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JANUARY 2O20

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

LET’S HEAR IT FROM

VIEW FROM THE TOP

100 TH ISSUE SPECIAL

CITY SERENITY

Mark Gregory, Landform Consultants

Sue Biggs on past and future industry changes

Celebrating an exciting milestone

Rosemary Coldstream’s award-winning garden


DESIGN TANK PHOTO MAX ROMMEL

Stripes Design: Lars Tornøe

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WELCOME

W E LCO M E W

elcome to the January issue of Pro Landscaper. Happy new decade! We’re very excited to get this new year off to a flying start with our 100th issue. Our very first big interview was with industry great Mark Gregory, who kindly invited us to meet with him at RHS Chelsea build-up – our first taste of the iconic industry show. So, this year, we revisited him to discuss his achievements over the last nine years, Landform’s developments, and Mark’s continuing passion for the industry. It’s clear that approaching a milestone birthday has focused his thoughts on succession planning and preparing for Landform to continue to strive as he pursues other industry-related interests. Another follow up is with Rupert Keys and Ruth Gwynn of Keyscape, who were featured on the cover of our very first issue – find out how this company has grown on page 24. We also catch up with other people featured in our first ever issue in Look Out For Revisited, page 62.

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Continuing the ‘100’ theme, check out the portfolio feature from PC Landscapes which celebrates the centenary of Exbury Gardens, located in the beautiful surroundings of the New Forest. Following a very passionate Pro Landscaper Summit debate at FutureScape 2019, we say why not let 2020 be the year of social conscience? What will you change? How will you encourage clients to respect the environment and make sure our future generations enjoy the wonder that is life on this beautiful planet earth? As always, let us know your thoughts. Have a healthy, prosperous (and environmentally friendly) new year. We look forward, as always, to meeting as many of you as possible through our events and awards throughout 2020. Happy New Year!

JIM & LISA

HAPPY NEW DECADE! WE’RE VERY EXCITED TO GET THIS NEW YEAR OFF TO A FLYING START WITH OUR 100TH ISSUE

Pro Landscaper / January 2020

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CONTENTS

INSPIRE 37 40 44

14

INFORM 08 10 14 17 24 27 28 30 31 4

Agenda Greening to greenwash? News Our monthly roundup of industry news

100 Years of Exbury Gardens PC Landscapes Isolated Bliss Acres Wild City Serenity Rosemary Coldstream Garden Design Landscape Architect’s Journal LDA Design Get Out In Front Debs Winrow 100th Issue Special Pro Landscaper through the years

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Future Projects Expo 2020 Dubai Let’s Hear It From Mark Gregory Company Profile Keyscape View from the Top Sue Biggs Attracting Valuable Projects Holly Youde The Value of a Decision Andrew Wilson A Box of Jewels Newby Hall

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50 52 55

69

NURTURE 69 74 75 76 77

Feature Garden Agius Evolution Garden The Ethics of Plastics Lewis Normand Trees for Urban Landscapes Trees and Design Action Group Provenance Versus Preference Jonathan Bourne Planting Trends for 2020 Provender Nurseries

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CONTENTS

J A N UA RY 2 0 2 0 E D U C AT E 81 82 83 84 87 89 90 92 93 96 98

The Value of Surveys Lee Bestall Exceeding Expectations Marian Barker Living Life Outside Millboard Setting the Standard Rolawn The Elephant in the Room Angus Lindsay Moving with the Times Ultra-low emission vehicles Commercial Vehicles The latest electric vans Determining Holiday Pay Changes for next year Inside The Pot Company Deciding to Diversify David Dodd Decking Product launches for 2020

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102

PEOPLE 101 102 105 106 108 111 114

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Out and About BALI Awards Out and About Landscape Institute Awards JANUARY 2O20

30 Under 30 Update Jacob Botting Life/Style Ruth Willmott What I’m Reading Nick Coslett What’s Your Role? Angelina Sooren IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Little Interviews Quick-fire questions with the individuals who make up our industry

LET’S HEAR IT FROM

VIEW FROM THE TOP

100 TH ISSUE SPECIAL

CITY SERENITY

Mark Gregory, Landform Consultants

Sue Biggs on past and future industry changes

Celebrating an exciting milestone

Rosemary Coldstream’s award-winning garden

Pro Landscaper / January 2020

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CONTRIBUTORS

CO N T R I B U TO R S Sue Biggs Pro Landscaper welcomes Sue Biggs, director general of the RHS, to this month’s View From The Top. Sue recalls the changes undertaken within the industry over the years and how the RHS has grown and blossomed.

P27

HOLLY YOUDE P28

W W W.RHS.ORG.UK @THE_RHS

Andrew Wilson This month sees Andrew Wilson discuss the processes that make up the fundamentals of design, as well as the stages carried out by his students to ensure that each element of a given design process is fully considered.

P30

DEBS WINROW P52

W W W.MCWILLIAMSTUDIO.COM @ANDREW WILSONII

Jonathan Bourne

LEWIS NORMAND P74

Jonathan Bourne explains the importance of sourcing sustainable materials and posits the idea of placing locality ahead of a client’s choice in order to work more harmoniously with the environment.

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W W W.BOURNEAMENIT Y.CO.UK @BOURNE_AMENIT Y ANDREW HIRONS P75

Marian Barker Marian Barker, the founder of Fresh Horticultural Careers – this year’s Pro Landscaper Business Awards Employer of the Year category sponsor – discusses the importance of listening to expectations and how to be a top employer.

CONTACT

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Eljays44 Ltd 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA Tel: 01903 777 570 EDITORIAL Editorial director – Lisa Wilkinson lisa.wilkinson@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 579 Head of content – Nina Mason nina.mason@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 959 393 Features writer – Rachael Forsyth rachael.forsyth@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 578 Features writer – Frankie Youd frankie.youd@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 959 394 Equipment editor – Rachel Gordon proarbeditor@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 777 570 Subeditor – Katrina Roy katrina.roy@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 959 391 Subeditor – Sam Seaton sam.seaton@eljays44.com Tel: 01903 959 391

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Printed by Pensord Press Ltd, Gwent, UK Published by ©Eljays44 Ltd – Connecting Horticulture. Pro Landscaper’s content is available for licensing overseas. Contact jamie.wilkinson@eljays44.com Pro Landscaper is published 12 times per year by Eljays44 Ltd. The 2020 subscription price is £95. Subscription records are maintained at Eljays44 Ltd, 3 Churchill Court, 112 The Street, Rustington, West Sussex BN16 3DA, UK. Articles and information contained in this publication are the copyright of Eljays44 Ltd and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publishers. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for loss of, or damage to, uncommissioned photographs or manuscripts. Whilst every effort has been made to maintain the integrity of our advertisers, we accept no responsibility for any problem, complaints, or subsequent litigation arising from readers’ responses to advertisements in the magazine. We also wish to emphasise that views expressed by editorial contributors are not necessarily those of the publishers. Reproduction of any part of this magazine is strictly forbidden.

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MANAGEMENT Managing director Jim Wilkinson Director Lisa Wilkinson Business development manager Jamie Wilkinson

Pro Landscaper / January 2020

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INFORM

AGENDA

ARE COMPANIES GREENING TO GREENWASH? Anna French

Chris Churchman

Ian Drummond

DIRECTOR, ANNA FRENCH ASSOCIATES

DIRECTOR, CHURCHMAN THORNHILL FINCH

CRE ATIVE DIRECTOR, INDOOR GARDEN DESIGN

Amazing that we even have to ask this question as we watch the forests burn, villages flood and island nations sink beneath the waves. That’s not to mention coral reefs dying, the oceans acidifying and millions of plants and animals at risk of extinction – including us if we carry on as we are. We need to stop burning fossil fuels and emitting greenhouse gases, and start implementing natural climate solutions such as large-scale tree planting and re-wilding.

Urban development is the primary source of global warming and yet, in the UK, it occupies less than 6% of our land area. For cities to pull their weight in

I think there has been a case of clients ‘greening to greenwash’ in the past, but I feel that adding any greenery to a building is a step in the right direction, so long as the design has been well considered and the planting scheme is well maintained. I have noticed a real change in attitudes over the past 12 months, possibly driven by the awareness of environmental issues. This issue is high up on the agenda as far as the public is concerned, and has been driven possibly by Extinction Rebellion and the likes of Greta Thunberg via media coverage and social media platforms. We are now approached by clients and architects at a much earlier stage to discuss interior and exterior planting.

SO DO YOUR RESEARCH, GATHER SOME SUPPORT AND THEN GET ONTO YOUR BOSSES TO MAKE SOME BIG CHANGES – THERE IS NO TIME TO WASTE Does the company I work for do everything in its power to help? This is the real question that we should be asking. If you find that it is purposely implementing a few green walls just to prove its eco-credentials, but is otherwise continuing with ‘business as usual’, then you have the right to be annoyed about that. Do your research, gather some support and then get onto your bosses to make some big changes – there is no time to waste.

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TRUE SUSTAINABILITY WILL ONLY ARRIVE WHEN WE EMBRACE THIS VAST UNTAPPED RESOURCE OF THE URBAN FABRIC AND GREEN THIS ECO DESERT offsetting emissions, a fundamental shift is required in the way that we conceive, deliver and manage development, with healthy urban greening central to this process. With elevations representing 80% of the surface area of any development, and so by definition 80% of the surface area of any city – and none of this surface considered appropriate for greening – attempts to rebalance the equation will continue to be of no consequence. Sustainability will only arrive when we embrace this vast untapped resource of the urban fabric and green this eco desert. Green facades, as currently conceived, are irrelevant. Meaningful vertical greening will only be effective and adopted when it is integral to the form of a building as its structure, not applied as retrofitted green smear.

I HAVE NOTICED A REAL CHANGE IN ATTITUDES OVER THE PAST 12 MONTHS POSSIBLY DRIVEN BY THE AWARENESS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES Biophilic design is now very much on the agenda. The results from the research of academics, such as Dr Craig Knight from the University of Exeter, in particular illustrate the important health benefits of having a well designed biophilic environment to live or work in.

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INFORM

Tim Waterman

Stephen Fell

Anna Roochove

SENIOR LECTURER IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE HISTORY AND THEORY, THE BARTLETT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, UCL

MANAGING DIRECTOR, LINDUM

MARKETING MANAGER, SCOTSCAPE

I don’t think that anyone would dispute that green spaces are vital in the urban environment, and Céline Baumann is quite right to press for a bigger role of landscape architects in urban planning. Wrapping buildings in green vegetation to satisfy planning requirements can fall into the ‘tick box’ category and needs examining more closely. I have never wanted my company to be involved with green walls because of the distinct lack of sustainability in the concept. Having to power water around a system to keep plants alive in a vertical

All businesses have an obligation to behave in a way that is responsible for both the planet and their staff. With research from around the globe

Greenwash is a ubiquitous corporate practice and it takes many forms – from a benign but weak signifier of good intentions to outright deception. What identifies all greenwash is that it is a veneer

IT IS A NEW SWEET COATING APPLIED TO THE SAME OLD BITTER PILL – A PILL THAT ISN’T HEALING ANYTHING BUT INSTEAD SICKENS US ALL applied to something that has not otherwise changed for the better. It is a new sweet coating applied to the same old bitter pill – a pill that isn’t healing anything but instead sickens us all. The problems are systemic and rooted in injustice. The family who flies its private jet for an international shopping jaunt is darkly mirrored by the family who burns down a forest because of poverty’s desperation. That’s what the veneer of greenwash is hiding. Until we think of landscape design as the strategic design of processes, practices, and relationships, rather than the deployment of empty forms and signifiers, we won’t make any progress towards sustainability, resilience, or regenerative and just design.

I DON’T THINK THAT ANYONE WOULD DISPUTE THAT GREEN SPACES ARE VITAL IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT situation does not seem to me to be a sensible use of precious resources. Added to that the fact that systems break down, often over a weekend, the result can be a very expensive wall of dying vegetation. Green roofs on the other hand are a much more attractive proposition. When correctly designed and installed, a green roof brings with it multiple advantages, including attracting biodiversity and reducing urban heat island effects. However, poor specification will result in poor results.

ALL BUSINESSES HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO BEHAVE IN A WAY THAT IS RESPONSIBLE FOR BOTH THE PLANET AND THEIR STAFF supporting the benefits that plants bring – mitigating the urban heat island effect, improving air quality and biodiversity in urban areas and being specified inside to support mental health and productivity – it is hard to argue against adorning our existing infrastructure with ‘green’. As the vertical-greening industry evolves, improvements are being made. This includes better systems, reduced water use, irrigation using rainwater harvesting, faster quicker living wall maintenance and smart remote irrigation systems to monitor water use. With 68% of the world’s population predicted to live in urban areas by 2050, it is key that the urban greening movement incorporates intelligent horticulture at the outset of new construction and landscape design, and this should never be downgraded by value engineering.

N E X T M O N T H : H O W D O YO U M A N AG E C L I E N T E X P EC TAT I O N S W H E N I T C O M E S TO P L A N T I N G ? H AV E YO U R S AY: C O N T E N T@ E L J AYS 4 4 .C O M

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INFORM

CU B E 19 94 ACH IE VES G OL D ACC RED ITATIO N W IT H IN V ESTORS IN P EOPLE

E

ssex-based design and landscaping company Cube 1994 has been awarded Investors in People Gold accreditation. It is the first residential design and build company in the UK to receive the internationally recognised achievement, and was bestowed on Cube’s first attempt. Cube has been working for a number of years to improve practices and the working environment, investing time and money in training, developing and rewarding the Cube team. Only 16% of accredited organisations achieve Gold. It is a considerable effort to earn as it requires the company to earn ‘Advanced’, the penultimate tier of four ratings, across nine different performance indicators. Investors in People, speaking of

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Cube 1994, says: “For a small business, your people and business processes are more advanced than might otherwise be expected. You understand the need and importance to actively engage your staff and include them as key players in the business and its future. “The overall findings were really very positive. All of the core responses were consistently and considerably above the overall IIP scores [for Gold].” Cube 1994’s managing director Sean Butler comments: “We are thrilled with these results and look forward to building on this success. We will continue to work with Investors in People to further develop our strategy and processes and make work better.” www.cube1994.com

©Christian Tate

NEWS

GA RD ENS A N N OUN CED FO R RHS CHELS E A FLOWER S HOW 2 02 0

C

limate change is taking centre stage at this year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show, with a number of the gardens revealed by the Royal Horticultural Society set to focus on combatting the global crisis. The world-famous show, which will take place from 19 to 23 May at the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea, will be used as a platform for brands, designers and contractors to encourage more sustainable practices and incorporate nature in urban design. Design duo Hugo Bugg and Charlotte Harris, for instance, are designing a communal residential garden for returning show sponsor M&G. This looks to promote the essential need to incorporate and maintain beautiful, sustainable green spaces within our growing cities for the benefit of the planet and people. The garden will feature repurposed materials, water management techniques, permeable surfaces and a resilient planting palette suitable for urban environments. Following similar themes are the Guangzhou China: Guangzhou Garden, designed by debut designers Peter Chmiel and Chin-Jung Chen of Grant Associates; The Facebook Garden: Growing the Future designed by Joe Perkins, who picked up a Gold medal for his garden for the same sponsor last year; and The Yeo Valley Organic Garden, designed by Tom Massey, one of Pro Landscaper’s 30 Under 30: The Next Generation winners. RHS show manager Rose Gore Browne says: “This time of year is always exciting as the themes and trends for 2020 begin to emerge, as gardens and horticulture are key to helping combat climate change, it is very encouraging to see a number of gardens addressing these issues and more designers and growers adopting suitable practices.” www.rhs.org.uk

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INFORM

FUNDING AWARDED TO IMPROVE BRIGHTON’S ROYAL PAVILION GARDEN

P

lans to restore and enhance Brighton’s Royal Pavilion Garden have been awarded funding. The National Heritage Lottery Fund has awarded initial support and development funding of £214,400 to progress plans to improve and enhance the historic garden and apply for a major National Lottery grant bid for £3.4m.

The council commissioned a conservation plan in 2018 which assessed risks to the garden’s heritage, and this has helped to shape a plan of action to improve future management and operation, interpretation, community engagement, learning and access. The plans include improving access to the garden for people with disabilities including an accessible outdoor learning space, new lighting and a secure boundary to address vandalism and anti-social behaviour. Plans also include the creation of apprenticeships and volunteering opportunities, particularly focused around horticultural therapy. Improving and protecting the Royal Pavilion Garden is a key part of the Royal Pavilion Estate project, which sees the council and Brighton Dome & Brighton Festival are working together to reunify the estate and conserve its heritage to create a world-class cultural and heritage destination. The council will aim to submit the full bid in March 2021 with work starting in January 2022. new.brighton-hove.gov.uk

NEWS IN BRIEF NURTURE LANDSCAPES’ GROWTH CONTINUES TO BE RECOGNISED Nurture Landscapes has returned to The Sunday Times’ Virgin Atlantic Fast Track 100 list, coming 65th overall. This is the company’s third inclusion in the past six years and marks its highest position. Nurture was first listed in the table in 2014, achieving a ranking of 92 out of 100, and again in 2015, when it ranked 98th. www.nurturelandscapes.co.uk

PROVENDER NURSERIES AND CAPEL MANOR CONTINUE COMPETITION Provender Nurseries and Capel Manor College continue into the eighth year of the Student Design Competition. Judges selected Clare Waters’ winning design from over 45 entries. The garden design students each had five minutes to present their design before a Q&A session with feedback from the judging panel. www.provendernurseries.co.uk www.capel.ac.uk

APL WORLDSKILLS UK CHAMPION REVEALED

N

ick Bundy of Gadd Brothers Trees and Landscapes has been named as the APL WorldSkills UK Champion having taken home the Gold at the final towards the end of last year. Each competitor spent the first of four days training and familiarising themselves with the process before being given 16 hours to individually build a garden from scratch. This garden was designed by Holly Youde, creative director of Urban Landscape Design and vice president of the APL. During the final, competitors were marked on elements such as paving, planting, lighting, health and safety and the overall appearance of the garden. The final also included a plant ident, designed to test the competitors plant knowledge. Judges for the competition included APL general manager Phil Tremayne, Steve Smith of Shore Landscapes, and 2011 WorldSkills UK Silver winner and international training manager, Simon Abbott.

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The APL also hosted the Horticulture Inclusive Skills competition on the Saturday of the show, won by David Jones from Pembrokeshire College. Kevin Stubbs

EXETER COUNCIL USING NEW KIT IN PUSH FOR CARBON NEUTRALITY

took Silver, and Dean Roberts took Bronze, both from Highbury College, Portsmouth. APL’s Inclusive Skills competitions enable young people with learning difficulties and disabilities to showcase achievements, work skills and growing independence, supporting them as they seek to enter employment. www.worldskillsuk.org

Parks staff in Exeter are moving away from traditional petrol-driven equipment in a bid to help reduce the city’s carbon footprint. It is investing in battery powered equipment, such as hedge trimmers and leaf blowers. The council is looking to create a carbon neutral city by 2030. www.exeter.gov.uk

Pro Landscaper / January 2020

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INFORM

Online Exclusives 2019 YEAR IN REVIEW An infographic looking back at some of the highlights that took place over 2019 in our industry. www.prolandscapermagazine. com/2019-year-in-review

NEW RULES ON PLANT HEALTH IN EFFECT

N

ew rules on plant health, designed to stop diseases spreading or jumping borders, came into effect on 14 December. The EU Regulation 2016/2031 on protective measures against plant pests was taken through the European Parliament by UK member Anthea McIntyre, Conservative MEP for the West Midlands. It became law in December 2016 and was directly applicable in all EU countries from December 14. McIntyre, Conservative spokesman on both agriculture and the environment, says: “Plant disease can have a devastating effect commercially, on biodiversity and the

environment generally, so it was vital that we should make ourselves more resilient. In Britain we were taught in the most direct and damaging way by ash dieback. “But it is also important to remain practical and to try not to over-burden the growers, importers, dealers and retailers who will have to make the new rules work. I believe we have got that balance right.” The new regulations on plant health will mean more effective protection, with greater focus on specific pests. New requirements will cover the movement of plants, both in and out of the EU and within the bloc. europarl.europa.eu

WHAT IS BIODIVERSITY NET GAIN? James Hewetson-Brown, managing director of Wildflower Turf Ltd explains what biodiversity net gain is and the impacts it will have on our industry. www.prolandscapermagazine. com/what-is-biodiversity-net-gain

GRANT ASSOCIATES DESIGNS LANDSCAPE STRATEGY FOR UK’S THIRD LARGEST ARENA COMPLEX THE BIG LITTLE INTERVIEW: NOEMI MERCURELLI We ask Noemi Mercurelli, landscape designer at PC Landscapes, a series of fun quick-fire questions – including some seasonal trivia. www.prolandscapermagazine. com/the-big-little-interviewnoemi-mercurelli

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TL has submitted a planning application to Bristol City Council and South Gloucestershire Council to repurpose the Brabazon aircraft hangars at the former Filton Airfield, delivering YTL Arena Complex, a new entertainment complex for Bristol and the South West. Landscape architect Grant Associates has worked in partnership with lead architect Grimshaw Architects, Manica Architecture and OPS Engineers to create the design concept. Grant Associates has been involved with the creation of Brabazon since 2015. The practice worked closely with architect Allies and Morrison on the Brabazon masterplan and developed the overall landscape strategy for the scheme, one of the largest brownfield sites in the UK. The development of a landscape strategy for YTL Arena Complex will be sympathetic to the local surroundings and the approved schemes that are already under construction at Brabazon.

YTL says sustainability is a key focus as proposals include zero waste to landfill, harvesting rainwater and installing solar panels on the vast roof area. By repurposing the existing hangars, the proposals will save more than 18,600 tonnes of carbon emissions alone. If the proposals for YTL Arena Complex are given the go ahead, YTL plans to open its doors to the public in early 2023. www.grant-associates.uk.com

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

18/12/2019 14:45


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17/12/2019 11:10


INFORM

FUTURE PROJECTS H

©Expo 2020 Dubai®

ome of The Sustainable City development and one of the fastest growing cities in the world, Dubai seems like an ideal location for the upcoming World Expo in 2020. The theme of the event is ‘Connecting Minds, Creating the Future’, bringing together 192 countries and an

MORE THAN $75M IS BEING SPENT ON LANDSCAPING ACROSS THE EXPANSIVE SITE

Expo 2020 Dubai DUBAI, United Arab Emirates

EXPO 2020 DUBAI COULD BE THE PINNACLE OF SUSTAINABILITY AS IT PUTS SOME OF THE LEADING ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATIONS ON A GLOBAL STAGE

Wildlife Fund found the United Arab Emirates to using recycled water – it aims for 95% of have the largest ecological footprint per person, condensate to be recovered from buildings. and Dubai – one of the most populous emirates And it’s not just water which will be recycled, in UAE – was decidedly one of the either. It is hoped that the majority largest contributors. (75%) of the materials used in Since 2006, Dubai appeared to temporary construction will be have doubled the number of vehicles either recycled, reused or returned. on its roads by 2015, with a report With 192 country pavilions by Dubai’s Roads and Transport displaying everything from cuisine Authority (RTA) revealing that there to culture, arts and architecture, and were 1.4m registered vehicles in having more than 20 performance the city. A taste for luxury and the venues and spaces, ensuring the bulk creation of an indoor ski slope, for of the materials used to build these example, have done little to sway are recycled will go a long way in people’s view of a frivolous, showcasing the sustainability fuel-guzzling destination either. credentials of this expo. Dubai is striving to change this, 'Sustainability' is also the topic EXPECTED though, not least through its indelible of one of three thematic districts, hosting of the World Expo 2020, the alongside 'opportunity' and 'mobility'. first of its kind to be held in the Middle Within the Sustainability District, East. More than $75m (AED277m) Singapore’s 1,500m2 pavilion will is being spent on landscaping across C O U N T R Y reside, boasting an immersive 3D the expansive site. Ahmed Al Khateeb, experience where visitors can walk PAV I L I O N S CEO of development and real estate through a green space of forest trees, at Expo 2020 Dubai, told the Emirates a hanging garden and 9m-tall garden 2 News Agency (WAM) that more than cones. Famous for its solar-powered 12,000 trees, 256,000 shrubs and ‘supertrees’, Singapore has a stellar thousands of flowering plants and reputation for showcasing sustainable herbs will be grown across urban solutions and will be playing on 2 a 220,000m2 nursery for the this at the event. numerous landscaping projects. In the Mobility District, Belgium’s A sustainability report in 2018 pavilion will also be promoting the PA R K A R E A also set out Expo 2020 Dubai’s key power of plants, creating a ‘green ark’ performance indicators (KPIs) for the which blends technology and ecology. event, which will take place over six Contractor BESIX says the 10,000 TO BE SPENT ON months from 20 October 2020 to plants used in the hanging gardens LANDSCAPING 10 April 2021. One of these is for will store up to 35t of CO2 over the 50% of the plants to be native or six-month period and will lower the adaptive species, and for 95% of the temperature by up to 5⁰C, reducing landscaped areas to be maintained ‘without the urban heat island effect. the use of chemical pesticides, herbicides Both of these are admirable, as are the aims or fertilisers’. set out by Expo 2020 Dubai, to ensure the site is The expo team is looking at ways to reduce as environmentally friendly as possible. However, water consumption across the site, too, such as it is the legacy of the area which shows how

173 DAYS

25 MILLION VISITORS

192 4.38km

SITE

©Expo 2020 Dubai®

45,000m

estimated 25 million visitors to celebrate global innovation. This will particularly focus on sustainability, and Dubai hopes to lead the charge with the creation of the 4.38km2 site, turning the arid landscape into a green oasis. This hasn’t always been the case though. In its Living Planet Report 2006, the World

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T O TA L $75.4M PROJECTS

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INFORM

©Expo 2020 Dubai®

IT’S THE LEGACY OF THE AREA WHICH SHOWS HOW INVESTED THE CITY IS IN FUTUREPROOFING

SINGAPORE PAVILION

©Singapore Pavilion, Expo 2020 Dubai

invested the city is in futureproofing. Once the event closes, the development of District 2020 will begin – a mixed-used site with 200,000m2 of commercial and residential space which will be available from late 2021. At least 80% of the infrastructure built by Expo 2020 Dubai will be reused according to its sustainability report. There will also be 48,900m2 of parks, gardens and water features, as well as 10km of bike paths and 5km of jogging tracks. The Sustainability Pavilion will be transformed into a place to visit and learn: the Children and Science Centre.

BELGIUM PAVILION

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©Expo 2020 Dubai®

Whilst some might consider Dubai's spending on development in the past a profligacy, its focus has undoubtedly changed to one where water and fuel consumption are reduced, and sustainable alternatives are being introduced. The World Expo and its legacy are hopeful exemplars of what’s to come for the glistening cityscape of Dubai.

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INFORM

Let ’s Hear it From

MARK GREGORY

special

LANDFORM CONSULTANTS PRO LANDSCAPER CELEBRATES ITS 100 TH ISSUE THIS MONTH, AND AS LONG-TIME READERS WILL REMEMBER, THE MAIN FEATURE IN THE VERY FIRST ISSUE WAS A ‘LET’S HEAR IT FROM’ WITH DESIGNER AND LANDSCAPE CONTRACTOR MARK GREGORY. READERS WON’T BE SURPRISED TO LEARN HE’S NOT GIVING UP ANYTIME SOON

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e first met Mark when he invited us to the 2011 RHS Chelsea Flower Show, where he was in the throes of building two show gardens on Main Avenue – Jim Fogarty’s Australian Garden, sponsored by the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne, and Nigel Dunnett’s RBC New Wild Garden. So, what significant changes in focus have occurred since 2011? As Mark explains, he hasn’t slowed down, but it can’t be ignored that the world around him has changed. During 2011’s Chelsea Flower Show, he was purely building, having gone back to being a contractor. He admits that he was fairly unsettled and almost felt lost for a while – but the demands of Chelsea meant it was the right thing for him to do at that time. So, how did Mark’s career change over the eight years that have followed our interview? Mark shares his most significant experiences that have happened since then: APL I’ve been able to diversify, and I’m at a point in my life where I genuinely feel like I’m living the dream. I’ve dropped some industry attachments. The APL was a big one. It was a hard decision to start with – I was upset, and missed it being a part of my life. But now many other opportunities that might not have come my way have materialised. I’m proud of what I did at the APL, but also wish I could have done more. I think my time at the APL was good because a lot of landscapers could relate to me, I was approachable and able to give time to those up-and-coming landscapers. I believe the APL

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INFORM

is in a good place now – I’d have liked to have been tied in with it somehow, but I’m still a big supporter of all that they do. London College of Garden Design I also gave up my part ownership of the London College of Garden Design – sadly I just felt I wasn’t fully giving it what I should. I haven’t taken on any other teaching roles yet as a matter of respect to the college, but I would like to go back to it at some point in the future. Landform Consultants I love the mix of things I’m now doing with Landform. The business is running very well without me being so hands-on, although I’m still very involved with lots of the technical stuff. I feel that Landform has really grown in recent years, we’ve taken on a full-time quality manager and we’re confident that the company is moving towards the next level. Landform is doing some great commercial work, as well as significant contracts, and we are looking at getting to a certain mass in order to sustain our overhead. We can now look at everything and know we can fulfil it. We don’t want to be scouring around for contracts. We market ourselves, constantly benchmark and

network, and luckily, there’s not a huge amount of competition in the realms we are getting into. I’m working on my exit, and as part of this, the business needs accrediting. We need to implement systems and develop the management team to enable me to do this. We need a blueprint for the business to continue without me. We’re working to do the right thing for the business and for the key people within it. Landform may eventually be an MBO or external buyout – but I don’t want people to think I’m retiring. I turn 60 next year, so it’s sensible to be thinking and planning this way. I definitely can’t think of anything worse than giving up just yet. Time is very precious as you get older, and you need to enjoy what you do.

I’VE BEEN ABLE TO DIVERSIFY, AND I’M AT A POINT IN MY LIFE WHERE I GENUINELY FEEL LIKE I’M LIVING THE DREAM

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INFORM

I’M PROUD OF WHAT I DID AT THE APL, BUT ALSO WISH I COULD HAVE DONE MORE Matt Moore. Like many others, we still have issues recruiting, and the industry is still facing massive challenges with this. We’re lucky to be positioned in a great location, so we are able to cherry pick our work and people. The future I see myself doing more consultation work internationally. It’s the next adventure for me. I’m still involved in a scheme in Gibraltar – doing design and soft build on a smaller park

2

1 Welcome to Yorkshire Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 ©Rachel Warne 2 A brilliantly lit project in North London ©Richard Bloom 3 Caring Wood, Kent ©Steven Wooster

I love the consultancy, judging, filming and the entire mix of everything I get to do. Most Influential In 2018, I received one of the most meaningful accolades of my career when I was announced as the overall winner in Pro Landscaper’s Most Influential awards for the landscape sector. It has been one of the most significant things to happen to me in the industry – being recognised by your peers is very humbling. The team We’ve got 64 full-time staff members now, so we’ve grown. In 2001, our employee count was somewhere in the 30s. We currently have a back room of 11, which includes all the important roles such as HR, quality and H&S. Key people in the business include designer Catherine MacDonald, commercial director Rudi Swanepoel and contracts director

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

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we developed the concept for two years ago. I see my future being centred around design and consultation work in a smaller international pond. For example, China has it sorted for commercial work, but is looking to build the domestic business. People who used to live in apartments are now buying villas, so there are some big opportunities for western designers associated with Chelsea. Currently, I still do all the visits and sales functions at Landform. I can get the smell and feel of a contract and can analyse the risks. I can also assure clients personally and convince them we are capable of doing the job.

Up-and-comers and role models When I think of up-and-coming names in the industry, my mind goes straight to people like Garden Club London’s Tony Woods and Matt Keightley, as well as the rest of the Rosebank Landscaping team, who are all doing cool stuff. The likes of Ross Conquest and Jake Catling are also brazen, enlightened and put everything into their work – all intelligent people. I’d like to think that, ethically, I’ve been a good role model. I want to be remembered as someone that raised standards in the industry. I like to treat people well. Being self-effacing keeps me grounded. I would never get complacent – if I did, it would affect me worse

5 than anyone or anything else. I’m honest and don’t try to hide or masquerade anything. Challenges outside of work My biggest challenge is getting the work-life balance right. I’ve made an effort to take more time out and do spontaneous things – I’ve cut corn in a combine harvester and flown a spitfire this year which might seem daft, but I love it. I’d say you should do something every day that you don’t want to do. We all get down, but if it happens to me, I get right back up again.

4 B  espoke metal sculpture ©Sopwell House Hotel 5 Luxury seating areas ©Cottonmill Spa 6 Welcome to Yorkshire Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 ©Rachel Warne

C O N TA C T Landform Consultants Limited The Nursery, Bagshot Road Chobham, Surrey, GU24 8DB Tel 01276 856 145

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www.landformconsultants.co.uk

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INFORM PART OF THE WEDGWOOD GARDEN TEAM

IN THE VERY FIRST ISSUE OF PRO LANDSCAPER, KEYSCAPE SPOKE TO US ABOUT A PROJECT IT WAS WORKING ON IN WORCESTERSHIRE. WE CATCH UP WITH OWNERS RUPERT KEYS AND RUTH GW YNN ABOUT HOW THE COMPANY HAS DEVELOPED SINCE AND ITS EXPERIENCE CREATING THE RHS GOLD MEDAL-WINNING WEDGWOOD GARDEN We spoke to you in 2011 in our very first issue about a project you were working on in Worcestershire. What’s changed for the company since then? Rupert: Our reputation has grown hugely since then – partly because of that article. In 2018, we celebrated our 25th anniversary. We have been very fortunate to be involved with some

WE HAVE BEEN VERY FORTUNATE TO BE INVOLVED WITH SOME AMAZING PROJECTS BOTH DOMESTICALLY AND ON THE ‘SHOW CIRCUIT’ amazing projects both domestically and on the ‘show circuit’ alongside Ruth Gwynn Associates, Ruth’s garden design practice. We’ve gained APL Awards and RHS Gold medals, and at this year’s RHS Chatsworth Flower Show we, alongside garden designer Jamie Butterworth, scooped an RHS Gold, Best in Show, Best Construction and People’s Choice Award. Ruth: On the back of creating show gardens, we have also diversified into designing and constructing sets for events such as weddings, galas and festivals. At RHS Malvern 2019, we designed and constructed a British beach scene for the main theatre stage, which involved using 20 tonnes of beach sand and six tonnes of boulders and cobbles. We have also moved premises and we now work out of an office on our small holding. It makes running the business easier – and keeps us away from the bakery in town! Rupert: In terms of our size, we haven’t grown hugely. I am still relatively hands-on and wouldn’t want to change that too much. However, 30 years of landscaping is taking its toll. Due to a change in circumstance, we are now working alongside a few other landscape contracting companies to carry out Keyscape projects. This is an exciting albeit a challenging time, but we will continue doing what we are so passionate about!

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COMPANY PROFILE

KEYSCAPE THE RHS CHATSWORTH WEDGWOOD GARDEN

PRIVATE GARDEN, WORCESTERSHIRE

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INFORM

What are some of the highs and lows you’ve experienced since 2011? Ruth: All our achievements at the RHS shows over the last few years have of course been our highs. We’ve met some great people along the way who have put their trust in us. We are so fortunate to be involved in an industry that is so talented, friendly and incredibly generous. We’re particularly proud to be heavily involved with RHS Malvern Spring and Autumn Shows and are grateful to the Three Counties Agricultural Society (TCAS) and RHS for recommending Keyscape as contractors. Rupert: I’ve also been given the opportunity to judge the APL Awards and it’s been a privilege. I’m now in my second year and it has allowed me to visit some amazing projects and meet

RUTH AND I ARE IN THE EARLY PLANNING STAGE OF SETTING UP A TRAINING ACADEMY FOR THE MIDLANDS

WEDGEWOOD GARDEN’S WATER FEATURE

ESTABLISHED 1993 RHS SILVER-GILT/GOLD MEDAL WINS 20 TOTAL INDUSTRY AWARD WINS 34

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some of the best in the business. The APL is an amazing association and plays a huge part within the industry and we are incredibly proud to be a member for over 20 years now. Fortunately, the lows have been scarce. However, as we all know, the industry is suffering from a decline of good horticultural talent. Ruth and I are in the early planning stages of setting up a training academy for the Midlands. I’m already involved with the APL Apprenticeship Programme and enjoy passing on any expertise that may help the industry’s next generation, so we feel this is the right time to do this in collaboration with promoting apprenticeship programmes within the industry as well as other land-based training bodies. Can you tell us about your experience creating the Wedgwood Garden at the RHS Chatsworth Flower Show? Rupert: When Jamie Butterworth asked us if we wanted to be involved, having met us at RHS Malvern 2018, I instantly said yes. Before we could start the project there were some restrictions at Chatsworth. Whenever we wanted to carry out any excavation work, an archaeologist had to be present to record any piece of stone that was extracted from the ground. However, the RHS was so efficient and quick to deal with things that it didn’t hold us up too much. The back wall also took twice as long

as we thought. None of us had worked with Vande Moortel walling bricks before, and this presented a huge challenge, especially as we only wanted shadow gap joints. As with all show gardens, the attention to detail was really important and it all paid off in the end. Ruth: The garden has a new lease of life now. We rebuilt part of it with the amazing ‘Mark Everleigh’ oak table and benches at the Wedgwood factory, and the staff now use the space for meetings and lunch breaks. Rupert: We felt privileged to be asked by Jamie to be involved and we got to work with some incredibly talented teams. We had a great group of volunteers as well, who we can’t thank enough. How much do you think the industry has changed since 2011? Rupert: Apart from the decline in qualified horticulturists, there has become an ever-increasing source of products available. I am a great fan of natural products and try to use them when we can. However, porcelain paving, composite decking and resin brush-in grout systems have made an impact in recent years. Products such as the resin grouts allow us to complete contracts on time, opposed to the traditional methods that are dependant on weather conditions. How do you see Keyscape growing in the next nine years? Rupert: We are fortunate enough to have farm buildings at our premise, so we will be concentrating on developing our training academy for future horticulturists and other training bodies. I’ve also started carrying out independent consultation to other companies to help them develop in their business. Hopefully, given my experience, I can offer a more independent and fresh view on their future growth. Ruth: We are also about to start the development of a garage conversion. We’ll use it as a holiday let but also to accommodate the students that enrol on the courses we’ll be providing. We are also in the process of developing a British cut flower farm, something which should be an exciting endeavour!

C O N TA C T Keyscape Landscape Design & Construction Ltd Tel 01386 462 790 Email rupert@keyscapegardens.co.uk

www.keyscapegardens.co.uk

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INFORM

S U E B I G GS VIEW FROM THE TOP

SUE BIGGS REFLECTS ON HOW THE INDUSTRY HAS CHANGED OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS, INCLUDING THE RHS, AND THE GROWING FOCUS ON ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS

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DRY GARDEN AT RHS GARDEN HYDE HALL

THE AGE-OLD ADAGE OF ‘RIGHT PLANT, RIGHT PLACE’, IT SEEMS, HAS NEVER BEEN MORE TRUE The age-old adage of ‘right plant, right place’, it seems, has never been more true. The Dry Garden at RHS Garden Hyde Hall is a good example of this. Designed by Matthew Wilson and Chris Carter and planted in 2000, the garden boasts more than 400 species of

plants that originate from low rainfall areas, including the Mediterranean, South Africa, South America, Australia and California, alongside a topsoil mixed with sand and grit to provide appropriate drainage. Needless to say, it hasn’t been watered since being planted and has positively thrived in recent years – erupting into a riot of colour in summer and providing fabulous structural interest from autumn. Perhaps unsurprisingly, gardens that highlight ways to combat climate change, or those that can alleviate some of its pressures, will take centre stage this year at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. This includes Hugo Bugg and Charlotte Harris’ community garden for M&G, which explores the role that green spaces can play in cityscapes while an increasing number of designers are incorporating elements that support the environment and wildlife. The industry will continue to play an important part in inspiring the UK’s army of 27 million gardeners to prepare and plant their plot for the benefit of the environment. I know I’m not alone when I say we’re up for turning the challenge – a big one we shouldn’t underestimate – into opportunity, getting more people engaged and gardening more for the sake of our planet.

ABOUT SUE BIGGS Sue Biggs joined the RHS as director general in 2010 with 30 years’ experience in the leisure industry. She has led changes to make the RHS more inclusive and forward-thinking, including a £160m Investment Programme. Sue was made a CBE in the 2017 for services to the environment and horticulture.

www.rhs.org.uk

Sue Biggs portrait ©RHS/Anna McCarthy

alleviate rising temperatures and capture pollution. We now know, for example, that if you want to capture particulate matter, you should plant a cotoneaster and hawthorn to ease demands on drains during downpours.

©RHS/Jason Ingram

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hen Pro Landscaper published its first print edition, way back in 2011, the world was a different place. Peat was still heralded as the pinnacle of growing media and busy lizzies had fallen out of favour, having largely been wiped out by downy mildew. How times have changed. As we mark the occasion of Pro Landscaper reaching 100 issues, it feels like an opportune time to reflect, not only on how far horticulture in the UK has come (for example, the RHS no longer sells peat), but also where it is going. In 2019 – in large part thanks to David Attenborough and Greta Thunberg – the public coalesced around the need to protect our planet, and gardening is increasingly becoming one of the more accessible ways to do that. Of course, the RHS has championed the benefits of plants, for people and planet, for more than two centuries. But the role of gardens in helping us to mitigate some of the biggest environmental issues we face – flooding, pollution, habitat loss and rising temperatures – has become increasingly important as they take on roles formerly delivered by the natural environment. Even in the most populated cities, green spaces account for half of the surface area, with the UK’s 22 million domestic gardens thought to cover as much as a quarter of towns and cities. What we grow in these spaces and how we manage them will, therefore, have a huge impact – both positive and negative. In the RHS Gardening in a Changing Climate report, and in subsequent science research, we’ve shown that clever design and plantings can help mitigate flooding, weather drought,

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WHAT WERE YOU DOING IN 2011 AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE?

INFORM

H O L LY YO U D E

Everything has completely changed! We’ve grown, won awards, taken on premises, built show gardens, joined APL and BALI, started doing commercial work, started reading Pro Landscaper, started writing in Pro Landscaper – basically, we have got out into the wider industry, which, in turn, brings opportunity and support. Prior to 2011 we stayed in our own little bubble!

ATTRACTING MORE VALUABLE PROJECTS HOLLY YOUDE VENTURES INTO THE DAUNTING PROCESS OF TAKING YOUR BUSINESS UP TO THE NEXT TIER OF PROJECTS

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f you have decided to grow your landscaping business and are taking on more staff and turning around more work, you are likely to get to the point where a smaller value project just isn’t feasible anymore. Nobody wants to turn away work, and lower value projects are often easier, quicker and less hassle. However, the logistics of running several smaller projects may make you realise that it’s not a great long-term business decision. We got to a point where we found the organisation and logistics of tools and machinery, materials and staff were taking up too much energy. The minute one project was up and running, you were having to set up the next, leaving no down time. We longed for the luxurious lull you get when a project is underway, running smoothly and you can leave the team to it for a little while and take a breath.

THE LOGISTICS OF RUNNING SEVERAL SMALLER PROJECTS MAY MAKE YOU REALISE THAT ITS NOT A GREAT LONG TERM BUSINESS DECISION Because of this, we took the decision to turn down projects below a certain value, unless they were an existing customer. Only you can decide what that value is, whether it is £5k, £50k or £100k, but make it suit you. Now, here’s the uncomfortable bit. Given that you are turning down the lower value work, you will need to

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attract higher value work instead. But how do you make the jump? As your ideal client shifts, you need to adjust your core message appropriately. You may need to update your branding to reflect a higher value service, or review your website design and functionality. A well-executed design emulates the quality and professionalism in your core work. With this in mind, it doesn’t have to be

A PARTICULAR SPECIALISM IS ALWAYS ATTRACTIVE TO A CLIENT, SO MAKE SURE YOU PROMOTE WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM OTHERS able to help but recommend you to others – it’s a good marketing strategy! A particular specialism is always attractive to a client, so make sure you promote what sets you apart from others. What else could you offer to make your service more valuable and desirable? Finally, one thing not to forget when pricing larger projects is to build in a contingency. Cover yourself and don’t get caught short when things don’t go exactly to plan.

complicated; simple is often best, clean and clear with high quality photography. Do some research, look at websites of similar companies and try to see them from a customer point of view. What would you be looking for if you were searching for a high quality landscaper? Speak to others in the industry – there are plenty out there who have been in the same position and will be willing to share some wisdom! Be confident in what you do, play to your strengths and don’t sell something you are not certain you can deliver. Your reputation is key to future works, especially as you pick up larger projects. If you give excellent customer service and deliver a good result, the client will not be

A B O U T H O L LY Y O U D E As joint director of Urban Landscape Design Ltd, Holly plays a fundamental role in the growth and diversification of Urban Landscape Design. Recent wins for the company include the Pro Landscaper Business Awards Landscape Company <£2m Turnover Award, Best Commercial Garden at the APL awards, Employer Excellence Award in the BALI Awards and the High Sheriff of Cheshire Award for Enterprise. This year, Holly has been listed as one of the Business Insider’s 42 Under 42 entrepreneurs in the North West, and is now the first female vicechairman of the APL.

www.urbanlandscapedesign.co.uk

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

16/12/2019 09:04


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04/12/2019 16:56:24 17/12/2019 11:11


WHAT YOU WERE DOING IN 2011 AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE?

INFORM

2011 saw LCGD move to RBG Kew and the college has grown tremendously since. We are about to open a partner college in Melbourne too. In 2017, my wife was diagnosed with cancer, changing our outlook on life. I now design with Gavin as a consultant, aiming to re-set the life/work balance.

ANDREW WILSON WHAT’S THE VALUE OF A DECISION?

ANDREW WILSON EXPLORES THE PROCESS AT THE HEART OF DESIGN – ONE THAT MANY COMING INTO THE PROFESSION FIND TO BE A SHOCK TO THE SYSTEM

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esign is a decision making process – a point I make to virtually every prospective student coming to interview and a point I make again in my first lecture each year when I tackle design principles and process. The design process is often overlooked or disregarded as a means of moving from a problem site, an empty space or a dysfunctional landscape. Most in the media brush it aside as insufficiently interesting, preferring the end result or the big reveal after construction and planting is complete. In their first real design project, our students take the lid off a Pandora’s box, identifying a wide range of inputs that need to be considered in developing their design thinking. I often describe this as a design triangle – the three points of that triangle being the site, the client brief and the designers themselves. In researching the site, the designer considers factual information – its history, soils, drainage, vegetation, climate and micro-climate, orientation, dimensions, levels, materiality, exposure and so on. The designer must also respond emotionally to that site through their site analysis or assessment. Some gardens and landscapes will have easily identifiable qualities and inherent characteristics – perhaps an atmosphere that needs to be identified. Other sites will be dull, sterile and lacking in character, making them much more challenging to pin down and describe. Despite initial reactions, I suggest to students that there will be something positive or worthwhile about every site they consider – they just have to find it. The amount of information flowing in as a result of this process alone is considerable,

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but designers also then need to deal with their client and the requirements identified in their brief. Functional, environmental and aesthetic considerations need to be balanced, but also designers must prioritise requests. Some requirements will prove core to the design, others will be little more than wishful thinking on the client’s part, to be sidelined in the design process as decisions are made. The third and final point of the triangle is the designer. Their experience and preferences dictate the geometry and layout patterns they choose as well as the atmosphere they want to create to deliver spatial character and mood. A whole range of decisions come into play as options and alternatives are considered in the production of a design solution that draws all of these aspects together in some way. It’s exciting when the client says yes to the proposals before the decision-making starts in earnest and as detailed considerations click in. Materials, junctions, finishes, edges, drainage and lighting provide food for thought in construction, juggled alongside detailed planting associations, species selection (sizes and specifications) and soil preparation. Planting design itself is a huge undertaking as a growing

range of options present themselves to designers at every turn. Most designers would admit that this is the most time consuming and challenging aspect of garden design, albeit often the most rewarding. The main issue is that most of this thinking time – which is not always linked to the computer or drawing board – is hidden, worked through out of sight and delivered in selected drawings that do not tell the full story. For those seeking a career change, this aspect needs careful consideration as it can take over your life. For those working with or employing a designer, have some respect and consider how design responses emerge and develop into the drawings you see. Looks can be deceiving, as they say. Pictured: Belsize Park garden by Andrew Wilson

ABOUT ANDREW WILSON Andrew Wilson is a landscape and garden design consultant, director of the London College of Garden Design, and an author, writer and lecturer.

www.lcgd.org.uk

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n recent years, the importance of green spaces – whether in the form of large public parks or privately-owned gardens – has become recognised across the whole of society in relation to improving the quality of people’s lives. For instance, at a time of shrinking National Health Service funds, getting out into the fresh air and spending time in places of great natural beauty is seen as essential to both mental and physical wellbeing. Meanwhile, from an environmental perspective, taking care of these spaces is now regarded as an integral part of a wider global effort, with the stakes being nothing less than the long-term survival of human life on the planet. With that in mind, it’s probably no surprise that, during the same period, initiatives aimed at raising the profile of the aforementioned green spaces have also become increasingly important. Many of these take the form of awards, with some of the most well-known

LUCINDA COMPTON

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A box of

JEWELS

FOLLOWING A SECOND HISTORIC HOUSES GARDEN OF THE YEAR AWARD WIN, PRO LANDSCAPER VISITS NEWBY HALL IN YORKSHIRE TO SPEAK WITH CURATOR LUCINDA COMPTON ABOUT WHY THE HOUSE AND GARDENS ARE SO SUCCESSFUL including Britain in Bloom – the RHS’s celebration of community gardening – as well as the likes of the prestigious Historic Houses Garden of the Year, which focuses on privately-run estates. The aim of the Historic Houses award is to identify which of these often incredibly beautiful sites has resonated most profoundly with the public. It was won this year by Newby Hall in Yorkshire, the grounds of which is made up of 40 acres of exquisitely tended gardens and woodland. Newby Hall – which receives around 140,000 visitors a year – is the first garden to scoop the award twice, with the first occasion being back in 1986. This provides incontrovertible evidence not only of the care with which the space is managed, but also its incredibly successful evolution over time. Across the generations Located near Ripon, North Yorkshire, Newby Hall in its current form dates back to the 17th century, when the house was designed and built with the assistance of Sir Christopher Wren. It is currently in the hands of Richard and Lucinda Compton, whose ancestor Major Edward Compton developed the latest version of the gardens at the beginning of the 1920s.

The site has had a house for a long time, beginning in the Tudor period, and that property has always been intimately tied up with the garden which has grown up around it.

PEOPLE ARE JUST INCREDIBLY FOND OF COMING HERE, AND ONCE THEY’VE FOUND IT, THEY HAVE A TENDENCY TO COME BACK AGAIN AND AGAIN When the Tudor house was knocked down and Wren began his work around 1680, plans were also carried out to build a traditional 17th century garden at the same time. That consisted of square compartments around the main property, with avenues of lime trees radiating outwards. The bones of that can still be seen in the layout of the space today. The site evolved again in the 18th century, when Thomas White, who worked with Capability Brown, was brought in to look again

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2 at the design. He created the duck pond, as well as views out to the river and the hills. Giving an overview of why the site is so popular, Lucinda – the garden’s curator – says: “We really are incredibly lucky in terms of where we’re situated, with the house sitting at the top of the site and the River Ure down at the bottom. We’re also surrounded by some of the most extraordinary natural beauty, with the Pennines to the west and the Vale of York to the

east. It’s a well-visited area when it comes to tourism.” Returning to the history of Newby Hall, the garden evolved towards its current form through efforts carried out by successive generations of the Compton family. This began with the aforementioned Major Edward Compton who continued his work until the 1960s, at which point his son Robin took over. Robin would later be referred to in his Daily

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Telegraph obituary as the “presiding genius” at Newby Hall. It was in the 20th century that Newby really took off when it came to the garden, as well as attracting visitors. Speaking of the part her family has played, Lucinda says: “Robin’s work was incredible, and he was responsible for introducing a lot of really wonderful rare trees and shrubs. “He developed several other smaller gardens around the site as well, and there are now probably about 20 different areas across the formal garden, all of which are well loved.” In full bloom As mentioned, Newby Hall is the first site to win the Historic Houses Garden of the Year award more than once, something which quite rightfully gives Lucinda a huge amount of satisfaction. It’s also doubly pleasing, however, due to the fact that the award is ultimately voted on by members of the public themselves. According to a press release published in October 2019, around of a third of the votes cast went to Newby Hall. As to why she thinks the site might be so popular, Lucinda says: “I think one reason is that people see it as a garden for all seasons, so there’s always something to see. When it’s in full bloom, the Autumn Garden is like a box of jewels – full of salvias, dahlias, and hydrangeas.

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“Another reason is that people are just very fond of coming here, and once they’ve found it, they have a tendency to come back again and again.” Another major factor of course is just how beautiful the site is, both from a design point of view as well as the standard up to which everything is maintained. Discussing why she thinks Newby is so renowned from a horticultural point of view, Lucinda says: “We’ve got fantastic soil, which means that we can grow a large range of plants.”

WHEN IT’S IN FULL BLOOM, THE AUTUMN GARDEN IS LIKE A BOX OF JEWELS Indeed, the Vale of York where Newby Hall is situated is famous for being very fertile. The soil varies from sandy loam to a slightly more acidic area along the river. Newby Hall also benefits from a milder temperature due to it being almost at sea level. The site gets very little wind, primarily thanks to a windbreak built by Edward Compton in the 1920s. Lucinda explains: “It used to be fairly windy as a site, which obviously is no good for more fragile

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6 plants and trees, which have a tendency to snap off or blow down. Edward waited 10 years for the windbreak to grow up before he started to plant.” As well as factors related to the site itself, another key reason for the success of Newby Hall is the care with which it’s maintained, something which begins with the Comptons themselves, approaching the task with unmistakable energy and devotion. Outlining the crewing and management structure, Lucinda says that, as the curator, she makes the majority of the decisions, working in close conjunction with the head gardener. The family also employ a deputy head gardener, with five gardeners, alongside a number of other horticultural experts, each of whom are responsible for their own areas across the site. “I’ve been doing this for something like 10 years now, having been trained up by my father-in-law.” Lucinda says. “He really took me under his wing when we first moved in and talked me through every aspect of the garden. My background before that was actually as a furniture restorer, although I had also volunteered at the Chelsea Physic Garden.” All of Newby Hall’s gardeners are responsible for their own areas, the idea of which is to give them a sense of ownership around what they’re doing. Different work areas include the Autumn Garden, greenhouses,

7 propagation, the Cornus collection, the Rock Garden, Sylvia’s Garden, Rose Garden, a water garden, tropical garden, orchard garden, woodland garden and the herbaceous border – one of the largest in the country. Newby Hall’s spectacular garden is one of the true jewels of British horticulture and has been deservedly recognised as such with its recent award wins. If the history of the site – and of the current owners’ involvement in it – is anything to go by, it would be no surprise if there were even greater things ahead. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

 View of herbaceous borders from River Ure  Azalea lutea in flower at Newby  South front of the Hall  Iris is planted throughout Robin’s Walk  Newby Hall’s rhododendrons close up  The Lily Pond’s focal sculpture  The Royal Scot Steam Locomotive crossing the Rock Garden bridge ©Charlotte Graham 8  The Newby Estate from the air

C O N TA C T Newby Hall & Gardens, Ripon, North Yorkshire, HG4 5AE Tel 01423 322 583 Email info@newbyhall.com

www.newbyhall.com

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PROJECT D E TA I L S Project value £222k Build time 5 months Size of project 885m2 Awards Principal award winner for the Hard Landscaping Construction (non-domestic) Under £500k category at the BALI National Landscape Awards 2019

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100 YE ARS CENTENARY GARDEN, EXBURY PC LANDSCAPES E X B U R Y G A R D E N S F E AT U R E S M O D E R N M AT E R I A L S A N D A M O D E R N P L A N T I N G S T Y L E , W H I L S T PAY I N G HONOUR TO THE RICH HISTORY OF THE EXBURY HOUSE, A NEOCLASSICAL MANSION BELONGING T O T H E R O T H S C H I L D FA M I LY

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estled within 200 acres of woodland, lining Beaulieu River, Exbury Gardens offers an array of world-famous plants and historical gardens. This year celebrated 100 years since Lionel de Rothschild saw the potential for the site and began its transformation into the contemporary haven it is today. In honour of this milestone, PC Landscapes was contracted to create the Centenary Garden in collaboration with MarieLouise Agius, Lionel de Rothschild’s great-granddaughter. Brief The brief was to create a garden that was different from, yet complementing, the existing gardens. Exbury Gardens is predominantly a woodland garden with an extraordinary diverse collection of rare trees and shrubs, with the core collection of rhododendrons and azaleas at the heart of the original planting, which has matured over the last 100 years. Marie-Louise Agius wanted to add to the garden and visitors’ experience by focusing on late flowering in summer and autumn and herbaceous perennials. The garden was planned

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5 1 R  othschild family crest set within paving 2 Royal visit opening ceremony 3 Perennial border 4 Echinacea 5 Eryngium 6 Overhead drone image 7 Bespoke oak pergola

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within good time, allowing for several growing seasons to mature before being opened up to the public. Design and build PC Landscapes was presented the plans for the site by Marie-Louise Agius. Having collaborated before, Marie-Louise Agius worked closely with PC Landscapes to make technical adjustments to the detailed elements of the designs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one being to reuse the old greenhouse iron runners to form climber supports. It soon became evident from their condition they would not stand unsupported, so a local metal worker was called in to recondition them. Additional supports and bars were also added to the plans. PC Landscapes took the gate and pergola drawings to its joiner to create the oak timber work. The style of the pergola was to reflect that of an existing pergola in the adjacent garden. Set in an old unused tennis court, new entrances were cut into the existing 3m-high Taxus hedges. Self-binding gravel paths lead to a central sunken area, enhancing the 3D space which features the Rothschild Five Arrows. The familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historical coat of arms is inlaid in black Caledonian slate, set into Yorkstone paving. The cloud-pruned evergreen azaleas that surround the bespoke curved timber bench are also tribute to the unique collection of rhododendron and azaleas of the garden. The 885m2 garden includes over 2,000 plants, many of those chosen to complement the surrounding gardens with late summer and autumn flowering perennials. With no specific colour palette, the focus was on plant performance, textures and form. Key structural plants found in the gardens include, Ginkgo biloba running through the main planting beds, Heptacodium miconioides, Hydrangea paniculata, Rhus typhina contrasting with the existing yew in the north-west corner, and Miscanthus running in swathes between the Ginkgo. Challenges Set in an old tennis court, the first challenges were to deal with the poor drainage on site. A large area of hard landscaping was lifted and excavated back to the original levels. New drainage was installed and designed to allow for any potential flash floods. Combining the curved steps and rotating slopes into the sunken area proved to be a challenge for the PC Landscapes team. The central area was excavated to required levels, and a fixed central line was established to create the shape and ensure the exact

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measurements for the bespoke stonework and paving. Blockwork faced with bricks to match the old existing buildings were used to create its walls, and 6mm steel edgings were installed to create the outline for the Golden Amber selfbinding gravel paths. After two years of growing and maturing, the gardens opened to the public in 2019, and had scores of beautiful shrubs, climbers and perennials in full bloom, providing a peaceful and fragrant spot for the public to explore.

A BOU T P C L A N DSCA P ES PC Landscapes is an established multi-awardwinning landscape design and build company based in Farnham, Surrey. Founder Paul Cowell is a charted landscape architect who, over the past 20 years, has worked closely with a range of professionals and private clients from concept to completion, to create exceptional external spaces that complement the home, lifestyle and environment.

www.pclandscapes.co.uk

REFERENCES Stone Rand and Asquith www.randandsquith.co.uk Waterjet UK www.waterjetuk.com Gravel Breedon Special Aggregates www.breedon-special-aggregates.co.uk Plants Deepdale Nurseries www.deepdale-trees.co.uk Orchard Dene www.orcharddene.co.uk Hortus Loci www.hortusloci.co.uk Bespoke timber Folly Patterns www.follypatterns.co.uk

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BLISS

BLUE DOORS GARDEN ACRES WILD T H I S R E M O T E H O U S E A N D G A R D E N A R E L O C AT E D O N T H E E D G E O F T H E N O R F O L K E S TAT E I N T H E H E A R T O F T H E S O U T H D O W N S N AT I O N A L PA R K , N E A R A R U N D E L

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PROJECT D E TA I L S Project value £150k Build time 6 months Size of project 1,700m2 Awards SGD Awards Finalist 2020

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ocated in the heart of the South Downs, this garden is just under half an acre in size. The house is located against the flint wall of the estate on the higher, west side of the garden with the land falling away to the east, with stunning views across the Arun Valley. Client brief The brick and flint cottage had been recently extended and refurbished as a weekend retreat. The clients wanted a simple, relaxed and timeless garden which would enhance the house and sit comfortably within the downland setting. Planting was to form a key part of the design and had to be bold yet simple to complement the scale, colours and patterns of the countryside, as well as being relatively easy to maintain and having year-round appeal. Design and build The hard landscape design is strong and modern in character, enhancing the remnants of a previous garden. Wide brick steps and a neat square lawn on the east side provide a formal setting for the house, whilst the largest garden area to the north is softer and more natural, creating a visual link to the undulating countryside beyond the flint boundary walls.

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A dining terrace is located outside the kitchen on the south side, connected to a seating area with a central brick fire pit. A further smaller terrace is located on the north side of the house to catch the early morning sun and enjoy views across the valley. Plant choice for the project was limited due to the garden sitting on chalk, and early on in the process the colour palette was restricted to soft blues, mauve, lime and white, harmonising with the colours of the landscape and sky. Ornamental grasses and mound-forming evergreens were used to reflect the textures in the surrounding fields and mimic the clumps of trees seen in the distant views. Key evergreens featured in the scheme include Hebe rakaiensis, used to hug the sides of the steps, Lavandula angustifolia â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hidcoteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, which edges the formal lawn, and Buxus sempervirens, which contains the small vegetable garden. Cistus x hybridus, Choisya ternata, Viburnum tinus and white-flowered hydrangeas provide structure to the sweeping borders, with Helleborus

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The view north over the Arun Valley The sweeping border enclosing the north lawn Brick steps and Breedon gravel paths The morning terrace on the houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s north side

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argutifolius and Euphorbia x martini, providing additional evergreen foliage. These lime green spring flowers complement the thousands of spring bulbs planted in bold swathes throughout the massed grasses and summer flowering perennials.

5 Challenges Acres Wild worked with the house builders rather than specialist landscape contractors on this particular job and found more liaison and site visits were required than normal. However, once the builders understood that gardens require just as much precision as buildings, they proved to be excellent installers. The builders undertook the first phase of the project, which consisted of all the hard landscaping around the house and down to the carport, including landscaping elements such as the brick and flint walls, brick steps, stone paving and gravel drive surfacing.

5 The Posh Shed glimpsed across the garden 6  The arrival garden replaces the former drive 7 Planting softens the approach to the front door 8 The house nestling into its new garden setting 9  Roses and Nepeta line the paths and steps 10 The fire pit built into the terrace 11 The dining terrace outside the kitchen

ABOUT ACRES WILD Debbie Roberts and Ian Smith started Acres Wild in 1988, specialising in the design and masterplanning of larger country gardens. The duo have worked internationally, but now prefer to take on projects closer to home in Sussex, Surrey and Kent. Debbie and Ianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gardens have won the SGD Large Residential Garden Design Award three times, including the Grand Award in 2014.

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REFERENCES Plants Provender Nurseries www.provendernurseries.co.uk BEFORE

Palmstead Nurseries www.palmstead.co.uk Knoll Gardens www.knollgardens.co.uk Morisca limestone Rock Unique www.rock-unique.com

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Carport The Classic Barn Company www.oakgarages.com Shed The Posh Shed Company www.theposhshedcompany.co.uk Kinetic sculpture David Watkinson www.davidwatkinsonsculpture.co.uk

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Bench Tom Nicholson Smith www.tomnicholsonsmith.com

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SERENITY LO N D O N G A R D E N R E VA M P ROSEMARY COLDSTREAM GARDEN DESIGN GARDENS CAN PROVIDE A PEACEFUL REFUGE FROM THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF CITY LIFE, AND ROSEMARY COLDSTREAM GARDEN D E S I G N T U R N E D T H I S L O N D O N G A R D E N I N T O J U S T T H AT, W I T H M U LT I P L E D I S T I N C T L A N D S C A P E D A R E A S

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he client wished to renovate and improve their garden, coinciding with the renovation of their house. As entrances and exits to the house were being relocated, it was a great opportunity to rethink external spaces too. Brief and design The front garden needed to make the clients feel good as they arrived home. To create this sense, the design, planting and lighting provided formality and practicality with the calming effect of plenty of green plants. Paths and levels also needed to be simplified and made more practical. The back garden is viewed daily, so needed to work year-round to provide

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PROJECT D E TA I L S Project value £360k (exc. VAT) Build time 10 Months Size of project 650m2 Awards Principal winners for ‘Design Excellence Over £100k’ and ‘Registered Designer & Registered Contractor Joint Submission’ at BALI National Landscape Awards 2019

interest for the whole family, as well as spaces to entertain and relax in. The seasonal changes keep the space invigorated throughout the year. The third space was a first-floor roof which gave Rosemary Coldstream Garden Design the opportunity to plant with lots of colour and scented plants without obstructing the views to the garden. The front and back gardens were fairly traditional in character with riven paving and overgrown trees and shrubs. Rosemary Coldstream Garden Design knew during the build most of the existing plants would have to be removed for either the building works or for space to store materials.

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Bespoke stepping stone slabs to dining terrace The dining terrace nestled within planting Sofa, firepit and the outdoor kitchen Hydrangea ‘Black Steel Zebra’, Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ and Betula pendula

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Build The front garden and driveway were landscaped in seamless detail with sophisticated blue-grey granite, accompanied by rich planting to soften the space. A black planet paddle stone sculpture makes a bold statement. After dark, light permeates the stones from within, illuminating the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core to dramatic effect. Bespoke paving was designed to minimise the number of joints and provide a spacious feel to the gardens. Smooth Yorkstone pavers flow through the spaces, connecting the back garden to the house which is used as a space for entertaining and relaxing, featuring outdoor sofas. Pleached trees, shrubs, perennials and grasses bring subtle changes in colour throughout the year and sparks of bright accents. Cedar trellis unifies the boundaries, while complementing the designed cedar shed. Construction of the rear basement extension posed a significant environmental challenge, with the solution being to create a garden above it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an area that might otherwise have been paved over. A lawn was fashioned with raised planting beds, with trees being introduced using custom stem heights to balance each side of the garden. A luxurious roof garden with lavenders, thyme and sedums provide a private space to feel connected to nature in the heart of London. The water feature pump pit required a special access hatch under the back terrace. Due to the heavy clay soil, water was sitting around the basement edge. This was channelled into land drains running the full perimeter of the basement and fed into a soakaway under the lawn.

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5 Terraced granite beds with Dark Planet Sculpture 6 Sawn Yorkstone paving flows through the garden

BEFORE

BEFORE

PAVING

REFERENCES Contractor Landform consultants www.landformconsultants.co.uk Water feature Tills Innovation www.waterfeaturespecialist.co.uk Garden furniture Coco Wolf www.cocowolf.co.uk

DURING WORKS

Challenges With multiple trades on site, protecting work as it was finished was one of the toughest challenges for Rosemary Coldstream Garden Design. Areas were taped off and shoe covers were utilised if workers needed to walk over the paving. The paving slabs were extremely large, therefore safety handling was critical for the team. Access to the back was via a scaffold ramp located on the right side of the house, leaving limitations with the machinery that could be used and material that could be barrowed in. Access was also hindered by the various trades on site. The builders continued to work externally which meant consideration of others and their safety was of paramount importance. The roof garden had varying finishing levels. Having a garden, not a sedum roof was of great importance to the client, meaning that the central area was to be built up with bespoke metal edging, which proved a challenge for the designers.

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Every detail in the garden has been carefully designed, from the taps and bespoke pipe stands to the size of the pavers and edge details. The coordination of all the different elements in the garden were superbly executed. The bold imaginative design resulted in a garden that exceeded the expectations of the discerning clients.

ABOUT ROSEMARY COLDSTREAM GARDEN DESIGN Founded in 2006, Rosemary Coldstream Garden Design is an award-winning design practice with a reputation for creating gardens of exceptional quality. Taking on projects of all magnitudes, Rosemary Coldstream Garden Design consists of four designers with diverse qualifications.

www.rosemarycoldstream.com

Outdoor kitchen Steininger Kitchen www.steininger-designs.at Dark Planet water feature David Harber www.davidharber.co.uk Firepit Solus www.products.solusdecor.com Plants Deepdale Trees www.deepdale-trees.co.uk Plants Europlants www.europlants.net Plants Orchard Dene www.orcharddene.co.uk

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TREX TRENDS FOR 2020 Last year saw the launch of the expanded Trex decking collection, giving homeowners and installers even more opportunities to create their perfect deck. As well as the beautiful Trex Transcend® range, the world’s number 1 decking brand now offers the Trex Enhance® Naturals collection and the Trex Enhance® Basics range – and with more products comes more colours to choose from. The Trex range gives homeowners the chance to create a personal colour palette that perfectly matches their style: and we’ve picked out the ones to watch out for in 2020! Trex Transcend Island Mist remains the most popular colour in the range, and its reign looks set to continue this year. Its stylish grey tones make it the ideal match for those wanting to create a modern outdoor space.

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But for those wanting a more cost-effective solution, Clam Shell, from the Trex Enhance Basics collection, looks set to be a key colour for this year. This monochromatic solid grey colour creates a striking effect – especially when combined with brightly coloured flowers and plants. Rocky Harbor and Foggy Wharf caused a stir at FutureScape last November – these natural-inspired tones look fantastic individually, but create a truly eye-catching effect when used in combination. In fact, look out for complementary colour combinations: with 11 colours to choose from, the options are practically endless, and we’re expecting to see more contrasting borders, fascias and design features – think Foggy Wharf and Spiced Rum, or Calm Water and Gravel Path.

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TAKING INSPIRATION FROM THE TREXPROS Last year saw a record number of entries to the second annual Arbordeck Awards – with our TrexPROs leading the way with their intricate designs and technical excellence. Simon Thomas Carpentry, a TrexPRO Platinum installer, took the top prize with his innovative Island Mist deck featuring a four-pointed star picked out in contrasting Island Mist and Gravel Path Trex Transcend boards. The intricacy of this work and his technical ability in creating something so unique caught the eye of the judges, with Andy Tudbury of Halcyon Days Garden Design commenting: “The integration of the star image really stood out - a lot of thought and design skill had gone into it, picking up on the orientation of the deck in relation to the vast amount of open ‘night sky’ at the site.” Manor Construction, a TrexPRO since September 2019, took the ‘Best Trex Design Solution’ accolade with an innovative deck that made the most of the existing features of the space. The deck featured moveable benches constructed from Trex surrounding a glass table positioned over a skylight – allowing the homeowners to use the outdoor space without blocking the natural light. Building the perfect deck is usually a collaborative effort between the deck owner and the installer – and the best decks are the ones where homeowners encourage their installers to think creatively and use their imagination. Anyone looking for inspiration should look no further than the TrexPRO scheme, where every installer has a wealth of knowledge, experience and – as this year’s Arbordeck Awards proves – creativity in spades.

TREX LIGHTS UP DECKS FOR 2020 LIGHTING

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IN 2011 WE SPOKE TO LDA DESIGN ABOUT ITS INVOLVEMENT IN THE CREATION OF THE OLYMPIC PARK. WE CATCH UP WITH DIRECTOR NEIL MATTINSON ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE, AS WELL AS HOW IT HAS INFLUENCED THE COMPANY NINE YEARS ON

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he 1946 New Town programme encouraged the restoration of Britains towns and cities, reflecting a spirit of social reconstruction after World War Two and growing from the need to provide new houses, jobs and reduce inner-city deprivation. This drew inspiration from the garden city movement, with an emphasis on green space and a healthy work-life balance. As the development corporations delivering the new towns were wound down, completion projects were offered to help landscape architects set up private practices. Founded in 1979, LDA was fortunate enough to be one of those start-ups. “The scale of the New Town projects changed the profile of landscape architecture,” Neil Mattinson, director at LDA Design tells us. “The profession began to be recognised as being able to unlock the potential of place at scale.” The power of landscape The Olympic Park demonstrates to the hilt this power of landscape to unlock potential; in this case, the regeneration of East London. Once London’s bid had succeeded in 2005, creating a green and blue setting for the Olympic Games was top of the agenda. It was a challenge. The Lower Lea Valley was neglected and environmentally degraded. The clean-up operation alone involved dredging up 30,000t of rubbish from rivers, demolishing 100 buildings, and decontaminating 1.5m3 of soil. Yet, even as this operation was underway, it was clear to LDA Design that the park’s potential to provide London with a sustainable legacy was still at risk. While the landscape architecture needed to

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

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INSPIRE

make a decisive response at a scale to match the iconic Olympic Games buildings, with vistas, meadows, lawns and wetlands, the site remained severed by road and rail, and the River Lea was polluted and sunken in a channel. LDA Design designed the Park for easy navigation, and pulled back the river’s banks, increasing the amount of green space and saving 4,500 homes from flooding in the process. “The first day of the Olympic Games was unforgettable for the team,” Neil tells us. But LDA Design has remained an integral part of the park’s future. “The Olympic Park continues to deliver on its original ambition to make a new piece of city that offers fresh opportunities to people in East London.” LDA Design continues to create developments, including Stratford Waterfront, London’s largest cultural initiative since the

THE OLYMPIC PARK CONTINUES TO DELIVER ON ITS ORIGINAL AMBITION TO CREATE A NEW PIECE OF CITY THAT OFFERS FRESH OPPORTUNITIES TO PEOPLE IN EAST LONDON

5 South Bank, and a new outpost for the University College of London, UCL East. For LDA Design, the process of creating such a complex project has changed the way it works today, as Neil explains: “The Olympic Park’s enduring success is a testament to the brilliance of the collective. We carry this collaborative spirit with us on every new commission.” Building community LDA Design’s projects focus on the needs of people and how lives can be improved. Burgess Park was originally developed in line with the County of London Plan in 1943. The plan

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4 involved removing areas damaged by bombing and creating the park, with displaced residents moving to a new high-rise in Aylesbury Estate. The park was built out, but a lack of a clear guiding plan meant it lacked structure, and over recent years, safety had become a concern. LDA Design’s vision for the site has created a popular, safe space with open sight lines explored via 3.5km of new footpaths. The central lake has been enhanced and the park holds Southwark’s first dedicated BBQ space. Thamesmead in south-east London was built in the 1960s on reclaimed marshland, with the promise of providing a new way of living. However, development was piecemeal and investment in maintenance was soon cut. Designed for the car, traffic still dominates and it is a hard place to walk or cycle. With its population set to double by 2050, Peabody, the major landowner, is investing to ensure it becomes a pleasant place to live. Car-free living Waterbeach New Town East is a groundbreaking proposed settlement on the edge of the Fens in Cambridgeshire. LDA Design has worked on the site for 19 years, leading the vision, masterplanning and coordination which envisions car-free living. A series of neighbourhood steads with up to 400 homes will have their own characters, landmarks and facilities, but will also connect to the bigger landscape story. The majority of the residential streets will also be car-free. The next chapter One of the biggest changes is LDA Design’s move towards employee ownership, giving a stronger voice to everyone in the business. Neil explains: “The move assures long-term independence and offers a sustainable and fair way forward. While employee ownership is an extension of the values and beliefs that have long guided us, we believe it will unlock greater opportunities for everyone here.” LDA Design has also appointed a new chair, Frazer Osment, and a new managing director, Mike Foster, who will now steer the company into its future.

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1 Olympic Park ©Robin Forster Photography 2 UCL East plaza ©LDA Design 3 Stratford Waterfront ©Allies and Morrison 4 Vision of Waterbeach New Town East ©LDA Design 5 London 2012 Olympic Park ©LDA Design 6 Thamesmead ©Paul Upward/Peabody 7 Burgess Park ©Helena Smith/LDA Design 8 Here East ©Robin Forster Photography

C O N TA C T LDA Design 8-10, New Fetter Lane London EC4A 1AZ Tel +44 (0)20 7467 1470 Email info@lda-design.co.uk

www.lda-design.co.uk

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RENSON LINARTE ALUMINIUM FACADES

INSPIRE

GET OUT IN FRONT DEBS WINROW OFFERS UP SOME IDEAS FOR FRONT GARDEN DESIGNS, FROM SMALL FINISHING TOUCHES T O B O L D E R S TAT E M E N T P I E C E S

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here is a great deal to tell about the character and personalities of the homeowners behind their front garden. The dreaded ‘kerb appeal’ kudos haunts many as we strive to ensure that passers-by look upon our homes with a positive impression. However, it shouldn’t all be about what others think. The feeling of arriving home after a long day to a gorgeous front of house that makes you smile is a lasting one. Focal points There may already be certain features that you’ll need to work with in your client’s home, such as a front door colour, existing boundaries, access or simply the location and style of property. A front garden design may therefore be a complete landscaping makeover or a simple styling proposal. Either way, every back garden lead or prospect could potentially also be a front garden client at the same time. It’s also worth considering adding into your pricing proposal some time to ‘refresh’.

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ALGARVE CANVAS CARPORT

CREATE LUSH PLANTING SCHEMES

Repainting a door in a classic front door colour such as navy, red or racing green can give the garden a whole new feel. Cleaning up planters and repotting can also give the area a nicer feel in an instant. Most paved, concrete or tarmac driveways will feel much better once they’ve been cleaned. The same obviously appeals to rendered surfaces, porches and decking. Also, add new house numbers, a porch light, polish any metal letterboxes and add a hardstanding area for bins. These are potentially simple tasks homeowners could do, but offering them a turnkey solution is always appealing.

laundries, garden rooms or much needed storage, or simply removed as we extend our living spaces indoors. Carports can add real architectural design elements to the house and allow clients to have something completely different. They can also be designed to become porches or cover from car to the front door. Aluminium structures can be powder coated to match window and door furniture. You can add lights, sides, storage areas, and with lots of styles to choose from, you can ensure the style of the property isn’t compromised.

New trends to consider Carports The introduction of carports is becoming even more popular. The traditional garage space that always seems too tiny to even fit a modern car in has long been transformed into gyms,

Design crush New to the marketplace are some amazing cladding products, allowing us to offer another dimension to vertical spaces, boundaries and more. These vertical walls can be freestanding, attached to gates and doors, or be installed

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

17/12/2019 11:02


WHAT WERE YOU DOING IN 2011 AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE?

INTRODUCE COLOUR THROUGH PLANTERS

DESIGNED BY ROGER SMITH

Since 2011, we’ve changed from a traditional landscaping company with branded vans and chaps in polo shirts to a design, build and styling company with showrooms, websites and trade stand awards – we even have creative guidelines for our brand! The best part is that unlocking the potential for clients to live outdoors is only getting stronger!

neglected. Lighting a path to the door, providing feature lighting to a house number, or simply using light to show details is an element not to be ignored. Consider timers, remote switches and even the ability to change the colour. Driveways Lots of options to incorporate driveways into designs, with manufacturers now having dedicated whole sections to their driveway products. Resin is making an appearance on many of our designs this year, with the variety of colours and finishes allowing it to compliment BRING THE GARDEN DESIGN INTO THE FRONT

other landscaping products of stone, porcelain, brick and edging. Continue with resin for pathways and edge with Corten or a similar material to transform gloomy spaces. If you haven’t got the skills inhouse, there are some great companies that can help with this part of the project. Most of these will offer effective in-house training so you can take the next project yourselves. As a choice of surface, resin bound is great, not only from a design point of view, but the permeability it offers is better for the environment and also conforms with current SuDS regulations.

BRING IN INTERESTING ACCESSORIES

straight onto buildings, seamlessly running around windows and doors to give a new and fresh facade. Colour to any RAL and customise with wood and LED light features. With the ability to pull these products into our outdoor spaces, front and back, the idea of a full outdoor concept becomes achievable. Whether you want privacy or panels in a particular style, there’s a wide choice to define boundaries. Add some greenery If the size of the front garden allows, adding in a bed or two filled to the brim with planting really adds appeal. The scope of planting design can also be very in tune with the style of property, from structural planting to soft and whimsical. Consider vertical green walls, sedum lawns or even a grassed area if space allows. Continue to green up the front spaces by adding pots and planters outside the doors or within the design.

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Planters are also a great way to add a colour accent to the design. Adding accessories Introduce elements that make the function of the front garden into something pleasing. Create hardstanding areas and paths from the front door to the waste and recycling areas. Build or buy off-the-shelf bin stores to hide unsightly bins. Introduce parcel boxes Take the hassle out of deliveries by designing in a letter and or parcel box. Lots of different versions, colours and sizes means a design can again be adapted to style any look. Lighting elements Introducing lighting in any garden scheme is a must, and the front garden shouldn’t be

Get out front Perhaps 2020 can be your year to develop and add a front of house proposition to your portfolio. Remember to take lots of photos, highlighting aspects that stand out for your gallery. This will be invaluable for winning future projects, and that is before considering that front gardens are perfect for potential clients to drive past, giving a chance to admire and see your work when considering commissioning you.

ABOUT DEBS WINROW Debs Winrow, creative director of award-winning landscape company Garden House Design, is an avid trend spotter, responsible for seeking out the latest and best outdoor living products, and developing an expansive portfolio to offer to both consumers and fellow landscapers and designers.

www.gardenhousedesign.co.uk

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WE ARE CELEBRATING

100 ISSUES OF

PRO LANDSCAPER THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT!

100th issue cover page.indd 55

18/12/2019 08:47


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17/12/2019 05/12/2019 11:13 10:45


Celebrating

100TH ISSUE

100 ISSUES S

"AS WE SAID IN OUR FIRST ISSUE BACK IN SEPTEMBER 2011, WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER"

tarting a new decade with our 100th issue – it’s almost as though we planned it. Our January 2020 edition is one of our proudest moments yet. To think, just over eight years ago, we took the plunge and published the first issue of Pro Landscaper – a 36-page magazine offering the latest tips and tricks, products and business advice to the landscaping industry, as well as featuring interviews with some of its leading names. We, of course, hoped that it would be successful and would make a difference, but we had no idea of the impact Pro Landscaper – and the events and awards attached to the brand – would have. In 2019, we sent out more than 6,000 copies of the magazine each month; to landscapers, garden designers, grounds maintenance operatives, landscape architects, local authorities – need I continue? Whilst we’d hate to be accused of bragging, we’re unashamedly proud of our reach, one we think has grown and developed with the redesign last June. And we’re not done yet. As you’ll find out within this 100th Issue Special, we have big plans for 2020, to not only increase our offering but also to improve our environmental credentials and to be part of the push for change.

BEST FRONT COVER

COMPETITION and the winner is ...

AUGUST 2019

As we said in our first issue back in September 2011, we’re in this together.

The

CONTENTS

team

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100th issue introduction.indd 57

58 PRO LANDSCAPER TIMELINE 60 WHAT HAPPENED IN 2011? 62

LOOK OUT FOR... REVISITED

64 GROWING TRENDS SINCE 2011 65 WHAT'S NEXT? 66 PRO LANDSCAPER STATISTICS

Ground Control’s The Children’s Garden at Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, graced the front cover of our August 2019 issue and clearly had a huge impact. More than half (56%) of our readers who voted for their favourite front cover chose the colourful creation. Scooping the bottle of champagne we dangled for voting is George Salisbury of Landscaping Solutions. Congratulations and enjoy!

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 57

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100TH ISSUE

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Concept to Delivery

Concept to Delivery

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DESIGN, BUILD AND MAINTAIN

September 2011

DEDICATED TO THE LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY

Let’s hear it from...

Mark Gregory, Landform Consultants and Chairman of the APL

An inspired transformation of the grounds at Heath Manor, Longdon, Worcestershire:

Latest kit at IOG Saltex 2011 Show highlights

Published by

Business intelligence

KEYSCAPE’S

MASTER PLAN

RSARY A N N IV E U E IS S

LA IS UN SU C E H

Portfolio

See how three companies have designed and implemented their projects

September 2011 The launch issue of Pro Landscaper was published. Our first Let’s Hear It From was with Mark Gregory, who went on to be crowned Pro Landscaper’s Most Influential Overall Winner at the inaugural Pro Landscaper Business Awards.

September 2012

October 2011 We interviewed Nick Temple-Heald, CEO of The Landscape Group (now idverde UK). Nick is now a regular contributor to our popular View from the Top column, covering topics from the use of glyphosate to the elusive Brexit.

February 2015 Adam White joined our growing list of contributors. He has since become president of the Landscape Institute and now contributes to our View from the Top column.

January 2012 Our longest standing contributor Angus Lindsay was welcomed into the fold. This was followed by fellow Pro Landscaper veteran Andrew Wilson, who started as a contributor in August, having featured in our Let’s Hear It From two months prior.

September 2012 Pro Landscaper celebrated its first anniversary. We grew our brand, earned glowing testimonials from industry-leading names and featured regular updates from top trade associations and expert contributors.

November 2012 The first FutureScape event was held at Kempton Park Racecourse. Since outgrowing this venue, it moved to Sandown Park Racecourse in 2014. Next year will see our biggest event yet at the ExCeL London.

November 2012 Senior designer Kara Thomas joined the team and has been with us ever since. Kara has been instrumental in keeping the magazine’s look up to date, leading to the recent redesign.

PRESENTS

PRO LANDSCAPER’S GUIDE TO THE

March 2016

DESIGN, BUILD, AND MAINTAIN

2015

RHS CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW

Concept to Delivery

NEW

WILLERBY LANDSCAPES

SUPPLEMENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH CED STONE GROUP

THE SGD AWARDS

AGENDA

IS THE GARDEN BRIDGE GOOD FOR OUR INDUSTRY?

WHAT WAS 2015’S BIGGEST CHALLENGE?

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BEST NEW PRODUCTS

FROM SCULPTURES TO PLANTERS

April 2015 Interior architect and landscape designer Anji Connell started to write for us. Always ahead of the curve, Anji’s first article was on blending indoor and outdoor design.

21/04/2015 13:55

May 2015 We published our first RHS Chelsea Flower Show supplement, giving a heads-up on the event’s highlights. In the main issue, we interviewed Sarah Eberle, who is now RHS Chelsea Flower Show’s most decorated designer.

58 Pro Landscaper / January 2020

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November 2015 November has become one of the most exciting months of the year for us, and 2015 was no exception. We announced the winners of the inaugural 30 Under 30: The Next Generation awards and published our first FutureScape showguide.

Cover final 3.indd 1

CHARACTER BUILDING ATELIER DYJG 18/02/2016 16:31

March 2016 Pro Landscaper was given a makeover. It was split into Inform, Inspire, Nurture and Educate, and we introduced the Agenda, initially questioning the controversial plans for a Garden Bridge in London. We’ll say no more…

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100TH ISSUE

TIMELINE JUNE 2O19

LET’S HEAR IT FROM

TONY WOODS

March 2019 One event just wasn’t enough, so to meet demand, a sister event of our flagship trade show FutureScape was launched – FutureScape Spring, where we held the first Pro Landscaper Podium Awards ceremony.

COMPANY PROFILE

DEFINED DESIGN

SHOW PREVIEW

FITTING IN

Soil consultants Tim O’Hare Associates

Streatham Hill, Kingston Landscape Group

RHS Chatsworth Flower Show 2019

Neil Parslow on choosing the right lighting

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23/05/2019 08:57

June 2019 Pro Landscaper underwent its biggest redesign, with a new logo and a completely new look. We upped the size of the magazine too, and added in the new People section.

October 2019 Our events portfolio increased further with the inaugural Future Landscape Conference in London, aimed at the landscape architecture sector to continue reaching a diverse audience.

What’s next? Next year, we will tackle: sustainability, the environmental value of landscaping, landscaping as a genuine career choice, best practice, driving the landscaping sector higher up the government’s agenda, technology and diversity.

THE MOST INFLUENTIAL FIGURES IN LANDSCAPING AND GARDEN DESIGN, VOTED FOR BY YOU

SPONSORED BY

November 2018 Our first and hugely successful small project BIG IMPACT Awards ceremony was held at FutureScape.

crossrail roof garden stephen richards gillespies

February 2018 The inaugural Pro Landscaper Business Awards took place in Canary Wharf, recognising companies in the industry which are raising the bar.

maintenance

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Horticulture CAREERS 02/11/2017 11:06

November 2017 We took the plunge and went perfect bound. At FutureScape, we also announced Pro Landscaper’s Most Influential, voted for by 200 prominent people in the industry.

Concept to Delivery

September 2016

DESIGN, BUILD, AND MAINTAIN finn chu Bartholomew

STEVE SWATTON

SWATTON LANDSCAPE

A PRO LA

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AP ER

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Celebrate with us!

EMENT

5TH ANNIVERSARY

SPECIAL INSIDE LOCAL AUTHORITY GROUNDS MAINTENANCE 7 PAGE IN-DEPTH REPORT

elephant & CASTLE lendlease and southwark council

Cover.indd 1

the value of landscaping clare hebbes, lendlease

23/06/2016 16:05

July 2016 We published our first London supplement, focusing on the pros and cons of working in the city, showcasing both upcoming and existing projects. At 68 pages, it is the largest supplement we’ve produced (so far).

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

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ART ATTACK HOW CITYSCAPES IS BRINGING TOGETHER ART AND LANDSCAPE Cover Sept final.indd 4

Plus

GARDEN BUILDINGS DESIGNER PLANTS OUTDOOR HEATERS MANAGING MEADOWS AND MORE… 18/08/2016 14:40

September 2016 A selection of nurseries began to distribute Pro Landscaper from their sites in purposed designed display stands.

April 2017 We had our first (and only) guest editor, John Melmoe, retired managing director of Willerby Landscapes, as Rick Davies took over the helm as Willerby's managing director. In this issue, we also welcomed Marcus Watson to View from the Top.

May 2017 The first in a series of Pro Landscaper LIVE events was held in Manchester. This was followed by a hugely successful Pro Landscaper Tech event at Google’s headquarters in Central London, in partnership with Adtrak.

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 59

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100TH ISSUE

WHAT WAS HAPPENING IN

PRO LANDSCAPER’S WEBSITE AND SOCIAL MEDIA HAVE GROWN Pro Landscaper took a jump into the digital world in 2011 with the launch of its website. Our online platform hosts press releases, online exclusives, and information regarding our awards and events. The year 2011 also saw the creation of our Twitter feed, which has amassed a following of over 13,000 people. Our Instagram page, which we started three years later, is now followed by more than 2,000 people, who can follow the Pro Landscaper team with regular updates and real-time Instagram stories of us out and about.

OUR COVERAGE OF CHELSEA HAS PROGRESSED In 2011, there were 17 gardens with nine Gold medals awarded at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. This has changed considerably. At the 2019 show, 28 gardens were showcased, and 12 Gold medals handed out. Our coverage of the show has grown along with the number of gardens. Back in 2015, Pro Landscaper started producing an annual supplement, informing readers about the gardens, as well as the designers

and builders behind them. The following year, we started to include interviews with some of the key people involved. Our latest supplement was our best yet, with an exclusive poll, a feature on the RHS Back to Nature Garden, and interviews with designers Joe Perkins and Jilayne Rickards. We also asked contractors to predict their biggest challenge, and caught up with some of our 30 Under 30: The Next Generation winners who took part in the 2019 show.

C O M PA N I E S STA RT E D I N 201 1

BRADLEY MURPHY DESIGNS

BURNHAM LANDSCAPING

Specialising in the creation of sustainable, people-focused landscapes and public spaces, Bradley Murphy Designs incorporates innovative ideas to ensure longevity of landscapes. It offers landscape design and planning advice, landscape and visual impact assessment, and arboricultural advice.

With over 10 years of experience, Ed Burnham aims to provide a comprehensive construction and garden design service. Ed and his hard-working team have worked on various domestic and commercial gardens in order to create unique, remarkable spaces.

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ELJAYS44 When Eljays44 launched, its sole product was Pro Landscaper magazine. This has grown to become a widely recognised brand within the industry and has branched out to have its own research arm, as well as a number of events and awards. Eljays44 also now publishes Pro Arb, FutureArc and Garden Centre Retail.

PRO LANDSCAPER’S GUIDE TO THE

RHS CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW

2015

WE LOOK BACK ON THE NEWS STORIES WE COVERED IN OUR FIRST ISSUE AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE

SUPPLEMENT IN ASSOCIATION WITH CED STONE GROUP

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HABITAT LANDSCAPES

21/04/2015 13:55

HORTUS LOCI

Offering a broad range of services, from complete garden redesign, patios, driveways and ponds, Habitat Landscapes has worked on various commercial projects since 2011, helping clients to achieve their goals.

The nursery located on Hortus Loci’s 17-acre site in Hampshire raises over 85% of the plants they supply, and offers a comprehensive selection for customers to choose from. The nursery’s offering ranges from alpine, large specimen trees and herbaceous species.

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100TH ISSUE

©Electric Egg/Shutterstock.com

GREEN FLAG AWARDS HAVE REACHED RECORD NUMBERS The first Green Flag Awards were awarded in 1997 to recognise and reward the hard work and management that goes into green spaces around the UK, as well as internationally. Since then, the number of flags being awarded per year has increased, with the awards being carried out successfully for over three decades. In 2011, when Pro Landscaper published its first issue, a total of 1,288 green flags were awarded. This has increased by 682 flags for 2019, with the total reaching an impressive 1,970 – the largest number of flags ever awarded.

APL SAYS ROGUE TRADERS REMAIN A CONCERN

LEADING RHS FIGURES CONTINUE TO IMPRESS

In 2011, The Association of Professional Landscapers (APL) was alerting consumers about the dangers of rogue traders who were offering landscaping and garden services. Eight years on, we asked APL general manager Phil Tremayne if this is still an ongoing issue – he explains: “Landscaping is an unregulated industry that is blighted by rogue companies forming and doing substandard work, causing misery to consumers and tainting the industry as a whole, before folding and disappearing again." “The APL has one of the most robust inspection processes in the industry. It offers its members the opportunity to reassure potential clients that their companies are bona fide, inspected and regulated by more than a club. “The actual work, materials and techniques used within the industry have changed since the article in 2011, but associations like the APL that ensure its members are kept abreast of all new information and support. Membership of this amazing, inclusive and cohesive community ensure the client is getting the best possible service.”

When Elizabeth Banks was president of the Royal Horticultural Society back in 2011, she received an honorary degree from the University of Greenwich. Elizabeth was the first female president of the gardening charity and, in 2017, she was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to horticulture. Her successor, Sir Nicholas Bacon, was elected as president in 2013. Sir Nicholas actively participates in the governance of the RHS and chairs the Horticulture Board. He also owns and runs the Raveningham Estate in Norfolk, a family garden open for the public to enjoy, and was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) back in 2010. On taking over from Elizabeth, he commented: “It will be a privilege to be president and to help continue the outstanding work that Elizabeth Banks has achieved over the last three years.”

JON SHEAFF AND ASSOCIATES With over 20 years’ experience, Jon Sheaff delivers innovative, cost-effective landscape architecture and urban design projects in the public and private sector. The multi-disciplinary practise specialises in design as well as management of public realm and space.

QUERCUS NURSERY Established by David Baldwin and Roger Smith, Quercus Nursery supplies high quality plants to a variety of garden designers, landscaping professionals and private clients. Using a range of nurseries throughout the UK and abroad to source plants, the nursery provides quality service to designers and clients alike.

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

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RE-FORM LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

THE EDIBLE BUS STOP

URBAN MOVEMENT

Keeping a sustainable design, sense of belonging and environmental impact at the forefront of its work, Re-Form Landscape Architecture has been involved with various high status projects. It has worked on Hull Public Realm, Sovereign Square in Leeds and the City of Salford & University masterplan.

Working on diverse, permanent and temporary settings, the team at The Edible Bus Stop has created a niche market to transform spaces. With the aim of engaging social and environmental issues through designed spaces, the team re-imagines and re-works areas, creating engaging gardens.

The team of landscape architects, traffic engineers and urban designers at Urban Movement work together to create spaces that are driven by environmental, public health and economic priorities. The team has worked on projects such as Canterbury Square, Glasgow Avenues and Brighton Station.

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100TH ISSUE

LOOK OUT FOR REVISITED WE CATCH UP WITH SOME OF OUR VERY FIRST 'LOOK OUT FOR' INTERVIEWEES TO SEE HOW THEIR CAREERS HAVE PROGRESSED OVER THE PAST NINE YEARS, WHETHER IT’S MOVED IN THE DIRECTION THEY EXPECTED, AND HOW THEY SEE IT GROWING OVER THE NEXT FEW YEARS

CHARLOTTE MURRELL

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“2011 was a big year for me. I graduated from college and my career kickstarted with my garden for the Student Design and Build Award 'Wild in the City', at RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show that summer. It catapulted me from college student to landscape designer almost overnight. 15/8/11 14:07 Page 27 After Wild in the City, I went on to design the BALI trade stand at the RHS Chelsea Out For… 27 Flower Show in 2013. Look In 2014, I designed the feature garden for the @ProLandscaperJW re-tweets: RHS Hampton Court Palace Tomatillos are Flower Show's main @AlysFowler kicking out ex presenter of lanterns, toms are Gardeners World starting to ripen sponsor that year, Ocean 28/7/11 and crazy purple French beans are appearing. It’s Just finished a Spray Cranberry Juice. happening. Marshalls 100 year history talk to the Stonemarket @MarshallsGroup Over the years, as management team Hardscaping company seemed to go well 12/7/11 to an interested my business grew, I found audience-thanks The Government attaches great @talklandscape importance to I had that just too much The Landscape the design of the Institute 25/7/11 built environment. Goodof design is my own work to keep indivisible from Off to do battle good planning with my sweet up with,squirrels but wasn't peas – thoseIthe completely hooked, and would love to exhibit left me. @plantmadnige Lovely, lovely rain. UK based garden writer again. The plants are comfortable becoming & journalist. 20/7/11 The week following Hampton Court I partying, now, but graduated with an FdSc in Garden Design from so are the weeds The Royal an employer myself. Sparsholt College Hampshire where I have been Horticultural studying for the past three years. I am now really @The_RHS Society is The Royal Horticultural launching National looking forward to beginning my career as a It– was then that Society 25/7/11 Gardening Week Garden Designer and I hope to find work with a 16 to 22 April 2012, Garden Design practice, with a long-term goal of to get the nation Sorry to say, but I heard of a position for growing running my own business. used a Karcher for the first time last Charlotte Murrell night, on garden @RHSthegarden www.charlottemurrell.co.uk a landscape designer with furniture. Its good! The Garden Magazine Wife now wants 2/8/11 everything Taylor Tripp Landscape ‘Karchered’...! Design. The timing and Follow @ProLandscaperJW for information and news about all things opportunity forto this just Pro Landscaper. Also recommend a few people follow. We at HQ would love to hear from you. seemed too good to miss.

LOOK OUT FOR...

CHARLOTTE MURRELL Charlotte Murrell is a bright young spark in the garden design industry, and it’s been a busy year for her since winning the Student Design and Build Award 2010 launched by Wyevale East Nurseries. Here she describes it all.

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n October 2010 I won the Student Design & Build Award, launched by Wyevale East Nurseries, providing sponsorship to build and exhibit a Small Garden at Hampton Court Palace Flower Show 2011. After a successful application to the RHS for a place at the show, the planning and sourcing for the garden, entitled ‘Wild in the City’, began in earnest. It has been eight months of steep learning, putting all that I have studied at college into practice. I chose to manage the project myself, which has taught me a great deal. Ranging from how to manage a team, source materials and talk to suppliers, estimate, work to a tight budget, complete official paperwork and handle publicity, construct a garden, talk to the public, and the list goes on! It’s been the most amazing experience, with little sleep, real highs and a few lows, but for the most part, just a whole lot of fun! I am now Wyevale East Nurseries, in conjunction with the Royal Horticultural Society launched the Student Design & Build Award in February 2010. Now in the Award’s second year, this year’s submissions are being emailed and posted in already. This unique Award is aimed at students on horticultural and design courses nationwide giving a rare and real opportunity to design and build a garden in the Small Garden category at Hampton Court. Judging is based on the applicant’s ability to

demonstrate a holistic and applied knowledge of all stages in the design process, from client brief to paper plan to the final implementation of the scheme. The winning design is then submitted to the RHS’ judging panel in January for inclusion in Hampton Court Palace Flower Show in the following year. The winning design is given £5000 for costs towards construction, materials and labour. There is no budget for the plants which are supplied by Wyevale East Nurseries.

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The ethos behind the Award is to offer a chance to a newly qualified designer to launch their career in a prestigious show and to ensure that they understand all of the processes associated with designing and building a garden to a client’s brief and budget. www.gardendesignaward.co.uk

Alongside my own work over the last nine years, I’ve been lucky to also freelance for both Hillier Landscapes and PC Landscapes. It's a bit back-to-front to what I envisaged I’d be doing back in 2011, but I have to say I’m really enjoying it. Taylor Tripp works on some really lovely projects, larger and more traditional than my previous work, so it’s a new and exciting challenge.

2011 WAS A BIG YEAR FOR ME. I GRADUATED FROM COLLEGE AND MY CAREER KICKSTARTED WITH MY GARDEN FOR THE STUDENT DESIGN AND BUILD AWARD I look forward to continuing in my position at Taylor Tripp, developing my skills further, while working with the excellent team there on an exciting variety of projects in some very beautiful locations. With a bit more time on my hands now, I hope to travel and finally start oil painting again.”

The Ocean Sp ra at RHS Ham y feature garden pton Co Flower Show urt Palace 2014

Curved Corten terraced lawn, part of design for a Wiltshire garden

Sunke n kitche courtyard, s n, jacu zzi and wimming po o seatin g area l, s

Croquet lawn and garden room – design for a contemporary garden in Hampshire

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MELISSA JOLLY “It feels like a lot has changed since 2011, but on the surface, it looks LOOK OUT FOR ... quite similar! I am still MELISSA JOLLY running my design practice from home and work on my own, taking on a variety of different commissions. Back in 2012 I was riding on a high after designing and building DIARY three consecutive show gardens for RHS shows. At the time, I was receiving quite a lot of media interest and I felt like it was all a bit of a whirlwind. I wanted to move on from doing show gardens to concentrate on making real gardens and building my client base, and have been busy doing that ever since. I am not sure that I had a clear view of what the future would hold – I have (rightly or wrongly – I’m guessing most people would say wrongly) never written a business plan, but I am still running a profitable business after 10 years, so I am pretty proud of that. I have also just passed the Society of Garden Designers’ adjudication process to become a full member of the SGD, which was a goal I set myself at the beginning of 2019. It also really means a lot to me to get feedback from the clients whose lives have been improved by their gardens. Going forward, I would like to encourage people to reconnect with outside spaces. I hear it much less now, but there are still people I meet who want me to create non-changing, maintenance-free, bee-free, bird-free gardens for them, and that is something that I am no longer willing to do.” People

1 Picturesque – Gold award-winner, Conceptual Garden, at Hampton Court Flower Show 2011. 2 and 3 The Salad Bar at Gardener’s

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World Live, NEC, 2010, for which Melissa (below right) received the Silver medal, presented to her by Carol Klein.

Meet the hard-working, focused garden designer who received an early-career boost via valuable exposure at Gardeners’ World Live and Hampton Court Flower Show. After a long career break looking after my two children, I retrained in garden design at the Oxford College of Garden Design. The one-year post graduate diploma was all-consuming and I was inspired by every aspect of this industry. I set up my garden design business in January 2010 and shortly after entered a competition run by NS&I to design a show garden at BBC Gardener’s World Live. I was one of three winners and built my first show garden ‘The Salad Bar’, at the NEC in Birmingham in June 2010. I received a Silver medal for the garden and won the public vote, which I was really proud of. I had a great team of contractors from Simply Green Landscapes, who had built show gardens before and so were great at guiding me through the process – and their workmanship was superb. The BBC also followed the making of my garden for its Gardeners’ World programme on the show, giving me a lot of publicity early in my career. While planning The Salad Bar, I got a parttime job with a well-established design and build landscaping company called Artscape, which gave me a fantastic insight into running a business in this field. But after only a few months working there though a mixture of late-night grafting and

FEBRUARY 15-16 RHS London Plant and Design Show, Lawrence Hall, London SW1P 2PE www.rhs.org.uk 23 February 2012 23 Managing Tree Planting Budgets: The Bare-Root Alternative – Free seminar, Coles Nurseries, Leicester www.colesbareroots.eventbrite.co.uk

good fortune I resigned to focus on my business full time. In late 2010, the RHS asked me to design my second show garden for the 2011 London Plant and Design Show and I also found out that a design I’d speculatively submitted for a conceptual garden at Hampton Court Flower show had been successful. While the show garden had given me a good profile, my private client work was slowly building up. The show garden for The London Plant and Design show had to be a roof garden and I decided to use only plants that are usable in ‘greenroof’-style planting to showcase how this sustainable method of planting could be implemented in a contemporary setting. I was awarded a Silver-gilt for this garden, so was slowly moving up in the medal ranks. RELISHING NEW CHALLENGES My first couple of gardens had just started to be built and new commissions were coming in, so it was a busy time and although often stressful, I was relishing the new challenges. A fantastic part of building show gardens is the speed with which the project gets completed and the number of people you meet along the

23 Alan Sargent Seminar – Managing as a Head Gardener, Brinsbury College, Pulborough, West Sussex sargent396@btinternet.com

way. I’ve made some great relationships with all manner of tradespeople who I will continue to use on private-client projects. The process of designing gardens for clients can be a very long one – especially when they’re also building a new house – so it can be years before you see the results of your work. Without the show gardens it takes a long time to build up a portfolio; shows, conversely, provide almost instant examples of your work and a good profile. The garden that I designed for Hampton Court was based on an art gallery and was great fun, as I spent time visiting as many galleries as I could – all in the name of work, which felt very indulgent. Although extremely demanding at times, the build went well and it was aweinspiring being at Hampton Court. I was utterly thrilled to get a Gold medal for this garden and the whole experience will always be one of my greatest achievements. I’m taking a break from show gardens for 2012 and concentrating on private clients, hoping to build up a solid portfolio and taking some time to go and visit different gardens and landscapes, hear people speak and generally keep learning as much as I can.

www.landscapeshow.co.uk 14 APL Awards, Kensington Roof Gardens, London www.landscaper.org.uk 16-1 Apr Ideal Gardens (Ideal Home Show), Earls Court, London www.idealhomeshow.co.uk/ gardens 20-22 Ecobuild, ExCel, London www.ecobuild.co.uk

22 Alan Sargent Seminar – Million Dollar Gardens, Brinsbury College, Pulborough, West Sussex sargent396@btinternet.com

I AM STILL RUNNING A PROFITABLE BUSINESS AFTER 10 YEARS SO I’M PRETTY PROUD OF THAT MARCH 8 APL/SGD Networking Seminar, Classiflora, Essex www.landscaper.org.uk 15-17 The Landscape Show, Olympia, London

APRIL 20-22 RHS Cardiff Show, Bute Park, Cardiff Castle, Wales www.rhs.org.uk 24-26 The Commercial Vehicle Show, NEC Birmingham www.cvshow.com

YOUR EVENT If you have a diary event you wish to publicise, email details to the editor: lisa.wilkinson@pro-landscaper.co.uk

www.pro-landscaper.co.uk

February 2012 | Volume 2 | Issue 2

Newly installed wildlife pond

Show 2016 RHS Chelsea Flower

With Char lotte

HUGO BUGG

Harris

“As well as me getting older and more wrinkled, the structure and size of the business also changed quite a lot since 2011. When we last spoke, it was just me. That’s now evolved having merged practices with Charlotte Harris two years ago to create Harris Bugg Studio. We’re working on a wide range of different projects now, too, and increasingly with clients that reflect our ecological and sustainable outlook on the landscape. Current projects include work for the National Trust on a large historic Grade I listed and SSSI landscape, as well as the Weston Kitchen Garden at RHS Garden Bridgewater, and the landscape design for the interiors of the new glasshouses at Gothenburg Botanic Gardens. We’re also working with a wide range of private clients who understand the importance of their gardens within the wider landscape and ecosystems. I’ve also completed two show gardens at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, met the Queen, and, for 2020, Harris Bugg Studio will be creating The M&G Garden. It’s all exceeded my expectations of where I thought I'd be. The biggest achievement is simple, but it’s working with fantastic clients, horticulturists, designers, artists, specialists and contractors. I also have to say that we wouldn’t be here without our team at the studio, and we feel we're always learning – working with people that have different experiences and LOOK OUT FOR... knowledge drives us to continue to learn. We’re I looking ahead to a year of challenging and interesting projects, and it’s important for us to be a small, focused practice, getting the quality of creativity and work-life balance right.”

WE’RE WORKING ON A WIDE RANGE OF PROJECTS NOW AND INCREASINGLY WITH CLIENTS THAT REFLECT OUR ECOLOGICAL AND SUSTAINABLE OUTLOOK

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HUGO BUGG 2009 saw the real start to my garden design career. Being selected and exhibiting my first ever show garden at the international garden festival ‘Future gardens’ in 2009 also saw my first ever garden built.

was delighted with how the show turned out but surprisingly did not realise that I had now caught the show garden bug. I could now not wait to enter the next competition. Entering and then winning the RHS Young Garden Designer of the Year competition in 2010 along with a gold medal and the overall ‘Best in Show’ award was an amazing experience. It brought me a surprising amount of publicity and a very busy year to follow.

rden in Romantic ga tertaining London for en

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Large country

family garden

DUCHY OF CORNWALL It has now been 14 months since the Young Designer competition and it has been filled with exciting opportunities and busy design work. My projects this year have included rural farm houses in Dorset and Somerset, a large town garden in Cheshire, city rooftop retreats in London and even a children's nursery garden for the Duchy of Cornwall in Dorset. I also relocated my Young Designer show garden to a secondary school in Dorset which was in great need of a garden. Being based between Devon and Cornwall does result in a lot of travelling, however the beautiful countryside and dramatic coastline provide a constant source of inspiration.

| November/December 2011 | Volume 1 | Issue 3

As well as my quickly expanding portfolio, 2011 also saw the creation of two more show gardens. A silver gilt medal for a roof top garden at the RHS London Plant and Design show was followed by a gold medal for the conceptual ‘CoppaFeel!’ garden at the Hampton Court Palace flower show. Both included the stressful build, mad panics and sleepless nights but that is what makes the overall garden feel so much better.This year I have also had my first experience of being a judge rather than being judged! I was asked to assess this year’s national Garden Guru competition sponsored by Ronseal. Hopefully my success will not stop now. I am keen to grow and develop my design practice to enable me to take on commercial schemes as well as private gardens. I also have plans for Chelsea 2013 which I am extremely excited about and have just discovered I have been shortlisted for Cornwall’s Young Entrepreneur award. Hugo Bugg Hugo Bugg Landscapes RHS Young Garden Designer of the Year 2010 t +44 (0)777 587 0702 e design@hugobugg.com w www.hugobugg.com www.pro-landscaper.co.uk

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NATIVE PLANTING SCHEMES

COMPOSITE DECKING

GROWING TRENDS SINCE PRO LANDSCAPER LAUNCHED EIGHT YEARS AGO, SOME PRODUCTS HAVE SOARED IN POPULARIT Y, WITH LOW MAINTENANCE PLAYING A KEY ROLE IN THE APPEAL OF THIS SELECTION

WILDFLOWERS

PORCELAIN PAVING

©Global Stone

The demand for biodiversity is on the up. Last October, an Environment Bill was published making ‘biodiversity net gain’ mandatory, meaning developers are now required to ensure habitats for wildlife are left in a better state post-development. One way to do this? The use of wildflowers. Highways England, for instance, is delivering numerous wildflower roadside schemes, funded by its £300m environment fund to promote biodiversity from 2015 and 2020.

Usually chosen to complement contemporary gardens, porcelain paving adds a sleek-quality finish to a project. It has low-level water absorption, ensuring the paving is low maintenance and easy to clean, and the trend towards it has seen plenty of companies bring the product to market over the past few years. It even had its own dedicated seminar at FutureScape in November, where experts shared their tips and tricks for specifying and installing the popular paving.

©Addagrip

Durable and anti-slip with little to no maintenance required, the benefits of composite decking have made it an increasingly common choice amongst clients. A Pro Landscaper Connect report in April last year revealed 42% choose it for its longevity and 47% for its ease of maintenance. The majority (69%) of those surveyed also predicted their company’s spend on composite decking would increase throughout 2019, so there’s no signs of sales slowing down any time soon.

Whilst it’s impressive to include plants from across the globe in a project, a planting plan of British natives can be just as diverse and awe-inspiring. It’s no wonder, then, that native planting schemes have been rising in popularity – we’re likely to see more of them, too, with Brexit on the horizon. With growing concerns around being able to import plants – and accidentally importing pests and diseases, for that matter – there’s talk of turning to British growers and concentrating on species indigenous to the UK.

RESIN BOUND Permeable, long-lasting and SuDS compliant – resin bound paving has risen up the ranks thanks to its numerous qualities. In a Pro Landscaper survey earlier this year, 60% of respondents said they expected to use more resin bound (or bond) over the following 12 months, and 50% said they had seen more suppliers appear within the previous 12 months. The porous material allows water to drain through and run-off easily, reducing the amount of surface water and making it a popular choice for tree pits.

OUTDOOR KITCHENS Eating outside has always been popular in the summer months, but why not cook it outside too? Alfresco dining has gone to the next level over the past few years, with outdoor kitchens becoming a must-have for clients who love to entertain (and impress) as the technology for the equipment continues to improve. There’s even app-controlled BBQs and ovens capable of cooking a pizza in less than 60 seconds.

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ell, that’s the first 100 issues done. Thanks to all who have contributed over the past nine years – we very much appreciate your support! As we now move forward, we are keen that Pro Landscaper and FutureScape continue to tackle the topics that are key to our industry and to celebrate the people that make the sector so great. We have a packed 2020 programme of events and exhibitions and, of course, our monthly issues of Pro Landscaper. Each month, we will continue to include your favourite sections and writers, but there will also be surprises along the way. We are always aware that time is a very important asset and Pro Landscaper needs to deliver each month. If you would like additional topics covered or want to have your say, please do contact us. Finally, 2020 needs to be the year that the UK landscaping sector becomes more respected for its significant role in the UK, and it’s our mission to help make this happen. We hope we will see lots of you in 2020.”

JIM & LISA

GOING GREEN To all those at FutureScape 2019 asking Pro Landscaper to step forward in leading the charge to combat climate change, we heard you and we agree. We’re starting the year how we mean to go on – with your favourite magazine arriving every month in more sustainable packaging. The new compostable packaging can be disposed of in your household garden or food waste bin. The content team will also be looking to highlight those within the industry – from contractors to suppliers – who are exploring environmentally friendly alternatives and ensuring our industry is pushing ahead with innovative initiatives, all with the goal of helping to protect our planet.

GROWING KNOWLEDGE Our redesign last year gave us the chance to look at our Educate section and see how we could go above and beyond in offering expert business advice. We’ve tackled a wide range of topics, from mental health to industry courses to social media, but there’s a lot more we want to delve into going forward. This includes highlighting best practice, new technologies, policy changes, and back office options – we want to help companies become more efficient and to achieve their goals. If you have any ideas on how we can do this, don’t hesitate to get in touch!

GAINING GROUND As FutureScape continues to be bigger and better, we’re making the bold move this year to a bigger, purpose-built exhibition venue – ExCeL London. We also thought that one day of learning and networking with your industry colleagues just wasn’t enough, so we’re making FutureScape a two-day event, giving visitors the chance to really make the most of everything the UK’s leading landscape trade event has to offer.

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DATES FOR YOUR DIARY Friday 7 February Pro Landscaper Business Awards East Wintergarden, 43 Bank Street, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5NX

Tuesday 17 March FutureScape Spring and Pro Landscaper Podium Awards Sandown Park Racecourse, Portsmouth Road, Esher, Surrey, KT10 9AJ

Tuesday 17 and Wednesday 18 November FutureScape 2020 ExCeL London, One Western Gateway, Royal Victoria Dock, London, E16 1XL

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SINCE OUR LAUNCH IN 2011 OF THE 5 PRESIDENTS LANDSCAPE INSTITUTE OF THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF LANDSCAPE INDUSTRIES 5 CHAIRS OF THE SOCIETY 2 CHAIRS OF GARDEN DESIGNERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 4 CHAIRS OF PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPERS 6 ENVIRONMENT SECRETARIES

350 VISITORS When FutureScape first launched in 2012, there were 350 visitors. At the 2019 event, 2,923 people flocked through the doors to explore what the event had to offer

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PORTFOLIOS

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32% LANDSCAPING 25% GARDEN DESIGN 16% DESIGN AND BUILD 11% LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 8% GROUNDS MAINTENANCE 4% LOCAL AUTHORITY 4% OTHER 2012

2019

2,923 VISITORS

331 150 WINNERS 77% MALE 23% FEMALE

OUR BIGGEST ISSUE

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F E AT U R E GARDEN P R O L A N D S C A P E R TO O K A TO U R O F T H E N E W AG I U S E VO LU T I O N G A R D E N AT T H E R OYA L B O TA N I C GARDENS, KEW, WHICH COMBINES SCIENCE AND H O R T I C U LT U R E I N A T R U LY R E M A R K A B L E WAY

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hough the rose-wrapped pergola and hundreds of eye-catching plant species will no doubt draw in the visitors to Kew’s latest addition, it’s the science behind the space, rather than the aesthetics, which really steals the show. The new Agius Evolution Garden blends science and horticulture, showcasing how plants have progressed over a timeframe of more than 350 million years. It opened to the public back in the summer, in the same year Kew celebrated its 260th anniversary. Around 700 different types of plants are divided into eight ‘rooms’ within the garden, which are separated by low yew hedges. These rooms reflect the DNA-based classification of plants, which the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APG) – including researchers from Kew Science – created in 1998, and now exists in its fourth version. Its research has been used to uncover Kew's Plant Tree of Life, and the layout of the Agius Evolution Garden is based on the branches of this tree. “At the bottom are the earliest plant groups and it becomes more recent as you go up the tree,” explains Richard Wilford, head of garden design and collection support at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. “Each branch represents a branch of evolution, so all of the groups originally evolved from a single ancestor.” Richard, who also designed the Great Broad Walk Borders, has been a horticulturist at Kew since 1989. The garden design department is a fairly recent addition, though. The department was set up around five years ago after Richard had completed a diploma in garden design, and is now made up of himself and Suzie Jewell, who designed the new Children’s Garden. They both work closely with the horticulture team, and in the case of the Agius Evolution Garden, with those at Kew Science has well.

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“There has been a real desire to get the research by Kew Science out into the gardens a bit more. Although we have the Kew Science Festival every year, this garden is the first really good example of its work being on permanent display. Kew is a scientific institution at the end

CATEGORISING PLANTS IN THIS WAY HAS A NUMBER OF BENEFITS, SUCH AS FINDING THOSE WHICH ARE MORE RESILIENT TO CLIMATE CHANGE AMICIA ZYGOMERIS

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of the day; there are more scientists here than there are horticulturists, but there’s very little representation of science in the gardens. The Agius Evolution Garden represents something which Kew is actively working on right now.” When Richard first started thinking about the design of the garden, he conferred with Kew Science to decide how the rooms should be arranged and the groups which should be represented. The interpretation team also spoke to Kew Science to develop different explanatory panels throughout the garden. There were three aims of the garden to include in the design. Richard says these were to bring the classification up to date; to make it clearer for visitors, with different rooms and interpretation signs; and to make it more aesthetically pleasing as a garden feature. “The area has always been a garden that’s shown plant classification, but it wasn’t doing a very good job of making it obvious to visitors what they were looking at. There was a series of rectangular beds which had been there since the 1870s. Each bed had its own plant family,

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and the order represented the classification system, which was out of the date. “Another problem with the previous garden’s system is that some of the families are quite boring visually, such as the nettle family. So, we wanted to mix up the planting a bit more, and the idea of making the rooms helped me to do that. I didn’t have to stick to one family in one section, I could spread them around the room.” Originally, the plant species were grouped by their morphology – their external characteristics. Whilst DNA research has predominantly supported this, there have still been some surprises, such as the London plane tree and the lotus flower being related, the nettle family being closely related to the rose family, and peonies – which have always been classified alongside buttercups in the Ranunculaceae family – are more closely related to the Saxifragaceae family. “It’s an example of parallel evolution where the plants have ended up looking similar but are not actually related at all,” says Richard. Visitors start in the rooms with the non-flowering plants, such as ferns and conifers which first appeared around 350 million years ago. These were the first plants on land, as plant life originally evolved in water. “Equisetales (horsetails) are some of the earliest known plants to live on land – they developed a vascular system, with a phloem or xylem. This evolved and allowed plants to start colonising the land, allowing them to get water up from the ground through their roots into the branches and leaves.” They can then move through to the earliest flowering plants in the magnoliids room, where there are simple, bowl-shaped flowers which are not specially adapted to certain pollinators. This is followed by the room of early diverging eudicots, where plants have become slightly more adapted to specific insects. “Some of the

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plants are still very simple with the bowl-shape, such as the Welsh poppy, but there’s also plants like delphiniums, hooded flowers which are more adapted to specific types of pollinators. As insects evolved, plants evolved alongside them and used the insects for pollination.”

SANGUISORBA 'BLACKTHORN'

IT’S THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE SPACE, RATHER THAN THE AESTHETICS, WHICH REALLY STEALS THE SHOW Moving throughout each room, visitors can learn more about each of the groups and the classification system behind them, by reading the information boards around the garden. In the rosids room, for example, a sign points people to an Ampelopsis which represents the grapevine family. “The grapevine family is one of

the earliest groups to appear – around 145 million years ago,” says Richard. “We didn’t want a grapevine in here though, as we thought it would take up too much room and would be too difficult to grow. So, we got an Ampelopsis, also known as porcelain berry, named after its lovely colourful berries.” Grasses, palms, orchids, lilies and spring bulbs can be found in the adjacent room, the monocots. This is one of Richard’s favourites, partly because of his work with bulb collections. “Monocots are plants that have one seed leaf, that’s one characteristic they all share. They appeared about 150 million years ago and continue to evolve. Orchids are some of the most advanced flowering plants now.” Most of the plants used throughout the garden are herbaceous. This follows the tradition of the area, which used to be known as the ‘herbaceous grounds’. “We’ve introduced some woody plants just to increase the diversity. All but one plant is hardy – the cycad, which has now gone in for the winter. It’s so iconic as a prehistoric type of plant. But it’s the only non-hardy plant as we didn’t want to spend loads of time taking plants in and out all the time.” Richard says the biggest challenge of creating the garden, which was built by Ground Control and planted by the team at Kew, was acquiring the various plant species. “In some cases, it’s quite a specific group of plants which are not easily found in the trade. So, about a third of the plants were rescued from the old scheme. We also used plants from within Kew, and the rest of them we had to buy in from trade – not masses, though. We didn’t spend a huge amount on plants.” It's worth the effort, though. Categorising plants in this way has a number of benefits, such as finding those which are more resilient to climate change. “Looking at the DNA can help us see if there are certain plants which seem

Photographs ©RBG Kew

ECHINACEA 'WHITE SWAN'

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NURTURE

FRANCOA SONCHIFOLIA

BEE ON HELIANTHUS

Photographs ©RBG Kew

to be resilient to climate change, and the relatives of these plants might be resilient too. DNA research allows you to work out what other plants might have certain characteristics. For growing crops, you could look at close relatives and grow something which is more resilient and breed that into new crops.” The classification system can also be used for medicinal purposes. “Closely related plants are likely to have similar chemical compounds. So, if a plant has a certain medicinal property that you wanted to take advantage of but is very rare, then you can look at close relatives that are maybe more common and get the same compound. You wouldn’t know this without doing research into DNA and finding out what’s closely related.” As Kew Science continues to discover more about plant DNA, Richard says the garden itself is likely to evolve, with new plants being added as well for more a more diverse range on show. The next focus for the garden design team at Kew will be the kitchen garden. This sits alongside the Agius Evolution Garden and was first created for celebrity chef Raymond Blanc to use in the BBC’s ‘Kew on a Plate’. Suzie will be taking charge on the design for this and will be looking to include yet more of the work from Kew Science, as its research continues to go hand in hand with horticulture.

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18/12/2019 09:43


ProLandscaper 100th edition(198x128).pdf

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WHAT WERE YOU DOING IN 2011 AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE?

NURTURE

THE ETHICS

OF PL AST I CS LEWIS NORMAND CONSIDERS THE ACTION WHICH NEEDS TO BE TAKEN IN TACKLING THE PERSISTENT PROBLEM OF PLASTIC IN THE INDUSTRY

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ver the last couple of years, our attention has been drawn to the reality of plastic pots’ capacity for harming our environment. While this is true in a sense, I have fundamental issues here, namely that most black plastic pots in UK horticulture can be recycled and most are at least partly made of recycled material. The issue is that when it comes to domestic recycling, most local authorities won’t take them due to scanners on the recycling conveyor belts not being able to see black plastic. This raises a question or two. Firstly, what happens to other black plastic items – are they recycled or not? Secondly, why can’t we develop better scanners to enable them to see black plastic on the conveyor belt? As a plants supplier, I have found several options for plastic pot recycling over the last decade and I am not aware of any professional grower who doesn’t consider the implications of plastic in their work. Moreover, I feel that the industry reacted pretty swiftly and thoughtfully to the issue, though there remains much to be done. Historically, one of the best ways for growers to return used pots was to the manufacturer, though cost of transport is now often a limiting factor. Pot manufacturers have invested time, money and effort in trying to find futureproofed, working solutions to this issue, and we seem to have made good progress so far. The nursery that I work for has always been happy to take back pots that we supplied and send them off to be recycled correctly. We experience very few pot returns each year, and even those who incorrectly believed that we ‘didn’t take back pots’ have not been

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forthcoming with returning these pots for us to deal with when corrected and reassured. So, while I’m sure there are those who diligently return pots to their nursery supplier, I don’t think it is anywhere near as great an undertaking as the industry expected. A number of growers have started to produce in the new taupe pots, which are both recycled and recyclable using current domestic recycling scanning technology. This is great, though I am

I AM NOT AWARE OF ANY PROFESSIONAL GROWER WHO DOESN’T CONSIDER THE IMPLICATIONS OF PLASTIC IN THEIR WORK

yet to be convinced of their environmental superiority and they remain a few pence more per pot. This means that the cost of plants has to rise to accommodate these changes, as it will with new plant passport labelling requirements. I was pleased to watch a YouTube video uploaded by ABC News Australia – ‘Have Australian scientists discovered a recycling solution to our plastic problem?’ – that highlighted a new recycling technique. It can take a variety of plastics from the four-fifths of currently unrecycled or unrecyclable plastics and reform them back to a petrochemical level. From there, they can be reformed into new plastics or even turned into petrol or other fuels.

2011 was a year of significant and positive change for me. My son Logan was born, we moved house, I got engaged to my now wife and left teaching – and over 1,000 students – after 10 years to work in plant sales as a retail manager, then company sales manager. A lot happened then (as it has every year since) and I wouldn’t change that for the world.

A number of similarly alternative projects have been undertaken across the world over the last five years or so, with great results on the horizon, but the lag to move forward with large-scale plastic repurposing is tiresome. A lack of a focused response from the world’s governments and a general apathy for change or business investment is severely holding back the well-minded majority. So, aside from new plastic recycling technologies, we need a few things to help reduce the existing burden of plastic and enable us to move forward. Firstly, costs need to be driven down through expansive investment to scale works, making it cheaper to recycle the 80% of plastic without commercially acceptable solutions in place. We need to greatly reduce the production of existing types of plastic polymers that cannot be recycled with ease. We also need to develop modern plastics with more cost-effective recycling capabilities and, where possible, reduce our dependency on plastics and research alternatives. Finally, as suppliers, we need to encourage our clients to return plastic waste to be recycled and to lobby councils across the UK to develop new systems. While some of this is seemingly bordering on rocket science, much of it is about strategic or attitudinal change. There isn’t any one group to blame here, and we all play a part in making change. We just need to ensure that we continue to push for it as individuals and companies.

ABOUT LEWIS NORMAND Lewis has worked in a wide variety of roles within horticulture over a 20-year career. He has lectured on garden design and horticulture, and designed gardens in the UK, Europe and the Middle East. Since 2011, Lewis has focused on nursery sales, now working as sales manager at Bernhard’s Nurseries, and has helped to launch a number of new plants into the UK plant market. He is a specialist supplier to show gardens, supplying over 100 gardens at major shows.

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17/12/2019 08:39


NURTURE

TREE SELECTION:

URBAN LANDSCAPES

A N D R E W H I R O N S S H A R E S T H E K E Y C O N S I D E R AT I O N S W H E N C H O O S I N G T R E E S FO R TOW N S A N D C I T I E S

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rees are a major component of the green infrastructure of our towns and cities. As such, they are associated with a whole range of benefits, ranging from improving our mental wellbeing to cooling our urban heat islands. However, unless you happen to be a saproxylic insect or a decay fungi, the benefits that trees bring is proportional to their vitality. Consequently, it is imperative that the tree species selected for a site are well suited to grow in that particular environment. Effective tree selection relies on the consideration of four factors: constraints, tree ecophysiology, ecosystem services and aesthetics (see below). Constraints capture the various site, biological and practical challenges that come with every planting site. These include the physical constraints of above- and below-ground environments, the vulnerability to emerging pests and pathogens, the availability of the plant material, and project budget. Tree ecophysiology determines the suitability of the tree species for the site as it integrates the species’ climatic preference, successional

status and environmental stress tolerance. In the UK, we can grow most trees from other temperate environments so are lucky to have trees from China, Asia, Europe and North America growing within our urban environments. However, some species from very continental temperate climates do prefer a little more summer heat than the UK currently offers,

QUERCUS PALUSTRIS

so can perform rather poorly unless all other growing conditions are close to ideal. Compared to forest environments, many urban planting sites are relatively open, so have high light conditions, low humidity and less fertile soil. This is much more closely allied to

an early successional environment favoured by so-called ‘pioneer’ species. It is partly for this reason that birches are used so widely, but many other species grow well as pioneers. These include red maple (Acer rubrum), golden rain tree (Koelreuteria paniculata), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), Sargent’s cherry (Prunus sargentii), pin oak (Quercus palustris) and Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata). Although urban environments are highly varied, they are often associated with stressful planting environments. Paved environments are particularly challenging as these often come with small rooting volumes, impermeable surfaces and high levels of reflected heat. Attributes such as drought tolerance can be essential for a tree to thrive as a street tree. Once the primary factors considering constraints and tree ecophysiology have been satisfied, the tree stands a great chance of long-term survival. From the remaining palette of trees, the secondary criteria of ecosystem services and aesthetics can be more fully considered. In this way, a tree that both performs well and is able to make positive contributions to society can be secured. More information on tree selection can be found in ‘Tree Species Selection for Green Infrastructure: A Guide for Specifiers’, published by the Trees & Design Action Group. It is available for free from www.tdag.org.uk. References: Hirons, A.D. and Sjöman, H. (2019) Tree Species Selection for Green Infrastructure: A Guide for Specifiers, Issue 1.3. Trees & Design Action Group.

A B O U T A N D R E W D. H I R O N S

KEY FACTORS INVOLVED WITH TREE SELECTION FOR GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE. FROM: HIRONS AND SJÖMAN (2019)

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Andrew D. Hirons is a senior lecturer in arboriculture at Myerscough College. As well as teaching modules relating to tree biology, tree establishment and tree management he has a research programme motivated by the need to create resilience in our urban forests. His current research focus is on using plant traits to inform species selection for urban environments.

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NURTURE

P ROVEN AN CE P RE FE RE NC E versus

JONATHAN BOURNE SUGGESTS THOSE INVOLVED AT THE START OF THE SCHEME SHOULD PUT LOCALITY AHEAD OF A CLIENT’S PREFERRED CHOICE WHEN IT COMES TO SOURCING MATERIALS

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ow that we exist in a world of high-speed online shopping, we want items delivered instantly, no matter where they come from and who has to break their back to deliver them. When it comes to goods and services, there is a battle between those who value provenance and laud the rise of ‘localism’ – best demonstrated in the resurgence of local farm shops – and those who don’t mind if their blueberries come from Bolivia, as long as blueberries are on the shelves. It is fairly obvious that flying fruit and vegetables all over the world in this way is unsustainable. At some point, we will have to live with the stark realisation that we can only consume asparagus in May and June, and that some of our favourite consumables just aren’t available all year round. It boils down to creating a sustainable supply chain and using materials that are available locally, even if they aren’t the client’s top preference. When architects and designers draw up initial plans including preferred plant lists, for example, do they consider where their preferred materials might have to be hauled from in order to achieve the ‘ideal’ scheme? Is the ‘ideal’ growing media available locally or, to the detriment of a project’s carbon footprint, will it have to be hauled in instead?

We were recently handed a specification that required the pH of the soil to fall between 6.0 and 6.2, and whilst this is not unachievable, sourcing a local ‘as dug’ soil to match the acidic requirement would be impossible. The only choice would be to fabricate or blend a low pH BS 3882 multipurpose topsoil from multiple components, and then transport this hybrid blend into the scheme. It would surely be far more ecologically sound to work with local materials to create a more indigenous planting scheme.

IT BOILS DOWN TO CREATING A SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN AND USING MATERIALS THAT ARE AVAILABLE LOCALLY, EVEN IF THEY AREN’T THE CLIENT’S TOP PREFERENCE There is an increasing trend to specify extremely narrow pH windows for soil. Whilst it would be lovely to incorporate azaleas and rhododendrons into a landscape, if the soil is naturally alkaline, would it not make more sense to play to this and plant trees and flowers that thrive in a higher pH environment? Each year, millions of trees are imported into the UK due to the cost savings of their

incubation in countries such as Holland and Germany. Many of these trees are native to the UK and the seeds have been exported, only to be imported back when semi-mature. There are numerous UK-based nurseries that can support the growing interest in semi-mature tree planting – architects should be encouraged to work with these nurseries when putting their plans together. Many of the specifications that cross our desks are copied and pasted from older documents and pay zero attention to what is available locally. A wildflower meadow may be a stunning visual, but how practical is it to cultivate and then maintain? Wildflowers will only survive in a low nutrient soil where more vigorous species do not out-compete them. We have recently delivered our low fertility soil to Scotland for a wildflower scheme and, although we welcome the business, I wonder if this is down to a lack of communication between the buyer and local suppliers. Whilst Bourne Amenity can usually source any item specified, it might be time for architects to choose provenance over preference and start designing schemes that work in harmony with the local environment and reduce the miles imported materials travel.

A B O U T J O N AT H A N B O U R N E Jonathan Bourne is sales director at Bourne Amenity, which has been supplying hard and soft landscaping materials to the industry for over 40 years, working with civil engineering companies, landscape designers and contractors.

www.bourneamenity.co.uk

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NURTURE

PLANTING ON TREND P R OV E N D E R N U R S E R I E S S H A R E S I TS P R E D I C T E D U P C O M I N G P L A N T I N G T R E N D S FO R T H I S Y E A R A S W E L L A S S O M E O F I TS OW N P O P U L A R P R O D U C TS

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rovender Nurseries is at the forefront of plant choice. We offer a diverse range of plants for our customers from our 18-acre cash and carry site in Kent. We listen to our customers and find that, on the whole, many of our customers want plants that solve an issue they have – plants that are low maintenance,

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disease resistant or simple to install are always sought after, as are alternatives to Buxus. Provender Nurseries predicts that in 2020 and beyond, the demand for low maintenance and diseaseresistant varieties will grow even further. With this in mind, we are working in collaboration with Proven Winners® and Covergreen®. Proven Winners® is a range of plants that combines a long flowering season or season of interest, strong compact growth, hardiness and low maintenance requirements, resulting in reduced maintenance time and costs for both the domestic and commercial market. Meanwhile, the quick and easy-to-install angle is delivered with Covergreen®, a ready-to-use ground cover that creates instant impact. Consisting of nine plant varieties, the evergreen carpet choices are low maintenance, easy to set up, and can be combined with perennials, bulbs and larger shrubs. Also on our radar are alternatives to Buxus ball shapes. Last year saw a massive rise in sales figures of Pinus mugo varieties that are, again, low maintenance and maintain their shape with no effort. Meanwhile,

Pittosporum ball type options are gaining in numbers again – Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Golf Ball’ has now been joined by ‘Pompom’, ‘Silver Ball’, ‘Glo Ball’, ‘Beach Ball’, ‘Golden Ball’ and a brand new variety called Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Bannow Bay’, a variegated sport of ‘Tom Thumb’ with all the same attributes and added extra colour. Of course, Ilex crenata continues to fill a gap and is often used to replace diseased Buxus. In autumn 2019, Provender Nurseries held an event – ‘New Season, New Plants’ – where we introduced our customers to new varieties of plants, including Lonicera nitida ‘Scoop’. During the event, many remarked on its similarities with Thymus. Farfugium japonicum ‘Wavy Gravy’ will raise to the top of planting lists in 2020 as it has interesting evergreen foliage with a distinctive wavy edge. Laurus nobilis ‘Angustifolia’ and ‘Bay Junior’ were introduced a couple of years ago, and are being used more frequently in designs. Looking beyond 2020, we feel that plants that are bred for disease resistance will be at the forefront of sustainability-focused customer requirements across the industry.

ABOUT Provender Nurseries is a wholesale, trade-only plant and sundries supplier in the south-east. It continually strives to bring its customers the best of what is available and regularly informs its customers via social media, its website, monthly emails and events. Its 18-acre cash and carry is fully stocked all year round with plants familiar, diverse and new introductions.

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 77

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WHAT WERE YOU DOING IN 2011 AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE?

T H E VA LU E O F

S U RV E YS LEE BESTALL STRESSES THE IMPORTANCE OF GARDEN SURVEYS AND DISCUSSES WHY OBTAINING A PROFESSIONAL SURVEY CAN BE KEY FOR GARDEN PROJECTS OF ALL SIZES

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t was a cold, wet January morning about seven years ago when I decided enough was enough. As my new recruit stood shivering with staff in hand, and as I tried to level the dumpy on its tripod, we made a pledge that this would be the last garden survey we ever did in-house. Previously, I’d used a local surveyor to gather measurements for me on medium and large jobs. For smaller ones, I was of the mindset that a client wouldn’t want to pay for a proper survey. I also felt that it seemed like overkill to get a topographical survey on a piece of land no larger than a terraced backyard. I was wrong on both counts, and ever since that dreary winter day when we returned to the office to draw up the survey, only to realise we’d missed out the final triangulation, I’ve never looked back.

Many of our clients are refurbishing a property or building an extension, so usually some kind of survey will exist. In my experience, these are rarely accurate and are usually a blend of an online survey (typically purchased for around £15) and/or some additional measurements from an architect who – for some reason only known to them – always presume that buildings are square!

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This made me smile. Back in 2011, I was working alone, designing and planting small spaces, as well as teaching at a college to make ends meet. I rented a desk from my dad in a tiny office which was meters away from the main London to Sheffield trainline. The office literally shook every 30 minutes – as did I when the rent left my bank account! We now have eight members of staff, a beautiful office in a listed building and some of the nicest clients.

The cost we pay for a topographical survey ranges from £250 for a small garden (if using a local company) to between £500 and £750 for a larger garden, and maybe a couple of thousand for a small estate. This will likely vary throughout the county though. The list of reasons why you should obtain a proper survey is huge – but let’s consider a few important ones, beginning with insurance. What happens if you use a proper surveyor who is insured, and they produce inaccuracies? When the design is completed and then quoted,

ESTIMATING QUANTITIES FOR HARD OR SOFT LANDSCAPING, WHETHER YOU DO THIS IN-HOUSE OR USE A QUANTITY SURVEYOR, CAN ONLY BE AS ACCURATE AS YOUR PLANS you have the assurance that the accuracy of the plans (if based on the topographical survey) may not be down to you as the designer. Estimating quantities for hard or soft landscaping, whether you do this in-house or use a quantity surveyor, can only be as accurate as your plans. Setting out plans is also so much easier when you’re confident that the survey is correct, and creating planting plans is a dream with properly measured borders illustrating existing shrubs and trees. Finally, I think it’s cheaper to get in a professional than it is to begin clambering around a site with a mate. There’s no feeling

worse than snagging your jacket as you pull a flexible tape measure through an overgrown shrub, only to find out when you get back to the office with your soggy bits of paper that you’ve missed some key running measurements or offsets. I’ll end by stressing the importance of taking this survey to site and layering up more information for yourself. This can include labelling the identified trees and shrubs to remove or retain, making notes on the positioning of the sun, lifting inspection chambers to properly check out drainage, identifying drainage issues and annotating boundary lines. If you do this, it will lead to a much smoother and thorough process for all involved.

A B O U T L E E B E S TA L L Lee Bestall has been designing and managing the construction of gardens in his signature style for more than 10 years – and his honest, genuine passion is infectious. He regularly writes gardening and outdoor-style articles for magazines, is brand ambassador for Spear & Jackson and a stand-in presenter for BBC Radio Sheffield’s Gardeners’ Question Hour.

www.bestall.co.uk

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EDUCATE

WITH FRESH H O R T I C U LT U R A L C A R E E R S S E T TO SPONSOR THE E M P LOY E R O F T H E Y E A R C AT E G O RY AT T H E U P C O M I N G P R O L A N D S C A P E R B U S I N E S S AWA R D S , D I R EC TO R M A R I A N B A R K E R E X P L A I N S W H AT B E I N G A TO P E M P LOY E R M E A N S

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s a recruitment specialist and business owner, sponsoring the Employer of the Year category was an obvious choice. As a recruiter and employer, it is essential that that I listen to the expectations and needs of my own staff as well as those people who come to us seeking either temporary or permanent work. We all know the adage ‘you are only as good as your staff’, and, therefore, it is essential once you have found the right people that you retain them. As a recruitment business, we hear a wide range of issues from employees who come to us looking for a new job or temporary work. In today’s market, with staff shortages at crisis point, it is more important than ever that, as an employer, you stand out from the crowd. Money is of course important, but in our industry – which historically is not highly paid – there are other ways to value your staff and retain the best. Landscaping is a tough industry which asks a lot from the people that work within its realms. Staff operate in quite challenging weather and environments with very early starts – sometimes just saying thank you and acknowledging this makes all the difference. So, what else might make you stand out?

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E XC E E D I N G E X P EC TAT I O N S

AS AN EMPLOYER Obviously, what you can achieve will depend on what is practically and financially feasible. Achieving a work/life balance in today’s world will always be top of an employee’s agenda. This could be something as simple as the option to work a day from home at agreed intervals or

FLEXIBILITY IS KEY TO ALLOWING YOUR BUSINESS TO THRIVE AND EMPLOYEES TO COPE WITH THE DEMANDS OF MODERN LIVING a periodic day to accommodate family time. Flexibility is key to allowing your business to thrive and employees to cope with the demands of modern living. Training and development can be key for many employees and can be provided either in house or externally. Allowing your employees to enhance their knowledge and gain new

skills can only be a win-win, providing they are given the chance to use said newly acquired skills. Above all, as an employer you need to communicate your goals clearly. Increasingly, employees are looking to their employer to have clear commitments towards the environment and green issues. These, and other attributes, will be looked out for when it comes to recognising talent in the Employer of the Year entries, especially as companies strive to push the bar even higher in our industry.

ABOUT MARIAN BARKER Marian has spent her entire career within the recruitment sector and has worked as a senior manager for major high street companies. In 2000 she took the plunge and started Fresh Horticultural Careers, originally as known as Andersplus. For the past two decades her passion for recruitment has become a passion for horticulture, and the business has become one of the go-to recruiters which focuses on the landscape and horticulture sector. www.freshhortcareers.com

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17/12/2019 11:46


EDUCATE

A D ECA D E O F

L I V I N G L I F E O U TS I D E S A L E S D I R E C TO R GUY DOUGLASS D E TA I L S M I L L B OA R D ’ S JOURNEY FROM NICHE M A N U FAC T U R E R TO MARKET LEADER

A

s Pro Landscaper launched back in 2011, Millboard (then sold under the company name of Elmdene) was still in its infancy, but growing rapidly. We’d not long entered the UK market, but our timber-look decking, comprising of resin and mineral stone, had resonated with buyers, encouraging us to expand our collection. Those early days saw us continually tweaking our core product, listening to customer feedback to get ‘it’ exactly right. We knew our developing client base loved our attention to detail. Each of our boards was (and still is) moulded from carefully chosen planks of authentic timber, and hand-finished in multi-tonal paints to create a truly authentic look. Our customers were enthusiastic about these points, so we resolved, even at that early stage, to always manufacture to the same level of craftsmanship. The start of this decade saw the company move premises and change names. The popular product brand name ‘Millboard’ became the company name as well. Additionally, our decking now had an accompanying subframe

material made of 100% recycled plastic. Our presence was growing in the marketplace, and by 2014, Millboard’s ascent caught the attention of The Telegraph, which listed the company in the ‘Top 1000 Companies to Inspire Britain.’

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As the decade progressed, the owners of Millboard – the Douglass family – turned their attention to ensure all processes and methods were up to high standards. ISO accreditations 9001, 14001 and 18001 soon followed, alongwith an Approved Installer Scheme, the introduction of the new 2K coating, and an independent verification of Millboard’s carbon

I’M PROUD TO SAY THAT MILLBOARD IS STILL A FAMILYBASED BUSINESS AND STILL MANUFACTURES 100% OF ITS STOCK IN THE UK footprint. Millboard soon found itself shortlisted for awards (including the Pro Landscaper Business Awards) and started to appear in home and garden magazines worldwide. By this stage, Millboard’s decking and cladding had gained such global recognition that the products could be bought in 18 countries. The company had also expanded its range to include pedestal supports, Durafix® ‘disappearing’ screws, and a useful multi-spacer tool. Today, Millboard offers a colour palette and various textures to complement any design scheme, from the slick and contemporary Brushed Basalt, to the dreamy and rustic Vintage Oak. The adaptability of the material has seen it displayed in many prominent garden and horticulture shows. From featuring in David

Harber’s Best Trade Stand at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, to winning the gold medal at the Ideal Home Show, Millboard has consistently attracted recognition for its stand-out qualities. I’m proud to say that Millboard is still a family-based business and still manufactures 100% of its stock in the UK. Over the past year, we celebrated our connections to the architectural world by opening a new showroom in Clerkenwell, an area of London synonymous with British design heritage. We also launched a new information resource, the Outdoor Design Hub, for professional landscapers, architects and builders. This hub of educational materials is free, and provides a single source for desktop learning, covering a broad range of useful information related to the world of outdoor design. Visitors can even earn CPD points by engaging with our online materials. Looking back, I can’t believe how far we’ve come, and I’m thrilled that Pro Landscaper has also found a loyal and growing readership throughout the same time period. From all at Millboard, here’s to the next decade!

ABOUT GUY DOUGLASS Guy Douglass grew up in a family business, one of the leading landscape industry paving company – Stonemarket (since sold to Marshalls). Stonemarket’s attention to detail was renowned throughout the industry and that exacting philosophy later transferred through to Millboard. Along with his brothers and father, Guy developed the original concept for Millboard before bringing it to market in 2007. Today, he is still heavily involved in the business and is now global sales director.

www.millboard.co.uk

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 83

16/12/2019 09:26


ADVERTORIAL

R O L AW N ’ S S A L E S & M A R K E T I N G D I R EC TO R J O N AT H A N H I L L E X P L A I N S W H Y H AV I N G I S O C E R T I F I C AT I O N I S B E N E F I C I A L FO R B OT H T H E C O M PA N Y AND THE CLIENT

Y

ou may have seen ISO certification for quality and environmental management systems advertised by leading brands, but what difference does it make? At Rolawn, certification is a hugely important part of our organisation, so what does it mean for you? At a headline level, it means you know exactly what you’ll get when you order from Rolawn, helping keep your customers happy and your business on track. Certification builds trust ISO standards are widely recognised as the measure of what ‘good’ looks like. To attain certification, an organisation must provide evidence that they are meeting the stringent standards set by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). Compliance is then audited every year to ensure standards are being maintained, processes are being upheld and improvements implemented. We have always operated a continual cycle of reviewing and refining products and processes. These measures are there to help reassure you that everything is being done correctly and that the products you purchase are manufactured responsibly and to the highest quality. Choosing a trustworthy supplier will also help to increase client confidence and trust in your business. ISO certification helps to focus our efforts on maintaining the high standards that we have already demonstrated in order to continue developing and improving.

SETTING THE

S TA N D A R D

The risks are managed and opportunities identified Documenting and auditing processes ensures that everyone involved is aware of and working to the correct standards. Rolawn’s in-house ISO team conducts a programme of internal audits, visiting all relevant areas of the company to check that procedures are being followed accurately. Corrective action is

WE HAVE ALWAYS OPERATED A CONTINUAL CYCLE OF REVIEWING AND REFINING PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES implemented if necessary, with actions recorded in an improvement log. These actions are seen as opportunities for improvement, closing a gap in a process. In many ways, these audits are central to business continuity. Keeping abreast of the latest legislation and forthcoming legislative changes ensures we are prepared and ready to adapt our practices so as not to interrupt our supply. For instance, understanding where and when Clean Air Zones may be implemented will help us make the appropriate changes to our distribution channels to keep delivery schedules on target. Feedback plays a key role One of the core principles measured by ISO 9000:2015 for quality management is customer feedback and how it is used to shape a business. The aim is always to exceed customer expectations, something which entails listening to and acting on customer feedback. For this

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reason, one of the main agenda items for our ISO management meetings is customer feedback. Detailed information from customer services and independent online feedback from Feefo provide key data on products and services which is monitored and addressed at management and board level. Feedback can also come from external experts who we liaise with when gaining certification from other organisations, such as the Forest Stewardship Council® and Green Achievers. We engage with their environmental specialists to ensure that we meet their criteria for certification and that we are fully conversant with issues that are currently affecting or may potentially impact customers, and consequently need to be included within our strategic planning. Protection for all parties Ultimately, these standards minimise risk and should build consumer confidence. Seeing that products and systems have been independently audited and certified, year after year, demonstrates reliability and trustworthiness. Setting benchmarks like this encourages an uplift in standards, helping to improve the reputation of the industry as a whole. Pictured: Rolawn ISO Team L-R: Executive director Chris Matson, farm secretary Deborah Wiles, office manager Jen Henzell, head of customer services Emily Kirkland, bulk products manager Ian Elwick

A B O U T J O N AT H A N H I L L After joining Rolawn in 2003 as regional sales manager, Jonathan Hill moved to York three years later to learn more about turf production and the market. Since becoming sales and marketing director in 2011, Jonathan’s focus has been to drive sales revenue by aligning Rolawn products and services with customer needs.

www.rolawn.co.uk

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

17/12/2019 08:47


Roof terrace planters - London A highly enlightened solution

This collection of 26 bespoke planters graces the roof terrace garden, created by award-winning designer Andy Sturgeon, for this Art Deco building in Soho. By choosing to manufacture them in aluminium rather than mild steel, we were able to make them two-thirds lighter and avoid any potential structural concerns. Skilful welding ensured strength and integrity, with meticulous polishing producing a seamless finish to our customary standards of perfection. View this project online: www.outdoordesign.co.uk

Whatever you can imagine, we can make it a reality in metal. To discuss your ideas, email info@outdoordesign.co.uk or call us now on 01903 716960.

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WHAT WERE YOU DOING IN 2011 AND WHAT HAS CHANGED SINCE? In 2011, the emphasis was very much on delivering more with less whilst battling budget constraints and increasing profitability. In today’s world, our environment takes centre stage and we have realised that our parks and green spaces are a key asset which must be managed and maintained as such.

THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM WITH THE LOOMING ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS DOMINATING OUR CONVERSATIONS, ANGUS LINDSAY CONSIDERS THE CHANGES THAT INDUSTRY MACHINERY WILL BE FACING AND STEPS CLIENTS COULD TAKE IN THEIR OWN GARDENS IN THE FUTURE

F

or the first time in 26 years, I missed the heady excitement of SALTEX, preferring instead to go on holiday. But from the build-up prior to the event, and the press coverage following it, I felt as though I had been there – albeit without the sore feet, parched throat and eye-watering car park charges! I’m not going to comment on what was there, as I wasn’t. But one thing that shouldn’t have escaped visitors’ notice is that, for diesel engines, the new Stage 5 regulations coming into force next year will mean that engines of over 25hp will have to follow their bigger siblings to reduce emissions through the use of DPFs and possibly AdBlue systems. Two things are certain: machine weights will increase, meaning that it will be more difficult to transport these machines on the back of a 3500kg beaver-tail truck, and machine prices will rise dramatically, with figures of more than £5k over existing prices being quoted. There’s no getting away from it, the cost of equipment is going to rise dramatically in the next 12 to 18 months, and next year’s SALTEX will be a very different place. This will force us and our clients to think differently, but we need

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to be doing this now. Electric and gas power options are becoming more commercial, but they’re not cheap. Clients, managers, procurement, and tendering teams will have to consider what equipment is available to do the job, rather than look at the job and apportion the equipment. Clients will have to consider where their priorities lie and take a more realistic approach to achieving what they want. Stripped, arising-free lawns may look fantastic, but at what cost to the environment?

STRIPPED, ARISING-FREE LAWNS MAY LOOK FANTASTIC, BUT AT WHAT COST TO THE ENVIRONMENT? The crisis within our environment is real and features every day in our media in some form or other, and we as an industry are not immune from affecting it. While landscape architects and environmental consultants do their best to design flood alleviation schemes, provide green arteries and turn derelict spaces into green oases, constructing and maintaining these still seems to utilise a large amount of fossil fuel. Is it not possible to consider not only how the maintenance is to be done but what is to be used to deliver that maintenance? Should the client not take more responsibility in this decision rather than going for the cheapest option? Whilst I am not about to sign up with the Extinction Rebellion movement, I do think we

are running out of time. No matter how slight the revisions we make are, our industry should be at the forefront of making change, whether

it’s in the construction phase or in the choice of materials and equipment that we use and how we choose to utilise them. Improving efficiency is all well and good, and mechanisation has its benefits, but the last time I looked the world’s population is still increasing, so what are we going to do with all these people?

A B O U T A N G U S L I N D S AY Angus spent several years working on arable farms in Scotland before joining VSO in Egypt, implementing a mechanisation programme, managing field operations for a commercial cotton plantation in Nigeria and working as a contract instructor for Massey Ferguson in Yemen. He has an Agricultural Engineering and Mechanisation Management MSc from Silsoe, and joined Glendale as machinery manager in 1994, then idverde UK in 2009.

angus.lindsay@idverde.co.uk

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 87

16/12/2019 10:26


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stoneworld.co.uk 01844 279274 sales@stoneworld.co.uk

17/12/2019 11:51


M OV I N G

EDUCATE

WITH THE

TIMES

MORE MANUFACTURERS ARE NOW LAUNCHING ULTRA-LOW EMISSIONS COMMERCIAL VEHICLES. HERE, WE TAKE A LOOK AT THEIR PROS AND CONS

P

utting your trust in an electric car when used mainly for leisure purposes is one thing, and having faith that it will be a reliable workhorse for your business is quite another. But the fact that electric vans are becoming increasingly available – and popular – suggests that landscapers should give this some serious consideration. What are the positives? For many, a huge positive is saving on running costs. Electricity is cheaper than diesel and maintenance costs are also lower. No exhaust fumes can also appeal to clients and switching to an electric van could help when tendering, particularly if you bid for local authority work. For those who tend to work locally and optimise their routes, it could well be feasible to do a day’s work on a single charge and then once back at your premises (or home if this serves as a work base) to charge overnight to be ready for the next day.

There are also some government financial incentives around including a plug-in van grant, meaning 20% off the list price (up to a maximum of £8k) and lower tax for business and personal use, along with grants towards workplace chargers. If you drive in urban areas, you may also find there is more free parking, and the number of charging points continues to rise.

ELECTRIC IS WHERE MANUFACTURERS ARE FOCUSING THEIR RESOURCES, BRINGING VANS OF ALL SIZES TO MARKET Electric vehicles are easy to drive as there’s no need to change gear. Buyers choice is increasing too – providers currently include Renault, Nissan, Peugeot and Citroen, while next year should see Mercedes-Benz, Toyota and VW launch electric vans in the UK. Looking ahead to 2020 and beyond, electric is where manufacturers are now focusing their resources, bringing vans of all sizes to market. Expect to see steadily improving technology, particularly where battery life is concerned. The case against The number one issue is ‘range anxiety’. This is rooted in fear of a weak battery life or potential stress finding somewhere to charge, or simply

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just not wanting to wait while a vehicle recharges. Typically, an electric van can manage around 100 miles a day, which may well be sufficient for landscapers working locally. But, there are landscapers who drive long distances if it is a large project, and drivers do not want to get stuck waiting for a charging point to become free – if they find one at all. This issue is exacerbated by the fact that there is a vast difference between standard and rapid chargers. There are only around 1,500 rapid chargers in the UK – these can charge a battery to 85% in half an hour, while a standard charger takes around eight hours to go from flat to full. In total, there are some 25,000 charging points across the UK, and these are listed on an interactive map at www.goultralow.com. A further negative is cost – electric vehicles are expensive, with some of the launches due for 2020 have price tags in the region of £60k. Although, as the market expands, affordability will improve. Electric vans also have a slightly reduced payload owing to the heavy batteries, which could be a factor if large amounts of equipment need transporting. A new vehicle is always likely to be a big decision. The fact the government has set a target of 2040 for all new vehicles to be emission free still seems a long way off, although more cities are also introducing Clean Air Zones, with drivers of more pollutive vehicles having to pay more. For many landscapers, the biggest push could well be wanting ‘to do their bit’ for the environment. So, if not furthering the global warming crisis matters, then is it time to consider electric as the next set of work wheels?

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 89

17/12/2019 09:04


EDUCATE

KIT

COMMERCIAL VEHICLES A R E YO U R E A DY TO G O E L E C T R I C I N 2 0 2 0 ? L E A D T H E C H A R G E TO WA R D S G R E E N E R D R I V I N G W I T H O N E O F T H E S E VA N S

MERCEDES-BENZ CITROËN

Next year will see the arrival of an electrified version of the Citroën Dispatch, which will be offered with a choice of two batteries, a 50kWh model to provide 124 miles of range, or a 75kWh that is capable of 186 miles on a single charge. Features include air conditioning, rear parking sensors, heated door mirrors, a configurable passenger bench, alarm, automatic lights and Citroën Connect Nav technology. Meanwhile, Citroën’s Relay Electric was unveiled at this year’s Commercial Vehicle Show and will be launched in 2020. The Relay is an L1H1 panel van and the range is said to be between 99 and 140 miles per charge using a 44kW battery pack, with the speed limited to 55mph. Citroën said it will also be launching an electric version of its compact New Berlingo van in 2021. The manufacturer has committed to providing plug-in hybrids or fully electric on all versions of new models. www.citroen.co.uk

TOYOTA Toyota is planning expansion within the commercial vehicle sector and has launched a new brand: Toyota Professional. Its growth plans include a focus on electric vans and its first offering will be a version of its mid-size PROACE, which will be available in 2020. Meanwhile, 2021 will see the launch of the PROACE CITY, a compact model that still has strong load-bearing capacity and is one of the few in its class that can accommodate two Euro-pallets. As standard, safety options include a pre-collision system, road sign assist, lane keep assist, cruise control and a ‘coffee cup warning’ that recommends the driver takes a break if they have spent a long time at the wheel. www.toyota.co.uk

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Prepare to see the mid-size eVito on the road in 2020. It can travel for 93 miles on electric power – fully chargeable in six hours – and has a hidden battery pack under the load floor, meaning the cargo space is not impacted. It was announced recently that delivery giant DPD was the first UK customer and had ordered 10 long-bodied versions of the electric van. The larger eSprinter is also expected to launch shortly after the eVito, and the manufacturer said the 10.5m3 load area will also not be impacted by the battery pack. The battery is protected within a steel cage to ensure it is undamaged if there's an accident. The battery will come in either 41kWh or 55kWh forms, offering a driving range of 71 or 93 miles. www.mercedes-benz.co.uk

PEUGEOT

Peugeot is pushing ahead with its electrification strategy and says all its vehicles will have an electric variant by 2023. The first to be unveiled is the Boxer Electric, a large van with a 1,215kg payload and a driving range of up to 140 miles, with speed limited to 55mph. It will be available in several length and height sizes with a 62kWh battery. The Boxer Electric will go on sale in 2020 with stop-and-start technology as standard, while a further key benefit is the Peugeot Connect system, which means telematics are installed that allows the van to be tracked in the event of theft. The manufacturer has also said it will launch electric versions of its mid-size Expert van and of its smaller Partner models, which are understood to be coming after the Boxer during the second half of 2020. Information on the Expert suggests it will have an identical load space to its diesel counterpart, with no encroachment from the battery packs. www.peugeot.co.uk

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

17/12/2019 09:00


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17/12/2019 11:16


EDUCATE

H O L I DAY PAY F R O M 6 A P R I L 2 0 2 0, T H E H O L I DAY PAY R E F E R E N C E P E R I O D W I L L B E E X T E N D E D F R O M 1 2 TO 5 2 W E E K S . N E W R E G U L AT I O N S A R E S E T TO I M P R OV E T R A N S PA R E N C Y B E T W E E N E M P LOY E R S A N D E M P LOY E E S I N T H E WO R K I N G WO R L D

W

hether you’re the person who books all their annual leave as soon as they get back in January or the one who takes it all in December after a nudge from HR, everyone is entitled to holiday, and to be paid for it, too. Other than the self-employed, all full-time workers are entitled to a minimum of 5.6 weeks’ paid holiday per year, according to the Working Time Regulations 1998. For seasonal workers, though, it is less straightforward. Currently, employers use a 12-week reference period to determine paid holiday. This is set to increase to 52 weeks to ensure those on irregular hours get fairer entitlements, providing they have been with their employer for 52 weeks. For those who have been in the same employment for less than a year, their reference period will be the number of whole weeks they have worked for the company. Monthly paid workers When workers are paid a regular monthly salary, including fixed hours and wages, separate holiday pay calculations aren’t necessary. Employers will need to use the holiday pay reference period when employees have varying monthly wages. Notably, three months of pay data doesn’t always correspond accurately with the 12-week reference period. To confirm how much employees are owed, employers will need to refer back to records of hours worked. The holiday pay reference period should start from the last whole week, before the

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Feature Holiday pay changes.indd 92

first day of leave. If a worker is paid monthly, and takes a day’s leave mid-week, then the first week used to calculate their holiday pay will be the pay earned throughout the preceding whole week.

THE HOLIDAY PAY REFERENCE PERIOD SHOULD START FROM THE LAST WHOLE WEEK, BEFORE THE FIRST DAY OF LEAVE For workers with a fixed monthly salary but no fixed working hours, the employer is to reference back to their weekly earnings in order to calculate their entitlement. However, for employees with no fixed hours nor salary, using an average hourly rate to estimate the workers’ average weekly rate may be required. Irregular hours and zero-hour contracts Employees with zero-hour contracts and irregular hours are still entitled to holiday pay. However, calculating their entitlement can be slightly more challenging. In this situation, the new holiday pay changes need to be actioned. Currently, the holiday pay for casual workers with no fixed hours will be the average pay over the previous 12 weeks worked – including the

last full week they worked prior to payment. As the holiday reference period omits any weeks they were not paid, a reference period may consider data which goes back further than 12 weeks. These new laws, from The Good Work Plan, will be implemented on 6 April, and will see the 12-week reference period extend to 52 weeks – the same calculation will apply, but with the consideration of the new reference period. When employees have not been with their employer for the new 52-week holiday reference period, pay is calculated from the number of whole weeks they have worked and been paid by the employer. If a worker has been with the company for just 20 weeks, their holiday pay will be calculated from this time frame. Seasonal or temporary staff Short contract or temporary workers will receive their holiday pay much in the same way as those on zero-hour contracts. A temporary member of staff will begin to accumulate holiday from their start date. If they don’t take their holiday throughout their temporary time with their employee, they are still entitled to be paid in lieu for all holiday accumulated within this period – this should be worked out using their average pay throughout. Overall, the amount of pay a worker receives for the holiday they take depends on the number of hours they work and how they are paid for these hours. Their pay received should be an honest reflection of what they would have earned if they were still at work.

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

17/12/2019 13:38


EDUCATE

INSIDE

T H E POT C OMPANY

CALM IN CHAOS, DESIGNED BY MAX HARRIMAN

A LO O K I N TO L E A D I N G P L A N T E R S U P P L I E R T H E P O T C O M PA N Y , P R OV I D E R O F S O M E 3 0 0,0 0 0 P R O D U C TS OV E R 3 5 R A N G E S FO R T R A D E A N D W H O L E S A L E How was the company founded? The Pot Company was founded in 1985, but went through a period of transformation when it was bought in 2013. The current owners have been working to expand and diversify the product range while keeping the original spirit and customer focus that returning customers would remember. The Pot Co is now a leading supplier to the garden and landscaping industry and is the exclusive importer and supplier of some of the most innovative and popular garden products. Its history and strong ties to the industry give the procurement team the edge when spotting future trends, and their size and purchasing power translate to great discounts on products. What products are in the range? With almost 300,000 units of stock in the warehouses, The Pot Co has a diverse offering that spans over 35 ranges, including Polystone,

Terracini, Fibreglass and Clayfibre. Crucially to landscapers, The Pot Co also offers a bespoke service for its Aluminium and Corten ranges. Product dimensions and colour (aluminium) can be tailored to specific requirements. What was your route to market? The Pot Co supplies garden designers, landscape architects, landscapers and wholesalers, as well as drop shippers across the UK. The Pot Co has no minimum order and delivers worldwide. It has supported a number of designers on overseas projects. What are your lead times? With same day dispatch for stock items, the delivery time is usually between three to five working days. For bespoke Corten steel and aluminium, the lead time is currently around six to eight weeks.

Do you offer trade discounts? The Pot Co is trade and wholesale only. It has a recommended retail price that is discounted by 15% to trade customers. Can clients order online? Once you have a trade account you can view prices, stock availability and place orders online. You can also view previous orders and favourite products. What kind of technical support is offered? The Pot Co is always happy to give guidance on its products. The companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales team studies the products and has in-depth knowledge of how they will perform and react once in situ. The team can also give technical support and advice in installation and aftercare of its water features and ponds. Do you have a showroom or product samples? Although The Pot Co doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a showroom, you can book an appointment to be shown around the yard and warehouse. There you will be able to see the volume and variety of products that the company hold in stock.

C O N TA C T The Pot Company Ltd, Maynards Farm, Lamberhurst Quarter, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, TN3 8AL

Tel 01892 890 353 Email sales@thepotco.com www.thepotco.com

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16/12/2019 13:49


ADVERTORIAL

LO N D O N STO N E

London Stone look forward to 2020 with improved service and value London Stone have been contributors of Pro Landscaper since 2013. Champions of the landscaping sector as a whole, the focus of the business continues to evolve. Offering high-quality products, outstanding service, and tangible value to clients, Managing Director Steve Walley explains more about the company’s 2020 plans.

Steve, 2019 saw London Stone introduce a fresh approach to your service offer. Are you continuing with that into 2020? Absolutely! Not only are we going to continue with initiatives like giving our customers complementary grout and slurry with porcelain orders over £1,000, and free nationwide delivery for full pack orders and orders over £1,000, 2020 will see us expanding our offers like never before! What have you got in store for your customers in 2020, then? Where to begin?! I’m really pleased that we’ve

Advert Template PL.inddjan.indd 24 london stone advertorial All Pages

been able to continue our price freeze into 2020. Careful analysis of our expenditure and sustainable cost control means that for the second year in succession, London Stone have managed to freeze the majority of our prices – and with some of our Italian porcelain products, we have even reduced the price. More than ever, choosing London Stone not only guarantees the best quality & service, but also puts money in your pocket.

range. London Stone is known for how we resolve issues in a quick and easy manner for our clients, but giving our customer’s end client a product guarantee will drive home the message that our products will perform for years.

How else does your service offer help your customer base? We’ve listened to what our customers want from us as a supplier, and we’ve acted. We’re introducing a 10 Year Homeowner Guarantee across our entire porcelain

17/12/2019 11:16


ADVERTORIAL

Do you offer guarantees on any other products? As an accredited applicator of Dry Treat, we can offer a 15 year guarantee on Dry Treat Stainproof. If you choose for us to pre-seal your natural stone, we can guarantee the sealant for an incredible 15 years. Talk about piece-of-mind! Does your approach to business mean that customers can expect inferior service? Definitely not. Anyone familiar with London Stone knows that service comes first; that doesn’t change. The market is competitive, which we welcome. I’m proud to say that we’ve reduced bespoke lead times to two weeks or less (in the last four months we have delivered 95% of bespoke orders within a two week lead time; nobody else can offer that), by introducing a new production philosophy. The team at our Bespoke Stone Centre are not only working more efficiently, they’re also happier and increased productivity has directly improved service for our clients. How has introducing an e-commerce platform changed the business? It means that customers have more control. Not only can they view live stock levels and have access to improved image galleries, but you can now order products at your convenience – on your timescales. It has enabled our sales team to actually deliver a better quality of service when they’re on the phone or in one of our showrooms. We also introduced a ‘trade-only’ WhatsApp service in 2019 which is a convenient way of getting answers to quick-fire questions.

Burge, who works exclusively with garden designers. Previously our senior estimator, Ryan’s knowledge, especially in the bespoke and design elements of a garden, can really add value. Are you adding any new products to your range for 2020? Keeping our range interesting, inspiring, and affordable is one of the biggest (and most exciting!) challenges we face each year. 2020 sees us adding more products to our range than ever before! We are expanding our DesignClad wall cladding and DesignBoard composite decking collections to include more affordable options of these adaptable, popular materials. There’s large-format porcelain (1200 x 1200mm) coming from Italy, which should inspire designers, and we’re also adding to our ‘Project Range’ of porcelain, which has really appealed to the more budget-conscious schemes this year. There’s so much coming for 2020 that I can’t

possibly mention it all here! We’ll be running our ‘Evening With’ events early next year so that our clients can come and view the new products for themselves and can ask our team questions about them. Finally Steve, why should the landscape industry buy from London Stone in 2020? Quite simply, the level of service and the quality of our products remains extremely high, but we’re being more budget-conscious than ever, and our service offer actually puts money back in our customer’s pockets. We are offering a ‘more for less’ ethos. What’s not to like?!

How does your service offer appeal to garden designers? Garden designers are a fundamental part of our client base. We’ve developed a 3D Warehouse SketchUp library with them in mind, that can be used by designers as part of the design process. Textures of all our paving, decking and cladding can be imported into their design visuals for presentation to their clients. We also have a dedicated landscape consultant, Ryan

STAY A H E A D I N A C O M P E T I T I V E M A R K E T: C H O O S E T H E B E ST For more information on how London Stone can enhance your next scheme: info@londonstone.co.uk www.londonstone.co.uk 01753 212 950

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EDUCATE

DESIGNED AND BUILT BY THE OUTDOOR ROOM

D EC ID ING TO DIVERSIFY Why did you get involved in an additional business outside of your successful landscaping company? I bought Pots and Pithoi either as an accident or by fate. Before the purchase, The Outdoor Room had an office in Cowfold, along with a small yard in Slinfold and a nine-acre yard in Capel, Surrey. For about two years we’d been looking for a suitable site where the office and yard could be together, and Pots and Pithoi’s location was ideal. There, the gift shop would become the office, the café would be the design studio, and the courtyard and outbuildings were ideal for storage and machinery. There was never any intention to continue with Pots and Pithoi until the lawyers and accountants told me it was being sold as an ongoing concern. How did you know about Pots and Pithoi? I’d been a customer at Pots and Pithoi for over 20 years and couldn’t believe it when it came

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DAV I D D O D D , M A N AG I N G D I R EC TO R O F T H E O U T D O O R ROOM, REVEALS THE HIGHS A N D LOWS O F TA K I N G OV E R T E R R AC OT TA P L A N T E R S SUPPLIER POTS AND PITHOI A N D H I S P L A N S FO R T H E C O M PA N Y ’ S F U T U R E

up for sale. I was sad when I thought it was closing down, so I decided to take it on as an additional business. I knew nothing about retail – my last experience working in it was as a teenager. I’ve always loved terracotta and knew about the quality of the pots. In the same way I’ve always been with The Outdoor Room, I don’t think I could sell a product I didn’t believe in. I’m like the Victor Kiam of the pot industry – he famously said: “I loved the product so much I bought the company”. Was it important that it was loosely linked to the landscaping sector? I think so. There had to be a strong link between the two businesses. I know how to use pots in garden design and my plant knowledge has been really helpful in selling the pots. I talk to customers all the time about the best ways of planting the pots and, now that The Outdoor Room has moved in, we’re

getting a lot more enquiries directly from the public footfall. Did you consider any businesses other than Pots and Pithoi? I still have ODR Property Ltd, buying and selling land and various properties, and I nearly bought into a brewery about eight years ago. I’ve often thought about buying a brewhouse pub. What were the main lessons learnt about the process of buying the business? Don’t trust lawyers or accountants! They have an amazing ability to only answer a question with a question. I wish I’d done a lot more of the due diligence myself, but simply didn’t have the time. How did you manage your time and keep the landscaping business going so successfully? For the first year I had to spend a huge amount of time at Pots and Pithoi and in Crete.

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I’m blessed with some amazing staff at The Outdoor Room and I trusted my management to keep things running. Fortunately, most of them were very loyal and understanding of what I was trying to achieve for both companies. Are the two businesses integrated? Although The Outdoor Room has now moved office to Pots and Pithoi, I’ve deliberately kept the two businesses very separate. Everyone gets on and there’s a lovely working environment between the staff of both companies, but they all know they have completely separate roles.

THE ORIGINAL COURTYARD WHEN PURCHASED IN 2017

How do you split your time? Has this changed over time? I usually work six or seven days a week. While I was at Pots and Pithoi for most of the first year, I’m now back predominantly at The Outdoor Room five days a week. THE POT DISPLAY COURTYARD

Did the purchase affect The Outdoor Room? Dramatically! There was a considerable amount of short-term pain, but we’re now reaping the benefit of what I hope to be long-term gain. Has buying the business helped The Outdoor Room in any way? To start with, no. However, two years on, both businesses are looking very healthy. Staff have come and gone from both companies (some people just don’t like change) and The Outdoor Room now has a whole new potential client base.

A POTTER WORKING IN CRETE

NEWLY THROWN POTS DRYING BEFORE BEING FIRED IN THE KILN

What are the future plans? I had a three-year plan to get Pots and Pithoi to where I wanted it, and we’ve met those targets in two years, so I’m already looking at expansion and other ideas for the business. We have some big plans for The Outdoor Room. We’re looking for planning permission to build new offices, a yard, demonstration gardens and a warehouse on the plot of land behind Pots and Pithoi. Top advice for a landscaper that is considering buying a business outside of core landscaping? Say goodbye to your family and friends for a while, get your head down, get on with it and hope they’re still there at the end. It’s been an absolute rollercoaster, and I remember having my head in my hands after six months and asking myself: “What have I done?” Speak to your staff and make sure they are behind you. If you have any doubts, don’t do it!

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POTS AND PITHOI’S OLDEST ANTIQUE POT, VALUED AT £16,000

ONE OF THE NEW LANTERN POTS, DESIGNED BY DAVID DODD AFTER BEING INSPIRED AT THE MAJORELLE GARDEN IN MARRAKECH

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MILLBOARD

ALL HANDS

DuoSpan For Millboard, 2019 saw many launches, including the stylish new Burnt Cedar Colour – part of the Enhanced Grain range – and a new showroom in the heart of London. More recently, Millboard unveiled the Outdoor Design Hub, an informative resource for professionals across the industry, which it plans to keep well stocked PRO LANDSCAPER LOOKS AT THE with up-to-date and original NEW DECKING PRODUCTS COMING materials for 2020. TO MARKET THIS YEAR However, Millboard's most exciting upcoming development is DuoSpan, an innovative landscape construction frame. Millboard's team has worked hard to create what it says is the most durable, adaptable and foolproof system available on the market today. The unique landscape construction frame combines the strength of aluminium with the design flexibility of recycled plastic. Trex Outdoor Lighting This combination enables Visitors to FutureScape in November 2019 had the chance to get an creative design options exclusive preview of the new Trex Outdoor Lighting range. From stairs for decking and outdoor to railing posts to deck perimeters, Trex Outdoor Lighting combines structures that would be effective ambient lighting with energy-efficient technology to create impossible with conventional a warm glow across the whole deck. subframes. DuoSpan offers These powerful LEDs offer long-lasting illumination in a variety the perfect subframe for of colours and are simple to install on both new and existing decks. Trex’s Millboard decking, as well as subtle recessed deck lights sit flush with the surface of the deck and can a universal support system be used to mark the deck perimeter or highlight feature areas, with the for other outdoor flooring, ability to adjust the lighting level with a remote control dimmer. Also, the cladding and more. Trex LightHub ‘snap and go’ connection system keeps installation simple.

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DECKPLUS

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Futuredek DeckPlus, a UK composite decking supplier, is offering attractive, hard-wearing deck boards to suit all tastes and budgets. DeckPlus’s decking range includes a variety of high-performance products from renowned composite decking manufacturer TimberTech. DeckPlus also sells a number of stylish deck boards under its own brand, promoting the composite decking boards on the great value for money they offer. It specialises in lowmaintenance products with long-life that are affordable, easy to clean and come with extensive warranties of up to 30 years. FutureDek Silver Birch composite decking is the latest addition to the DeckPlus range, now standing alongside the existing EvoDek and WeatherDek choices. These capped grey boards are lightweight yet durable, and have a stylish variegated colour that really helps it to stand out from typical decking solutions, completed by a wood-textured finish. The low-maintenance Silver Birch deck boards come standard with a 15-year warranty, and are currently priced from £39.16/m2 (excluding VAT).

SmartFRAME The huge growth in composite decking has stimulated the need for premium quality support framing of similar longetivity. Enter Hoppings' SmartFRAME – multiapplication pre-treated incised structural Scandinavian pine available in long lengths of section 45 x 95 and 45 x 145mm. SmartFRAME is for designers of highperformance structures at risk of fungal decay where a 30-year service life requirement is desirable. WWW.HOPPINGS.CO.UK

WWW.DECKPLUS.CO.UK

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P EO P L E

OUT AND ABOUT LANDSCAPE INSTITUTE AWARDS

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I N S I D E P E O P L E T H I S M O N T H PA G E 1 0 1 O U T A N D A B O U T: B A L I A W A R D S , PA G E 1 0 2 O U T A N D A B O U T: L A N D S C A P E I N S T I T U T E A W A R D S , PA G E 1 0 5 3 0 U N D E R 3 0 : J A C O B B O T T I N G , PA G E 1 0 6 L I F E / S T Y L E , PA G E 1 0 8 W H AT I ’ M R E A D I N G , PA G E 1 1 1 W H AT ’ S Y O U R R O L E ? , PA G E 1 1 4 L I T T L E I N T E R V I E W S

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PEOPLE

OUT & ABOUT

BALI NATIONAL LANDSCAPE AWARDS 2019 A

t a glistening ceremony held on 6 December, Ground Control scooped the British Association of Landscape Industries’ (BALI) prestigious Grand Award. The commercial grounds maintenance company had picked up the Principal Award in the Community and Schools Development category for The Children’s Garden at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, before being revealed as the overall winner. The 43rd BALI National Landscape Awards took place at JW Marriott Grosvenor House in Park Lane, London, and recognised its members’ excellence in landscape design, construction and maintenance – both those in the UK and internationally. Twenty-three Principal Awards were announced at the event, as well as eight Special Awards and one Grand Award. This followed 91 National Landscape Awards being bestowed on 63 members of the association back in September. Wayne Grills, BALI’s chief executive, says: “Once again, I am delighted that the level of quality and professionalism demonstrated at our 43rd awards is set at the highest possible level. “Our well-deserved Grand Award winner for 2019, Ground Control, seriously impressed adjudicators who recognised their outstanding contribution to landscaping with a flawlessly executed standard of workmanship and professionalism in The Children’s Garden scheme. This delivered in excess of the expected levels of quality as a BALI-registered member and also achieved the highest level of client satisfaction. “Congratulations to them and all of our winners this year, and thank you to our sponsors, who without them, the event would not be possible.” To view the full list of winners, visit: www.baliawards.co.uk

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THE CHILDREN'S GARDEN AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW

GROUND CONTROL COLLECTING THE GRAND AWARD

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PEOPLE

OUT & ABOUT

LANDSCAPE INSTITUTE AWARDS C

limate change and biodiversity were undoubtedly the leading themes of this year’s Landscape Institute Awards. Winning projects showcased a range of ‘landscape interventions’, from better managing water resources to using natural methods to mitigate hurricane damage. “In June this year, the LI declared a climate and biodiversity emergency,” says president Adam White. “That’s why I’m particularly impressed to see the range of projects leading the way in developing innovative ideas and approaches at this crucial time for our planet. At a time when we are seeing more extreme weather, from flooding in Yorkshire and Derbyshire to wildfires burning on several continents, we have the opportunity – as individuals and as a profession – to make a real difference.” And if the winning projects themselves weren’t enough to convince you, then Sir David Attenborough’s presence at the event might. The guest of honour received the LI Medal for Lifetime Achievement at the event, which was held on 28 November at The Troxy in London. Sir David is the tenth recipient of the medal, which is awarded to individuals who have provided “exceptional service to the landscape professions, or exceptional achievements that have led to the creation or conservation of landscapes now held in high regard”. At the ceremony, he spoke about the importance of reconnecting communities with nature and the part this can play in ensuring the natural world’s protection, telling attendees they have “a great responsibility to bring the realities of the natural world to the understanding and the love of human beings worldwide.” This message was delivered to more than 350 guests, which included the Landscape Institute’s president-elect Jane Findlay and the awards’ host Arit Anderson, who alongside Adam White welcomed Sir David as an honorary fellow. www.awards.landscapeinstitute.org

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WINNERS Open Categories • Dame Sylvia Crowe Award for Outstanding International Contribution to People, Place and Nature Landscape Belt of Xianglu Bay Beach in Zhuhai LAY-OUT Planning Consultants Co. Ltd • Landscape Innovation Award Pioneering Digital Innovation Arup • Landscape Legacy Award Zheng Jie’s Landscape Architecture Group, Hangzhou Professional Categories • Adding Value Through Landscape Walthamstow Wetlands Kinnear Landscape Architects Limited • Communications and Presentation WINNER What’s Growing on the Greenway LI President The Paul Hogarth Company Limited Award • Design for a Large-Scale Development Valencia Parque Central Gustafson Porter + Bowman • Design for Small-Scale Development Marlborough Primary School Macgregor Smith Landscape Architects • Design for a Temporary Landscape Fitzpark Arup • Excellence through Planting and Horticulture The Water Gardens HTA Design LLP • Landscape Planning and Assessment Shropshire Landscape and Visual Sensitivity Assessment Gillespies LLP • Local Landscape Planning Masterplan for Sustaining Caerphilly’s Landscape WYG • Transforming through Management and Science Charting a Natural Course: An Ecosystem Services Opportunities Map and Natural Capital Account for the River Irwell The Environment Partnership (TEP) Ltd Richmond Park Management Plan The Royal Parks • Urban Design and Masterplanning High Path Estate Regeneration PRP Special Awards • Client of the Year Derek Dunsire, Glasgow City Council Nominated by Urban Movement Limited

Photographs ©Paul Upward Photography

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PEOPLE

THE MONTESSORI CENTENARY CHILDRENʼS GARDEN ©RHS

3 0 U N D E R 3 0 U P DAT E

THE SQUARE GARDEN FOR BBC GARDENER'S WORLD LIVE 2018

JACOB BOTTING PRO L ANDSCAPER CATCHES UP WITH JACOB BOT TING TO DISCUSS HIS BBC GARDENER’S WORLD LIVE AWARDS AND STARTING HIS OWN COMPANY, AND TO REFLECT ON HIS 30 UNDER 30: THE NE XT GENERATION AWARD

S

ince becoming one of our 30 Under 30: The Next Generation winners back in 2017, Jacob Botting has been involved with building a decorated RHS Chelsea Flower Show garden and accrued multiple BBC Gardeners’ World Live awards. Last year, Jacob decided to move on from Norfolk-based consultants Bespoke Outdoor Spaces to start his own business – Garden Elements – which has seen him working on various projects for both residential properties and commercial developments. Along with this, the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 saw Jacob's involvement with constructing The Montessori Centenary Children’s Garden alongside designer Jody Lidgard and the team at Bespoke Outdoor Spaces. The garden scooped a Gold medal with much praise from the judges, and Jacob hopes to be involved with show gardens again in the near future. “I would like to do Chelsea again, hopefully just helping someone out or maybe doing one of my own designs.” BBC Gardener’s World Live is another competition familiar to Jacob – he won The Young Landscapers Award in 2018 with

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Laurence Senior. Involvement with BBC Gardener’s World Live is something which Jacob wants to continue and increase

INVOLVEMENT WITH BBC GARDENER’S WORLD LIVE IS SOMETHING WHICH JACOB WANTS TO CONTINUE AND INCREASE INVOLVEMENT WITH involvement with: “We’re looking at hopefully doing Gardeners' World again soon, maybe doing one of our own designs. That’s the show I would like the company to get back to.” One of the highlights of Jacob's role has been the ability to work outside and be in nature, as well as being physical and involved with the builds of the jobs. “I can’t stand sitting behind a desk at an office, not yet anyway. Maybe when I get a bit older!” When it comes to the most disruptive challenges for Jacob, the weather has

represented one of the biggest obstacles when it comes to completing client jobs or site visits – a struggle many in the industry dread. Reactive responses to adverse weather are almost inevitable for Jacob and his team: “It always throws a bit of a curveball in there. You've got to change the plan more or less every day – it can be frustrating.” When considering future aspirations, Jacob noted that show garden involvement and continuing to develop his skills within his profession were areas he wants to focus on. However, expansion is at the top of Jacob’s list. “Long term plans, I’d like to build the business really, get it into a position where I’ve got a couple of landscaping teams and I’m managing it all. I would say get off the tools, but I can’t imagine not being the one to not build the garden!” Being selected for 30 Under 30: The Next Generation was something Jacob says brought on recognition, an issue the industry has historically struggled with. “It’s not often that the landscaper gets appreciated for their hard work, so it’s nice to be acknowledged, especially within this industry where there are so many great people involved.”

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WORK

PEOPLE

Best project I think the one we felt most proud of was the Wildlife Garden and Bluebell Glade at Paddington Recreation Ground, nature hubs for local, urban school children. We were very proud when the Duchess of Cambridge decided to visit our projects in October 2018 to inspire her Back To

bounce design ideas around with and get overexcited about new plants. Mentors I was lucky at the English Gardening School to have the advice and support of the incredibly inspiring Rosemary Alexander and my dearly departed friend Simon Pyle, who I still miss very much. They were so supportive and encouraging. Best learning curve Making the career change from management consultancy to landscape design was the scariest, steepest learning curve, but also the best. Completely retraining and starting a business in an unknown industry was incredibly daunting, but has proven to be very rewarding.

Nature agenda. She came back again in 2019 to film for her Blue Peter episode. Colleagues I consider myself very lucky that for the last five years I have worked with two accomplished designers, Philippa McKee and Pilar de la Lama. They are great to

High and low points of your career The highest point was earning a Gold medal in 2013 for an RHS Chelsea Flower Show garden inspired by the work of Charles Jencks. I’d been asked to redesign the garden into a much smaller plot, which really threw me. I had to change the whole garden in one week and, fortuitously, it turned out better than the first one.

The lowest point of my career was after graduating from my design course, when I naively worked with and trusted someone whose values it turned out I did not share. Thankfully, Philippa and Pilar have helped me remember just how much I enjoy working and designing with others and how fulfilling it is to work in a team with capable and kind people. Leadership style Visionary, challenging, with a positive ‘can do’ attitude and generally opinionated – but if you have a good counter argument I might just roll over. Whilst I love the big picture, I like to get stuck into the detail too. What you hope to achieve in your work during the next 12 months I’ve always had ambitions to do a larger Main Avenue garden at an RHS Chelsea Flower Show, we have no end to great ideas.

LIFE/STYLE

RUTH WILLMOTT G A R D E N D E S I G N E R R U T H W I L L M O T T TA L K S A B O U T M A K I N G A SW I TC H F R O M M A N AG E M E N T C O N S U LTA N C Y TO D E S I G N I N G R H S G O L D M E DA L-W I N N I N G S H OW G A R D E N S W I T H R U T H W I L L M O T T A S S O C I AT E S , A S W E L L A S H E R I N S P I R AT I O N S , B AC KG R O U N D A N D I N T E R E STS

INSPIRATION People Charles Jencks, Fernando Caruncho, John Pawson, Luis Barragán and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.

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Gardens The Garden of Cosmic Speculation, the private garden of Jacques Wirtz, Villa Lante and Villa Gamberaia are all great inspirations.

©Duncan Andison/Shutterstock.com

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PERSONAL Hobbies I like to visit gardens and I love gardening, both ornamental and productive. I like seeing my friends, reading, music and dancing. Design tastes I’m drawn to minimal, bold garden structures, but I love the massed detail of textural planting and colours. I do like to keep a restricted hard material palette, and I love textural changes in monotone materials. Most treasured possession(s) I value experiences and time with people. However, if you had to push me, it might be my Prunus ‘Shirotae’ multi-stem tree in my garden. It’s completely stunning. Food I like a lot of different types of food from all parts of the world, but I would probably say my favourite is Indian food, or maybe Thai. Drink I enjoy a very dry martini. Most fun you’ve ever had Probably my last ‘Suicide Sunday’ when I was a student at Cambridge. The escapades can’t be divulged in detail, but my dress was far too short to have scaled the college wall that my friend Kat and I climbed. I laugh out loud every time I think about it.

TRAVEL Places you’ve been I travelled internationally a lot with my work as a management consultant. Some of the highlights included Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago and the USA. I really enjoyed visiting Japan and seeing the gardens in Kyoto. My favourite trip was for my 40th birthday – my thoughtful husband took me to Venice on the Orient Express. I have travelled to China, Australia, Bali, Thailand, Russia, parts of Africa and have travelled around most Western European countries. Places you’d like to go I would really like to return to Tanzania to climb Mount Kilimanjaro again and see the incredible sunrise from Gillman’s Point, as well as – if they are still there – the glaciers at the top of Uhuru. How you like to travel I really enjoy travelling by train so I can watch the scenery.

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W H AT I ’ M READING Nick Coslett THE INDUSTRY RENOWNED PLANTSMAN

TITLE Wilding: The Return of Nature to a British Farm AUTHOR Isabella Tree

R

ecently, I read Wilding: The Return of Nature to a British Farm by Isabella Tree – a good name for an author writing about our countryside. Wilding is about a landed farming and old 16th century hunting estate in Sussex. It details how the owners, Isabella and Charlie Burrell, stopped pushing the elephant up the hill on marginal land. Exhausted and out of pocket after battling with heavy Wealden clay soils, with intensive dairy and arable agriculture, they let nature take its course and welcomed wildlife back to the 3,500 acres.

THEY LET NATURE TAKE ITS COURSE OVER THE KNEPP ESTATE AND WELCOMED WILDLIFE BACK TO THE 3,500 ACRES I know Pro Landscaper’s readers are interested in the natural world and are aware of the pressures facing it – not just upon our urban environments and gardens but also our agricultural landscapes. With the arrival of tractors and the Dig for Victory campaign, farmland saw vast tracts of land ploughed up for food and the loss of wildflower meadows.

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This continued post-war with a wellintentioned push for productivity using fertilizers, pesticides and antibiotics in livestock. Dairy farms, like Knepp, intensified production and brought in quotas to gain efficiencies of scale, but neither the dairy nor the arable made a profit of more than two years out of 10. The Countryside Stewardship subsidy allowed them to restore their Repton-designed parkland in 2001. They researched schemes such as the large-scale rewilding project at Oostvaardersplassen in Holland, where some 5,000ha have been allowed to rewild.

Charlie and Isabella wanted to let the land go wild and return to nature – as it would have been without man’s intervention. After resistance or inertia from Defra, their research succeeded and grants to remove the fences across the estate were made. Hedges widened, fallow grassland evolved, and wildflowers grew. After two years, with evolution well underway, they started to introduce “wild or near wild” animals to graze and manage the landscape in a more natural way – first some fallow deer, one of the country’s oldest herds, from Petworth where their bloodline goes back five centuries. In 2003, six Exmoor ponies arrived – as close to the Tarpan wild horses they could get – then a few English Longhorn cattle

to imitate the ancient Auroch cattle. These animals grazed in different ways, eating both grasses and shrub layer. Two Tamworth pigs

IT’S A VERY INTERESTING READ AND OFFERS A POSSIBLE WAY FORWARD FOR OUR COUNTRYSIDE STEWARDSHIP ON LAND WHICH IS UNECONOMIC TO FARM were introduced in lieu of wild boar, as these are listed as dangerous animals. The pigs rootled and disturbed the soil, allowing insects and seeds new habitat. The story is of how wildlife in all manner of ways returned and colonised the land. The rare Turtle Dove is their mascot, and they now host a major part of the UK population. The land is closely monitored by ecologists and much has been learnt of the preferred habitat of invertebrates, birds and larger animals, causing some rewriting of the text books with this new evidence base. It’s a very interesting read and offers a possible way forward for our countryside stewardship on land which is uneconomic to farm, but could grow increased biodiversity with good carbon sequestration. Knepp now offers safaris, and sells surplus organic pasture-fed meats which keeps the herbivore-pasture ratio in balance. It’s worth a read and a visit!

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17/12/2019 11:31


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WHAT’S

YOUR

ROLE? GROUND CONTROL GROUND CONTROL’S NEW HSQE DIRECTOR ANGELINA SOOREN DISCUSSES HER FUTURE ASPIRATIONS, HER FAVOURITE ASPECTS OF THE ROLE AND HOPES OF BECOMING AN AMBASSADOR FOR WOMEN

What does your new role involve? I lead the HSQE department – health, safety, quality and environment – with a great team of expert health & safety professionals who work across multiple divisions. I’m here to ensure that we mitigate the risks of our operations, protecting our employees, clients, members of the public, contractors and our environment. I aim to encourage a positive safety culture, eliminating all accidents and incidents. We also quantify our environmental impact and continually look to innovate to support a sustainable future. We safeguard the health and wellbeing of our people – no job is so urgent or important that it cannot be done safely! Are there any stand-out colleagues at Ground Control that have been instrumental to your success? I am very new to the role and business, the success here is founded and driven by the existing HSQE team. Their collective determination to consistently deliver an exceptional service, care for the environment and their dedication to the workforce ‘family’ is just unrivalled.

What do you find most challenging? We have a lot of complex delivery requirements across a multitude of divisions and no risk in this business is the same. You’ve got to be a very flexible, passionate and adaptable to succeed in this role. It’s challenging but extremely rewarding.

NO JOB IS SO URGENT OR IMPORTANT THAT IT CANNOT BE DONE SAFELY What does a normal day look like for you? I’m very much a people person, I devote as much time as possible to my team to encourage, develop and lead by example; coaching, mentoring and striving for continuous improvement. There could be delivery changes, legislation updates or external factors as simple as the weather that could affect our operations. I always prepare for the unexpected and relish the challenge ahead.

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

Whats your role.indd 111

IT’S MY ASPIRATION THAT THE BUSINESS IS RECOGNISED NOT ONLY AS ONE OF THE BEST ORGANISATIONS, BUT AS ONE OF THE SAFEST. IT IS A BUSINESS THAT VALUES ITS PEOPLE

What do you enjoy most about the role? No day is the same – I love the challenge. I enjoy problem solving. To me, this is not just a job, it’s about having a lasting positive impact on others, acting with integrity and honouring our commitments. What are your future aspirations? Ground Control are very supportive of development and education and I am looking forward to my progression here. I endeavour to improve safety, protect the environment and guarantee quality. It’s my aspiration that the business is recognised not only as one of the best organisations, but as one of the safest. It is a business that values its people, cares for the environment, embraces change and strives to deliver an amazing service. I also want to be an ambassador, encouraging women in this industry and giving them the tools and support to develop as I have had the opportunity to do so.

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 111

16/12/2019 09:01


JOBS

For full details on all jobs, please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk Call 01903 446 076 or email liam.colclough@eljays44.com with your vacancy

EXPERIENCED GARDENERS AND SOFT LANDSCAPERS – FOR IMMEDIATE START BELDERBOS LANDSCAPES Location: London

GARDEN MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT LANDSCAPES BY JONATHAN STOLLAR Location: London

Belderbos Landscapes is recruiting experienced gardeners and soft landscapers for immediate start. This is a fantastic opportunity for the right person to be part of a growing business. You will gain valuable experience, working at some prestigious addresses and unique, high specification gardens in Central London. The ideal candidate will be experienced and/or qualified in garden maintenance and horticulture. They will also be honest, self-motivated, reliable, and have a friendly yet professional approach with clients.

Landscapes by Jonathan Stollar is looking for a garden maintenance assistant to join its maintenance and planting department, which services private and commercial clients, mostly based in Blackheath, London. Some horticultural knowledge and a desire to learn more is a must. The company is looking for candidates with a passion for plants and the outdoors. Reporting to the maintenance manager, gardeners are paired in teams of two and work a set number of clients on a rolling schedule, as well as one-off planting jobs as they arise.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

CONTRACT SUPERVISOR – PLAYGROUND INSTALLATION

SALES MANAGER

COLE & YATES RECRUITMENT Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

WILDFLOWER TURF LTD Location: Basingstoke

A client is recruiting for a play area installation contracts supervisor, with ‘on the tools’ experience installing outdoor play equipment and leading a team. This job covers the north of England, so ideally you will be based within commuting distance of Leeds and Sheffield, with easy access to main motorways. You will be travelling to a variety of sites preparing for new installations, checking the quality of current installations as well as arranging and attending pre-start, interim and completion meetings.

Wildflower Turf is looking for a high-performing sales manager to help it meet its customer acquisition, retention, and revenue growth targets by keeping the company competitive, responsive to the market, and at the top of its game. The successful candidate will be responsible for maximising customer relationships and sales potential, coordinating with the marketing department on lead generation, and crafting sales plans and justifying them to the management team. Excellent communication skills will be necessary, as well as someone who is self-motivated, driven and determined to achieve sales goals.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

SALES MANAGER

HARD LANDSCAPE ASSISTANT FOREMAN

GLENDALE MANAGED SERVICES LTD Location: North East and North West England Based at home or a local depot with travel across the north region, successful candidates will work with the sales and development director, regional managers and senior leaders to implement the regional and local strategic sales plans and meet or exceed the targets set out in Glendale’s strategic board plan. The role requires a strict regime of sales development and management of the customer relationship management software, and reporting sales qualified leads (SQL). The successful candidate will have previous experience in a green space environment and have worked in a similar role.

FRESH HORTICULTURAL CAREERS Location: London One of Fresh Horticultural Careers’ clients has an exciting vacancy for a hard landscape assistant foreman to join its team based in Hertfordshire. You will be working on projects located in London and home counties, reporting to the foreman, and stepping up to the foreman role when necessary. You will play a key role within the construction team, being responsible for the delivery of projects in both the private and commercial sectors. The ideal candidate will currently be employed in a similar role or looking for promotion into such a role.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

APPRENTICESHIP IN BOTANIC HORTICULTURE (2020-2022)

HL SERVICES

ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW Location: Richmond, London

The two-year Kew apprenticeship is an entry level position for those desiring a career at senior craft level in botanical or amenity horticulture. Apprentices are employed on a salary, and college fees and staff exchanges are supported financially by the School of Horticulture. Personal development is encouraged, with a two-week staff exchange to a European botanic garden or plant collection, and a competitive travel scholarship opportunity for two weeks at the beginning of the second year. For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

112 Pro Landscaper / January 2020

Hort Careers Jobs.indd 112

HL Services specialises in permanent and temporary recruitment solutions across the UK for the grounds maintenance and facilities management sectors. Explore a wide range of vacancies in London and across the UK by searching ‘HL Services’ on the Horticulture Careers homepage. The company is recruiting landscaping and grounds maintenance staff at all levels.

For more details please go to www.horticulturecareers.co.uk

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

17/12/2019 15:41


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17/12/2019 11:18


PEOPLE

T H E L I T T L E I N T E RV I E W

PRO LANDSCAPER ASKS QUICK-FIRE QUESTIONS TO GAIN A SMALL INSIGHT INTO THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UP OUR INDUSTRY. TO TAKE PART, EMAIL CONTENT@ EL JAYS44.COM

114 Pro Landscaper / January 2020

Little Interviews.indd 114

ANDREW WILSON Garden designer and director of London College of Garden Design, consultant to McWilliam Studio www.mcwilliamstudio.com www.lcgd.org.uk If you weren’t in the horticulture industry, what would you be doing? I’d be an opera singer or a newsreader. Other than the UK, which country’s landscape inspires you the most? New Zealand. What would you blow your budget on? An Aston Martin or a house by the sea. The one person in the industry you’d love to meet? Fernando Caruncho. Best piece of trivia you know? I have an apple tree in my garden possibly as old as my house (approx. 220 years old). Who would play you in a movie of your life? Keanu Reeves would be the glamorous choice but it’s more likely to be Simon Callow! What three things would you take to a desert island? A piano, music and a tutor. Your favourite joke? How do you know if an elephant’s been in your fridge? You can see his footprints in the butter. Karaoke song of choice? Somebody to Love by Queen. What is your biggest achievement since 2011? Coping with what life has thrown at me!

ANJI CONNELL Interior design and design director, ACID+ (Anji Connell Interior Design) www.anjiconnellinteriordesign.com If you weren’t in the horticulture industry, what would you be doing? My first and ongoing profession – interior architecture. Other than the UK, which country’s landscape inspires you the most? Drought tolerant desert gardens like those in Arizona and northern Mexico. Another landscape that fascinates me is South Africa’s Western Cape Fynbos. What would you blow your budget on? Designing and building on a cliff made from minimalist glass, green concrete, and Corten steel – surrounded by water and indigenous Mediterranean gravel with a sculpture garden. It would overlook a rocky seashore with sea views and no other houses in sight. One thing that you think would make the industry better? Banning fake flowers and fake green walls. Best piece of trivia you know? Elephants can’t jump. What three things would you take to a desert island? iPhone, a mini Yorkshire Terrier pup and an unlimited supply of Vodka Martini. What is your biggest achievement since 2011? Getting my postgraduate diploma from Inchbald School of Design, being shortlisted for the ID&A Award, the SBID Excellence in Design Awards, Perspectives Awards 2013, and the 41st IIDA Awards 2014. And, of course, being asked to write for Pro Landscaper.

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

16/12/2019 13:39


PEOPLE

H O L LY YO U D E

A N GUS L I N DSAY

DAVID DODD

Director, Urban Landscape Design Ltd

Group head of assets & fleet, idverde

Managing director, The Outdoor Room

www.urbanlandscapedesign.co.uk

www.idverde.co.uk

www.theoutdoorroom.co.uk

If you weren’t in the horticulture industry, what would you be doing? I have lots of travelling to catch up on.

If you weren’t in the horticulture industry, what would you be doing? Agriculture, the industry I grew up with.

Other than the UK, which country’s landscape inspires you the most? Anywhere with mountains and lakes.

Other than the UK, which country’s landscape inspires you the most? Scandinavia, all of it!

If you weren’t in the horticulture industry, what would you be doing? There was only one thing preventing me from being a professional footballer – a lack of talent.

What would you blow your budget on? Food – I love food!

What would you blow your budget on? Travel.

The one person in the industry you’d love to meet? I’d love to have a good rant at Charlie Dimmock right now.

The one person in the industry you’d love to meet? Nobody in particular, we all play our part.

One thing that you think would make the industry better? For everyone within the industry to know their worth.

One thing that you think would make the industry better? More appreciation of value of our parks and green spaces and investment in them.

Who would play you in a movie of your life? I’ve asked in the office and they said Cameron Diaz because I’m blonde and a bit ditzy! What three things would you take to a desert island? My dog, a windup torch, a knife. Your favourite joke? What’s brown and sticky? A stick! Karaoke song of choice? Sorry not a fan, avoid at all costs! What is your biggest achievement since 2011? Growing the business along with hubby Mark (and managing to stay happily married – most of the time).

www.prolandscapermagazine.com

Little Interviews.indd 115

Best piece of trivia you know? Ginger Baker – RIP – wanted to compete in the Tour de France. Who would play you in a movie of your life? Toby Jones. What three things would you take to a desert island? iPod with a solar charger, a Leatherman multi-tool and sun cream. Karaoke song of choice? Tubular Bells – I can’t sing! What is your biggest achievement since 2011? Being part of the business and having worked for continued success.

Other than the UK, which country’s landscape inspires you the most? USA and Japan. The one person in the industry you’d love to meet? Kim Wilkie. One thing that you think would make the industry better? Tighter regulations on practices and codes of conduct that protect and benefit clients to a far greater degree. Best piece of trivia you know? In the original film of The Wicker Man, Britt Ekland had a bottom stunt double for the nude dancing scene. Who would play you in a movie of your life? Brian Blessed… or Shrek. What three things would you take to a desert island? The complete works of Dostoevsky, Viz and an unlimited supply of Oakham Citra. Your favourite joke? My wife has just left me for the local milkman. Seeing them drive off together was the worst two hours of my life! What is your biggest achievement since 2011? Buying Pots and Pithoi.

Pro Landscaper / January 2020 115

16/12/2019 13:39


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16/12/2019 16:22 11/12/2019 22:09

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Pro Landscaper January 2020  

Pro Landscaper January 2020  

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