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STYLE SHOPPING 3.0 | 40 Lynn Yaeger imagines an even more radical future for e-commerce URBAN JUNGLE | 42 Fur gets wild with boldly patterned coats and bags STYLE NEWS | 48 Statement gloves; Armani’s “Nude” collection ALL THAT GLITTERS | 50 A new age of opulence reaches the art world THE KING OF DIAMONDS | 54 De Grisogono’s Fawaz Gruosi knows exactly what women want

20

KEEP YOUR SHIRT ON | 56 A garment by Alex Mill too striking to cover up STYLE MOVEMENT | 58 Layers make more than one giant leap for mankind BLUE IN THE FACE | 62 The top men’s watches display a dash of indigo

LIFE GRAND OPENINGS | 64 Nothing displays Howard Slatkin’s celebrated style quite like his doors COLLECTED | 66 Drew Barrymore shares her favorite photograph, shot by Dennis Hopper CLEARLY SPEAKING | 68 Interiors become a touch retro with this minimalist statement: Let Lucite rule RHAPSODY IN BLACK | 70 Garlic’s gone goth. And prominent chefs are following suit FORM MEETS FUNCTION | 72 Louis Vuitton finds a muse in the designer who made functionality a true luxury

BODY

CULTURE

WINTER VITALS | 78 Men’s-grooming and women’s-beauty products fuse practicality with cool

IN LIVING COLOR | 115 L.A. artist Peter Shire is being discovered by a new generation of fans

I DREAM OF DETOX | 80 Retreats that transform travelers

INSIDE WALT’S VAULT | 118 Walt Disney’s secret apartment is the best address in the Magic Kingdom

LET THERE BE LIGHT | 82 Doctors reveal the secrets of laser treatments WORK IN, WORK OUT | 84 The latest in high-intensity fitness

I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST SUMMER | 120 Why we’re obsessed with binge watching TV

PLAY GAME ON | 89 Top-ranked tennis star Novak Djokovic and Masters-champion golfer Adam Scott face off SKI SUITED | 92 Hermès hits the slopes (again); Colorado’s charming hamlet NEW CAR ON THE BLOCK | 94 Maserati’s sticky-sweet entry-level luxury sedan UNDER THE INFLUENCE | 96 On the eve of Miami Basel, why the art world is getting liquored up

WORK POWER SEAT | 100 Inside the headquarters of globe-trotting architect Peter Marino BIRTH OF A NOTION | 102 The brilliance, and the backstabbing, that went into founding Twitter MAKING WAVES | 104 Wall Streeters make a mass exodus to the shores of Palm Beach KIRSTEN’S CALL TO ACTION | 106 Working women have a voice in New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand CORPORATE STRUCTURE | 110 Polished accents push the woman’s suit to the next level PICTURE PERFECT | 112 Modeling mogul Faith Kates sees her world in black and white

DADDY DEAREST, THE SOLO ACT | 74 The surprising rise of the single father

Lovely Lupita

PA G E 1 2 4

Lupita Nyong’o wears a dress by RODARTE and jewelry by CARTIER, ROBERTO COIN and VAN CLEEF & ARPELS.

PHOTO STEVEN CREDITS PAN TEEKAY

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contents Designer Michelle Gerson’s interior using Lucite accents

Las Vegas: A girl walks into a dry bar

pa g e 1 8 6

CITIES aspen | 176 The perfect day in the Rocky Mountain town: après-ski, shopping at Fendi, a challenging hike Chicago | 177 Shopping the new Gold Coast; Animal Flow at Equinox; Rosemont’s new luxury fashion outlets

pa g e 6 8

FEATURES Lupita Nyong’o | 124 A single film in—and with Oscar buzz already— Lupita Nyong’o, the compelling star of 12 Years a Slave, is just getting started. But as Nyong’o makes clear, being a newcomer doesn’t mean being naive. By Adam Rathe; photographed by Steven Pan

22

Great Performances | 130 They were haunting, uplifting, hilarious or heartbreaking, but these actors all had one thing in common: passion. The most unforgettable Hollywood players of the year. Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth and Eric Ray Davidson

Beyond the leather

pa g e 1 0 0

The Notorious Scarface | 140 Power. Arrogance. Jealousy. Drugs. Thirty years after the iconic film hit theaters, Al Pacino, Oliver Stone, Michelle Pfeiffer and Brian De Palma reveal all. By Patricia Bosworth Basic Instinct | 144 White, that most primal of colors, is also winter’s most versatile in textures that range from simple cotton and linen to leather, vinyl and rumpled silk. Photographed by Raf Stahelin Rediscovering Vietnam | 152 Culture rich and postcard perfect, a regal country gets new life. By Bill Keith; photographed by Douglas Friedman Blonde Ambition | 160 Winter’s head-to-toe accessories officially settle the debate: More is definitely better. Go big for evening with scene-stealing bags, bold jewelry and some serious shoes—or all three at once. Photographed by Bela Borsodi

On the cover: Top, $1,030; skirt, $1,200; bracelet, $630, SACAI, sacai.jp. Mini Ipanema Drop earrings in 18-karat rose gold with moonstone, $980, ROBERTO COIN, 800-853-5958. Photographed by Steven Pan; styled by David Vandewal.

The secrets of white collar Prisons | 168 Inmates know your life story. Celebrity friends might drop by via helicopter. But the psychological punishment is all too real. Bernie Kerik, Jack Abramoff and Dennis Kozlowski, three of the most high-profile men to be on the inside, smash the perception that prison life is anything like “Club Fed.” By Lisa DePaulo; photographed by Grant Cornett

Dallas | 179 Art at the Joule Hotel; designer Jan Showers’ stunning new coffee-table book; global eats Houston | 181 Lyle Lovett gives the shirt off his back; Josiane Goerl’s personal style secrets; Karen Pulaski’s stylish linens Las Vegas | 183 New restaurants from celebrity chefs; the Wynn’s refreshed spa menu; the best blowouts Los Angeles | 188 The Peninsula’s helicopter getaway; manicures for what ails you; the United Artists building’s Hollywood history Miami | 190 A South Florida farmers’ market; seasonal hotel suites; Fortune International’s new property New York | 193 Sake offerings at Sen NYC; a jarring exhibit at the Met; The Charles comes to the Upper East Side Tri-State | 198 Party in the Philip Johnson–designed Glass House Orange County | 199 “California Landscape Into Abstraction” exhibit; foodie’s delight; primping and priming spa treatments palm beach | 200 David Webb’s legacy at the Norton Museum of Art; preppy swimwear San Francisco | 201 A pair of local brands prove business is better in twos; Union Square is blowing up parties | 203 Lanvin in Las Vegas; Tom Ford opens in Chicago

BACK PAGE Famous Last Words | 208 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin may have conquered the moon—but is Mars next? Here, his handwriting brings him back to earth

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with emily lohrman

Letter from the cEO

Jason BInn

26

I

t’s hard to believe we’re already at the end of another fantastic year for DuJour. In the past 12 months, we’ve made unprecedented strides in seamlessly integrating our quarterly print magazine and monthly digital issues. After much research and development, we’re proud to introduce the DuJour app, a state-of-the-art experience putting us at the forefront of moder n technology and media. (Download it now, and let me know your thoughts!) I ca n’t th i n k of a not her med ia property that’s won more accolades, online and off, from prestigious and prominent outlets than DuJour. On a personal note, in my 25-year publishing career nothing has been more rewarding than to have been named as one of the most inf luential and impactful media visionaries of the year by industry authority Folio, which honored me alongside peers and friends including Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti, Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp and Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin Smith. Additionally, we’ve been nominated by min, the indust r y mustread, for awards including Best Web Design, Best Magazine Launch and Best Investigative Feature, and AdWeek has nominated us for its Hottest Newcomer Award. I hope by the time this issue comes out we’ll have already won! Content is king, but drawing in the right local and national audiences, when working with strategic partners, is priceless—and our marketing partners continue to support us as we experience new, exciting developme nt s a nd be come more nimble than ever. (We’ve got big news to come!) Speaking of great content, look no further for proof than our winter

philip goldfarb “you must stay with phil” justine koons, nicole ruvo, jeff koons, trent fraser “celebrating a great collaboration”

cover star, Lupita Nyong’o, a bright new talent whose big-screen debut in director Steve Mc Q u e e n’s i n c r e d i bl e 12 Ye a r s a S l a v e , produced by Brad Pitt, is one of the most buzzed-about per for ma nces of the year and is al ready wi n n i ng awa rd s. O r t a ke our recent digital cover, N BA A ll-St a r a nd for mer B o s t o n C elt ic Pa u l P ie r c e , who just relocated with his gorgeous, generous wife Julie and their th ree wonder f ul child ren to play fo r t h e Br o ok ly n Ne t s . T h e y’r e spectacular people who work hard to engage the community they live in and who k now the meaning of the phrase “giving back,” and I’m gla d to call t hem my neig hbor s. T he welcome par t y we th rew for t he P ie r c e s wou ld n’t h ave b e e n possible without Br uce Bozzi and The Palm Restaurant, Graff CEO Henri Barguirdjian, whose fabulous jewels sh i ned as br ig ht as t he Pierces, and John Esposito and elit by Stolichnaya. There’s nothing more rewarding than supporting great people like my dear pal Goldie Hawn, who recently spoke to DuJour about her education-focused charity, the Hawn Foundation, and opened her home for an intimate photo shoot and interview. Goldie and her partner, Kurt Russell, also made headlines as guests of honor at a party we threw for them at Seth Greenberg’s Espace with Arty Dozortsev and Forever Young wines. Here’s to a great 2014 full of love, peace and happiness.

wendy maitland “a real estate maven”

Photo by Bruce Weber at the photographer’s home in Golden Beach, Florida

gianluca isaia

jeffrey hirsch, jarrett posner and jorge mora

michael stillman, alan stillman and alan patricof “It’s all about family” andrea dorigo “a vision-ary”

michael weaver “all about wynn-ing”

with scott sartiano, andrew sasson and noah tepperberg “25 years of friendship” with connie annE phillips, dr. richard firshein and melissa beste

sharon ray, majid pishyar and mojdeh pishyar “the dream team”

BInn shots behind the velvet rope

serena d’angelis “great to have you here”

leo d’angelis “welcome to the world”

Follow on Twitter and Instagram @JasonBinn


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SHE WAS GORGEOUS. ONE OF A KIND. AND SHE WAS RIGHT WHERE YOU WANTED HER. DOCKED IN SLIP 9C. Legend tells of a resort in the Antilles. Where the games never end. And neither do the rewards. Where the harbor is home to a collection of floating castles. And where the two best days of a boat owner’s life are when he arrives and when he returns. It is a place of privilege. Of 5-star luxury and opulence. For those in pursuit of the sporting life.

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with haley lank au and jesse cole

With Francois Banos and Florian Etienne

BInn shots behind the velvet rope

Follow on Twitter and Instagram @JasonBinn guy chetwynd and aryeh bourkoff

allison gollust audra baldwin

with bruce weber at his home in montauk

handpicked Alberto Milani Alex Drexler Andrea Dorigo billy macklowe, julie macklowe and stephanie hirsch

dr. richard ash and rachel ash

Anne-Charlotte Loupi Cliff Fleiser

bippy Siegal

Cristiano Mancini Denise De Luca Erik Maza Geoffrey Hess Gianfranco D’Attis Graziano de Boni Hanna Struever eric lichtMess and jim kerwin

Isabella Hunter

30

James Mullaney Jeffrey Roseman Jesse Angelo John Delaney Jonah Peretti with jesse weber, jarROd weber and ina simmel “here’s to the beginning of an outstaning adventure”

the cohen family at graduation

Molly sims, David Goldberg, gry winther and Scott stuber

Krista Florian chuck townsend

Ludovic du Plessis Maria Tui Meghan McCain Munawar Hosain Nathalie Morgan Pam Bristow

with my wife, haley, and Giuseppe cipriani

with Mark mullett and Dr. paul frank “the beach boys” stephanie smith, jamie foX x, john steinberg and jill steinberg

Pamela Duckworth barry diller

Patti Cohen Peter Bonell Peter Malachi Peter Webster Reed Krakoff Richard Johnson

randy brandoff “someone to watch”

Ken wise

Stacie Henderson Susan Anthony

with Andrew Heiberger, Haley Lankau, Nicole Oge and Jesse Cole

Tom Venables Toni Belloni Venanzio Ciampa Veronique Louise Vincent Ottomanelli Walter Coyle robin coffey

kurt russell and goldie hawn

Diana Picasso, Eddie Trump and Elie Wiesel


PA G E 1 6 8

A MOMENT WITH THE EDITORS

THOUGHTS DUJOUR It was

visits the Los Angeles studio of artist Peter Shire, a Post-

Years a Slave. I didn’t

modernist from the ‘70s having an unexpected renais-

expect to be uplifted. Though

sance of sorts at the hands of color-loving collectors and

brilliant, the film is a brutal look

nostalgia-junkie children of the ‘80s. And in “Making

at slavery, and director Steve

Waves,” we examine the mass exodus of Wall Streeters

McQueen’s last film, after all,

heading to Palm Beach for less taxes, better parties and,

was the sufficiently depressing

of course, more palatable weather.

to be as blown away as I was by

KP: Sounds good to me. NV: We even find fashion at its most versatile and, we’d

a beautiful, haunting newcomer

say, hopeful in “Basic Instinct.” If stark white is a winter

named Lupita Nyong’o, whose

staple, the long months ahead are already looking a bit

performance as a young slave

brighter.

32

Shame. But neither did I expect

Arresting Looks: Orange might be the new black in the white-collar prison yard, above, where inmates get their exercise, however on the outside neutral tones reign supreme: The model at right wears MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA, GUESS and CHLOÉ; below, Lupita Nyong’o wears THAKOON and VAN CLEEF & ARPELS.

PAGE 124

PA G E 1 4 4

NV: In the story “In Living Color,” writer David A. Keeps

raining the day I saw 12

at the mercy of a violent master

KP: The issue is, as always, packed with celebrity, from

is nothing short of breathtak-

Drew Barrymore, who talks about her longtime love of

ing. Who is this woman?

art, to Buzz Aldrin, who is so optimistic that we’ll land on

K

Mars in his time that he charmingly signs his correspon-

EITH POLLOCK:

Getting

dence “Mars Guy.”

behind this movie, and this

NV: In the end, though, I found myself most fascinated by

actress, was an obvious and

“Shopping 3.0,” which looks at the future of shopping in

immediate choice for us. It’s rare to

the digital era. The pleasure once derived from shopping

catch someone in a truly defining

in stores hasn’t gone away, suggests Lynn Yaeger; it’s

moment, but that’s the best way to

just changing. And in positive ways as well: After all, the

describe just what Lupita is facing,

Internet (with some help from UPS) has made accessible

how significant it is. The day of our

things once inaccessible, delivering goods from the far-

photo shoot, Lupita found out she’d

thest corners of the earth.

been nominated for a prestigious

KP: For me it was a draw between “Daddy Dearest, the

Gotham Independent Film Award,

Solo Act,” about Growing Generations, a surrogate

and as the weeks went on, her buzz

agency committed to helping single fathers have

grew. People started talking Oscar.

biological children, and Lisa DePaulo’s report on white-

NV : After more than a year of

vaguely punishing hideaways for privileged offenders,

featuring some majorly iconic faces

but through her exclusive interviews with such prison-

on our cover—Nicole Kidman,

ers as Bernie Kerik, the former New York City police

collar prisons. We tend to think of these places as cushy,

Julianne Moore and Robert De

commissioner and one-time nominee for head of the

Niro, to name a few—it felt right

Department of Homeland Security, DePaulo presents a

to consider a new face, someone well on her way

far more humble side. And yet the story, ultimately, is

to becoming a person of that rank and prestige,

one about faith and looking forward.

and to celebrate the optimism she must feel at

NV: We hope you enjoy this issue. We have to say:

this moment in her life.

We’re optimistic.

KP: Defining moments, new beginnings and, most

of all, optimism—the promise of great things— became something of a recurring theme as we produced this issue, and not just because we always get reflective at this time of year. Michelle Cottle, who profiles Kirsten Gillibrand, makes a powerful case for the New York senator as the second coming of Hillary Clinton, in terms of the hope she holds not just for women but for the entire nation.

Tell us your thoughts DuJour: E-mail TheEditors@DuJour.com

COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GRANT CORNETT, RAF STAHELIN, STEVEN PAN, THOMAS WHITESIDE

N

ICOLE VECCHIARELLI:


Co-Editor in Chief Keith Pollock

Co-Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

Chief Revenue Officer Alan Katz

Sales

Art Director Stephanie Jones

Associate Publisher John Clarkin

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau

Executive Directors Cat Dewling Gayle Perry Sobel Ron Stern Phil Witt Erik Yates Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France) Susy Scott (Italy)

Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe

Features Deputy Editor Natasha Wolff (Cities) Articles Editor Adam Rathe

Project Manager Isabelle McTwigan

Staff Writer Lindsay Silberman

Senior Executive Assistant Mallory Samet

Research Editor Ivy Pascual

Sales Assistant Jennifer Lentol

Associate Editor Natalia de Ory

Marketing Director Julia Light

Art + Photo

Marketing Coordinator Caitlin Hosek

Photo Editor Etta Meyer

Designer Jason M. Szkutek

Senior Designer Sarah Olin

Chief Advisor Monty Shadow

Fashion + Beauty

Executive Vice President Cynthia Lewis

Senior Market Editor Sydney Wasserman

Production

34

Assistant Fashion/Market Editor Paul Frederick

Vice President, Production Shawn Lowe

Editorial Assistant Brooke Bobb

Prepress Manager John Francesconi

DUJOUR Cities

Systems Administrator Howard Wanderman

Regional Editors

Print and Paper Management CALEV Print Media

Anna Blessing (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston), Sam Glaser (Las Vegas), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami),

Finance

David Nash (San Francisco), Chadner Navarro (New York, Tri-State), Maxine Trowbridge (Dallas)

Financial Controller Allie Schiffmiller Senior Financial Analyst Michael Rose

Contributors Paul Biedrzycki (Automotive), Patricia Bosworth, Lisa Cohen (Home), Dori Cooperman, Grant Cornett,

DUJOUR.com

Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Jeffrey Podolsky,

Chief Digital Officer Robin Keller

Mickey Rapkin, Rhonda Riche, Lee Brian Schrager, Michael Solomon, Tyler Thoreson, Lauren Waterman, Bruce Weber, Thomas Whiteside

Digital and Social Media Editor Krista Soriano

Contributing Editors Melanie Carnsew (Art), Kara Cutruzzula (Features), Antoine Dozois (Copy), Nick Earhart (Copy), Joanna Scutts (Copy),

Senior Web Developers David De Los Santos, Jeff Marx Senior Web Producer Julianne Mosoff

Dacus Thompson (Research), Matthew Weingarten (Copy), Katherine Wessling (Research)

Founder/CEO Jason Binn

Interns

Chief Financial Officer Caryn Whitman

Marco Benatoff, Meaghan Hartland, Stefanie Lagalia, Bari Machado, Paulina Mann, Co-Chairman James Cohen

Jasmine Mays, Kyle Wukasch

Director of Editorial Operations Haley Binn

Web Design Code and Theory

Co-Chairman Kevin Ryan

General Counsel John A. Golieb

BPA Worldwide membership applied for October 2012 DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016, 212-683-5687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright Š 2013 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to subscribe.dujour.com, call 954-653-3922 or e-mail duj@themagstore.com.


R O SÉ V IN TAG E 2 0 0 3 A LIMITED EDITION BY JEFF KOONS


contributors

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—lunch order and all

Catherine Newell-Hanson Stylist, “Basic Instinct,” p. 144 Soup duJour: classic tomato

“I tried to show that white doesn’t have to be this blank, boring canvas—you can be playful with it,” says stylist Catherine Newell-Hanson of the all-white fashion spread. “I played with volume and texture by mixing pleats with leather and vinyl and mixing in things like cotton and silk.” Having styled shoots for Vogue, Dazed & Confused and Elle, NewellHanson says what excites her most about her job is “being able to create a character and tell a story with clothes.”

adam rathe Writer, “Lupita Nyong’o,” p. 124, and “Peter Marino,” p. 100 Soup duJour: hot and sour

Photographer, “Great Performances,” p. 130 Soup duJour: Vietnamese Pho

Ellen von Unwerth was so impressed by her celebrity subjects—including Clive Owen and Carey Mulligan—she found it impossible to choose a favorite. “Everyone was unique. They’re all such talented actors and very interesting to spend time with,” says the German-born fashion photographer. Von Unwerth’s career launched with a 1989 ad campaign featuring a young Claudia Schiffer. Since then, her work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Interview and i-D.

grant cornett Photographer, “The Secrets of White-Collar Prisons,” p. 168, and “Rhapsody in Black,” p. 70 Soup duJour: Roasted Cauliflower

Photographer Grant Cornett had never been to a prison before shooting the correctional facility seen in “The Secrets of White-Collar Prisons”—and he has no plans to return any time soon. Says Cornett, “It felt strange and was uncomfortable for me, actually. It’s the one thing you don’t ever want to have to experience.” The Brooklyn-based photographer also lent his lens to DuJour’s story about black garlic. His work has been featured in Time, Vogue and Esquire.

While an actress having a breakout moment and an established architect might seem worlds apart, DuJour’s articles editor Adam Rathe found at least one similarity between Lupita Nyong’o and Peter Marino, both of whom he profiled in this issue. “Lupita and Peter were so passionate about their craft,” Rathe says. “Each is highly trained but also knows how to have fun with work. Spending time with them was inspiring.” Rathe has written for Out, Spin and the New York Observer.

drew barrymore Subject, “Collected,” p. 66 Soup duJour: Cream of broccoli

Drew Barrymore’s appreciation for beautiful images isn’t surprising—the actress is an avid photographer herself. “I shoot film with two cameras, a Kyocera Yashica point-and-shoot and a Pentax K1000,” she says. “I always found myself photographing objects shaped like hearts: man-made, natural, graffiti, things in bricks, food.” Her forthcoming book, Find It in Everything, is a compilation of photos she’s taken over the past 10 years. In this issue, she shares a coveted Polaroid from her personal collection taken by another actor-cumphotographer: Dennis Hopper.

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

counterclockwise from top left: ellen von unwerth, grant cornett, getty images, robert rathe, freddie campion

36

ellen von unwerth


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212.463.8898

Double Mystery Collection


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sHopping 3.0

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ver y Sat u rd ay for yea rs, u nless we had something else to d o — a nd we r a r ely d id — my friend K and I spent the afternoon at a swanky New York department store (hint—it’s on Fifth and 57th Street and starts with B), grabbing lu nch i n t he basement café a nd killing hours trying on every conceivable thing, from bikini to ball gow n, jod hpu r to ju mpsuit, and even, very occasionally, actually buying something. We don’t do this anymore. Now we follow the UPS tracking feature on our MacBook Airs until the glo-

The advantages to this revolutionary new shopping system are many: One, we no longer have to deal with an outraged salesclerk when we ret ur n 42 dresses. And two, the whole world is at our dancing fingertips—we can fetch stuff from venues with names like Concept Store Riga and Maria Store, Dubrovnik (not making these up). No one is more sur prised than me that I have taken so enthusiastically to this mode of commerce. I was, unlike Judy Garland, not born in a tr unk, but more or less took my first breaths in a retail store— my parents loved shopping, and I was conversant with the seductions of Saks and the lure of Lord & Taylor before I could walk or talk. So you’d thin k I would be the last person to find herself furiously phone-bidding for a mechanical toy pig on eBay—it’s a long story, but suffice to say that having only two out of three circa-1933 little pigs is just no f un— even as the pilot announces that it’s time to shut off all devices and, in his ridiculous words, “Sit back, relax and enjoy the f light.” (Is he nuts? No one

The whole world is at our dancing fingertips. rious moment when a big brown box ar rives at one of our houses (it’s more fun to order together), awaiting the arrival of this parcel with an anticipation worthy of the second coming of the Messiah. W hen the g reat day is f inally here —and it comes at this point around once a week—we fire up the coffee, have a long, delicious, tryon party and inevitably each keep one, or at most two, of, say, the 43 assorted frocks ordered.

has actually enjoyed a f light since 1962—plus, how can I enjoy the f light when I don’t know how the auction ends?) Of course not everyone is lusting after a mechanical hog in a sailor hat (lucky thing for me). Though the Inter net has transfor med the way we buy everything, from raref ied Rolexes to naughty thongs cou r tesy of u nder pa nt s- of-t he month clubs, most people are ordering practical, mundane things like boots or bathing suits or, as our extensive research reveals, lots and lots of jeans. Now the dreaded “Is everything OK in there?” shouted through the fitting room curtain as you struggle to pull that devilish denim up ove r you r k nees (no, not OK! I need a way bigger size!) has been replaced by a phenomenon that relies on something called “Virtual Fitting Room Technology”—contraptions with names like “MeAlity.” This equipment employs a kind of souped-up X-ray vision that bounces off the moisture in your skin, or some such, and gives you the bad news, albeit silently, about your expanding girth. (I remember when the Prada store in SoHo first opened, offering trick mirrors that

allowed you to find out more than you ever wanted to know about the back of your ensemble, not to mention your coiffure.) I have a theory: Someday, maybe someday soon, all the stores we have come to know and love will be transformed into giant showrooms. They won’t actually sell anything. Instead of salespeople, the staff will wander around, like chic retail nurses in white coats, demonstrating just how downy the cashmere, how feather-light the satchel, but after that leaving you strictly alone. Then you’ll go home, fix yourself a hot toddy, log on and let a robot somewhere in Transylvania figure out what size to send you. I only hope that my imaginary salons will line Madison Avenue and New Bond Street and all the other boulevards that make life worth living. And please let them have giant windows, because who wants to eat a chestnut and watch an ice skater in Rockefeller Center and then not be able to visit those holiday displays so enticing, so amusing, so poignant—those dioramas that enchant us and mark the seasons in a way that a cardboard box at the front door, for all its dubious promise, never could?

Topshop now offers augmented-reality changing rooms: Stand in front of a screen to see how desired clothing will fit.

©blutgruppe/corbis

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With fitting rooms beyond passé, Lynn Yaeger imagines an even more radical future for e-commerce


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Micro Teddy coat, price upon request; Sleeveless Maxi Teddy coat, price upon request; Trompe l’Oeil skirt, $611, JEAN CHARLES DE CASTELBAJAC, Gregory’s, 404-812-0060. Colorado bodysuit (worn throughout), $260, WOLFORD, wolfordshop. com. Bra, $1,080, JEREMY SCOTT, Opening Ceremony, 212-219-2688. T-Back jean, $66, DAANG GOODMAN FOR TRIPP NYC, trashandvaudeville. com. Sunglasses, $240, CAST EYEWEAR, casteyewear.com. Belt, $295; Small duffel, $545, MEREDITH WENDELL, shop. meredithwendell.com. Foxy Mitten, $425, GLAMOURPUSS NYC, glamourpussnyc.com.

trending

Urban Jungle

Bright colors, oversize silhouettes: Fur gets wild this season with boldly patterned coats, statement bags and even shades photographed by hans feurer styled by Katie mossman

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THERE ARE EXCEPTIONS TO EVERY RULE.

ROYAL OAK DIAMOND SET IN PINK GOLD.

AUDEMARS PIGUET BOUTIQUES. 646.375.0807 NEW YORK: 65 EAST 57TH STREET, NY. 888.214.6858 BAL HARBOUR: BAL HARBOUR SHOPS, FL. 866.595.9700 AUDEMARSPIGUET.COM


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Right: Jacket, $5,900, DONNA KARAN NEW YORK, donnakaran.com. Lana long-sleeve tunic, $445; Lana turtleneck dress (worn underneath), $495, DKNY, dkny.com. Maxim sunglasses, $300, A-MORIR, a-morir.com. Kalahari choker, $3,750, LANVIN, Neiman Marcus, 310-550-5900. More Is More bag, $790, LONGCHAMP, longchamp.com.

Above: Coat, price upon request, REEM ACRA, reemacra. com. Coat (worn underneath), $910, PEDRO LOURENCO, Space Mue, +82-2-541-3633. T-Back jean, $66, DAANG GOODMAN FOR TRIPP NYC, trashandvaudeville.com. Liam sunglasses, $250, A-MORIR, a-morir.com. TU’TIL earrings, $5,910, MONIQUE PEAN, moniquepean.com. Pompom clutch, $2,595, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Foxy mitten, $425, GLAMOURPUSS NYC, glamourpussnyc.com. Left: Coat, price upon request; Bucket bag, price upon request, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Sweater, $695, JASON WU, Bergdorf Goodman, 800-558-1855. T-Back jean, $66, DAANG GOODMAN FOR TRIPP NYC, trashandvaudeville.com. Bauhaus earrings, $612, MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE, mariafrancescapepe.com. Classic necklace, $175, HOLST+LEE, holstandlee.com. Gloves, $690, MARNI, 212-343-3912. Bag, $825, JÉRÔME DREYFUSS, jerome-dreyfuss.com.


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Vest, $9,150, MARNI, 212-343-3912. Sweater, $2,230, LANVIN, 646-613-9541. Sunglasses, $240, CAST EYEWEAR, casteyewear.com. Tiger Stripe hoop earrings, $75,100, JACOB & CO., jacobandco.com. VPL necklace, price upon request, ORLY GENGER BY JACLYN MAYER, jaclynmayer.com.


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Mirca coat, $4,990; Veliero dress (worn underneath), $750, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Devore Marvin tee, $554; Devore Trinity trouser, $795, JOSEPH, joseph-fashion.com. Sunglasses, $165, WESTWARD LEANING, westwardleaning.com. Cyprus ear piece, $350, EDDIE BORGO, net-a-porter.com. Horn pendant, $750, EDDIE BORGO, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-872-8901. (Right arm) Bag, ST. JOHN, discoverstjohn.com. (Left hand) Daphne clutch, $3,995, JASON WU, jasonwustudio.com.

Coat, $40,000, FENDI, 212-759-4646. Vintage leotard, EMILIO CAVALLINI, similar styles at emiliocavallini.com. Grimal sweater, $346, A.L.C., shopbop.com. Caftan Moon Bakelite necklace, $1,010, AURÉLIE BIDERMANN, net-a-porter.com. Racer Flap clutch, $700, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM, 31philliplim.com. Rex mitten, $250, GLAMOURPUSS NYC, gorsuch.com. Hair: Erika Svedjevik for Oribe Haircare. Makeup: Alice Lane at Jed Root. Model: Shanina Shaik at Next. Casting: Oliver Ress for Creartvt.


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THE GLOVES ARE ON Hands up for glamorized versions of the winter staple

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHARLIE ENGMAN

RUNWAY

omewhere between the winter whites and cool pastels that dominated the fall 2013 runways there was Armani’s Privé collection. The designer’s latest couture creations, done entirely in a neutral palette, are a nod to the ‘90s, when minimalism was at its peak. Also making its debut was Armani’s “Nude” capsule collection of ready-to-wear pieces—including tailored jackets, tapered trousers and accessories—constructed in the same vein and color as his most recent couture offerings. It might be the season to bundle up, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to fashionably flash some flesh.—BROOKE BOBB

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WEB-SIGHTED

La D de Dior watch in pink gold with diamonds and mother-of-pearl, $28,500, DIOR, dior.com, Bag, price upon request, THE ROW, therow.com. Gemlock Eternity ring in 18-karat yellow gold, price upon request, GEMVETO, 212-755-2522. Formal gloves, $145, GASPAR GLOVES, gaspargloves.com.

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tep aside, infi nity scarf: Gloves have thrown down the gauntlet, so to speak, for the best accessory of winter 2013. And we’re not talking just any old hand-warming mitts. Though everyone’s got at least one simple, classic version in cashmere, wool or leather, the most striking of the season reach for the elbows in fabrications too precious to be considered ordinary: bright calfskin (Jean Paul Gaultier), sequins on mesh (Marc Jacobs), red leather and satin (Nina Ricci) and graphic black-and-white leather (Proenza Schouler). Rochas combines supple suede with playful wool for a set that’ll keep you toasty through the winter months, while Lanvin’s pony-hair pair, with matching dress, makes piling on additional accessories totally unnecessary. For men, the offerings are a bit tamer, if no less luxurious: leather and more leather at Brioni, Zegna and Louis Vuitton. Belstaff introduces a welcome bit of fur lining to a standard pebbled-leather driving glove, while only Hermès could, and does, make mittens look manly. And should you by chance consider $985—the cost of Gucci’s elbow-length black python gloves for women—too much to spend on such a season-specific accessory, relax. Just think of all the cash you’ll be saving on manicures.—ALYSSA GIACOBBE

It’s the thought that counts when it comes to holiday giving, so let us do the thinking. The DuJour.com gift guide features an expert selection of the most coveted products available, whether you’re thinking about friends, family or maybe even yourself.

This fall, Mayor Michael Bloomberg declared October 24 “Giorgio Armani Day” in New York City.

GLOVE, STYLIST: JAMES WORTHINGTON-DEMOLET; ARMANI, LEFT TO RIGHT: IMAXTREE.COM, COURTESY OF ARMANI, IMAXTREE.COM; GIFT GUIDE: CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

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IN THE NUDE


SELECT NEIMAN MARCUS LOCATIONS

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK

OSCAR DE LA RENTA BOUTIQUES

NEIMANMARCUS.COM

SAKSFIFTHAVENUE.COM

OSCARDELARENTA.COM


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ON DISPLAY

L THAT ALL GLITTERS Opulence and fantasy in art and adornment

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inimalism has its virtues, but this season’s designers of fine jewelry are having none of that, t ur ning heads in a par ticularly artful way. How else to describe such byzantine embellishments as seen from the likes of Graff, Damiani and others? While diamonds may be forever, so is art, and each draws inspiration from the other. Consider the complex dreamscapes of Kashmir-bred, Londonbased artist Raqib Shaw, whose vibrant paintings, drawings and sculptures are speckled with glitter,

In a season flush with statement jewelry, Dutch photography and art duo–turned-designers Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin have chosen instead to downplay decoration. The pair’s latest jewelry collection—a capsule collaboration with cult jewelry brand Ten Thousand Things—is distinctly delicate, incorporating stones like turquoise, black Tahitian pearl and rubies into graceful rings, bangles, necklaces and earrings. And though the pieces may be understated in design, they are rich in sentiment: The interlocking circles were conceived by Matadin to represent the duo’s union in marriage.—B.B.

crystals and semi-precious stones. Though the otherworldly scenes he creates are massive in both size and concept, they are also highly deliberate: Shaw often paints with porcupine quills for precision. Through January, Pace Gallery in New York will host Shaw’s “Paradise Lost,” an exhibition inspired by John Milton’s fall-of-man theme. Featuring new pieces best described as grand—including an eightfoot sculpture inspired by Shaw’s bonsai collection— the show is a glittering homage to man, beast and the power of embellishment.—KRISTA SORIANO

Clockwise from top left: Greek Lion bangle, $19,500, DAVID WEBB, 212-421-3030. Marquise chandelier earrings, price upon request, GRAFF, 212-355-9292. Fancy Intense ring, price upon request, CORA, 888-971-2672. Dorotea Masterpiece earrings, price upon request, DAMIANI, 212-760-2790. Aberdeen ring, $4,900, IVANKA TRUMP FINE JEWELRY, 888-756-9912. Oiseaux de Paradis necklace, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com.

Bangle in 18-karat rose gold with diamond pave, $6,745; Ring in silver with Tahitian pearl, $450, INEZ AND VINOODH VINOODH, prettymucheverything.com.

In Lady Gaga’s video “Applause,” directed by Inez and Vinoodh, the singer wore what Inez calls a “glove-kini,” made of fabric cutout hands.

IMAGE FROM RAQIB SHAW, PARADISE LOST, 2011: CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE; JEWELRY: COURTESY; INEZ AND VINOODH: COURTESY

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GOING AGAINST THE GEM


www.brunellocucinelli.com

877 3308100

Our fathers have told us


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this fall. Her ambition is to offer clients a head-totoe Tod’s look. Until now, ready-to-wear has always taken a back seat to the company’s accessories, but according to president and CEO Diego Della Valle, in five years Tod’s ready-to-wear business will grow to account for 30 percent of the company’s annual sales. Max Kibardin, creative director of Bruno Magli, won praise for a move from designing shoes to readyto-wear. Accordingly, the brand’s Milan and Venice shops were revamped and its website was overhauled. With this kind of growth, the fashion world will surely keep watching.—HARRIET MAYS POWELL

IN THE DETAILS

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MORE THAN RUBIES

The timeless luxury and seductive details of Dolce & Gabbana’s new watches PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

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talian designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana’s fashions have long been celebrated for the quality of their craftsmanship as well as a sense of sexy spectacle. Their new women’s watch collection brings both dimensions to bear. In fact, the label has rethought its entire approach to timepieces (starting with men’s watches in 2012) to focus on high-quality Swiss engineering, construction and movements and luxurious finishes. One look at the opulent elements (cases are available in gold, rose gold and steel) and it’s also apparent that this new line was personally designed, styled and conceived by signori Dolce and Gabbana (a rarity for fashion houses). Even the ruby indexes recall the bottle stopper on their signature scent. The ladies’ watches feature classic case shapes based on the men’s models but feminized by details such as bezels set with precious gems. Like Dolce and Gabbana themselves, these timepieces are a great pairing of enduring style and sensibility.—RHONDA RICHE

34mm in stainless steel, price upon request, DOLCE & GABBANA, available exclusively in selected Dolce & Gabbana boutiques.

166

Number of steps required to make a Speedy bag.

THIRTY

Number of people who touch each Bruno Magli shoe during the course of its manufacturing. That’s a lot of hands devoted to feet.

$425

Average price of Tod’s classic driving shoes.

450

Pairs of Tod’s equivalent to the cost of a Bentley Continental GTC convertible.

43.9 / 9.4

Shoes and clothing as percentages of Ferragamo’s total sales in 2012.

Years since Prada launched a ready-to-wear collection.

100

Congratulations to Prada, which entered its second century in 2013.

BY THE NUMBERS, PRADA: AFP/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHERS: COURTESY

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lurred lines are going from radio to runway as an increasing number of accessory houses move into ready-to-wear. Perhaps everyone is taking a cue from Louis Vuitton, which soared during Marc Jacobs’ 16-year tenure as creative director, a period that saw a respected luggage company ascend to the pinnacle of fashion. Or Prada, which launched its fi rst ready-to-wear collection in 1989, long after the house’s founding in 1913. At the forefront of the current trend is Tod’s and its new creative director, Alessandra Facchinetti, who got rave reviews for her debut collection in Milan

Year that Louis Vuitton created the Speedy 25 bag at the request of Audrey Hepburn, who wanted a size smaller than the classic Speedy.

1965

Accessory houses are finding unexpected success in the ready-to-wear game

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FROM BAGS TO RICHES

LUXURY BY THE NUMBERS


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THE KING OF DIAMONDS

De Grisogono’s Fawaz Gruosi knows exactly what women want. Jeffrey Podolsky takes note

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group of women has assembled at the de Grisogono boutique on Bergdorf Goodman’s first f loor. One client, smitten with a phenomenal half-million-dollar oval-cut white-diamond and emerald cabochon ring, blushes as a gentleman appears from behind and surprises her with an orange leather cord bracelet (with a smattering of brown diamonds and orange and pink sapphires), perfect for St. Jean beach in St. Barts come Christmas. “Why not?” says the mysterious man who had been standing unnoticed in a corner. “It’s just a gesture.” “My clients are like family,” declares de Grisogono founder Fawaz Gruosi, dressed in a bespoke Caraceni double-breasted charcoal-gray suit, a custom Turnbull & Asser white shirt with a blue-spotted tie and Doriani tassled loafers. His “family” includes the Begum Salimah Aga Khan, Sharon Stone, Naomi Campbell and Carine Roitfeld. With droopy eyelids that reveal Costa Smeralda–green eyes (picture a quietly handsome version of Mohamed Al-Fayed), Gruosi is as enigmatic and romantic as his signature multi-faceted black diamonds. An allure that’s not lost upon his clientele. “It’s an integral part of him,” says Michele Herbert, philanthropist and wife of Pantone founder Larry Herbert, who can’t help eyeing a pair of $488,000 circular drop earrings laden with diamonds and emeralds. “He looks at a woman, and they just love it. You can feel it.” The genteel-playboy reputation amuses Gruosi no end. “I’m actually very shy,” insists the man known for hosting the most fabulous party each August at Porto Cervo’s Billionaire Club in Sardinia, for a paltry 200 or so “family friends.” His friend and client Denise Rich says: “Fawaz has this easy way about him

that people want to be around. He makes you feel comfortable. You can be yourself.” Adds Herbert: “He is one of the sexiest men in the world. Fawaz is always surrounded by literally the most gorgeous women I’ve ever seen.” Over the past three decades, Gruosi has established himself as one of the jet set’s go-to jewelers, with a flair for the unusual, both in his designs and his air of reticence. (“I never push the client. I find it vulgar.”) Perhaps this taste stems from his atypical upbringing. Born in Lebanon to an Italian mother and Lebanese father, Gruosi grew up in Florence (hence the priceless collection of 15th- and 16th-century Florentine antiques at his villa overlooking Lake Geneva), where at 18 he began working for a jeweler. Twelve years later, the potent combination of Saudi Arabia’s Alizera family and Harry Winston discovered him, and he became Winston’s representative in the Middle East. Later Gruosi represented the most priceless jewelry of Bulgari patriarch Gianni Bulgari, whom he credits with “giving me a chance in life,” along with the courage to launch his own business, in 1993. He quickly became known for his avant-garde use of black diamonds, stingray (or Galuchat) leather, and “brown gold,” as well as his Instrumento No. Uno watch, which presaged today’s trend of men’s oversize timepieces. Although currently in the midst of a divorce from his wife of over 18 years, Caroline Gruosi-Scheufele, of the Chopard family, this modern-day Medici has no complaints. “I’ve been lucky,” says Gruosi. And he is defi nitely not forthcoming on his present love life. “I prefer to be at home with my eight dogs,” he insists. “They talk without talking. They feel you.” Sound like someone we know? From left: Yellow-gold and white-diamond Galuchat cuff; white-gold and whitediamond earrings with emeralds; Collier-brown- and white-diamond necklace with pink sapphires, all prices upon request, DE GRISOGONO, 212-439-4220.

The Spirit of de Grisogono Diamond is the largest cut black diamond in the world, at 312.24 carats.

COURTESY OF DE GRISOGONO

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ILLUSTRATION BY KATRIN FUNCKE


s tua rtwe itz m a n. c o m


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End on End shirt, $145, ALEX MILL, 212-343-2539

SPOTLIGHT

KEEP YOUR SHIRT ON

An impeccably made garment by newcomer label Alex Mill proves too striking to cover up PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRAD BRIDGERS

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here’s a reason shirts from Alex Mill, the f ledgling clothing line founded by 35-year-old Alex Drexler, have built a devoted following: Drexler is a man obsessed with perfection. The brand began with Drexler’s own quest to find the ideal shirt. When he couldn’t, he made his own. “The most important thing for me is quality itself,” Drexler says. “If it’s not a quality shirt, where does that leave us?”

The resulting shirts—made to wear with anything from suits to swim trunks—have found their way into Barneys, Fred Segal and other upscale retailers. Though Drexler says he’s particularly finicky about buttons, the details of making his clothing aren’t as important as the final product. “When a customer wears this shirt, he won’t pinpoint all the little elements that go into it,” Drexler says. “But he’ll know it feels right.” And he’ll look great, too.


Malo Palm Beach 561.655.3312

Malo Aspen 970.925.3111 www.malo.it

Malo Beverly Hills 310.288.5100


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STYLE MOVEMENT

This season, layers make more than one giant leap for mankind

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Charlie Engman styled by james worthington demolet

Clockwise from left: Blazer, $3,645, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, 212-627-9202. Sleeveless sweater, $660; pants, $1,010, JIL SANDER, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. Traverse boot, $725, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Coat, $5,850; tie, $395, LANVIN, 212-812-2866. Astiral shirt, $198, ROBERT GRAHAM, 973-258-0500. Trousers, $175, BOSS, hugoboss.com. Shoes, $1,230, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Jeffrey, 212-206-1272. Overcoat, $3,250, ISAIA, Wilkes Bashford, 415-986-4380. Astiral shirt, $198, ROBERT GRAHAM. Heart sweater, $2,195, BURBERRY PRORSUM, burberry.com. Pants, $1,700, JIL SANDER, 212-925-2345. Gloves, $625, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Sneakers, $380, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, 212-292-9027.

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JOHN ISNER, 6 ATP titles – GUY FORGET, 3 Davis Cup titles – MATS WILANDER, 7 Grand Slam titles – GUSTAVO KUERTEN, 3 Grand Slam titles

4 MUSKETEERS CELEBRATE 80 YEARS OF TENNIS & STYLE

New York • Los Angeles • Miami • Las Vegas • Chicago Dallas • Houston • San Francisco • Honolulu Montreal • Toronto • Vancouver


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Clockwise from left: Coat, $1,429; pants, $621; tie, $252, KRISVANASSCHE, krisvanassche.com. Ohm Sport shirt, $198, ROBERT GRAHAM, 973-258-0500. Crew-neck sweater, $945, MALO, 310-288-5100. Boots, $1,020, COSTUME NATIONAL, 212-431-1530. Coat, $2,590, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Branston sweater, $650, BELSTAFF, Neiman Marcus, 312-642-5900. Slim pants, $425, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, 212-292-9027. Shoes, price upon request, PRADA, prada .com. Coat, $2,590, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-980-2970. Turtleneck, $700, MALO. Pants, $900, GUCCI, 415-392-2808. Shoes, price upon request, PRADA. Groomer: Kumi Craig for La Mer at The Wall Group. Model: Brady Ervin at Major.

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C U LT U R E redux

Continental Consequence

timepieces

BLUE IN THE FACE

This winter, the chicest watches are displaying a dash of indigo

From top: Automatic Chronograph, $28,900, FRANCK MULLER, franckmuller.com. King Power Oceanographic 4000, $30,400, HUBLOT, hublot.com. Men’s Nautilus, $26,700, PATEK PHILIPPE, Gearys Beverly Hills, 310-273-4741.

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f Brooks Brothers made its name as clothier of choice for the man on his way up in the world, the brand’s recently launched Natural Craftsmanship collection is aimed at the man who’s already made it. Butter-soft bombers, luxurious cashmere knits and soft-shouldered sport coats are more Milano than Midtown, and the 40-piece capsule has the 195-year-old label targeting entirely new (and European) levels of refinement. Fabrics are sourced from some of Biella’s finest mills, and 13 styles of cashmere knits come from Scotland. While austerity is being called for the world over, in the land of menswear, the smart money is on big spenders. Or as Brooks Brothers chief merchandising officer Lou Amendola puts it: “Most companies take things out of a product to hit a price point. We saw an opportunity to put things in.” Brooks Brothers isn’t the only all-American brand reaching for this rarefied air. Take CFDA-winning designer Billy Reid, whose American-made Heirloom collection is built around such awe-inspiring pieces as a $2,795 cashmere-bonded-neoprene peacoat. The customer who’s planning to purchase that piece, or pay $2,495 for an Italian-made blouson from Brooks Brothers, is less interested in brand than in quality, in the details that make the difference. “Customers know how much we put into it,” Reid says. Unexpectedly, it’s a younger customer Amendola and his team are aiming for. “The new generation is intrigued by wearing tailored clothing to work,” he explains. Whatever their age, “they seem to be acknowledging the craftsmanship, and they’re willing to pay the price.”—Tyler Thoreson

Buy that blazer in a larger size: Brooks Brothers has announced a plan to open a steakhouse inside its Manhattan flagship in 2014.

blazer courtesy

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Joanna McClure


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This Page: French wallpaper from the 19th century forms the backdrop of the entrance gallery (top left) which contains a Louis XV clock (top right); the guest room displays 18th-century Chinese wallpaper (bottom left and right). Opposite page, clockwise from top left: The kitchen ceiling is covered in reproduction Delft tiles; the back hall displays a collection of silver-mounted porcelain; the library’s powder room has walls of miniatures; neutral shades accentuate the park view; the kitchen door is inset with 19th-century plaques; hand-painted panels modeled on Raphael.

SHOW & TELL

GRAND OPENINGS

Nothing displays Howard Slatkin’s celebrated style quite like his doors. Daryl Chen steps over the threshold PHOTOGRAPHED BY KYOKO HAMADA

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he novelist K ather i ne D u n n once said , “Ever y door way, ever y intersection has a story.” Nowhere is that truer than in the eclectic and elaborate upper Fifth Avenue apartment of interior designer Howard Slatkin, where objets d’art abound but the doors—each a separate work of imagination and craftsmanship, using Delft plaques, tortoiseshell, Chinese lacquered screens, marble and more—are especially mesmerizing. Over the cou rse of his 20 years in the de-

sign trade, Slatkin assembled the sources, artists and know-how to create dream homes for his clients. Although he doesn’t like to drop names, it’s said that he’s designed for Nili and Nat ha n iel de Rot hsch ild , Lily a nd Ed mond Saf r a , a nd Deed a a nd Willia m McCor m ick Blair. (Along the way, he also cofounded the Slatkin & Co. home-fragrance company and, more recently, Torie & Howard, purveyors of organic candy.) As he worked for others, though, a million imaginary castles were f loating around

in his mind. All he needed was the right space, and with the purchase of a wreck of a Manhattan apartment in the late 1990s, he got 6,000 square feet of his very own to work with. It’s the subject of the new book Fifth Avenue Style (Vendome Press). Every room ref lects Slatkin’s wide-ranging inf luences as well as the painstaking, detailed work of his corps of craftspeople. Take the library: It was small, dark and low-ceilinged, so Slatkin turned those negatives into positives,

Good taste runs in the family. Slatkin runs a home-fragrance company with his brother Harry, an owner of luxury-goods brand Belstaff.


fashioning an Aladdin’s cave to show off some of h is t reasu res: t u r ned ivor ies, rock- cr ystal objects, gold boxes, Elizabethan potter y, bronzes, Augsburg silver-gilt pieces, Dutch paintings and t reasured old books. Inspired by the books’ bindings, he commissioned embossed leather panels for the walls to suggest a fumoir, or smoking room; their pattern came from a design he saw in a French château. To accompany the walls, he installed a parquetry f loor modeled on one at Pfaueninsel Palace in

Berlin. Sasha Solodukho, with whom Slatkin has collaborated for 20 years, and his team took four months to build it with four kinds of wood. “I love working with artisans,” Slatkin explains. “You read about people saying, ‘Oh, you can’t find quality craftsmanship today,’ and I say, ‘Bullshit—there are people who are just as brilliant, just as talented, just as able as ever.’ ” Besides an insistence on quality, another hallmark of Slatkin’s style is luxury, which, he says,

is “what gives you comfort and pleasure.” To truly appreciate what he means, take a seat on the living-room sofa—designed by Slatkin, of course. The body is covered by a plum-mauve cashmere, the arms with a matching suede, the back with—ahhh—sheared mink. Sink in, gaze at the beaut if ul, adored objects arou nd the room—a Meissen parrot, the bronze sculpture of Venus, the hand-embroidered curtains, the Degas sketch—and marvel at all the things two hands can create.

The first three candle scents Slatkin created were gardenia, tuberose and a grapefruit-mango blend; his current favorite is bamboo.


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Dennis Hopper, Untitled, 1991

COLLECTED

DREW BARRYMORE The actress finds inspiration in the art of the everyday. Her first book of photography, Find It in Everything, comes out in January

“IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE EXPENSIVE OR FAMOUS FOR ME TO ENJOY IT.”

at a group show at the Craig Krull Gallery in Santa Monica. I was—I am— the biggest fan of h i s wo r k a s an actor and an artist. Hopper started taking Polaroids like this one in the 1980s, and this piece is pretty r e pr e se nt at ive of h is work from that time. He was known for his fascination with graff it i a nd s t r e e t c u lt u r e; h i s d o c u m e nt a t io n of t h e way L.A. u sed to look is some thing I’ve always been drawn to a s wel l. I’ve neve r bee n inclined to buy lithog raphs or photographs because t hey a re re produce d , but a Pola roid w ill always be a n o r ig i n a l. But mo r e , it ju s t spoke to me: this great, minimalist building, the blue sky

a nd t h is ma scu l i ne, g r it t y, t aboo si ngle p e r fe ct word . It’s currently leaning against a f ireplace in my house, but it’s been moved th roughout every room. Generally, I just buy what I li ke: It doesn’t have to be expensive or famous for me to enjoy it. In fact, I’m often i nt i m id at e d by la rge pr ic e tags. I have my cap, and I usually don’t go above it, except once or twice in the bluest of moons. I don’t always know the name of the ar tist—it’s about loving the piece. —As told to NATASHA WOLFF

In the 1970s, Dennis Hopper shot two bullet holes into his Andy Warhol screen print of Chairman Mao and Warhol called him “a collaborator.”

PHOTOGRAPH: BIZ URBAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Y

ears ago, when I dropped out of school, I was determined to surround myself w it h obje c t s a nd ide a s that were interesting and important. I pored over art books and made a point to visit museums and galleries. I began taking my own photographs, and in 20 years I have archived some 25,000 photos, many of which form the basis for my new book. I became a pretty avid and eclectic collector: There’s a Ryan Price drawing that hangs in my k itchen, a Hugh Holland photograph and a Brigitte Waldach the size of a small wall that hangs in my daughter’s room. Recently, for my birthday, my husband [art adviser Will Kopelman] gave me an Ed Ruscha, whose work I’ve always loved. I bought this Dennis Hopper photograph five years ago


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Clockwise from top: Z-Chair, $1,330, PLEXI-CRAFT, plexi-craft.com. Caboche LED suspension light, $1,161, PATRICIA URQUIOLA AND ELIANA GEROTTO FOR FOSCARINI, foscarini. com. Mid-century candleholders, $1,500, DOROTHY THORPE, nyshowplace.com. Swinging bubble chair with stand, $1,195, MODSHOP BY ROOMSERVICE, roomservicestore.com. Fina side table, $17,720, RON SEFF, ronseffltd.com. Mongolian lamb bench, $1,450, JONATHAN ADLER, jonathanadler.com. Acrylic coasters eight-pack, $118, ALEXANDRA VON FURSTENBERG, alexandravonfurstenberg.com.

ROUNDUP

CLEARLY SPEAKING

Interiors become a touch retro with this minimalist statement: Let Lucite rule EDITED BY LISA COHEN

Known for his Lucite costume pieces, Alexis Bittar launched his first fine-jewelry collection this fall.

BACKGROUND: CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE; CANDLESTICKS: COURTESY OF SHOWPLACE ANTIQUE + DESIGN CENTERS; ALL OTHERS: COURTESY

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HUNGER GAMES

YOU ATE WHAT?

KITCHEN AID

RHAPSODY IN BLACK

Garlic’s gone goth. And prominent chefs are following suit PHOTOGRAPHED BY GRANT CORNETT

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eminiscent of its roasted sibling yet far more complex, black ga rlic gets its d a rk , smolder i ng looks and beg uiling funkiness from a monthlong exposure to constant heat and humidity—essentially a Bikram yoga session of the culinary kind.

Found at gourmet and Asian markets, the pungent ingredient has also turned up at the nation’s top restaurants, adding a molassestinged smokiness to Gulf shrimp pasta at Bottega in Napa Valley and a subtle licorice finish to a hamachi crudo at Manhattan’s

Le Bernardin. Indeed, chef Eric Ripert doesn’t mince words when it come s t o si ng i ng + more @ the praises of the eb- DuJour.com ony allium: “Once you start using it, you won’t want to stop—it brings such great depth.” —JOLYON HELTERMAN

RE AD AN EXC LUSIVE EXC ER P T FROM ANY THING THAT MOVES ONLINE AT DUJOU R .COM

Black garlic is rich in umami, the “fifth taste” alongside the better-known sweet, salty, bitter and sour.

STYLIST: JANINE IVERSEN

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A

mong the delicacies Dana Goodyear consumed while researching her latest book were the following: fresh ant eggs, frog fallopian tubes, crème brûlée made with bone marrow, and coffee brewed from beans fed to, and then excreted by, Asian palm civets, small catlike animals found in Southeast Asia. It’s true: Feces-covered coffee beans are an epicurean treat—the digestive process is said to make them less acidic—and not an inexpensive one: $60 for a mere four ounces. A staff writer for the New Yorker, lecturer at the University of Southern California and author of two books of poetry, Goodyear makes her much-anticipated nonfiction debut with Anything That Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture (Riverhead Books). It’s a comprehensive, often gut-churning look at the extremes the food movement is embracing; the growing demand for the underground, the raw, the illegal and the otherwise questionably edible; and the chefs and exotic-food purveyors responsible for getting such curios to the table. Given that America’s other food obsession is with what we’re not eating—gluten, dairy, sugar—the “extreme foodists” Goodyear encounters are undeniably out-there, but they’re also undeniably mainstream. Since when did ash, hay, wood and air become the stuff of haute cuisine? The answer, of course: since people began paying for them.


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C U LT U R E SCRAPBOOK

#WORLDTOUR

Christiane Lemiux, founder of New York’s interiors studio DwellStudio, travels the world looking for unexpected inspiration. What she finds, she snaps with her smartphone, making @DwellStudio one of the most compelling Instagram feeds to follow.

Perriand in Japan in 1940

The designer in Japan in 1954

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Charlotte Perriand, “Bibliothèque Mexique,” 1952

Blue Aster Petrol Sunglasses, $665, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com

JOURNEYS

FORM MEETS FUNCTION

Louis Vuitton finds a muse in the designer who made practicality a true luxury

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odernist furniture designer and architect Charlotte Perriand, one of the pioneers of 20th-century functionalism, was a woman of exacting standards. For something to be beautiful in her mind, it not only needed to appeal to the eye but to serve a purpose, and her graphic, modular buildings and interiors for clients like Air France and the League of Nations were a seamless blend of intriguing form and multi-functionality. Now, Perriand’s legacy and modus operandi has been resurrected through Louis Vuitton’s spring/summer 2014 “Icons” collection. Conceptualized by Vuitton women’s creative director Julie de Libran, the primary-colored, versatile line of clothing and accessories, from graphic printed dresses to sturdy sunglasses and convertible scarves, pays homage to Perriand’s love for travel, architecture, industrial design and interchangeable parts. “The ‘Icons’ collection is designed always thinking of materials, functionality, timelessness, desirability and attention to details, so Charlotte’s approach and her way of life had a natural connection to us,” says de Libran. Though practicality may not always be high on the list when it comes to indulging in luxury, in the case of Perriand’s ideals and Vuitton’s latest collection, it’s nice to see the two meet somewhere in the middle.—BROOKE BOBB

TO SEE LEMIUX’S EXTENDED TRAVEL DIARY, GO TO DUJOUR.COM

When Perriand first asked Le Corbusier to hire her as a furniture designer, he said, “We don’t embroider cushions here,” and sent her away.

LOUIS VUITTON, ARCHIVAL PHOTOGRAPHS: ARCHIVES CHARLOTTE PERRIAND 2013; ALL OTHERS: COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON. WORLD TOUR: COURTESY OF CHRISTIANE LEMIUX.

Carre Pompon Vichy Beige, $715, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com


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cultural shift

DADDY DEAREST, THE SOLO ACT

Michael Martin reports on the rise of single fathers

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Christine Blackburne

From left: Classic booties, $94, JACADI, jacadi.us. Sartorial wingtips, $1,495, JP TOD’S, tods.com.

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i x ye a r s ago, St eve n Ha r r is took inventor y of his life, as single Manhattan men generally do around certain watershed birthdays, and realized that something was missing. “A kid,” the 56-year-old lawyer says with a laugh. W hat Har r is did next was, he says, “unheard of.” With no serious girlfriend or potential partner on

the horizon, he searched online for a surrogacy agency to find a woman who would carry his biological child. He settled on Growing Generations, a firm that originally specialized in matching surrogates to gay and lesbian couples but which now has a rapidly growing clientele of single men, gay and straight, who want to start families—and are willing to pay six figures for the privilege.

“T his is def i nitely on the up swing,” says Stuar t Bell, the coowner of the agency, which has offices in Los Angeles and New York. There are no statistics available on the number of single men pursuing surrogacy, but Bell says he’s seen the numbers grow from 5 percent of his practice five years ago to 15 percent today. He attributes this rise to the in-

creased visibility of single-parent surrogacy. Seemingly every month there’s a fuzzy celebrity-magazine story about Hollywood personalities going through the process. “In the U.S., it’s almost common now,” says Bel l. “ You r u n i nt o si ngle people, and they say, ‘Yeah, I had a baby because I didn’t want to wait any more. It’s almost a mant ra: I haven’t found a partner, I haven’t

Barcelona played host to Europe’s first “Men Having Babies” seminar last year. Similar conferences have taken place in the U.S. since 2005.


SELLECK: BUENA VISTA/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION

40 I would be a dad.” Bell says single men seeking surrogates have a similar personality profi le. “They’re type A, very high achievers,” he says. “They’ve concentrated most on their careers, not on their love lives or personal lives. They get to a point in their forties, and they’re saying, ‘Wait a minute, I’ve worked so hard to build this life that I have, and I’ve always wanted to be a dad.’ Gay men and straight men are very similar in that way. “ We d o n ot ,” h e s ay s w it h a laugh, “get playboys.” One of the most pop-culturally notable single fathers is Tuc Watkins, the One Life to Live and Desperate Housewives star. He pursued surrogacy two years ago and now has a boy and a girl who are nine months old. “I always knew I was going to be a dad, even when I was a kid,” says Watkins, who came out as gay earlier this year. “So it was never really a question of am I—it was really a question of how.” O nce he t u r ned 45, Wat k i n s f ig u re d he “ wa sn’t get t i ng a ny younger” and sought out Growing Generations, which matched him with an egg donor and surrogate. “Finding donors is a little like online dating,” he says. “You look through pictures, they tell you what their GPA was in high school, what their favorite color is; it’s a ver y thorough profile. I thought it would be fun to go through the donor database, but the truth is, it created a lot of anxiety. You’re provided with so much information, you feel like you receive the route to the answer ‘no’ rather than answer ‘yes.’ I sort of agonized about it.” For all three men, working with a su r rogate was relatively easy; G row i ng Gener at ions at t r acted several who were willing to bear children for single men. Bell says

that hasn’t always been the case. “We used to have to do a lot more explaining and talking with a surrogate about working with a single guy than we would a couple. We don’t have to do that anymore. In fact, almost 30 percent of our surrogates are single—they’re living the life they’re helping people achieve.” Harris’ child was born in South Dakota; his surrogate called him when she went into labor, and he hopped on a plane. “What’s funny is they gave me a room in the maternity ward with all the moms, and my son slept in the room with me the fi rst night. It was me and all the moms. He was born on a Friday, and I took him home on Sunday—he was two days old on the plane.” The process is distinctly expensive; according to Bell, it can cost $150,000 to $200,000. Harris says he spent around $200,000. Watkins sold his house in order to afford his surrogate. Given the cost and the laby rinthine path they must follow, a question these fathers hear relentlessly is, why not adopt? “I was too old,” Harris says frankly. “Nobody’s going to give a child to a 50-year-old single guy.” “There’s a lot of ways to be a parent,” says Watkins. “But there are a lot of things to be said for seeing yourself in your child.” “I wanted to create something,” says Kaminow. “I didn’t think of it as rare. I just knew I had to do it. I looked at people like Neil Patrick Harris and his partner and thought that was cool. Not that that inf luenced my decision. It made me feel like I was part of a growing community that I could cultivate and be a part of.” One thing that has changed for the men is dating. All three men interviewed for this story have put it on hold.

“Oh, my God, I’m a chick magnet!” says Steven Harris. “It’s not why I did it, but it’s cer t ainly a fringe benefit. But I’ve only gone out with one woman. Before I had my son, I dated so much because I was trying to get married, and I say I’m not in that business anymore.” “ I n a l l i rony, I met some one during my surrogate’s pregnancy,”

“I’M A CHICK MAGNET! IT’S NOT WHY I BECAME A FATHER, BUT IT’S CERTAINLY A FRINGE BENEFIT.” —STEVEN HARRIS says Kaminow. “I had embarked on this road, and it was my road— I didn’t want to share it. We broke up. I didn’t want him to be a part of this with me.” Harris originally planned to go through the process twice but decided against it. “My son wants a little brother, and I say, ‘Ben, it’s kind of complicated for me,’ and he says, ‘Just do what you did with me —get an egg donor and a surrogate and make another one.’ He knows the words; he just doesn’t know what they mean.” The occasional uncomfor table conversation aside, all three men feel like they’re ultimately part of the new normal. “I was talking to a colleague who said he was single,” says Kaminow, “and I started saying, ‘Yeah, when I was single . . . ’ I had to stop myself and say, ‘Wait, I’m still single. I’m just a dad.’ “I have to keep reminding myself that,” he says, laughing. “Just like any other single parent.”

Three Men and a Baby, starring Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg and Ted Danson, was the highest-grossing U.S. movie of 1987.

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found the right person, and so now is the time for me to do this.” But most celebrity examples are female. Why the rise in single men? The impetus for the phenomenon is nothing less than a seismic societal shakeup in terms of gender roles, thanks to advances in gay acceptance and female advances in the workforce. “In the last 10 years, there’s been a dramatic shift in how society views the role of a mother versus a father,” says Bell. “It used to be that you must, must, must have a mother in the picture for a child to develop and be nurtured, and that has really changed. You’ve seen it in heterosexual households with stayat-home dads and with gay couples who are having children. So that opens the door for single men to say, ‘Wait a minute—I can do this too.’ ” For his part, Steven Harris had planned to have a wife or steady girlfriend by midlife and dated, in his words, “so, so much.” “I always thought I would get married and have a family,” he says. “At 50, I actually got engaged and thought it was the best way to have a kid. Then I realized I just didn’t want to get married, so I broke it off. The next day I went online.” That was six years ago, when the idea seemed unorthodox, to say the least, not just in the larger picture but to Harris’ family. “All my friends and family said, ‘Why not just get mar ried?’ But once they saw I was serious about it, it all kind of fell into place.” For David Kaminow, a 42-yearold single gay marketing executive in Los Angeles, the decision to pursue surrogacy was less spontaneous. “As far back as I can recall, I knew I wanted to be a father,” he says. “And I sort of had a deal with myself when I was in my early to mid-thirties that by the time I was


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For her, clockwise from right: Tory Burch Eau de Parfum, 3.4 oz, $110, TORY BURCH, bloomingdales.com. Anti-Aging + Intensive Repair Daily Serum, 1.0 oz, $225, PREVAGE, elizabetharden.com. The Lip Balm, $50, LA MER, lamer.com. Satsuma Tsuge Brush, $75, CHIDORIYA, bigelowchemists.com. Fluid Sheer, $59, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com. Nail Oil, $39, UKA, peachandlily.com. Generation S Curler, $24, SHU UEMURA, shuuemura-usa.com.

checklist

WINTER VITALS

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These his-and-hers picks fuse practicality with cool for an effortless new maintenance routine PHOTOGRAPHED by CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

For him, clockwise from left: Charcoal Facial Soap, $29, BINCHOTAN, rikumo.com. Omega Shiso Skin Supplements, $45, ZELENS, zelens.com. Lip Balm, $8, JAO, jaoltd.com. Skin Revitalizing Concentrate, $150, TOM FORD FOR MEN, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com. Épice Marine, $240, HERMÈS, hermes.com. 90 Proof Hair Pomade, $18, BLIND BARBER, blindbarber.com.

Derek Lam and Estée Lauder will release a makeup line that includes mascara, lipstick, eye shadow and lip gloss inside a satin clutch.


Caterina Murino by Sylvie Lancrenon

“Eternité Elégance” sapphire ring: 18 kt. gold, pavé diamonds and sapphires, $7,450.

714 Madison Avenue (63rd Street) - New York, NY - 212.752.4300 - mauboussin.us


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wellness

I DREAM OF DETOX Here, retreats that transform travelers from the inside out. Lindsay Silberman recharges

crimson tide

F

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rançois Nars is not one to shy away from color. “If I had to pick one color to describe fashion, it would be red,” he declares. “It’s timeless but provocative, and women always look beautiful with red.” Inspired by the iconic photography of Guy Bourdin, Nars created a range of items for a capsule collection, including the new nail shade Lost Red. Below, we ask a few of our favorite ladies to fill in the blanks.—NATALIA DE ORY

N

BEST SUITED FOR

WHAT TO EXPECT

YOU’LL SACRIFICE

BUT YOU’LL LEAVE

RUMORED GUESTS

Masochists

Laxatives, nasal cleansing, blood tests, colon hydrotherapy, austere lodging

Phones, Wi-Fi, caffeine, sugar

With glowing skin, a flatter stomach, clear sinuses and a desire for fresh, unprocessed food

Sarah Ferguson, Alber Elbaz, Qatari princes

Burning Man attendees, yogis

Periods of silence, a lack of eye contact, yoga, naked hot-spring bathing, farmto-table food

Being able to speak or look at people

Well on your way to selftransformation and personal development

Deepak Chopra, Penélope Cruz, Orlando Bloom

Spiritual seekers

Metaphysical spa treatments, meetings with healers, putting your worries in a “worry box”

Being grounded in reality, but not much else

Feeling centered and de-stressed with a renewed sense of inner peace

Mariah Carey, Mel Gibson, wealthy hippies

Type A’s

5:30 a .m. wake-ups, 5-hour hikes, ritzy accomodations, muscle spasms, food dreams, occasional vomiting

Your watch, meat, alcohol, caffeine, dairy, gluten

A slimmer waist and thighs (down an average of 5 pounds and 9.5 inches)

Patrick Dempsey, Kate Spade, Carolyn Murphy

A RED NAIL WILL ALWAYS

be the statement nail, no matter how many rhinestones you’ve glued to them. –Kelly Oxford, author and comedian

HOW AMAZING WAS

101 Dalmatians? Cruella De Vil with those bright red nails?! (Fine they were gloves!)

VIVA MAYR

Lake Wörth, Austria

–Leandra Medine, founder, Man Repeller

MY SHADE IS

Garnet by Essie.

–ivanka trump, designer

THE RED NAIL DECLARES

I am not so stupid as to waste my time and money getting a french manicure that no one will notice. I like compliments, duh.

ESALEN INSTITUTE Big Sur, California

–Claire Titelman, comedian

I PREFER

blood-red gel manicures. Once you go Shellac, you don’t go back. –Jill Kargman, author

MY SECRET IS

I only paint the tips of my nails red.

MII AMO

Sedona, Arizona

–Tamara Mellon, designer

IT SAYS

years executing a concept that he says, “doesn’t indulge you, but doesn’t feel like an asylum.” Vana’s team of wellness consultants creates a bespoke program for each guest, incor porating Ayurvedic practices. The approach is a stark contrast to the extreme boot camps or silent retreats you’ll find elsewhere, but the overarching message is the same: Take time to recharge, rid the body of stress and toxins, and you’re guaranteed a transformative travel experience. From colonics in Austria to meditation massages in Arizona, here’s what you should expect at four of the world’s most prominent detox destinations.

I’m ready to get real.

– Sophia Rossi, Editor of HelloGiggles

THE RANCH AT LIVE OAK Malibu, California

Founded in 1962, Esalen was once considered a countercultural mecca, hosting lectures by Aldous Huxley, Timothy Leary and Ken Kesey.

nails: image source/getty images; retreats: courtesy

survey

estled deep within the lower foothills of the Indian Himalayas, Vana Malsi Estate is as far from life’s daily distractions as it gets. W hen the proper t y off icially opens this Januar y, founder Veer Singh is conf ident it will be “ the most prolif ic offer i ng of well ness i n the world.” So confident, in fact, that the New Delhi–based entrepreneur invested $155 million— out of pocket—to transform his holistic-wellness dream into a reality. The 21-acre proper ty, designed by a contemporar y Spanish design st udio, has 90 rooms, 4 yoga studios, 50 treatment rooms, and 2 restaurants. Singh spent nearly five


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vanity

LET THERE BE LIGHT

The country’s top skin docs reveal the secrets of laser treatments. Alyssa Giacobbe gets illuminated

donna trope/trunk archive

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ith the power to absolve you of wrinkles, acne scars, unwanted hair, fat, college tattoos and sun damage from all those fun-while-theylasted Nantucket summers, lasers are one of der matolog y’s most valued tools. But with growing interest comes growing confusion: Between ablative and non-ablative, fractional and pulsed dye, Q-switch and IPL, how are you supposed to know which laser is right for you? We asked the country’s top dermatologists to shed light on what you need to know now about lasers.

Pink Floyd is often credited with pioneering the use of lasers in concerts, and hired a dedicated laser team to manage them during shows.


“I AM ARMENIAN, SO OF COURSE I AM OBSESSED WITH LASER HAIR REMOVAL! MY ENTIRE BODY IS HAIRLESS.” —KIM KARDASHIAN HOW DO I KNOW WHICH LASER IS BEST FOR ME?

ISN’T THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY THE BEST TECHNOLOGY? Not necessarily. “Just because someone has a piece of equipment doesn’t mean they know how to use it,” says Cambridge, Massachusetts, dermatologist Dr. Ranella Hirsch. In many cases, an older laser will be more effective because a doctor has more practice with it. Or it may just be more effective. “The smartest patients don’t come in and say, ‘I want such-and-such laser,’ ” says Hirsch. “They sit down and say, ‘This is what bothers me. What can I do about it?’ ”

IT’S WAY CHEAPER AT THE MED SPA. CAN’T I GO THERE? Most devices are safe, but the laser is only as good as the person handling it. “One of my wisest medical school professors put it to me this way,” says Dr. Hirsch. “Doctors aren’t there for the 95 percent of cases that have no complications. You’re there for the

FINE, THEN. DERMATOLOGIST OR PLASTIC SURGEON? It’s most important, says Dr. Alster, that whoever you see is board certified, and that skin care is a core specialty. “There is no way a gynecologist is going to resurface someone’s face the way I can,” she says, “but there are a lot of them out there doing it.” If you’re only looking for laser treatments or injectables, you’re often better off seeing a cosmetic dermatologist who is more likely to perform the work herself instead of having an aesthetician or assistant do it. But if you also want to talk about having, say, an eye lift at some point, says Dr. Hirsch, a plastic surgeon—again, one equipped with at least three to five machines—may make sense.

WHAT’S THE MOST RESPONSIVE AREA TO TREAT? Dr. Hirsch sums up the majority of her laser practice as “hair, wrinkles, sun damage, red spots, brown spots,” noting that most patients come in for work on their face, neck and décolletage, and hands. “Hands are majorly in demand these days,” she says.

provide a range of what to reasonably expect, and how fast, especially after he or she sees how you respond to the fi rst treatment. “It could be three to five treatments, or four to six,” says Dr. Hirsch. “Some people may see results after one. But you should always ask, ‘What can I expect?’ ”

SHOULD I USE AT-HOME LASERS BETWEEN TREATMENTS?

POTIONS

THE BEST POST-LASER SKIN CARE

“They’re pricey, but I always say that if it buys you one less visit with me, it’s worth it,” says Dr. Hirsch. “But in my experience, few people stick with them.”

ARE IPL AND LED TREATMENTS ALSO LASERS? There are other medical-grade treatments that use light but aren’t lasers. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) and lightemitting diodes (LEDs) both use light to even out skin tone and produce collagen, with IPL being more powerful. These treatments are more often administered by aestheticians rather than doctors, but Dr. Alster recommends they should always be done in a doctor’s office, since side effects due to a therapist’s inadequate experience can still include blisters, scabs, pigment problems and/or scarring.

HEALGEL INTENSIVE Cooling, fast-absorbing gel formulated by plastic surgeons to soothe and repair. $60, net-a-porter.com

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The quick answer: You don’t. But a board-certified doctor with years of experience does. Resist the urge to ask for a specific laser by name— don’t be swayed by marketing—and instead choose a doctor who has plenty of experience (ask for photos of patients they’ve worked on) and at least three to five different machines. The best results for any condition are almost always achieved through a combination of laser types. “The doctors with the most experience will have several machines and can be choosy about which laser and in what order,” says Washington, DC, dermatologist Dr. Tina Alster. “I often use two or more lasers. For instance, if someone has red or raised scars, I might use pulsed dye to remove the red and flatten it down, and then follow with a fractional laser to resurface. For fat reduction, I generally use one laser to remove fat and another to tighten.” For added peace of mind, seek out a doctor in your area who has published on the topic.

other 5 percent.’” When something goes wrong, says Hirsch, it goes terribly wrong. If you don’t have someone who knows what they’re doing, you can wind up with permanent damage. A good doctor will screen you in advance as well as monitor you along the way to check how you’re reacting and adjust treatment accordingly. “Every day I have at least one person coming in with a side effect or complication that could have been prevented had the right laser been chosen or the right follow-up been conducted,” says Dr. Alster. But it’s not just about worst-case scenarios. “You have to understand the tissue to optimize the clinical effect,” she adds. “And to understand tissue, you need training.”

SKINMEDICA RESTORATIVE OINTMENT Specially created to treat post-procedure skin. $70, dermstore.com

CAN I HAVE LASER WORK IF I JUST GOT BOTOX? Yes, indeed. Just be sure to disclose any medications, recent sun exposure—even if was just last week’s alfresco lunch—or recent cosmetic work so your doctor can choose a laser accordingly. “Many of my patients travel frequently and come back saying ‘I got this done in London’ or ‘I got that injected in Rome,’ ” says Dr. Alster. “But then they don’t know exactly + more @ DuJour.com what ‘it’ was. Always fi nd out. People ask more questions of their car mechanics than of those working on their face.”

WHAT RESULTS CAN I EXPECT?

HOW DO I KNOW WHEN TO START GETTING LASER WORK?

Everyone’s different—genetics matter—but your doctor should be able to

This one’s easy, says Dr. Hirsch: “When it bothers you.”

SKYN ICELAND ARCTIC HYDRATING BALM Oatmeal and arctic red algae calm inflammation and reduce skin stress. $35, b-glowing.com

KIEHL’S CENTELLA RECOVERY SKIN SALVE Gentle but effective for sensitive post-treatment skin. $43, kiehls.com

New micro laser beams are powerful enough to inscribe personalized messages, serial numbers and images onto a diamond.


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first person

Work in, Work out B

right shone the summer sun on acres of lush farmland in cent r a l Pe n n sylva n ia la st Ju ne. But I didn’t notice. I was too busy crawling facedown through a pit of mud, trying not to get electrocuted. Barbed wire was strung inches above my head, and from it hung randomly electrified cords. I was competing in a Tough Mudder, an extreme obstacle course that has surged in popularity since it began in 2010. In its first year, there were 20,000 participants; in 2012, there were 460,000. Along with similar masochistic endeavors like the Spartan Race and the Warrior Dash, the Tough Mudder challenge involves painful obstacles, feats of superhuman endurance and no small amount of mud. O n t h a t s u m m e r d ay, I le a p t across deep valleys, jumped from high platfor ms, sur mounted half pipes, submerged myself in a dumpster full of dirty ice water, ran 10 miles and, oh yeah, got electrified. I was bleeding and bruised. But why? A nd why did thousands of other Tough Mudders do it with me? The answer is twofold. On one hand, we all wanted to prove our toughness. On the other, running around outside is a great de-stresser—even if

it is painful. And often, the more painful the experience . . . the more satisfied we would be on Monday. But Monday would i nevit ably come, and then four more days of off ice life. St ress would coil my back and clench my jaw. The exhilaration of getting through the tenmile crucible would fade. I needed a de-stressing, life-sustaining exercise I could do all the time. Dr. Belisa Vranich had an idea for people just like me—weekend warriors who get an adrenaline rush from Saturdays engaged in mock heroics but spend the week as mere mortals. This fall, Dr. Vranich unveiled a class called Elements of Breathing ($125 for a semi-private 90 minute session), held in Willspace, a New York fitness studio, to train the muscles and organs most athletes overlook: their lungs. “Breathing is the next big thing in fitness,” Dr. Vranich says. “It literally helps you in every single aspect, from endurance to strength to recovery.” Dr. Vranich, a muscular blond clinical psychologist, combined techniques of yoga, meditation, martial arts and Russian tactical-forces training to create the ultimate lung workout. Hey, we all have to breathe.

According to Dr. Vranich, we use just a fraction of our lung capacity. We breathe with our chest, but we should be breathing with our bellies. Breathe deeper, breathe better—more oxygen flows, well-being ensues. And so on a recent Friday evening, for just over 90 minutes, Dr. Vranich bullied and cajoled me to breathe with my belly. “I taught this to a jujitsu guy,” she told me. “Now he never gets tired. Not ever.” I’m not entirely sold on that claim,

For the last 15 minutes, I lay on my back while Dr. Vranich taught me “recovery” breath. I inhaled and exh a l e d a s i n s t r u c t e d w h i l e D r. Vranich played pop music on the stereo. For the first five minutes, I thought I was going to pass out. “What’s the difference between this and hyperventilating?” I asked. Answer: “When you hyper ventilate, you’re not in control.” I forced myself to inhale and exhale even more deeply, flooding my blood with oxy-

“I reached a sort of superoxygenated Zen peace. It made the mud pit look like a tiptoe through the tulips.” but the benefits of deep breathing have been well documented. Breathing balances your blood’s pH levels; when we’re stressed, it counteracts our f light-or-fight response, triggering the parasympathetic nervous system’s sense of calm. Plus, you know, the more oxygen your body has, the better. So I followed Dr. Vranich’s bidding. I held my breath. I stood up straight. I engaged my pubic f loor.

gen. For the second five minutes, I freaked out and tried not to show it. My jaw tingled. I felt f loat y. My belly ached. But I persevered. And for the final third, I reached a sort of super-oxygenated Zen peace. It made the mud pit look like a tiptoe through the tulips. I left that night, f loating around the West Village like a deep-breathing sage. The relaxation lasted all weekend—and into Monday.

Participants that have a Tough Mudder logo tattooed on their body compete for free. Over 1,000 competitors have been inked so far.

getty images

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The latest it exercise regimens will leave you bruised, bloody, light-headed and loving it. Joshua David Stein feels the burn


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On Djokovic: Sweater, $40; Heattech T-shirt, $13; pants, $40, UNIQLO, uniqlo.com. Royal Oak Offshore Arnold Schwarzenegger The Legacy watch, $47,200, AUDEMARS PIGUET, audemarspiguet.com. On Scott: Button-down shirt, $30; Heattech T-shirt, $13; jeans, $20, UNIQLO. Oyster Perpetual Explorer watch, $6,550, ROLEX, rolex.com.

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banter

GAME ON

Top-ranked tennis star Novak Djokovic and Masters-champion golfer Adam Scott face off PHOTOGRAPHED by eric ray davidson

a

s t wo of the most successf ul and recognizable athletes in the world, top-ranked Serbian tennis phenom Novak Djokovic and Australian golf champion Adam Scott a re n’t u n fa m il ia r w it h fa n s a naly z i ng t hei r eve r y move. D u r i ng t h is ye a r’s U.S. O p e n , 11.7 million viewers watched the 26-year-old


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sex symbols, which the 33-year-old Scott calls “very strange,” b e c a u s e h i s fo c u s i s p r i m a r i ly o n t h e s p o r t .) Si n c e t h e y spend so much of their time silently doing bat tle on ten nis courts and golf courses, DuJour decided to put Djokovic and Scott through a quick-fire questionnaire. There’s at least one thing they both agree on: beer t r umps whiskey. Their other answers, below. — L.S.

Djokov ic compete for t he cha mpion sh ip t rophy, a nd more than 44.3 million t uned in to witness Scott claim victor y at the 2013 Masters. One thing’s for sure: These two gentlemen perfor m exceptionally well under pressure. How similar are they other wise? For star ters, they’re both pop - cult u re personalities, philanthropists and global ambassadors for brands including Uniqlo. (That’s not to mention their shared status as

NOVAK DJOKOVIC

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ADAM SCOTT

YOUR FIRST INDULGENT PURCHASE? ? A present for my brothers. Just a clothing item—you can imagine how low my prize money was at the time.

A Mercedes. It was fun, but you live to regret those impulse buys.

ONE SKILL YOU HAVEN’T MASTERED? ? Cooking, even though I should be better at it.

I can’t sing a lick. I’d love to, but I’m terrible. Novak’s good though. I’ve seen videos on YouTube of him singing.

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BRING ANY KEEPSAKES FROM HOME WITH YOU ON THE ROAD? A bracelet with all the holy icons on it. My mom and my brothers give them to me. It’s something that reminds me of home. It keeps your soul at ease that you’re still with your people and with your country.

I use a dollar coin from Australia to mark my golf ball on the green, so that’s in my golf bag all the time. There are lots of things that I miss about Australia—Vegemite, meat pies and iced coffees.

IF YOU COULD HAVE ANY SUPERPOWER, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Being able to teleport. To go from one place to another in a split second rather than taking a plane for a whole day.

I think flying has got to be the way to go.

THE MOST TALENTED CELEBRITY YOU’VE COMPETED AGAINST? Kate Hudson. At a charity gala dinner in London, she took a tennis racket and showed some incredible skills with it. She impressed me very much.

Kelly Slater. He’s really good. Probably the best non-golfer golfer I’ve played with.

ANY FAMOUS FACES YOU WANT TO CHALLENGE? I played with De Niro last year and he was great—very passionate about tennis. So I’d like to play him again.

I’d like to get on the course with Bill Clinton. I know he’s a pretty keen golfer. I’ve had the chance to meet him a few times, and I think he’s fascinating.

YOUR WEIRDEST FAN INTERACTION? In China, one of the Chinese fans changed his name to a Serbian name. He was waiting at the hotel every day [of the China Open]. We got there and he was singing the Serbian national anthem word for word fluently. So that was interesting.

When I came back [to Australia] after winning the Masters, things got completely out of hand, almost violent. Kids were being exploited, getting paid to get autographs. That was pretty weird to me.

Djokovic’s victory over Rafael Nadal at the 2012 Australian Open was the longest Grand Slam final in history, lasting 5 hours 53 minutes.


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GEAR

SKI SUITED

Hitting the slopes in Hermès is no longer a (half) pipe dream. The French fashion house has unveiled its first skiwear and accessories collection since the 1930s

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BUTTE OF COURSE 92

C Leather and canvas ski jacket, $4,475; trousers, $2,450, HERMÈS, hermes.com.

UPGRADE

HEATED LIFTS No shivering aboard Vail’s new Gondola One: This ride has heated seats, a trend that has been spreading stateside from posh Austrian resorts like St. Anton am Arlberg and Hochzillertal, which unveiled a toasty leather-seated gondola cabin in partnership with BMW last year. Doppelmayr, the company that built Park City’s heated-seat Orange Bubble Express, is helping warm up a dozen or so destinations this season—including Sochi, home of the 2014 Olympic Winter Games.

rested Butte, Colorado, is often called the last great Rocky Mountain ski town: It’s got an Old West charm that glam-washed Aspen has lacked for years and that Vail, which sprung up out of nothing half a century ago, never had. Best of all, a new tour-and-lodge company is making it ver y, ver y easy to enjoy this unsung powder haven to the fullest. It’s called Eleven Experiences, and it offers, for star ters, guided skiing in your own private mountain domain. The company, which works internationally but is based in Crested Butte, affords exclusive access to more than 1,000 acres in Gunnison National Forest, and bring guests in via souped-up Sno-Cat. Given the variety of available grades and surfaces, you can warm up on groomed trails then brave backcountry glades and bowls in the afternoon—or, if you like, vice versa. There’s a restored cabin on the mou nt a i n for c o c oa br e a k s a nd a p r è s - s k i a n d a p a i r of d el u xe lodgi ng options i n tow n. One is Scar p Ridge Lodge, a seven-bedroom for mer brothel; the other is four-bedroom Sopris House, which

opened next door this season. (It can be rented on its own or in conju nct ion w it h it s more spaciou s neighbor.) Also being unveiled this year is Eleven’s private saloon— th ree blocks off the town’s main drag and complete with jukebox and custom-made pool table. Included in ever y booking are Wagner skis that have been made specif ically wit h t h is ter rai n i n mind, a perk Eleven offers at its other ski locations as well. (One of those is Iceland, where the company is opening a far mhouse proper ty next summer; the other is the French Alps hamlet of Le Miroir, where guests can traverse or helicopter into Italy then ski back across the border.) With gear provided and a mini-mar t at each lodge offering skiwear from the likes of Patagonia and Icebreaker, you can literally arr i ve w i t h n o t h i n g m o r e t h a n a change of clothes—and perhaps a swimsuit, for the saltwater swimming pool or steam room at Scarp Ridge or the copper hot tub at Sopris House. (Both properties come with a sauna.) In other words, get yourself to Crested Butte, and it’ll be all downhill from there.

Fernie Alpine Resort is the real-life spot that filled in as Kodiak Valley Ski Resort in the 2010 film Hot Tub Time Machine; a sequel is due next year.

SKI SUIT: HAO ZENG, STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK; SKIER: ANDRE SCHOENHERR/GETTY IMAGES; HEATED LIFTS: JACK AFFLECK

This charming hamlet is Colorado’s next great ski town. Darrell Hartman hits the trails


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TEST DRIVE

NEW CAR ON THE BLOCK

Maserati introduces its sticky-sweet entry-level luxury sedan. Paul Biedrzycki goes for a spin

T

he sound of a Maserati, according to at least one questionably scientific study, raises testosterone in women, signaling sexual arousal, at levels higher than both Lamborghini and Ferrari. Before the release of the Ghibli, however, the cost of getting superiorly turned on was well into the six figures. The manufacturer’s first foray into the entry-level market, however, maintains Maserati’s seductive verve while performing on par with such veteran competitors as the Mercedes E-Class, the BMW 5 Series, and the Audi A6. Equipped with a Fer rari-produced V- 6 engine and hand-stitched leather interior, the Ghibli is a ready-made cocktail of hot-blooded styling

cut with everyday function. Inspired by the birdcage Maserati GT race cars that dominated the European racing circuits f ifty years ago, its look is classically sexy—but its performance is entirely modern. The ca r’s cent r al ner vou s system , a ga nglion of sensor s k now n a s t he Maserati Stability Program (MSP), ensures a f luid ride through a variety of conditions, while the optional Q4 power train all-wheel-drive dynamically distributes torque between the front and back tires for a smooth-handling sedan that glides—sensually, you might say—through tight turns. Starting at $65,000, it’s not exactly a cheap thrill, but it’s undeniably a lot of Maserati for the money. Va-va-vroom, indeed.

Dubai police have a “superfleet” of luxury patrol cars that includes a Bentley Continental GT, a Ferrari FF and a limited-edition Aston Martin.

ENGINE DETAIL: PAUL BIEDRZYCKI

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY DREW INNIS


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dilemma dujour

ON THE SCENE

UNDER THE INFLUENCE

grinch games I’m planning on letting our housekeeper go on January 2, right after we get back from Cabo. Do I still need to give her a holiday bonus?

On the eve of Miami Basel, Alexandra Peers considers why the art world is getting liquored up

Firstly, kudos to you for having the moxie to say out loud what so many of us think regarding those end-of-year handouts: What’s in it for me, anyway? The answer, sad to say, is nothing. You don’t tip your doorman for all the packages he’ll collect for you next year; you tip him for all the packages he collected this year (like, say, that three-ton Massoud settee you “forgot” was coming). Though generosity does tend to engender good feelings, the holiday tip isn’t prepayment. So if Alice did a good job for you this past year—or longer—pony up: She earned it. Especially if you’re planning to send her packing just as soon as she finishes up with your vacation laundry. If there’s one thing worse than being let go by a cheap tyrant, it’s being let go by a cheap tyrant with a tan.

W

hen the Campar i G roup celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2010, the art world gathered to celebrate at a gala co-sponsored by the nonprof it A r t P roduct ion Fu nd. Performance artist Kalup Linzy appea red i n d r ag a nd Ja mes Franco crooned “Proud Mary” as some of the world’s leading collector s sipped br ig ht-red Campari Negronis. Today, the phrase “Cocktails by...” appears on virtually ever y invitation to an ar t-world party. Top-shelf (and aspiring) liquor brands are allying themselves w it h t he bu z z y world of ar tists, dealers and collectors. Let the beer brewers have spor ti ng events; any ar t-fai r lounge worth its VIP pass now has champagne or a dedicated mixologist. In recent years, the business partnership of art and alcohol has become more tempting—and more profitable. People who attend contemporar y-ar t events “like beaut i f u l t h i n g s ,” s a y s N i c ol a s

R ic r o q u e , a b r a n d m a n a ge r at LVMH, “and they have the purchasing power” to get them. Ricroque, who oversees Ruinart Champagne, says the brand has invested seven figures at art events around the world, betting that ar t lovers are the perfect customers for their $120 bottles. Li ke much i n t he mo de r n art world, all this started with Andy Warhol. In 1985, the Popart star had dinner with Michel Roux, then-president of Carillon Importers, which distributed the little-known Swedish vodka brand Absolut in the U.S. Warhol agreed to do an Absolut Warhol ad for $65,000. In the past, artists had often been commissioned to do wine labels — Chagall and Picasso designed for Château Mouton Rothschild —but the Absolut campaign took the idea further, including dozens of contemporary artists. “People don’t realize how radical it was then,” to put the work of unknown artists on the back of magazines, says

A nd r á s Sz á nt ó, who help e d develop Absolut’s huge 2012 art commission at Art Basel Miami Beach. (The striking bar-slashartwork was by the noted Cuban collective Los Carpinteros.) Over the years, alcohol brand managers have found that, more so than the wealthy ballet or opera patron, art folks tend to enjoy their drink. Consider Art Basel Miami Beach, the industry’s biggest U.S. contemporary art fair, held every December. In 2002, the first official year, g uests boarding yachts to cross the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway were handed personal Pommery bottles and straws. By 2007, Krug was taking guests on balloon rides over Miami. Today, Ruinart Champagne focuses its marketing campaign on art fairs, and it seems to be working. Sales at last year’s Art Basel Miami—at $20 a glass— “ we r e u p 25 p e r c e nt ,” s ay s Ricroque. To re ad more about th e art world’s exc esses, go to Dujou r .com

I’m a diehard Republican. Most of my friends and coworkers are flaming liberals, which means at holiday parties I’m always faced with someone who attacks my views. How do I make it clear that I don’t want to talk about Obamacare at Christmastime? This is the problem with the holidays: Another year gone and you still have these same damn friends. What’s a Bill O’Reilly– obsessed student of establishmentarianism supposed to say to a bleeding-heart women’s-care advocate who’s cornered you far away from the bar? Here’s the plan: Speak your mind—but don’t expect to change someone else’s. Before you shoot back a barbed response to that Brooklyn novelist’s self-righteous certainty about “evolution,” ask yourself if it’s worth the drama only to see yourself show up as a character in his next NYT bestseller. Pick your battles. Chances are good your buddy from Berkeley’s not going to pledge the NRA. Why work yourself, and everyone else, up? Have a piece of pie instead. Stuff it, already. When you want nothing more than to hurl your martini at the know-it-all from accounting, remember you love your friends, and maybe even your coworkers, for reasons other than politics. And if you don’t, well, make getting some new ones your New Year’s resolution. Dilemma DuJour welcomes your social-misfit questons. E-mail us at askdilemma@dujour.com

In 2013, Jeff Koons collaborated with Dom Pérignon to design a limited-edition bottle and a mini version of his Balloon Venus sculpture.

fototeca storica nazionale/getty images

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age that’s equally engaging. Visitors walking off the elevators on the 36th floor of Manhattan’s Architects & Designers Building are greeted by a portrait Fine art and epic views are only the beginning at of Marino in his motorcycle gear. Down the globe-trotting architect’s Manhattan headquarters. the hall, the lobby of Marino’s practice is Adam Rathe looks beyond the leather home to an eye-catching display of conPHOTOGRAPHED by Adrian Gaut temporary art—including Hirst’s portrait of Marino, Dark Architect—and the taste for provocative visuals that has made Marino sought after is apparent. What else here many architects keep pencils, Peter Marino stores would you expect from the man whose severe, swank designs feathers. The plumes, formerly the trousseaux of turkeys, define modern luxury? “I’ll collect anything,” Marino says from behind the desk in are front and center on Marino’s desk so the 63-year-old architect and designer can easily access them and tuck them into his office, a spacious corner that’s the hub of activity on this floor, one of three his firm inhabits. The room is piled salon-style the end of his ponytail. This is not Marino’s only eccentricity. The first thing you’ll notice about Marino is his style: head- with art, becoming a sort of makeshift gallery. Gesturing toward to-toe black, mostly leather, a Mohawkish haircut and the gen- a collection of small silver columns by Swiss sculptor Not Vital eral demeanor of a Hell’s Angel. It’s a look that’s made him a and a wall festooned with photographs, including a Steven Meisel permanent member of the international glitterati and a subject shot of Marino’s daughter, he says, “You know how less is more? for ar tists f rom Damien My theory is so much more is more.” That theory shows throughout Marino’s workspace. (He moved Hirst to Francesco Clemente. Speak to him, how- in after starting his business in 1978 and has since acquired more ever, and the tough exte- than 27,000 additional square feet.) Whether it’s the views of rior fades. In a voice that’s Manhattan his office commands or the 81 international projects Br it ish i n t he Madon na he and his 180-person team are currently working on, there’s s e n s e , M a r i n o c r a c k s nothing small about Marino’s operation. It wasn’t always this way. The New York native, who toiled jokes and chats fervently about what captivates him: art, culture, travel and, of course, Peter Marino. The designer who’s created for Andy Warhol and I.M. Pei, started out working from home. “I was a freelancer when I left I.M. Pei; I had a drafting board the world’s most luxurious interiors has made for himself an im-

PETER MARINO

W

“Less is more? My theory is so much more is more.”

Explaining his hard-to-place accent, Marino has said, “My parents spent a lot of money so I wouldn’t sound like I came from Queens.”


“It’s exciting to go into a meeting with someone wearing all leather.” Opposite page: Peter Marino’s art-filled office faces north and offers views of Central Park and Upper Manhattan. This page, left, from top: A collection of photographs and three works by Belgian artist Wim Delvoye; the architect’s desk and a wall of projects in progress. Below: Marino.

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over my bathtub,” he says. “If you needed a shower, you had to move the board.” These days, Marino himself is as well known as any of his designs, which include retail spaces around the world for clients such as Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Dior and the Americana Manhasset shopping center, as well as residential projects for the likes of David Koch and Steve Schwarzman. Still, his best years aren’t behind him. To the left of his desk are renderings of projects in progress, including Hamptons homes, a Beirut hotel, a project in South Korea for Samsung and two buildings in China for Ermenegildo Zegna. It’s a remarkable portfolio of high-end buildings for a guy who looks like a member of a biker gang. “Peter is very grounded,” an Americana Manhasset executive who’s worked with Marino says. “But it’s exciting to go into a meeting with someone wearing all leather.” While he spends his days crafting stunning spaces, Marino’s not too keen on where his own work gets done. “This building’s a piece of shit; it’s a commercial office tower and it leaks,” he says drolly. “It’s just that I live across the street, so that was attractive.” Leaks or not, the setup isn’t so bad for the associates Marino calls “the kids.” A gig with Marino comes with globe-trotting assignments and, of course, the opportunity to work with the man himself. One aide-de-camp, a happy young man who pops in to deliver a snack of schnitzel, is even responsible for sourcing those turkey feathers. “I ask people to spend their lives here,” Marino says. “I had better give them a nice environment or I’ll come back in my next life as a cockroach.”

Above: The lobby of Marino’s midtown Manhattan office is home to works including, from left, Temperature, a sculpture by Richard Deacon; Pro Street, by Richard Prince; a bodhisattva statue from the Kushan period; and Die Runen, by Anselm Kiefer.

Marino’s first commission was a renovation of Andy Warhol’s NYC town house. “I can’t figure Peter out,” Warhol wrote. “He’s nutty.”


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REIGN CHECK

Life in a monarchy isn’t all crowns and castles. These royals have day jobs

Q&A

In Hatching Twitter, author Nick Bilton chronicles the brilliance, and the backstabbing, that went into founding the world’s hottest website

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D U J O U R : Your book delves into those rivalries and how devastating the firings were. How easy was it to get the principals to talk? N I C K B I LT O N : That was the hardest part. At first people believed I was in one camp or another, and none of them wanted to talk. This book took hundreds of hours of inter views and finding documents and letter and tweets. D U J O U R : Bottom line: Was coming up with Twitter a case of the world’s best timing? N I C K B I LT O N : I think so. If Twitter had been invented two years earlier or two years later, it wouldn’t have worked. The timing was literally perfect. D U J O U R : But as you report in your book, in the first years the site itself didn’t work. N I C K B I L T O N : One of the founders said to me D U J O U R : Why did you focus your book on the t hat Tw it ter succeeded i n spite of itself. Part of its success is just luck. At the same origin of Twitter? N I C K B I LT O N : When I started, I believed the sto- ti me [cofou nder] Biz Stone believes that ry I’d heard about how Twitter was invented: the chaos at the beginning, the fact that it did n’t work all the time, by one young g uy, Jack drove the curious to want Dorsey. But as I set out t o ex plor e wh at Tw it t e r to do my reporting, I rewas even more. alized it was completely d i f fe r e nt . T he Tw it t e r D U J O U R : Some of the finanstor y is about four ver y cial titans working on the f lawed g uys who acciTwitter IPO say they know dently made this thing. it’s a phenomenon but they –NICK BILTON p e r s on a l ly don’t u nd e rD U J O U R : None of those four stand it. That’s pretty wild. now r uns Twitter. They were once such good friends, but trust broke N I C K B I LT O N : Twitter’s challenge is not making down. What happened? money or what color the next logo will be. N I C K B I LT O N : I think the thing that captured me It’s figuring out how to get more + more @ in a way I didn’t anticipate was that they all people to use the service. FaceDuJour.com tried to find connections through technology, book makes sense for everyone, and while technology does help us reach other and Twitter makes sense for only some, with people, it doesn’t replace a human connection. the @ symbols and hashtags. Their biggest challenge will be to grow. It’s something a lot of people struggle with. he social-media site valued as high as $13 billion was not all that long ago an idea bounced around among friends at a failing San Francisco start-up. In his book Hatching Twitter: A True Stor y of Money, Power, Friendship and Betrayal, published in November, New York Times columnist Nick Bilton tells a riveting story of how Twitter became a phenomenon used by 100 million people a day, from celebrities communicating directly with fans to revolutionaries in Egypt and Iran. The men who launched the site in 2006 “didn’t have any concept of the magnitude” it would reach, says Bilton. The author tells DuJour the story of how Twitter came to be. —INTERVIEW BY NANCY BILYEAU

“TWITTER SUCCEEDED IN SPITE OF ITSELF.”

PRINCESS EUGENIE OF YORK Country: England Place in the line of succession: Seventh Day job: Benefit-auctions manager at art-auction website Paddle8 Common moment: Since relocating this fall to New York City for her job, Eugenie’s been spotted hauling boxes of take-out pizza through SoHo

INFANTA CRISTINA, DUCHESS OF PALMA DE MALLORCA Country: Spain Place in the line of succession: Seventh Day job: Social-welfare coordinator for Caixa Foundation Common moment: A 2013 subpoena for an investigation into allegations that her husband embezzled millions from a nonprofit

PRINCE HARRY OF WALES Country: England Place in the line of succession: Fourth Day job: Apache aircraft commander in the British Army Common moment: A leaked photo of a 2012 game of strip billiards in Las Vegas; various allegations of nightclub fisticuffs

Fans of the British monarchy can now follow its most exciting characters via two Twitter accounts: @BritishMonarchy and @ClarenceHouse.

TWITTER: BLACKRED/GETTY IMAGES. ROYALS: GETTY IMAGES (ALL)

BIRTH OF A NOTION


Equal Housing Opportunity.

Equal Housing Opportunity.

© 2013 Douglas Elliman Real Estate. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property information, including, but not limited to square footage, room count, number of bedrooms and the school district in property listings are deemed reliable, but should be verified by your own attorney, architect or zoning expert. Equal Housing Opportunity.

© 2013. Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

© 2013 Douglas Elliman Real Estate. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property information, including, but not limited to square footage, room count, number of bedrooms and the school district in property listings are deemed reliable, but should be verified by your own attorney, architect or zoning expert. Equal Housing Opportunity.

© 2013. Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

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Slim Aarons, Sea Drive, 1967

Making waves community

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ehind a semicircular brick drive and a lawn as manicured as a put t i ng g re e n sit s a 30,0 0 0 -­­ square-foot masterpiece of Italian Renaissance architect u re called Casa Nana. John Porter, a real estate associate for Corcoran who oversees some of the largest sales in Palm Beach County, Florida, points out the spiral staircase, built by famed 1920s architect Addison Miz ner for the founder of the National Tea Compa ny. “ T h is home we nt for $30.2 million in 2003; today that sum wouldn’t be in the top 25 highest prices” of houses for sale in this area, Porter says. “Palm Beach real estate has gone from nothing going on to nothing left to sell.” Por t e r is g iv i ng me a t ou r of

the so-called Billionaire’s Row, a stretch of South Ocean Boulevard on the island of Palm Beach that is bordered by some of the highest hedges I’ve ever seen. Through gaps in the greenery appear stone fountains, elephant statues, pools the size of tennis complexes (next to actual tennis complexes), and more clay roofs than one could count. It’s a monumental display of wealth, and it is rapidly expanding, not just here but in Delray Beach, Jupiter, Pa l m B e a ch G a r d e n s a nd B o c a Raton, as money pours out of the Northeast (and in some cases, from as far as London and Singapore) and into this already wealthy section of southeast Florida. Approximately 70 hedge and private equity funds

are now headquartered here, many of which have set up shop in the last two years, jacking up home prices and spurring a countywide initiative to become, as some have said, “the new Greenwich.” For hedge f und managers who might normally be inclined toward Westchester or Con necticut, the allure of South Florida is as plain as g r its on toast. T he homes are sprawling; the Intracoastal Waterway is a yachter’s paradise. It has a glittering social scene. During high season—October through March— there might be several fundraisers on any given night. Perhaps the key factor, however: In Florida, there are no individual income taxes, no estate taxes and no capital gains

taxes. A hedge f und manager repor ting $1 million in income can expect to pay only the federal government, whereas his counterpart living in Connecticut pays that plus an extra $67,000. And if the poor sch muck were still in New York City? He’d better be ready to fork over $104,300. As for why all of this is happeni ng now, when Flor id a ha s long been a sunny tax haven, so to speak, f inanciers point to the upcoming application of Section 457A of the I nt e r n a l Reve nue C o de. Befor e 457A was enacted, certain fees and related earnings could grow tax deferred in offshore accounts for up to ten years. But now, according to the section, hedge fund managers

Manhattan-style perks are available for the Palm Beach–bound: Café Boulud has an outpost in the Brazilian Court hotel.

Slim aarons/getty images

As Wall Streeters make a mass exodus for the sunnier, tax-lite shores of Palm Beach, South Florida may soon be swimming in it. Jacqueline Detwiler dives in


FLIGHT PLAN

will need to funnel all of the fees that were deferred before 2009 and their related earnings back into the U.S. by 2017. If a manager lives in Flor ida when this happens, he’s much less likely to pay exorbitant state taxes on the whole amount. If he still lived in New York City? Fuggedaboudit. It’s the job of Kelly Smallridge, president a nd CEO of t he Pal m Beach Bu si ness Development Board, to ensure that hedge fund and private equity managers are informed of these benefits, in the hopes that they, and their fi rms, will become Palm Beach County’s newest residents. She’s developed a redcarpet tour that goes beyond looking at office space and real estate to include meeting headmasters at private schools, the school-district superintendent and the mayor and speaking with the governor’s staff and CEOs who have moved their operations here. Plus, of course, a few nights on the town. I n t he wi nter, when t he wellto-do from all over the Northeast visit Florida for charity balls, the board hosts di n ners and par ties fo r p r o s p e c t ive r elo c a t o r s a n d local capt ai ns of i ndust r y. Last ye a r, Sm a l l r id ge a nd c om p a ny sponsored a soiree aboard a $70 million yacht that featured Veuve Cl ic q uot , c av ia r a nd l ive ja z z . Guests—who included the CEOs of a national IT company, a major f inance company and a land developer, venture capitalists, hedge fund managers and the creator of Goldman Sachs’ prime brokerage division—took pri vate tours with the captain of the yacht. Smallridge is also working with former hedge fund CIO Dr. Rainford Knight to develop a club for local investment managers called SocialAlpha that encourages bankers in Palm Beach County’s ritzy social scene to get to k now each other. Even Florida governor Rick Scott has gotten involved, send-

ing personal letters to friends and prospects from the Northeast (the gover nor is a for mer Greenwich resident and businessman) to convince them of Florida’s merits. Smallridge and Governor Scott are hoping to induce a snowball effect, and so far, it seems to be wo r k i n g. Eve r y f i n a n c ie r w h o

one of the Business Development Board’s red-carpet tours that I took as part of researching this story. I ate breakfast at the clubby Top of the Point restaurant with some of the area’s prominent financiers. A waiter in a captain’s outfit served lobster rolls while a CPA, a lawyer and the executive director of

“ONE STARTS TO WONDER WHY WALL STREETERS WOULD BE ON THE FENCE AT ALL.” moves south chips away at the primar y reason to remain near New York City—the fact that everyone else is there. That’s not to say it’s been easy. Florida is still Florida, and popular opinion has not been kind. Even Palm Beach, which has for the most part dodged the insults hurled at the rest of the state, is known for its residents’ apocalyptically bad driving and worse Hawaiian shirts. “ T he r e wa s a fa i r a mou nt of t re pid at ion ,” says A l R abil I I I, m a n a g i n g p a r t n e r a n d C E O of Kayne Anderson Real Estate Advisors, who made the move from Ar mon k, New York, with 20 coworkers this sum mer. “But once everybody got past the stereotypes a nd a c t u a l ly c a me a nd lo oke d , t hat cha nged.” He says most of his employees weren’t looking for bottle service and models anyway. The major it y of t hose who have r e a c h e d t h e u p p e r e c h elo n s of f i na ncial ma nagement a re ma rried with children, and the appeal of a semi-t ropical paradise with lu x u r y re st au r a nt s , ye a r-rou nd recreation, and sophisticated socializing in a community far more tight-k n it than Man hat t an (yes, that’s Donald Tr ump over there) is not lost on them. Porter’s tour of Billionaire’s Row was part of a modified version of

the Palm Beach County Education Commission touted the area’s benefits. I surveyed real estate and office space surrounded by miles of water without once having my foot stepped on by a tourist. You can see how all this might sway someone who’s on the fence. Exploring the sugary beaches of South Florida, one starts to wonder why Wall Streeters would be on the fence at all. Between the smiling locals and the shopping on Worth Avenue, the Hiaasen-esque stereot y pes recede. W hat remains are the facts: Take-home pay is higher, commutes are shorter, and it’s just as fabulous as Manhattan, at least for four months of the year. Meanwhile, no one in Florida even owns an ice scraper. With the Internet allowing more and more money managers to perform their work from nearly anywhere, there are few reasons not to make the move. “Initially, it was a way to play golf and keep the wife and k ids happy,” says Brett Langbert, managing director and head of sales at I.A. Englander & Co. “But once we moved down, it became a qualityof-life issue. There are unlimited things the kids can do outside. I have to tell you, my wife and I are so happy we haven’t had to go to one of those indoor bouncy-castle places since we got here.”

A new terminal lands in Palm Beach

S

omething you don’t hear very often: That airport meal was divine! Out to change the dialogue, or at least the prepackaged matter of course, is NetJets, the private aviation company, which recently unveiled an exclusive, $13 million terminal at Palm Beach International Airport. Tucked inside the 10,000-squarefoot space, a formal business room created for power lunches on the go offers sky’s-the-limit

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DIRECT TO PBI

catering options, from fancycasual sandwiches and craft beer to lobster and champagne on fine china. There’s also a reservable conference room, a plush lounge and valet parking for clients who’d prefer to drive directly up to their aircraft (who wouldn’t?) For the kids, there’s a play suite with beanbag chairs, a coloring table, an HD television and, most critically, an Xbox. Unveiled in late September, the facility was built in response to the increasing number of NetJets flights in and out of Palm Beach International—10,000 annually, according to the company—making this the company’s sixth private terminal. The timing, it seems, couldn’t be better.—L.S.

Palm Beach County averages 20 natural disasters per year versus the national average of 12.


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KIRSTEN’S CALL TO ACTION

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t’s only been a few d ays, but al ready the crutches are getting on Kirsten Gillibrand’s last ner ve. A mid- October misstep on the squash cour t has left the famously energetic senator with a torn calf muscle that prevents her from putting weight on her heel without grimacing. Seated at a conference table in her Capitol Hill offices, she demonstrates, f lexing her foot, clad in a black Toms f lat (“The most comfortable shoes I own!”), and gesturing at the large Ace bandage swaddling her right leg. “ T he do ct or says it will be four weeks,” she tells me. The pain isn’t so bad, the senator insists, but the crutches are slowing her down. And these days, Gillibrand does not have time for such hindrances. Since moving into Hillary Clinton’s vacated seat in 2009, New York’s junior senator has al-

ready made her mark on the upper chamber— and drawn comparisons to her indomitable predecessor. During the 111th Congress, the petite blond legislator successfully led the charge to repeal Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and to secure aid for 9/11 first responders. This year, Gillibrand emerged as the fiercest voice demanding that the military tackle its sexual-assault problem and introducing legislation to remove assault investigations from the chain of command.

“THE FACE OF THE AMERICAN WORKING FAMILY IS SO DIFFERENT, AND OUR WORKPLACE POLICIES HAVEN’T KEPT UP WITH IT.” As if taking on the Pentagon weren’t enough, in late September—as Washington was bracing for the shutdown, which Gillibrand called a “Tea Party tantrum”—the senator rolled out her most ambitious effort to date: a handful of

economic proposals called the Opportunity Plan. Her focus? The nation’s working women. Gillibrand’s brainchild, including bills she wrote and those put forth by colleagues, would raise the minimum wage; ease access to quality, affordable child care; provide universal pre-K; create a trust fund supported by employees and employers to give workers paid family medical leave; and ensure equal pay for equal work. It is an ambitious plan—and one that is sure to meet opposition in this hyperpolarized era. As Gillibrand sees it, however, every one of the proposals is a sorely needed revamp of workplace policies established back when husbands went off to work and wives stayed home with the kids. (Gillibrand, 46, has two children of her own with her husband, Jonathan Gillibrand.) “The face of the American working family is so different, and our workplace policies haven’t kept up with it,” she says. Then there’s minimum wage. The senator declares it “perverse” that “today, you are literally working 40 hours a week and you are still living in poverty in a

While an undergrad at Dartmouth, Gillibrand studied abroad in Beijing—and roomed with the actress Connie Britton.

TRUNK ARCHIVE

Working women have a voice in New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand. Michelle Cottle listens in


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“women determine election outcomes, and they rarely ask anything for it.” country that has always prided itself on rewarding work.” While the agenda touts itself as “five simple solutions,” its consequences— n e w t a xe s a n d e x p a n d i n g e n t i t l e ments—also seem tailor-made to push the buttons of the GOP. But the aggressively optimistic Gillibrand refuses to let the political landscape f luster her. “I don’t know that the Tea Party will oppose any one of these measures,” she counters. “Just look at what Ted Cruz said when faced with the bill on sexual assault. He said, ‘Yes!’ ” she crows, refer ring to the Texas bomb-thrower’s embrace of her militar y refor m. “He said, ‘I listened to the argument. I think K irsten’s r ight.’ ” Gillibrand insists that, if she can just get enough lawmakers to look at her new agenda “on the merits”—and with a nudge from the reform-minded business leaders she is recruiting to support the cause—gridlock can be avoided. Not that Gillibrand is naive about the task at hand. She knows that moving any one of these bills will take time and effort and, most of all, serious public pressure. Indeed, whatever her specific policy aims, Gillibrand harbors a more overarching goal: getting more women engaged in politics. “Women determine election outcomes, and they rarely ask anything for it,” she says, lamenting the resulting imbalance in how issues are prioritized. “The debate is really lacking. It’s so male-dominated.” Credit Gillibrand’s persistence at least in part to Hillary Clinton. During her years as a young attorney, Gillibrand saw Clinton deliver a speech at a Democratic-women’s-club meeting in Manhattan with the message: If you’re not involved in the political process, you cannot complain about any outcomes you dislike. “She was good,” laughs Gillibrand. “I was sweating and

thinking, Well I guess it’s my fault; I really need to get involved.” More recently, it was the 2010 election that sparked her women-focused economic package. When the midterms led to the first decline in the percentage of female congress members in three decades, “it was really a smack in the face,” she recalls. “It was the greatest sign that we were going in the w rong direction, that we weren’t constantly evolving and moving women up the ladder.” Thus was born not just Gillibrand’s policy blueprint but also a related PAC, Of f t he Sidelines, through which she raised more than $1 million fo r wo m e n c a n d id a t e s l a s t cycle (and has a goal of twice that this cycle). She sees it as a r al ly i ng poi nt for wome n to dema nd more f rom t hei r elected leaders and a way to expand the national discussion of “women’s issues” well beyond reproductive r ights. “W hat I want to do th rough t h is Of f t he Sideli nes ca mpaig n is talk about these issues and say, ‘The next time a senator comes to your state or district and asks you for $100, ask him or her what his or her view is on paid family medical leave or raising the minimum wage,’ ” she explains. Gillibrand is clearly pleased to be carving out a reputation as a congressional champion of women. She’s even writing a memoi r on t h is sa me t heme, t a k i ng f ull advantage of the Lean In movement spurred by Sheryl Sandberg. “It’s all about creating a call to action to basically engage A mer ica’s women and tell them how important their voices

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are.” Asked if she’s concerned some of her male colleagues in Congress will roll their eyes at her focus on women’s empowerment, Gillibrand fires back: “They don’t have to read my book! It’s for every 18-year-old girl who wants to figure out what to do with her life and isn’t quite sure that she matters.” As for what Gillibrand wants to do with the rest of her life, the senator denies any interest in a 2016 presidential run—even in the event that Hillary doesn’t get into the race. “I love being in the Senate,” she demurs. But down the road, who can say? For the moment, though, Gillibrand’s focus is on the many legislative irons she has

in the fire—and, of course, on getting rid of her infernal crutches. “I’m going to be in physical therapy every day this week,” the senator tells me as we say our goodbyes. “And I can swim!” Injuries be damned, Gillibrand has places to go.

The International Olympic Committee recently rejected a bid to add squash to its roster of sports for the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo.

Trunk archive

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accessories

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Sheryl Sandberg, author of Lean In, has become a meme—at Facebook headquarters, a “Sheryl” refers to a powerful corporate woman.


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Kates in her Upper East Side home, wearing JASON WU

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Richard Avedon. His studio late British photographer Corinne Day still in an was so clean and white, and envelope. “I got a phone call from somebody who i n t hose d ays nobody d id said that Corinne was dying of brain + more @ that.” So when she gut-reno- cancer and didn’t have enough money DuJour.com vated the apartment, bought to get treatment,” recalls Kates. “I said I’ll write PHOTOGRAPHED BY LIANNA TARANTIN just last year, Kates gave in- a check because I just loved her work, and they terior designer Michelle Ger- sent me this incredible Kate Moss photo. I haven’t any people have perks at their jobs, but son simple instructions: “The three things that been able to frame it yet.” Rest assured, she’ll fi nd perhaps only Faith Kates can say hers go with me are my family, my pictures and my the time and space. was Marilyn Monroe. Renowned photog- books. Everything else, it doesn’t rapher Bert Stern had fallen out of favor with matter.” Touring her home now, you’ll the fashion industry when Kates, the founder and owner of top agency Next Model Manage- see favor ite photos f rom over ment, booked him for a job. In return he pre- the years, many of which feasented her with one of his now-iconic portraits ture people she’s worked with in of Monroe. “This was before anyone wanted the past. “There’s a really cool them,” says Kates. “It inspired me to start col- Steven Klein pict ure of Justin Timberlake,” says Kates. “It’s a lecting black-and-white photography.” Walk into the living room of her Upper East little gory—my kids are scared, Side apartment, where Kates has hung another but I love it .” I n t he k it che n Monroe alongside Greta Garbo, Audrey Hep- is an Er ic Michelson photo of burn, Elizabeth Taylor and Sophia Loren, and Brooke Shields doing the Lucille you’ll notice a minimalist style—the space is Ball “Vitameatavegamin” skit. her refuge. “When I come home, because I have K ates’ d rea m get? “To ow n a a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week job, this is Bruce Weber,” she answers. “It’s relaxing to me,” says Kates, who founded her so f unny because he is a good agency 24 years ago and reps models from New friend, but I’ve never bought a Designer Kenneth Cole asked Kates to recommend a photographer to shoot this York City to Milan. “I love seeing these beauti- picture because I’ve never been high-profile 1985 campaign for AIDS research—the first of its kind—featuring, ful pictures.” It’s a way of living she’s picked up able to afford one.” among others, Christie Brinkley, Beverly Johnson, Cindy Harrell, Andie MacDowell For now, there’s more art to be from a career in the company of legends. and some of their children. A print of the resulting photo, shot by Annie Leibovitz, hangs outside Kates’ master bedroom. “My first job,” Kates says, “was working for displayed, like one print by the

Modeling mogul Faith Kates knows beauty— at work and at home. Krista Soriano takes a look at an impressive collection

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red iscove d g n i is be aking ile pro f rnism, in the rem e d o n tm of Pos visits an ico e c a f l ps nia peren vid A. Kee a , e r i a s. D er Sh ist Pet ation of fan t r a . er L.A w gen oshua white e n a by by j da P H ED

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n an r salo i rk a h h o Pa da b e h i n n L . A .’s E c d ist t e r k uc of a io o d e u c t a s l s kp - b u tPilate e wo r t h i ng h t y n , a e u nt e d s in Av e n re pai e h id e a r i s h e t S ed ga Pe t e r br ush met al y s i b H d . pe maid sig ht d top a mer n pl a i n a d n e a t tered reus gels t- s pl a n i c h a r t s-st e el a n a p a c a rm, a les nd t he , once stain o o i y d e u b st g ig ; o t he w h i rl i . eads t l e s egins a fun b st ai rc l s i a . p e e sho pac he r re pai r s w h e r e t fo ot s a e i r r a st l qu That’ . I ndu a re 50 0 - s n , r 6 e t e t l a e th meta and p I n sid api ng een a nd c olor h f s o r t o r o f a ri ines s of g ets mach s wat h o ol c a bi n d i v shop i t v f rk. n o a i d s ed ht t o awe r r g i d pai nt l e m nge o n , t h ombré f ro i n ora d e saffr h n c a ren wo r k : ed in are d s t he i s c olo r e e r h e c l a ge s n th w ren s se mb . T he a n Ev e n l e a e t r me s in a l i ve g t iv i s t chai r c l u a nd o r a t r e s u etha n s Con cu lpt ol y u r Sh i r e’ m s i c a l l y s p d d n e lor ot s a hi d y- c o c t eap n a nd w i a c m a f r e ow o -f i r e c r ai nb n d l ow a s g n c oat i

t

The Memphis group’s name came from the Bob Dylan song “Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again.”

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“Right Weld” chair, made of steel and enamel with tassels.


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The artist in his studio.

“THE PEOPLE WHO LIKE MY WORK SAY I HAVE A TRUE VISION AND CONSTANCY.”

mugs in Miami Vice pastels with abundant black stripes. To the sound of Haydn on the local classical radio station, Shire enters, d ressed like one of his ar tworks, wearing a striped Tshirt, red apron and mismatched color-blocked socks tucked inside a pair of leather sandals. It all might seem like an homage to the 1980s—call it Peter’s Pee-wee’s Playhouse. In fact, Shire, one of the few American Postmodernists

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to have been a key member of the inf luential Milanbased decorative-arts collective known as Memphis, has been a working artist since the 1970s. “The people who like my work say I have a true vision and constancy. I have never thought, ‘I’d better switch things up and go with the market,’ ” he says, pointing to a teapot made in the 1990s and one he recently made, both of which bear his unmistakable design signature. “Now they call me a designer-maker with a studio practice,” he adds with a laugh. “Have you ever heard such shit?” This designation may amuse him, but, gratifyingly, it has come from all corners: critics, curators, decorators, collectors and the crafts-obsessed Etsy crowd. At 65, the lifelong resident of bohemian Echo Park— son of an entrepreneur mother and carpenter father and brother of Billy Shire, who founded the groundbreaking L.A. lowbrow gallery La Luz de Jesus—is suddenly being rediscovered by a younger audience captivated by his upbeat style. Recently, at the inaugural Parachute Market, a fashion-and-design pop-up in L.A.’s downtown arts district, Shire’s Echo Park Pottery, a diverse collection of ceramics that he designs, drew a crowd of admirers that included Tyra Banks. “You combine his work with Memphis in the 1980s and all the attention that postwar California design has been getting and it’s 100 percent time for Peter Shire,” says interior designer Oliver M. Furth, chair of the Decorative Arts and Design Council of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). “Peter is Postmodern and pre-hipster.” A quick history lesson: Postmodernism, a broadly applied term used to describe everything from conceptual art to deconstructed literature, clothing or food, had perhaps its most visually powerful realization in the field of architecture in the 1980s. Practitioners such as Michael Graves and Frank Gehry humorously reintroduced classical architectural elements to modern buildings—a vintage example being the broken pediment atop Philip Johnson’s 1984 Sony Building at 550 Madison Avenue that looks like a giant keyhole. Postmodern architecture emphasized the use of pure forms: cubes, spheres, rods and cones. These shapes became the vocabulary of Postmodern decorative ar ts as pract iced by designers including Shire, Et tore Sot tsass and Shiro Kuramata, who joined forces in the Memphis group, a collective that coincided in time with such pop-cultural signif iers as Fior ucci, illust rator Pat r ick Nagel, Duran Duran and Grace Jones. From 1981 to 1988, the Memphis g roup incorporated art deco, Pop art, Jetsons-esque f lourishes and a broad palette of color and pattern into furniture and accessories that were highly fash-

Shire’s famous “Bel Air” chair has been in constant production since its creation in the 1980s.


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ionable in certain circles but aesthetically perplexing to the world at large. “It was not that easy to digest,” says Furth, who has a vintage Shire table in his living room alongside 18th-century Italian chairs and a contemporary sofa. Memphis, Shire says, was a reaction to the standardization of both the lowest-common-denominator design pumped out in factories and bourgeois Italian modernism. “Things that are optimistic and bright are very easy to see as saccharine and cloying,” Shire says. “That contributed to the divisive reception for Memphis—some people can’t handle fun. Sottsass said it was like fashion: good for a season and then it’s gone.” While Postmodernism evolved—the pared-down Neo-Rococo designs of Marcel Wanders and Studio Job fit the bill today—Memphis has remained largely an outré curiosity. Now, however, like neon fashion and New Wave music, it is being reconsidered by the children of the 1980s, and Shire is the beneficiary. “I grew up with bed sheets that were watered-down versions of the Memphis style, having no idea of what it was,” says Furth. “Now I recognize the beauty of the original work by artists like Peter Shire.” Though his work straddles the line between fine art and industrial design, Shire has achieved institutional recognition at the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, in New York and at LACM A, which has some two dozen Shire works. In the auction market, his work has appreciated in recent years. In 1996, Peter Loughrey, owner of Los Angeles Modern Auctions, sold his first Shire work for under the estimated value; this past October, he sold a single Shire teapot for $3,125, twice the low end of the estimate. Though Memphis had a brief existence, Shire has kept the aesthetic alive by diversifying. In 1984, he created artworks for the Los Angeles Olympics and began building massive sculptures found throughout Los Angeles’ parks and streets—including one for the West Hollywood Ramada Plaza—and in Japan. He takes commissions from public arts institutions, architects, decorators and collectors; shows his chairs in galleries and museums; and sells his pottery at regular events in his studio and at retailers such as Hickoree’s

in Brooklyn, Gravel & Gold in San Francisco and South Willard in L.A. He has also chosen two functional objects—chairs and teapots—as a continuing point of focus and source of inspiration. “This was one of the most lyrical sculptures I had ever seen,” his wife, Donna Okeya, says of a 1976 piece entitled Ostrich. “Peter called it a teapot.” For Shire, the key to longevity is simple: “I am either blessed or cursed with knowing how to make things,” he says. “W hether it’s simple teapots and cups or weather vanes or pure sculpture, being a designer is an attempt at being of some value in the world. What I hope to do is bring people unmitigated joy.”

Above: “Memphis in Context” poster, for the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, 1986. Below: a selection of works spanning three decades that includes ceramics, furniture and sculpture made with a variety of colorful asymmetrical shapes. Go to DuJour.com to view more work by Peter Shire.


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in memoriam

Lou Reed in retrospect

Anthony DeCurtis remembers a friend and trailblazer

To r e a d t h e f u l l e xc lu s i v e t r i b u t e to Lo u R e e d by roc k c ritic Anthony D e C u r tis, go to Dujou r .c o m

behind the scenes

inside walt’s vault

Move over, Cinderella. The best address in the Magic Kingdom isn’t a castle, but a secret apartment Walt Disney kept all to himself—until now PHOTOGRAPHED by daniel trese

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ou know a lot about Disney, Hollywood’s most renowned dream machine. But try naming a few facts about Walt, the man behind it all. Drawing a blank? The folks at his eponymous empire won’t blame you. John Lee Hancock’s new film Saving Mr. Bank s, a backstage tale of Walt Disney’s extraordinary efforts to produce Mary Poppins, is the studio’s first-ever depiction of the t win kly-eyed Mouse House magnate, played by Tom Hanks. It’s a big move for a company that’s built such an immaculate image of its creator that, as Disney biographer Neal Gabler points out, “at least one generation of individuals has no idea of Walt Disney as a real person.” So it may or may not be surprising that a piece of Disney’s private life—an entire apartment, in plain view above the firehouse

at Disneyland—has gone largely unnoticed by swarms of visitors. On the inside, it remains mostly untouched. Built as a personal space for Disney to stay, the pied-à-ter re became his pr ivate retreat whenever he visited the park and a refuge of sorts for his wife, daughters and grandchildren—few else were allowed up. To this day it’s not open to the public, but the space still echoes the Victorian vibe of Main Street below, with touches including a parlor modeled after a turn-of-the-century home. Original antiques like an Edison phonograph and a Regina music box are scat+ more @ duJour.com tered throughout. The decorator? Emile Kuri, who would later earn an Academy Award nomination for his set design on Mary Poppins. Would Walt have had it any other way?—KRISTA SORIANO

Reed influenced the world’s most successful musicians. “Every song we’ve ever written was a rip-off of a Lou Reed song,” Bono has said.

lou reed: michael ochs Archives / Getty images

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eople always say to me, ‘Why don’t you get along with critics?’ ” Lou Reed said to me one night last year. “I tell them, ‘I get along fine with Anthony DeCurtis.’ Shuts them right up.” We were sitting in the dining room in the Kelly Writers House at the University of Pennsylvania, where I teach creative writing. I’d brought Lou down to do an interview with me in front of 50 invited guests and have dinner with a dozen or so students, faculty, musicians and local media luminaries. Like so many things with Lou, it was touch and go until the very end. “We could just not do this,” he’d said to me the day before. It wasn’t a suggestion; it was a threat. But Lou showed up. His one demand—I’m not kidding—was for kielbasa to help with his diabetes. He blew off the reception he’d agreed to attend before the interview, and we sat in an office munching on delectables from the famed Di Bruno Brothers gourmet shop in Philadelphia. Lou got so lost in the food—“This is the best prosciutto I’ve ever tasted!”—that I hated to interrupt him so we could go out and begin the interview. When we emerged, I could feel the audience’s tense energy. Lou, of course, seemed impervious. But we had a great conversation and afterward Lou chatted with everyone, signed autographs and stayed for dinner. Most important, everyone there got a Lou Reed story. And I got my compliment. I’d gotten to know Lou from writing about him for Rolling Stone and elsewhere, and over the course of 15 years we’d regularly run into each other in New York—at clubs and concerts, at restaurants and parties. An artist of incalculable significance, he was also, as one of his songs put it, the ultimate “NYC Man,” as inextricable a part of the city as, say, the Twin Towers. Now he and they are gone and the city still stands, however much diminished.


“This is my time” Dario Franchitti

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I know what you did last summer

TV marathons have been around for ages, so why are we obsessed with binge watching now? Alexandra Peers tunes in

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spent August in a haze, terribly thirsty, the sun beating down on me. I know I went to work that month, even went on vacation, but that’s not what I remember. I was powering through episodes of seasons 1 to 4 of Breaking Bad, five or six at a time. I wasn’t alone. I’m not referring to my husband, though he got hooked too—“Don’t watch one without me,” he’d say, as if the 21st-cent ur y version of adulter y were my cheating with Jesse Pinkman, all cute in his yellow hazmat suit. Thousands of people joined me across the country, racing to catch up with the series, as if it were a road trip with a destination of the September 29 finale. Binge TV watching has a bad name, associated as it is with binge eating, a habit followed by guilt and fatness, or, worse, with binge drinking, a habit followed by blackouts and regret. That rep is undeserved.

In a summer that featured multiple trips to the Hamptons and Maine, the highlight for me was still a camera’s close-up of a flowerpot bursting with lily of the valley. (And if you don’t get the reference, I so envy you. There are fun days ahead.) T h is fall, T V-resea rch g u r u s Nielsen re por ted , “Viewer s a re st ream i ng video at a brea k neck pace — demonstrating incredible binge appetites for programming.” Note that happy breathlessness: Bingeing is the solution the enter tainment industr y has been scrounging for since God created TiVo. Bingeing is an 11th-hour savior for TV, which can now sell its best wares on DVD, and for websites that found the nerdy (but enlightening) cottage industry of recaps provided a huge traffic boost. But why are we feeling the pull of marathons now? Conventional wisdom—and by that I mean every midwestern

communications major who wrote his senior thesis on “Be Careful Out There, Mo’fucker: Good and Evil Law-Enforcement Archetypes from Hill Street Blues to The Shield”—argues that it’s because television has just gotten so damn good. True, but TV marathons began decades ago, as stoned college students watched Star Trek from midnight to sunrise. TV marathons did die out for a while; the formulaic styles of pro-

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celerated. Producers learned from soaps that people could follow more characters and a more complicated story. Wiseguy, an almost forgotten late-1980s crime show, was an early pioneer of the multi-episode arc: The first episode starred as its villain Kevin Spacey, who would later nail the can’t-stop-watching cliff hanger genre in Netflix’s House of Cards. Then a handful of older shows started popping up again, in bulk, on cable over Memorial Day weekend, so those uninvited to barbecues could feel they had an appointment. The repeats that lent themselves to bingeing had nothing in common at first glance. But they were all texturally rich in time or place; they were a heady trip to somewhere else. The futuristic disconnection of The Twilight Zone. The pervasive New York City of Law & Order. The hypnotic 19th-century immersion of doing all of Ken Burns’ The Civil War in a day. These were shows with an inexorable momentum to them. It was only amplified as TV screens became ginormous. At some point, I’m supposed to apologize for knowing all this, for watching all these. We as a country are ashamed of our vices, none more so than television. You’d never apologize for reading Kazuo Ishiguro or seeing Shakespeare, both of which I also did last summer but which didn’t stick with me with the same clammy resonance as the evil of Walter White. We allow that readers of books are “armchair travelers,” opening tomes to go other places. Perhaps “couchpotato tourists” do the same. It’s all

We are ashamed of our vices, none more than tv cedurals like medical dramas didn’t lend themselves to bingeing. The few exceptions were repeats of Masterpiece Theatre, where a lucky viewer could watch the full depravity of I, Claudius in one afternoon. Then the pace of television ac-

storytelling, and we deserve to experience the stories we want whenever we desire them—which is whenever we take them down from the shelf. TV is the new novel. That sound you hear is the “click-shoop” of the DVD tray and the push of the play arrow. Enjoy.

Watching the entirety of Breaking Bad might require more than one binge; in total, the five-season series runs 62 hours.

photograph: getty images; photo illustration: sarah olin

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Lupita Nyong’o

a single film in—and With Oscar buzz already—Lupita Nyong’o, the compelling star of 12 Years a Slave, is just getting started. But as Nyong’o makes clear, being a newcomer doesn’t mean being naive Written by Adam Rathe

PHOTOGRAPHED by Steven Pan

Styled by David vandewal


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Manicure: Casey Herman at Kate Ryan Inc for Julep; Fashion Assistant: Tas Tobey

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Bomber jacket, $5,500, HERMÈS, 800-441-4488. Dress, $1,845, ROBERTO CAVALLI, 212-755-7722. Mini Ipanema drop earrings in 18-karat rose gold with moonstone, $980; Wide Granada ring in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $3,500, ROBERTO COIN, 800-8535958. (On cheeks) Pure Color Cheek Rush in X-pose Rose, $28, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com. (On nails) A Different Nail Enamel in Really Rio, $13, CLINIQUE, clinique. com. Hair: Ted Gibson at tedgibsonbeauty.com. Makeup: Kristin Gallegos at CLM using Bobbi Brown.


“There was no way Lupita wasn’t going to be extraordinary.” —sarah paulson

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this is huge,” she says. “I had no expectation of getting the role at all; it was just too out there for me to think I had a chance. So I approached the audition like a rehearsal. It was my chance to have that role for 10 minutes, and I owned it. Then I got the part and the panic began.” Co-stars say Nyong’o had no reason to be anxious. “I know she had some nerves because we would talk about it—we both wanted to do the best job we could—but I never saw it in her work,” Sarah Paulson recalls. “She was always so focused.” Even when Nyong’o and Paulson were filming scenes that portrayed harrowing acts of violence, the newcomer’s skill was apparent. “I think people are responding to her performance because through it all, through everything Patsey endures, there is this grain of hope and light in her that has not been squelched,” Paulson says. “It’s heartbreaking to watch her fight for her life. There was no way Lupita wasn’t going to be extraordinary.” The opinion that Nyong’o is indeed extraordinary—at press time she’d won a Hollywood Film Award and been nominated for a Gotham Award—might weigh heavy on a different type of woman. But for the measured, self-possessed Nyong’o, who grew up in Nairobi with a politician father and a family in the spotlight, fame doesn’t feel entirely unfamiliar. “When you’re a public figure, people have an ownership of you in a way,” she says. “People would interrupt our dinners all the time to have a moment with my father, and we’d understand because it was their one moment to have with him. I grew up observing that dynamic.” However, it’s a bit different when the admirers paying their respects are themselves members of rarefied circles. “Actors will come up to me and they look so familiar—it’s killing me because I can’t remember,” Nyong’o says with a laugh. “I spend all this time trying to place people, and it’s like, ‘Oh, that’s the woman from Luther, not the woman who did my hair last week.’ Some people have watched the film, so they acknowledge me, but I know I’ve never met them. Or I think I haven’t. It’s quite bizarre.” “Bizar re” is probably an u nderstatement. Nyong’o has said that while she was growing up “it didn’t seem feasible to want to be an actor.”

The goal became more tangible when she attended Hampshire College, a small liberal-arts school in western Massachusetts, where she focused on film and African studies, and later Yale’s acting program, which counts among its alumni Meryl Streep, Angela Bassett and Liev Schreiber. “What validated my three years there was that I was able to put all of that training to work immediately and so relevantly,” she says. “I know I wouldn’t have been able to play Patsey had I not gone through three years of school. I wouldn’t have had the elasticity or the confidence to take it on. I don’t think I would have known I could do it.” For now, Nyong’o enjoys a quiet life near Brooklyn’s Prospect Park. She’s in a book club, says an ideal night out is a slumber party at her best friend’s house and clams up when asked about her love life. In the coming months, things are bound to change. In February Nyong’o will hit theaters again, in Non-Stop, a thriller also starring Liam Neeson and Julianne Moore, and depending how awards season plays out, by next year she could be a household name. “I would love to have a career that’s governed by the material; I always want to be part of stories that I feel are worthwhile,” she says when asked about the future. “And they don’t all have to be as heavy as 12 Years a Slave. I do my best work when I feel conviction to say something through the character I play. Always I want to have integrity and not compromise that.” A nd if t h i ngs don’t go qu ite a s pla n ned? Nyong’o says she’s ready to face that possibility. “That’s one of the concerns when you get lauded for something—can I do it again?” she says. “One thing I learned at school was the value of failure, because once you fail you can get up and do it again.” Of course, we’ll be seeing more of Nyong’o even if she wins—specifically all those awards that cinematic oracles claim to be in store. It’s a thought that’s crossed her mind. “I’m definitely forced to think about it, but there’s nothing to do with the thought because it’s totally out of my hands,” Nyong’o says. “I’m really fulfilled right now by the traction this film is getting. It was made to be seen, and that’s what’s happening—America is engaging with it and being moved and changed by it. It’s really rewarding to be a part of that. That’s more important to me than any award.”

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upita Nyong’o wants to change the subject. The 30-year-old actress, who landed her starring role in 12 Years a Slave before she even graduated the Yale School of D r a ma , has let it slip she kee ps a jou rnal, but as far as the secrets scrawled in it go, she won’t say. “I don’t want to bring that up,” Nyong’o chirps in her beguiling accent—she’s a theatrically trained, Mexicanborn Kenyan living in Brooklyn, after all. But who can worry about confessions marked in a diary when what’s happening to Nyong’o in public is so very enthralling? “My life changed about three weeks ago,” she says, her fingers wrapped tightly around a mug at a hushed New York City teahouse. “That’s when my schedule went from nil to this.” This, of course, being the marathon promotional push—its finish line is on Oscar night— for 12 Years a Slave, director Steve McQueen’s brutal account of a freeman’s life after he’s kidnapped and sold into slavery. The film, based on the true story of Solomon Northup, boasts bravura performances from an all-star cast including the British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor as Northup, McQueen muse Michael Fassbender as a sadistic plantation owner and Sarah Paulson as his equally merciless wife. But it’s Nyong’o who’s racking up award nominations and accolades for her performance as Patsey, the beautiful, damned slave who’s the object of her master’s violent lust, his wife’s rage and the audience’s empathy and affection. It’s the sort of performance that compels strangers to stop Nyong’o just to check that she’s all right. “Lots of people come up and touch my back and want to give me a hug,” Nyong’o says. “At this point, it’s not too crazy. I let them hug me.” Audiences aren’t the only ones left in thrall of Nyong’o. “It was like searching for Scarlett O’Hara to find Patsey,” McQueen says. “We saw over 1,000 girls, and Lupita came in at the last hour. We met in New Orleans, and she was just astonishing. I had to cast her in this movie. It was almost as if she came off the page of the book.” For her part, Nyong’o says she approached the audition thinking she didn’t stand a chance. “When I learned Steve McQueen was directing and Brad Pitt was producing, I thought, Well,


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G R E A T

P E R F O R M A N C E S

THEY WERE HAUNTING, UPLIFTING, HILARIOUS OR HEARTBREAKING, BUT THESE ACTORS ALL HAD ONE THING IN COMMON: PASSION. DUJOUR GATHERS THE MOST UNFORGETTABLE HOLLYWOOD PLAYERS OF THE YEAR


CULTURE

This page:

c a r e y

C U LT U R E m u l l i g a n The great gatsby

Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth Wearing Lanvin Opposite page:

n a o m i e

h a r r i s

mandela: long walk to freedom

Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth Wearing Marchesa

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here’s a catch-22 that comes with being a movie star. On one hand you’ve got one of the more recognizable faces in the world; on the other your job is to convince audiences that you’re playing a character entirely different from yourself. If this were an easy task, there’d be nobody left to make lattes in Los Angeles. Still, there’s an impossible-to-define alchemy that turns fine acting into a monumental performance. This year, the 13 actors in this portfolio exhibited just that. From the hilarious to the heartrending and the historical, there was no dearth of work to prove that the most memorable roles are much more than top-notch imitation. In fact, it’s something actors are just as aware of as audiences. “I was always cognizant of the fact that I was portraying a real human being who suffered a tremendous loss,” Octavia Spencer says of her role as Wanda Johnson in Fruitvale Station. “I can tell you what resonated with me: the simplicity and heartbreaking humanity of the story.” For Naomie Harris, playing Winnie Mandela in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom was a similarly meaningful experience. “To be able to play the exuberance of youth, the falling in love, the naiveté, the self-awareness and then becoming this hardened warrior figure,” she says, “was a gift you just don’t normally get as an actor.” And while a juicy role can be seen as a gift, there’s no doubt that it takes a capable performer—in addition, of course, to an equally devoted cast and crew— to turn it into the sort of experience that becomes indelible for audiences. No matter how easy it might look, it’s not something that happens by magic. “I’ve been working toward this moment for a really long time,” Fruitvale Station star Michael B. Jordan says. “I’ve been doing television shows since I was 11 years old, and to finally work on this level, to have the opportunity to be the lead role, I was very nervous to see how people would respond. But it’s definitely changed the conversation. The bar has risen, and now it’s about what’s next.” —ADAM RATHE


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e d g e r t o n the great gatsby

Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth Wearing Ermenegildo Zegna


c l i v e

o w e n

blood ties

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Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth Wearing Giorgio Armani and Jaeger-LeCoultre


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l o u i s - d r e y f u s

enough said

Photographed by Eric Ray Davidson Wearing DKNY and Jordache

j a k e

g y l l e n h a a l

prisoners

Photographed by Eric Ray Davidson Wearing Burberry


e t h a n

h a w k e

before midnight

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Photographed by Eric Ray Davidson Wearing Dolce & Gabbana

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d e l p y

before midnight

Wearing Tadashi Shoji


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o c t a v i a

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fruitvale station

Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth Wearing Tadashi Shoji


M E L O N I E

M I C H A E L B .

JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS, CASEY AFFLECK AND JENNIFER GARNER, STYLIST: SARAH SCHUSSHEIM; FASHION ASSISTANT: FRANCESCA ROTH. NAOMIE HARRIS, HAIR: KYLEE HEATH FOR KEVIN MURPHY AT THE WALL GROUP; MAKEUP: EMMA DAY FOR CHANEL A/W 2013 AT THE MILTON AGENCY. CASEY AFFLECK, GROOMING: KIM VERBECK FOR LA MER AT THE WALL GROUP.

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From left:

FRUITVALE STATION

D I A Z

Photographed by Ellen von Unwerth Wearing Moschino

FRUITVALE STATION

J O R D A N

Wearing Prada


j e n n i f e r

g a r n e r

dallas buyers club

Photographed by Eric Ray Davidson Wearing Max Mara

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c a s e y

a f f l e c k

ain’t them bodies saints

Photographed by Eric Ray Davidson Wearing Hugo Boss and Diesel


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Power. Arrogance. Jealousy. Drugs. 30 years after the iconic film hit theaters, Al Pacino, Oliver Stone, Michelle Pfeiffer and Brian De Palma reveal all

Written by Patricia Bosworth


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o matter where Al Pacino goes, he hears it. It could be New York City, Paris or Tel Aviv, but when he is spotted on the street, total strangers bellow lines from a movie released in 1983: Scarface. “Say hello to my leetle friend,” they yell. Or, “I always tell the truth—even when I lie.” Pacino is the star of more than 40 films and has been nominated for eight Academy Awards, but the role for which he is best known around the world, the performance that is perhaps the most imitated in the history of film, is still Tony “Scarface” Montana, Cuban refugee turned Miami drug lord. And Pacino is fine with that. “I always knew there was a pulse in Scarface that kept it beating,” he says. For years, Pacino was one of the few who believed in the film. Scarface was released to mostly bad reviews and indifference from the industry and the public. It took 20 years for it to become one of the most-watched films of all time—beloved by rappers, bankers and college students alike. And for the next decade it stayed popular: Millions of DVD copies have been sold around the world. There are video games and limited-edition boxed sets. Tributes range from comic books and posters to serious works of nonfiction. This year, as Scarface reaches its 30-year anniversary, there’s talk of a remake from Universal Pictures. But before anybody tries to reimagine the film, it’s time to reveal what took place behind the scenes of the making of Pacino’s movie: the reversals of fortune, fears, rivalries, shouting matches and poor treatment of women that mirrored what would appear on the big screen. For all the turmoil, a powerful story emerged in Scarface, one that struck a deeper chord in society than almost any other piece of pop culture.


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hen Al Pacino was growing up in the South Bronx during the 1940s, his g randfather of ten talked about Howard Hawks’ violent gangster classic Scarfa c e. Pa u l Mu n i pl aye d t h e part of a brutal, vicious Italian immigrant hood bearing a scar who prowled the streets of Chicago with a machine gun cradled in his arms and rose to the top of the bootleg-liquor business at the height of Prohibition. Pacino never forgot his grandfather’s description of Scarface, but he didn’t actually see the 1932 movie until he caught it at a Los Angeles revival house in 1974.

Yale dropout and Vietnam vet, a workaholic who by his own admission was pretty “drugged up.” In 1979 his screenplay for Midnight Express had won an Oscar, and for a while he’d been “like on a magic carpet,” living intensely all the fantasies he’d ever heard about Hollywood partying. Stone stayed in Florida for weeks, getting to know both sides of the drug trade, law enforcement and gangsters. He met street hustlers— the men and women, mostly Colombian, who peddled dr ugs on the sandy beaches near the Fontainebleau hotel—and so-called banditos who unloaded cargo off the various Keys. Soon Bregman joined Stone in Miami and accompanied him when he went to speak to the authorities. “I was absolutely stunned,” Bregman

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“I want the world . . . and everything in it.” “It was the f irst time in my life that I was blown away by a performance,” the actor says. “It was almost—uplifting.” Pacino phoned his friend and former manager Martin Bregman in New York City and told him they had to remake Scarface. Bregman, who had produced two of Pacino’s most memorable hits, Dog Day Afternoon and Serpico, had, by an odd quirk of fate, just seen Hawks’ Scarface on late-night TV and independently decided it would be “a great part for Al to play—the rise and fall of an American gangster,” he says. “I realized what Al could bring to it. He’d never had the chance to express that steely, streetwise quality he had. Even in The Godfather he was inscrutable—a rich man’s son, not a street gangster like Scarface.” When it came time to f ind a screenwriter, Bregman approached Oliver Stone, who was not that interested at first. He didn’t want to write a gangster remake or deal with Prohibition. But Stone was, as he put it, “in a tough place.” According to Bregman, Stone took the assignment because he needed the money. After Dog Day Afternoon’s Sidney Lumet agreed to direct, Stone got more excited, especially when Lumet suggested setting the remake in present-day Miami and transforming the character of Scarface into a Cuban refugee. In 1980 the Marielitos were in the news. Following a tense diplomatic standoff with the United States, Cuba’s Fidel Castro opened the port of Mariel to anyone who wanted to leave. Within months, 125,000 Cubans landed in South Florida, crammed into some 3,000 boats. It soon became clear that Castro had forced boat owners to carry with them not just decent, hardworking Cuban families but thousands of “undesirables.” About 25,000 Marielitos had criminal records. Stone was edgy and hyper, a shaggy-haired

says. He had assumed the dr ug business was big, “but when the U.S. attorney general told us cocaine was a hundred-billion-dollar-a-year industry, I thought I hadn’t heard right. ‘One hundred million dollars?’ I repeated. ‘No,’ he corrected me. ‘One hundred billion.’ ” In Miami and Palm Beach in the 1980s, “it was like the Wild West,” Bregman says. But the filmmakers found the cops very cooperative—and competitive, too. Who could come up with the best anecdotes? They loved the idea of helping out a big movie that starred Al Pacino. The police gave Stone endless case histories to read of murders committed over drugs. “Really horrific stuff,” Stone says. He incorporated many real-life details into his screenplay, including the infamous sequence with the chain saw in a Miami hotel room. As part of his research, Stone traveled to Peru and Ecuador. “It was scary; my life was on the line.” In Bimini, in the Bahamas, he almost got killed. Most of his research took place after midnight and lasted until dawn: “That’s not a very safe time to be out alone when you’re dealing with guys who might have second thoughts about you after they decide they might have told you too much.” Stone says he stopped doing drugs the day he finished his research and flew to Paris with his wife. They took an apartment and stayed there for six months. “The heating was poor, but the food was good, and I had a whole new set of friends who were drug-free. I wrote all of Scarface there as a farewell to dr ugs, really.” He’d never worked so hard, he says: “Six or seven drafts.” What emerged was a fairly schematic updat-

ing of the Howard Hawks original, the rise and fall of a punk with a 1980s twist. It started off with the sadistic murder Tony and his pal commit in the refugee camp in order to buy their freedom and get green cards. “It was all terrific,” Pacino says of the script Stone tur ned in. “Explosive. Powerful. I felt that this Scarface was a piece of so many different kind of gangsters, a collective. In Oliver’s script, Tony was a renegade—angry, vindictive, weirdly funny. Out of control. And those lines of dialogue, like, ‘Who do I trust? ME!’ ” Lumet, though, thought Stone’s screenplay was “corny.” He disliked the suggestion of incest (which was also part of the 1932 film). He wanted to introduce politics into the screenplay and thought that it needed to explore the CIA’s connection to drugs. Lumet said Stone’s version read too much like a comic strip, Bregman says. Stone was devastated. Undaunted, Bregman called in director Brian De Palma, whose earlier films Carrie and Dressed to Kill had been great, nasty entertainments. “Brian really knows how to exploit the audience,” Bregman says. “He uses their fears and their desires to unify his films.” As soon as De Palma read the script, he was sold on Stone’s approach to the material. Casting started in 1982 and went on for weeks, “because we wanted Al to be surrounded by the very best actors,” Bregman says. Robert Loggia, F. Murray Abraham and Harris Yulin won important parts. Ultimately the youthful Steven Bauer (then married to Melanie Griffith) was cast as Pacino’s loyal friend Manny. He was a bilingual CubanAmerican and brought to the part “a nifty mixture of businesslike murder and lover-boy sweetness,” as film critic Pauline Kael would later write. Michelle Pfeiffer, then 23, recalls auditioning over and over again for the part of Elvira, Tony’s fragile, coked-up wife. Pfeiffer, who had not that long ago been bagging groceries at a supermarket, says she auditioned for Scarface so many times she was sick of it, and “then they stopped calling me, and I wanted to forget about it.” But she was called back to screen-test with Pacino: “I was petrified. I vomited before I went out on the set—I mean, he was one of the biggest stars in the world. I was just beginning.” They did a marvelous, intense scene together from the screenplay, she says—the one in the expensive restaurant where Elvira ends up walking out on Tony. “I was so keyed up my arms went f lying and I broke a glass and cut Al. There was blood all over the place. I was sure I’d lost my chance.” But a couple of days later, her agent phoned to tell her the part was hers.

“ Don’t get high on your own supply.”


The cast rehearsed for an entire month in California and New York. By fall 1982 the production was poised to start filming in Florida, but suddenly there were problems with the Cuban community in Miami. Opposition to the project was growing. According to Bregman, no matter how much he argued and pleaded that a great many Cubans would be employed in the production and that the movie wasn’t all negative, the locals wouldn’t be swayed. Bregman was physically threatened and hired a bodyguard armed with a machine gun. The last straw came when a Miami city commissioner demanded that the script be changed to make Pacino’s drug lord a spy sent by Castro to corrupt America. The production shifted to Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, and the crew made the most of the second-choice locations. The refugee internment camp underneath the Miami freeway was re-created between the intersection of the Santa Monica and the Harbor freeways. Scenes set in Miami’s bustling Little Havana were shot instead in L.A.’s Little Tokyo, where the crew erected storefronts and Spanish-language billboards and used an evocative mural of the Miami skyline. According to Michelle Pfeiffer, “Brian could be stylistically obsessive.” Most of the time she had to slink around in glistening satins and sparkling jewels. “I was objectified. Not a hair could be out of place.” Once, she had a bruise on her leg and De Palma made her take off her panty hose and put makeup on the bruise to cover it. “He wanted no imperfections.” Pfeiffer adds, “I was terrified all the time. I couldn’t speak to Al [off the set]; we were both too shy. It was like pulling teeth to say one word to each other. And then the subject matter in the script was so dark. There had to be a coldness in the relationship between Elvira and Tony.” She goes on to say that she and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio were ignored by the mostly male cast: “All the guys were very macho, laughing and joking among themselves; we were never included.” She says she noticed a big difference between Pacino’s temperament when they worked together on Scarface and then, eight years later, on Frankie and Johnnie. In the later movie, Pfeiffer says, “He was a happier person.” Occasionally during filming, shouting matches ensued, with Pacino and De Palma and Stone and Bregman all jumping in. “Al had all sorts of ideas about how things should be done, and so did I,” De Palma says. “But we worked it out. Sometimes he was right; sometimes I was right. But a lot of screaming and fighting did go on.” A member of the cast who wants to remain

nameless says, “The show was commandeered by Al. He was the real power. Brian had to listen to him in terms of acting values. We didn’t do De Palma’s version of Scarface, we did Al Pacino’s version—and don’t let anyone tell you differently.” And then there was Stone, who would barrel onto the Universal soundstage every day. He was possessive about his screenplay—he was worried about cuts and changes and what he felt were differences of interpretation. One evening after work, De Palma, Bregman and Pacino sat in a darkened screening room with Stone, who suddenly started talking back to the screen, “yelling stuff like, ‘What kind of dress does Michelle have on?’ and ‘Where the fuck did that line come from?’ ” Bregman says. Stone was not allowed back to see rushes again. “Sometimes making a film is like going to war,” Bregman says. In the last weeks, in spite of continued death threats, the cast and crew finally did go to back to Florida. There they shot the last scenes, in which Tony, high on coke, has a spectacular shoot-out with a Bolivian hit squad—and is finally killed, in a great burst of blood and smoke and noise, and plunges to his death in an ornate fountain. “Al was on a rampage,” one of the actors remembers. “He’s yelling and screaming, ‘Say hello to my leetle friend,’ as he brandishes that bazooka-like machine gun—he seemed to go absolutely crazy all alone in that vast mansion

says. Fortunately, the public didn’t listen to the critics. Thanks to cable and video and an enthusiastic response in Europe and the Middle East, Scarface gradually morphed into a cult hit. At the start of the 1990s, Pacino began receiving more and more residual checks for Scarface. W henever he was f ilming in Europe, people would come up to him and say, “Hey, Tony Montana!” Hip-hop was f lourishing—as was the crack trade. For a lot of rappers who came up in that era, the movie seemed to embody their moment. In 2003, Sean “Diddy” Combs said he’d seen the movie 63 times. Rapper Trick Daddy put Venetian blinds with Tony Montana’s face on them over his bed and the band Blink 182 claimed it took its name from the number of times Pacino’s character says “fuck” in the film. “Scarface is a cautionary tale for poor guys who suddenly strike it rich,” says Combs. “Montana violated his own maxim—don’t get high on your own supply. He was destroyed by his own arrogance.” The film’s appeal crosses many boundaries. A Wall Street businessman once told Pacino that the line he and his colleagues love best is, “Why don’t you try sticking your head up your ass, see if it fits?” Millions of students, everywhere from Groton to the Sorbonne, own the f ilm. Since Universal released a two-disc digitally remastered DVD in the fall of 2003, it has sold 4 million units worldwide and is going strong. A theatrical rerelease for two weeks the same year

“I always tell the truth—even when I lie” with the mounds of cocaine on his desk.” At one point, Pacino gripped the barrel of his machine gun and it was so hot it gave him second-degree burns. He landed in the hospital, shutting down production for 14 days. Throughout the whole dramatic shoot, Pacino stayed away from the rest of the cast. “Al didn’t talk to anybody except me,” Bauer says. “And then when he had to kill me in the movie, he stopped talking to me.” Pacino says now, “As you do this more and more—acting, that is—you don’t mix up your parts and yourself so much.”

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carface tanked at the box office; the $25 million picture earned only $44 million during its first theatrical run and then seemed to melt away. “I frankly couldn’t understand it,” Pacino

played to sold-out theaters. In 2011, a Blu-ray edition was released. Brian De Palma has a theory as to why this film has become a classic. “Tony Montana is the antihero contemporary kids identify with,” says the director. “He’s about greed and power and self-destruction in the land of opportunity, unfettered by morality.” Still, there are many movies about a hustler who gets rich but then loses it all. Why is Scarface in a category by itself? According to Pacino, it has to do with the “two-dimensional” essence of a man inspired by a blimp floating across the Miami sky f lashing the words, “The World Is Yours.” Pacino says: “Brian thought of it as an opera, and so did I. An opera in the Brechtian sense, with an exaggerated sense of style. What you see is what you get—that was the idea. It wasn’t about why he dies but what he does, period. “Tony Montana,” adds Pacino, “was never meant to be ref lective.”

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opening spread: everett collection

“You gotta make your money first. When you get the power, then you get the woman.”


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Basic Instinct White, that most primal of colors, is also winter’s most versatile in textures that range from simple cotton & linen to leather, vinyl & rumpled silk

PHOTOGRAPHED by Raf Stahelin Styled by Catherine Newell-Hanson


Jacket, $2,700, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Jumpsuit, $1,890, REED KRAKOFF, reedkrakoff.com. Designer ring in 18-karat yellow gold (worn throughout), $4,000, ROBERTO COIN, 800-8535958. Celeste sandal (worn throughout), $840, CHLOÉ, 212-717-8220. Belt, CÉLINE.

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Smocked Banded dress, $1,347, J.W. ANDERSON, net-a-porter.com. (On hair) Powder Grip Mattifying hair powder, $15, REDKEN, redken.com.


Crop top, $595, ROSIE ASSOULIN, fivestoryny. com. Tiered Blanche gown, $23,565, LANVIN, 646-439-0380. (On skin) Phyto-Teint Eclat Oil-Free Foundation, $119, SISLEY-PARIS, saks.com. Blush Subtil in Cedar Rose, $30, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com.

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Coat, $31,000; top, $1,600; pants, $1,250, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703.


Dress (worn as top), $2,410, ROBERTO CAVALLI, 212-755-7722. Skirt, price upon request, ROCHAS, rochas.com. (On skin) The Body Crème, $165, LA MER, cremedelamer.com.

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Folded Arms shirt, $175, SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE, slowandsteadywinstherace.com. Reverse Seam skirt, $839, J.W. ANDERSON, modaoperandi.com. (On eyes) Studio Secrets Professional Eye Shadow in Gilded Bronze, $4, L’ORÉAL PARIS, lorealparisusa.com. (On skin) Photoready Bronzer in Bronzed and Chic, $13, REVLON, drugstore.com.


Irregular Seam Pressed top, $1,495, ALEXANDER WANG, alexanderwang.com. Long-sleeve shirt, $225, LACOSTE, lacoste.com. Pants, $129, BEBE, bebe.com. Hair: Tamara McNaughton using Bumble and bumble. Makeup: Benjamin Puckey at D+V Management using Chanel. Model: Aline Weber at Next Models. Casting director: Ros Okusanya for Creartut. Production design: Raf Stahelin Studio.

fashion assistant: amber harris; hair assistant: tiffany Fodor

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Rediscovering Vietnam

Culture rich and postcard perfect, a regal country gets new life Written by bill keith

PHOTOGRAPHED by Douglas Friedman


Previous page: The Quang Trieu (Cantonese) Assembly Hall, originally built as a place for merchants to gather, is now a must-visit attraction for visitors to Hoi An. Left: Marblestatue shops are prevalent in Da Nang, located on Vietnam’s central coast, south of the imperial city of Hue. Below: A home in Hoi An doubles as a porcelain showcase.

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ran Lebowitz once said, “You’re only as good as your last hairc ut .” I f t h at’s t he c a s e, my l i fe’s br ig ht , sh i n i ng mome nt came cour tesy of a man named Vi n h on the f ront porch of his house on Han Thuyen Street in Hue, Viet nam, and it cost just $2 . 50. I’ve h a d ple nt y of b a d haircuts in cities where language barriers weren’t an issue and my practitioner had more than scissors and a st raight razor at his disposal. Still, when Vin h dug into my nearly shoulder-length

hair without so much as wetting it, I was full of excitement instead of fear. Why? Because this experience felt authentic. My job has sent me to many of the world’s most far-f lung hot spots, and I’ve been presented with plenty of local customs and r it uals, i ndigenous delicacies, and site-specific spa treatments that too often feel like they were ginned up for wide-eyed honeymooners. Even exotic destinations like Thailand, Tahiti and Bali begin to lose their luster. Phrases

l i ke “ t i me -honored t r a d it ion” start to sound meaningless. But throughout my few days in central Vietnam, whether I was at a historic landmark or contemporary crafts fair or roadside pho stand, not a moment felt pa r ticularly forced or hackneyed. I was happy to f i nd out that Vietnam doesn’t subscribe to the “why on Earth would you leave the grounds of the resort?” flavor

“when we are not sure, we are alive.” —graham greene


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Right: Buddhist monks worship in the citadel in Hue, the former imperial capital city of Vietnam previously restricted to the ruling family. Opposite page: A look at a pagoda inside the grounds of the once-forbidden city, which is now undergoing an extensive renovation.

of vacationing. And eschewing the more obvious excursions to Hanoi in the north and Saigon in the south in favor of the central cities of Da Nang, Hoi An and Hue not only diminishes your chances of running into an ex-boss on the beach or getting stuck behind a school group in an ancient grotto, it also means you’re getting the best of both regions—without all of the congestion. “Travelers pass th rough Hanoi and Saigon, but vacationers come to central Vietnam,” says Phan Trong Minh, the general manager of La Résidence Hôtel and Spa in Hue. “We have the dy namism of Saigon in Da Nang, the profound heritage of Hanoi in Hue and Hoi An, plus all the incredible leisure opportunities.” Ah yes, the leisure. While it’s true I passed serious time in pagodas, mingled with merchants and hiked along the Ho Chi Minh trail,

I also clocked many hours spa-hopping in lagoon-side treatment rooms and sunbathing along untouched beaches. Once home to “China Beach,” the well-known camp for American GIs during the Vietnam War, the road f rom Da Na ng to Hue is no stranger to R & R. Also, in the past year, luxury brands A man and Banyan Tree have opened their first Vietnamese proper ties to great success, attracting a sophisticated guest who wants a singular experience. “The people we’re getting now aren’t really here for a taste of Vietnam; they’re here to indulge in the central coast,” says Anthony Gill, general manager of the Nam Hai resort in Hoi An, the ne

plus ultra of luxur y proper ties, which opened in 2006 and won a Travel + Leisure Design Award for Best Resort and a Condé Nast Traveller Best Overseas Spa Hotel distinction. “They’re here to log hours on the beach and the golf cou rse, a nd t hen when t hey’re primed, they head out for a day’s adventure among Hue’s renowned palaces and tombs or out to see

what t he a ncient Cham people worked up in stone at My Son, t ravel up into the Highlands or explore the world-renowned cave system at Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park.” W hat’s happening in cent ral Vietnam isn’t comparable to anything else. As Gill puts it: “If what you’re after is access to the ocean, then comparisons to Phuket are


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156 Above: A marble sculpture on the central coast near Da Nang. Much of the marble and limestone mining in the nearby mountains has been stopped, but it continues elsewhere in the country.

apt. But we’re more than a beach, the way Bali is more than a beach. There’s tremendous cultural depth here that resonates as deeply as 1,500 years. It’s this combination of culturally profound and fantastically f un—I thin k we’re on to something new here on the central coast, something the rest of the world is just waking up to now.” A journey typically begins in Da Nang, thanks to daily direct flights from Seoul and f lights four times a week from Singapore and Hong Kong. Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific offer fantastic service from the U.S. through Changi air-

port, where you can grab a short flight on SilkAir, the regional wing of Singapore Airlines. Besides being the area’s commercial capital, Da Nang is also home to the Marble Mountains, a cluster of five hills that have provided the raw material for many of Vietnam’s celebrated stone car vi ngs. W hile you may not need a life-size Jesus or a fivefoot-tall Buddha statue, a trip to the 500-year-old stonecutters’ village is worth a visit for sheer spectacle, as is the 156-step climb atop one of the peaks, which takes you into Huyen Khong, a jaw-dropping grotto that has served as both a place

of worship and a hospital for the Vietcong during the American War. Just 18 miles down the beach f rom Da Na ng l ie s t he a ncie nt city of Hoi An, a merchant capital whose charm is as palpable as the 16th-cent ur y-st yle car vings ador ni ng hu nd reds of t wo - and three-stor y, Chinese-inf luenced structures that now do triple duty as residences, museums and commercial spaces. The cit y is also home turf for Saigon-born, Texastrained celebrity chef Duc Tran, whose cuisine at MangoRooms will force you to reconsider the phrase Asian fusion.


Left: A view of the countryside at the Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park, where numerous grottoes and caves, including the largest one in the world, helped secure its status as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003.

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But for me, Hue was the understated showstopper. The political, cult u ral and religious center of the country from 1802 t o 1945, it’s home t o the Ng uyen dy nast y’s For bidde n Cit y. Now you can spend all day getting lost among the square citadel’s striking gates, temples and palaces—but then you’d never make it to Emperor Tu Duc’s tomb, set inside a pine forest dotted with pagodas, pavilions and ponds just five miles outside the city. It was there I caught sight of mon k s per for m i ng their daily rituals (before working in a quick game of soccer). Hiring a local guide here — or any where in this par t of the cou nt r y— is a wor t hwh i le ex p e nd it u r e, a nd t he one reg ret I have is not a r r a ng i ng a me al at what’s called a fami ly r e s t au r a nt . For about $40 per person, a private chef will not on ly prepa re a feast fo r yo u r g r o u p , h e’l l a l s o e xplain how and why he’s prepared it and, more likely than not, give

Left: The Huyen Khong grotto, located in the Marble Mountains, is illuminated through the ceiling by sunlight. Top: The governor’s residence of Hue was renovated to become the boutique hotel La Résidence. Above: Along China Beach lies the Nam Hai resort, where guests dip into personal infinity pools.


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“walk as if you are kissing the earth with your feet.” —zen master Thich Nhat Hanh

Le arn more about Vietnam’s hidden tre a su res online at DuJou r .com

Left: Outside of Hue, in the demilitarized zone of Vietnam, a reunification monument stands on the edge of the Ben Hai River, which once marked the border between north and south Vietnam. Above: The Marble Mountains, located in Da Nang, are named for the five elements: metal, water, wood, fire, and earth.

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you pointers on where to spend the rest of your evening. “People from the center of Vietnam are relatively new to international tourism,” says La Résidence’s Phan Trong Mi n h. “It’s all fresh to us, so we lack the jadedness that naturally comes from long exp os u re t o i nt e r n at ion al peoples. There is an earnestness to the people who work at my hotel. We feel this incredible responsibility to tell this city’s story to people who visit, and we know we only have a short time to make a deep impression.” And speaking of deep impressions, did I mention I’ve got a guy who gives a mean haircut and face massage for just $2.50? There were no lot us petals strewn about his porch and he didn’t offer me locally sourced lemongrass tea, but he did call me 007 when I left. And judging by the line of local guys who had gathered behind me to get the same treatment, I’d say I got the authenticity I was looking for.


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Winter’s head-to-toe accessories officially settle the debate: More is definitely better. Go big for evening with scene-stealing bags, bold jewelry and some serious shoes—or all three at once

PHOTOGRAPHED by Bela Borsodi Styled by lester garcia


Rita jumpsuit, $2,195, GIULIETTA, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. Gloves (worn throughout), $24, GASPAR GLOVES, gaspargloves.com. Stonehand bracelet, $2,500, DELFINA DELETTREZ, openingceremony.us. Essential Cross Body Flap bag, $2,280, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton .com. Shoes, $835, VIKTOR & ROLF, shopcurve .com. Tiago socks, $28, FALKE, falke.com.

photo credits teekay

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photo credits teekay

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Dress, $13,500, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Bag, price upon request, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Bracelet, $1,845, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-9802970. Escape sandals, $925, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. On hair: Hydrating styling cream, $33, MOROCCANOIL, moroccanoil.com.

photo credits teekay

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photo credits teekay

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Blouse, $1,330; skirt, $10,405, ROCHAS, rochas. com. Watch bracelet, $975, NINA RICCI, Carla Martinengo, 214-739-7076. Barbed Wire ring with emerald and diamond pavĂŠ, price upon request, DAVID YURMAN, 212-752-4255. Demi Jours bag, $1,850, FENDI, 212-759-4646. Maite kitten heels, $625, BIONDA CASTANA, biondacastana.com.

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photo credits teekay

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Gown, $12,995, MICHAEL KORS, michaelkors.com. Ring, $2,950; bracelet, $5,970, MARIKA FOR GILBERT ALBERT, 212-888-3232. Perfume bag, $9,500, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Sasha thigh-high sandal, $795, TIBI, tibi.com. (On nails) Intense Nail Lacquer in True White, $24, DOLCE & GABBANA, saks.com. Hair: Leonardo Manetti/Ion Salon. Manicure: Cassandra Lamar. Model: Ariel V at APM. Retouching: Lutz + Schmitt.

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The Secrets of

WHITE COLLAR

INMATES KNOW YOUR LIFE STORY. CELEBRITY FRIENDS MIGHT DROP BY VIA HELICOPTER. BUT THE PSYCHOLOGICAL PUNISHMENT IS ALL TOO REAL. BERNIE KERIK, JACK ABRAMOFF AND DENNIS KOZLOWSKI, THREE OF THE MOST HIGH-PROFILE MEN TO BE ON THE INSIDE, SMASH THE PERCEPTION THAT PRISON LIFE IS ANYTHING LIKE “CLUB FED”

PRISONS WRITTEN BY LISA DePAULO

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GRANT CORNETT

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

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f there were ever a person who might be able to clue you in on what life in a white-collar—or minimum-security or “country club”—prison was actually like, it was this guy. You know this guy. How many former New York City police commissioners, former overseers of Rikers Island, former consultants for U.S. security in Iraq or former almost-heads of the Department of Homeland Security are there in the world who ended up in the slammer? I thought so too. I wanted to find out what life was like for Bernard “Bernie” Kerik—what he ate, where he slept, who came to visit. But when I finally got to his prison in August of 2010, seven months into his sentence, I thought I was in the wrong place. After a convoluted five-hour journey that required trains and automobiles and the kindness of his pal John Picciano—a cop who worked as Bernie’s chief of staff both at Rikers and when he was police commissioner and remained so devoted that he had visited him in prison more than 60 times already—we pulled up to a building in western Maryland that looked like my high school. There wasn’t a single guard out front. No one searched us. There wasn’t even a metal detector. I’d been to prisons before, almost all of them maximum-security and wretched; certainly none that looked like this. The Federal Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Maryland, has both medium- and minimum-security prisoners. Its visiting room is spotless and sprawling, with sparkling windows and walls that are decorated with quilts handmade by inmates. Enter Bernie Kerik, in moss-green khakis, matching long-sleeved button-down shirt and work boots, the outfit he would wear most every day for three years and 11 days. Kerik was the guy who previously ran one of the worst jails on earth (trust me, there are no quilts on the walls at Rikers) and the guy who was chosen by George W. Bush to be the head of the Department of Homeland Security, until it all hit the fan. First there was the illegal-immigrant-nanny brouhaha. Then the real domi-

was 50 pounds leaner. (By the time he was released in May at the age of 57, he was down 80 pounds from his pre-prison weight of 260.) “So which quilt did you make?” I asked. He gave me the look I deserved for that question. And then he laughed. I knew his spirit had not been crushed when I gingerly brought up the quilt topic again later and he lasered me with his green eyes (that just happened to match his prison outfit) and growled: “Enough with the fucking quilts.” OK, so he was still Bernie. And this was still prison. But what I really wanted to know—what was life actually like on the inside?

E

very time another big one goes away—Bernie Kerik or Bernie Madoff or Dennis Kozlowski (the Tyco guy with the $6,000 shower curtain) or Martha Stewart or Mickey Sherman (the once hotshot defense lawyer) or any of the Wall Street types who got busted in the recession—the inevitable questions arise: Did they go to Club Fed? To what the public perceives as “country club” prisons? While there used to be a time when you could, in fact, find tennis courts at prison (specifically, the infamous now-closed Federal Prison Camp Eglin, which inspired the name Club Fed), “those stories were always exaggerated,” as CNBC’s John Carney wrote in a story on prison treatment. Plus, sentencing guidelines for “white-collar crimes” have only gotten worse for offenders, the result, as Carney noted, “of politics and public outrage largely tied to stock-market losses.” As Kerik explains it—and I had to keep reminding myself that he was once a prominent authority figure in the system—“there are four or five classifications for the BOP [Bureau of Prisons]. You have super-maximum security, if there’s a terrorist or a super-violent criminal. You have maximum security, which is the next level down. After max, you have medium.” That’s where Bernie Madoff is, by the way. “Then you have low. Then you have minimum.” To be eligible for a minimum security “camp,” your

“‘Till Bernie got there, I was the celebrity of the prison.” —jack abramoff

noes fell. By November 2007, the former top cop was facing a 16-count indictment for, among other things, lying to the IRS and to the White House. He was also accused of accepting renovations to his home from contractors who wanted to work in New York. He ended up pleading guilty to eight charges, including tax fraud, in a plea bargain and was sentenced to four years. The last time I had seen Bernie, we shared an excellent Barolo and a couple of steaks at a fine joint in Midtown Manhattan. Like many journalists, I came to know him as the kind of dude who was forever entertaining, always plugged-in and seemingly invincible. Now he was in prison. I visited him not even halfway through his incarceration. Already, he looked like a different man, and not in a bad way. He was working out like a maniac, jumping rope, running and walking four miles a day and doing anywhere from 600 to 1,200 push-ups. Bernie Kerik looked like a bull and

sentence has to be less than 10 years (or has gotten to under 10 years) and you need to be considered “nonviolent.” In other words, if you’re going to prison, this is where you want to go. When details of these camps trickle out, they rarely seem terrifying. Mickey Sherman, who spent part of 2011 in the Otisville, New York, camp for tax evasion, said last year that the most dramatic part of prison took place when inmates watched American Idol and argued over who got kicked off. Sometimes the accommodations can seem downright quaint. Take the five months Martha Stewart served in the Alderson, West Virginia, women’s prison, where she taught a yoga class and created an entire nativity scene out of ceramics. Her minimum-security prison—complete with “cottages” and tree-lined gates—wasn’t nicknamed “Camp Cupcake” for nothing. After former hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam was sentenced to


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11 years (which was the longest sentence ever imposed for insider trading), one prison insider told the New York Post he was “reigning like a king,” with a “personal manservant” who doted upon him with the hopes of becoming his driver after they’re released. People eat these stories up. But the truth is slightly more complicated: Because of his type 2 diabetes, Rajaratnam is staying at a federally run medical facility and in need of a kidney transplant. No picnic there. But if fellow inmates wanted to treat him favorably, who would stop them? Not all for mer CEOs have it t he sa me. There’s the case of Kozlowski, the disgraced head of Tyco who received a sentence of eight and one third to 25 years for multiple crimes, including the illegal receipt of $81 million in bonuses. He’s something of an authority on the differences between prisons, having seen the inside of two very different institutions. Dur ing his stay at the maximum-secur it y Downstate Cor rectional Facilit y, nor th of New York Cit y, Kozlowsk i did n’t go outside for eight and a half months, according to the for thcoming book Taking Down the Lion, which covers his rise and fall. In 2006, he moved to Mid-State, a medium-security prison (where he was housed in the same unit as the rapper Ja Rule), and passed the years Former New York City Police Commissioner Bernie Kerik, photographed in his New Jersey home. “doing laundry, reading hundreds of books, tutoring other inmates,” even teaching himself to paint. While incarcerated, he wrote to the book’s author, Catherine S. Neal, that he most looked forward to “doing what free people do. Close a bathroom Ber nie got there, I was the celebrity of the prison,” says one of Berdoor, go to the store, drive a car, open a door, call on a telephone, touch nie’s best prison buddies, Jack Abramoff, the well-known Washington a computer.” He closed his letter by saying, “Simple pleasures and the lobbyist who was infamously sent away on corruption charges in 2006 and whose time in the slammer overlapped with Kerik’s by about six freedom to enjoy them are more precious than you can imagine.” That’s why no matter what the public perception is, it’s not a good idea weeks, which was long enough for them to bond. Kevin Spacey played to call this a cakewalk to people on the inside. “That whole Club Fed Abramoff in the movie Casino Jack and even came to Cumberland to mentality, that shit that they portray in the press, is complete nonsense,” do some research. “You don’t want to be the celebrity of the prison, by the way,” says Abramoff. Another lesson he shares: “It’s never good Kerik says. Kerik, who got out in May but was still wearing an ankle-bracelet dur- to draw attention to yourself in a prison. Nothing good is gonna result ing his home detention when I spoke to him again by phone recently, did f rom that.” He remembers his fellow in mates gather ing around the his time at Cumberland, one of 81 minimum- and/or medium-security pris- television to view the Bill Moyers special about his life. “It seemed like ons in the U.S. He was, by all accounts, including those of prison officials the entire prison took time to watch, and those are the kinds of things I spoke with, a model prisoner. (If he hadn’t been, he wouldn’t have gotten you don’t want.” Perhaps it’s not unusual for guys with similar backgrounds to team up 11 months shaved off his time.) His law-enforcement background and his very conservative political views have always been a large part of who he with one another. It was Abramoff who showed Kerik the ropes, introduced him around. “He had a disadvantage coming in, given his occupational is—even after he was sent to prison for breaking the law. But a larger-than-life persona is, apparently, a tricky thing in the Big background,” Abramoff recalls with some understatement. “The guys House. And being famous and a former cop is a double whammy. “Till who I mainly hung out with, you know, the white-collar-slash-whatever


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folks, they thought he was great. I mean, he was interesting, intellectual, urbane, funny. And the other guys, I think, were just still kind of figuring out, ‘What is he all about? What are we looking at here?’ Subsequently, they all determined he was a good guy.” But there was a learning curve. I asked him if everyone knew who Kerik was when he got there. “They know everything!” Abramoff replies. “They either know or they find out. Plus, they have an e-mail system now. There aren’t too many secrets in a prison.” However, there are, I have come to find out, plenty of myths. The first is that white-collar pr isons are f illed with, well, white-collar prisoners. At Cumberland, the majority of inmates were dr ug dealers whose sentences were less than 10 years. “At least while I was there,” says Abramoff, “about 90 percent of the drug dealers were inner-city drug dealers, and some of them were violent folks.” Those who were true “white-collar” criminals were few and far between. T he s e c ond g r e at my t h i s that the famous g uys get better treatment. In fact, the more “high profile” you are—unlike in the non-prison world—the fewer perks you may receive. No one wants to be accused of favoritism. This encompasses all sorts of things, from which facility you’re sent to—though there were several minimumsecurity prisons within a hour’s drive of Kerik’s home in New Jersey, he was shipped to wester n Mar yland, where his wife and kids had to travel 10 hours round-trip to see him—to what happens when a loved one dies. Abramoff’s mother passed away while he was incarcerated “and almost ever ything I asked for the answer was no. You’re supposed to get a deathbed visit, and I asked for that and the answer was no. Then I wasn’t allowed to go to her funeral.” Abramoff says he understood why. “They feared that if I went out—and correctly, by the way—the media would have descended on wherever I was, and then they would have to be answering the question, ‘Why did you guys let him out of prison?’ And they didn’t want to deal with that. So the price was to basically say, ‘Sorry, Charlie.’ ” He does add with some bitterness: “I didn’t see anybody else denied the chance to go to his parent’s funeral. And I was there long enough that I saw a lot of people go to funerals. Including a lot of pretty vicious guys.” One of the most interesting characteristics about a prison with minimum security is how minimum the security really is. At Cumberland, the doors are locked only at night. As Kerik explains it, you’re basically on an “honor system.” You could pretty much leave at any time, but if you do, you’re

looking at another seven years tacked on to your sentence. In other words, says Bernie, “they’re doing easy time now, and the light is at the end of the tunnel. So it doesn’t make sense [to run away].”

D

uring my visit with Bernie, we settle around a table with mauve plastic chairs. This is kind of nice, I say. “Compared to what?” says Bernie. It’s early evening, and dinner has already been served to the inmates, but Bernie doesn’t eat any because it is turkey pot pie. (“Allegedly,” he jokes.) It turns out that a little garden patch I saw on our drive in is a source for some of Bernie’s more edible meals. The inmates who are in charge of the “farm” often bring him cor n, squash, zucchini and tomatoes, which he mixes with rice that he cooks in the microwaves in the laundry room and visiting room. Besides working out, there are other ways to pass the time, and to hear Kerik tell it, these activities are essential. “There’s no golf course or tennis courts. There may be basketball, baseball and a workout area. But you have got to give these g uys something to do. If they’re locked up 24 hours a day, without their families, without any contact with outside society, you can’t expect them to do nothing but rot.” Cumberland actually appears spar tan compared with other prisons. “Some of them have weight-lifting equipment, athletic equipment, movies, big video libraries, and Cumberland didn’t really have any of that,” says Abramoff. “But the important things—safety, cleanliness, basic needs—were met. I mean, it is prison.” When Kerik first got here, he was hoping to get Jack Abramoff’s old job in the prison chaplain’s office. Abramoff had what he calls “the best job there,” working in the nondenominational chapel, handing out prayer books, setting up the room for services and so on. He even brushed up on his piano skills. He had to earn the job by doing dishes in the kitchen for six months, “which was really quite horrible.” And he wanted to give his cushy job to his friend when he left, but the BOP put the kibosh on that. So Kerik mopped f loors, which he preferred to dishwashing. Plus, this came with an additional perk: access to the kitchen and to his favored breakfast of three or four eggs, eaten raw. After that, Kerik moved into a job in the library. He also wrote up a storm. There was a blog and a Facebook account (which he since shut


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“You are constantly berated, degraded, demoralized.” —BernIE Kerik

down), showing photos of his shocking weight loss. And a Twitter account, of course. Beyond all of that, he wrote 1,940 pages of his next book, a continuation of his autobiography that starts exactly where his first book ended: September 14, 2001, when President Bush came to Ground Zero with his bullhorn. If he chooses to write about his prison time, there will be a couple of notable cameos. He’s been visited a few times by Geraldo Rivera, who arrived by private helicopter. And by New York congressman Peter King, who made the six-hour drive to check in with Kerik about how he was doing and for some light discussion about politics. But what I really want to know about, beyond the food and the bonding and the living in a cramped cubicle where he barely had enough room to get dressed without bumping into someone else, is what surprised him, the man who knew jails better than anyone, about prison time. What was the most shocking thing about being on the other side of the bars? “The punishment should be the deprivation of freedom and liberty,” he says. “But once you arrive at prison—I was shocked by the psychological punishment.” This is unexpected. “You are constantly berated, degraded, demoralized,” he says. “You’re herded like cattle.” The isolation from family also takes its toll. “You can’t show your child love and support and guidance in absentia. You damn sure can’t do it in a two-hour visit in a visiting room. You can’t discipline your child while you’re in the system, because the last thing you need is for that last con-

versation you have with your child to be a negative one,” he says. “You cannot fathom the pain, the heartache, that the system causes parents and their kids. Nobody gets it. Nobody understands it.” Kerik may be out now, but that doesn’t mean the prison system has left his thoughts. In fact, he has more ideas than ever about refor m, specifically changing the policies about giving prisoners “good-time incentives” and the use of solitary confinement. According to Kerik, a prisoner can get solitar y for smoking cigarettes. “I k now how the system is supposed to work, and I know what the system is supposed to accomplish,” he says. “I know it can work the way it’s supposed to work. But it doesn’t.” Kerik also points to some of the system’s punishments as too severe. “To stand in a room and talk to a guy that had a first-time offense, one kilo of cocaine, no violence, and then was given 27 years? Are you kidding? I didn’t know that kind of stuff happened. Like, how could that be?” But there was another revelation, one that’s going to stick around longer than memories of vegetable-patch dinners, longer than his prison friendships, probably even longer than his weight loss. “I’ve come to realize being sentenced in the U.S. criminal justice system, for anything, is a life sentence,” he says. “It’s not about the time they give you. You receive a punishment of imprisonment and then a lifelong sentence of collateral punishment.” None of which sounds like an offering at Club Fed.


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In late December, almost exactly four years since its last seating, the legendary Tavern on the Green will once again shine for the public. Nestled at the western edge of Central Park, the restaurant will be reopening under the watchful eyes of Jim Caiola and David Salama, the Philadelphia-based restaurateurs who won the bid for a city-issued contract to run the space, and chef Katy Sparks, formerly of the Quilted Giraffe and Mesa Grill. “This is the best location for a restaurant because everyone in the world is here,” Caiola says, “and they’re having these celebratory moments.” There will be plenty of celebrating when the restaurant, which first opened in 1934, is back in business. Boasting three dining rooms as well as an Apple Store–like glass box where the famed Crystal Room once was, the restaurant will keep its focus on high-end American cuisine, but with a more approachable, neighborhood vibe. “Katy takes the best ingredients and does very little to them,” Caiola explains. “Our wine list will be extraordinary but very simple, and the same goes for cocktails.” Although most aspects of Tavern on the Green, from the menu to the decor, will be NATASHA WOLFF ILLUSTRATION BY TATSURO KIUCHI updated, there’s one thing that EDITED Caiola BY wouldn’t dream of changing. “The element of magic,” he says, “is what I want to keep.”

EDITED BY NATASHA WOLFF ILLUSTRATION BY TATSURO KIUCHI


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Located just blocks from Ajax Mountain in the heart of downtown, Timbers Resorts’ Dancing Bear is the year-round destination of choice for inthe-know travelers. A fractional ownership ($695,000 per year) gets you the use of one of the property’s nine three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bathroom residences for six weeks a year. While you’re there, take advantage of the screening room, wine cellar, game room and rooftop lounge outfitted with hot tubs. There is a concierge service if you want to go out and a delicious brasserie on the ground floor for eating in. Amenities like heated bathroom floors, daily maid service, a breakfast buffet and a popular happy hour add to the luxe offerings. “With its excellent location, this truly intimate mountain retreat is a private escape that feels very exclusive and relaxed at the same time,” Timbers Resorts’ Amy Anderson says. 411 SOUTH MONARCH STREET DANCINGBEARASPEN.COM

970-920-6333

3:00 P.M. EXPLORE THE RETAIL OPTIONS

10:30 A.M. TAKE A HIKE DOWN VALLEY

Boulder-based Newton Running footwear company is launching its first trail running shoe, built for variable surfaces and challenging weather conditions. Take advantage of a thaw and head to Carbondale to test run the cult-favorite brand’s new, brightly colored footwear. BoCo AT shoes, $129, NEWTON RUNNING, newtonrunning.com

Aspen plays host to major retail brands from Ralph Lauren to Brunello Cucinelli. If Alaïa and Stella McCartney are what you crave, check out Nuages and Distractions. For casual sportswear, Gorsuch and Pitkin County Dry Goods are local favorites. Hostess presents or last-minute holiday shopping mean a trip to Fendi’s South Mill Street boutique.

5:00 P.M. APRÈS-SKI AT AJAX TAVERN

Whether you ski, snowboard or shop, you can be sure everyone will want to meet up for drinks. This season’s musthave spirit is Reserve Vodka, the newest offering from local craft distillery Woody Creek, which is made from Polish Stobrawa potatoes. Vodka, $130, WOODY CREEK, woodycreekdistillers.com

Leather and fox-fur key fob, $580, FENDI, 970-920-3100

8:00 P.M. DINNER AT DAVID BURKE KITCHEN

1:00 P.M. LUNCH AT THE ASPEN MOUNTAIN CLUB

Accessible by gondola on the top of Ajax Mountain, the members-only Aspen Mountain Club is the place to see and be seen. The homey David Easton–designed clubhouse, which boasts members

Chef David Burke is bringing his signature flair to town with the opening of David Burke Kitchen in January. Expect the chef’s trademark dishes, like pretzel-crusted crab cakes and duck and foie gras in a jar. 515 HOPKINS AVENUE; DAVIDBURKE.COM

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THERE’S MORE THAN JUST SKIING TO KEEP YOU BUSY IN THIS ROCKY MOUNTAIN TOWN


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VMR SHOWROOM

Drawing on physical instinct and animal movements, the new Animal Flow class at Equinox fitness clubs will draw you out of hibernation. The dynamic Get Stacked class also promises sleek, defined muscle—or sign up for the restorative Rx Series for breathing and stretching to make it through to spring equinox and longer days at last.

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Slip-on, $425, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, ferragamo.com

CULTURE & COMMERCE

A one-stop shop for the fashionable, the frugal and the highbrow, Rosemont’s Fashion Outlets of Chicago is a posh new $250 million outlet mall of luxury stores, including Gucci, Brunello Cucinelli and Hugo Boss. The outlets are also partnering with a local collective, the Arts Initiative, to showcase up-andcoming artists like Andrew Nigon and Jen Stark with an installation curated by Miami-based gallery Primary Projects. 5220 FASHION OUTLETS WAY

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GILDING THE GOLD COAST A BIGGER, BETTER AND BOLDER SHOPPING SCENE FOR CHICAGO

1. VMR SHOWROOM Mark Gill has been styling Chicagoans since the ‘90s. Recently a fashion consultant for private clients, he’s now offering his eye to the public, alongside his partner, Tina Kourasis, at their new Gold Coast showroom. VMR—Vintage, Modern, Resale—is a by-appointment designer resale boutique, a curated closet of oneof-a-kind pieces from Chanel, Fendi, Oscar de la Renta and more.

2. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO Another name to add to the series of recent Michigan Avenue makeovers (Burberry, Coach, Zegna) is Salvatore Ferragamo, which recently reopened after a months-long renovation. The store now boasts a new second floor and 3,000 square feet of brighter, airier space. All the classics are here, but this is not your grandmother’s Ferragamo store.

3. CHURCH’S From Northampton, England— the capital of English shoemaking for ages—to the heart of the Gold Coast comes Church’s. The classicmeets-contemporary storefront is stocked with the label’s handsome boots, rubber-soled loafers and wing-tip brogues for dapper men and women alike. The brown color palette is offset by green leather and crystal, wood and marble finishes.

34 EAST OAK STREET; VMRCHICAGO.COM

645 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE; FERRAGAMO.COM

75 EAST WALTON STREET; CHURCH-FOOTWEAR.COM


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Expect crowds this winter in the Gold Coast triangle when another New York City import arrives: the THOMPSON CHICAGO, the first Midwestern location of the brand. No surprise that it attracted One Off Hospitality

A TRIO OF TOP-NOTCH NEW WATERING HOLES TO KEEP YOUR WHISTLE WET ALL WINTER

Keep your eyes peeled for a new restaurant from beloved chef Rick Bayless, who specializes in modern Mexican cuisine. RICKBAYLESS.COM

CH DISTILLERY It was only a matter of time before the city’s first grain-to-bottle spirits distillery opened its doors to patrons wanting to get a glimpse of the distilling process— and sample the end product. Enjoy a range of made-on-site spirits mixed into cocktails like the Rhymes with Orange, featuring Serrano chili vodka, lime, orange curaçao and watermelon.

Group—the Blackbird/Publican/Big Star crew—with their latest, Nico Osteria, an Italian seafood restaurant. With in-room offerings from James Beard Award–winning chef Paul Kahan, REN skin-care

THE BERKSHIRE ROOM Classic cocktails are the focus at the Acme Hotel’s new drinks destination in River North. Barrelfinished Manhattans and Negronis take the spotlight alongside new concoctions like the Nepi (Amaro, honey tea syrup, prosecco)—or try a Dealer’s Choice and let the bartender create a cocktail customized to your specifications.

products and complimentary car service to downtown, this might be just the place for a staycation. 21 EAST BELLEVUE PLACE; There

won’t be a shortage of places

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Hotel Boom

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to stay in the city: the second outpost of the HOTEL INDIGO is slated to open before the end of 2014, a boon to business travelers and Millennium Park–ers alike. 168 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE; HOTELINDIGO.COM

And in

the historic, Venetian-style CHICAGO ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

564 WEST RANDOLPH STREET CHDISTILLERY.COM

JIMMY For low-key, late-night lounging, Jimmy at the James Hotel is the spot. Every inch of the space is perfectly planned, from the Maria Pinto– designed staff duds to the cocktail menu’s reimagined classics. Try a modern Rusty Nail, with its violet-hued ice cube clinking around in Yamazaki 12-year Scotch and Drambuie.

15 EAST OHIO STREET ACMEHOTELCOMPANY.COM

building, Chicago-based AJ Capital Partners and hotelier John Pritzker’s Geolo Capital are putting together a $61 million, 240-room luxury hotel,

610 NORTH RUSH STREET

expected to open late in 2014.

JIMMYATJAMES.COM

12 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE

FOODIE FIX

This winter, all eyes will be on two men with projects that promise to give a shot in the arm to Chicago’s dining scene. Who are they? MARIO BATALI

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BRENDAN SODIKOFF

TV chef and cookbook author Batali is gearing up to open an outpust of his massive Italian foodie haven Eataly. The 63,000-square-foot space will host eight restaurants, a brewpub, a butcher and a specialty grocer—and will have Chicagoans exclaiming mille grazie, Mario!

Sodikoff can’t be stopped. Last year he debuted Bavette’s; this summer his deli-style eatery Dillman’s had just opened when he announced the fall launch of Green Street Smoked Meats. He’s even squeezing a ramen bar in the same space. We can’t keep up.

43 EAST OHIO STREET; EATALY.COM

112 NORTH GREEN STREET

SOMBRERO: HOLLY EXLEY; BATALI: EUGENE GOLOGURSKY/WIREIMAGE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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AMBER VENZ, THE GURU BEHIND FASHION WEBSITE REWARDSTYLE.COM SHARES HER FAVORITES, FROM COUTURE TO CUISINE WINTER MUST-HAVES: I’m living in Tibi’s thigh-high Thea boots (1), Balenciaga white blouses, Saint Laurent’s wide-brim

hat, Valentino’s blue-and-white gowns (2) and Carven’s deer-print pieces (3). I carry a black bag to work every day. This season, it’s a Givenchy Antigona bag. MAKEUP: Urban Decay Naked eye-shadow palette and L’Oreal Double Extend mascara. SKIN CARE: Chanel Sublimage La Crème Yeux and Chanel Le Blanc Brightening Moisturizing Cream, Neutrogena makeup wipes and toner. NAILS: Essie Mademoiselle (4). HAIR: My mom cuts my hair, and I do my own touch-ups when I’m traveling. I’m a natural blonde, but I color my hair red with Clairol 6R. STORES: Restoration Hardware (5), Neiman Marcus for makeup, VOD, Five & Ten and Forty Five Ten. ART & DESIGN: “I commissioned a table by Daniel Arsham for our office. I prefer 3-D art, so I have Derek Lam skateboards on my wall. I also decorate with books from clients like Kelly Wearstler. RESTAURANTS: Rafa’s is a total hole in the wall, but it’s my favorite. The fried-chicken salad at the Porch and the fried pickles at Jake’s are my guilty pleasures.

The Dallas Museum of Art celebrates Robert Smithson with an exhibition focused on five Texas-based projects he proposed to the state throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s. Smithson, though known largely for his land art, also used photography, painting, sculpture and drawing to conceptualize his larger-scale plans. Through April 27. 1717 NORTH HARWOOD STREET; DALLASMUSEUMOFART.ORG

AMBER VENZ

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BLUE BACKGROUND: PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; CARVEN: IMAXTREE; POLISH BLOT: PEDERK/GETTY IMAGES; SMITHSON: COURTESY OF ROBERT WADE, AUSTIN, TEXAS; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

“ROBERT SMITHSON IN TEXAS”

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1 Leather boot, $795, TIBI, tibi.com

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From Russia With Love

Fashion wunderkind Kira Plastinina, 21, has been hard at work on her clothing company since she was a teenager in Russia. Now the Dallas resident and SMU student has opened her first U.S. boutique (she has 120 in Russia), Lublu, at the Plaza at Preston Center. “I am very proud of our patterns. Each one is done in house, and this floral is one of the more popular prints. I love the full skirt—it’s very feminine.” Dress, $1,200, LUBLU KIRA PLASTININA; lublukiraplastinina.com

4 Nail polish, $9, ESSIE, essie.com


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on the runyon

“I create a collaborative experience for each collector,” says John Runyon, the art adviser for The Joule hotel’s collection. “It’s up to me to offer exciting opportunities that shape their collection in a personal way.” Here, Runyon shares three of his best buys and explains what makes them special. Outspan (2008) by Tony Cragg “I have admired and placed Tony’s work in some prominent collections over the years. He’s a great classical sculptor employing some very innovative mediums and techniques. The work is prominently exhibited in the entryway.”

Dallas-based designer Jan Showers has impressed some very discerning people. The foreword to Showers’ stunning new coffee-table book, Glamorous Retreats (Abrams), was written by fashion designer Michael Kors.

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Eye (2010) by Tony Tasset “The concept utilizes the lot across the street from the Joule to construct a 30-foot, three-dimensional eye to look back toward the hotel. The sculpture is an anchor for an outdoor private-event space in the heart of downtown Dallas.”

sculpture by incorporating anodized aluminum and framed vacuum-formed plastic within the picture plane. His work conveys an energy that connects nicely with the downtown vibe, which is current and thriving.”

Global Eats

pakpao Forget plain old pad Thai. Chef Eddy Thretipthuangsin’s new eatery serves southeast Asian favorites including crispy tamarind duck and short rib with massaman curry to foodies in the Design District. And don’t forget to try one of the innovative cocktails like the Phuket Old Fashioned, made with bourbon, star-anise clove honey and

bitters. 1628 oak lawn avenue; pakpaothai.com belly & trumpet Chef Brian Zenner’s menu of small plates was inspired by his travels around the globe, from London to Thailand (where he was born) and Dubai. To wit, he offers dishes like steamed buns with Wagyu beef tongue and a refreshing watermelon-and-arugula salad with chili and lime. 3407 mckinney avenue; bellyandtrumpet.com mesero miguel Mi Cocina founder Mico Rodriguez’s latest restaurant features south-of-theborder-inspired cuisine like halibut tacos with cilantro aioli and pickled vegetables as well as several varieties of supremely fresh ceviche. “It’s a cool, clean setting serving well-crafted food,” Rodriguez says of his two-story space. 2822 north henderson avenue; meseromiguel.com

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showers: Holly Exley; all other images courtesy

Slugs in Sodium (2013) by Nicholas Deshayes “Deshayes blurs the boundary between painting and


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Music icon and native Houstonian Lyle Lovett is giving away the shirt off his back

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He hit the runway for Dillard’s department store as a kid, appeared in Robert Altman’s 1994 film Prêtà-Porter, and spent almost two years married to one of the world’s most glamorous women, so it comes as no surprise that the inimitable singer-songwriter Lyle Lovett’s latest endeavor shows off his stylish side. Lovett, the country legend, is now the driving force behind a new line of Western dress shirts from Houston’s 130-year-old custom shirtmakers Hamilton. “I’ve always been interested in fashion, and as a performer, you have to be conscious of it—or at least you should be,” he says with a chuckle. A loyal fan of the company, Lovett had been personalizing his Hamilton orders with different yokes, cuts, scalloping and more for more than a decade before approaching sibling owners David and Kelly Hamilton in January about partnering on a special collection. “I was going through my changes with David, and I asked, ‘Do you think anyone else would like these, that we could sell these?’ ” Lovett remembers. “He went for the idea.” In a matter of months, the style-savvy crooner’s shirt specs—a trimmer fit, three-button cuffs, more than 23 different fabrics and distinctive, carved-horn buttons—became part of “the strongest product launch for us,” David Hamilton says. Indeed, the designer had a feeling Lovett’s customizations would appeal to a broader range of clients. “Lyle is sophisticated, local and unique, and that’s everything we’ve ever wanted Hamilton to be,” he says. “[The collaboration] needed to be authentic, and what Lyle designed feels very real to us.” Lovett says he wears a Hamilton shirt every day, and he’s been known to pair a white button-down with a Prada suit onstage. “It’s kind of a luxury,” he says. The star says he still has every Hamilton shirt he’s ever bought, “because it’s such a classic design. I’ve never had anything happen to one.” So how many shirts does he own? “More than I can wear at once.” hamilton1883.com

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text by holly crawford; Photograph by Jack Thompson

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Goerl’s World

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DRINK OF CHOICE:

Josiane Goerl, mother of three and Tanglewood resident, lives in Roberto Cavalli and Louis Vuitton. Here, she shares her personal style secrets with us

Caipirinhas (I am Brazilian, after all!) and I love a good white Burgundy. Get in line! Houston had zero food-truck parks just a few months ago, but as of October, it has three.

NIGHTTIME LOOKS:

Vibrant print dresses or sexy black looks from Roberto Cavalli and Alexander McQueen / Beaded dress,

BAG:

Louis Vuitton and Chanel are my favorites.

price upon request, ROBERTO CAVALLI, robertocavalli.com

/ Bauletto bag, $1,975, VERSACE, versace.com

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MAKEUP:

Laura Mercier tinted moisturizer and neutral lip glosses, Sisley eye liner and mascara, Chanel blush, MAC eyeshadow / Eye shadow in Bamboo, $15, MAC, maccosmetics.com; So Intense Mascara, $66, SISLEY, saks.com

DEPARTMENT STORE:

Saks Fifth Avenue

Akris pants, Louis Vuitton and Prada shift dresses / Pants, $1190, AKRIS, akris.ch

Snakeskin and spiked Christian Louboutin pumps at night and flats for day / Pumps, $725, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, christianlouboutin.com

SWEETER DREAMS

Houston can sleep well knowing interior designer and contemporaryart enthusiast Karen Pulaski has unveiled Tribute Goods, her first line of linens. “My favorite items to procure for clients were always linens,” she says. “They’re the most intimate things in your home.” She often introduces her interior-design clients to artists whose work she loves, so it’s no surprise her collections feature original watercolor works of art, digitally enhanced and printed on the finest Italian textiles. “There is intention and sentiment behind everything,” she says. “There are plenty of beautiful things out there and I wanted to collaborate on a project that brings ceremony to everyday life.” Accent pillows, $126; Euro shams, $198, TRIBUTE GOODS, tributegoods.com

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GOERL: ADA BUCCHOLC; FOOD TRUCK: HOLY EXLEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

SHOES: DAYTIME LOOKS:


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Get outdoors for a change and check out the public park between Monte Carlo and New York–New York, on the Strip.

Wynn’s new spa menu offers luxurious therapies from head to toe

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TOP TOQUE THROWDOWN

CELEBRITY CHEFS GIADA DE LAURENTIIS AND TOM COLICCHIO ARE BOTH OPENING NEW RESTAURANTS IN LAS VEGAS. HOW DO THE TWO PROJECTS STACK UP?

GIADA DE LAURENTIIS

TOM COLICCHIO

CHEF

STAR-MAKING TV PROJECT

Giada at Home

Top Chef

RESTAURANT

Giada

Tom Colicchio’s Heritage Steak

The Gansevoort 3595 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH GANSEVOORTLV.COM

WYNNLASVEGAS.COM

The Mirage 3400 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH

WHERE TO FIND IT

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Asian-inspired skewers grilled over a charcoal fire

Mars Landing Grammy winner Bruno Mars heads to the Cosmopolitan to inaugurate its newest venue, the Chelsea, with several upcoming appearances, including two New Year’s Eve shows and concerts February 15 and 16. The 50,000-square-foot space, which holds 3,000 guests, features cast-glass chandeliers, a vintage lobby bar and private opera boxes for VIPs. “Mars is a true performer,” John Unwin, CEO of the Cosmopolitan, says. To paraphrase the singer, you won’t want to be locked out of this heaven. COSMOPOLITANLASVEGAS.COM

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SIGNATURE DISH

A killer antipasto station

CHEF SAYS

“Ever since I was a little girl hanging out at my grandfather’s restaurant, I’ve dreamed of having a restaurant of my own. I couldn’t be more excited to turn this dream into a delicious reality.”

“The big thing here is we’re cooking over live fuel, so everything is cooked over wood or charcoal. Las Vegas has changed. Someone figured out people want not only a place to have fun but great food.”

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Overindulgence, sky-high heels and late nights may be a given in Sin City, but the recently reopened Spa at Wynn stands to help reverse the damage. The spa’s new menu features treatments like the Swift Lift Facial, an antiaging stem-cell therapy that provides a “lifting effect” to the face, and the Serenity Foot Ritual, which includes a detoxifying apricot cream scrub followed by an Asian-inspired massage for the legs. “These experiences will relax, rejuvenate and renew guests,” Ella Stimpson, Wynn’s director of spa operations, says. “The luxurious treatments have been developed by our therapists and use the most exclusive product lines to create an experience that you just can’t find anywhere else.”

MARS: BRAD BARKET/GETTY IMAGES FOR ATLANTIC RECORDS; TREE: HOLLY EXLEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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A GIRL WALKS INTO A DRY BAR FOUR NEW BLOW-DRY OFFERINGS ARE BRINGING SLEEK STRANDS AND LOTS OF BODY TO THE STRIP

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TH E rel SPA a sa xed & SA l L Blo on o curl ON A s” f T w f e ad rs Ce ARI d D be ed ry.” stan ntra A M glo lea For dar lly ost ssy ve-i an d b loc Re a n ,s hin con extra lowo ted que st at u y a dit $ nd ion 45, ts fo Ari ed H pe ing sty r $ a on ai 7 li r rfe ctl trea sts p 5 an the styl y s tm erf d a Str e: “ e tyl ed nt t orm spe ip, th Big , . A ha cia th e t RI e AL gu se l “Tr AS a r VE ran vic eat GA tee e w me S. CO s h ith nt M air an wi ll

on bar, ex y “S -dr m : yle l blow tinu bett s ir a Pla or Ha igin 5. — ed y’s or at $3 $20 M t s ue e cit ting extra AS.CO q e G th star an VE tR AS os being yles, for YBARL M n t R h it GE 6 s salo LOWD e URA d w rs 1 B NTO edite offe to th calls. E r M e e e c C U s rag ervi TIN h” ou PLA Beac Entou eur s do h f l l the inum hauf ts wi c t s Pla ides styli v s pro et, it y ter

BLO W Cus OUT DO LLH tom OU e slee k an rs can SE Mo cho st R Dol d st o lh raig e ht “ se amo quest salo ouse. Loc ed p n n is o g lish at H st i suit ed t ntimat ed at t ed” lo yles lik airsty le: e h e “b o th cks, —it e “C M e do e s a h llho as jus rket LV tarting achy” urly Do t fo wav use ll” at $ ins u -ins pire r stylin ide Tiv 35, at es and oli V d at g ch Blow mo out sph airs— illage, wh ere. ich the BLO is p WO UTD erfe OLL ctly HO US E.C OM

DAVID FURNISH ON HIS FAVORITE VEGAS MEMORY “It has to be the opening night for [my husband] Elton John’s Red Piano show at Caesars Palace [in 2004]. Elton felt he was taking an artistic risk working with the edgy photographer David LaChapelle as the show’s creative director. Everyone was nervous because parts of the show were really ‘out there.’ Fortunately, the response was universally positive, and the show went on to become a massive success.” FURNISH’S NEW CHAMPAGNE LOUNGE, FIZZ LAS VEGAS, HAS OPENED INSIDE CAESARS PALACE. FIZZLV.COM

HAIR DRYER: NICK VEASEY/GETTYIMAGES; FURNISH: TIM P. WHITBY/GETTY IMAGES

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” , exy ents e dS il an ointm le M w ig o “B app irac e n f o M m le: vic ser lots sty roo the air r in- t at -Go ith OM d H d fo fron -the y,” w DSLV.C n n e x LHEA ste Se tor s-o ue L ma eq d de its s Doll and 0. DO e s tR os ease clos e. It “Big r $8 V M incr d to obil ture m fo SL n m na roo e EAD g a cid ely ig l LLH seein V de plet its s hote DO L om like ur ter ds Af lhea go c ts— to yo l u o o Do st ls— op blow cur Sh s d ng an bri me lu vo

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FIRED UP

SANTA MONICA’S PIZZA SCENE IS GETTING 800 DEGREES HOTTER

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If the aroma of earthy, buttery truffle cheese begins to blanket Wilshire Boulevard come winter, it’s likely a Tartufo in the oven at 800 Degrees. The build-yourown Neapolitan-style pizza shop will be serving up the best-selling pie in addition to other offerings from its new Santa Monica location beginning in December. Fans of the fast-casual restaurant, which opened its first location in Westwood in January 2012, include Neil Patrick Harris and Conan O’Brien, so the expansion comes as no surprise. Having an all-star team of founders doesn’t hurt either—the concept comes from

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Umami Burger mastermind Adam Fleischman, former Michael Mina chef Anthony Carron and restaurateur Allen Ravert. 800 Degrees in Santa Monica will offer regular and gluten-free dough with toppings like caramelized onions, basil pesto, smoked provolone, bacon marmalade, rock shrimp and prosciutto. Once it officially opens, you might find yourself waiting for a table, but the good news is your pizza won’t take long—each pie bakes in just 60 seconds. No wonder this place is expected to be one of the hottest openings of the season. 120 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD; 800DEGREESPIZZA.COM

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MANDA-TORY SHOPPING

Rodeo Drive will welcome the doyenne of modern luxury this holiday season when Tory Burch’s West Coast flagship opens its doors, offering Angelenos polished gifts from a shop that is itself dressed to the nines in lacquer, velvet, gold-leaf wallpaper and Moroccan tiles. “For Rodeo Drive, we wanted the decor to be sophisticated and accessible in keeping with the spirit of Los Angeles,” Burch says of the space, which she codesigned with architect Daniel Romualdez. That translates to an outdoor terrace with a working fireplace and, of course, a private VIP shopping area. —TRACEY LOMERANTZ LESTER 366 NORTH RODEO DRIVE; TORYBURCH.COM

TONX

Back in 2011, Nik Bauman and Tony Konecny recognized what was missing from the coffee market: access to reliably great beans and a business that focused on the home consumer. In response, the Angelenos launched Tonx, a coffee-subscription service that sources high-quality beans from farmers all over the world. “We believe paying great prices to people who use good processes to grow and harvest their crop is the most lasting way to do business,” Bauman says. “And it helps us secure the tastiest beans.” Bags are available in 12- or 24-ounce sizes and are shipped nationwide biweekly. TONX.ORG

Delivery Boys Meet two new retailers that bring their goods right to your door

BUCK MASON

Inspired by a love for quality American-made clothing and a mutual aversion to the mall, retail veterans Erik Schnakenberg and Sasha Koehn teamed up to found Buck Mason, a mensweardelivery service. Customers just log on to the user-friendly website and choose from a rotating selection of six-piece packages, each of which contains wardrobe essentials like twill chinos and chambray button-downs. Shipping is free, and users have 10 days to decide what to keep. BUCKMASON.COM

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THE HOLLYWOOD HOTEL

When the Ace Hotel moves into the United Artists building in downtown Los Angeles this winter, it will be occupying not just a structure but also a landmark. Built as the home for Charlie Chaplin’s production company, the legendary space is awash in Tinseltown history. Here are some highlights from its storied past.

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Designed by architect Frank Gehry, “Calder and Abstraction: From Avant-Garde to Iconic” opens at the Resnick Pavilion at LACMA November 24. LACMA.ORG

1927 The 13-story building was finished just in time to host the premiere of United Artists cofounder Mary Pickford’s My Best Girl. The National Guard was reportedly required to control the crowd at the event.

MALIBU COUNTRY THE PENINSULA BEVERLY HILLS OFFERS GUESTS A RARE VIEW OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Imagine a trip across L.A. without a bit of traffic. If it sounds too good to be true, that may be because you’re assuming you’d be driving. Thanks to a new helicopter getaway excursion designed by the Peninsula Beverly Hills, going over gridlock is the new going around it. As part of the hotel’s Academy program—experiences created to give travelers a unique introduction to Southern California—guests are whisked from the hotel to Van Nuys Airport, where the trip begins aboard an A-Star or Sikorsky S76 helicopter. After a tour of downtown Los Angeles, the chopper descends upon Malibu Canyon for a private tasting and gourmet picnic lunch at the Malibu Family Wines estate. But what’s even more impressive than the estate’s Cabernet Sauvignon? The horses, zebras and buffalo on the property. “This is truly an insider’s Southern California experience,” the Peninsula’s Offer Nissenbaum says. We couldn’t agree more. 9882 SOUTH SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD; PENINSULA.COM

In the classic film The Sweet Smell of Success, a United Artists movie starring Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis, the lobby and entrance serve as a backdrop for the characters’ nefarious dealings. 1986 Celebrities weren’t the only objects of worship in the United Artists building, which was purchased by the Wescott Christian Center. Rumor has it that Pickford’s private screening room was repurposed for Bible storage.

THE MANICURE FOR WHAT AILS YOU

2013 When the Ace Hotel opens, it will boast 200 rooms and suites—some stocked with guitars—as well as a performance space, a rooftop pool and bar and a restaurant by the team behind Brooklyn’s perennially popular Five Leaves. It’s the kind of grandeur one would expect from Hollywood. ACEHOTEL.COM

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Olive & June offers a chic setting that blends the convenience of a corner nail shop with the luxury of a high-end spa. “L.A. really lacked a middle ground in nails,” owner Sarah Gibson Tuttle explains. With that in mind, the former banker turned entrepreneur worked with TenOverSix designers Brady Cunningham and Kristen Lee to conceptualize a new nail salon that fills the void. Another bonus: a diverse selection of polish from over 10 brands. “I used to hate seeing the same brands over and over,” Tuttle says. This new concept has definitely hit the nail on the head. 430 NORTH CANON DRIVE; OLIVEJUNE.COM

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Seasonal Suites THE REDBURY SOUTH BEACH The Redbury South Beach, an intimate offshoot of the Los Angeles hotel, is the latest Sunshine State installment from West Coasters SBE, whose SLS and newly acquired Raleigh hotels sit just across the street. The group is already on a tear restaurant-wise: It’s partnered with Levy Restaurants in Chicago to import chef Tony Mantuano of Chicago’s Spiaggia to run Lorenzo, a wood-oven Italian eatery.

FARM CHARM

South Florida’s growing season kicks into gear around the holidays. For a good overview of the region’s bounty, head to the Yellow Green Farmers Market in Hollywood, between Miami and Fort Lauderdale. The weekend market celebrates its third year of operation with over 150 vendors of organic produce, line-caught seafood and handmade wares such as soy candles and Peruvian-style cotton clothing. Pass for a local by snacking on bacalao empanadas while shopping.

ART BASEL BIGGIES TRACEY EMIN AT MOCA

AI WEIWEI AT PÉREZ ART MUSEUM

What better locale than brightly lit Miami to show neon works by Tracey Emin? The Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, has taken on the task with an exhibition featuring the new site-specific work Angel Without You, which lends the show its title. “Her neons are understudied,” MOCA interim director Alex Gartenfeld says of the artist’s first U.S. solo museum show. “It affirms our tradition of scholarship and innovation.”

The museum christens its Herzog & de Meuron–designed bayfront home with “Ai Weiwei: According to What?” The Chinese artist’s first-ever U.S. retrospective presents 12 large-scale works as well as new pieces including handcuffs carved from a single piece of jade and hundreds of stacked bicycles. “His references to global issues like free speech are relevant to our highly international audience,” director Thom Collins says.

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HOTEL VICTOR SOUTH BEACH Hotel Victor South Beach is open for business after closing for an $8 million renovation. Anyone who visited the prior property will barely recognize it with Yabu Pushelberg’s airy wood-and-linen interiors. Brooklyn-based Sushi MiKasa’s second restaurant and the 10,000-squarefoot V Spa are more reasons to return. 1144 OCEAN DRIVE; HOTELVICTORSOUTHBEACH.COM

METROPOLITAN BY COMO, MIAMI BEACH Metropolitan by COMO, Miami Beach, will be the hotel group’s first U.S. venture, and no detail seems to have been too small for it to consider. Paola Navone designed the 74-room hotel, which features white marble and chrome amid a wash of mint green. Guests can indulge in the spa before hitting the rooftop juice bar and Traymore restaurant. As part of the popping strip between South Beach and Soho Beach House, it will soon be joined by Miami Beach Edition. 2445 COLLINS AVENUE; COMOHOTELS.COM

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Before South Beach’s comeback, Coconut Grove was ground zero for the glitterati. Relive 1980s decadence with the Mayfair Hotel & Spa’s Miami Vice–themed packages celebrating the joint 30th anniversary of the storied property and of the TV show.

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BE JADED

Despite Miami–Dade County’s competitive condominium market and weekly announcements of development, the Sunny Isles–based 57-story property, Jade Signature, whose 192 units range from 1,400 to 10,500 square feet, is bringing impressive goods to the table. To begin with, it was designed by a dream team consisting of Herzog & de Meuron—it’s the Swiss architecture firm’s first residential high-rise in Miami—along with Pierre-Yves Rochon’s Parisian firm for interiors and Raymond Jungles for landscaping. “It was extremely important that our residents have an authentic experience of living on the ocean,” Fortune International president Edgardo Defortuna says of the column-free units, which boast direct ocean and sunset views. Learning from other local developers’ mistakes,

EDGARDO DEFORTUNA’S FOUR REAL ESTATE MILESTONES

1. JADE OCEAN (2007) “The entrance and lobby are situated on the ocean rather than the street side. Custom software enabled residents to contact the valet, control lighting and even shop with the touch of a screen.”

Go Fish

2. ICON BRICKELL (2008) “This introduced a unique property through Philippe Starck’s genius. But what I really love is how they were able to pull off very strong interior design for three large structures.”

the team thought about every challenge plaguing the high-rise category. Most pools lose sun early in the day, for instance, so they researched the optimum angle for catching not only rays but ocean breezes. They also brought improvements to the way glass doors open and terraces withstand strong winds. “We were impressed by Herzog & de Meuron’s towers because they design from the inside out, always with in-depth analysis,” says Defortuna, who considers himself lucky to have secured the firm. “Sophisticated buyers want a unique experience, and hiring a notable architect sets the foundation.” Defortuna reports that Sunny Isles’ renaissance was cemented by the addition of restaurants and parks, but the oceanfront locale still remains the main selling factor. “It would be hard to find another site with 300 feet of prime oceanfront.” 3. APOGEE (2009) “Its unveiling brought simple lines, clean architecture, large units and high ceilings into play, ultimately resulting in attracting buyers from all over the world to Miami.”

4. JADE SIGNATURE (2016) “This sets new standards through seamless integration from its lobby entrance to the pool and beach; intelligent, detailed design; and flow-through units with large terraces.”

Pescatarians will be pleased with Miami menus this season, as new chefs and restaurants rethink their seafood selections. Andrea Travaglia, owner of Lee & Marie’s Cakery in Miami Beach, has expanded next door with BAR CRUDO. Winter dishes

among its all-raw preparations include octopus and edamame salad and salmon splashed with yuzu juice and pomegranate seeds. New cocktails, including a ginger daiquiri, are also available. 40 SOUTH POINTE DRIVE; BARCRUDOMIAMI.COM Epic Hotel’s AREA 31 has brought aboard Wolfgang Birk, the German toque formerly with Casa Casuarina. The beautiful bay views from the restaurant’s terrace look even better when you’re tucking into Birk’s lobster cooked in coral butter, which is flanked by ravioli and finished with pea shoots. 270 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD WAY; AREA31RESTAURANT.COM LA MAR BY GASTON ACURIO

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brings chef Acurio to the Mandarin Oriental, one of the city’s best waterfront venues. Enjoy fabulous bay views—and traditional and reimagined Peruvian fare, from anticuchos to ceviches—from the ample indoor and outdoor seating areas. 500 BRICKELL KEY DRIVE; MANDARINORIENTAL.COM

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FORTUNE INTERNATIONAL’S NEW JADE SIGNATURE IS CERTAINLY A GEM


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The prejudice against ordering the house wine is eroding, as a slew of restaurants now offer high-quality private labels that eclipse the stigma. “You can produce the exact wine you want,” says Edi & the Wolf owner Edi Frauneder, who created a private label for his Austrian eatery. “It allows for a nice collaboration between winemaker, chef and restaurateur.” Frauneder and two other private-label proponents share their thoughts:

The Wine: Private Reserve Cuvée, a Meritage blend The Region: Napa Valley, California. “It’s something that our guests aren’t able to enjoy anywhere else—and it’s our number-one selling wine by the glass and by the bottle.”—Beverage director Marc Passer

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EDI & THE WOLF The Wine: Gemischter Satz, a field blend of white varietals The Region: Vienna, Austria. “I wanted to tell people the story of our restaurant. What better way to do that than through a Viennese wine?” —Owner Edi Frauneder CRAFT The Wine: Craft by Lieb Cellars, a sparkling Pinot Blanc The Region: Long Island, New York.“Craft is very focused on supporting local purveyors, so philosophically it made sense to me. When I approached [owner] Tom [Colicchio] about doing a house wine, he was very supportive.”—Beverage director Greg Majors

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Home Away From Home Created in a heritage 1920s building, the brand-new WestHouse Hotel been given a rich art-deco vibe by Jeffrey Beers International. “Our guests want a seamless transition from home to hotel,” says general manager Karla Keskin. “They will feel as if they’ve entered the pied–à–terre of a world traveler.” Beyond the warm mahogany and custom metallic furnishings, the real star of this property might be its amenities, created in partnership with upscale brands like Sferra, Sleep Studio and Dean & DeLuca. 201 WEST 55TH STREET; WESTHOUSEHOTELNEWYORK.COM

A SAKE STORY

The Flatiron’s newest sushi hot spot, Sen NYC—a satellite of the Sag Harbor original—has unveiled an on-site sake program that’s aiming not only to please the taste buds but to educate as well. For those who believe that sake—which by law is preservative-free—is simply rice wine, there’s a lot to learn. “It’s actually made similarly to beer,” co-owner Tora Matsuoka explains. “It’s one of the most complex beverages in the world.” That’s just the beginning of what guests will discover on Sen’s exhaustive sake list. The smorgasbord of styles, including hot, cold and Nigori (cloudy) sake, pairs perfectly with the kitchen’s simple-yet-modern sushi and its inventive vegetarian and gluten-free options. “Don’t tell wine geeks, but sake has more breadth and depth then wine could ever have,” Matsuoka swears. 12 WEST 21ST STREET; SENNYC.COM

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GO EAST, YOUNG MAN

THE CHARLES MAKES ITS MARK ON RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE UPTOWN THIS SPRING

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The Upper East Side’s impossibly opulent real estate landscape continues to expand with Town Residential’s latest high-rise, The Charles. The 32-floor glass tower on First Avenue is the only all-residential project with interiors designed by the late David Collins, whose legacy includes the Scarpetta restaurant inside Miami’s storied Fontainebleau resort and The London hotels in NYC and West Hollywood. “The Charles offers the privacy and space residents might find in a townhome, but with the amenities and convenience of a luxury apartment in the sky,” developer Ramin Kamfar says. Full-floor units start at 3,300 square feet and will boast floor-to-ceiling windows that complement glistening mostly white interiors punctuated with striking grays and blues. The elegant, dramatic and icy aesthetic perfectly represents the designer’s glamorous style. Starting at $5.8 million. 1355 FIRST AVENUE; CHARLESNYC.COM

Real Estate Roundup

Jeffrey Roseman, a founding partner of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Retail, has had a hand in the development plans of some of the biggest companies out there, from Barneys to Urban Outfitters and Equinox. Here he tells us more about which New York neighborhoods are hottest and why retail is still king.

ON THE NEXT GREAT NYC NEIGHBORHOODS:

Roseman likes the growth he sees in Williamsburg, the Bowery and NoMad. Hip hotels, interesting new restaurants and trendy shopping are complemented by strong office and residential projects, making all three incredibly dynamic. “All of these areas share a vibrancy that is very much in demand,” he says. ON NYC’S RETAIL POWER:

All those tourists on the street in Manhattan aren’t just gawkers: they’re potential customers. “Nowhere else offers the brand visibility, the tourists

and the energy,” Roseman says. “A great store here,” he adds, “will take a retail brand to the next level.” ON MADISON AVENUE’S CACHET:

Brands from all over vie for space on the tony Upper East Side thoroughfare, and Roseman isn’t the least bit surprised, saying that recent movement—both new tenants and address switcheroos—has made Madison Avenue that much hotter. “It is arguably the finest luxury street in the world,” he adds. “Every exclusive brand must have a store on Madison, period.” ON WHAT’S NEXT:

Stores will get even more over-thetop. “Retail is now entertainment,” Roseman says. “The experience we get when we walk into an Apple store or an Eataly is quite different from what shopping was just a few years ago.”

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1 HUGO BOSS The Time Warner Center

flagship has just expanded to over 15,000 square feet, so fans of the German brand’s clothing and accessories for men and women now have three floors of sharp suits and desk-to-dinner dresses to peruse. The store’s revamp was feted in September with the unveiling of a digital art installation (called Anthropocene) by New York–based artist Marco Brambilla, with the likes of Woody Allen and Marina Abramovic in attendance.

FOUR NEW STORES ON THE BLOCK PLUS WATCHES AND JEWELRY WORTH YOUR TIME

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2 BERGDORF GOODMAN MEN’S STORE As part of the men’s-store overhaul (its

first since opening in 1990), the retailer is completing construction on the first and second floors. One of the most hotly anticipated debuts? December’s new Berluti ready-to-wear and shoe shops (a store exclusive). 745 FIFTH AVENUE; BERGDORFGOODMAN.COM

NYC celebrity facialist Tracie Martyn’s new blend of organic olive leaf, white tea and lavender water acts as an all-natural, alcohol-free poretightening toner. TRACIEMARTYN.COM

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a good comeback story, and 1980s denim icon Jordache is just about to stage one with the debut of its new Times Square shop. Designed with customer experience in mind, the store features inventory placed directly at eye level, allowing shoppers easy access to what’s on offer: Jordache’s sexy, figurehighlighting jeans in a wide swath of colors, silhouettes and washes.

Jeans, $16, JORDACHE, jordache.com 4 ROBERT GRAHAM

The label opens its first NYC boutique to showcase its colorful wares. 380 BLEECKER STREET;

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Guys and watches can be a lot like girls and shoes: They have a relationship that borders on obsession. But if you’re the type with commitment issues, check out the new members-only watch club Eleven James, where, for a fee, you can get hooked up with a new luxury watch every few months. Carefully selected by Eleven James’ concierge team, these timepieces (from brands like Rolex, Hublot and Patek Philippe) average $10,000 to buy. Eleven James founder (and former NetJets exec) Randy Brandoff explains: “Our members can use the program to test-drive their next purchase, to supplement and reinvigorate their existing collection or simply as a substitute for building one.” It certainly seems like one to, well, watch. ELEVENJAMES.COM

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JORDACHE Everyone loves


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A veteran of Cartier, Chopard and Christofle, Thierry Chaunu was recently appointed CEO for North America by Mauboussin, bringing his nearly 30 years of experience to the French brand with one goal in mind: to reintroduce it to Americans. The charge for stateside sales started back in 2008, when the 186-year-old jewelry company opened its first U.S. shop, on Madison Avenue, but didn’t have the intended impact. “We were part of New York,” Chaunu explains. “But people forget.” To remind them, Mauboussin has sprinkled more accessible pieces (such as chic gold bracelets) into its catalog of art-deco sapphire and diamond rings, watches scattered with colored stones, and earrings emblazoned with mother-of-pearl and diamonds. But more importantly, Chaunu is focused on demystifying the culture of jewelry buying. “What’s important is to turn our attention to the young woman who will buy $10,000 earrings,” Chaunu says, “in the same [casual] way she might buy a handbag or a pair of shoes.”MAUBOUSSIN.US

Blown Away The comprehensive renovation of Macy’s Herald Square will include an in-store outlet for Blow, the original NYC blowout salon. Its offerings will include four express styles (each $20) as well as updos (braids, chignons and sleek ponytails) for $50. Department-store counters may offer makeup tips and fragrance facts, but Macy’s new hair concept on the first floor has upped the service ante. “There was no one in the store to give great hair advice,” Blow founder Stuart Sklar says of the traditional department-store beauty floor. “We saw a hole in ; . the market that we knew we could fill.” 151 WEST 34TH STREET MACYS COM

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“There’s something magical about JAR,” Elle Macpherson tells DuJour. “Designed with a sense of humor and style, his pieces are unique and unusual, understated and yet extraordinary.” She isn’t the only one who feels that way: No less a venue than the Met is paying homage to the jeweler, Bronxborn, Paris-based Joel A. Rosenthal, who works under the label JAR, with a retrospective featuring some of his most renowned creations. Showcasing more than 300 pieces culled from JAR’s 35-year history (from clever objets d’art to floral jewelry in fine gems and diamonds), this exhibition is the first of its kind in the U.S. “Each creation is truly a work of art. Although they are enhanced with gems, this almost becomes secondary to the magical artistry of each piece,” says interior designer and JAR collector Ann Getty. “He is one of the most accomplished artists of the 20th and 21st centuries,” agrees Jo Carole Lauder, philanthropist and collector. “He’s in a class of his own.” METMUSEUM.ORG

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A WHOLE NEW WORLD


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MARTHA STEWART “I could definitely live in this house. It’s simple but not too simple.”

SARA ARNELL

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JULIAN NICCOLINI “I think it’s totally spectacular. It’s almost like an extension of the Four Seasons Restaurant, so whenever I come here I feel like I’m at home again.”

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Party in a Glass House

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The setting was as glamorous as the guests on September 20 when power publicist Susan Magrino hosted an intimate cocktail party for friends at the Philip Johnson– designed Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut (an experience she’d purchased at a silent auction). Guests including Martha Stewart, Julian and Lisa Niccolini and Kathy Sachs roamed the 49-acre grounds, enjoying wines curated by Christie’s vino expert Per Holmberg and the property’s impressive art collection, with works by Donald Judd, Robert Rauschenberg and Bruce Nauman. Nestled into the landscape, the property, completed by Johnson in 1949, has been wonderfully preserved and maintained. Indeed, most of the furniture came from Johnson’s apartment, designed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Many of the well-heeled visitors had been to the property before and knew Johnson well. Stewart recalled visiting the house when Johnson hired her to cater a lunch. “Everything had to be perfectly displayed. He was very, very particular,” she said. Niccolini, managing partner of the Four Seasons Restaurant, remembered: “After his heart attack, instead of adopting a healthy new diet, Johnson sat at his usual table—number 32—and drank a martini and ate foie gras every day.” While meticulously kept up, the landscape still feels somewhat wild. So much so, in fact, that domestic doyenne Stewart spied turkeys congregating on the lawn and proceeded to coo at them. She also shared that although her family is now vegetarian, she has previously eaten her own turkeys. Anyone looking to spend time at the Glass House is in luck. Neiman Marcus, as part of its Fantasy Gifts offerings, is selling the opportunity to spend a night for $30,000 (including a catered dinner for 10). Conversations with the wildlife, one assumes, will be included.

THE BORGATA Haven’t made New Year’s Eve plans yet? You’re in luck because the Borgata in Atlantic City is turning its Event Center into MIXX nightclub for the occasion, with performances by DJ Tiesto and David Guetta throughout the weekend. Also on the bill for the festivities are Sam Ronson, husband-and-wife . team DJ MOS and KISS, Rev Run and DJ Ruckus. THEBORGATA COM

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FOODIE’S DELIGHT

RED O Award-winning Chicago chef Rick Bayless will debut a Fashion Island outpost of his popular L.A. restaurant, which infuses traditional Mexican cuisine with a California twist. Mixing modern and old-world textures in the decor, interior designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard was inspired by the historic villas of San Miguel de Allende.

ORANGE COUNTY

Fine dining and fresh ingredients hit the O.C. Good day, sunshine. Orange County averages roughly 280 sunny days a year.

143 NEWPORT CENTER DRIVE, NEWPORT BEACH; REDORESTAURANT.COM OCEAN PARK SERIES (1962) BY JOHN ALTOON

FIG & OLIVE The French Riviera comes to Newport Beach with the opening of Fig & Olive, also at Fashion Island. “It reminds me of where I grew up in the south of France, surrounded by olive trees and refined cuisine,” founder Laurent Halasz says of the property, which features 43 olive trees and is perfect for alfresco dining.

California Dreaming

401 NEWPORT CENTER DRIVE, NEWPORT BEACH; FIGANDOLIVE.COM

ARC FOOD & LIBATIONS This cozy South Coast Plaza eatery offers filling dishes made with locally sourced components (think an onion, bacon and parsley tart or a hearty chicken casserole) as well as an innovative cocktail menu. (We love the Grappa Sour, with grappa, citrus and egg white.) The main point of differentiation at ARC? “The restaurant does not have a conventional oven,” owner Marin Howarth says, “so anything and everything is cooked over wood or in the brick hearth.”

850 SAN CLEMENTE DRIVE NEWPORT BEACH OCMA NET

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3321 HYLAND AVENUE, COSTA MESA ARCRESTAURANT.COM

LARK CREEK NEWPORT BEACH Chef John Ledbetter lets the farm-fresh ingredients be the focus at his new oceanfront boîte. White shrimp ceviche and chicken tamales are among the many shareable dishes that have made this indoor/ outdoor restaurant a welcome addition. “We are tailoring our seasonal, sustainable philosophy specifically for O.C. customers,” cofounder Michael Dellar says. 957 NEWPORT CENTER DRIVE, NEWPORT BEACH; LARKCREEKNB.COM

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Between the Montage Laguna Beach and the St. Regis Monarch Beach, there’s no shortage of ways to plump and polish skin. Both spas are offering new anti-aging treatments without the harshness of a chemical peel or needles. The updated spa menu at the Montage boasts the Natural Facelift, a treatment that focuses on healing skin, stimulating collagen and increasing elasticity. “This treatment is ideal for someone who has a special event, as it delivers an instant result,” spa director Michael Conte says. At the St. Regis Monarch Beach, Spa Gaucin has incorporated Intraceuticals products into its Ageless Oxygen Facial, a favorite red-carpet pick-me-up. Spa director Darcie DeBartelo explains, “The facials are enhanced with essential oxygen to brighten and firm, leaving the skin moisturized and reducing fine lines and wrinkles.” Dermatologists, beware: There’s some new competition in town.

MONTAGE LAGUNA BEACH 30801 SOUTH COAST HIGHWAY, LAGUNA BEACH MONTAGELAGUNABEACH.COM

THE ST. REGIS MONARCH BEACH 1 MONARCH BEACH RESORT NORTH, DANA POINT STREGISMB.COM

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While Southern California is commonly associated with movie stars and surfers, serious artists have found a home here as well. The Orange County Museum of Art’s new exhibition “California Landscape Into Abstraction” proves that point. Curated by Dan Cameron and on display through March 9, it includes paintings from the likes of John Altoon and Elmer Bischoff, showcasing the way the artists explore traditional SoCal landscapes and transform , ; . them into dreamlike abstractions.


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Webb Design

When the Norton Museum of Art’s “David Webb: Society’s Jeweler” opens on January 16, the exhibition will showcase 80 pieces—from fierce rings and necklaces adorned in precious stones to signature animal-inspired brooches—by the man Jacqueline Onassis called “a modern-day Cellini.” The show follows a just-published coffee table book on Webb’s legacy, David Webb: The Quintessential American Jeweler (Assouline), and runs through April 2014. (There is a preview and a special opening-night gala dinner on January 15.)

NIGHT SOUNDS (2013)

THECOLONYPALM BEACH.COM

ELIZABETH THOMPSON

ISLAND IDYLL

When she’s not working out of her studio in New York City, figurative painter Elizabeth Thompson finds inspiration in the front yard of her home in Manalapan. Here, the artist, who’s showcased her work locally at Royal Poinciana Plaza, sets the scene and discusses her charmed Florida life.

/ READ MORE ABOUT DAVID WEBB: THE QUINTESSENTIAL AMERICAN JEWELER ON DUJOUR.COM

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Consummate entertainer Regis Philbin performs at the Colony Palm Beach hotel February 18–22.

HOW MUCH TIME DO YOU SPEND HERE?

”Although the last seven years have been quite peripatetic, I am principally based in Manalapan— actually, Ocean Ridge. I have owned my house since 1976.” YOU’RE KNOWN FOR PAINTING THE EVERGLADES. WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO FLORIDA?

“I became fascinated with the Everglades as a subject. I built myself a studio in our home, and I usually take a break at five o’clock to walk on the beach. My late husband found our house, which has quite a history. Michael Jackson, Margaux Hemingway and various Kennedys all rented it multiple times.”

SURF SCHOOL GOES PREP

HOW DO YOU ENTERTAIN IN YOUR HOME?

Amanda Boalt is a child of 1980s Palm Beach—a lover of color and playful prints. Accordingly, when she launched Strong Boalt, her swimwear line for men, the former Ralph Lauren buyer brought to a sometimesmonotonous market what she knew best. “They’re fun, colorful suits with exciting prints,” she says of her fast-drying, durable and non-fading styles, which, this season, come in shades of purple and brown. The look is classic American prep with the elegant details and fit of Italian sportswear—trunks that, say, Daniel Craig might wear to the country club. In her own words, Boalt’s ideal customer is “a confident man who has great style without any self-consciousness. He can pull off the outrageous without looking contrived.” Board shorts, $130, swim trunks, $145, STRONG BOALT, strongboalt.com

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”Mariachi bands on the deck overlooking the ocean, with margaritas and guacamole—which I could make in my sleep. We cook whatever is fresh at the fish store. My stepson catches his own. Everything contributes to a sense of disconnecting from the frenetic pace of modern life.” ELIZABETHTHOMPSONART.COM

PHILBIN: HOLLY EXLEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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A PAIR OF LOCAL BRANDS PROVE THAT BUSINESS CAN BE BETTER IN TWOS

R. NICHOLS CANDLES Nick Hanzlik, an illustrator and the owner of stationery and gift company R. Nichols, and Gary McNatton, an awardwinning fragrance designer for Gap and Restoration Hardware.

WHO THEY ARE

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WHAT THEY MAKE

Candles that have won over fans including Oprah Winfrey. When it’s lit, the snowflakes on the orange-and-clove soy-and-paraffin Glisten ($45) candle glow from within, and the brand is introducing a three-piece holiday votive candle set—Sparkle, Glisten and Glow ($68)— just in time for the gift-giving season.

WHY IT WORKS

“We truly respect each other,” McNatton says. “It has been a complementary relationship from the get-go.” Hanzlik explains: “We bonded immediately. We share a similar design appreciation and, equally important, sense of humor.” R-NICHOLS.COM

BESPOKE HOME Best friends and arbiters of Silicon Valley style Molly Gibbons and Abby Durban.

Personalized monogramming for a myriad of items, as well as unique custom goods for the home—including their own private-label line of tabletop linens and guest towels— both sold online.

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262 SUTTER STREET BENEFITCOSMETICS.COM

ALEXANDER McQUEEN The brand’s sixth U.S. boutique opens, with designer Sarah Burton bringing McQueen’s legacy—including an exciting safari-chic resort collection—to the Union Square neighborhood.

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The pair keeps things simple with a tailored, fresh look inspired by their frequent travels; recent destinations have included Hawaii and Croatia. BESPOKEHOMESHOP.COM

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55 MAIDEN LANE ALEXANDERMCQUEEN.COM

SAINT LAURENT On the heels of his brand’s name change, Hedi Slimane reintroduces his collection to San Francisco with this art-deco-inspired boutique, which offers men’s ready-to-wear and accessories. 108 GEARY STREET; YSL.COM

Restaurant News

THE CAVALIER Partners Anna Weinberg and James Nicholas and chef Jennifer Puccio recently introduced their British brasserie on the ground floor of the new Hotel

Zetta. The menu includes fish and chips, pork and beef bangers, ale-brined Berkshire pork loin and oyster pie. The SoMa boîte, designed by Ken Fulk, is divided into four unique and intimate spaces, including the 27-seat Blue Bar. 360 JESSIE STREET; THECAVALIERSF.COM BOULI BAR The team behind Boulette’s Larder, chef Amaryll Schwertner and Lori Regis, have opened the more casual Bouli Bar adjacent to their original spot, serving inspired pizzas like the Lost in Translation, a tuna, togarashi, cauliflower and lemon creation, as well as seasonal salads. 1 FERRY BUILDING

BROOKS BROTHERS Four floors await men, women and children at the retailer’s new 26,000-square-foot flagship store. Keep your shopping energy up with a trip to the Nespresso coffee bar. 240 POST STREET BROOKSBROTHERS.COM

MARKETPLACE; BOULETTESLARDER.COM

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Luxury brands are joining Chanel, Hermès and Marc Jacobs in this fastevolving neighborhood

BENEFIT COSMETICS The local cosmetics company’s new shop is filled with the latest products and services, including the popular brow bar for shaping and waxing.

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DESIGN DUOS

UNION SQUARE IS BLOWING UP!

VALENTINO The 7,000-square-foot space, outfitted by architect David Chipperfield with Venetian terrazzo flooring and custom leather furniture, is the first boutique to carry Valentino’s men’s collection in the U.S.

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LA URBANA This creative cantina-style Mexican spot, from Edurado Rallo, Alessandra Bonisoli and restaurateur

Juan Garduño, offers delights including the Huarache de Pato (duck leg, Mayocaba bean spread with queso fresco) and a strong cocktail list featuring a number of mezcal creations. 661 DIVISADERO STREET; LAURBANASF.COM HI LO BBQ The Mission District barbecue joint from Scott Youkilis (Maverick, Hog & Rocks) and executive chef Robin Song credits a 7,000-pound stainless-steel Mesquite Texas Oyler Pit named Precious with some of its success. Order the grilled Hi Lo sausage or Thai BBQ chicken, and don’t miss the addictive homemade pull-apart rolls and honey butter. 3416 19TH STREET; HILOBBQSF.COM AKIKO’S Ray Lee has updated his family’s 18-year-old Union Square restaurant. These days, Lee, with chef Ricky Yap, cranks out some of the most amazing sushi in the city. The pair has created a chic eatery with an equally impressive menu including not-to-be-missed seared salmon belly. 431 BUSH STREET; AKIKOSRESTAURANT.COM INOVINO This brainchild of owner Claudio Villani opened in late September and offers a thoughtful sampling of Italian Alpine-region wines. Villani, the former wine director at Perbacco, seems to know what he’s doing—and his 30-seat wine bar has been packed nearly every night (except Monday, when it’s closed). 108 CARL STREET


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The new cabaret Feinstein’s at the Nikko hotel is the hot place to catch live entertainment. Recent performers have included Rita Wilson, and Betty Buckley is soon to take the stage. hotelnikkosf.com

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A day in the life of Belcampo group’s Anya Fernald, who’s carving out a role at the forefront of modern meat

Anya Fernald begins most days by Hula-Hooping. It’s how the Oakland-based CEO amuses her 18-month-old daughter before making her way to her company’s nearby headquarters. And hoop or not, the rest of her day requires continuous motion. In addition to Belcampo’s first brick-and-mortar shop, in Larkspur at the Marin Country Mart, she’s working to open butcher shops and restaurants in Pacific Heights, Palo Alto and downtown Los Angeles in 2014. “Our business is doubling in size,” she explains, “and a big focus for me is keeping our company culture strong as we go through that boom.” Also in the works: family food-education programs. “In November in Marin County, we’ll be launching a series for kids and their parents,” she says. “Our first class is trussing and roasting a turkey!” Fernald, an early adopter of the Slow Food movement, ran Slow Food Nation before founding Belcampo. Another big project on the horizon: a rum distillery in Belize. “Our distillery in Belize is like a small city,” she explains. “We have our own power plant, huge water-treatment plants and places for people to live.” When it’s time for lunch, Fernald might take the opportunity to visit an empire outpost. “I am at our store in Marin frequently; I love to stop in there for lunch,” she says. “My go-to order is the Star Route Farms salad with seared steak.” Fernald does her best to return home by six o’clock each evening to have dinner with her daughter and husband. What does the honcho of a globe-spanning culinary empire make? Belcampo’s lamb merguez sausage is always a favorite, even for a toddler’s tiny palate. “It’s not too spicy,” Fernald says, “but it does make her mouth pucker a little.” Even as Belcampo expands, the Slow Food principles of balance and sustainability keep Fernald grounded. Being busy doesn’t have to mean rushing things: “Measure twice, cut once.” belcampomeatco.com

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TExt by DAvid nash; belcampo clockwise from top: angela Decenzo; Talia Dillman; angela Decenzo; Brown Cannon III; Clay McLachlan; saxophone: Holly Exley

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Chicago’s art and fashion worlds collided at the opening of Tom Ford’s latest boutique, located on Oak Street. The label celebrated its fourth U.S. store by hosting a soiree, with proceeds from that evening’s sales going to the Art Institute of Chicago. Meredith BluhmWolf, Stephanie Harris and Betsy Rosenfield co-hosted the event, which drew such notables as Amy Tara Koch, Anne Hokin and Tom Ford’s esteemed chairman, Domenico De Sole, and his wife, Eleanor, for cocktails (including delicious elderflower spritzers) and canapés. The party was a sea of leather, fur and python, an extension of the shop’s glamorous interior. “I love Tom’s vision of sexy and powerful women, and, for men, nobody cuts a suit like him,” Koch gushed. De Sole, who’s also an avid art collector, is clearly thrilled with the space: “It’s a premiere location, and the acceptance by the city has been amazing.”

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On the morning of September 10, Las Vegas philanthropist Audra Baldwin opened her Southern Highlands estate for a private Lanvin fashion show benefiting the Nevada Ballet Theatre. The invite-only affair gathered 75 guests, who enjoyed a three-course meal, a Lanvin pop-up shop and a runway show of the French fashion house’s latest collection. “We’re creating a fun event to get more people exposed to ballet—the show will be amazing, and none of the guests know what’s in store,” Baldwin explained before the event began. Indeed, the intimate fashion show was impressive. Fifteen models transformed Baldwin’s double-sided princess staircase into a runway. “I flew from L.A. to be here because Audra is one of my favorite people in the world,” said Christos Garkinos, co-owner of the perennially popular vintage boutique Decades. “She’s really passionate about the ballet, and she thinks big.” The pop-up shop featured Lanvin’s leather-andfur outerwear, word jewelry (see Audra’s “Cool” necklace) and animal-print accessories—which were scooped up by voracious shoppers.

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CECILE ANDRAU, KRISTOPHER HEGLAND AND MEG HEINZER

MARY GIULIANO AND FARID MATRAKI

STELLA ROY, NANCY HOUSSELS AND BETH BARBRE

NANCY GROUNDS, JESSICA NORDLING, JENNIFER ATKINSON AND MAGGIE BOASBERG

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Some of New York’s most fashionable ladies descended on the Westfield Mall in Topanga for a panel discussion, auction and showcase of costumes from Emmy-nominated television series like Mad Men.. The evening also included a Project Runway–style –style showdown that challenged young designers to create red-carpet gowns in under an hour. Guests enjoyed tequila cocktails, s’mores, berry parfaits and macaroons by Wolfgang Puck—as well as fancy bites from Beverly Hills Caviar—while fashion editor Zanna Roberts Rassi moderated an all-female fashion panel with bloggers Rumi Neely and Athena Calderone and celebrity stylist Jeanann Williams. The group also gathered two weeks later with entrepreneur Randi Zuckerberg in Silicon Valley for the launch of Westfield Valley Fair mall’s luxury collection (think boutiques like Hugo Boss and Cartier) to discuss personal style and inspirations, shopping tips and the rise of street style.

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From left: RUMI NEELY,

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ATHENA CALDERONE AND JEANANN WILLIAMS


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Slam Dunk

DuJour had the honor of hosting a “Welcome to New York” cocktail party at the Palm Tribeca for NBA All-Star Paul Pierce, who was joined by his wife Julie (stunning in Graff diamonds and Jimmy Choo). Guests danced to the sounds of DJPrice while sipping on Stoli Elit specialty cocktails— like the Truth Gimlet—inspired by Pierce’s nickname, “The Truth.” New Brooklyn Nets teammates Alan Anderson and Deron Williams were in attendance, along with Jamie Foxx (straight off the set of the Annie remake) and D.L. Hughley. The party, co-hosted by Graff CEO Henri Barguirdjian, also celebrated Pierce’s October digital cover of DuJour and his new caricature on the wall of the Palm.

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WATCH OUT!

JUSTIN TUCK, MICHAEL STRAHAN, ARTIE RABIN, JASON KIDD AND SENATOR CORY BOOKER

The other star of the night was SISU’s A3 Guardian watch, worn by Paul Pierce. With fans like Michael Strahan (at leftwith the brand’s owner Artie Rabin), Jason Kidd and other watch aficionados, this timepiece is destined for fame.

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Binn Around New York DUJOUR’S JASON BINN SHARES SOME OF HIS FAVORITE SNAPS

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FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin may have conquered the moon—but is Mars next? Here, his handwriting brings him back to earth

His spacing is clear and well considered—he has good organizational skills.

Block printing indicates a person who is quite defiant and self-assured. He follows rules to the degree that those rules make sense to him. He’s a leader, not a follower.

Look at the firm pressure that he uses. It’s easier to write without creating such a strong imprint, but he enjoys that exertion. He is strong-willed, secure and emphatic.

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We know he can do rounded strokes—look at the roundness of the capital A—but he prefers angles. Angular writers are critical thinkers that love to debate.

People who write large tend to be larger-than-life characters who find themselves at the center of attention and otherwise enjoy being in a position of prominence.

People embed symbols in their handwriting—notice the prominent I in his signature. He has an affinity for the concept of “I” as in “me, myself and I.” He is an independent.

“W

hat did it feel like to step on the moon?” It’s a question astronaut Buzz Aldrin gets asked quite often, but his answer isn’t exactly the impassioned, poetic response one might expect. “Through training, our minds are conditioned not to focus on emotions,” he says. “Fighter pilots like myself—or those who have been in combat—we don’t lead with emotions. We do what is required to the best of our knowledge beforehand and execute. That’s why I think most astronauts aren’t

given to f lowery responses.” Aldrin’s handwriting tells a similarly unsentimental story. According to Toronto-based graphologist A n net te Poizner, the ast ronaut’s ang ular w r iting st yle suggests a tech n ically m i nded person. “He strips down letters rather than embellishing them and turning them into round, puffy characters. Angular types strip down ideas and are highly analytical,” she explains. The quote above —f rom President John F. Kennedy’s iconic 1962

Look at the underscore beneath his signature. There’s a confidence communicated, an energy that indicates anything he says or does he is definite about.

“Moon” speech—is one Aldrin considers his favorite. “I like it because of the applicability of his observation. W hen things get tough and disappointing, people are tempted to do something easy and ignore the diff iculties. I’ve found that’s not a ver y good mentalit y,” says Aldrin. Not to mention, he adds, “that speech helped set our entire space program in motion.” These days, Aldrin’s focus exte nd s fa r beyond t he moon. H is latest book, Mission to Mars, lays

the groundwork for a plan to reach the Red Planet by 2035. At the age of 83, Aldrin continues to be a leadi ng author it y on space exploration and rocket science. But there is one arena where his expertise falls short. “I’m not exactly known for handwriting proficiency,” says the Mars enthusiast. “I took a ‘military, topography and graphics’ course at MIT, and ever since, I began mixing lowercase and uppercase. I guess that’s a no-no?”

—LINDSAY SILBERMAN


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Winter 2013