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The magazine for your English

Kid lit

N째. 2 - 2010/2011

Pull-out booklet

Twilight

8 Sping Jokes

4

7

Kid on the road

The North-East of England

12

for

KID LIT

TWILIGHT


glossary

2

It’s so hot out here today!

Yes, Jeremy?

Here dad. I’ve copied a CD of old hits for you.

Why don’t you ever think of something like “my poor little child?”

Well, put on a thinner top!

Hi mum. I don’t know how to pass the time until you come home.

I don’t know… You can stay sitting there, immersed* in your thoughts.

Thanks Jeremy.

immersed: (here) concentrated on worthy: (here) deserving

Well, cut the grass then.

It’s boring!

“The middle” by Jimmy Eat World, “Superman” by Five for Fighting. “Here is gone” by Goo Goo Dolls. “Drive” by Incubus…

Hello, thoughts.

What’s up?

These old hits are still too new for me.

Mmh.

(Uff…) (oooh…)

(oooh…)

Is anything wrong, Jeremy?

Nobody has said anything interesting yet to write on my blog!

I promise that from now on I’ll try very hard to be more worthy* of a blog.


EDITORIAL

CONTENTS

2 Cartoon strip Zits

4 Kid Lit Twilight

Report Open museums

7

Hi everyone! We’ve got a fun-packed issue for you full of surprises and interesting things to read and do. Do you like playing jokes on your friends? Then don’t miss our pull-out booklet – it might give you some ideas for your next joke! And for all you Twilight fans out there you must read Kid lit which speaks about the book by Stephenie Meyer. We continue our journey in Kid on the Road as we visit another important part of England and there’s a lot more too! So, happy reading!

Pull-out booklet 8 Spring Jokes

6

12 Kid on the Road The North-East of England

14 Fun and Games

16 Famous faces Milla Jovovich

The Change Up editorial tea m

Water for Elephants

Grammy. In this number you’ll come across: Common European _ Passive forms Framework _ Present perfect Intermediate level _ Conjunctions (B1 – B2) _ 2nd conditional _ Infinitives and gerunds Page 3: lemonade; completed sentence: “thanks to Robert Pattinson the popularity of my sons at school has increased because all the girls are crazy about him! Page 4-5: The missing words are: drove, degrees, blue, wearing, farewell. Page 6-7: a 7; b 8; c 5; d 6; e 4; f 1; g 3; h 2. Page 12-13: first answer B; second answer A. Page 14: A Museums: 1 were created (false) 2 was built (false), 3 is located (false), 4 has been opened (true), 5 be found (false), 6 are collected (true). B a. Edward, b. Forks, c. father, d. legend - blood, e. vampire, f. gloomy, g. bite, h. dream, i. Eclipse.

Everyone at the circus with Robert Pattinson’s new film! The film Water for Elephants by the film director Francis Lawrence who also directed I am legend and Constantine, is set in the world of the circus in 1929, the period of the Great Depression* in the United States. The story is dramatic and exciting - Jacob Jankowski (Robert Pattinson) is a veterinary student at Cornell University, whose parents are killed. Jacob leaves everything behind and ends up* in a travelling circus. He finds a job there as a vet and makes friends and falls in love with the beautiful acrobat Marlena, played by Reese Witherspoon. But he also discovers dangerous secrets! To discover them as well – you’ll have to go to the cinema!

Do you know....? Rosie, the kind elephant The film is based on the book of the same name written by the American writer Sara Gruen. The title refers to the circus elephants, Rosie, an enormous, pacific female elephant. Rosie doesn’t drink only water, but also adores… a b c

orange juice coca cola lemonade

glossary

ends up: finds himself Great depression: a period of economic crisis which started in America in 1929

Put the missing words in the gaps and discover what Sara Gruen said about the star of the film. SONS

HAS

POPULARITY

CRAZY

THANKS

“_________ to Robert Pattinson the _________ of my _________ at school _________ increased a lot, because all the girls are _________ about him!”


4

KID LIT

infinitives / and gerunds passives / conjunctions

Welcome back to another issue of Kid lit. In previous editions, we’ve taken a look at some classic novels from the past that have left their mark on young people. Today, however we’re going to jump forward to the present day and take a look at one of the books from the most successful series that has been written recently.

What’s it about? The story begins with 17-year old Bella who leaves her home in Arizona to live with her father in a small, gloomy* town called Forks. She doesn’t want

to go and live there and doesn’t expect to like it, but once she’s there she settles in* and makes friends.


However, there’s one of her classmates who seems to dislike her and who tries to ignore her. Bella can’t understand why and remains intrigued* by this extremely attractive boy named Edward Cullen. This all changes, when one day, Edward saves her life and prevents her from being knocked over*. They become friends and gradually begin to fall in love with each other. However, Bella still thinks that there’s something strange about Edward. She hears about a local legend about a tribe of people who drink animal blood and she gradually realises that Edward is a vampire. Edward himself is tormented* by his love for Bella and his attraction to her blood. Their relationship is put in danger when another tribe of vampires arrive in the town and one of them, called Jack, tries to kill Bella. He bites her hand and she risks becoming a vampire herself, but again Edward saves her by sucking the poison from her hand. The story finishes at the school dance where Bella tells Edward that she wants to become a vampire but Edward refuses to let her.

Where the idea came from

glossary

The writer, Stephenie Meyer, says that the idea for the book came to her in a dream. She dreamt of a meadow* with two distinct figures – a pretty girl and a vampire. The dreams continued and she hurried* to write down everything she could remember. She sent the manuscript* to lots of different publishing houses but was rejected by many. Eventually* one of them accepted her and she became an instant success.

eventually : at gloomy: da the end of a period rk and sad hurried: do something quickly intrigued: very intere sted in som to know mor ething and e wanting knocked ov er: hit by a car manuscrip t: th it’s publishe e original pages of a book before d meadow: a field where grass and settles in: w become fa miliar with ild flowers grow tormented: a new way suffering m of life ental pain

What a success! The book became the biggest selling book in 2008 and by then had sold 17 million copies all over the world. The book has even been translated into 37 different languages. And of course, that was only the beginning. Since then, the first book in the series has been followed by the rest of the saga – New Moon, Eclipse and Breaking Dawn. In addition, films of the second and third book – New Moon and Eclipse – have been made and the film Breaking Dawn is expected to be released this year.

Can you ...? Read the extract from the beginning of the book and complete it with the missing words. FAREWELL

DROVE

WEARING

DEGREES

BLUE

“My mother ________ me to the airport with the windows rolled down. It was seventy-five ___________ in Phoenix, the sky a perfect, cloudless ______. I was __________ my favourite shirt. I was wearing it as a ________ gesture.” The answer is on page 3


6

What would you think, if a friend said to you “There’s a great museum. It’s open”,? Probably, that you can go ’inside’ the museum and visit each room. Or, that it’s a museum completely … in the open air!

al / 2nd condition ositions ep pr / es iv pass

Open air museums

Where they are found

Italy - ‘Campo del sole’ and its columns

Open air museums are found in areas that offer wonderful natural views. They allow* the beauty of art and nature to be discovered together.

“Campo del sole” is not only without walls but it doesn’t even have a road! To get there, you have to take a boat as the museum is on a small island in the middle of Lake Trasimeno. It’s situated on a beautiful, green and sunny plain* full of ... columns! 28 artists have created unique* works of art on each tall, stone column. • http://www.musei.it/umbria/perugia/museo-all-apertocampo-del-sole.asp

The original idea. The first open air museums were created in Scandinavia towards the end of the XIX century by a clever music scholar, Sten Rentzhog, in order to open new spaces for art. Soon the idea spread* and open-air museums of all kinds were born: village-museums, farm-museums, historical, archaeological and contemporary art museums. ... Let’s take a look at some of them around the world!

Australia - the green park In Victoria, in the McClelland Sculpture Park, you can admire sculptures of all kinds made by more than 70 artists. • http://www.mcclellandgallery.com


Filippo Brunelleschi, one of the most important architects of the Renaissance period, convinced the citizens of Florence to play a terrible joke on Manetto Ammanatini. The citizens began calling the man by another name (Matteo) and in the end the poor man believed himself to be mad! When he found out the truth, he was so ashamed that he left for Hungary where he became rich and started a new life.

1409, Florence. Brunelleschi and the man without an identity.

One evening, Raffaele Mormone, the owner of the biggest theatre in Naples in the 1800s returned home from work ‌ but was unable to find his house! In fact the door had been hidden by a newly-built wall. It was one of the many jokes carried out by Antonio Petito, the greatest actor in the 1800s. His victims were often theatre owners, the prompter* or other friends, who never knew what might happen!

1867, Naples - The house that disappeared.


em; search tion via mod In 2007, the ternet connec in an , was … Sp n o Ti ti connec of Google that but the t u o ab e g n hed nothing stra ad was publis In 2008, a job t! ile year, to st e La th s! from ... on Mar b , jo a g in is vert w.topeka.com on the site ad d name to ww an go lo s it d city change Topeka, the the company in honour of as w it name s at it th ” ed chang ad h “explaining re o ef b e a short tim in Kansas that Kansas”. to “Google,

of laughs. le, a network g o o G d n o unch 2007 and bey unced the la engine anno

ntlem received a “Ladies and ge but we’ve just e, m m h the ra og pr ogramme wit of our music the famous pr s n ga be M * us val of artian bulletin....”. Th unced the arri no an at s th s ld le or Wel eW vel War of th voice of Orson reading the no as w trying s le as el w W ople he on Earth. g to some pe in rd co ac tion was t la bu pu as the po l el on the radio w ry ve d ed . He succeede mage was caus to play a joke so a lot of da al , ly te na tu or terrorized. Unf . fled* in terror ho w by people

ns!” “Help, martia uption for the interr 1938, U.S.A en, apologies*

TV - S

paghetti as a On April 1st 19 fruit! 57 the BBC an nounced that in Switzerlan farmers d picked spag hetti from sp produced that ec ia l trees that type of pasta . It was an in yet* various cr ed ible story, people telep honed the BB Maybe they C to find out more thought that . if the bread-t also spaghet ree exists then ti trees could exist too!

1957, British


10, the TV ad bought In October 20 geles police h n A s Lo e th nological the news that of super tech e p ty a , ks ac jet p en could fly 10 thousand ich the policem h w h it w k” r. However, “backpac 0 km per hou 10 at s re et m ent, one up to 2,400 e announcem th r : te af s te u TV by saying about 40 min sorry live on y sa to ad h ters of the presen invented!”. it was in fact y, rr “We’re so

w 2010, Fox ne

police. s. The flying sted ews broadca station Fox N

apologies: sayin g sorry fled: ran away prompter: a perso n who reminds ac tors of their lines if the y forget what the y have to say suspicious: unbe lieving thus: so, conseque ntly yet: however

glossary

s in 4D

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. April 1st 2010 , the site Tota l film announ based on the ced that the book The Ho film b bit was going in 4D. In add to be filmed ition to the ‘t raditional’ 3 the spectato dimensions, rs would be ab le to smell od and even a sp ours, perfum ray of water e – an absolute immersion! Th ly total e story was b elieved by ev serious newsp en very apers and sp ecialized web sites.

2010 - laugh

2010, Austra

‘global’ joke Some month . s before the World Cup in Morning Her 2010, the Syd ald published ney the news that Beckham had the footballe accepted the r job of coach national team of the Austra . Many reader lian s believed it were suspicio but many oth us*. The articl ers e said that B was recoveri eckham, who ng in hospital , had accepte because the d the offer Australian pre sident Lowy a basket of p h ad sent him ineapples an d bananas. M loves fruit bu ay be Beckham t this seems an exaggeration !


April the 1st is a traditional date for playing jokes - here’s a trip into the past to remember 8 of them!


glossary

allow: permit mosaics: a pictur e made of many small pieces of sto plain: large, flat ne area of land reconstruction: a copy of a place that existed in the spread: covered past a big area unique: special, unusual

Egypt - back in time You can take a step back in time in Cairo, Egypt, thanks to the true to life reconstruction* of a village from the time of the Pharaohs. Small boats allow you to reach and visit houses that look like those of the past.

Japan - at the foot of the ‘art’ mountain The first Japanese open air museum, Hakone Open air Museum, was opened in 1969. Here, in the enormous space (70,000 square metres) at the bottom of mount Fuji, you can admire more than 100 works of art by artists from all over the world. • www.hakone-oam.or.jp/english

South Africa, mosaics* in the park In Bloemfontein, in South Africa, at the Oliewenhius Art Museum, you can find an extraordinary collection of huge cement sculptures and mosaics*. • www.nasmus.co.za/museum/satellite/museums

If you could crea te a museum to save an object, which object wou ld it be? Why? Ask your fr iends the same questi on and talk about your ch oices together!


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present perfect / past simple / adjectives

KID ON THE ROAD

Kid on the Road Here w e around are again as w E togeth ngland. We’ e continue o ve trav er ur jour e n and am and visited lots of lled many m ey azing p i l i e n travell laces t s teresti in og n the fin g together! A ether. We’v g e al n taking phases of o d now as w had fun ur jour e ente a look r ne at So jum p aboa the North-E y, today we’ re ast par rd and t of En off we gland. go*! Hadrian’s Wall So, where are we today? I can see a long, long wall in front of me that stretches* for miles and miles! Is it the Great Wall of China? The former Berlin Wall? No, impossible! We’re in the north of England so this must be Hadrian’s Wall, built by the Roman emperor Hadrian in the year AD122 to stop invaders taking control of the Roman empire in Britain. Although it doesn’t exactly follow the same line as the English-Scottish border, it runs from the East coast to the West coast of Northern England. Today you can walk along it on foot and in 1987 it became a World Heritage Site*.

Newcastle Leaving the wall behind us, we head towards the biggest city in this area, which is the city of Newcastle. In the past, the city was famous for its shipbuilding and coal mining and it played an important role in the industrial revolution. Nowadays, it’s an important place of culture and entertainment. It also has a well-known football team ‘Newcastle United’ which play in the premier division.


Whitby Would you like to have a look at the sea? Then let’s go to Whitby, a fishing town situated on the east coast. It’s a small but very interesting place and has lots to see and do. The town of Whitby has appeared in many works of literature and probably the most famous was ‘Dracula’ by Bramstoker. The book was set* in Whitby. Probably because the town has something mysterious about it and the symbol of Whitby is the ruins of the impressive Abbey* built above the town. One of Whitby’s famous inhabitants was Captain James Cook who was one of the first Europeans to make contact with the eastern part of Australia in 1770. You can visit the Captain Cook Memorial Museum and visit the house where he lived for a period. Another important symbol of Whitby is a huge* whalebone* arch which represents the large whaling industry that took place in the sea near Whitby.

York Just an hour’s drive from Whitby is the picturesque* town of York. It has pretty cobbled* streets with medieval shops and houses. York is a city with Roman and Viking origins. In fact, here you can visit the famous ‘Jorvik museum’ where you can go back in time to AD975 and visit a Viking settlement* and experience the tastes and smells from that period. Make sure you get there early though as it’s really popular and there’s always a long queue*! For all you train lovers, you can spend a few hours visiting the National Railway museum where you can see 100 different types of locomotives and discover the history of the railway from its creation to the present day. And finally if you like being scared why not go on a ‘ghost walk’, which is a guided tour around the ‘haunted’ streets at night.

Hull Our final destination for today is the city of Hull. It’s home to one of the world’s most spectacular aquariums and contains over 40 sharks and more than 3,500 fish. It’s also the place where lots of marine biologists carry out research into sealife.

ter all ired af t . g n li fee r today re you t’s it fo a a , h t w , e ll r Ph ? We nish ou velling n we fi e h this tra w , e . ext tim ngland Until n n u o dE r a y e journ

glossary A person from Newcastle is known as a ‘Geordie’. One of the most famous Geordies of the moment is Cheryl Cole, the ex-wife of the Chelsea footballer Ashley Cole. But do you know in which famous girl group Cheryl sings?

a b c

Spice Girls Girls Aloud Sugababes

In English we have the saying ‘carry coals to Newcastle’. What do you think that means?

a b c

useless and superfluous difficult and tiring dirty and unclean

The answer is on page 3

abbey: a big church cobbled: covered with little stones haunted: visited by ghosts and spirits huge: very big locomotives: the front part of the train off we go: let’s start our journey picturesque: very pretty queue: a long line set: (here) takes place settlement: place where people live stretches: goes from one part to another whalebone: bones from the very large sea animal World Heritage Site: a place of special cultural or physical significance


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FUN AND GAMES

MUSEUMS Complete the sentences with the correct form of the passive and then decide if each sentence is true or false. T

F

1. Open-air museums ____________ at the end of the 17 century (create). th

2. The “Campo del Sole” museum in Italy ____________ as a factory – museum (build). 3. The open-air museum in Cairo ____________ on a big lake (locate). 4. The first Open Museum in Japan ____________ since 1969 (open). 5. Hakone Open Air Museum can ____________ at the foot of Mount Kiso (find). 6. In the Oliewenhius Museum sculpture masterpieces ____________ (collect).

TWILIGHT Look at the wordsearch and try to find 10 words from the article you read on pages 4-5. You can find the words horizontally, vertically or diagonally.

E

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a. The name of the boy Bella falls in love with __________ . b. The name of the town where Bella goes to live __________ . c. The person who Bella goes to live with __________ . d. Bella finds out about a local __________ which talks about a group of people who drink animal __________ . e. Bella discovers that the boy she’s fallen in love with is a __________ . f. The town where Bella goes to live is described as dark and __________ . g. Bella almost dies when Jack gives her a __________ on her hand. h. The idea for the book came to the writer in a __________ . i. The name of the third book in the series __________ .

The answers are on page 3


Liven up your lessons! With audio CD and Teacher’s guide English

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ELI Language Magazines www.elimagazines.com

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FAMOUS FACES

Milla Jovovich

The beautiful Ukranian actress, who became famous after the science fiction series Resident Evil, is now Milady De Winter in The Three Musketeers. A step back into the past in 3D! From the novel to the cinema

Milla Jovovich has gone back to the 17th century – she interprets Milady De Winter in the new film version of the novel The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas written in 1844. It’s the first version made in 3D, by the director Paul Anderson. Milla said “Fantastic. I’m a fan of the book! It’s always been an extrordinary story”. The Musketeers were guards that protected the King of France. Milady, a beautiful but evil* woman, worked for the powerful Richelieu and put the Queen and the Kingdom in danger.

The Three Musketeers is a costume drama. Milla said: “If I could go back to that era, I would immediately change the clothes - they were really beautiful but very uncomfortable! She spent hours trying them on and has put the photos on Twitter. Milla adores fashion. When she was 12 years old she began her career as a model and if she had more time, she would do more fashion shows. She also designs clothes and has created a collection for the Japanese brand Ich and together with Carmen Hawk, has created some clothes for Resident Evil.

A passion for adventure Milla loves Twitter and she uploads* news about her life but also useful information such as the campaign against spina bifida, a genetic disease. Her favourite hobbies are music, parachuting and underwater diving.

A fantastic career

glossary

evil: bad ,cruel upload: put photo s, videos the intern onto et

She acted for many years before becoming a star: The last train for Kathmandu, Return to the blue lagoon, Kuffs… The turning point came in 1996 when she was chosen by Luc Besson for the film The Fifth Element (1997). It was a big success and was followed by other films such as Ultraviolet (2006) and the four films of Resident Evil. These took their inspiration from famous videogames and were set in the imaginary Raccoon City where Alice and her friends defend the world from the powerful multinational company called Umbrella. The fifth film has already been announced for 2012!

Not only the future!

present perfect

/ 2nd conditional

In reality she has also made historical films (Joan of Arc, 1999) and dramatic films (The Million Dollar Hotel by Wim Wenders with Mel Gibson, 2000). She said “a science fiction film and a historical one are similar. In both of these an unreal world is created in which the audience is immersed”.

Complemento operativo allegato al volume Change Up Intermediate. Non vendibile separatamente. Copyright Eli 2011

A question of style

ChangeUp2_Rivista2  

8 Sping Jokes Kid on the road Pull-out booklet Twilight for Kid lit 12 4 7