avocado and mango orchard. Looking for ways to produce food sustainably, I stumbled upon permaculture, a practice we instantly saw that transformed the farm into a high- yielding, diverse ecosystem.

What would you blow your budget on? Two items: a water feature and a specimen tree. I think that the experience of water in the landscape elevates the space around it. The sound, the movement and the reflection of water are fundamental features in my opinion. A specimen tree brings an ageless and timeless quality to the space. It typically takes many years to grow and reach the size and structure of such a tree. Newest gardening trend in your opinion? I think that there is an increased appreciation for quality outdoor spaces. Following the pandemic, we all know too well the importance of outdoor spaces to our basic well-being. What advice do you have for those starting out in the industry? Always follow your heart and find a mentor that you respect and can teach you the craft you wish to learn.

south.prolandscaperusa.com

What would you blow your budget on? Makeup, indoor plants and pots, travel

Other than the U.S., which country’s landscape inspires you the most? The landscape in Holland and Germany. The way they income water and wildflowers can make a landscape feel so magical and romantic like a storybook!

Best trend you are seeing? Outdoor living spaces being frequently and fully utilized. Also, a more concerted effort to include native plants and others that do well in your area.

What would you blow your budget on? Accent rocks and edging! I love the Florida Olite; exposing the ground and using the rocks to add some topography to our very flat landscape can really elevate a design.

Best piece of trivia you know? Anything and everything about pop culture. But don’t ask me what I ate for dinner last night. No idea. Couldn’t get through the week without ... coffee, NY Times crossword puzzle, cuddles from my family and pup, whatever book I’m reading …

What three things would you take to a desert island? A machete, water filter and a fire starter

Your most used saying or cliché? Happy to help! (I really am!)

Who would play you in a movie of your life? Paz Vega

Pro Landscaper USA South January/February 2022 67



Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.