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FALL 2016 FALL 2016

CHICAGO / DALLAS-FORT WORTH / HOUSTON / LAS VEGAS / LOS ANGELES / MIAMI / NEW YORK / ORANGE COUNTY / SAN FRANCISCO

LADIES WHO MUNCH: INSIDE L.A. SOCIETY’S BUDDING POT SCENE INSIDE LARRY ELLISON’S $300M PRIVATE PARADISE BLACK-ANDWHITE BLING NEW FRONTIERS: LUXURY TRAVEL IN OMAN, BHUTAN & RWANDA

CAN PRIVATE JETS SAVE ENDANGERED ANIMALS? WOOD SHOP: THE BEST JEWELRY TREND OF THE SEASON

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575 MADISON AVENUE, NY, NY 10022. 212.891.7000 © 2016 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. IF YOUR PROPERTY IS CURRENTLY LISTED WITH ANOTHER REAL EST ESTATE BROKER, PLEASE DISREGARD THIS OFFER. IT IS NOT OUR INTENTION TO SOLICIT THE OFFERINGS OF OTHER REAL ESTATE BROKERS. WE COOPERATE WITH THEM FULLY. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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TOWN Residential LLC ("TOWN") is a licensed real estate broker and a partnership of Buttonwood Residential Brokerage LLC and Thor Equities, LLC. All property listing information, including, but not limited to, square footage, room count, and number of bedrooms are from sources deemed reliable, but are subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal and should be verified by your own attorney, architect, engineer or zoning expert. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Real estate agents associated with TOWN are independent contractors and are not employees of TOWN. TOWN owns the following subsidiary real estate brokerages: TOWN Astor Place LLC; TOWN Fifth Avenue LLC; TOWN Flatiron LLC; TOWN Gramercy Park LLC ("TOWN Gramercy”); TOWN Greenwich Street LLC ("TOWN Financial District”); TOWN Soho LLC; and TOWN 79th Street LLC (“TOWN Upper East Side”).


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CONTENTS 122

STYLE 50

BRANCHING OUT

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STYLE NEWS

WIEN I FALL IN LOVE

With its warm, elegant tones and supple hand, wood—the season’s most exciting must-have material—is finally putting down roots H&M Studio debut; rugged new diving watches; Derek Lam’s 10 Crosby denim collection; Louis Vuitton scents; Rosie Assoulin baubles; patent-leather kicks 60 BRILLIANT DISGUISE

For more than 40 years, Bruce Springsteen has been a rock god—but he’s also been a style icon

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PALES IN COMPARISON

66

GREAT EGGSPECTATIONS

70

LETTUCE BE BASIC

DIRT CANDY

From linen lights to wicker chaises, the season’s best design shares the subtle palette of nature A fertility-focused twist on the Tupperware-party model helps many women turn panic into peace Iceberg lettuce returns as the season’s coolest green

BODY 72 STARRY-EYED

The best of fall fashion’s glittery makeup trend—in a rainbow of wearable, shimmering shades 74

MOVING PICTURES

In the forthcoming book Misty Copeland, a celebrity photographer sheds light on a celebrated ballerina— but she’s not striking any poses 76

PRO PICKS

Beauty industry greats reveal their secret weapons 78

MACHINE AGE

An industry pro’s high-tech quest to sculpt, tone and chisel—one body at a time

PLAY 80

RANCH HANDSOME

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DIRT CANDY

86

TROPICAL THROWBACK

What happens when an American designer turns his eye to a boutique property in the Colorado wilderness? Inside the deliciously hush-hush business of truffle tourism At these five iconic enclaves, members and guests bask in low-key elegance

On the cover: Gown, $7,490, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, oscardelarenta.com. Photographed by Mary McCartney; styled by Paul Frederick.

VIENNA: KYOKO HAMADA; TRUFFLES: ERIC HELGAS

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LIFE


CONTENTS WORK

FEATURES

90 THE MET’S NEW CLOTHES

112 THE RENAISSANCE OF RENÉE

Can the Costume Institute and the world-class museum be fashionable and friendly bedfellows? 94

FLYING FIRST CLAWS

For a new generation of wild and domestic animals facing dire odds, private airplanes are their arks to survival

CULTURE 100 PATHS OF COREY

Actor Corey Hawkins, largely blind to his own stardom, proves the value of talent and timing 108 CULTURE PACKAGE

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Amor Towles’ second novel; the Russian invasion of New York’s stages; The Girl on the Train

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In a revealing interview, Renée Zellweger speaks to the cruel scrutiny of fame and makes clear why she’ll always fit the role of Bridget Jones. By Frances Dodds; photographed by Mary McCartney 122 WIEN I FALL IN LOVE

No longer a sleepy city just for Mozart fans and museumgoers, Vienna has become a modern mecca–complete with boutique hotels, trendy coffee shops and a thriving contemporary-art community. By Lindsay Silberman; photographed by Kyoko Hamada 132 SWEET & VICIOUS

Brazilian supermodel and Victoria’s Secret upstart Lais Ribeiro smolders in fall’s moody, romantic best. By Rachel Wallace; photographed by David Roemer 144 POT LUCK

The wine-soaked L.A. dinner party is going up in smoke. By Alyssa Giacobbe; photographed by Gieves Anderson

CITIES

PATHS OF COREY

150 CHICAGO

Winifred Grace custom jewelry; The Kitchen at Waldorf Astoria’s Italianinspired menu; two new eateries hit one West Loop locale; Lumination salon 151 DALLAS/FT. WORTH

Chic new retail options downtown; Moby-Dick makes waves; Bruce Weber takes over Dallas Contemporary Top: Coat, $3,450; Shirt, $980, BOTTEGA VENETA, 800-845-6790. T-shirt, $95, T BY ALEXANDER WANG, alexanderwang.com. Trousers, $398, JOHN VARVATOS, Saks Fifth Avenue, 877-5517257. Superstar sneakers, $670,

153 HOUSTON

The anticipated arrival of Jones New York; a premium hard cider worth seeking out; uber-chic bedding 154 LAS VEGAS

GOLDEN GOOSE DELUXE BRAND, goldengoosedeluxe-

brand.com. Left, from top: Link necklace in rosewood and sterling silver, $1,595, JOHN HARDY, johnhardy.com. Bangle in rosewood and diamonds, price upon request, FRED LEIGHTON, 212-288-1872. Aura neckring in ebony and sterling silver, $3,000, GEORG JENSEN, georgjensen.com.

Colin Cowie and RH put down permanent Vegas roots; Zuma opens at The Cosmopolitan

50

BRANCHING OUT

157 LOS ANGELES

Bring on the Shinola; JetSmarter’s redefining private aviation; Pirelli’s first “prestige” center; Arts District rising; The Garland’s top-down overhaul; NYC’s Catch comes ashore

COREY: JEREMY LIEBMAN; WOOD: GIEVES ANDERSON

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B a r n e y s N e w Yo r k G h u r k a | 7 8 1 F i f t h Av e n u e , N YC 2 1 2 . 8 2 6 . 8 3 0 0 | 6 5 P r i n c e S t r e e t , N YC 2 1 2 . 3 3 4 . 4 0 0 0 ghurka.com/collection


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CONTENTS 162 MIAMI

Two boat-friendly newcomers; Nautilus and Fontainebleau Miami Beach get upgrades; Employees Only welcomes all in South Beach; Baby Jane and Ariete

132

SWEET & VICIOUS

165 NEW YORK CITY

The continued revitalization of Lower Manhattan; the city’s best festivals; Jay McInerney’s eating list; Hudson Yards’ first opening; Jordache Legacy; a Q&A with Equinox CEO Harvey Spevak 170 HAMPTONS

Ina “Barefoot Contessa” Garten dishes on her latest cookbook; a South Fork autumnal must-do list 172 TRI-STATE

A perfect day in Hudson, N.Y.; IvyWise CEO Dr. Kat Cohen has the recipe for college-admissions success; art at Yale 174 ORANGE COUNTY

A rundown of the area’s premier hotels; The Celect relocates to Fashion Island Table + Teaspoon’s on-demand chic parties; Larry Gagosian adds to his empire; Waxman’s gets fired up 176 PARTIES

Snapshots from DuJour celebrations honoring Tony Robbins, Michael Strahan, Misahara and more

BACKPAGE 184 FAMOUS LAST WORDS

What Carol Burnett’s handwriting reveals is no laughing matter

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PALES IN COMPARISON Pipe floor lamp, $3,031, FOSCARINI, hivemodern.com.

Top, $2,250; Trousers, $1,350, PROENZA SCHOULER, 212-420-7300.

LAIS: DAVID ROEMER; ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY

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175 SAN FRANCISCO


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FA L L 2 016

ED LETTER

of linen reclaims the runway. In travel, we make our way to the American heartland for some lungfuls of Colorado air on Smith Fork Ranch, where the goodness of nature meets remarkable design. In food, with all of our superfood savvy, we can be too quick to discount the culinary classics. Spinach and kale have their nutritional charms, but there’s nothing that quite beats the cool crunch of iceburg lettuce—and our investigation into its chef-approved comeback reveals we’re hardly the only ones who think so. And of course, when it comes to comebacks, we couldn’t be more thrilled to have Renée Zellweger on our cover, as she reenters the spotlight in a role that has defined pure happiness for so many of us over the years: Bridget Jones. Bridget is everything we’ve been talking about (well, all right, fine, she’s British—but the actress who brought her to life is decidedly American), the essence of un-snobbish, self-effacver the course of the last few months, as ing and timeless fun. And Zellweger, one of Hollywood’s election season has escalated, there’s been a most persistently humble and dexterous talents, sees the lot of talk about what it means to be American. importance of revisiting Bridget now more than ever. As she What do Americans want? What do they value says in our interview, “As much as Bridget fixates on the now? It’s a complicated question about a details, her failures and successes, I see her as a person who complicated nation of people, and while here looks outward at the world and not back toward herself.” at DuJour we’ve always strived to curate We could all probably use more reminders to stay open to exceptional stories from all corners of the the big picture—and for me, this has a particularly bitterworld, we’re still American in our gut sweet resonance. After being with DuJour since its incepsensibilities, planning and executing each issue from our tion, it’s time for me to start my next chapter out in the office in New York City. And this issue, I think we’ve world. I want to thank all of the readers, contributors and channeled the American spirit in a fundamental sort of staff who have worked to make this magazine so special; I way—not politically, you’re getting plenty of that elsecan’t wait to watch it evolve in its next chapter. You can bet where—but in a return to the uncomplicated things we love. I’ll be reading it out there in the wilds of evergreen We’re celebrating people and places and things that offer Americana, over my own blue cheese and bacon wedge. ■ comfort and real joy, because too often we forget that just because something is down to earth and unpretentious doesn’t mean that it isn’t luxurious. The greatest luxury, after all, is having the time to spend on people and things we love. We see this essential blend of good company and simple pleasures in Alyssa Giacobbe’s report from Los Angeles on the stoner ladies of society—who’ve discovered that marijuana is the best thing for entertaining since the crockpot: Everyone’s giggling and out the door by 10 P.M., with memories of those chardonnay hangovers dwindling quicker Nicole Vecchiarelli than smoke from a vape. While we were on the “nature’s NV@DuJour.com Instagram: nicolevecchiarelli treasures” train, we couldn’t help but notice how wood is showing off its beauty au naturel in the season’s most stunning jewelry collections. In fashion, the timeless austerity

O Sneak Peak Top left: A view of Colorado’s Tater Heap mountain, near Smith Fork Ranch. Top right: Behind the scenes at the cover shoot with Renée Zellweger.

VECCHIARELLI: THOMAS WHITESIDE; ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY

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Thoughts DuJour


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CEO LETTER

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F

all always feels like a fresh start, and this year is no exception. As we enter our fifth year in business, we’ll be embarking on some exciting new adventures, but we can’t help looking backwards for a moment to reflect on all of the DuJour team’s amazing accomplishments. In June, we partnered with Starz to help celebrate the season three premiere of the hit show Power, dancing the night away at The Top of the Standard. And the next month, we had the pleasure of hosting a two-day extravaganza in honor of my good friend Tony Robbins and filmmaker Joe Berlinger, whose inspiring Netflix documentary Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru chronicles the famous “Date With Destiny” seminar. It all started on a Thursday night in NYC, when guests enjoyed a cocktail reception, followed by a screening of the film and an afterparty at Mike Satsky and Brian Gefter’s Provocateur nightclub at The Gansevoort Hotel. On Sunday, it was the Hamptons crowd’s turn to mingle with Tony at an intimate brunch before heading to the beautiful Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill—the perfect backdrop for a second screening of the film, followed by a cocktail reception. Across the board, guests sipped Peroni beer, FIOL prosecco and Smoke Tree wines while basking in Tony’s infectious energy, especially when he treated both the NYC and the Hamptons crowds to impromptu question-and-answer sessions. In other great news, I have been fortunate to have the pleasure of forging a number of new relationships with some of the best brands in luxury. I want to personally thank Kais Zaiane from Gaggenau, Ghurka, Ernst Benz and The Shephard. We’re also welcoming a monumental addition to the DuJour family, our new Editor-in-Chief Fiona Murray. As she takes her place at the top of the masthead, we will say a tearful goodbye to Nicole Vecchiarelli, who has served as an invaluable visionary. It wouldn’t have been possible without her. I, along with our team, wish her the best of luck as we both turn the page to a new chapter. ■

Jason Binn

Twitter/ Instagram: @jasonbinn

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1.  COO of Starz Jeffrey Hirsch, David Wassong 2.  President of Outlets at HBC Jonathan Greller, Partner at Stikeman Elliott LLP Ian Putnam, SVP and General Counsel at HBC David Pickwoad 3. Henry Baker, guest 4.  Jonathan Binstock, Moreton Binn, Marisol Binn, Jason Binn 5.  Kyle MacLachlan, CEO at Full Picture Desiree Gruber 6.  Peter Arnell, Jason Binn 7.  Director of PR and Events at Moncler USA Julia Catherine Erdman 8.  CEO at Invicta Eyal Lalo 9.  Arianna Huffington, Isabela Huffington 10.  Michael Gruber and Debbie Gruber 11.  President at Saks Fifth Ave Mark Metrick, CEO at Hudson’s Bay Company Gerald Storch, Jason Binn 12.  Director of Photography at Getty Images Parky Lee, Jason Binn 13.  Andrea Wynn, Steve Wynn 14.  Founder and CEO at Authentic Brands Group Jamie Salter 15. President at HBC Liz Rodbell, Jason Binn, Governor and Executive Chairman at HBC Richard Baker, Lisa Baker


Taste

Feel

See

Smell

Chef Daniel Humm

Hear

Limited time. September 2016. NYC. gaggenaurestaurant1683.com 16GAGG012-14-133667-1


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CEO LETTER HANDPICKED

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16. Executive Chairman of HBC Richard Baker, Jason Binn 17.  Director of PR and Media Relations at Chopard Desirée Gallas 18.  Emily Appelson Blavatnik, Leonard Blavatnik 19.  Joseph “Rev. Run” Simmons, Nadya Nepomnyashaya, Jason Binn, guest 20.  Selita Ebanks, President and CEO at Moët Hennessy North America Jim Clerkin, Director of Brand Communications Swarovski Iesha Reed 21.  CEO at 5W PR Ronn Torossian, Jason Binn, Courtney Love, CEO and Founder Talent Resources Michael Heller 22.  Head of Fashion Partnerships at Instagram Eva Chen, Jason Binn 23.  Dick Spring, Wilbur Ross, Jason Binn 24.  CEO and Founder at Talent Resources Michael Heller, Cuba Gooding Jr., CEO at 5W PR Ronn Torossian, Jason Binn 25.  Owner at Colin Cowie Lifestyle Colin Cowie, Jason Binn, Ranjana Khan, Designer Naeem Khan 26.  Chief Creative Officer at Camuto Group Louise Camuto, Jason Binn 27.  The Binn Family 28.  Jason Binn, Luka Sabbat, Manager at Cipriani Federico Contu 29. Founder and CEO at Master and Dynamic Jonathan Levine and Vicki Gross

Adam Keen Adam Laukhuf Alberto Petochi Alexandra Haxton Ally Coulter Amanda Stackman Ankush Sengal Anne du Boucheron Arnaud Cauchois Arnie Cohen Brad Zeifman Colleen Curtis Corey Lober Cori Galpern Dan Rothmann Daniele Bruni Danielle Naftali David Pecker Denise DeLuca Emily Tannenbaum Emre Erkul Eva Chen Eva Lorenzotti Fiona Sciame Francesca Pittaluga Frank Sciame Gabriela Fernandez Gany Lalo Gena Smith Gian Luca Passi Giles Woodyer Gillian Greaves Gina Marusch Grace Kim Graziano Deboni Harry Hurst James Fallon James Morrissey Jarrett Olivo Jason Morrison Jeff Zuchowski Jenna Lipkin John Hardy Jonas Tahlin Josh Gaynor Julia Erdman Kara Lewis Kathleen Bridoux Kevin Mohajer Lisa Dallos Luka Sabatt Madeline Gibbs Marc Metrick Marco Pievan Marissa Brooks Mark Birnbaum Mark Weber Mary Jo Klein Michael Stillman Nehme Abouzeid Neil Carty Peter Arnell Peter Herink Peter Webster Prosper Assouline Richard Baker Richard Johnson Robert Brotherton Ryan Schinman Shawn Sachs Sonny Smith Stanley Chera Steven Fisher Steven Schaefer Susan Duffy Terrence Thomas Theano Apostolou Tirath Kamdar Tom Kovacic Tom Roberts Valerio D’Ambrosio Vanessa Ide Veronica Kelly Virginia Carnesale Wenda Harris William Makris


CALIBER RM 63-02 WORLD TIMER


EDITOR IN CHIEF

CEO/PUBLISHER

Nicole Vecchiarelli

ART DIRECTOR

Jason Binn

EDITOR AT LARGE

Sandie Burke

Alyssa Giacobbe

CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Leslie Farrand

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Julie Arkin

FEATURES

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Phil Witt

FEATURES DIRECTORS

David Foxley Adam Rathe

LUXURY GOODS DIRECTOR

Adriana Martone

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Araceli Franco

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Frances Dodds

JUNIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Berggitte Maeser

RESEARCH EDITORS

COPY EDITOR

Ivy Pascual Regan Hofmann

Esther Bergdahl

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES

Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France), Susy Scott (Italy) EXECUTIVE ASSISTANTS

ART + PHOTO

FASHION/BEAUTY/HOME

PHOTO EDITOR

FASHION MARKET EDITOR

JUNIOR DESIGNER

ASSISTANT FASHION MARKET EDITOR

Lauren Kill

Paul Frederick

Bryan Vargas

Meaghan Hartland

Jennifer Lyons Brianna Montalto Jesika Rozenberg

INTEGRATED SALES PLANNING MANAGER

Stefanie LaGalia

INTEGRATED MARKETING MARKETING DIRECTOR

Jackie Cinguina

MARKETING MANAGER

Jennifer Lentol

REGIONAL EDITORS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas), Jessica Ritz (Los Angeles and Orange County), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami and Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco), Andy Wang (Las Vegas)

MARKETING DESIGNER

Victoria Barna Chelsea Hernandez EVENT COORDINATOR

Sara Strumwasser

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CITIES

DUJOUR.COM DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Eden Univer

DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

WEB PRODUCER

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Caitlin Heikkila

Rachel Wallace

Kasey Caminiti

PRODUCTION MOBILE/PRINT & OPERATIONS, DIRECTOR

Shawn Lowe

SENIOR PRE-MEDIA MANAGER

Michael Oh IT MANAGER

WEB ASSISTANT

Kevin Singh

Rachel Barber

PRINT CONSULTANT

CALEV Print Media

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Paul Biedrzycki (Automotive), Keith Pollock (Home), Rhonda Riche (Watches), Jerry Silberman (Sports)

PAPER SOURCING

Aaron Paper

FINANCE FINANCE MANAGER

Michael Rose

CONTROLLER

Dahlia Nussbaum

CONTRIBUTORS

Alex John Beck, Nancy Bilyeau, Patricia Bosworth, Cedric Buchet, Anne Christensen, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Lindsay Silberman, Bruce Weber, Lynn Yaeger

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

BOARD ADVISORS

Dan Galpern Matt Witheiler

INTERNS

Olivia Brandt, Amber Elliott, Atalie Gimmel, Cara Gordon, André Wheeler

GENERAL COUNSEL

John A. Golieb

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2016 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 844-385-6871 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com


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Luxury Card marks are property of Black Card LLC. BLACKCARD is a registered trademark used under license. Luxury Card products are issued by Barclays Bank Delaware. MasterCard and the MasterCard logo are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated.


GIEVES ANDERSON

“Branching Out” p. 50

Because of his fine-arts background, Anderson finds himself drawn to photographing objects in painterly ways. “The amount of control I have shooting objects allows me to be playful until I find something engaging,” he says. For this issue’s wood-jewelry shoot, the photographer and DuJour’s fashion market editor Paul Frederick worked in Anderson’s Brooklyn apartment. “It was just us trying various combinations on several surfaces until we found something that worked.” There was also a third person there: a security guard, sent to watch over the most expensive pieces. “She was retired from the NYPD,” Anderson recalls. “She had so many good stories.”  SOUP DUJOUR:

Pea

MARY Mc CARTNEY “The Renaissance of Renée” p. 112

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Taking pictures is in McCartney’s DNA: At 4 months old, she appeared on the back cover of her father Paul McCartney’s first solo album with him, while her mother, photographer Linda McCartney, was the first woman to shoot the cover of Rolling Stone. Since then, she’s become a major photographer herself, having had her work exhibited at London’s National Portrait Gallery. On set for this issue’s cover shoot, McCartney and Renée Zellweger just clicked. “My style is to make a connection with my subject,” she says. “Renée and I hit it off immediately.” McCartney also accomplished the challenge of receiving permission to shoot in Osterley Park. “I asked Renée to run through the path near the house, wearing her wonderful ballgown. She scampered down the grand staircase and gracefully ran off into the distance! She looked liberated!” SOUP DUJOUR:

Minestrone in winter, gazpacho in summer

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Contributors

Getting to know some of the talent behind the issue—lunch orders and all Written by Atalie Gimmel and André Wheeler

FRANCES DODDS

As a writer, Dodds finds herself interested in sculpting life’s messy interactions into capsules of meaning. To prepare for her interview with Renée Zellweger, she dug through archives to read as many profiles of the star as possible. “I really like the process of figuring out how to put someone at ease and make them laugh genuinely,” she says. For their interview, Zellweger and Dodds visited L.A.’s Getty Center and wandered through a Robert Mapplethorpe retrospective. “It was Renée’s idea because she’d never been.” The architecture and artwork were amazing, but Dodds says she was a bit distracted during it all—for obvious reasons. SOUP DUJOUR:

Italian wedding

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY

“The Renaissance of Renée” p. 112


RACHEL LEHMANN-HAUPT “Great Eggspectations” p. 66

“It’s kind of funny that a serious medical intervention like egg freezing is being marketed as a party,” says Lehmann-Haupt, author of In Her Own Sweet Time: Egg Freezing and the New Frontiers of Family and a recent first-time attendee of an egg-freezing party, “because the medical procedure is definitely not a party.” The writer and media consultant explains, “Essentially these parties are really a happy way of talking about something that’s important.” SOUP DUJOUR:

Chicken noodle

SOUP DUJOUR:

Pho (with extra sriracha)

ANNE CHRISTENSEN “Sweet & Vicious” p. 132

Christensen is a seasoned sartorial pro, having spent her decades-long styling career with fashion’s top models. Her work has been featured in the American, Italian and Chinese editions of Vogue, and she formerly served as the fashion director of The New York Times Style Magazine. In the case of her subject Lais Ribeiro, the two shared a common interest. “On our shoot day, Lais was planning on going to a Justin Bieber concert and working out what colored wig to wear,” Christensen says, “I was just a little jealous!” SOUP DUJOUR:

Gazpacho

LEHMANN-HAUPT: AMANDA MATHSON; KILL: BEN HOFFMANN; CHRISTENSEN: COURTESY

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LAUREN KILL

As DuJuour’s photo editor, Kill has her hands in a lot of pots, looking at the landscape of each issue and decoding its visual narrative. “At any given time, it feels like an entire photo shoot is about to fall apart,” she says. Kill pieces together all of the things that go into producing a great photography spread, pooling stylists, talent and photographers and landing on a date and time that work for everyone. “I like putting a team together that will be able to capture the tone of the story, but also take creative freedom and put an original spin on it.” This issue was particularly exciting, she says, as the magazine collaborated with a number of new photographers for the first time and fostered relationships.


DAVID HART. AMERICAN DESIGNER


SKY Y.

TANEISHA B.

TIARA T.


CAROLYN S.

CLASSIC BEAUTY YOU’LL NEVER FORGET. VALISA M.

NEW YORK 177 FR ANKLIN ST DETROIT • MIAMI • CHICAGO • LONDON WASHINGTON DC • LOS ANGELES • SAN FR ANCISCO SHINOL A .COM


STYLE

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Branching Out

With its warm, elegant tones and supple hand, wood—the season’s most exciting must-have material— is finally putting down roots Photographed by Gieves Anderson Styled by Paul Frederick


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Serpenti High Jewelry necklace in 18-karat pink gold with snakewood, price upon request, BULGARI, bulgari.com. Wood and leather serving board, from $100, PERNT, trnk-nyc.com. Hemingway box, $1,380, ARMANI/CASA, 212-334-1271. Opposite, clockwise from top left: No. 99 cuff in cocobolo wood with citrine, $37,500, VERDURA, verdura.com. Serpentelli earrings in 18-karat yellow gold with maple, $2,270, LUCIFER VIR HONESTUS, 786-577-0858. Ali necklace in 18-karat yellow gold and wood, $1,130, AURÉLIE BIDERMANN, 212-335-0604. Marquetry earrings in 18-karat yellow gold with wood and smoky quartz, $3,570, SILVIA FURMANOVICH, silviafurmanovich.com. Drum tables, from $3,496, MASSIMO CASTAGNA FOR DDC, ddcnyc.com.


STYLE

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Clockwise from top left: Out of Retirement interlocking bangle in 18-karat yellow gold with rosewood, $6,500, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Heritage bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold and American mahogany, $22,700, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels .com. Ring in 18-karat yellow gold and wood, price upon request, FRED LEIGHTON, 212-288-1872. Modern Nicholas square side table, $950, RH MODERN, rhmodern.com.


Clockwise from top right: Cross Stitch bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold with rosewood, price upon request, DAVID WEBB, davidwebb.com. Half-link earrings in 18-karat yellow gold and rosewood, $4,950, SEAMAN SCHEPPS, seamanschepps.com. Vintage Alhambra necklace in 18-karat rose gold and letter wood, $13,900, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com.

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STYLE H&M’s Studio collection is always full of surprises—and sold at a higher price point than the store’s usual fare— but the defining moment of the fall collection’s Paris Fashion Week debut had less to do with the well-tailored, Swedish heritage– influenced clothing than with the women shown wearing it. Models of all ages and sizes circled the runway, including body-positive heroine Ashley Graham. “I walked with icons like Pat Cleveland and Amber Valletta,” says Graham. “I was honored to be the model representing curvy women.” As for how she felt in the clothing? “I felt like a badass!”—EU

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Curve Appeal

The new coffee table book Neville Jacobs: I’m Marc’s Dog (Rizzoli) features stories (and supermodels) from the life and Instagram account of fashion’s hardest-working canine—or at least most social media–savvy. Neville Jacobs: I’m Marc’s Dog, $23, rizzoliusa.com.

Strap on one of fall’s rugged new diving watches, dressed up in ceramic finishes and all-weather metal, and find yourself swimming in compliments— underwater or above. From top: ChronoDiver PVD Limited Edition, $6,525, ERNST BENZ, ernstbenz.com. Dive Automatic, $9,000, GUCCI, gucci.com. Planet Ocean Coaxial Master Chronometer GMT, $11,700, OMEGA, omegawatches.com. Excursion, $300, INVICTA, invictastores.com.

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY

THE DAWN OF THE MUTT

THE DIVE MIND


THE NEW NEW YORK PLACE TO BE

WESTFIELD.COM/WORLDTRADECENTER


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STYLE On the Lam

The Derek Lam 10 Crosby denim collection fits the designer’s nowiconic aesthetic like a glove Written by Eden Univer

A look from the new 10 Crosby denim collection.

direction of his new 10 Crosby Denim collection to a vote. “We basically canvassed the office to determine everyone’s most favorite shapes and their favorite eras, and then gave them our own spin,” says Lam. He even named each style after a member of the team: Gia, a mid-rise cropped flare; Mila, a mid-rise slim girlfriend; Lou, a high-rise classic straight-leg. There’s also Noah, a mid-rise sexy flare, and Devi, a mid-rise authentic skinny. Representative of the 10 Crosby brand as a whole, the styles are meant to fit seamlessly into any woman’s wardrobe. “It’s that thing that you always reach for,” says Lam, “which is basically the premise of the work that I do.” And it’s work that he does well. Lam’s eponymous high-fashion line has received seemingly endless accolades. In addition to being a celebrity favorite and the recipient of no fewer than three CDFA awards, his work has been put on display at the Kennedy Center, New York’s Neue Galerie and London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. The 10 Crosby line, named for his company’s original HQ on SoHo’s Crosby Street, lets Lam design for a wider audience—an everywoman he sees all around him in the brand’s namesake city: New York. “Ten Crosby was literally me looking out the window of my office and seeing these really cool, interesting young women,” he says. “Obviously they had very creative lifestyles and jobs and spirits, and it left me kind of thinking, Why can’t I dress her as well?” He says 10 Crosby is the product of imagining “how these women live their lives, which is very intriguing to me,” and then interpreting it in a clothing collection. And rage runway reviews and critical acclaim notwithstanding, it’s the woman who gets to wear his designs that he’s here to impress. “I spend a lot of time in the stores,” he says. “To see the work that I do with my team actually fit into someone’s life and work for her body, that’s very satisfying. It’s almost like having a kindred spirit.”

SUIT FANCY

Women’s suiting may have been overlooked by high-end fashion at one time, but in these days of leaning in, the closet staple has never been riper for reinterpretation. Designer Dion Lee, a recipient of the Woolmark Prize for Australia, one of the industry’s most prestigious awards, took to his new counterpart, Woolmark Company, to create SUIT, a 10-piece collection that transcends typical workwear and aims to carry the silhouette from day to night. Inspired by a personal mission to incorporate principles of functional fashion design, craftsmanship and luxury fabrics, Lee laser-focuses on the classic jacket, pairing it with separates in black, navy and white in luxe fabrics like Australian merino wool, Italian wool crepe and Italian cotton. net-a-porter.com; dionlee.com

FASHION SCENTS Louis Vuitton enters the uncharted territory of fine fragrance Louis Vuitton doesn’t do anything halfway. For the brand’s debut fragrance collection, master perfumer Jacques Cavallier Belletrud traveled the world searching for the notes that make up the seven new scents. Tuberose-based Turbulences was conceived while Cavallier Belletrud and his father, also a perfumer, walked through his father’s garden in Grasse, France. Dans la Peau similarly draws on Cavallier Belletrud’s hometown, mixing notes of leather and sambac jasmine with a CO2 extraction of Grasse-grown jasmine. While the fragrances are complex, the Marc Newson-designed bottles are intentionally simple. Louis Vuitton stores will be equipped with a fountain for filling the bottles, which are available in 100, 200 or 7.5-ml sizes. Also available, in true Louis Vuitton tradition: a collection of three bottles housed in their own miniature monogrammed case. louisvuitton.com

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY

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EVER THE DEMOCRAT, Derek Lam put the


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STYLE ROSIE’S DOZEN ROSES Ever since Rosie Assoulin debuted on the fashion stage three years ago, she’s been stretching the boundaries of expectaRing, $199, tion, so perhaps it should ATELIER come as no surprise that SWAROVSKI BY her latest capsule collecROSIE ASSOULIN, atelierswarovski.com tion makes use of one very stretchy material: rubber. Jewel-y McHue-y, Assoulin’s collaboration for Atelier Swarovski, is made up of 12 unique pieces of jewelry featuring sparkling Swarovski crystals in reimagined (rubber) Georgian settings. The autumn/winter 2016 collection’s colors span an understated, moody rainbow—from dark moss green and silvershade to denim blue and light Colorado topaz. Assoulin—whose dramatic sculptural designs require couture-friendly doorways—is one of fashion’s boldest new talents, rejecting minimalist trends for vast ruffles, cutouts and flares. Every piece is a statement piece, and her jewelry line demands no less attention. If you thought you’d only find rubber burning on the highway, get ready to find it on the runway.

PUT IT IN NEUTRAL

The latest addition to the booming athleisure category comes from A.P.C. and Outdoor Voices, who’ve collaborated on an activewear capsule collection that—depending on how intense you are at the gym, we suppose—all but eliminates the need for a change of clothes. In tapered silhouettes and earth-tone shades like anthracite, khaki and gray mélange, collections for both men and women feature sweats, leggings, tanks and bras in the classic, muted aesthetics for which both brands are known. Says A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou,

Paired with velvet and suede, as seen on shoes from loafers and brogues to double monks and slippers, patent leather is lending some polish to black-tie feet From top: Ballroom, $990, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Savoy brogue, $295, DAVID HART FOR JOHNSTON & MURPHY, johnstonmurphy.com. Cambridge loafer, $875, GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI, Saks Fifth Avenue, 877-551-7257. John slipper, $725, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Double-monk strap, $765, TOD’S, tods.com. Loafer, $750, GUCCI, gucci.com.

A.P.C. x Outdoor Voices is a “nod to the

gray area between the gym life and the everyday life.” usonline.apc.fr; outdoorvoices.com

ALL PHOTOS: COURTESY

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Patent Pending


CALIBER RM 037


STYLE

1975

Born to Run-era Bruce brought louche, Dylanesque flair, care of a newsboy cap and striped shirt, to his native New Jersey.

1978

Not entirely immune to trends, a late-’70s Springsteen adopted the punk-rock look of a leather jacket and exceedingly snug trousers.

1981

Some bosses sport a suit and tie, but the Boss made an unbeatable uniform out of an everyday white T-shirt and jeans.

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Brilliant Disguise 1984

For more than 40 years, Bruce Springsteen has been a rock god— but he’s also been a style icon

Around the release of Born in the USA, Springsteen embraced showing skin with an allAmerican, sexy-mechanic look.

1990

As he strode into his 40s, Springsteen doubled down on the importance of quality denim.

1988

Never one to shy away from a sartorial risk, Springsteen sported a bolo tie and Southwestern guitar strap.

2012

A 21st-century Springsteen didn’t lose the leather jacket or jeans—he just updated them for a new millennium.

2016

These days, the stylish sexagenarian—whose memoir, Born to Run, is out this fall—sports Saint Laurent, but doesn’t let the clothes wear him.

BOTTOM RIGHT: LONDON ENTERTAINMENT; ALL OTHERS: GETTY IMAGES

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LIFE

From linen lights to wicker chaises, the season’s best design shares the subtle palette of nature Photographed by Gieves Anderson

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Pales in Comparison

From top: Heavyweight drapes, from $239, RH, rh.com. Banana leaf chandelier, $2,228; Handwoven trellis daybed, $698, ANTHROPOLOGIE, anthropologie.com. Duvet cover, from $229, RH. Napoli pillow, $95, LIBECO, abchome.com. Sisal rug, $999, ABC CARPET & HOME, abchome.com.


Ries chair, $950, JAYSON HOME, jaysonhome.com.

Paris panel, $370, ROCHE BOBOIS, roche-bobois.com.

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Wireless speaker, $449, VIFA HELSINKI, trnk-ny.com.

Pillow, from $440, FENDI CASA, luxurylivinggroup.com.

Dog beds, from $285, MUNGO & MAUD, mungoandmaud.com.

PK24 chaise lounge, $16,450, FRITZ HANSEN, theline.com.


Model Residence Coming This September Three to Five Bedroom Newly Imagined Condominium Residences Prices Starting at $6,675,000

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LIFE

As I step inside the egg-freezing party, a server offers me a glass of white wine and directs me to a buffet table filled with delicate bites. The tables are decorated with white tablecloths and bouquets of pink roses and white hydrangeas. Dr. Aimee, a tall brunette casually dressed in black pants and a flattering cotton drape maternity shirt (she’s five months pregnant with her fourth child), personally and warmly greets every woman who walks into the room. I take a seat next to Lisa, the high school teacher, who is shyly sipping a glass of Chardonnay. “I’ve been busy pursuing my career, and suddenly I’m 40,” Lisa says when I ask why she’s here. “I wish someone had told me about egg freezing in my 30s, because now I don’t have that much time. I didn’t know about fertility tests. No doctor has ever said to me, ‘Have you thought about this?’” “I’m thinking I’m going to do it when I’m 31 if I’m still single,” says Aileen, a pretty 25-year-old wearing a casual blazer and jeans. She works at an integrative health clinic in Marin County and tells me she will be starting medical school in the fall. “Knowing I’ll be in school training for seven to 10 years, I think this is a good option.” These single women’s experiences are far from marginal in an era in which a growing majority of adult females put their economic power ahead of their procreative power. Most of us are getting married and having children after we get our degrees and are on more solid ground professionally, and many of us are not getting married at all. In her new book, All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation, journalist Rebecca Traister reports that in 2009, the proportion of American women 18 and older who were married dropped below half. “During the years in which I had come of age,” she writes, “American women had pioneered an entirely new kind of adulthood, one that was not kicked off by marriage, but by years and, in many cases, whole lives, lived on their own, outside matrimony.” The challenge that comes with this new era is that many women are also wrestling with ambiguities and desires around having children while backed up against the inevitable tick-tock of their biological clocks. As we’re postponing marriage, the age of first-time motherhood and fatherhood is naturally rising, especially in cities. In the U.S. alone, the number of women getting pregnant between the ages of 35 and 44 has nearly doubled since 1990, but many are also running into fertility problems. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1 in 8 women today has trouble getting pregnant or sustaining a pregnancy. Technology and feminism, however, have made it possible for more women to make new reproductive choices. Our mothers’ generation started using birth-control pills to turn off their ability to conceive in order to enjoy sexual freedom and gain economic power. Today, that economic power allows their daughters to save their fertility and freeze their eggs for use farther down the road. So it’s not surprising why the women I met at Dr. Aimee’s party have stepped out on the town alone to talk and learn about their options among strangers, and also why eggfreezing parties are aiming to market this reproductive tool

Great Eggspectations

A fertility-focused twist on the classic Tupperware-party model helps many women turn panic into peace. But is there a catch? Written by Rachel Lehmann-Haupt

HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES

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hen Lisa, a 40-year-old high school teacher in San Mateo, California, gussied herself up in a floral wrap dress and a hint of plum lipstick and drove up to San Francisco on a balmy February evening, it wasn’t to meet a hot Tinder date. Instead she was heading out by herself to an egg-freezing party, a modern ladies’ dinner at upscale Battery Street Italian restaurant Il Fornaio, hosted by Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh, an ob-gyn otherwise known as the Egg Whisperer or simply Dr. Aimee. This was the doctor’s 17th such party since 2014, all of which she’s paid for with her own money and a nominal $20 entrance fee. The idea is similar to a Stella and Dot jewelry party, except rather than serving wine and food to sell shiny baubles, she says her goal is to help women in their 20s, 30s and 40s learn about their fertility. Dr. Aimee also promotes her cause and services, of course, which include fertility testing and egg freezing. She’s adamant, however, that her goal is not a hard sell of this expensive fertility-extension procedure, whereby a woman undergoes hormone shots and surgery to extract her eggs, which are then preserved in liquid nitrogen until she’s ready to use them. Rather, by taking the fertility conversation into a more relaxed social setting, Dr. Aimee, alongside a burgeoning number of doctors in her field, is attempting to take the stigma out of what has traditionally been a difficult discussion that happens in hushed tones on the social edge. “Most ob-gyns are not trained about what fertility means for women,” she tells me a few days before the party. “My goal is for them to say to their patients, ‘Hey, let’s talk about fertility risk factors,’ and offer them the option to check their fertility the way they might check their cholesterol.”


as something that’s fashionable and cool. Ever since the American Society for Reproductive Medicine removed the “experimental” label from the procedure in 2012, a growing number of fertility clinics and doctors are offering the option. Companies like Facebook, Apple and Google have begun covering it on their health insurance plans up to $20,000. Another company, called EggBanxx (slogan: “Smart Women Freeze”), has been hosting its own “Let’s Chill” parties in San Francisco, New York, L.A. and Boston as a way to raise awareness and market its services. EggBanxx negotiates the cost of the procedure with a physician in its growing network, then helps clients get loans and pays the up-front costs in exchange for a down payment. But to be clear, this isn’t just about promoting fertility awareness and a way to outsmart one’s biological clock for the sake of social good or feminist empowerment. It’s also incredibly lucrative for the doctors, clinics and companies who offer the procedure. It costs women between $10,000 and $15,000, in addition to more than $1,000 a year for storage fees. Allied Market Research has projected that the global fertility business will grow to a $21.6 billion concern by 2020. Even though egg freezing has come a long way, it’s still out of reach for most people. Lisa tells me that she can’t afford it because her school district doesn’t cover it on their plan. “It’s still a luxury item,” she says, “and it shouldn’t be.”

According to Zsa Zsa Gabor’s ninth husband, Prince Frédéric von Anhalt, the actress had eggs frozen in the ’60s, but they mysteriously went missing.

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child-free. No doubt related, Dr. Aimee admits that she’s gotten death threats about trying to get rich off women’s desperation. Yet she remains confident that this is not about coercion, but rather about a reproductive choice, just like birth control or abortion. “I just want to give women options, particularly when it seems like their options have run out,” she says. Today, because the technology has advanced, the success rates for freezing and thawing have dramatically improved. But that still doesn’t guarantee a baby. After one woman at the party raises her hand and asks what the chances are that she will get pregnant from her frozen eggs, Dr. Aimee says 20 percent, and then makes a joke: “Humans are not like bunnies—we’re really bad at reproduction.” She also explains a little bit about the experience. “You might feel bloated and gain a little weight. During the shots, you’re not going to want to wear your skinny jeans.” Her description of the procedure proves all too familiar. When I first got my eggs frozen, in 2009, it was still considered experimental and not covered by insurance. In fact, I used some inheritance money to pay for it. Shortly after New Year’s Day, having just ended a long-term relationship, I started giving myself the shots to stimulate egg growth. I would wake up, make coffee, brush my teeth and then shoot hormones cloned from Chinese hamster ovaries into my belly. It was surreal. The night before my egg retrieval, a good girlfriend gave me the trigger shot of human chorionic r. Aimee takes the stage at her San gonadotropin, a hormone that told my ovaries to get my eggs Francisco egg-freezing party and stands ready for release. in front of a projection screen displayOn the day my eggs were retrieved, a nurse took my vital ing a PowerPoint presentation. “This signs and then led me to lie down on a surgery table. While I is going to be a fun fertility seminar,” was asleep, using an ultrasound needle, the doctor extracted she says, and then delivers the stark my eggs and handed them off to a nurse. An embryologist reality of what happens to a woman’s then hunted for the most mature ones, put them in a petri fertility as she ages, which I know dish filled with cryoprotectant and then placed them in liquid for some women in the room who are nitrogen, where they will stay frozen. When I woke up, I nearing 40 and hoping to have a baby probably isn’t so fun learned they had taken out 35 eggs, what most doctors say is to hear. According to the ASRM, each month a healthy, a good number. fertile 30-year-old woman tries to get pregnant, she has a 20 Six years after that experience, I’m happy to hear Dr. percent chance of succeeding. By age 40, that drops to just a Aimee tell the group the in vitro fertilization rates of pregfive percent success rate per cycle. nancy with frozen eggs were found to be the same as with Dr. Aimee begins by focusing on fertility awareness and embryos, and the data also shows that IVF cycles conducted explains that if women in their 20s and early 30s become with frozen eggs cause no increase in birth defects, developeducated about their fertility, many won’t run into the infermental disorders or chromosomal abnormalities. tility problems that so many in the generation ahead of them But I can also say that the reality of the procedure is defihave experienced. nitely not a party. It’s much closer to climbing a mountain: The first step, she says, is to test your fertility, something The journey is steep and hard, but when I was done, I felt a her clinic offers patients through a number of methods. But sense of accomplishment and peace, knowing my younger Dr. Aimee doesn’t get into a controversy surrounding the eggs were preserved in a little test tube in a big metal tank, process: Many experts, including those at the ASRM, still waiting for me to use when my life was in the right place, believe that the procedure shouldn’t be sold to otherwise hopefully resulting in a baby. healthy women as a way to delay motherhood for social or It’s also important to keep in mind that fertility is career purposes. It’s now well-known that Facebook started extremely variable, as each woman has her own unique covering the procedure after an employee with cancer asked biology; some women can easily conceive in their late 30s CEO Sheryl Sandberg to do so, because she would otherwise and even early 40s. In fact, the great irony of my story is not be able to conceive a child following chemotherapy. that I never even used my frozen eggs, and ended up getting Of the situation, Sandberg told Time magazine, “I talked pregnant with my son at 41 without going through in vitro about it with our head of HR, and said, ‘God, we should fertilization. But I also credit the sense of peace I got from cover this.’ And then we looked at each other and said, taking advantage of this reproductive choice. ‘Why would we only cover this for women with cancer, why At the end of Dr. Aimee’s presentation, waiters come wouldn’t we cover this more broadly?’ ” around and serve us pieces of chocolate cake topped with The “more broadly” is where critics stepped in, accusing whipped cream. “I love that we’re talking about this stuff in companies like Facebook of offering the procedure as a way a social setting,” says Aileen, the aspiring doctor, as she digs to coerce their female employees into working more years into her dessert. ■


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Lettuce Be Basic

Iceberg returns as the season’s coolest green Written by Regan Hofmann Photographed by Eric Helgas


T

Darby) Alex Guarnaschelli puts it, a “vitamin bomb.” Besides, says Guarnaschelli, iceberg has plenty of redeeming culinary qualities. “It’s fibrous, it has no calories, it’s hydrating, it’s luscious, it has great texture,” she says. “You can get to really clean eating that breaks up the monotony of the protein shake.” One might call the Ice Box crudités at Geoffrey Zakarian’s brand-new Georgie, an all-day oasis in the Montage Beverly Hills, anything but monotonous. Served with a retro-chic green goddess dressing for dipping, the platter is a painter’s palette of impeccably sourced gardenfresh vegetables, with refreshingly cool iceberg lettuce standing tall at center stage. A staple for midcentury hostesses, the dish proves crudités can appeal to modern, well-traveled appetites—in fact, Zakarian says he drew inspiration from his travels in St. Barts. Another old-school iceberg application driving modern chefs wild is the wedge. Draped in creamy, tangy dressing and studded with rich bacon and juicy tomatoes, the wedge is the ultimate salad-for-dinner indulgence. At Butter, Guarnaschelli punctuates hers with piquant leeks instead of the traditional chive garnish, though she is adamant that the classic version needs no apologies. “The first time you eat a wedge, your whole life changes,” she says. “Then you have to pretend that you love arugula and mustard greens and mugwort and carrot-top pesto, but secretly you just want a giant ice-cold wedge with blue cheese and warm bacon on top.” It’s true that the wedge salad probably won’t win any nutritional awards, but then, we’ve already redeemed butter, wine and red meat from their former reputations as nutritional villains. Today, happily, the watchword is balance. Which puts iceberg, with its fresh-from-the-garden green flavor and total versatility, right at home in the modern whole-foods pantry. And a little bacon won’t hurt either. ■

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he most exciting thing to happen to salad bowls this year isn’t exactly new—in fact, it’s about as close to an American classic as roughage gets. But to a certain set of creative chefs, iceberg lettuce has opened up a world of possibilities that are freeing plates and palates from the last decade’s obsession with ultra-intense supergreens. Iceberg has a storied place in the American culinary psyche. It first rose to the top of the lettuce ranks in the 1920s thanks to its sturdiness, which allowed it to travel long miles (often packed under ice) without wilting, making it ubiquitous from coast to coast. The uninspired side salads it unfortunately spawned, however, are less distant a memory, and for those who lived through those dark, frozen-food decades, iceberg’s return is understandably fraught. Alice Waters, the ardent Berkeley crusader for ultralocal eating, famously singled out iceberg as symbolic of everything wrong with the food-industrial complex. But while iceberg may seem like an unlikely candidate for a comeback, there’s more to the pale green leaves than meets the eye. Sure, it doesn’t pack the superfood punch of its trendier colleagues. But iceberg is still a low-calorie source of vitamin A, omega-3s and antioxidants, and unlike its darker-hued contemporaries, it’s low in vitamin K, making it suitable for people on certain medications. More importantly, iceberg’s return represents an embrace of the radical idea that good-for-you foods can also be tasty—and actually tasty, not raw cacao chia seed puddingtasty. It’s a less-is-more approach to health that comes as a welcome respite from the fanatical wellness crowd. Ever cringed at the idea of choking down powdered maca or sprouted-rice protein boosts? You may now relax. Not every salad needs to be, as New York City chef (Butter, The

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RANCH: GETTY IMAGES

AN ODE TO RANCH DRESSING A little-known piece of trivia: Ranch dressing and Oprah Winfrey share a birthday. At least, 1954 is the year that Oprah was born, and also the year that a couple in California bought a ranch named Hidden Valley, where they would go on to trademark what has become the most popular salad dressing in American history. Is it a coincidence that Oprah also went on to become the most popular talk show host in American history? I think not. You see, 1954 was the year that the fates of mass consumer appeal realized that our country needed some bold talkers. Oprah obviously carried the torch on television, but who forged the way on the salad plate? Ranch dressing comes from humble origins—just buttermilk, mayonnaise and herbs—but essentially annihilates any and all other flavors that come into its path, and there have been some suspect flavors lurking around the American diet over the past half-century. We should never be allowed to forget the ‘60s, an era in which Jell-O and meat regularly merged in common household recipes. Bravely, ranch crashed onto the scene, pacifying our taste buds with its let’s-all-be-friends

attitude to foods from all corners, from wings and pizza to celery and carrots. Only recently has America had something of a culinary awakening, but just as we must support Oprah in her new chapter of life behind the camera, we cannot renounce ranch dressing simply because our palates have evolved to grasp the values of health and nuance. Remember who brought us together when we needed it most, and stand with ranch. —FRANCES DODDS


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StarryEyed

The best of fall fashion’s glitterymakeup trend—in a rainbow of wearable, shimmering shades Photographed by David Rinella Edited by Eden Univer

Tarteist Metallic Shadow in Poker Face, $14, TARTE, tartecosmetics.com. Book of Eyes Eye Quad Collection in Soft Shock, $44, SMITH & CULT, smithandcult.com. Mascara Vinyl Couture in I’m the Storm, $29, YSL, yslbeauty.com. Illusion D’Ombre Long Wear Luminous Eyeshadow in Rouge Diable, $36, CHANEL, chanel.com. Luminizing Face Enhancer in 16, $95, CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ, cledepeaubeaute.com. Studio Nail Lacquer in Enterprise, $14, MAC, maccosmetics.com. Dual-Intensity Eyeshadow in Arcturus, $29, NARS, narscosmetics.com. Le Prisme Superstellar Eyeshadow Palette, $63, GIVENCHY, sephora.com.


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Moving Pictures

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

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In the forthcoming book Misty Copeland, a celebrity photographer sheds light on a celebrated ballerina—but she’s not striking any poses Written by Frances Dodds


On Pointe Gregg Delman’s Misty Copeland follows the American Ballet Theatre’s first African-American female principal dancer over the course of five years.

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PHOTODELMAN CREDITS TEEKAY GREGG

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hotographer Gregg Delman, who’s captured everyone from Oscar Isaac to Katy Perry, is no stranger to the strictures of time and concept that often dictate celebrity portraiture. But when he first shot Misty Copeland in 2011, it felt different—even transformative. “There was no set concept,” Delman says. “I wanted her to have the freedom to move wherever and however she wished. It allowed us both to create more subconsciously.” This was so true, in fact, that over the course of their next five years and seven shoots, Copeland herself was surprised by what she saw mirrored back to her. “I am always aware of how I appear while I’m dancing,” she says. “It’s a big part of a dancer’s responsibility, and what separates us from athletes. But it’s interesting because the first photo Gregg ever took of me, I was shocked by how soft I looked. The photo looked like a painting. There was an innocence he’d captured in my face that I’d never seen in a photo of myself.” ■


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BODY CHRISTOPHE ROBIN CLEANSING PURIFYING SCRUB WITH SEA SALT

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Beauty industry greats reveal their secret weapons Written by Eden Univer MASCARA WAND

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“Skin Food is a go-to for me because it can moisturize, highlight and give skin a glow—it’s an emergencyanything product! I’ve also used it to rub out dry, flaky skin on the face or around a blemish. It’s essentially a miracle eraser.” usa.weleda.com Romy Soleimani Celebrated makeup artist

“I have been an aesthetician almost 30 years and I’ve used Biologique Recherche for 20 of those years. With the P50 alone, most of my clients see a difference after just one visit—combined, of course, with my magic hands and unique treatment techniques. Beautiful like a baby’s skin.” biologique-recherche.com Shyou Hung

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Machine Age

An industry pro’s high-tech quest to sculpt, tone and chisel—one body at a time Written by Eden Univer

SHAPE IT UP While Astarita maintains that everyone’s needs are

different, for a taste of the magic she whips up at Eva Scrivo, here she shares the ingredients for some fan-favorite mechanical cocktails THE TARGET:

Tighten and tone tummy in a hurry Lift and tighten butt, slim and tone thighs Transform tummy, back or flank in 10 weeks flat Tone those arms

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esthetic laser specialist Jeannel Astarita doesn’t cut corners. When she worked in various doctors’ offices and saw patients whose concerns couldn’t be suitably addressed by whatever bodycontouring machines she had on-hand, she’d send them away, refusing to treat using anything other than the precise mix of technology she knew to be best. It’s not common practice in an industry where, to some, patients look like walking, talking dollar signs—and machines are expensive enough that most offices can afford only one or two—but Astarita is not your average specialist. Instead of waiting for her doctor-employers to buy all the machines on her wish list, she bought them herself, each and every gleaming hunk of metal. Now Astarita treats clients out of one of two Eva Scrivo salons in Manhattan, where she keeps her 10-machine arsenal (some of which are multipurpose), mixing and matching to refine each client’s body. You might say she’s something of a mechanical mad scientist. Although Astarita’s methods are proprietary and her combination of treatments is completely customized, one of her most-requested treatments is CoolSculpting, which she calls the “gold standard” for noninvasive fat reduction. It uses controlled cooling to selectively destroy fat cells by freezing them without harming surrounding tissue. Though it was once recommended for patients with just a small amount of unwanted fat, Astarita, ever the sculpting pioneer, tried it on a wider variety of body types—and the results were amazing. That’s when she first realized she might be able to combine a number of machines to get previously unheard-of results, with one or two machines doing the “heavy lifting” and others serving to complement, smooth and reshape for the most natural look. She often uses Vanquish, for example, to blend and tighten areas that have had multiple sessions of CoolSculpting. “I call it my shrink-wrap service,” says Astarita, who explains that Vanquish uses noncontact radio frequency to kill fat cells with heat. She’ll also use Vanquish with UltraShape, which she calls “the most comfortable” of all the effective treatments. “It works by causing the fat cells to vibrate until they rupture,” she says, “destroying the cell membrane, which is then processed as waste.” She might use UltraShape to enhance the fat-melting benefits of Futura Fit, a machine that simulates the effects of a superhuman workout, calling on ultrasound and electric muscle stimulation to liquefy fat and build muscle tone. Exilis Elite, often used after Vanquish, is a radio-frequency device that resurfaces and tightens skin, smoothing over unwanted lumps and bumps, while ZWave, used post-CoolSculpting (and sometimes post-Vanquish), serves to enhance overall outcomes by using radial acoustic shockwaves to “break up the destroyed fat cells, stimulate lymphatic drainage and increase blood flow,” says Astarita. Mad scientist, indeed. ■


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Rocky Mountain High Above: The open-air deck is a gathering spot for lunch and sundowners.

Below: The West Elk Mountains frame a pristine, nearly forgotten valley.

Ranch Handsome

What happens when an American designer turns his eye to a boutique property in the Colorado wilderness? Written by Etta Meyer

Russell Crowe, Whoopi Goldberg, Dennis Quaid and Reese Witherspoon are among the celebrities who have strapped on cowboy boots and bought sprawling ranches.

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arley Hodgson drives a 1962 Land Rover with custom leather seats, which—of course the founder of heritage leather brand Ghurka drives a car with custom leather seats. “When we bought ‘Rover’ in the 1970s, we replaced the vinyl seats with our own leather,” Hodgson explains. Summers in Martha’s Vineyard—and kid passengers in wet swimsuit bottoms—made that an impractical amenity for a time, but humidity is no longer a concern. These days, the small people riding shotgun in Rover are more likely to be grandkids wearing dusty riding chaps than damp swimsuits. Just over a decade ago, Hodgson and his wife, Linda, shucked their former life in New York City and Connecticut for the West—specifically, the West Elk Mountains outside of Crawford, Colorado, where they’ve since applied their meticulous design expertise to refurbishing Smith Fork Ranch, a secluded private guest ranch surrounded by national forest, 100 miles from either Aspen or Telluride. The original buildings were restored log by painstaking log, sneaking in all the modern comforts (feather down beds, slate tile bathrooms, WiFi) and the dining hall deck was extended to provide more outdoor space for sunset cocktails. Like the original homesteaders, the Hodgsons brought with them treasures from back East, including a collection of early American primitive antiques, taxidermy elk mounts and Navajo rugs. In the River House, one of just five guest cabins, an 18th-century woodworking table abuts a leather sofa, while the hickory Adirondack-style chairs in the dining hall feel seamlessly Western. Once word was out in the valley that Smith Fork Ranch was being restored, local craftsmen started showing up with portfolios of their work, evident now in the elk-horn pepper grinders, hand-blown glass vases and iron-and-leather wine holders dangling from barn-board tables. Certainly Hodgson’s enthusiasm for expert artisanship has not waned since he envisioned the canvas-and-leather tote that launched the Ghurka brand back in 1975. The ranch attracts a clientele that appreciates the character of the design, as well as the quality of the food, wine and service, which includes the ranch’s impressive organic farmstead. Executive chef Marcus Parrott also calls on the bounty of the surrounding valley, where orchards, wild mushrooms, artisan dairies and heritage beef and lamb abound. Seafood is flown in twice weekly. And with the help of his son, Hodgson has developed SFR’s wine cellar to win the Award of


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Back to the Roots Clockwise from above: Executive chef Marcus Parrott plucks produce from the ranch’s farmstead; the five guest cabins are

unique in layout and decor; fly-fishing on one of the ranch’s six stocked trout ponds.

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Excellence from Wine Spectator three years in a row. “We’ll never be able to drink it all!” he exclaims as he refills his guests’ cups. At max capacity, the staff still outnumbers guests, 28 to 26. While other high-end ranches host between 100 to 225, the smaller numbers at SFR allow guests to enjoy ranch amenities without a scheduling hassle. If, on a whim, you would like to cast a fly line after skeet shooting, no problem: The ranch has three private miles of the Smith Fork, as well as six trout ponds. For the dedicated angler, a guided day trip up into Little Elk Basin is an option, as is floating the Gold Medal waters of the Gunnison River, though the easiest way to explore the 1.7 million acres of Gunnison National Forest and West Elk Wilderness surrounding the ranch is on horseback, and upon arrival, wranglers assign each guest a steed for their entire stay. Alternatively, there is always the quixotic Rover, still riding pretty, available to carry you up the draws and through the coulees, just as Hodgson always imagined. ■


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isa and Johann Pepin’s relationship started with elements of a romantic comedy: A bubbly blonde from suburban Milwaukee meets a charming Frenchman working on his master’s degree in Wisconsin. The pair marry and move to Chicago to start their careers, she in public relations and he in finance. But in an unexpected plot twist, Johann’s grandparents need help with the upkeep of their farm in Provence, and the couple soon find themselves in the French countryside, facing an unkempt property in need of an overwhelming amount of work. “We were what I call ‘soft-hands and -face workers,’” says Lisa. “We had no idea what we were doing.” But with help and advice from local family and friends, they slowly made progress overhauling the land, their work paying off in fruits and vegetables. One day, a neighbor mentioned that the previous owners of their own home had found truffles on the property. The Pepins soon uncovered truffles on the neighbor’s land and then, interest sufficiently piqued, on other nearby estates as well. At first, the discovery led to something fun to do on the weekends. “On Saturday mornings, we’d go from house to house, hunting truffles, splitting the bounty with the owner and enjoying a cocktail before moving on to the next property,” Lisa recalls. Soon, though, they realized they had

Dirt Candy

a unique experience to offer visitors from overseas. They’ve since gone from novice farmers to a sought-after trufflehunting idyll, with adventurous gourmands from around the world making the trip to the Pepins’ tiny corner of Provence to spend their mornings digging for truffles and their afternoons enjoying the fruits of their labor. All guests at the property—named Les Pastras, a Provençal term for “the pastures”—receive a warm welcome from Johann and his two truffle-hunting dogs, Éclair and Mirabelle. Then it’s down the hill and toward a forest of oak trees, where the pups sniff out the morsels and dig shallow holes, from which foragers can easily pull the truffles. Once the bounty is collected, the hunting crew takes a break back at the house, where Lisa pours generous glasses of champagne to serve alongside truffle-dusted cheese. Guests are sent home with bottles of truffle oil and locally produced wine; some opt to adopt their own truffle oak tree on the property, which comes with 100 grams of black Périgord truffles. The Pepins also ship their truffles worldwide, and some visitors to the estate have started a “truffle-share” back home, ordering the product in bulk to repurpose locally and spawning an inadvertent truffle-hunting obsession. TV producer Jeanne DeBell Polocheck fell in love with the Pepins’ estate and their story a few years back while filming a truffle hunt at Les Pastras. She was inspired to create a truffle-lovers club in her native Houston, flying in shipments from Les Pastras for exclusive truffle dinners in the city’s finest homes. The popularity of the Les Pastras truffles—her club has nearly 400 members, she says—inspired Polocheck to expand the business, which now includes guided trips to Provence. Vancouver food educator Kendall Gustavson similarly launched a supper club after visiting the Pepins, hosting intimate truffle-themed brunches in her hometown and organizing truffle-hunting tours to Les Pastras. “Having the truffle club is a way to connect with Provence when I can’t be there,” says Gustavson. The Pepins, meanwhile, are happy to have helped fuel the frenzy, even as the truffle business is so notoriously “shady and secretive” that the Pepins will sell truffles anywhere in the world—except France. “We prefer that locals remain unaware of the fact that we have truffles on the property,” she says, comparing it to an open-air jewelry store. For that reason, it’s also difficult to know exactly how many ventures like the Pepins’ exist, though tours like those at Truffle Farm in Canberra, Australia, and Tuscany’s 800-year-old estate Castiglion del Bosco do brisk business year-round. Meanwhile, the demand for truffles certainly isn’t waning: One of NYC’s top truffle dealers, Francesca Sparvoli, reportedly brings in up to $25,000 a day selling Périgords to the city’s leading restaurants. As far as dirty little secrets go, this one’s having a brilliant moment in the sun. ■

Inside the deliciously hush-hush business of truffle tourism Written by Caitlin Heikkila

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PLAY Sand and Stripes Clockwise from top: the Lower Lobby at Round Hill; Teeth of the Dog golf course at Casa de Campo; Coral Beach and Tennis Club.

Tropical Throwback

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At these five iconic enclaves, members and guests bask in low-key elegance Written by Elizabeth Quinn Brown

1940s and 1950s, when the blue-blooded were beckoned to the islands with the region’s new—and exclusive—clubs. For all their preserved midcentury glamour, these idylls of leisure are charming discerning travelers perhaps more than ever before: a rum-mixed cocktail of discreet luxury and warm hospitality, topped with a dash of Old-Guard Northeast style. Here, an invitation to peer through the palms into these “country clubs” of the tropics. (Just remember to pack a blazer and your whites.)

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THE CARIBBEAN WAS CALLING like a siren in the


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CASA DE CAMPO RESORT & VILLAS This carnival for sporting boasts a collection of golf courses designed by Pete Dye, including the famed Teeth of the Dog. The resort comprises an airy, modern hotel and the village of Altos de Chavón (home to Casa de Campo’s mascot, a donkey named Margarita). Garner an invitation to the owner’s December “white party” to dance with the likes of Beyoncé and Jay Z. BERMUDA

CORAL BEACH & TENNIS CLUB Coral Beach embraces its past and its pastels with traditions like afternoon tea in the chintz-covered clubhouse. Bermuda debuted the first tennis court in the Western Hemisphere, so the island is known for the game—a heritage that is integral to Coral Beach with its competitive ladder and eight clays. To relax, members play games like bocce and croquet on the lawn. BAHAMAS

LYFORD CAY CLUB

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The warm-weather chic of this exclusive “Caribbean Nantucket” is a legacy of members like Nan Kempner, while a win on the court is toasted with a Rum Dum—a rum cocktail with a secret “sweet sauce” that we assume is ordered “shaken, not stirred” by member Sean Connery. ANTIGUA

MILL REEF CLUB

From top: Round Hill’s recreation pool; the Altos de Chavón amphitheater at Casa de Campo; Round Hill’s main beach.

JAMAICA

ROUND HILL HOTEL & VILLAS Creating a pocket of preppiness? Call Ralph Lauren (who, as it happens, owns two villas at Round Hill). The designer was asked to redecorate the Cocktail Bar and the Grill, as well as the 36-room Pineapple House. Guests of this colonial-influenced cove (a roster that includes John F. Kennedy, who rehearsed his inauguration speech here) are welcome to golf at the esteemed Tryall Club nearby.

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Go for the Jungular

Mill Reef was established, per WASP custom, as an enclave of understated luxe; the founding members were restricted when constructing their homes. The breezy sophistication is a credit to onetime members like Bunny Mellon and her friend Jackie Kennedy (plus the fact that children weren’t allowed until the 1980s). Today Mill Reef represents an older skew—a destination, perhaps, for “old boys” to act boyish.


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WORK

The Met’s New Clothes

Can the Costume Institute and the world-class museum be fashionable and friendly bedfellows? Written by Nate Freeman

O

nce a year, the fashionable and the celebrity-seeking throngs fix their gaze upon New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the venerable institution on Fifth Avenue, perhaps the grandest and most comprehensive cultural showcase on the planet. And it truly is just once a year—the occasion being that of the Costume Institute Gala, the Oscars of the East Coast, a fundraiser that’s been called an “ATM for the Met.” So what of the other 364 days? As the Met Ball morphs into more of a pop-culture spectacle rather than just another slot on the spring dance cards of Upper East Side socialites, it’s somehow managed to take away some of the spotlight from the museum at large and the two million works in its collection. This year, for the first time, E! News broadcast hours of live footage from the red carpet, when just a few years ago, the only way to figure out what people were wearing to the gala was to read cult style blogs. Today, the parade of some of the world’s most famous people in sparkly gowns travels far and wide on social media. Endless images pour into Snapchat and Instagram feeds, and as the night goes on, there are

pictures of attendees getting in and out of cars, on their way to a succession of swanky and exclusive parties. The wall-to-wall coverage ultimately drowns out the mission of the institution in general. So you can see why there’s a bit of a divide between the Anna Wintour Costume Center (which was christened for the Vogue editor in May 2014 during a ceremony presided over by First Lady Michelle Obama) and its Metropolitan Museum home, which doesn’t have an opening that can come close to the crossover appeal of the Met Ball. Something like, say, Cornelia Parker’s “Transitional Object (PsychoBarn)”—a gigantic commissioned structure the artist created as an homage to both the classic American red barn and the house Norman Bates rents in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho—got some traction on social media when it opened on the museum’s roof in April. The Met was clearly trying to make #MetRoof happen. Most convincingly in terms of funds, there’s no single museum event that can compete with its fashionable little sister. Tickets cost $30,000 a person and $275,000 a table—the gala pulled in $12.5 million in a single night in 2015, according to The First Monday in May, a documentary about the Met Gala that was released this year. (The film charts the creation of the celebrated Costume Institute

When We First Met Above, clockwise from left: Anna Wintour, Andrew Bolton and Thomas Campbell; New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Diorama Drama From top to bottom: A couture display at Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2011; dresses exhibited as part of China: Through the Looking Glass in 2015; the Temple of Dendur, a gift from Egypt to the U.S., in the museum’s Sackler Wing.

SEVERAL SOURCES HAVE DISCUSSED THE PROBLEMS FACING THE MET, BOTH IN TERMS OF MASSIVE DEFICITS AND ITS PERCEPTION AS A MUSEUM STUCK IN THE PAST.

exhibit China: Through the Looking Glass, warts and all. The original title was the not so politically correct Chinese Whispers, and early plans included a Chineserestaurant theme complete with smoke-puffing dragons at the entryway.) The Costume Institute’s fundraising dominance has dovetailed with the reality that the museum itself is in dire financial straits. This summer, the institution announced that it would lay off as many as 100 employees to help cut a $30 million deficit, as spending this year has ballooned due to the opening of the Met Breuer, a space devoted to contemporary art at the Whitney Museum’s old digs on Madison Avenue. The space cost $15 million to renovate, and will continue to bleed $17 million a year in operating fees. Retail operations have slowed, depriving the museum of nearly $4 million in expected revenue. And a new logo design that cost the museum $3 million encountered a slew of scorn, including from New York magazine’s architecture and design critic Justin Davidson, who called the logo “a typographic bus crash.” “We’re not in a crisis,” the Met’s director, Thomas P. Campbell, told The New York Times. “The Met is a very strong institution firing on all cylinders.” Through a spokesperson, Campbell declined to comment for this story. But several other sources have discussed—unnamed, for fear of retribution— the problems facing the Met, both in terms of the massive deficits it has to make up and its perception as a fusty museum constantly trying to play catchup. Plans for a $600 million new wing that would allow the space to house a collection of contemporary art (of which the Met has very little, a crucial gap in an otherwise encyclopedic archive) have stalled due to the gargantuan price tag. Efforts to reinvent the museum as a 21st-century digital leader have sputtered as well: After a very high-profile series of product roll-outs, app launches and online spectacles, the Met’s first digital officer, Sree Sreenivasan, stepped down this summer. That last defection stings a little more when the Costume Institute—which is funded separately and operates on its own budget—can pull its honorary chairs from the top ranks of tech’s vanguard: Apple’s Jony Ive, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer. (When reached for comment, a member of the digital team told me she couldn’t speak on Met-related issues—“for obvious reasons”—and Andrew Bolton, the Costume Institute’s director, could not be reached.) To get a better sense of the Costume Institute in the context of the Met, director of communications Nancy Chilton gave me a tour of the exhibition that opened in May, Manus x Machina, which is an investigation into what “handmade” means in our post-industrial era. In an apparent fit of vanity (and to protect certain items of clothing from sun damage), the Costume Institute had OMA, the firm of starchitect Rem Koolhaas, build a big dome in its space, with a haute couture wedding dress Karl Lagerfeld designed for Chanel in 2014 in the center, its long elegant train rippling out behind it and ambient Gregorian chants playing in the background. “Andrew says it’s the Cathedral of Couture,” Chilton enthused. ■

MCQUEEN: CHARLES ESHELMAN/FILMMAGIC/GETTY IMAGES; CHINA: GEORGE PIMENTEL/WIREIMAGE;

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Flying First Claws

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his spring, 33 lions were flown on a chartered wide-body jetliner from Colombia and Peru to Johannesburg. Last year, 10 rhinos—the most ever on a plane at one time—were boarded onto a four-engine cargo plane in South Africa and transported north to Botswana. Up to three times a week, a single-engine turboprop takes off from Los Angeles’ Van Nuys Airport, the city’s hub for private jet travel, filled on every journey with close to three dozen dogs. These animals make up a new sort of jet set, though the flights they’re on are hardly leisure jaunts. A cadre of conservationists are banding together and funding expensive private jet travel to whisk away at-risk animals from high-poaching areas and death-row pet shelters. For some, one-way airfare can reach tens of thousands of dollars. Custom crates need to be constructed. And just the way airline companies maximize the number of seats on a plane, countless hours are spent configuring the layout for the animals’ holding containers. Despite the costs involved,

these big-ticket flights to safety are attracting substantial financial backing—even though charitable giving to animal and environmental causes makes up only about three percent of the total Americans give philanthropically every year. Such pricey missions are possible these days for a few reasons. More and more famous names, such as Leonardo DiCaprio and princes William and Harry, are committing themselves to helping animals and bringing attention to their plight. Much of the cause’s recent success also stems from invoking the prestige of private-jet travel (some airlifts are dubbed “Flights to Freedom”), not to mention the increased attention on big-game animal causes since the widely reported shooting last year of Cecil the Lion. The 33 lions, for one, were saved from abusive conditions in South American circuses by Animal Defenders International, an animal welfare group that has successfully lobbied to outlaw using wild animals in circus acts. “I don’t travel in first class and get a flat bed where I can lie down,” says ADI vice president Tim Phillips, “but all these lions did. They had as much leg room as possible, and once the lights were turned off, they laid down and slept well for

More than 450 snakes, from 30 different species, were used to film Snakes on a Plane, starring Samuel L. Jackson.

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For a new generation of wild and domestic animals facing dire odds—from poachers to cruel circuses and kill shelters­—private airplanes are their arks to survival Written by Degen Pener


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WORK most of the flight.” every seven hours,” says Beverly. “People think rhino horn In the circuses, some of the lions had been starved and can cure them from virtually anything—it does nothing at abused. After ADI won their release, a team travelled all. It’s a big misconception that can lead to the death of a throughout Peru and Colombia to confiscate each large cat, species.” The situation is so dire that other conservationists then housed them in special facilities for 18 months until are looking to fly rhinos off the African continent altogether they could raise $330,000 for the flight—the most ambitious to create insurance populations in places such as Texas and airlift of lions ever undertaken—costing $10,000 per lion, Australia. aboard a McDonnell-Douglas MD11 to a private sanctuary Throughout the U.S., domesticated dogs are regularly in South Africa. “In-flight catering gave them a light snack taking flight as well. A handful of groups formed by somewhere over the Atlantic, a few treats of chunks of volunteer pilots—including California’s Wings of Rescue meat,” says Phillips. and South Carolina’s Pilots N Paws—transport dogs from Two-thirds of the trip’s cost, $220,000, was raised by cities with overcrowded kill shelters to other areas of the online fundraising platform GreaterGood. Its director of country where homes can be found for them. operations, Noah Horton, says what’s remarkable about the Wings of Rescue’s primary aircraft is owned by the campaign was not only the amount of money raised but how group’s founder, Yehuda Netanel, a commercial shoppingquickly the dollars flowed in. More than 7,000 individual center developer and longtime pilot who personally flies donors took part, many brought in by a social media campaign. “We really framed this lion campaign in such a way that we introduced the audience to every individual lion,” says Horton. “They knew exactly what their donation was doing: We were selling this trip across the ocean so that the animals could go to a sanctuary, and that connection really resonated with individuals.” Rhinos Without Borders is the group behind the relocation of the species from South Africa—where illegal killing of the animals for their horns outside guarded sanctuaries THE SITUATION IS SO DIRE THAT CONSERVATIONISTS is decimating the ARE LOOKING TO FLY RHINOS OFF THE AFRICAN population—to CONTINENT ALTOGETHER TO CREATE INSURANCE POPULABotswana, which has TIONS IN PLACES SUCH AS TEXAS AND AUSTRALIA. a shoot-on-sight policy against poachers and a very low rate of illegal killing. In the past, about a third of the missions on his Pilatus PC-12. The rhinos have tended to be moved to safety by truck, but their five-year-old group, which has saved more than 19,000 extreme endangerment is pushing conservationists to resort adoptable pets from likely death in shelters, would like to be to bigger, more expensive moves that can protect them more doing five flights every week, although donations currently quickly. The nonprofit is co-founded by the andBeyond allow them to schedule just one to three. travel company and wildlife photographers and filmmakers The need for rescue will certainly continue, at least for Dereck and Beverly Joubert. Two years ago, after a quarter- wildlife. As global warming worsens and humans take more century spent documenting African wildlife and witnessing and more habitat away, animals are increasingly left in the toll poaching is taking, the couple resolved to get out fragmented areas, unable to migrate without human assisfrom behind the camera to help. Their goal is to move 250 tance. “For some species,” says Ileene Anderson, senior rhinos, at $45,000 each, to relative safety in Botswana over scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, “ ‘facilitated the next two years. “We are losing rhinos at a rate of one migration’ will be the only way they will survive.” ■

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Paths of Corey

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f you had asked Corey Hawkins as a young boy singing in his church in Washington, D.C., what he would be when he grows up, he would have said a performer. And he’d be right: The 27-year-old actor’s star has unequivocally risen. Hawkins––whose career began with a few walk-on roles in popular TV shows after graduating from Juilliard, the acclaimed conservatory for performing arts––garnered serious attention after landing the part of Tybalt opposite Orlando Bloom in the 2013 Broadway revival of Romeo and Juliet. But it was when he was cast only a few months later in the leading role of Dr. Dre in F. Gary Gray’s Straight Outta Compton that he became something closer to a household name. Hawkins’ transition onto the big screen, though swift, was not quite seamless. He was admittedly apprehensive about starring as the famed music producer in the critically acclaimed biopic, and who could blame him? “I didn’t want to be the one to mess it up,” says Hawkins. “I was like, ‘I can never show my face in California or L.A. again.’ I knew that Gary Gray expected greatness, Dre expected greatness!” But Dre didn’t take the casting decisions lightly. “He said, ‘You’re the man for the job,’ and he had my audition on his iPhone,” says Hawkins, looking back. “It was one of those things where it’s like: I have a responsibility now, and I love to be the underdog.”

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The electrifying young actor—largely blind to his own stardom—proves the value of talent and timing Written by Eden Univer Photographed by Jeremy Leibman Styled by Paul Frederick


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Hawkins wasn’t the underdog for long. His performance as the young producer was met with resounding praise, and it also allowed him to lead a cast of minority actors during a year when the trending criticism of the Academy Awards was #OscarsSoWhite. “He could turn on a dime and that’s great when you’re dealing with young actors who may not be used to being vulnerable,” says Gray of working with Hawkins. “To be able to give you street and also tap into being unguarded is something that goes a long way as a lead.” “I value Gray because he gave us the opportunity to know what it’s like to be a leading man in this industry,” says Hawkins. “We each got to be leading men in that movie, and a lot of the times, we don’t have that confidence, especially us young black guys, because often we don’t see each other on the screen, or we don’t see each other in that position. So it was great to be able to step into that role and be reminded every day that this is your film, this is your legacy.” The script, which is set in Compton in the 1980s and early ’90s, reads eerily like a front page today. Hawkins filmed scenes of the Detroit and L.A. riots that took place after the Rodney King beatings while the people of Ferguson, Missouri, protested police brutality on the news. “I wanted to make sure that we told that story of what it was like for them growing up [in Compton], and equally what it’s like for us as actors—not even as actors, as young men growing up in this country, walking in this skin,” he says. Hawkins calls the experience a journey, clearly not a problem to be solved today—or by him alone. In fact, the actor is relishing his new starring role as Eric Carter in 24: Legacy, a reboot of the popular television show originally led by Kiefer Sutherland, primarily because the plot is not driven by race. Quite the opposite, actually. “It isn’t to be taken lightly that I am a young black man


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[playing Carter], because when I was growing up, I didn’t see—you still don’t see enough, these days—the young war hero who comes back home, who has a beautiful wife, a great house and is doing okay,” he explains. “I never got a chance to see that growing up. So I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be amazing for someone who looks like me to see that story?’ Because that story is valid too. And why not?” Some outlets apparently didn’t get the memo that the

new series is about the character of Carter, and not the color of Hawkins’ skin. A headline on the industry trade site Deadline read “Fox Orders Pilot for New ‘24’ Series With Young Black Hero to Succeed Jack Bauer.” If that was a challenge, Hawkins is up for it. “[No one mentioned,] ‘He’s actually a trained actor.’ Or that he’s an actor anyway,” he says, reflecting on some of the media’s initial reaction. “It’s funny, because people love


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to put us in boxes, like, ‘He only did Straight Outta Compton, I don’t know if he’s really an actor.’ I was playing Tybalt on Broadway just a few months before. If you don’t like it, get out the way.” To Hawkins’ point, the conversation isn’t about race— it’s about talent. And the actor seems to have an unlimited reserve. Next year, he adds the big-budget Hollywood thriller Kong: Skull Island to his resume. In the film, Hawkins is joined by his Compton castmate Jason Mitchell, whom he describes as a brother figure, as well as industry heavyweights like Samuel L. Jackson, John Goodman, John C. Reilly and Brie Larson. “And then to get to work with Jordan Vogt-Roberts, the director—he’s new and he has such a fresh take on it,” Hawkins says of the new project. “It was, no pun intended, ‘gorilla’ filmmaking. It was a huge-budget film; it felt like we were really making the movie that we all wanted to make.” With leading roles comes fandom, of course, and Hawkins takes it in stride. At home in New York, he gets a few nods here and there by the city dwellers who are notoriously averse to fawning over celebrities, but when he leaves the bright lights behind, his growing fame is more difficult to ignore. “I went down to North Carolina to visit my grandparents,” he recalls, “and we all went to some big shopping store and all of a sudden this lady ran up on us and she was like, ‘Listen, I’m not gonna blow your spot up but I know who you are!’ We literally took two steps after leaving her, and she gets on the loudspeaker and goes, ‘Dr. Dre is here!’” Asked how the ordeal made him feel, Hawkins pauses. “It’s a little strange, a little scary—I’m not used to it,” he says. “But it’s all a part of the journey.” ■


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mor Towles is standing in the lobby of the Yale Club. He’s wearing a gray, trimly fitted suit that complements his gray, trimly clipped beard—the respectable sort found on older professional men who’ve earned the leisure of kempt scruff. His handshake has the svelte just-so firmness of a veteran businessman, which is exactly what Towles is—or was—for 20 years. Towles’ second career began in 2011, when at 47, he published his debut novel, Rules of Civility, which garnered critical applause and climbed the New York Times bestseller list. Rules of Civility captures 1930s New York through the eyes of a young woman from Brooklyn as she navigates the glamorous minefield of Manhattan society. As we settle into armchairs, I think the Yale Club seems quite the appropriate setting to discuss Towles’ second novel, A Gentleman in Moscow, which like its predecessor wades with a gimlet eye through the unavoidable quagmire of social decorum. A Gentleman in Moscow tells the story of Count Alexander Rostov, an aristocrat who, after the Russian Revolution, is sentenced to house arrest in a grand Moscow hotel. The book spans decades as Rostov builds an existence within his new confines, finding love and friendship in unexpected places and watching his beloved country change radically outside (and inside) the walls of the hotel. The count took his duties as a gentleman very seriously, but after the revolution, everything he exemplified is reviled, and he must consider his worth in this new society. “Yes, we are back in the world of manners,” Towles says. “It intrigues me that by definition, with civility or etiquette or social class, there’s always a thin line—with all kinds of behavior on either side. You bring different ways of living, different priorities and different privileges into

relief the minute you start setting a table.” This conflict over priority and privilege is the intellectual backbone of Rostov’s struggle to accept the Bolshevik ideology. In one particularly poignant passage, Towles writes, “As we age, we find comfort from the notion that it takes generations for a way of life to fade… But under certain circumstances, this process can occur in the comparative blink of an eye. Popular upheaval, political turmoil, industrial progress— any combination of these can cause the evolution of a society to leapfrog generations… [And] those with newfound power are men who distrust any form of hesitation or nuance, and who prize self-assurance above all.” I tell him that I felt a surge of sad recognition when I read this passage, because it holds such a mirror to our own time. Towles nods vigorously. “But,” he says, “I try not to dwell too closely on contemporary parallels. I try to create an environment in which universal truths are at play. I’m interested in writing something that is timeless.” ■

Master of Manners Amor Towles returns with his second novel, an unusual story of captivity Written by Frances Dodds

WEST IN SHOW Trailers for a new sitcom set in a tony Connecticut enclave get under some of the locals’ skin

American Housewife, an upcoming ABC sitcom rescued from its less savory pilot title (The Second Fattest Housewife in Westport), depicts the tragicomic trials and tribulations of a grounded, plus-size mother not exactly at ease around the pressed juice–drinking, yoga pants–wearing housewives of her new town. The satirical show’s extended trailer paints Westport, Connecticut, the country’s fifth highest-earning city, as a sterile place dotted with Stepford-style housewives and husbands. Actual residents wasted no time running to the Internet to voice their bemusement. Here’s a peek at some of the comments. —ANDRÉ WHEELER JILL TURNER ODICE Will there be a laugh track to tell you when you are supposed to laugh? (06880) LYN HOGAN Thinking this show might be about me!! It actually looks pretty funny, stereotypes or not! (06880) RACHEL HALPERIN That’s absolutely hysterical! Sure sounds like it’s Fairfield County, but this Westport is like any mirage. Looks real, but the reality is just an illusion (of perfect people and perfect children). (06880) BILL BOYD No surprise that the selfabsorbed ... many of whom populate my old home town … would want to immortalize themselves in a flatulent sitcom. (06880) ATHORNTON436 You hate us cause you ain’t us. (Reddit) IMALOSERNOFRIENDS Hey no press is bad press let’s go Westport! (Reddit) COLLETTEMN I’m leaning towards the idea that this one might not be too far from the truth. (Reddit)

TOWLES: DAVID JACOBS

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PUTIN ON THE RITZ

This season, New York stages are facing a Russian invasion— and they’re better for it IN JUNE, PLAYWRIGHT Stephen Karam took home a

Cate Blanchett makes her Broadway debut alongside Richard Roxburgh, bringing the Sydney Theatre Company’s production of The Present—adapted from Chekhov’s first play, Platonov, by Blanchett’s husband Andrew Upton—to the Barrymore Theatre for a limited run in December. The play, a look at two childhood friends reunited later (and much more damaged) in life, was a hit in Australia, where one review noted the “parties, pills, guns… and bottle after bottle of vodka.”—ADAM RATHE

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Tony Award for his Pulitzer Prize–nominated original play The Humans. This fall, however, when his work lands back on the Broadway stage, it’ll take the form of a more familiar story. Karam has adapted Anton Chekhov’s 1904 classic The Cherry Orchard for a Roundabout Theater Company production starring Diane Lane as Madame Ranevskaya, a faded aristocrat whose once-proud family (and valuable land) is facing ruin. And he isn’t the only one looking to Russian works this Broadway season. Come October, Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812—an adaptation of a section of War & Peace—starring Josh Groban and Denée Benton will land at the Imperial Theater. The musical follows a love triangle during the 19th-century French invasion of Russia and features traditional Russian music blended with more modern sounds as well as lyrics lifted directly from Leo Tolstoy’s 1869 novel. Meanwhile, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Mikhail Baryshnikov will appear in a dramatic role as the Ukrainianborn Vaslav Nijinsky in Letter to a Man, director Robert Wilson’s staged production of the famed danseur’s diaries, beginning with the onset of his schizophrenia. The show, scored with songs by Henry Mancini and Tom Waits, among others, is performed in both English and Russian.

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TRAIN OF TERROR

The Girl on the Train is one of fall’s most anticipated films, and the latest in a long line of thrillers to spill blood on the tracks

 1938 In Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes, one woman (Margaret Lockwood) grapples with the disappearance of an elderly traveling companion—as well as every other passenger’s memory of her existence.

The Burt Lancaster film The Train depicts a German colonel bent on smuggling stolen artwork out of France—and set the bar for high-stakes heist films playing out on the rails. 1964

 1974 Murder on the Orient Express follows detective Hercule Poirot as he attempts to solve the mystery surrounding the on-board death of a businessman amid suspects played by the likes of Lauren Bacall, Sean Connery and Vanessa Redgrave.

In Runaway Train, two escaped convicts (Jon Voigt and Eric Roberts) board a train with no idea that its brakes are shot and it’s speeding toward a deadly collision. 1985

 2013 In Snowpiercer, starring Chris Evans and Jamie Bell, the last humans survive a new Ice Age on a train making its way endlessly around the world. When the people living in the slums at the back of the train revolt, the fate of mankind rests precariously on a speeding locomotive.


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WRITTEN BY FRANCES DODDS PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARY MCCARTNEY STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK

THERE’S A REASON WE LOVE BRIDGET JONES, WHO ALWAYS REMINDS US TO LAUGH AT OUR OWN INSECURE ABSURDITIES. HERE, IN A REVEALING INTERVIEW, ZELLWEGER SPEAKS TO THE CRUEL SCRUTINY OF FAME AND MAKES CLEAR WHY SHE’LL ALWAYS FIT THE ROLE

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tall, wiry man with round glasses is standing in the palatial lobby of the Getty Center in Los Angeles, the sprawling museum and gardens complex snuggled into the hills of Brentwood. He’s holding an iPad, which he’s suspending feebly toward distracted passersby. He asks if we’d like to take a survey. With brusqueness of New York habit, I say, “No thanks” and breeze past. But Renée Zellweger pauses kindly. “Oh—maybe,” she says, in her whisper-soft Lone Star accent. “Do we get one of those pretty postcards?” Don, as his name card reads, is radiant. Indeed we do! Alas, further investigation unearths that the survey is meant to be taken upon leaving the museum. So we promise to return. I turn to Zellweger, the well-bred Texas girl who’s just disgraced this one-time Texas girl down to her bluebonnet roots. “So where,” she wants to know, “did your family live in Dallas?” Zellweger’s hair is pulled up under a baseball cap, with wisps of blonde hair falling in front of her ears. She’s dressed in sneakers with black yoga pants and a black SoulCycle workout jacket, zipped up to the neck. Her skin is a silky buttermilk white: If she spent those idle high school hours slicked up in baby oil and broiling under the suburban sun like the rest of us, you’d be none the

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honest. Whatever it was that Helen experienced and suffered for the rest of us, I’m grateful.” Another person to whom Zellweger feels indebted is Maguire, who took the chance all those years ago of casting a “Texan comic,” as the British tabloids snidely dubbed her, as Bridget, a character beloved as a national treasure. But Maguire says that she’d seen her in Jerry Maguire and Nurse Betty (two of her biggest roles at that point) and was impressed with her ability to “combine truth and comedy.” So the pair arranged to have dinner. “She had a lovely, self-deprecating quality,” Maguire says, “which isn’t natural to everyone, and was what Bridget needed. She really made me laugh. So I thought, Phew, that’s half my job done.” In the years following Bridget Jones’s Diary, Zellweger established herself as one of the leading actresses in Hollywood and starred in a procession of big-budget roles, among them her Academy Award-winning performance in Cold Mountain and her Golden Globe-winning performance in Chicago. So much is different now; surely Zellweger herself is different. “She has changed,” Maguire says. “We were both groping our way, to tell you the truth, with the first one. We didn’t know if it was going to work. But she’s so much more confident now. This one, she just came on and nailed it on the first take, and by the second take, she was trying something different. She is probably one of the most skilled physical-comedy actors I’ve ever come across.” It’s true that it’s hard to think of a character whose body Regardless, now she’s back. And this September, 15 years after Bridget Jones’s Diary and 11 years after Bridget language—that perky, vaguely duck-footed gait, the furrowed brow and mouth slightly agape with concentraJones: The Edge of Reason, we will get the much-anticipated third chapter, Bridget Jones’s Baby. Zellweger, at 47, tion—is more endearing. “Bridget herself is made up of a has returned to play the character for which she received an sort of healthy self-loathing combined with a misguided Academy Award nomination, and for which she is arguably self-certainty,” Maguire says. “Which is, of course, in Renée, and in all of us.” most loved—the aspirational single girl who can be counted on, with cigarette in hand, to slosh wine on the ellweger admits to being a bit most important person at a party before inadvertently jet-lagged, just in from a insulting everyone else, all while squeezed into Spanx couple weeks of final touches under a dress that’s just a bit too snug. on Bridget Jones’s Baby in Most of the original cast is back, including Bridget’s London. I tell her I’m curious longtime love interest Mark Darcy, played by Colin Firth, where she feels most at home, as well as director Sharon Maguire (who sat out the being from Texas, having second movie). The notable exception among returnees is settled in L.A. and perhaps Hugh Grant, who played publishing playboy David belonging just a little bit to Cleaver. Those shoes have been filled by Patrick Dempsey, England, the country having who is very in character as a very American founder of a embraced her so warmly as its dating site. Emma Thompson, also a co-writer on the pop-culture progeny. “I’ve screenplay, is another charming addition, in the role of Bridget’s forthright doctor. The story, based on a series of never thought about that,” she says. “I guess I kind of feel at home wherever I go, most places. But I really know I’m columns written by Helen Fielding, author of the original home when I go to Texas. My boyfriend is also from Texas Bridget Jones books, centers on a mystery of paternity, and his family is still there, so we go back quite a bit now, after Bridget—now 42 and a successful morning show which is nice.” producer, but single still—has a promiscuous week that The boyfriend in question is Doyle Bramhall II, the results in an unanticipated pregnancy and an unusually musician, songwriter and producer who’s known for his high-stakes love triangle. work with a number of major artists, including Eric “Bridget is so true,” Zellweger says of her character while digging through her bag in search of gum, extracting Clapton, Elton John and Roger Waters. They’ve been together for about four years, but met when Zellweger was a travel sewing kit and earplugs in the process. “She’s so wiser now. In fact, it’s doubtful that the teenage Zellweger, a reputed extracurricular queen whose overachieving streak lasted well into her career (as, you know, a movie star), had too many languid afternoons to kill back then. So perhaps in 2010, when she decided to vacate the limelight for a while, she had plans to reclaim a few of those afternoons in the sun.

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“I GET EXCITED ABOUT THE INTERNET BECAUSE IT SEEMS LIKE IT SHOULD MAKE OUR CULTURE LESS NAIVE ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF MISINFORMATION, BUT I STILL GET PHONE CALLS FROM PEOPLE I’M CLOSE TO LIKE, ‘OH MY GOSH, CONGRATULATIONS!’ ”

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still in college at the University of Texas at Austin. Has it been interesting, I ask, dating an artist from another medium? She smiles. “We’re very compatible.” Zellweger is famously private, having managed to keep her numerous high-profile relationships over the years— with Jim Carrey, the musician Jack White, an annulled marriage to Kenny Chesney, a two-year stint with Bradley Cooper among them—largely out of the spotlight. And as we’re talking, it strikes me that perhaps her dexterity in obscuring her personal life is a product of her most beguiling quality, which is an apparent curiosity about the minutiae of others’ lives. I mean, we’re talking about an Oscar-winning actress here, but if she’s not genuinely interested it hardly matters because you feel like she totally is. She asks so many questions that—somewhere between learning the hobbies of your four siblings and your favorite cheese and your closeted professional aspirations—it’s easy to forget who’s interviewing whom. Given her plentiful profiles over the past two decades, I know I’m not the first person to feel this way. But I’m curious: What has it been like meeting so many writers over the years, spending time with them and then seeing yourself assembled in their observations? She laughs. “Someone had me talking to penguins in my own special language at the zoo. But we sat on a bench, we never went to the zoo!” She’s referring to a Vogue cover story from 1998. I gesture shock. I’d read that story; the part where they “went to the zoo” was a substantial part of the narrative. “My reaction exactly!” she exclaims. “I don’t know. I guess I have bigger things to worry about. But that’s one of the things I’ve had to learn to make peace with. The truth is…” “Wobbly?” I suggest.  “It’s wobbly,” she says. Paradoxically, perhaps now more than ever. “I get excited about the internet because it seems like it should make our culture less naïve about the effects of misinformation,” she continues. “But I still get phone calls from people I’m close to like, ‘Oh my gosh, congratulations!’ The big question is why there is such an appetite for [vicious tabloid coverage]. Snark has somehow replaced intelligent wit, and it’s pervasive... it’s in the political spectrum, it’s everywhere. There’s no shame anymore. It’s an interesting time, and I wonder where the cycle goes from here.” There is a scene in Bridget Jones’s Baby that seems prescient to our conversation. Bridget finds herself being fired from her job as a morning talk show producer after she has, in a classic Bridget gaffe, mistakenly put a befuddled chauffeur on air to be cross-examined instead of a murderous war general. This comes as the climax to a building conflict with her millennial boss, whose solution to a weighty segment is to air photos of cats that look like Hitler. Bridget launches into an impassioned speech about the integrity of substantive journalism and marches out of the room. It’s an “Ah-ha!” moment of self-emancipation for her, but it leaves the audience feeling a bit despondent—as most soapboxes on this subject can. Bridget is


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storming out in righteous protest, but the show will go on without her. By this point, we’ve wandered our way into the Robert Mapplethorpe retrospective, and as our eyes adjust from the California sunshine to the indoor dimness, Mapplethorpe’s shadowy images seem especially lurid. We’re standing in front of a black and white nude of a woman reclining, the expanse of her chalky white torso rushing to meet a tangle of dark pubic hair. Zellweger speaks with unhurried deliberation, foregoing filler words for gaps of silence as she considers her thoughts. “I guess I just think a lot about this new idea we’re presenting,” she says, “about what you need to do in order to be considered a person of substance in our society. I know I feel overwhelmed by whatever that standard is. Could that be what fuels this need to read negative things about people you don’t know? Or to take out aggression by humiliating people who are in some way recognized for something that they’ve done?”

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ut in our era of whiplash reactivity, at the exact moment any one person is getting ripped to shreds on Twitter, you can almost hear the tapping of keyboard across America as op-eds are drafted in that person’s defense—the ultimate progression being toward a kind of enforced awareness. Perhaps few have personified this more in recent years than Zellweger herself, although certainly not by her own wishes. It may be ironic that it was at the Elle Women in Hollywood Awards—one of the foremost annual events celebrating and supporting women in her industry— that she made an appearance in 2014 after six years off the grid and generated a hurricane of unusually cruel speculation over her seemingly altered visage. At the time, Zellweger, in model Southern belle form, politely showed the subject to the door. “I’m glad folks think I look different!” she told People magazine. “I’m living a different, happy, more fulfilling life, and I’m thrilled that perhaps it shows.”  Of course, this response—potentially a statement of denial, but most certainly a pointed dismissal of the discussion—was not enough to satiate the carnivores of celebrity gossip. Some came to Zellweger’s defense, mostly with arguments along the lines of “We’ve created a culture that expects women to look younger and then shame them for getting plastic surgery to look younger.” But the fact of the matter is that within the conversation about “aging gracefully,” with its outsized focus on Hollywood actresses, no one really knows how to talk about plastic surgery. Cosmetic plastic surgery is synonymous with vanity, which is synonymous with shallowness, and while we’re all comfortable decrying the pressures to get plastic surgery, once it’s done, to any conspicuous degree, it seems to be viewed as a sort of pitiable

surrender. We perceive vanity as operating on a sliding scale, with obsessive exercise, fanatic eating habits and hours spent on makeup contouring and perfecting social media posts on one end—and going under the knife on the other. Being healthy is great, obviously, but if vanity is equivalent to hours spent on the cause of appearance, then surely the equation of “plastic surgery = pitiable vanity” is off. Because really, in this particular feminist cocktail, pity is the poison. It’s the feeling we get when we see a woman who has “overdone it” with plastic surgery—pity that she couldn’t reconcile the changes in her body with our culture’s standard of beauty, and that she cared so much. Because we think women of substance shouldn’t care so much about the way they look. But none of this is to say that Renée Zellweger got plastic surgery. So here is where we come to an uncomfortable moment. Having ventured outside again, we are sitting under a shaded enclave with bags of potato chips, and I ask Zellweger her thoughts on Rose McGowan’s recent op-ed for the Hollywood Reporter. The actress had penned a savage defense of Zellweger in response to a column by Variety critic Owen Gleiberman, who, after watching the trailer for Bridget Jones’s Baby, was disappointed that Zellweger, to his mind, no longer looked like the character of Bridget Jones, implicating plastic surgery as the culprit. He then laments our culture for reinforcing an unrealistic beauty standard, and mourns Zellweger—once a “poster girl for the notion that each and every one of us is beautiful in just the way God made us”—as the latest victim of this “cosmetic-zation of reality,” counting Bridget Jones as a

HERE IS A WOMAN WHO IS FAMOUS, BUT WHO BECAME FAMOUS IN A TIME WHEN BEING FAMOUS REALLY DID MEAN SOMETHING DIFFERENT THAN IT DOES TODAY. related casualty. (Never mind the possibility that Bridget, a middle-aged television producer living on the same planet we do, might herself consider plastic surgery, but I digress.) The internet was flung into a fresh bout of outrage along all the lines one might imagine. Zellweger, however, has until this moment been unaware of the entire drama. Which puts me in the very unpleasant position of explaining it, and Zellweger in the presumably beyond unpleasant position of hearing about it.

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So I fumble through a summary of the main points, a cold sweat pricking at my forehead. Here is a woman who is famous, but who became famous in a time when being famous really did mean something different than it does today. She became famous at a time when the most libelous press she had to worry about was a made-up story about her and some penguins. She’s clearly a deeply intelligent, reflective person who is invested in the state of the world, and as a public figure, she has a greater capacity for impact than the average individual. But it becomes clear, from her reaction in this moment, that for purposes of self-preservation, she is compelled to distance herself from fully engaging with the world as it pertains to her public image. And yet the world knocks; here I am. So Zellweger listens, and pauses for a long moment before responding. “Well, um, thanks, Rose,” she says, and tells me that she and McGowan “came up together, and that she’s always been very lovely and bright, and involved in important causes.” Then she says very quietly, “But that’s really too bad. He wrote this because he read a tabloid story and it played into his imagination when he watched the trailer? I can’t comment on it because I don’t know specifically what he was talking

writes, “I hope it turns out to be a movie about a gloriously ordinary person, rather than someone who looks like she no longer wants to be who she is.”  But seriously, what gloriously ordinary person, at certain moments in their life, hasn’t wished they were someone else? That they looked like or thought like or had the life of someone else? Because where, really, is the glory in being ordinary? Bridget Jones, in all of her “wanton sex goddess” fantasies, wanted precisely not to be ordinary. And each of us, in a society consumed with presenting the least ordinary fantasies of ourselves—living off the feast-or-famine endorphin rush of likes on our best angles and cleverest captions—is petrified of ordinary. But perhaps the one person who actually does want to live an ordinary life is Renée Zellweger. And she, having concluded her heartfelt monologue, is now jumping around in a very dignified sort of jig (no squealing), with a bee in hot pursuit. I think it’s probably more of a hungry bee than a paparazzi bee, so I pick up her empty chip bag and take it to the trashcan. “NO, Frances, you can’t be cleaning up my trash!” she cries with surprising force from her bee refuge. We bid

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“I SEE IT DIFFERENTLY. AND I WON’T APOLOGIZE TO HIM FOR DISAPPOINTING HIM THAT I’VE GROWN OLDER, BECAUSE THAT’S THE GOAL.”

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about, but he’s misinformed. He should have called me.” But then she does comment, and her voice rises a decibel for the first time in our conversation, the sweet twang of her accent taking on a harder edge. “But I disagree with him, if what he’s talking about is that there can’t be a character who represents every woman at different stages in her life—a character who is flawed, and who represents the truths about our humanity. I don’t know why he thinks there’s no value in that. I see it differently. And I won’t apologize to him for disappointing him that I’ve grown older because that’s the goal.” She stops and stares into her bag of chips for a moment. She goes on. “My mom turned 80 in June, and it was a room full of her closest friends. The things they’ve seen—their collective experiences—are invaluable. They’re the winners. Not someone at 26 who was beginning her life as a movie actress and landed a really fun role. He’s an entertainment critic? What does he think of Lucille Ball? Should she have stopped when they went from black and white to color because it wasn’t an ideal representation of that character in his mind? Is that what he’s suggesting?” In the final line of Glieberman’s article, after he insists that he’s always been the biggest Bridget Jones fan, he

adieu to the bee and find Don to take our exit survey, since we did promise. Two girls come up and shyly ask Zellweger for a picture. She agrees genially, even though she tells me afterwards she’s not feeling very photogenic. “A lot of things feel broken right now,” Zellweger says, as we pass the place we met, the sun lower and gentler now in the late afternoon sky. “But there are also incredible things happening. Women in America are experiencing a cultural renaissance. We’re questioning the pressures that society places on us in terms of expectations for traditional female roles. We’re questioning ideas about body image, ageism. We’re asserting ourselves and recognizing our value. Is that the pendulum swinging? Is that the result of us getting tired of the negativity? Maybe. Maybe we need one to serve as a catalyst for the other.” It’s true, and in this way, Bridget is still a guiding light—in all of her sloppy, self-respecting, “frankly I’d rather have a job wiping Saddam Hussein’s arse” glory. Zellweger thinks so. “As much as Bridget fixates on the details, her failures and her successes, I see her as a person who looks outward at the world and not back toward herself. Despite her fixations on certain things, and being embarrassed by her imperfections at times, I like the idea that she’s still free.” ■

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WIEN I FALL IN LOVE This page, clockwise from top left: The café and brasserie Palmenhaus is a fully operational greenhouse where patrons dine in a lush botanical setting; Vollpension, a hipster-filled coffee shop, employs charming retirees to do the baking; city views are best enjoyed from the Grand Ferdinand hotel’s rooftop pool; traditional fivestar grandeur is alive and well at the Hotel Imperial; a slice of Vienna’s decadent Sacher Torte. Opposite page: Just outside the opera house, women in ball gowns and tuxedo-clad men line up for late-night sausage and champagne at Bitzringer.


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WRITTEN BY LINDSAY SILBERMAN PHOTOGRAPHED BY KYOKO HAMADA

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n the outdoor garden of Salonplafond—a buzzy new addition to Vienna’s burgeoning restaurant scene—you’ll find pastel-painted Adirondack chairs scattered throughout the grass, string lights draped above wrought-iron dining tables and tattooed bartenders slinging lemongrass-infused Moscow mules to a crowd of young, beautiful patrons. Some sit at tables dressed with blue gingham napkins and pint-sized succulent planters; others sprawl out on picnic blankets, hand-rolling cigarettes in the golden glow of a mid-July sunset. It’s an impossibly hip atmosphere filled with impossibly hip people. If you didn’t know any better, you’d think you were in Brooklyn. Vienna? Hip? It’s hardly the first word that comes to mind when describing the Imperial City, a place more commonly associated with aristocratic palaces, horse-drawn carriages and Mozart concerts than, well, “trendiness.” But lately, the city has been experiencing something of a modern reinvention—a comeback, so to speak. Not since the early 1930s, before the devastation of World War II, has Vienna felt this alive. It’s as if the city just woke up from a seven-decade slumber, looking and feeling fresher than ever. The contemporary art scene is

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NO LONGER A SLEEPY CITY JUST FOR MOZART FANS AND MUSEUMGOERS, VIENNA HAS BECOME A MODERN MECCA— COMPLETE WITH BOUTIQUE HOTELS, TRENDY COFFEE SHOPS AND A THRIVING CONTEMPORARYART COMMUNITY


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Left: Vollpension’s shabby-chic interior features antiques donated by the seniors who work there. Above: A new wave of restaurants is pushing the boundaries of typical Austrian cuisine.

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booming, chic boutique hotels are popping up alongside dated heritage museums and restaurants are revamping the traditionally heavy, meat-centric cuisine. You won’t find Wiener schnitzel on Salonplafond’s menu, for instance, but you will find local Danube salmon garnished with hemp seeds and watermelon radishes. Even vegan restaurants— the crunchy-granola variety you’d expect from Venice Beach—are having a moment, serving vegetable-based interpretations of Austrian dishes. (Incidentally, chanterelle mushroom goulash is even better than the real thing.) Salonplafond, which opened just six months ago, is already a hotspot for locals and tourists alike. Come wintertime, the crowds move to the restaurant’s indoor space, where graffiti art hangs on the walls and DJs spin late into the night. What makes the eatery so of-the-moment isn’t the celebrity chef at the helm (Germany’s famed cooking-show personality Tim Mälzer) or the cozy, tavern-inspired aesthetic—it’s Salonplafond’s location inside the Museum of Applied Arts (MAK), a historic space that has housed works of art, design and architecture for more than 150 years. Like the restaurant, MAK effortlessly fuses old and new: There’s an entire hall dedicated to Baroque Rococo Classicism (think 18th-century porcelain cabinets and gilded bronze wall clocks) that the late American artist Donald Judd designed. These days, in nearly every corner of the city, you’ll see the grandeur of Vienna’s past carefully juxtaposed with the present. At the 14-acre MuseumsQuartier art complex— located just outside of the Imperial Palace in the former stables commissioned by Emperor Charles VI—Baroquestyle buildings are sandwiched between ultra-modern facades, like the minimalistic Mumok (Museum of Modern Art), an imposing cubic structure that houses Warhols and Lichtensteins. The cultural hub feels like a strange symphony honoring the city’s roots while looking toward its future. Beyond MuseumsQuartier (MQ to locals), there’s


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“THE CREATIVE SCENE IS REALLY THRIVING, AND IT’S YOUNGER, IT’S GREENER, IT’S MORE COLORFUL NOW THAN IT’S BEEN IN YEARS.”

even more happening: Ai Weiwei just launched a massive installation that runs from July to November; Francesca Habsburg, a descendent of Austria’s royal Habsburg dynasty, owns a contemporary hall that hosts edgy exhibitors like Tracey Emin; each summer, an international squad of graffiti artists can be found painting the town during the Cash, Cans and Candy street art festival. Given that Vienna just earned the title of “world’s best city to live in” for the seventh year in a row—a designation based on socioenomic conditions and quality of life—it’s no wonder so many young creatives are flocking here.

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ienna has long been considered the cultural and intellectual core of Europe, and rightfully so: It’s where Mozart, Strauss and Beethoven composed some of their greatest masterpieces, where Freud developed his early theories of psychoanalysis and where Gustav Klimt popularized art noveau. But it has also, until recently, lacked the sex appeal of more alluring destinations, like Paris or Florence, written off by travelers as being too serious, too staid—the kind of place that seems suited for AARP tour groups snoring the night away at the philharmonic orchestra. Several years ago, the Vienna Tourist Board conducted extensive market research to gain a better understanding of how travelers perceived the city. After surveying 11,000 participants in key regions like the U.S., Germany, Italy, Japan and Russia, they discovered a singular sentiment: Most people said that Vienna was a place they’d like to see “someday,” but they felt no urgency to go anytime soon. In response, the tourist board launched a massive worldwide advertising campaign with a snazzy, updated logo and a powerful new slogan: “Vienna: Now or Never.” They set out to show travelers that the most exciting time to see Vienna is now. Indeed, they had a point. “Vienna has changed a lot over the past few years,” says Katharina Marginter, the owner of Das Möbel, an interior design shop located in the fashionable Naschmarkt neighborhood. The handcrafted contemporary pieces that fill Marginter’s tri-level space represent a portfolio of 250 established and emerging designers, more than half of whom are native Austrian. “The art scene is very lively and the creative scene is really thriving,” she says. “It’s younger, it’s greener, it’s more colorful now than it’s been in years.” Along with her interior design shop, Marginter owns Das Möbel Café down the street, which serves as a living showroom for many of the pieces; every item that furnishes the coffee house can be purchased on the spot. The café’s unique twist on Viennese coffee house culture—a tradition that’s recognized by UNESCO as part of Austria’s cultural heritage—is just one example of how the centuries-old custom is being reinterpreted. Though the stale, smoky institutions like Café Hawelka and Café Sperl will always have their place in Viennese history, fresh ideas are rapidly taking hold. It’s just after 3 p.m. on a Tuesday in Wieden, Vienna’s latest cool-kid neighborhood, and the tattered armchairs at Vollpension have been occupied by locals for what seems like hours, a middle-of-the-workday Viennese phenomenon that Americans will never truly understand. Hipsters graze


Opposite page: Cocktail culture in Vienna is quickly catching on.

This page, clockwise from left: Performers dressed in period costumes roam the streets; Supersense, a trendy cafĂŠ and concept shop, opened two years ago in an abandoned 19th-century palace with gilded ceilings;

the stone-clad Museum of Modern Art (Mumok) is a stark contrast to the Baroque facades that surround it; quaint wine taverns surrounded by vineyards offer locals a tranquil escape just 30 minutes outside the city center.


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on avocado toast and field greens, and businessmen sip coffee while thumbing through the paper, as if they have nowhere in particular to be. Yes, the city is changing quickly—but inside coffee shops, time continues to stand still. Vollpension (“full pension”) is littered with antique vases, dusty table lamps, faded family portraits—a hodgepodge of tchotchkes that look like they’ve been plucked straight from grandma’s attic. And in fact, they have: The café is decorated and run entirely by senior citizens. It launched in 2012 as a temporary pop-up during Vienna Design Week, a citywide festival now in its 10th year, but the charming concept took off and Vollpension stayed put. Gaze past the tiled countertop into the kitchen, and you’ll see “Opas” (German for Grandpa) and “Omas” (Granny)— like 74-year-old Charlotte, a former chambermaid at the iconic Hotel Imperial—churning out secret family recipes for tartes, biscuits and cakes. On any given day, there are more than 200 varieties to choose from. The menu describes Vollpension as “an intergenerational coffee shop run by and for the old and the young” that aims to intermingle Vienna’s new generation with the old guard. It seems to be working.

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Opposite Page: An immaculate tablescape at Hotel Sacher’s Marble Hall, set for a 60-person dinner hosted by royals. Left: A modern twist on the classic Viennese coffee house.

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n 2010, Austrian hotelier Florian Weitzer did the unthinkable: He voluntarily relinquished the five-star status that had been awarded to one of his properties, the Hotel Wiesler, located two hours outside of Vienna in Graz. He craved independence from the formality that required five-star hotels to have uniformed bellmen and stringent dress codes, and he was confident that a new wave of travelers felt the same. At that time, says Weitzer, “You could find a lot of imperial and traditional properties, but there was a lack of new and innovative hotel concepts in Vienna. We wanted to breathe new life into the hotel scene.” A year later, he did just that. Weitzer’s stylish boutique hotel Daniel Vienna opened in 2011, followed by the Grand Ferdinand in 2015, offering visitors a laid-back approach to luxury that the city hadn’t seen before. The properties have youthful elements, like Vespas for rent and in-room hammocks (Daniel) and a swanky rooftop pool (Grand Ferdinand), but also pay tribute to Vienna’s old-world glamour. Ornate Lobmeyr chandeliers hang in Ferdinand’s lobby, for instance, and the restaurant’s silverware comes from an Austrian silversmith that has been around since 1882. Weitzer’s hotels are a stark contrast to the Viennese institutions just across the street. At the Hotel Imperial, butlers iron the newspaper each morning to save guests from ink-stained fingers; the museum-esque Hotel Sacher feels like stepping back into another era, even though it’s now more “casual” (by Viennese standards) than when it opened in 1876. The dress code at Sacher’s stately Marble Hall has loosened (diners are no longer required to wear a jacket and tie), though its role as a stomping ground for aristocrats and high society endures. The style is


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This page, clockwise from top left: Desserts at the famous pastry shop Demel are carefully assembled like works of art; a heaping charcuterie platter pairs well with GrĂźner Veltliner, a notable wine from the region; the mostly locals Caribbean eatery

Comida; boutique hotels like the Grand Ferdinand opt for young, smartly dressed staffers in lieu of formal, buttoned-up bellmen.


“WHAT’S SPECIAL ABOUT VIENNA– WHAT MAKES IT UNLIKE ANYWHERE ELSE–IS THAT YOU CAN STILL FEEL THE GLORY OF ITS PAST EVERYWHERE.” 20th century in decline, is slowly returning to its former glory. Hoeller and Kaps seem to have a knack for recognizing potential. Prior to SuperSense, they made a small fortune by launching The Impossible Project, a company that saved instant film from “extinction.” When Polaroid announced it would be permanently shutting down its last factory in 2008, the duo bought the production machinery for $3.1 million and started manufacturing cameras and film themselves. The Impossible Project’s product line is sold at SuperSense, as well as stores in 43 other countries, and has since amassed a cult following. “I’ve opened shops all over the world, but what’s special about Vienna—what makes it unlike anywhere else—is that you can still feel the glory of its past everywhere,” says Kaps. “We’re just hoping to give people who visit this city again a reason to discover something new.” ■

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shifting, but Vienna is by no means on the brink of becoming a watered-down version of its former self. If you walk past the Marble Hall dining room on any given night, you might see a table set for 60 with a seating chart that lists Prince Philipp and Princess Isabelle of Liechtenstein as the evening’s hosts. “You see these tables?” says entrepreneur Florian Kaps, pointing to the cluster of well-worn bistro tables on the patio of his quirky concept shop in Vienna’s Praterstrasse neighborhood. “The Hotel Sacher thought they looked crappy, so they threw them out. But I love these! The marks that are here, they tell their own story. I only like to use things that have history.” Kaps and his co-founder Andreas Eduard Hoeller, both native Austrians, opened their store SuperSense on the ground floor of an abandoned 19th-century palace two years ago. The sprawling space contains a café, recording studio, retail store and a “scent laboratory” for creating custom fragrances. “It took the older people in the neighborhood quite some time to understand it,” says Hoeller. “Initially, the first three weeks or so, people didn’t dare to walk in. They’d stand in the entrance and ask, ‘Is this a museum? Can we enter?’ There was a bit of a novelty in the beginning, but now people are so comfortable here, sometimes it’s difficult to get them out!” It soon became clear to Hoeller and Kaps that SuperSense was exactly what Praterstrasse needed. “People weren’t going out anymore because there was nothing to do. They felt like the neighborhood was missing something,” explains Hoeller. The once-posh boulevard, which spent the better part of the

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Left: Opened in 2015, the Grand Ferdinand brings a refreshingly modern aesthetic to Vienna’s hotel scene.


Shirt, $575, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, 212-334-1010. Dress, $1,195, EMPORIO ARMANI, armani.com. Lowland boots, $875, STUART WEITZMAN, 215-640-0400.

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BRAZILIAN SUPERMODEL AND VICTORIA’S SECRET UPSTART LAIS RIBEIRO SMOLDERS IN FALL’S MOODY, ROMANTIC BEST

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eeing models in person is always jolting. They’re poised, they’re beautiful; they are very, very tall. There’s an aura of effortlessness around them that acts as a magnetic force, making it difficult to look away—and difficult to imagine them as anything but models. Lais Ribeiro is certainly no exception—just look at her—but in professional modeling terms, she’s only just begun. Born in Teresina, in the north-central Brazilian state of Piauí, the 25-year-old was not all that long ago a young mother attending nursing school. She launched her own career in modeling by distributing flyers outside her hometown mall, eventually landing small jobs for local magazines and brands. “Those were my first ‘jobs’ as a model,” she says. It might have been a modest opening, but once she had that, it was clear she was poised for more. It wasn’t long before the Brazilian fashion community took notice and she took off, walking in upward of 25 shows in both São Paulo and Rio fashion weeks. “I put so much makeup on my face in one day that I couldn’t use makeup anymore,” she recalls of that first year. “It was quite an experience.” Since then, Ribeiro has graced runways in New York, London, Paris and Milan, appeared in countless magazines and, last fall, was named an official Victoria’s Secret Angel. Lest anyone think her beauty is entirely effortless, she points out that she stays in shape through dancing, a passion that began with salsa-style steps back in Brazil (and today also includes popinspired workouts she shares on Instagram). “I grew up dancing in Brazil, and always like to dance here,” she says of her adopted home of New York City. “There’s this Brazilian party every Sunday, that if I’m here, for sure, if you want to find me, I’m there.” ■


Coat, $1,800, ACNE STUDIOS, acnestudios.com. Greta loafer, $365, ASKA COLLECTION, askacollection.com.

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Dress, skirt and boots, all price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com.

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Jacket, $5,700, ETRO, Saks Fifth Avenue, 877-551-7257. Shirt, $575, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com. Cap, stylist’s own.

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Coat, $598, DKNY, dkny.com. Dress, $1,995; Lyndon boots, $750, ALEXANDER WANG, alexanderwang.com.

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Cardigan, $2,595, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, 212-334-1010. Shirt, $495, ISAIA, isaia.it. Trousers, $498, DKNY, dkny.com.

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Shirt, $960, MACKINTOSH FOR VETEMENTS, lagarconne.com. Trousers, $1,265, VETEMENTS, lagarconne.com. Pumps, $750, GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN, giuseppezanottidesign.com.

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Shirt, $1,100; Trousers, $1,200, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703. Greta loafer, $365, ASKA COLLECTION, askacollection.com.

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Laverne dress, $3,690, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com.

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Jacket, $4,295; Vest, $1,345; Trousers, $1,545, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana .com. T-shirt, $125, HELMUT LANG, barneys.com.

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Tuxedo jacket, $3,685; Bra, $895; Trousers, $2,165, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, 212-645-1797. Mazzy bootie, $995, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Hair: Serge Normant using Serge Normant Hair Care; Makeup: Georgi Sandev using Chanel; Stylist assistant: Rachel Pincus.


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THE WINESOAKED L.A. DINNER PARTY IS GOING UP IN SMOKE

WRITTEN BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE PHOTOGRAPHS BY GIEVES ANDERSON

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

POT LUCK


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PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

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n a recent Friday night, Laura and her friends gathered around a 22-seat farmhouse table on the back patio of a bungalow in Brentwood. It was just after 9 and the surface was littered with the telltale remnants of a good dinner party: casually just-so arrangements of white peonies, half a dozen empty bottles of Commanderie de Peyrassol, chatter about camps, holidays in Capri, what everyone was watching on Netflix. Then out came coffee and dessert. Someone had brought chocolates. Laura placed them onto the table: nine delicate pieces each topped with an artful fold of dark chocolate and a sprinkling of sea salt (Maldon, naturally) and tucked into a small, fabric-lined box embossed with gold foil. Inside them, she announced, was caramel. Also: cannabis, each perfect square infused with 10 mg of THC. “You need to meet my friend,” a coworker had told Laura a few years earlier of the chocolatier who’d made them, a former apprentice to Alice Waters who, she’d been told, had found a celebrity following with her underground line of high-end handmade, organic chocolates. Brilliant, she thought. It wasn’t like Laura was a pothead, she says, or even a regular smoker. She’d gone to college in Vermont, where, she says, “people smoked weed, but I wouldn’t say I was an avid user.” But after spending her 20s drinking in bars, her more civilized 30s drinking wine in nice restaurants or over at friends’—getting married, having kids, climbing the ranks at work and closing in on her 40s—there was just something just so appealing, so right, about weed. If it doubled as a classy hostess gift, one that everyone could enjoy, even better. Over the last few years, marijuana has eased its way onto guest lists around L.A., shrugging off any hippie connotations to earn a place at the table alongside noncouch-surfing, non-binge-eating professionals who perhaps hadn’t thought about pot in years, if they’d ever thought about it much at all. Jess, who heads an educational nonprofit, says that she and her friends will even bring along a bag of gummy bears (the edible kind) to a night out at dinner for a “giggly good time.” For one thing, as Jess points out, “Anyone can get a

IF YOU’RE GOING TO TAKE THE TIME TO GO TO, OR TO HOST, A DINNER PARTY, YOU WANT IT TO BE FUN AND INTERESTING, THE BEST VERSION OF ITSELF.

prescription.” Laura’s husband’s doctor recommended marijuana for his sleep issues, but, not yet an official U.S. citizen, her husband was wary of filling the script. So Laura got one instead, simple as that, joining the some 800,000 people in California, or about two percent of the population, who are licensed to receive medical marijuana prescriptions. Sales of medical marijuana in California hit $2.7 billion last year. For another, marijuana is both efficient and effective, something that Los Angeles type-A types can appreciate— a quick and guaranteed good time in the way rosé really isn’t. “I and a lot of the people in my peer group are at places in our lives where we’re very busy,” says Laura, a mom of two. “We have kids, careers, social lives, and everything needs to run as efficiently as the next.” The gummy bear and pot-infused chocolate part of the evening serves to amp things up on an abbreviated timetable, now that the nanny needs to be relieved by 11, the short sprints of parenthood and early middle age having officially replaced the 3 A.M. marathons of their 20s and early 30s. “If you’re going to take the time to go to, or to host, a dinner party, you want it to be as fun and interesting as possible, the best version of itself,” she says. “Getting stoned is a mini-bomb to throw into the evening to kick it up a notch and differentiate the night, and fast,” a social, collaborative, near-instant high. Or, as Jess describes it, “It’s like coke in the ’80s.” Except, of course, without the comedown. Pairing wine with pot, in fact, makes hangovers, for the most part, a thing of the past—something these busy parents also enjoy. Even with the stronger strains that have accompanied the medical marijuana boom, pot offers a gentler, more manageable buzz than alcohol, while also countering


A luxury sector has sprung up to accommodate more discerning pot smokers. Here, the top vaporizers for lighting up in high style The Herbalizer You know those humidifiers for when you have the flu? The Herbalizer operates just like that, except with a very different purpose. HERBALIZER, $599, herbalizer.com

Sidekick Focus on freshness. With a vortex cooling chamber, American handblown glass and a ceramic heater, every hit from this vape feels as clean as the first. SIDEKICK, $300, 7thfloorvapes.com

Kandypens Gravity Besides the pen’s discrete size and a dependable, temperaturecontrolled battery, the Gravity offers an elevated air-flow system that won’t clog or leak. More importantly, the chamber comes sans coils, so it can hold an abundant .5 grams. GRAVITY, $129.95, vapesociety.com

Ascent DaVinci’s Ascent is perfect for the vapist who knows exactly what she wants. Ascent’s precision temperature controls go up to 430°F and its threehour battery life makes it possible to keep on puff, puff, passing. DAVINCI, $199, davincivaporizer.com

Pax 2 The Pax 2 looks like a prop from a space-age film. Petite, minimalist and futuristic, it has a lithium ion battery that recharges via USB, allowing you to focus less on when and where to charge it and more on the future, dude. PAX, $279, paxvapor.com

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OPENING SPREAD, FROM LEFT: SHIRT BY LONGCHAMP, RING BY DE GRISOGONO. RINGS AND BRACELETS BY JENNIE KWON DESIGNS. PLATES BY RESTORIATION HARDWARE.

DAZED AND REUSED

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its morning-after effects. “I can’t go out and have five gin and tonics and get up at 6:30 with my two kids—it’s too painful,” says Laura. “But certainly a couple glasses of wine and a gummy bear is a good combo.” And, of course, a creative class of marijuana artisans, like the chocolatier, bubbling just beneath the surface of legalization doesn’t hurt, offering too an air of exclusivity and refinement—good taste all around. “A lot of times when you’re doing edibles, it’s like, I’m just going to grin and bear it and swallow this gummy bear and it will be fine, but some of this better stuff, like the chocolates, don’t taste like you’re eating pot,” Laura says. “It’s delicious. Plus, there’s some style to it.” A measure to legalize marijuana for recreational use in California will appear on the ballot this November, and while states including Florida, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada will also decide on marijuana-related ballot initiatives this fall, California’s Adult Use of Marijuana Act, or Proposition 64, is the most high-profile and far-reaching of the bunch, allowing adults to “possess and grow small quantities of cannabis for personal use,” while also establishing a regulatory framework for commercial production and for taxation of its sale. It will almost certainly pass: A February poll conducted by public policy research group Probolsky Research found that 60 percent of registered voters say that they will vote in November to “legalize marijuana for recreational use under California law.” Both Jess and Lauren are part of friend groups that spend weekends throughout the winter in Aspen, where, since Colorado’s recreational legalization in 2014, pot has fully worked its way into the social scene. Upscale boutiques like Silverpeak Apothecary—“a fascinating education in the art and science of enjoying a superb cannabis experience,” according to its website—deal in plants, accessories and infused products, artfully displayed in glass cases and sold by highly educated, well-spoken staffers. “It’s weird,” says Jess. “But you might as well be in Cartier. You get used to the idea that pot is now highend, or can be.” Until now, people like the chocolatier have been secret resources, their existence shared mostly between friends and friends of friends. Although she has a beautiful website, the chocolatier tells me she’s holding off on press while she keeps an eye on legislation. In the meantime, she’s busy collecting advice from some of her high-powered clients, including Laura’s consultant husband, about how to position the business post-legalization. The wait, for many, is eager: Legalization is expected to raise state revenues by $1 billion in the first year alone, with a number of pot-related goods and services, from on-demand delivery to $600 “smart” vaporizers, lying in wait. Meanwhile, the price of land in the Southern California desert tripled after laws opened to permit commercial marijuana cultivation. There is, perhaps not surprisingly, such a thing now as a “cannabis lawyer.” Jess is looking forward to legalization too, so long as her dinner parties will still feel special, of course. She recalls a recent birthday gathering for 14. “Everyone ate chocolate and it was the most fun,” she says. “We were hysterical the whole time.” By 10 P.M., the plates were cleared and by 11, she was washing her face and happily slipping beneath her duvet. ■


CITIES CITIES → CHICAGO

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HERE COMES THE NEIGHBORHOOD

A latecomer to the party, Lower Manhattan is currently enjoying a booming revival. The historic district below Chambers Street continues to undergo an exciting resurgence as a cultural, tourist and real-estate destination, as well as becoming the city’s newest neighborhood for luxury shopping, after-dark hotspots and architectural spectacles. From One World Trade Center, where Condé Nast, among other top companies, has found a shiny new home, to the WTC Transportation Hub, designed by Spanish Neo-Futurist Santiago Calatrava, and the new crop of residential towers dotting the skyline, the lower part of downtown is certainly on the up and up. ILLUSTRATION BY OWEN GATLEY


CHICAGO CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

→T  he Chicago Symphony Orchestra will celebrate its 125th anniversary at this year’s Symphony Ball, where Riccardo Muti will conduct a recreation of the symphony’s first concert in 1891, followed by dinner and dancing. cso.org

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BRIGHT IDEAS

Two Chicago jewelry boutiques are set to shine this fall

Chic jewelry is written in the stars at Winifred Grace, the Andersonville boutique where designs can be personalized with birthstones and imprints. The store’s latest offering is the Constellation Collection, a line of pendants and cuffs available in gold, rose gold, sterling silver or platinum, each stamped with a pattern of stars corresponding with one of the 12 zodiac signs. Designs can also be set with diamonds or the corresponding birthstone. “Our collections are often inspired by personal narratives. In this case, our Constellation Collection was influenced by my interest in astrology and how it informs experiences and personal stories,” says owner Winifred Gundeck. 5642 North Clark Street; winifredgrace.com

Constellation necklace, $1,038, winifredgrace.com

World Time watch Ref. 5930, price upon request, PATEK PHILIPPE, razny.com.

Watching the Stars

Watch-lovers are counting the minutes until the opening of an exciting fourth location of Razny Jewelers. The new Oak Street store will be a dual watch boutique carrying Rolex and Patek Philippe exclusively. With stores in Addison, Highland Park and Hinsdale, the thirdgeneration family business is “bringing the Razny culture into downtown,” says owner Stanley Razny. Considered nonpareil brands when it comes to luxury watches, Rolex and Patek Philippe share homes in very few locations around the world, bringing Oak Street shoppers a rare opportunity to invest in high-quality timepieces. 109 East

Oak Street; razny.com

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Champagne Dreams

There are only a few more months to enjoy chef Nicholas Marino’s Italian-inspired menu at The Kitchen at Waldorf Astoria Chicago, an oasis overlooking the hustle and bustle of the Gold Coast neighborhood. Come 2017, the seasonal pop-up will close to make way for a yet-to-beannounced concept, but until then, the outpost is serving up breakfast, dinner and an epic weekend brunch featuring unlimited mimosas, Bloody Marys or champagne—a unique complement to anything on the menu. “Our team selected our favorite champagne varieties from the hotel’s extensive collection, identifying the distinct flavor juxtapositions and how they can enhance a dish,” says Marino. 11 East

Walton Street; waldorfastoriachicagohotel.com

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OUT OF THIS WORLD


DALLAS/FORT WORTH CITIES → CHICAGO

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→ October’s annual TWO X TWO for AIDS and Art gala has raised over $60 million for DMA and amfAR. twoxtwo.org

ORANGE COUNTY

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Retail Therapy

Exciting options for chic shoppers are coming in droves to downtown’s fashion scene … CANALI

For personalized, tailor-made menswear, Canali has come to the NorthPark Center. The luxury Italian house, acclaimed for its customized know-how and meticulous attention to detail, prizes itself on its made-to-order methods by creating distinctive suits, jackets, trousers and shirts. 8687 North

Central Expressway; canali.com

LONGCHAMP

Dallas’ finest shopping experience has received some much-needed additions. French luxury house and accessories favorite Longchamp made its Southern debut at NorthPark Center, becoming the brand’s only store in the state of Texas. The new space carries its famed handbag, luggage and accessories lines. 8687 North Central Expressway;

FORTY FIVE TEN

Le Pliage Héritage Luxe, $1,155,

Street; fortyfiveten.com

… PLANET BARDOT

On Knox Street, the popular Planet Bardot has tripled its footprint to accommodate more of its carefully constructed selection of styles by the likes of Frame Denim, Ulla Johnson and Helmut Lang. Owner Diana Tabeshi continues to offer downtown Dallas a one-stop solution to on-trend shopping.

3119 Knox Street

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OPERA ON DECK

After premiering at The Dallas Opera six years ago to waves of praise, followed by a grand voyage around the world, this operatic version of Moby-Dick is returning home. Composer Jake Heggie and librettist Gene Scheer adapted Herman Melville’s seminal 19th-century tale into a production starring tenor Jay Hunter Morris as tragic hero Captain Ahab. “I gladly confess he leaves both my body and soul wrecked,” Morris says, “but what a journey! Jake and Gene have given us a remarkable retelling and re-crafting of the ill-fated hunt for the Great White Whale. The overture alone is worth the price of admission.” We think it sounds like a whale of a time. Opening November 4,

The Dallas Opera, 2403 Flora Street; dallasopera.org

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LONGCHAMP

The incredibly successful boutique Forty Five Ten is set to open its Main Street location in mid-November. The 37,000-square-foot space will feature Forty Five Ten’s famed curation of a wide variety of upscale fashion, fine jewelry, home decor, menswear, fragrances and beauty brands from Comme des Garçons to Saint Laurent, as well as a tea room. 1615 Main

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us.longchamp.com


LIFE BEHIND A BIG LENS Reflect on the life and career of famed fashion photographer Bruce Weber at Dallas Contemporary starting September 18, when more than 150 photographs—some never before seen—take up residence at the museum. Candid photos will be displayed alongside the iconic images that make Weber a legend. The exhibition’s curator, Peter Doroshenko, says visitors can expect a view of life as it happened between the iconic snapshots that landed on magazine pages and in Weber’s many ad campaigns. There will be pictures “of somebody having a drink of water. The downtime between actually taking the photographs. Or somebody relaxing in their hotel room before they have to run out and go do the photo shoot,” explains Doroshenko. “Those personal moments of what happens during or on the way to a photo shoot... the unexpected time before the making of the photographs that we recognize and admire.” Weber and his camera have covered a lot of ground, and the exhibition will be grouped geographically to illustrate

his journey through time, style and culture. At least 20 countries will be represented in photographs dating from 1978 to the present. “Fashion will be the overarching umbrella theme, and there will be kind of a sub-theme of the various locations,” says Doroshenko. “The Rio series, which is very sultry and sexy, to Vietnam, which was really kind of a strange juxtaposition of putting high fashion in the rice fields, to various shots of Norway, where the landscape is just as impressive as the fashion models.” Past Weber exhibitions have taken place in North Miami and Detroit, though neither explored the total breadth of his work, instead focusing on one specific location. Dallas, as Doroshenko puts it, “is as Americana as you can get.” It’s fitting that this exhibition—the first to span Weber’s oeuvre—will take place where everything is bigger. Work from Laercio Redondo and Pedro Reyes will also appear at the museum this fall. Through March 2017. 161 Glass Street; dallascontemporary.org

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BRUCE WEBER

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HOUSTON CITIES → CHICAGO

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HOUSTON

→ To mark the opening of its newest U.S. boutique, in the River Oaks District, Akris has created an Ai Horsehair Messenger bag in Burgundy exclusive to the location. akris.ch

LAS VEGAS

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KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES

Timed to Jones New York’s Fall 2016 Collection debut, the classic brand will set up shop in the Houston flagship of the equally iconic retailer Dillard’s. The featured collection, along with the campaign, will showcase the versatility of what the brand calls the new Jones New York. Contemporary pieces are mixed with sleek, structured styles that are more fashionforward, yet still embody the sophisticated polish of the modern Jones New York woman. jny.com

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CIDER HOUSE RULES

Leprechaun Premium Hard Cider was conceived

Sleep On It

It was only a few years ago that 20-something Texan Olivia White had a tough time finding the right linens for the bed in her college dorm room. “The industry lacked unique bedding that fit twin XL beds,” she says. That’s when her aunt Catherine Carmody got the idea to fit those college bunks—and then some—with stylish colorful linens, pillows and other accessories that “couldn’t be found anywhere else,” says White (pictured). She founded 41 Winks with Carmody after earning her degree in 2013, and has since helped rebrand with whimsical additions like the velvet Friendship Winking Skull Pillow ($90) and the cotton sateen Bailey “Block Out the Haters” Eye Mask ($38), which is already blowing up on social media. Next come pop-up shops around Texas and New York City—and eventually a permanent place to rest their heads. 41winks.com

Sequin Turquoise Pillow, $70, 41winks.com

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five years ago after 26-year-old Houstonian Jake Schiffer fell for the libation on a European trek. “It was what everyone was drinking [in Europe],” he says, but he couldn’t find a top-shelf version stateside. So he created his own artisanal cider with fresh-pressed juices fermented with champagne yeast. “People don’t realize cider’s parallels to wine,” says Schiffer, who sells his three different ciders only in Texas—for now—at restaurants, Whole Foods Market, Central Market and Spec’s. leprechauncider.com

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ÊFOR MORE ON HOUSTON, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

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Strip Keys “A lot people focus on food, flowers or the guest experience,” says Colin Cowie, one of the world’s foremost party planners, on the eve of opening his permanent outpost in Vegas. “We focus on everything: how to achieve excellence in what you smell, touch, taste, see and hear. We take you on the most magical journey.” At the star-studded, Cowie-produced grand opening of The Cosmopolitan in 2010, Coldplay and Jay Z, with special guests Beyoncé, John Mayer and Kanye West, rang in the new year as guests let loose on a metallic dance floor beneath 50 disco balls. Flanked by a champagne and oyster bar, revelers, including Jaleo chef José Andrés, did bumps of caviar off their arms before a VIP dinner in a purple-lit ballroom. “I’m used to doing very big things. This is the scale and the nature we’re used to,”

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GLITTER GULCH GLOBAL

says Cowie, who previously worked on the opening party for Atlantis at The Palm in Dubai, an event that featured what he says was “the largest fireworks show in the history of pyrotechnics.” Despite such spectacle, Cowie is also a master of creating more intimate events. “Without a doubt, if the people are nice and I like the vibe, I’ll do it,” he says. His work is highly personal; he often becomes a third wheel when planning a wedding. “If it feels right, there’s nothing I wouldn’t do, as long as it’s legal and safe.” Those two words maybe don’t come to mind when describing Sin City, but Cowie loves working in Vegas, where he’s thrown everything from 40-person parties to blowouts for more than 2,000. There was a birthday bash that cost $2 million for 24 hours, and big events at Wynn Las Vegas, Bellagio and Mandarin Oriental and for the iHeartRadio music festival. In Las Vegas, he says, “you can get anything you want, 24/7—good, bad or indifferent.” What’s more, the city offers a seemingly unlimited supply of event space. “It’s like a blank slate,” he says. Which is why opening a brick-and-mortar presence for his company in Vegas made sense, especially when the Strip has new venues such as the T-Mobile Arena and ongoing major resort makeovers like the $450 million transformation of the Monte Carlo into the NoMad and Park MGM properties. “My middle name is ‘party,’ ” Cowie says. “Vegas has only gotten bigger and better. I see a lot of opportunity here. And I think I bring style and class and elegance.” colincowie.com

“Part of our repositioning and strategy is to aggressively market to a high-end international clientele,” says Bill McBeath, CEO of The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas. Which is to say that the new Zuma, the elite but relaxed contemporary Japanese restaurant, beloved by patrons in London, Hong Kong, Istanbul, Dubai, Miami, Bangkok and New York, is the perfect dining spot for McBeath’s remake of the luxury resort. On first visiting Zuma in London in 2007, the hotelier recalls enjoying some of the best food he ever had, but he was equally wowed by the elegant architecture, the attentive service and the well-heeled crowd feasting on shared plates from the sushi counter and robata grill. “It’s a very appealing destination for those who want to see and be seen,” he says. The diverse revamp of the property includes a new Eggslut sandwich shop that has seen long lines around the clock since opening. David Chang’s Momofuku and Milk Bar will also join the resort’s dining collection in the coming months. Says McBeath, “The collection of brands and the overall dining experience is really unprecedented.” 3708 Las Vegas Boulevard South; cosmopolitanlasvegas.com

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CITIES → CHICAGO

→ Some of Vegas’ most distinguished chefs are showing up on the new Amazon series Eat the World, including host Emeril Lagasse, who helms four Sin City eateries when he’s not on TV.


LAS VEGAS BEGINNER’S LUCK

A roundup of the hottest openings around town

Much more than a driving range, this four-level entertainment venue behind the MGM Grand has two pools, a concert venue and five bars. When they’re not taking swings in one of the 108 climate-controlled hitting bays, guests can also relax in a cabana, order bottle service and feast on sliders, steak and shellfish. 4627 Koval Lane; topgolf.com

at the more than 24,000-square-foot hotspot are the five skybox suites. 3730 Las Vegas Boulevard South; jewelnightclub.com HYDE LOUNGE 

Nightlife heavyweight SBE’s top-level, 18,000-square-foot venue in the T-Mobile Arena has four bars, full-service catering and a DJ booth to keep the party going after the headliners have finished their encores. This is the place to sip cocktails or champagne at your private table before, during or after the show. 3780 Las Vegas Boulevard South; sbe.com

JEWEL NIGHTCLUB 

Hakkasan Group’s sparkling club at Aria has been lighting up the night with LED displays galore and top-tier talent from Jamie Foxx to Steve Aoki. The most prized perches

ÊFOR MORE ON LAS VEGAS, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

Hard and Fast

Designed in partnership with architect James Gillam of award-winning California firm Backen, Gillam & Kroeger, next-generation gallery RH Las Vegas, The Gallery at Tivoli Plaza brings some refinement to Vegas with glass-and-steel French doors that open to reveal four floors and nearly 76,000 square feet of exclusive luxury home collections, including the brand’s latest, RH Modern. The second-floor RH Design Atelier calls on the latest technology and design capabilities to offer guests an unprecedented level of personalized service, while the 16,000-square-foot Rooftop Park and Conservatory serves as a showroom for all RH Outdoor collections. RH chairman and CEO Gary Friedman describes the space as “a study of human design in regard to balance, symmetry and proportion,” and a reflection of the brand’s commitment “to curating and integrating the very best people, products and ideas.” 340 South

Rampart Boulevard; rh.com

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TOPGOLF 


LOS ANGELES CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

→ Opening spring 2017 as the reimagined Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the museum will occupy a sprawling former garment-manufacturing building in the Arts District, designed by Kulapat Yantrasast of wHY Architecture. theicala.org LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

Tinseltown Traders

SPIN CITY

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

HOME IS WHERE THE ART IS

“This neighborhood has more and more young people interested in art and design,” says interior designer Alison Palevsky about the Brentwood community. Palevsky—her namesake hybrid boutique, design studio and gallery— showcases contemporary furniture pieces from Palevsky’s own line, along with vintage pieces and a range of home and personal accessories, collaborations with other local designers and makers (such as Thomas Hayes Studio) and original artworks. Each season, she curates the merchandise and art to fit a new theme. (Past examples include “Source of Life” and “La Vie en Gris.”) “We can evolve and change, and be conceptual,” she says. 11740 San Vicente Boulevard, Suite 115; palevsky.co

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Shopping for tires may not be the most riveting way to spend an afternoon, but Pirelli, the 144-year-old Italian manufacturer that supplies tires to more than 300 racing championships worldwide, is now looking to elevate buying new wheels to a cultural experience. The company’s first global “prestige” center, P Zero World in Los Angeles, is not just a place to get a new pair of shoes for your ride, but an entrée into the iconic brand, the world of motorsports and beyond. The 8,000-square-foot retail center boasts state-of-the-art tire-fitting technology and will serve as a cultural

hub, offering events that ensconce Pirelli in the local art, fashion and dining scenes. Like many luxury-goods makers these days, Pirelli is banking on glitz by association. “People buying a $400,000 car expect to have a $400,000 experience when they go to change their tires,” says Paul Hembery, the company’s global motorsports and prestige project director. Odds are if you’re buying Pirellis, you’re buying other fancy things, and the hope is that the center will offer a marketing opportunity for both Pirelli and other luxury brands—putting getting new tires on par with, say, lunching at the Ivy. At least you’ll have the wheels you need to outrun the paparazzi. pirelli.com

L.A. has been rather simpatico to Detroit-based Shinola, with two new retail locations bolstering the brand’s presence in Silver Lake and Venice. New shops at the Grove and in the Arts District—over 5,000 square feet of space on East Third Street—deal in U.S.-made bicycles, watches and more. “This brand is so story-driven, and after opening our Silver Lake location, we learned how deeply our experience resonates,” says Shinola president Jacques Panis. “We keep opening stores so we can invite people in to feel the quality of the product and understand more about Shinola’s mission to create jobs in the U.S.” shinola.com

Small Field bag, $595, shinola.com


LOS ANGELES Mile-High Club

membership, the music producer is a loyal fan of the company. “It’s something I’ve strongly recommended to all of my friends,” he says. “In my business, I’m constantly carrying hard drives, and in the one instance where I had made it to L.A. from New York and realized I forgot one, I would have gladly taken a flight right back to New York. I could have sat on that plane the entire day.” And Vallis doesn’t just experience the perks of being a JetSmarter member in the air. For a recent Valentine’s Day, he decided day-of to take his girlfriend to the notoriously hard-to-book Mastro’s Steakhouse. Ultimately it was a JetSmarter concierge who secured the table last-minute and at the couple’s specified time. It’s no wonder, then, that Vallis, as he puts it, is “never going back to commercial.” Membership is now offered at three different tiers; the most popular is at $10,000 annually, with a $5,000 initiation fee. jetsmarter.com

From top: Sergey Petrossov, founder and CEO; Ronn Torossian, chief marketing officer

PILLOW CROCK

Hotels around town are rolling out the welcome mat for guests and visiting diners alike with a bevy of newly refreshed menu options. Here’s a peek

Ivory on Sunset at the Mondrian Chef Brian Malarkey: Grilled octopus with cannellini beans, braised tomato, preserved lemon and capers. 8440

Sunset Boulevard; ivoryonsunset.com

The Belvedere at the Peninsula Beverly Hills Chef David Codney: Taramasalata (salt-cod roe whipped with olive oil and lemon), served with freshly baked pita bread.

9882 South Santa Monica Boulevard; beverlyhills .peninsula.com

Viviane at the Avalon Hotel Beverly Hills Chef Michael Hung: Mafalde pasta with star anise–braised quail and broccoli di cicco sugo, chili vinegar sauce and Thai basil. 9400 West Olympic

Boulevard; vivianerestaurant.com

Georgie at the Montage Beverly Hills Chef Geoffrey Zakarian: Shrimp and grilled avocado with salsa roja and cotija cheese. 225

North Canon Drive; georgierestaurant.com

Avec Nous at Viceroy L’Ermitage Beverly Hills Chef Olivier Quignon: Whole oven-roasted cauliflower with Vadouvan curry, Marcona almonds, golden-raisin purée and parsley. 9291 Burton Way;

avecnous.com

IVORY ON SUNSET: MARIE BUCK; GEORGIE: MARGARET ZAKARIAN; AVEC NOUS: KEVIN MARPLE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

A private charter is unquestionably glamorous when compared to flying commercial, but it’s the JetSmarter app’s efficiency that has ultimately made the company such a popular solution for busy travelers flying coast to coast. Through its real-time mobile platform, which seamlessly connects travelers to private jets at attractive fares, the company (whose founder and CEO, Sergey Petrossov, and CMO, Ronn Torossian, are pictured at right) boasts the world’s largest private-jet marketplace and unprecedented services. Members are exclusively offered free seats on scheduled flights and guaranteed availability for discounted rates on private jet flights to and from over 170 countries. Additional benefits include a 24/7 team of aviation specialists, personalized concierge services, invitations to VIP events, complimentary airport helicopter transfers to and from Manhattan and premium hotel and travel benefits, as well as a 24-karat gold-plated membership card. In the six months since joining JetSmarter, member Beau Vallis has completed six JetShuttle round trips between L.A. and New York. Thanks to the convenience and networking opportunities afforded by his

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An innovative private-aviation company is redefining the industry—one networkingconducive flight at a time


LOS ANGELES 2

ARTS DISTRICT RISING

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The era of sparsely populated sidewalks, empty industrial buildings and quiet nights in the Arts District is a fading memory. The massive One Santa Fe (2145 South Santa Fe Avenue; osfla.com) mixed-use development, designed by L.A. architect Michael Maltzan, houses commercial tenants such as the art and architecture bookshop Hennessey + Ingalls (hennesseyingalls.com), men’s boutique Wittmore 2 (shopwittmore.com) and bar and small-plates eatery Westbound (westbounddtla.com). Officine Brera 3 (1331 East Sixth Street; officinebrera.com) joins neighborhood staple Bestia in winning over diners with hearty, handcrafted Italian fare, inspired here by Northern Italy’s Po River Valley. Other instant faves include Silverlake Wine and its accompanying Everson Royce Bar 5 (1936 East Seventh Street; erbla.com). “There’s something really exciting about the Arts District,” says Everson Royce co-owner Randy Clement. His team wanted a community gathering spot where “everyone knows your name, and you have the right stuff.” Cyclists and coffee drinkers alike are welcome at The Wheelhouse 4 , a hybrid bike shop/cafe (1375 East Sixth Street, Unit 6; thewheelhouse .bike). Co-founder Tami Spenst observes that the neighborhood’s somewhat spread-out pockets of activity call for bicycles “as a way to stitch it all together.” Home-furnishing retailer HD Buttercup 1 has an eastern outpost here (2118 East Seventh Place; hdbuttercup.com), but all design-curious eyes will be focused on a certain prominent newcomer when it arrives: the Soho House at Santa Fe Avenue and Bay Street.


Crown Royalty

North Hollywood’s The Garland gets a major facelift—and doesn’t care who knows

Beverly Park, for hosting weddings and events. The aesthetic still sets forth The Garland’s original bohemian vibe, though now detailed with chic decor and modern appliqués. There’s also the highly anticipated addition of in-house restaurant The Front Yard. Helmed by executive chef Larry Greenwood, it offers guests a quintessential Southern California atmosphere—bright and airy, with plenty of seating al fresco— alongside an elevated yet approachable menu (tuna tartare tacos, grit cakes with bacon jam) and craft cocktails. 4222 Vineland Avenue; thegarland.com

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A BIG FISH GOES WEST

New Yorkers have been hooked on Catch since EMM Group’s Meatpacking District hot spot opened in 2011. This fall, chef Andrew Carroll’s expansive menu of oysters, sushi, Alaskan king crab and more finally hits the West Coast. The new West Hollywood outpost, on the corner of Melrose and San Vicente, will feature a 12,000-square-foot retractable rooftop. “My favorite thing by far is the arrival moment when you step off the elevators,” says EMM Group’s Mark Birnbaum. “You will feel like you have escaped the city and come to an oasis.” 8715 Melrose Avenue; catchrestaurants.com

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scene, proves that property is not immune to the siren call of self-improvement, with an expansive three-year, $20 million renovation that yielded more than 16,000 square feet of newly designed space and gave its original Spanish Mission influence a 21st-century-twist. The hotel’s Hollywood roots are certainly authentic. Beverly Garland, the critically acclaimed American film and television actress, built the hotel in 1972 with her husband, Fillmore Crank, and eventually handed over the property to their son James, the present owner. Under his direction, and with help from hotel designer Forchielli Glynn and Rossi Architecture, The Garland unveils 257 revamped guest rooms and suites, a new lobby and lobby bar and an outdoor garden,

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Everyone loves a classic Hollywood remake. Now The Garland, a mainstay in the booming North Hollywood hotel


MIAMI CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

→ Looking for your Gee spot? Gee Beauty moved south to a larger location with expanded services and products–plus fashion!–in Sunset Harbour. geebeauty.com HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

B.Y.O. Boat

Once limited to staid yacht clubs and salty-dog establishments selling fried seafood baskets, Miami’s boating community has a new spot to tie up. Herewith, two upscale destinations with dockage (and debauchery) Jaws drop upon seeing the view from The Deck at Island Gardens. Located on Watson Island, the sprawling, St. Tropez-style “bay” club overlooks the entire Miami skyline. “Sunset is a particularly magical time,” says Mehmet Bayraktar, chairman and CEO for Flagstone Property Group, which also developed the adjoining Deep Harbour superyacht marina. He enlisted South Beach nightlife impresarios to host weekly soirées like Friday dinners and epic Sunday brunches where revelers soak up magnums of Dom Pérignon and the Island Gardener (a riff on the mojito that adds ginger and bitters to the classic Cuban cocktail) and feast on burgers and raw-bar towers. “Sunday transforms into an Ibiza dance party till midnight,” says Bayraktar. 888

MacArthur Causeway; islandgardens.com

RIVER YACHT CLUB

Leave it to Stephane Dupoux, the designer behind Nikki Beach and Seaspice, to launch River Yacht Club on the Miami River. More than just another pretty place, the Raymond Jungles–landscaped marina’s restaurant rotates guest chefs like Michael Lewis (Zuma, KYU) and Christopher Rendell (The Surf Lodge, Flinders Lane). “Without a doubt, table 15 is the best in the house for people-watching and sunset and river views,” says GM Fabien Lepaitre, who also recommends sipping a spicy Waterfront, a mix of tequila, watermelon water and fennel, upstairs in the first-ever VanDutchbranded lounge. “Taking a boat ride to dinner beats sitting in traffic on I-95 any day.” 401

SW Third Avenue; riveryachtclub.com

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THREE MEN & A BABY

Jason Odio and Michael Beltran followed up Ariete (see below) with Baby Jane, a luncheonette and all-day lounge in the bust of Brickell. They tapped nightlife veteran Roman Jones as a third partner (would that make him a surrogate?) to lend South Beach sizzle. When the wolves of Wall Street South come to down Chug burgers (ground chuck and cut steak patties) and bone-marrow canoes filled with vaca frita, they’re encouraged to hand over their smartphones for coloring books and Jenga. There’s show-and-tell too. “People can bring vinyl albums from home to spin on Tuesdays,” says Odio. 500 Brickell Avenue; babyjanemiami.com

Cuban Connection

Among a handful of chef-driven restaurants reinventing Coconut Grove’s food scene, Ariete’s partners have a true stake in the neighborhood. Jason Odio grew up there, where his father owned a seafood shack, while Michael Beltran, a Michael Schwartz protégé, hails from nearby Little Havana. Both Cubans, their heritage crops up in stick-to-yoursides farmhouse fare. “I found the recipe for ‘temptation caramel’ in an old Cuban cookbook,” says Beltran, who tosses smoked, fried plantains in the sauce as a bed for foie gras. “Sherry vinegar and sour orange juice make the caramel more acidic than sweet, so it hits all the umami notes.”

3540 Main Highway; arietemiami.com

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THE DECK


Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the developer. For correct representations, reference should be made to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. This is not an offer to sell, or solicitation of offers to buy, the condominium units in states where such offer or solicitation cannot be made. Prices, plans and specifications are subject to change without notice.

An address to be envied.

Retail. Offices. Residences. EAST, Miami Hotel.

Residences from $595,000

Penthouse pricing upon request: 305 371 2888

Visit our Sales Gallery: 700 Brickell Ave. Miami, Florida 33131

brickellcitycentre.com


MIAMI MAKING THE UPGRADE

Two ritzy Miami hotels get even ritzier—just in time for high season   Nautilus

Nautilus, a Sixty Hotel, has entered the fray in penthouse-mad Miami. The eighth-floor perch combines nearly 1,500 square feet of blue and white interiors with a nearly 2,000-square-foot ipe wood deck, perfect for sinking into ikat pillows amid flickering lanterns and tropical greenery. “Guests can sunbathe with a view of the city,” says Nautilus GM Steven Hiblum. The penthouse’s decor departs from that in the rest of the 250-room hotel too. Nautical and seaside cottage motifs unfold in the one-bedroom layout, from whitewashed rattan to walnut millwork. “The living room’s three portal windows add to the effect,” says Hiblum. Families and besties can convert the den into a bona fide second bedroom—its sectional sofa expands into a queen bed, while pocket doors seal tightly for privacy. The master soars higher with 16-foot ceilings and a king bed. 1825

Collins Avenue; sixtyhotels.com

Miami Beach

In the spirit of election season, the Fontainebleau Miami Beach is going all the way to the White House with its new poolside cabanas. The resort commissioned Clausen-Chewning Interior Design, the same Southeastern firm that designed its presidential suites, to revamp 33 cabanas around several pools, including family-friendly options in the kids’ zone. “Ipe wood panels offer privacy while allowing ocean breezes to flow through,” says president and COO Philip Goldfarb. “They enhance the sophistication of the already iconic poolscape.” Bigger Haiku ceiling fans keep things comfortable too, and neutral furnishings and plush poufs by Paola Lenti offset the dark wood. Flatscreen TVs have also been upgraded and enlarged, a handy amenity for afternoon siestas after snacking on mahi-mahi tacos with rosé, Cointreau and strawberry sangria. Personal charging stations and mini fridges stocked with fruit and beverages complete the stylish set-up. 4441 Collins

Avenue; fontainebleau.com

Servicing South Beach

Employees Only, the late-night New York haunt that’s sweet on the service industry, is set to open in Miami in a cozy, coral-rock bungalow. Besides its signature complimentary soup—served in the wee hours so patrons can get home in one piece—the craft-cocktail pioneer is bringing down some tasty, tried-and-true concoctions. Pucker up with the Westside’s Charbay Meyer lemon-flavored vodka, or brood in the corner with the Billionaire’s single-barrel bourbon and absinthe bitters. “Billy Gilroy, a founding partner who’s leading the Miami expansion, deejays soul and disco music on Mondays in New York, so expect the tradition to continue,” says Miami project manager Allyson Noman. 1030 Washington Avenue; employeesonlymiami.com

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  Fontainebleau


NEW YORK CITY CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

→ This fall, Greenwich Village’s iconic art-house Quad Cinema, which first opened in 1972, will again welcome cinephiles after an extensive overhaul. 34 West 13th Street; quadcinema.com MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

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LOWER MANHATTAN CONTINUES TO RISE

The revitalization of Lower Manhattan as a buzzing creative and residential community has seen it hailed as New York’s “oldest new neighborhood.” The landmark Beekman building, an 1883 architectural gem, has reemerged as a luxury hotel; Saks Fifth Avenue announced its newest location in Brookfield Place; and One World Trade Center has become a hot tourist and workplace destination. “Exciting retail, culinary and entertainment-focused developments are breathing new life into these historic neighborhoods,” Phillip St. Pierre, senior general manager of the Seaport District, explains. Here are a handful of glittering new gems:

MAP ILLUSTRATION: OWEN GATLEY

SAKS DOWNTOWN

Manhattan’s chicest shopping mall, Brookfield Place, has now installed some uptown specialty luxury with a new Saks Fifth Avenue outpost. The three-level showcase will feature the usual high-end brands as well as a selection tailored to the downtown customer. 230

Vesey Street; brookfieldplaceny.com

1 SEAPORT RESIDENCIES

With apartments ranging from $1 million to $20 million, the 60-story all-glass residential tower is the first to open in the historic Seaport District. Features include a teak-detailed sauna, a glass-encased fitness center and a porte cochère with valet parking. 161

Maiden Lane; 1seaport.com

WHISPER EDITIONS

Founded by former Vanity Fair photo director Judith Puckett-Rinella, Whisper Editions works with artists and designers to create original limited works. Now moving from online-only to a shop on Fulton Street, the store will offer a roster of photographers, jewelers, furniture makers and designers. 8 Fulton Street;

whispereditions.com

FELICE

An uptown Tuscan favorite, Felice restaurant and wine bar has now opened at Gild Hall hotel. The authentic menu of Italian classics and extensive wine list, along with the upstairs lounge, La Soffitta, make this intimate Wall Street location a must for downtowners.

15 Gold Street; felice15goldstreet.com

THE BEEKMAN, A THOMPSON HOTEL

Newly opened in August, the 237-room neoclassic building, complete with its stunning original glass atrium and skylight, was refurbished throughout by Swedish designer Martin Brudnizki. 123 Nassau

Street; thompsonhotels.com

SEAPORT STUDIOS

Bringing the city’s best emerging creative talent to the corner of Fulton and Front streets, this twofloor studio space will feature up-and-coming designers, plus showcase “what’s next” in the worlds of art, fashion and food.

19 Fulton Street; southstreetseaport.com

WESTFIELD WORLD TRADE CENTER

Housed inside the $4 billion Santiago Calatravadesigned “Oculus,” Westfield’s roster of 125 stores (such as Stuart Weitzman, Dior, Lacoste and Mont Blanc) is just as impressive as its exoskeleton exterior. 185

Greenwich Street; westfield.com


NEW YORK CITY Steel Dreams

A luxe megacomplex rising on Manhattan’s West Side welcomes the first of many high-profile occupants at 10 Hudson Yards

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Already a veritable city-within-a-city, Hudson Yards, New York’s largest private real estate development since Rockefeller Center in the 1930s, is going through a metamorphosis, rapidly crystallizing into a hub of fashion, technology and innovative eco-urban development. By 2024, the complex—which spans 60 blocks on the west side of Manhattan—will include an Equinox-branded hotel, a shopping center featuring New York’s first ever Neiman Marcus, 4,000 residences and a 750-seat public school. Before the project’s 2012 groundbreaking, the Hudson rail yards sat untapped for over 50 years due to a series of failed bids to develop the massive site. Scrapped plans included the world’s tallest skyscraper, a new stadium for the New York Yankees and a potential spot for an Olympic stadium. Now, however, the curse has been lifted. The area’s grand transformation can already be seen and felt. Ten Hudson Yards, a new 52-floor office tower, is the High Line’s newest neighbor, housing among others the headquarters for Coach Inc., L’Oreal USA and The Boston Consulting Group. Its interiors are just as impressive as its all-glass, 900-foot exterior, starting with a sprawling, color-coded lobby display of over 2,000 handbags plucked straight from Coach’s historic archive.   “Hudson Yards will create an entirely new neighborhood and transform the west side of Manhattan,” says Jeff Blau, CEO of Related Companies, the luxury real estate firm spearheading the Yards’ development. “With grand public spaces, vibrant shopping and restaurants, cultural amenities and unique residential and commercial offerings, Hudson Yards is destined to be the new heart of New York.” livehudsonyards.com

bloomingdales.com

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GREAT JEANS

Jordache has been a mainstay for stylish denim lovers since it debuted in the 1970s. Now, after a successful e-commerce launch in 2015, the brand is releasing its latest collection, Jordache Legacy, available in select boutiques and premium department stores, including, in New York, Bloomingdale’s. “The collection resonates with the Bloomingdale’s customer,” says Debra Lavi, Jordache’s VP of sales. “She’s looking for premium styles that will make her feel and look confident and sexy.” Beginning in September, the jeans will be available in cuts including Super Skinny, High Rise, Boot Cut and Slim Boyfriend, and feature subtle rip-and-repair and detailed hem treatments. “Every piece has long-lasting quality, which is exactly what we had in mind when designing the collection,” Lavi says. “I feel fantastic wearing each fit, from the Dawn High Rise legging to the Brooklyn Boyfriend jeans.”


mermaids welcome

tropical oasis lounging iconic entertainment endless surprises seminolehardrockholly wood.com


NEW YORK CITY Getting to know the fall’s top two cultural extravaganzas

NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

NEW YORK CITY WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL

filmlinc.org

nycwff.org

September 30–October 16

October 13–October 16

YEARS RUNNING

9 years

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54 years

BEST KNOWN FOR

A stunning selection of international cinema, including premieres of films like Steve Jobs, Gone Girl and The Social

Network.

Gastronomic events of every stripe, including the annual Burger Bash, which features all-star chefs competing to make the best hamburger.

HOT TICKET EVENT

“An Evening With...” Last year’s NYFF favorite featured Kate Winslet in a conversation with festival director Kent Jones.

Opening night’s sold-out family affair, featuring dinner by chef JeanGeorges Vongerichten, his brother Philippe and children Louise and Cédric.

CELEBRITY ATTENDEES

In 2015, Tom Hanks, Cate Blanchett and George Clooney, among many others.

Past years have drawn the likes of Neil Patrick Harris, Sienna Miller and Patti LaBelle.

REIGNING CHAMP

If you’ve got something special to celebrate, forget popping a bottle of regular champagne. This October, Champagne Armand de Brignac will release its Debut Blanc de Noirs Assemblage Two, a rare assemblage of vintages from 2008, 2009 and 2010, each sporting a suggested $1,000 price tag. Only 2,333 bottles will be released globally, but New Yorkers can find the bubbly at Bagatelle in the Meatpacking District. While a blend this special doesn’t come cheap, it also doesn’t come along quickly. “One of the joys of making wines of this quality is being able to take as many steps as are needed to achieve the very best,” explains Jean-Jacques Cattier, the brand’s Chef de Cave. “When we first began to set aside some of the most remarkable Pinot Noir juice, we had an idea that it would be exceptional… Last year, when conducting our tastings of all the blends, we finally all agreed, This is it.” armanddebrignac

JAY MCINERNEY SHARES DINING FAVORITES

There are many restaurants in Bright, Precious Days, some under their own names and some under fictional names. Odeon, that enduring classic, appears on both the cover and within the book. Protagonists Russell and Corrine Calloway live just a block away, and it’s their date night destination. Balthazar, another former hot spot that’s now a signature, is the backdrop for two scenes, while Declan’s is the name I give to a restaurant that very much resembles Michael’s, the midtown power lunch spot for the media tribe. The Fatted Calf is very similar to The Spotted Pig, the West Village gastropub that was the first place New Yorkers became familiar with chef April Bloomfield’s cooking. Bacchus is a mash-up of two mid-’80s wine-centric restaurants, Cru and Veritas, where deep-pocketed collectors and investment bankers would drop thousands on trophy bottles, sending glasses to adjacent tables and conspicuously consuming rare Burgundy and Bordeaux. Bright, Precious Days (Knopf) is available now.

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New York’s Best Fests


COMPANIES LOVE COMPANY

SPRING PLACE: ADRIAN GAUT; ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY

Twice a year, during the equinox, the daylight hours are relatively equal in length to the dark of night. Striking that kind of parity between work and life proves elusive to most people, but Harvey Spevak, CEO of the luxury gym chain named for the celestial phenomenon, says he’s achieved it. Equinox has grown like wildfire, especially in the New York area, where four new clubs in Manhattan and two in Brooklyn will have opened by the end of the year. Spevak isn’t fazed by the workload that comes with tending to such huge growth, mostly because he doesn’t consider it work. “I view this as my hobby,” says the CEO, who joined the company in 1998. “It’s what I do for fun.” Reflecting on his almost 20 years with the company, he acknowledges that the fitness industry has changed—technology, social media and lifestyle trends like athleisure have all played a role—but in many ways it’s still a cyclical business. “Right now, for example, boxing is having a moment,” he says. “Boxing is not a new sport, yoga is not new, Pilates is not new, boot camps are not new.” That’s not to say Equinox is anywhere but on the cutting edge—especially when it comes to promoting fitness as way of life. Come 2018, tourists looking to maintain their routines on the go will be able to stay in Equinox’s first-ever hotel in Manhattan’s Hudson Yards. “Today I saw something that just spoke volumes to me,” Spevak says. “It was a neon piece of art that says, ‘We want it all.’ ” equinox.com

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Equinox CEO Harvey Spevak talks work-life balance

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Power Play

Long gone are the isolating cubicles and company-specific floors; instead, modern shared workspaces are servicing a new networking generation. Workspace and membership club Spring Place fuses a community of global influencers, creative entrepreneurs and industry leaders. Located at 6 St. Johns Lane in TriBeCa, the space offers sweeping city views and three elegant floors of studio, work and social amenities, including a rooftop and all-day restaurant and bar. Following a $2,000 initiation, potential members can apply for one of five monthly options. (springplace.com) WeWork, a hip chain of co-working spaces throughout Manhattan and across the globe, is set to open its newest uptown space on October 1. WeWork Grand Central is located at 450 Lexington Avenue; membership for a one-person private office begins at $1,000 a month. (wework.com) WorkHouseNYC, a sleek new Midtown option at 21 West 46th Street, offers five floors of stocked pantries, furnished and wired office suites, landscaped terraces and rooftop and a sky lobby coffee bar. Spots go from $450 a month for one co-working seat to $8,500 a month for a large private suite. (workhousenyc.com)

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HAMPTONS CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

→ The 24th annual Hamptons International Film Festival —this year co-chaired by Alec Baldwin and Randy Mastro—will kick off October 6 with screenings, workshops and star-studded events. hamptonsfilmfest.org

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

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Ina Garten, better known as entertaining goddess the Barefoot Contessa, has starred in her hit cooking show for 13 years, developed hundreds of beloved recipes and will this fall release her 10th culinary tome, Cooking for Jeffrey—but don’t dare call her business an empire. The chef chuckles at the suggestion while testing new recipes in her East Hampton chef’s kitchen. Known simply as “the barn,” it sits next to the home she’s shared with her husband Jeffrey for decades. “I think when I started writing cookbooks, if somebody had told me that I would get to write a second one, let alone a 10th one, I would’ve thought they were crazy,” says Garten. In Cooking for Jeffrey, Garten intersperses sweet anecdotes about the duo’s life together next to the tried (and tried, and tried) and true recipes for which she’s famous. Their stories range from romantic—food-inspiring trips to Paris in their youth—to empowering. She says Jeffrey was the first feminist she’d ever met, encouraging her early on to go after her dreams in the face of considerable odds. It’s that unrelenting support that’s helped motivate her to constantly reinvent the (cheese) wheel, so to speak. “After writing almost 900 recipes,” says Garten, “I always think, ‘How can I come up with another 80?’ But it just happens! It’s kind of like being an athlete. You just get better at what you do.” Garten’s small but mighty team consists of longtime friend Barbara Libath and assistant Lidey Heuck, who help her develop and test each new recipe. Jeffrey, for his part, is not included in the taste-testing process because, Garten points out, he’s never disliked a dish she’s made. (“The best kind of person to cook for,” she jokes.) As for the backdrop, there couldn’t be a more serene setting to cook up a storm of comfort food than East Hampton. “I just can’t imagine a better place, a more beautiful place,” says Garten. “The ocean is here, the open fields and farm stands. It’s just amazing.” And of course, she has her dream guest in attendance for dinner every night. The secret to their decades-long marriage? “I think it’s just that each person feels that they’re the most important thing in the other person’s life,” says Garten. “And if you feel that way, it doesn’t matter whether you’re on the other side of the earth or whether you’re together, having dinner.”

A SOUTH FORK FALL

These Hamptons hotspots are staying open past Labor Day—and they won’t be cooling off The Greenwich † Chef Carmine Di Giovanni prepares his fresh ingredients simply—there’s a section of the menu dedicated to whole-roasted dishes—but with sophistication. 1020 Montauk

Highway, Water Mill; greenwichrestaurant.com

Momi Ramen † Fresh noodles are crafted in-house throughout the day to complement Momi’s rich, homemade bone broth—ideal for when the weather starts to chill. 221 Pantigo Road,

East Hampton; momihamptons.com

… Jue Lan Club New York City’s Jue Lan Club now has an East End outpost, where diners are treated to signature dishes like braised oxtail sloppy bao buns and shrimp crystal dumplings. 268 Elm

Street, Southampton; juelanclub.com

… The Surf Lodge This summertime mainstay parties on come autumn with a bounty of local ingredients across its menu, including fall additions like crispy skate with kohlrabi slaw and purple radish. 183

Edgemere Street, Montauk; thesurflodge.com

JUE LAN CLUB: KIMBERLY MUFFERI; ALL OTHER: COURTESY

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Garten of Earthly Delights


TRI-STATE CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

→ Hoboken, New Jersey, is embracing its maritime side thanks to Halifax, the new restaurant at the W Hoboken, which offers riverside views and a seafood-centric menu. halifaxhoboken.com

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

A Perfect Day

A quick trip from NYC, bucolic Hudson, New York, offers the ideal mix of rustic charm, refined dining, local culture and the great outdoors. Here’s an itinerary for an unforgettable 24 hours WHERE TO STAY

1

Rivertown Lodge 1 , a retro-tinged hotel inside a 1920s movie theater, features an open-plan lobby, cozy library and front desk with its own record player. The minimalist, bright rooms have quickly made the lodge a hit with design lovers— and don’t miss the gift shop’s selection of totes, matches, pencils and desk accessories. (rivertownlodge.com) WHERE TO EAT

2 4

3

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WHERE TO GO

A short drive out of downtown brings you to Jack Shainman Gallery’s The School, a former schoolhouse reinvented as three floors of gallery space. Its provocative exhibitions examine cultural and political issues from around the world. (jackshainman.com) For unparalleled views of the Hudson River Valley, visit the Olana State Historic Site 5 , the former home of painter Frederic Edwin Church that now serves as a destination for architecture and nature lovers. (olana .org) No trip is complete without a stop into Hawkins New York 4 , an expertly curated home goods store specializing in must-haves like recycled glassware, hand-stitched bedding and modernist furniture. (hawkinsnewyork.com) —RACHEL BARBER

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY

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Start your day at Moto Coffee Machine 2 , a hybrid motorcycle shop and coffee bar. (motocoffeemachine .com) Grab breakfast at local favorite Bonfiglio & Bread, where you can splurge on creamy polenta with poached eggs and Parmesan. (bonfigliobread.com) For a casual lunch, look no further than Grazin’, a diner serving salads, sandwiches and 11 different burgers, like the lamb option with yogurt sauce or a grilled Portobello burger. (grazinburger .com) For dinner, indulge at chef Zak Pelaccio’s James Beard Award nominee Fish & Game 3 , which offers inventive and locally sourced fare (think grilled swordfish with sour-cherry kimchi) inside a refurbished blacksmith shop. (fishandgamehudson.com)


Setting Yale

Head of the Class

New Haven; britishart.yale.edu

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY

INTO THE WILD

Some love the Jersey Shore for the sea and the sand, others for the boardwalks. Photographer Mark Havens’ favorite thing about the shore is a bit less predictable: the architecture. In his new coffee-table book, Out of Season, Havens—a regular on the beaches of Wildwood, New Jersey—presents a collection of more than 100 photos of the stunning midcentury-modern motels of Wildwood, some of which are slated for demolition and many that are already gone. “When I first started shooting, around 2003, it was because the escalating prices along the coast in New Jersey had finally reached Wildwood, and these motels that had been encased in amber for the last five decades were getting knocked down,” he says. “When you go to a place for that many years, you think they’re going to stay the same—those motels were as immovable as the landscape for me. I thought they’d always be there, but I was wrong.”

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DUJOU R .COM

After working in the admissions office at Yale University, “I realized that I could really be helping these students from the other side of the desk,” says IvyWise CEO Dr. Kat Cohen. A few years later, an educational consulting business was born. IvyWise has since grown to include 14 counselors and a staff who cater to students around the globe. At the helm is Cohen, whose work has taken her to India, London, Turkey, Dubai, Norway and beyond. As summer ends, however, application season has her back in the U.S. “In August, I’m generally in New York when everyone’s on vacation or they’re in the Hamptons,” she says. Busy season continues through December—it takes an intense level of organization, she says, to get students college-ready while balancing business and family life. “Every day I have a day planner literally hour by hour, sometimes half an hour by half an hour,” she says, but meticulousness isn’t the only thing Cohen recommends in her recipe for achievement. “I think grit is one of the most important characteristics for success,” she says. “I certainly had to have it.” ivywise.com

The Yale Center for British Art, home to the largest collection of such works outside the U.K., reopened last spring after undergoing an extensive renovation. But the building isn’t the only thing looking incredible: Beginning September 15, Spreading Canvas, a major survey of 18th-century British marine painting, will be on exhibition. These aren’t just nice paintings of boats, however. As curator Eleanor Hughes explains, “From thundering naval engagements to tranquil coastal scenes; from stormy shipwrecks to detailed views of working life in dockyards and on rivers; and from native shores to the farthest reaches of the globe, marine painting helped to tell the stories of Britain’s successes and disasters.” 1080 Chapel Street,


ORANGE COUNTY CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

→ American Mosaic: Picturing Modern Art Through the Eye of Duncan Phillips at the Orange County Museum of Art features 65 works, dating from the 1860s through the 1960s, by iconic American artists Alexander Calder, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe and more. Through December 4. ocma.net

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

PROPERTIES WITH PERSONALITY A rundown of the area’s premier hotels, each boasting a fresh vibe

PASÉA HOTEL & SPA

MONARCH BEACH RESORT

After a yearlong, $40 million renovation to introduce the Miraval Life in Balance Spa and revitalize the resort’s pool area, rooms and restaurants, The Monarch Beach Resort (formerly The St. Regis Monarch Beach) in Dana Point encompasses the best of coastal luxury. AVEO Table + Bar joins chef Michael Mina’s lauded Stonehill Tavern. Golfers will enjoy the Monarch Beach Golf Links designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. 1 Monarch Beach

Pacific Coast Highway, Huntington Beach; meritagecollection.com/ paseahotel

THE RANCH AT LAGUNA BEACH

Ninety-seven guest rooms and suites are stunningly sited within Aliso and Woods canyons on the town’s first homestead and ranch, dating back to 1871. Two restaurants and poolside dining, a Gary Roger Baird-designed nine-hole, par-21 course and a spa and fitness center round out the offerings. 31106 South

Coast Highway, Laguna Beach; ranchlb.com

Resort, Dana Point; monarchbeachresort.com CASA LAGUNA HOTEL & SPA

The historic inn’s cluster of hillside Spanish Colonial Revival–style buildings has gotten a top-to-bottom refresh by A-list Hollywood interior designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard. The seamless blend of old and new in the property’s 23 guest rooms and lobby makes for an ideal low-key getaway for 21-and-over guests. 2510 South Coast

Highway, Laguna Beach; casalaguna.com

HAND PICKED

Recently relocated to Fashion Island, Carrie and Murphy Martines’ The Celect continues to offer forward-thinking clientele men’s and women’s fashion and accessories not easily found elsewhere in Orange County. The new store, with minimalist white shelves and a smartly streamlined palette, is well-stocked with known names like Y-3 and Rick Owens ready-to-wear, as well as edgy pieces by indie designers and off-thebeaten-path goods. Below, a few of the owners’ favorite items for the SoCal fall. Fashion Island, 571 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach; thecelect.com Issey Miyake Bao Bao Prism Basic Tote, $595; Chapter Tor Parka, $375; Adidas X Raf Simons Stan Smith, $400.

ÊFOR MORE ON ORANGE COUNTY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

A Cut Above

“Going to the salon should be a phenomenal experience,” says Lavender Salon & Boutique owner Heather Hart, whose full-service Castaway Commons beauty and retail emporium features all of her favorite things, from Hermès mugs for serving drinks to Japanese-made hair-washing stations and products from Leonor Greyl, Patyka and RMS Beauty. For those who covet luxury that lasts longer than a new cut, there’s also a covetable selection of certified Chanel bags. 1617 Westcliff Drive,

Suite 102, Newport Beach; lavendernb.com

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY

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Surf City’s newcomer offers a happening beachfront social scene, with a full-service pool area, Tanner’s restaurant, which showcases modern, rustic California cuisine, and the open-air Treehouse Lounge. Retreat to your sea-inspired room with a view, test out Huntington Beach’s famed waves with the help of Paséa’s surf-butler program or find maximum serenity at the deluxe Balineseinspired Aarna Spa. 21080


SAN FRANCISCO CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

Life of the Party

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

GOING GAGOSIAN

As one of the most powerful art dealers in the world, Larry Gagosian is merely adding another gallery to his global empire with the opening of his space in the historic Crown Point Press building, just around the corner from the newly renovated San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The 4,500-square-foot gallery, designed by L.A.-based wHY Architecture’s Kalaput Yantrasast, will display the work of renowned artists such as Cy Twombly, Roy Lichtenstein, Richard Serra and Jasper Johns. According to director Anna Gavazzi Asseily (a transplant from Gagosian London), the gallery will open four shows per year. 657 Howard Street; gagosian.com

DUJOU R .COM

“Domesticity has been left in the dust, as more and more millennials spend most of their time at the office,” says Liz Curtis, the founder of the Table + Teaspoon website and app, a home-entertaining version of Rent the Runway. Curtis, 33, a Bay Area native, launched T+T late last year, followed this summer by her new SoMa district showroom and office. Conceived as an entertaining and cooking blog in 2009, T+T soon evolved into an eventplanning and private catering firm. Curtis’ retail component takes home entertaining up a few notches with its four-step process for ordering the hottest table settings. And the best part: You don’t have to do the dishes—just repack everything and send it back. “I curate the perfect dinner party based on your taste, and deliver it to your door with step-by-step instructions,” she explains. tableandteaspoon.com

LOS ANGELES

→ Diego Rivera’s 1931 fresco “Allegory of California,” located in The City Club, was the first such work the artist completed in the U.S. 155 Sansome Street; cityclubsf.com

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Native Son

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Jonathan Waxman, the famed Berkeleyborn chef of NYC eateries Barbuto and Jams, has come home with the opening of Waxman’s, his new Ghirardelli Square restaurant. Set in a renovated warehouse, the open-plan space comes alive with 19th-century exposed brick detail and Douglas fir columns, and boasts Italian and Mediterranean fare enhanced by local seasonal ingredients. The menu includes a crispy softshell crab with avocado tomatillo salsa ($26), green herb tagliarini ($20) and a Wolfe Ranch quail with herb spaetzle, cherries and mustard seeds ($31). 900 North Point Street; waxmanssfo.com


PARTIES CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

Anna Wintour

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

Francesca Alessandro, Louisa Warwick, Dr. Richard Firshein

Patrick Dempsey and Michael Strahan

Ban Ki-Moon

SAN FRANCISCO

Kilian Muller

Brian Chesky Catherine Komarnicki, Darren Levine

Tony Abrams, Kevin Ryan, Christine Hohenstein

Janice Winter, Carol Alt

Richard Gellman, Kiyo Taga, Jason Binn

Will Smith, Jaden Smith

Khirma Eliazov, Susan Shin, Linda Vojtova Shaun Ross Ernie Arias, Michael Strahan Tamara Grove

Dan Trachtenberg

Harvey Weinstein

Gwyneth Paltrow

Jared Gutstadt

Cannes Lions

WHO: Ronald Perelman, Brian Chesky, Ron Meyer,

Madonna Badger, Harvey Weinstein WHAT: The annual International Festival of Creativity, drawing the biggest names in entertainment and the most innovative thinkers and powerful people in media WHERE: Cannes, France

Gordon Roberts, Luisa Barrana, Denise De Luca

Time to Party With Michael Strahan WHO: Michael Strahan, Patrick Dempsey WHAT: The VIP opening night of the TimeCrafters luxury watch show WHERE: The Park Avenue Armory

Lepa GalebRoskopp, Kat Cohen

Brent Lamberti, Araceli Franco, Piet Hein, Ana Cabanillas

The Luxury of Time WHO: Lepa Galeb-Roskopp, Andrew Warren,

Louisa Warwick, Kevin Ryan WHAT: A cocktail party celebrating the launch

of Misahara’s Time Collection WHERE: TriBeCa

MISAHARA: ASTRID STAWIARZ /GETTY IMAGES; MICHAEL STRAHAN: ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES: GETTY IMAGES

Madonna Badger

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Mark Ronson


PARTIES CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

Harvey Spevak, Russell Simmons, Jason Binn, James Lipton, DJ D-Nice Andrea Wynn, Steve Wynn, Jason Binn

Kristen Corcoran, Amber Jacobs

Adam Silverman, Jeffrey Roseman, Shirley Roseman

Noah Tepperberg, Melissa Tepperberg, Jason Binn

Frank Sciame, Fiona Sciame, Alexandra Sciame, Alison Downey

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Jessika Ossipov

Nick Hissom

Sara Giles, Jane Notar, Richie Notar Emma Sokol Guest, Julie Zeff, Robert Barnett, Jason Binn, Kevin Ryan

Hayley Byrnes, Ludacris, Jason Binn, Bella Hunter

What Happens in Vegas WHO: Ludacris, Nick Hissom WHAT: The Billboard Music Awards Kick-Off Party WHERE: Intrigue Nightclub at Wynn Las Vegas

Kicking Off the Summer

WHO: Russell Simmons, DJ D-Nice, James Lipton, Gayle King WHAT: Jason Binn’s annual Memorial Day party WHERE: Moby’s East Hampton PRESENTED BY: Rolls-Royce and Empire CLS

BILLBOARD: GABE GINSBERG/GETTY IMAGES; MEMORIAL DAY: ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IIMAGES

Sean Christie, Jason Strauss, Shing Tao


Allison Downey, Alexandra Sciame

Jason Binn, Tony Robbins

Mark Canton, Omari Hardwick, Jason Binn

Joe Berlinger, Tony Rodrigues, Tony Robbins Courtney Kemp Agboh, Jeffrey Hirsch

Anahi Angelone, Kwame Jackson

Joseph Sikora, Lucy Walters

Jeannie Arciga, Thomas Johansen Andrea Correale, Curtis Jackson

Lela Loren

DUJOU R .COM

STARZ: PAUL ZIMMERMAN/GETTY IMAGES; TIONY ROBBINS HAMPTONS: MATT EISMAN/GETTY IMAGES; TONY RIBBINS NYC: ASTRID STAWIARZ/GETTY IMAGES

Christine Curiale Monica Reiner, GiuliaRobbins Napoli, Sage Sage Robbins

Katherine Bleich, Amy Chan Jimmy Carchietta, Andrea Correale, Tony Robbins

Chris Albrecht, Carmelo Anthony, La La Anthony, Jason Binn

A Powerful Premiere

WHO: Omari Hardwick, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson, La La and Carmelo

Anthony, Joseph Sikora, Chris Albrecht WHAT: The season three premiere of Starz’s hit show Power WHERE: SVA Theatre and The Top of the Standard

Gideon Kimbrell and family

Jason Weinberg, Jason Binn

Ray Kelly, Jason Binn, Anthony Haden-Guest, Richie Notar, Greg Kelly

A Weekend with Tony Robbins

WHO: Director Joe Berlinger, Sage Robbins WHAT: Screenings and parties for Netflix’s Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru WHERE: AMC Loews, Provocateur and The Parrish Art Museum PRESENTED BY: Peroni, FIOL Prosecco, Elegant Affairs and Smoke Tree Wines

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Leslie Farrand, Theano Apostolou Chris Albrecht, Tina Trahan

Ben Widdicombe, Jason Binn

Lona Alia Duncan, Amy Chan


BINN AROUND TOWN CITIES → CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

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1. André Balazs and Jason Binn 2. Sara Morishige Williams and Co-Founder at Twitter Evan Williams 3. CEO at Authentic Brands Group Jamie Salter 4. Jason Binn and CEO at The Americas at Akris Peter Herink 5. Nadya Nepomnyashaya, Jeffrey Rüdes, Andy Cohen and Terri Jacobs 6. At BLADE Lounge West 7. Jason Binn, President and CMO at Neiman Marcus James Gold 8. Jason Binn, CEO at 5WPR Ronn Torossian, Founder and CEO of JetSmarter Sergey Petrossov, Will Smith 9. Owner at EMM Group Mark Birnbaum 10. Co-Founder at Strategic Group Noah Tepperberg, Jason Binn, CEO at Strategic Group Jason Strauss 11. Reya Benitez, Jason Binn, Gaïa Jacquet-Matisse, Owner of JustDrewClothing, Andrew Warren, Rebecca Chernyavsky 12. Jason Binn, President and Creative Director at Ernst Benz Leonid Khankin 13. CEO at Sunshine Sachs Shawn Sachs, Jason Binn, guest 14. Brand President Americas at Chloe Dan Rothmann, Jason Binn, Communication Director at Chloe America Arnaud Cauchois 15. Bill McBeath at Zuma NY 16. Brian W. Steel, Kayla Hohenstein, Nicolas Ryan-Schreiber 17. Bella Hunter, CEO and Chairman at Restoration Hardware Inc. Gary G. Friedman, Jason Binn 18. President of Outlets at Hudson’s Bay Company Jonathan Greller 19. Jason Binn, President of IMG Models Ivan Bart, Massimiliano Di Battista 20. SVP of HR and Head of Global Executive and Creative Recruitment at LVMH Gena Smith 21. Roberta Nass, Westime Founder John Simonian 22. Jason Binn, CEO at Empire CLS David Seelinger 23. VP of Global Sales at Ghurka Drew Sheeran, CEO at Ghurka Arnold Cohen, Jason Binn, VP of E-Commerce and Digital Strategy at Ghurka Justin Sellman 24. Jason Binn, VP and Publisher at The Wall Street Journal Anthony Cenname 25. Wyclef Jean 26. Jesse Itzler, Brad Blumenfeld, Chris Mongeluzo, Scott R. Feldman, Stu Zicherman 27. Jason Binn, CEO at Equinox Harvey Spevak, Billy Zane 28. Zoe Sternberg 29. Michel Kassan, Jason Binn, Senior VP of Innovation Strategy at MediaLink Neil S. Carty 30. Emma Sokol, Jason Binn 31. The LateLate Bar Owner James Morrissey 32. Jason Binn, Danielle Kramer, CEO of Griffon Ron Kramer 33. Seal, Wynn Resorts Chairman and CEO Steve Wynn, Andrea Wynn 34. Jason Derulo, CEO at Moët Hennessy North America Jim Clerkin 35. Dr. Michael Apa

TAKE A HIKE COURTESY

Channel your inner outdoorsman when visiting these three national parks GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

Presented by:

In the 1,583-square-mile wilderness of Montana’s Rocky Mountains, visitors can cycle, camp and hike.

BADLANDS NATIONAL PARK

No rock formation has the same color or shape in this stretch of South Dakota.

GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL PARK AND PRESERVE Take in the 30 square miles of sand dunes that can reach up to 750 feet.


BINN AROUND TOWN

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36. President at Shinola Jacques Panis, Jason Binn, COO at Wynn Las Vegas Sean Christie 37. Managing Director at B&B Italia USA Mattia Crippa, Jason Binn 38. Mark Canton, Omari Hardwick 39. Rabbi Angela Warnick Buchdahl, John Golieb, Marianne Golieb, Margaret Axelrod, Jay Axelrod 40. Dr. Bernard Kruger and guests 41. Jason Binn, Nadya Nepomnyashaya, David Rabin, CMO of SPiN Amy Chan 42. CEO at 5WPR Ronn Torossian, Jason Binn 43. Jason Binn, Maxwell 44. Lincoln Pilcher, Delfina Blaquier, Nacho Figueras, Jason Binn 45. USA President at Breitling Thierry Prissert, Jason Binn 46. Brunello Cucinelli USA President Massimo Caronna, Jason Binn 47. Brand President of Omega Brice Le Troadec, Jason Binn 48. Laura Meda, Jason Binn, Creative Director at Pasquale Bruni Eugenia Bruni, Marketing Director at Pasquale Bruni Daniele Bruni Bossio 49. Wilbur Ross, CEO of MoĂŞt Hennessy Jim Clerkin, Jason Binn, guest, Dick Spring 50. Mixologist Brian Van Flandern, Jason Binn, Todd English


DON’T BE DRIVEN BY SUCCESS BE DRIVEN TO SUCCESS

PROUDLY CHAUFFEURING VISIONARIES, LEADERS, INNOVATORS, AND DISRUPTORS FOR OVER 30 YEARS empirecls.com

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(800) 451-5466


See how carefully she shapes numbers: She has aptitude for numbers and a head for finance. Notice how she puts the date at the top of the correspondence. The convention when penning a correspondence is to follow that norm, but if one is mindful of being a celebrity, then one does not follow convention. It wouldn’t occur to her to leave off the date! In other words, she has achieved psychospiritual maturity.

The writing is legible, because she wants people to be able to read it. She is conscious of details and wants to get things right. Look at how the T is crossed with an arcade. That little umbrella connotes an interest in form, an awareness for appearances and a commitment to poise.

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Note the sharpness in some letters. See the N in “untroubled” or “in.” Sharpness in writing shows somebody with a clear mind and strong analytical skills.

Famous Last Words What Carol Burnett’s handwriting reveals is no laughing matter Written by Adam Rathe

B

y the time The Carol Burnett Show ended its 11-year run in 1978, the weekly variety hit had won 25 Emmy Awards and made comedy icons of many previously unknown stars. And while what happened on-camera has been pored over by millions of devoted viewers, what went on behind the scenes was never public record—until now. “I’ve been approached by other authors who wanted to write about my show,” Burnett says, “but I figured I should write it because I was there.” And so she did. In Such Good Company, Burnett’s smart, illuminating and—of course—very funny new book recounts her struggles to bring the series to air, analyzes what made the show so successful and dishes on the dizzying cavalcade of stars who made guest appearances, from Lucille Ball and Bing Crosby to Rita Hayworth. Still, as the handwriting sample above professes, Burnett tries to keep a level head about her success. “I heard that in a yoga class years ago, and I thought,

That’s terrific!” she recalls. “It means if you get a bad review, don’t be troubled by it. And if everybody just loves you, be untouched by that and don’t let it go to your head. In other words, this too shall pass—so just get over it!” According to graphologist Annette Poizner, Burnett’s handwriting underscores this very idea. “Celebrity handwriting often shows dramatic embellishments; fame acclimates a person to being on show and therefore there is a drive to embellish,” Poizner says. “In this handwriting, there is none of that. In fact, this script could be called rather conventional, indicating somebody with classic tastes who is down to earth.” Poizner might say that reliability is what has kept fans flocking to Burnett for all these years, though the comedy legend herself has a somewhat different take. “People ask why The Carol Burnett Show is still popular, and I think it’s because we were never really topical—we just went for the belly laugh,” she explains. “The only thing that would really date us is the way we looked. But as far as the sketches and the musical numbers go, they hold up today. And I’m really proud of that.” ■


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Fall 2016