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SPRING 2018

SOFIA VERGARA


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SPRING 2018

CONTENTS

ON THE COVER Dress, PUCCI. Shoes, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Bracelet, TIFFANY & CO.

FEATURES

HIDDEN JEWELS

After a brief glimpse at a mysterious piece of jewelry, author Cherie Burns couldn’t shake its allure

SISTINE’S STYLE

A model in the making, Sistine Stallone serves major looks in this season’s highest fashions

BY CHERIE BURNS ILLUSTRATED BY MEAGAN MORRISON

BY RACHEL BARBER

100 ERIKA JAYNE AT EASE

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PATRIC SHAW

86 BELGRADE

STYLED BY JOSEPH DELATE

We discover Serbia’s capital city, which has become a hip and happening urban travel destination

Ever wondered what it takes to make a pretty mess? We go inside the star’s headquarters to see what really goes down in the clubhouse

The star of the comedy-thriller Game Night talks his unique career and upcoming projects

BY LANE NIESET

BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAHESH SHANTARAM

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMY NEUNSANGER

BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

92

PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID ROEMER

The high-profile actress reflects on married life and looks to the future of Modern Family and beyond

80

BILLY MAGNUSSEN

STYLED BY KAREEM RASHED

SOFIA VERGARA

BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

34

From left: Watch, $700, SHINOLA, shinola.com. Rings, prices upon request, IRENE NEUWIRTH, 323-285-2000. Rings, from $3,600, MISAHARA, misahara.com. Earrings, $14,390, WENDY YUE, swoonery.com.

I M AG E : C L A I R E B E N O I S T

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Argyle Pink ™ Diamond jewelry is exclusively available at these U. S Select Ateliers with an unbroken chain of custody:

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SPRING 2018

CONTENTS STYLE 30

68

MEET MONSE

The co–creative directors of Oscar de la Renta on their edgy passion project

CITIES

32 STYLE NEWS

107 OPENER

The latest from Coach, Off-White and Jimmy Choo

Napa Valley’s Ink House has a history steeped in rock ’n’ roll

34

108

SPRING ACCENTS

Cultivate your garden with these jewels and bags

Charlotte Tilbury’s tips and tricks

46 BEAUTY NEWS Products so good they’re like candy

47 THE WITHERSPOON WAY

22

DUJOUR.COM

Inside Reese Witherspoon’s new apparel collection

LIFE 48

110 CHICAGO

55

Tamara Mellon collection celebrates International Women’s Day

32

118 LAS VEGAS Experience the city’s newest club VIP-style

120 LOS ANGELES The town’s hottest ticket; glasses by Tilda Swinton

122 MIAMI Off/White collaborates with Jimmy Choo

ELI MANNING

The football legend shows off his personal style

56

News from Cynthia Rowley; inspiration for your next renovation

33

CRAZY FOR KETO

A Sin City developer goes east

114 HAMPTONS

Forty Five Ten’s Houston debut

Luxury fitness studios get in the game

RESORT CITY

DALLAS

A trip to the opera; 100 kinds of sake

116 HOUSTON

50 BUSINESS OF FITNESS

54

112

Hotel Crescent Court in Dallas serves opulence for the modern traveler.

AERIN LAUDER

The keto diet is nutrition’s hottest trend

Meet the woman who helped discover Virgil Abloh

112

A beauty-heiress-turned-entrepeneur

53

ASPEN

The Viceroy’s $4-million renovation

40 MAGIC MAKEUP

SPRING 2018

HONG KONG BASEL

The city welcomes the art industry’s heavy hitters

The Ritz’s first-ever residential art studio; A salty-dog seafood shack

64

Grab a bite at the Granary Cafe in Cape Town

LUKE ROCKHOLD

The ultimate fighter’s Ralph Lauren campaign is surprisingly serene.

124 NEW YORK CITY Sanctury-like rooms at The Baccarat; the new Never Never

126 ORANGE COUNTY A Nantucket-style resort in California

128 SAN FRANCISCO An eight-table supper club; a fine-arts temple

57

LUXE EXPERIENCES

Pop-ups are the new “it” offering

130 PARTIES

58

133 BINNSHOT

WATCH YOUR SPEED

With today’s many collaborations, cars and watches go hand in hand

ARTIFACT

CULTURE 64

We found the dinner menu from the first-ever Academy Awards

CAPE TOWN

Art and hospitality collide inside the city’s newest cultural offering

67

136 RED CARPET RECIPES

MUST LOVE DOGS

Isabella Rosellini’s philanthropic passion

40

Charlotte Tilbury’s favorite products


CALIBER RM 037

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


CEO LETTER FILM PRODUCER JASON WEINBERG, DIANE KRUGER, JASON WU, JASON BINN

JASON BINN, SYLVESTER STALLONE, PENSKE MEDIA CORPORATION’S JAY PENSKE

SPRING 2018

24

DUJOUR.COM

JASON BINN, WARD SIMMONS

JASON BINN, WATCH ANISH’S ANISH BHATT, SWIZZ BEATZ, CEO OF ZENITH WATCHES JULIEN TORNARE

HARVEY R. BLAU

A

s we step into spring, it’s with the utmost pleasure that I look back on a successful season. Every winter marks another year in Miami for Art Basel, and DuJour’s signature kickoff event did not disappoint. In celebration of our November digital cover star Sofia Richie, we partnered with WellNEST to host guests including Scott Disick, Karolina Kurkova and Jermaine Dupri at The Confidante Miami Beach. Guests sipped on Whispering Angel and superfood elixir “Basel Fuel,” created by chef Tricia Williams, a founding WellNEST practitioner along with Peder Regan and Rachel Paletsky Ash. Winter also marked a celebratory event with Zenith Watches CEO Julien Tornare to mark the launch of the brand’s Defy Collection. Along with good friend Swizz Beatz (who unveiled his own limited edition piece, the Defy El Primero 21 Swizz Beatz Edition Unique) we marked the beginning of a buzzworthy season with a timely celebration. Although one friendly face we’ll miss dearly at our events, and in life, is Harvey R. Blau. Though 2018 brings many exciting things, we’ve lost a dear friend, husband and father in Harvey. Awards season also brings out the best-of-the-best, and I pride myself and DuJour on always staying ahead of the curve when it comes to predicting the winners. Our lovely Winter 2017 cover star Diane Kruger absolutely stunned on our cover and on the stage at the 2018 Golden Globes, where she and director Fatih Akin accepted the award for Best Foreign Language Film. I look forward to summer as we launch DuJour Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard, an expansion of our presence in the jewel of the Cape with tailored content that reflects the lifestyles and passions of our most aff luent readers. Adding to our existing east-towest footprints in resort markets like Aspen, Palm Beach and the Hamptons, DuJour Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard widens our reach where the nation’s most influential consumers reside and relax. These summer towns, after all, are a celebration of leisure and nautical glamour set against a backdrop of the region’s most prominent and talkedabout demographic. I also celebrated a big birthday—at 50 years young, I can’t think of a better group to spend it with than Team DuJour. I look forward to the friendly (and new) faces I see around town each day and can’t Jason Binn Twitter/Instagram: @jasonbinn wait to see what this season holds in store for us all.

KAROLINA KURKOVA, ROMERO BRITTO, JASON BINN IN MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA JASON BINN, KATIE HOLMES

JASON BINN, WILL SMITH

EVE, JASON BINN

MARSHMELLO, JASON BINN


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150 EL CAMINO DRIVE, BEVERLY HILLS, CA 90212. 310.595.3888 © 2018 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


E D ITO R I N CH I E F

CEO/PU B LI S H E R

Renee Lucas Horan

Jason Binn

WE B E D ITO R

D I R EC TO R

Samuel Anderson

Shayne Kunzelman

AS SOCIATE E D ITO RS

LE A DS

Rachel Barber Atalie Gimmel

Cameron Chalfin Cristina Graham Christine Meagher

CO NTR I B UTI N G CO PY CH I E F

Svetlana Kitto

E XECUTIV E AS S I STA NT

Ryan Byrne CO NTR I B UTI N G FAS H I O N R ES E A RCH AS S I STA NT

Maura Aleardi CO NTR I B UTI N G AS S I STA NT D ES I G N E R

INTEGRATED MARKETING

Emma Storm

M A R KETI N G O PE R ATI O N S, D I R EC TO R

Andrew Prasad D ES I G N E R

D I R EC TO R O F O PE R ATI O N S

Chelsea Hernandez

William Pelkey

D UJ O U R .CO M WE B PRO D U CE R

PRODUCTION

Kasey Caminiti

IT M A N AG E R

Luis Del Rio

CITI ES R EG I O N A L E D ITO RS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen), Carly Boers (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas), Jeremy Kinser (Los Angeles, Orange County), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami, Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco)

PR I NT CO N S U LTA NT

PA PE R SO U RCI N G

Calev Print Media

The Aaron Group

FINANCE

I NTE R N S

Sabrina Hichour

CO NTRO LLE R

CH I E F F I N A N CIA L O FF I CE R

James Manso

Dahlia Nussbaum

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

DAVID ROEMER

ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

JOSEPH DELATE

AMY NEUNSINGER

A certified image-maker, Roemer has shot everyone from Bella Hadid to Game of Thrones’s Sophie Turner to Britney Spears. For our rugged yet playful men’s fashion story, he captured ascendant actor Billy Magnussen in classic black-and-white—the perfect palette for stylist Kareem Rashed’s retro-meetsmodern looks.

Adrienne Gaffney (“Modern Woman,” “Charming Billy”) is a freelance writer who was raised in Massachusetts and now lives in New York with her cat and dog. She has contributed to The New York Times, Marie Claire, Billboard and New York Magazine, and was formerly on staff at Vanity Fair and WSJ Magazine.

“It was a pleasure to collaborate with one of my favorite photographers,” says Delate, the stylist behind our Sistine Stallone story by Patric Shaw. With two decades of experience in media and television, Delate has seen his share of young talent. But even he was impressed by Stallone’s energy: “Her manners and personality are so refreshing!“

This issue, Neunsinger photographed Erika Girardi in Los Angeles in her vibrant Pretty Mess Clubhouse pied-à-terre. A veteran of 18 years who has styled for brands from Beats by Dre to West Elm, Neunsinger is no stranger to gorgeous spaces; her own home has been featured in Better Homes & Gardens, House Beautiful and more.

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2017 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 800-783-4903 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com

D E L AT E : T H E O WA R G O/ W I R E I M AG E F O R FAC T O RY P R

CONTRIBUTORS


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STYLE DUJOUR.COM 29

I M AG E : J A S O N L LOY D E VA N S

Michael Halpern’s sequins are bringing back a sensuous ’70s sheen

The party doesn’t stop at dawn for Michael Halpern; the ascendant designer has built his eponymous label on sequins meant to be worn any time of day. The good times continue with Halpern’s spring collection, which boasts glittery trousers, shimmering, deep-blue mini dresses and animal prints. After his graduation from Central Saint Martins two years ago, Halpern worked under Donatella Versace, whose inf luence can be seen in Halpern’s penchant for bold patterns and highoctane glamour. But if Versace represents nostalgia for the ’80s and ’90s, Halpern takes it back to the sensuous ’70s, offering distinct silhouettes such as a highly embellished jumpsuit. If Halpern’s work didn’t already have us running to the discothèque, other designers are also making a case for all-day clubwear. (See: Tom Ford’s sequined frocks, Marc Jacobs’s floor-length glittering gowns, and Coach’s mid-length sequined skirts.) Even Yves Saint Laurent, long known for grunge-chic, is pivoting more to sequin-studded glamour under Anthony Vaccarello’s reign. But Halpern’s dedication to the decade, not only as a glossy going-out aesthetic, but as a subversive daywear eye-grabber, remains unmatched. Glistening, yet angular; dramatic, yet fresh: such is the spirit of the modern-day disco. —JAMES MANSO

SPRING 2018

DISCO DAYWEAR


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hen Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia began to seriously discuss co-founding Monse, the Tribecaba sed fa shion house wor n by everyone from Diane Kruger to Daisy Ridley, Garcia needed some coaxing. “It was always Laura’s dream to open her own line,” Garcia says. “She was more prepared than I was and convinced me this was the age to develop our own point of view outside of an existing brand’s vision.” The duo now describes their work relationship as fast-paced and decisive, a natural result of having collaborated since 2009. They met during their time together at Oscar de la Renta, where Kim was a studio director and Garcia a senior designer. After six years at the storied fashion house, the pair brief ly migrated to Carolina Herrera before starting their own line, Monse. Named after Garcia’s mother, Monse’s identity is the edgy cousin to their work for de la Renta, to which they later returned as co-creative directors. “Besides the [use] of bold colors and our [shared] love of shirting, each brand has a very specific DNA,” the duo says. “There is no need for overlap.” Since Monse’s first collection debuted in spring 2016, the brand’s point of view has been clear. Marked by deconstructed shirting in common plaids and stripes, asymmetrical blazers and denim, the irreverent-chic backbone of Monse is a downtown Manhattan counterpoint to the uptown glamour of de la

Renta. “I thought it was important for us to develop our own point of view as designers,” Kim says, “and to have ownership of what we created.” For the most part, the differences between Monse and de la Renta are apparent: where Monse distresses denim, Oscar de la Renta embroiders it with silver sequins. (de la Renta’s take on spring is especially high-drama, with ref lective tees and dresses, oversized dinner jackets and, of course, evening gowns.) However, while Chez Monse may be generally more accessible, that same highly embellished glamour shines through in bursts. Exhibit A: a sequined basketball jersey that commands brand name recognition with the label’s emblazoned logo—a rarity at Oscar de la Renta (save for those branded fur coats). “At Oscar, knowing the things he felt passionate about is always our starting point. From here, we inject our aesthetic into his vision,” the pair says. “For Monse, we draw inspiration from walking around the city and listening to music. They do not inform one other—they are two separate entities entirely, with their own DNAs.” ■

Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia have taken Monse mainstream

Monse’s Moment

The edgy brainchild of Oscar de la Renta co-creative directors Laura Kim and Fernando Garcia, Monse finds its vision P O R T R A I T : H U G O A R T U R I . R U N WAY I M AG E S : E VA N M I L L E R .

BY JAMES MANSO

MONSE SPRING/ SUMMER 2018


A collective of hotels, each with their own story. www.journalhotels.com


STYLE   

STYLE N EWS

From left: Claire, $1,195; Elisabeth, $1,650; Victoria, $1,995. All OFF-WHITE C/O JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com.

PIAGET’S LIBERATING JOY

In the new Piaget campaign shot on location at Casa Kaya in Ibiza, Doutzen Kroes vamps under a twilit sky. Shot in Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott’s high-gloss style, Kroes is seen enjoying a poolside moment overlooking the ocean—dripping in Piaget jewels. “Freedom is such an important value to me and one I share with Piaget,” Kroes says. “Whether freedom of thought, style or expression, this value has been magnificently brought to life through the lens of Mert and Marcus, as a woman free to be herself and express herself in her own unforgettable magical paradise.” With the Piaget woman in mind, Mert and Marcus have captured someone who is beautiful, luminous and feminine. “Mert and Marcus’s bold approach to their art mirrors Piaget’s own free spirit and desire to always surpass itself with daring creativity,” says Chabi Nouri, Piaget CEO. Through the lens of the dynamic photographic duo, this new campaign is a celebration of life lived to the fullest in one of the most unforgettable places in the world. In their words: “We have been big fans of their audacious design and heritage for years. Working under the sun with Doutzen and Piaget was magical. Ibiza is also such a special place to us; there could not be a better fit for this campaign.”

On Brand with Off-White

Jimmy Choo and Off-White are inspired by Princess Diana in this unexpected collaboration

P

owerhouse luxury shoe and accessory brand Jimmy Choo and cultfavorite streetwear brand Off-White will unite in a collection inspired by the elegance of the late Princess Diana, one of the very first Jimmy Choo devotees. The collection will celebrate Diana’s timeless royal style, while Virgil Abloh’s aesthetic will reimagine classic silhouettes for 2018. Says Jimmy Choo Creative Director Sandra Choi, “To collaborate with a brand like Off-White allows Jimmy Choo to explore a new avenue and take part in a different conversation.” With both brands counting models, actors, musicians and taste-makers among their devoted fans, the collection is likely to be a celebrity street-style favorite. Styles will include a modern take on the glass slipper, a pointy-toe heel encased in PVC. Another design takes inspiration from the tiara, drenched in feminine teardrop crystals. The collection will include boots as well, with leg-lengthening styles encased in elegant tulle or sleek PVC. Says Abloh, “Creative dreams were fulfilled when [we were] able to combine the young exuberance of Off-White and the storied elegance of Jimmy Choo.” The new designs will come in exclusive packaging, making the pieces as collectable as they are wearable.

—RACHEL BARBER

K RO E S : M E RT & M A RC U S

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Photographers Mert and Marcus capture Doutzen Kroes in Piaget’s new campaign


Leather to Love

Coach’s covetable accessories according to you

F

rivets, whipstitch lace, charms and souvenir pins present chic additions to leatherpieces while monogramming offers a more traditional option of self-branding. Unveiling online and in 88 stores across the U.S. and Canada, Coach Create can be as simple or as complicated as you’d like, with orders ranging from in-store completion to six to 12 weeks for exotic customizations. Personal, pretty and particular to you, the experience allows the enviable bag you’ve always wanted in a new version that no one else has.  —JOS H UA GL ASS

Clockwise from left: Coach Create’s Bowery Crossbody; leather swatches; fabric and handle options

DUJOUR.COM

rom the Bitmoji avatars we text to our friends to the websites we use to fashion everything from denim to undergarments, we live in a time of peak personalization. Never before have our points of view—and the fact that they can be gleaned by others upon first glance—mattered as much as they do now. Seizing on our collective need to express, Coach has raised the bar on customization in an exclusive and experiential way. With Coach Create, the fashion and accessories brand introduces a unique program this spring that allows shoppers to personalize a select number of handbags and small leather goods to their own liking. Start with the brand’s 1972 favorite, the Saddle, or the downtown Bowery Crossbody, and render each in a color, from tulip pinks to warm bordeauxs, of your choosing. While items differ in available materials, the Rogue—Coach’s most popular from the runway—can be seen in 12 options including glovetanned pebble, glovetanned or suede leather, and py thon and crocodile handles; each piece carries with it a realm of possibilities. An expert leather craftsman will then guide you through the next steps, from determining the interior lining hues and adjoining hardware, to swapping bag straps and dressing the body. Tea rose applique, western-inspired

33 SPRING 2018

KALEIDOSCOPE KICKS

Tamara Mellon creates a bright whimsical collection in honor of International Women’s Day The many vintage stores of Los Angeles held the key to Tamara Mellon’s vintage scarf-inspired Kaleidoscope shoe collection. The designer and cofounder of Jimmy Choo sought out prints popular in the 1970s and created a new way to wear them. Each shoe is made out of its own unique scarf, so no two prints are the same, much like no two women are alike. “I believe women are complex—our identities are f luid. Most days I’m polished, but some days I want to let out my inner hippie. We defy style quizzes and algorithms. And we reserve the right to change our minds or our shoes, whenever we want.” The collection will be released just in time for International Women’s Day on March 8.

Toan Nguyen, a Parisian designer based in Milan, has created bold, sculptural piceces for Restoration Hardware’s Spring 2018 outdoor collection. He takes three wide planes of premium teak and meticulously joins them to create the illusion of an undulating weave. Low and deep, the handcrafted wooden frame encases plush tailored cushions, creating an alcove of comfort, as the appearance of the collection’s “woven skin” changes with the angle of the suns rays throughout the day.

Modern Weave

Kaleidoscope 30mm platform, $495, tamaramellon.com

Restoration Hardware’s contemporary interpretation of traditional basketry


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Spring’s most beautiful and bountiful accessories are in full bloom PHOTOGRAPHED BY CLAIRE BENOIST STYLED BY KAREEM RASHED

From left: Bag, $375, STAUD, staud.clothing. Bag, $2,290, LOEWE, fortyfiveten.com. Opposite, from left: Watch, $1,475, LONGINES, longines .com. Ring, $16,800, MIMI SO, mimiso.com. Ring, $37,100, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels .com. Ring, $11,750, TIFFANY & CO, tiffany .com. Ring, $34,200, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Cuff, $84,500, BELPERRON, belperron.com.


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DUJOUR.COM 37 SPRING 2018

Necklace (worn as bracelet), $144,000, MISH, 212-734-3500. Ring, $17,050, WENDY YUE, ikram.com. Opposite: Cuff, $38,500, DAVID WEBB, davidwebb .com. Rings, from $1,850, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Earring (in hand), $9,800, MISH, 212-734-3500.


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Sandal, $895, GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI, giuseppezanotti.com. Opposite: Bracelets, from $5,295, IPPOLITA, ippolita .com. Rings, from $5,780, LALAOUNIS, 212-439-9400. Shears, $1,095, gloves, $910, HERMES, 1-800-441-4488 Manicurist: Yuko Wada using Dior Le Vernis for Atelier Management. Model: Mari Nagase / Parts models.


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harlotte Tilbury, celebrity makeup artist a nd founder of her epony mous lu x ur y makeup line, began her career at the height of the supermodel era. It was the age of mononymous models—Naomi, Christy, Linda, Cindy—and Tilbury couldn’t have chosen a better time to get her start. “I have such incredible memories of being towered over by these Amazonian models, looking fabulous,” remembers Tilbury. “They understood the power of makeup to completely enhance their assets and morph into character. It was an incredible time to start out.” Even during the early ’90s, a period marked by the glamour of Kate Moss, paparazzi and partying, Tilbury developed a style of minimal, artfully done makeup. She saw beauty as a way to enhance a look and create confidence. But years before she would develop her cult-favorite Magic Cream moisturizer, Tilbury discovered makeup as a thirteen-year-old student. “I became fascinated by its power,” she exclaims, “It changed my life. I went to boarding school and I started wearing mascara—overnight everyone from seven to 70 reacted to me in a very different way. I was instantly more empowered, magnetic and mesmerizing. I felt enriched with confidence.” However, her newfound love of makeup and awareness of its power became a conundrum for the smart, young girl, who worried that her passion seemed shallow. “At first it seemed like a depressing, superficial realization, but I soon realized that makeup is incredibly powerful,” she continues. “It’s every woman’s secret weapon. When you look good, you feel good and exude confidence—the world reacts to you in a powerful way.” That understanding of the psychology of makeup is what differentiates Tilbury from so many others in her field. Ever since she had her “a-ha!” makeup moment, “no one has ever seen me without makeup on! Not even my husband,” she laughs. “I definitely wouldn’t have the life and career I have without it,” she muses.

Charlotte’s Magic Cream, $100. Legendary Brows Brow Gel in Perfect Brow, $23. Magic Foundation in 7 Medium, $44. Matte Revolution Lipstick in Very VIctoria, $34. Luxury Palette in The Dolce Vita, $53. All CHARLOTTE TILBURY, charlottetilbury.com.

T I L B U RY : C O U R T E S Y O F C H A R LO T T E T I L B U RY M A K E U P. M A K E U P : J E F F R E Y W E S T B R O O K . O P P O S I T E PAG E : A L L P O R T R A I T S : G E T T Y I M AG E S

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Today, Charlotte Tilbury’s empire is quickly growing into an internationally renowned beauty brand defining the next decade in makeup. And that is exactly Tilbury’s goal. “With my makeup line,” she says, “I wanted to create a limitless makeup revolution and make all women, from 18 to 80 feel like the most beautiful versions of themselves.” Among her fans, she counts soon-to-beroyal Meghan Markle, a reported user of Tilbury’s Matte Revolution Lipstick in Very Victoria. Kate Moss, Amal Clooney, Kim Kardashian-West and many others have lauded Tilbury for her artistic hand and unmatched eye for enhancing natural beauty. Here, Tilbury gets candid about her favorite clients and her flawless skincare routine. Was there one moment where you knew you “made it”? One of my all-time favorite beauty moments was creating Kate Moss’s incredible makeup look for Vogue’s “Castaway” shoot in June 2002. It was shot by the amazing duo Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott and kick-started a new beauty trend for bronzed, beautiful skin! I gave Kate a sun-kissed, radiant look using glow-giving formulas for the ultimate healthy tan. It was all about youthboosted skin, fresh-faced freckles and a nude lip. If there were anyone’s face you could get your hands on that you have not yet, who would that be? The Queen!

Makeup Maven

Charlotte Tilbury defines the next decade in makeup BY SARAH JOY VERSACE VERSUS. S/S 2018 BEAUTY.

Favorite clients? Throughout my career I’ve been to lucky enough to work with countless incredible women, many of whom are amazing friends too. Iconic actresses, models and powerhouses from Amal Clooney, Kim Kardashian-West, Sienna Miller, Penelope Cruz, Salma Hayek, Gigi Hadid to Jennifer Lopez, Kate Moss, Nicole Kidman, Naomi Campbell and Olivia Culpo—the list is endless, it’s impossible to choose a favorite! What was your favorite fashion show makeup moment this season? This season I worked with the iconic Donatella Versace for her Versus show in London. Donatella asked me for a strong eye so I created the perfect, graphic punk-eye for the strong Versus girl. The look was inspired by the great and glorious Amy Winehouse’s iconic overdrawn feline f lick, as well as Kate Moss’s signature eye. The complexion was lit-from-within, highlighted, glowing, bare and natural with a fuller, wider beige-nude Kate lip. Donatella wanted every model to have a slightly different makeup personality, but feel like they were all from the same tribe.

Charlotte Tilbury counts women like Kate Moss and Penelope Cruz as clients and fans

Why is skincare important to you? Skincare is so important—skin should always look youthful, glowing and radiant. From the very beginning of my career, I was always known for amazing skin before amazing makeup. You can’t have a beautiful painting without a beautiful canvas!

Tilbury’s Tips

What’s inside this beauty guru’s makeup bag? 1. My miracle-working Magic Cream is my everyday go-to, I couldn’t be without it. 2. My Magic Foundation is the perfect demi-matte makeup that literally gives you flawless, HD camera–ready skin in seconds. 3. My cinematic Contour Wands and Beauty Light Wand are the perfect duo for making you look and feel like you’ve just stepped out of a Hollywood screen. 4. My new Brightening Youth Glow, a magic brightening skin potion with color-correcting, anti-shadow and glow-boosting super powers to treat and transform the complexion!   5. As a makeup artist, I’ve always been wary of talc-heavy powders that create a cakey-skin finish, making women look old before their time. I have created not a powder, but a micropowder that [resembles] the most finely milled, highest thread–count cashmere. Airbrush

Flawless Finish doesn’t sit in lines but optically blurs them away, whilst giving the skin an ultra-luxe luminosity for a high-definition result. 6. Brows are the pillars of the face — they define your beauty. Eyebrows are actually the key to facial identity, they’re what makes us recognizable. My revolutionary new sculpt & shade gel, Legendary Brows, glides on like a dream and has a first of its kind micro-fine precision brush that coats, shades and grooms every single hair, growing them for flawlessly defined brows in an instant. 8. I always use my Luxury Palette in Dolce Vita. I love the decadent molten bronze-y golds and rich chocolate shades; they really make my green eyes pop and give me that gorgeous, come-hither gaze. And mascara – multiple coats of my Full Fat Lashes — I am a mascara obsessive!


STYLE   

SCENT

Perfume Genius

Brighten up your vanity with these intoxicating new scents, floral and flirty with a drop of feminine power

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

From left: L’Eau Rosée, $105, MIU MIU, miumiu.com. Viper Green, $325, EX NIHILO, bergdorfgoodman .com . Nomade, $132, CHLOÉ, chloe .com. Eau de Soleil Blanc, $122, TOM FORD, tomford.com.


CALIBER RM 67-01 EXTRAFLAT

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


STYLE   

MAKEUP

Candy Crush

Color outside the lines with these bold shades for spring PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

Clockwise from top: Infallible Paints Eyeshadow in Mint Detox, $9, L’OREAL, lorealparisusa.com. Phyto-Kohl Star Waterproof Eyeliner in Mystic Green, $55, SISLEY-PARIS, sisley-paris.com. Eyeshadow in Sideline, Chaos and Narcotic, $19, URBAN DECAY, urbandecay.com. Matte Lipstick in Mangrove, $18, MAC, maccosmetics .com. Eclat Minute Instant Light Lip Balm Perfector in Plum, $26, CLARINS, clarins.com. Dior Addict Lacquer Plump in Disco Dior, $37, DIOR, dior.com. Phoenix Facial Oil Mini, $28, HERBIVORE, herbivorebotanicals.com.


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Clockwise from left; Lotus Youth Preserve Rescue Mask, $62, FRESH, fresh .com. Saturn Sulfur Acne Treatment Mask, $55, SUNDAY RILEY, sephora.com. Supercharged Mask, $25, CRYSTONITE, crystonite.com. Violet-C Radiance Mask, $68, TATCHA, tatcha.com.

Behind the Masks

They’re often credited with helping to achieve that #SundaySelfie Insta-glow, but what are the active ingredients behind today’s buzziest face masks? From clays packed with radianceboosting lotus flower extracts and Japanese superfruits, to just-add-water powders packed with toxin-busting activated charcoal, these highly effective formulas are here to stay.

Upgrade bathtime with goop’s newest way to detox

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hot bath can be a panacea for a variety of ailments— soothing tired muscles, quie t i ng a bu s y m i nd—a nd Gwyneth Paltrow hopes to make your next bath even more of a healing experience with the launch of goop Bath Soaks. The five soaks combine various salts, oils and minerals, utilizing Eastern and Western herbal traditions to turn a home bath into a spa treatment. The G. Nite formula mixes valerian root and Australian sandalwood to calm restlessness and prepare for bedtime. The Martini de-stresses the mind and melts tension in the neck and shoulders with a concoction of Himalayan pink salt and chia seed oil. Add Phys. Ed. to a post-workout bath to relax an overworked body. For a full-body refresh, try G.Tox, with glacial marine

clay and activated charcoal to remove grime and pollutants. And finally, for a sick day, choose Nurse! to comfort the body when you’re under the weather and to help promote sleep when you need it most. “Each soak is extraordinary in its own right,” says Paltrow in a statement. “We sourced the most powerful active ingredients we could find, from rare salt to miracle-working botanicals. They’re seriously life-changing.” —RACHEL BARBER

Bath Soaks, $35, GOOP, goop.com.

HOMELAB, $98, KÉRASTASE, kerastaseusa.com.

Hair to The Throne Kérastase introduces a way to take home salon softness It’s nearly impossible to replicate the soft beautiful hair you leave the salon with, but Kérastase is getting you close. The Fusio-Dose Homelab—a custom-blended, at-home treatment—complements and extends a salon’s powerful results and treats hair’s biggest challanges for $98. Homelab utilizes the same professionalstrength concentres and boosters used by hairdressers, and each kit provides four at-home applications for instant hair preservation. So now your salon-quality cut and color can last you all spring long.

P O RT R A I T: G I L L E S - M A R I E Z I M M E R M A N / AU G U ST

SOAK IT UP


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W I T H E R S P O O N : J . RYA N U L S H S T U D I O . P R O D U C T S : D R A P E R J A M E S

BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

SPRING 2018

Reese Witherspoon’s Southern-inspired fashion collection extends its reach to Saks Fifth Avenue

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es, this is my kitchen,” actress and entrepreneur Reese Witherspoon says with a smiling lilt. “Welcome to my Southern restaurant.” Unfortunately, we are not in her kitchen—which undoubtedly rivals that of her Big Little Lies character Madeline’s picture-perfect Monterey home—but, rather, in Manhattan’s East Village at the Southern-style eatery Root & Bone. With its bric-a-brac rooster and distressed-tin roof designed to emulate the rustic dinettes of the South, the venue feels well-chosen for the occasion: an unveiling of the latest collection from Draper James, the fashion brand Witherspoon founded in 2015 in homage to her Nashvillian roots. Dress racks bordering the restaurant burst with A-line frocks and springy patterns from the line’s Spring 2018 collection. “It has all the classic elements of what we’ve been doing: Southern, lots of color, lots of prints, stripes—my style,” Witherspoon explains. “Just making ‘pretty’ easy for women, and bringing that Southern happiness and friendliness to everyone everywhere.” The clothes ref lect the sunny disposition that has made the actress famous—one descended, Witherspoon says, from her grandmother and grandfather, Dorothea Draper and William James Witherspoon, the line’s inspirations and eponyms. “My grandmother always used to say, ‘Just smile at people. Smiles are contagious,’” Witherspoon recalls. “And I think there’s a thing in the South where everyone just says hi to everybody else, even on the street. Everyone’s very friendly.” With stores in Lexington, Nashville, Dallas and, most recently, Atlanta, Draper James has been making Southern belles smile for some time. But, you don’t have to be Scarlett O’Hara to channel a bit of Southern charm. “The spring collection was all about balance—something we as women are always striving to achieve. Classic Draper James prints and details [the magnolia f lower, stripes and delicate lace] are complemented by everyday wear in solid colors,” Draper James tells us in a statement. And this spring, the line will be spreading Southern hospitality north of the Mason Dixon line when it hits shelves at Saks Fifth Avenue. As she makes her way in Southern-inspired fashion, Witherspoon says she would consider channeling her Southern roots for the silver screen. A power-producer known for screen adaptations like Wild, Witherspoon says she

This spring, Reese Witherspoon’s Draper James collection will be available at Saks Fifth Avenue

would like to see Tennessee Williams’s not-so-sunny A Streetcar Named Desire given the modern-day Hollywood treatment. “I love Williams,” Witherspoon tells us. “Blanche DuBois is one of my favorites.” Fans won’t have to wait much longer for Witherspoon’s next adaptation: she co-stars as one of the witches in Ava DuVernay’s forthcoming movie version of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, alongside Mindy Kaling and Oprah Winfrey. So what did Witherspoon learn from Winfrey, one lifestyle guru to another? A lot, she says. “I literally would just listen to Oprah talk,” she says. “I got so much wisdom from her. She really talks about, ‘What is your intention with things?’ and it’s really important to think about how you are trying to help people and inf luence them.” This wisdom, says Witherspoon, was easily applicable to her growing lifestyle business. “So much of the Draper James brand is making dresses that make you feel good and confident in your life,” she says. “And ready to face the world.” ■


LIFE

Aerin Lauder, granddaughter of beauty industry titan Estée Lauder, in her office

The Key to Timeless Style Aerin Lauder, founder and creative director of AERIN and granddaughter of beauty industry revolutionary Estée Lauder, reveals what she’s learned about elegance BY RACHEL BARBER

Hibiscus Palm Eau de Parfum, AERIN, $120, aerin.com.

Shagreen Tic Tac Toe Set, AERIN, $695, aerin.com.

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Beauvais Velvet Jewelry Box, AERIN, $975, aerin.com.

gant and tasteful regardless of the decade. “I think my personal style is quite timeless,” she muses. She loves simple accessories, a beautiful pair of black pants, a silk shirt. She’s worn the same watch for twenty-two years. Her style icons are her friends, other effortlessly chic women: Moda Operandi’s Lauren Santo Domingo and Net-a-Porter’s Alison Loehnis. It is no surprise that her beauty routine also ref lects a tastefulness and simplicity learned through years of watching Estée apply makeup. “My routine is very, very simple but very consistent,” Lauder says. First, she washes her face with a favorite from her own line: the AERIN Rose Cleanser, followed by a moisturizer and a little foundation. She recalls a childhood memory, watching Estée create her own foundation concoction. “I remember my grandmother mixing her foundation with her Re-Nutriv cream, and that was the beginning of the Re-Nutriv Foundation,” says Lauder, referencing the cult classic product. “So, Re-Nutriv has always been a part of my upbringing,” she continues. “I use [the cream] every day, twice a day. And then I put on foundation, Re Nutriv Foundation, actually.” In the next year, Lauder plans to continue to evolve AERIN, while staying true to the classic she has created. This spring, the brand will unveil an accessories line inspired by Palm Beach, plus a new fragrance, Hibiscus Palm. As she talks about the upcoming launches, it’s apparent that Lauder really loves what she does. She ref lects on a piece of career advice once given to her by Estée. “Whatever you do, do it well and do it with passion,” Lauder recalls, “and I have never felt more strongly about that than when I was starting my own company five years ago.” The timelessness of AERIN is most apparent when it comes to who gravitates toward the product. “I guess you could say it’s for 25-plus,” says Lauder, “but in Southampton over the summer, a man came in with his 12-year-old daughter who loves my lip conditioner.” AERIN doesn’t change with the trends, nor does it target a demographic, but rather, it combines the classic with the spirited, producing a product that transcends age. “It’s really more about state of mind,” Lauder says. The AERIN woman is ageless, effortless. And that is timeless.

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f there is a recipe for timelessness, Aerin Lauder, granddaughter of beauty industry titan Estée Lauder, has figured it out. Achieving timeless style requires an ability to marry the traditional with the fresh and modern, to combine heritage with spirit. As style and image director of Estée Lauder and founder and creative director of AERIN, Lauder does this on a daily basis, both in her business decisions as well as in the classic and polished personal style for which she is known. Years before the launch of her own brand, Lauder learned the value of tradition while working at the family company, honing her business acumen and designer’s eye as Estée Lauder’s creative director. “Estée Lauder has an incredible heritage as a company,” she says. “It was started in 1946, and the best advice I learned there was the importance of maintaining your heritage and really understanding and accepting the past and evolving to work with the present.” This is exactly what Lauder would eventually do with AERIN, creating a brand that combined her knowledge of her family’s iconic cosmetics business with her passion for other forms of beauty—namely, exquisite home items and accessories. Her namesake brand launched in 2012 and spans fragrance, beauty, home and accessories, each category evoking effortless sophistication. “There’s an element of heritage,” she notes, again using the word “heritage,” thereby revealing its importance in the design of something timeless. Each detail in the line has a history—for example, each fragrance conjures the story of a different destination. The candle packaging is the creation of different watercolor artists, and the signature gold touches—found in the cap of a fragrance bottle or the lid of a candle—come from Estée herself. Says Lauder of the gold details, “I think I learned to love gold from my grandmother. She used to say gold is a neutral, and she always wore gold jewelry. She had elements of gold in her home. She was very iconically known for having gold wallpaper with birds on it. It’s warm. It’s luxurious. It’s one of the three colors of the brand.” Beyond the brand, Lauder also emphasizes the importance of heritage in her personal style—a look that would be deemed ele-

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY VICTORIA STEVENS


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The Business of Fitness

Affluent health nuts will pay extra for experiential fitness—and several new boutique studios are springing into action

Rumble and Mile High Run Club consider their demographic to be relatively young (between 22 and 35 years old) and majoritively female (70 percent). But although those two variables can vary, one characteristic between the two companies remains constant: the people who can regularly pay for these workouts are likely to be affluent. “Research shows that higher income level means a higher rate of exercise participation,” Dr. Danielle Wadsworth, who leads the Exercise Adherence and Obesity Lab at Auburn University, told Quartz in 2016. The article, about the rise in popularity of group fitness classes, touched on the simple logic that the trend is geared towards those who can afford it. Factors like budget and time are subject to a studio’s structure (including price-per-class and strict class scheduling) while they are the very things that attract an upper-crust clientele. And aside from people’s mere ability to afford this, is their willingness to invest in their personal fitness that attracts entrepreneurs. They know, as health mobile app Netpulse’s Greg Skloot told the LA Times in 2017, that “[people] want to be able to make physical fitness choices on demand, and they are willing to pay for it.” For Debora Warner, the founder and CEO of Mile High Run Club, one of her goals is to attract people who care about their fitness. The full- and half-marathon veteran (and former Equinox trainer) opened MHRC in November 2014, and aimed to translate the experiential components she admired so much in group fitness studios like SoulCycle to the traditionally solitary sport of running. And she especially hoped to do it for anyone, regardless of aptitude level, who truly values an exceptional fitness experience.

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RESEARCH SHOWS THAT HIGHER INCOME LEVEL MEANS A HIGHER RATE OF EXERCISE PARTICIPATION.

financially backed by investors who include Sylvester Stallone and Justin Bieber. Equinox (the owner of SoulCycle and Pure Yoga) also announced a “significant minority” stake in Rumble one week into the New Year. New locations are set to open on the Upper East Side and in Philadelphia in 2018, and each location, Neiman explains, will follow suit. “We spent $100,000 on dryers—on dryers,” he says emphatically. From shower pressure to bathroom fixtures, no expense was spared in the making of this space. “Why do you spend more money on Louis Vuitton when a Jansport backpack does the same thing? Because of the quality— the [Louis Vuitton] will last you forever.” Case in point, Neiman says, “Rumble isn’t going anywhere.” Rumble is by no means the first boutique to delight fans of boxing and group fitness—Neiman himself found a haven in many gyms growing up in Philadelphia and credits greats (including NYC- and LA-based boxing studio Aerospace’s Michael Olajide, Jr.) for breathing new life into the sport. But one could say that Rumble is the first (of likely more to come) to marry the sport with the business of luxury—pure, shameless, Biggie-worthy luxury.

The amenities inside facilities like Rumble and the Mile High Run Club always feature luxury beauty products and facilities. The people who can work out here tend to be affluent.

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BY ATALIE GIMMEL

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he status symbols of today are less about what you hold in your hands and more about memories you can’t misplace at baggage claim. The tangible has been eclipsed by the experiential—a fact particularly illustrated in the health and fitness industry. And with the race to create the “next SoulCycle” well underway, the business of fitness’s culture of luxury is officially f lourishing. According to the 2015 Vogue article “Looking Like Money: How Wellness Became the New Luxury Status Symbol,” fitness studios are well on their way to becoming the ultimate status signifiers. These classes, often created by former athletes, personal trainers and gym executives who have distilled their years of training into one 45-minute session, offer anyone with upwards of $30 to spare the chance to experience high-intensity workouts like boxing and cycling. These studio-based programs now account for 35 percent of the $25.8 billion U.S. fitness market, according to a report by the International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association. But the competition in any luxury market is steep; currently, two frontrunners—running studio Mile High Run Club and the boxing temple Rumble—are in a race to lock in the business of the influential, young and affluent. And in doing so, they’re creating an experience that fits the bill. Walking into Rumble’s second location in New York City’s trendy NoHo neighborhood, for instance, the “experience” factor b e c ome s i m me d i a t e l y c le a r. O nc e i n s ide t he m a s s i v e 6,500-square-foot space, you’re treated like a five-star guest: friendly receptionists welcome you in for check-in and offer equipment to rent and amenities to use—and the towels and Essentia waters are just the beginning. Rumble’s locker rooms have everything to get you looking like you never broke a sweat, like products by Nubian Heritage and Beekman 1802 (the founders’ mindful alternative to “basic” luxury offerings like Le Labo and Malin + Goetz). But it’s not just the beauty products that make you forget you’re mainly here to workout. All around you, designer duffels have been stuffed into crisp white lockers decorated with graphics in “Rumble Red.” On the lower level, a mural of John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson in their Pulp Fiction characters has been painted directly on the wall; opposite, a lifesize, gold-leaf sculpture of Biggie Smalls sits on top of a wad of cash, positioned in the likeness of Buddha. Did I mention the vibey hip-hop (Top 40 and throwbacks included) playing in the background? Not to mention the space’s actual fitness studio, which can host a total of 60 participants during Rumble’s 45-minute class model. As a package, Rumble truly packs a punch. And the brains behind this business are fully aware of what they’ve built. “When you pay for a premium, you better be getting a premium product,” Noah Neiman, a founding partner of Rumble says regarding each class’s $34 price tag. “We gladly spent $2.5 million to build this place out,” he says. The business is, after all,

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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with a living room designed by Kelly Wearstler (a mesmerizing sight I experienced firsthand at the press launch of Finery last summer), “the cost is a bitch,” Casey says. But not enough of one, she adds, that it’ll stop her from reaping the benefits of being a proverbial member of the proverbial SoulCycle cult. “I still try to go three, four days a week,” she says. Not only has she made lasting friendships by riding so often, but she’s also formed key relationships with people in the tech industry. “There was a time I was trying to go everyday because there was so much going on [in my life]. It’s therapy and a workout.”

For the sport of running, the CEO of Mile High Run Club hopes to work with people who truly value an exceptional fitness experience

“I was kind of blown away by how committed their demographic is,” Warner says about the clients she would work with at Equinox. “I think anyone who really values [their fitness] will be willing to pay for it, and I’m that person. I will bargain hunt for clothes, but when it comes to fitness, health and wellness: the sky’s the limit,” she explains. MHRC currently has two New York locations—one in NoHo, the other in NoMad. Both are stocked with luxury products by Red Flower, and both follow the theme of ridiculously well-outfitted locker rooms that tempt you to workout for the sole purpose of showering in them. Taking this into consideration, along with the upkeep of her studios’ equipment (each studio has 35 and 34 treadmills, respectively, and complimentary strength training equipment for all participants), Warner settled on the price of $34 per class—with class packages and occasional sameday discounts, directly through MHRC or booking platform ClassPass. If the prices start to seem a bit familiar, you wouldn’t be the first to notice. Did SoulCycle set a precedent with the $34-class price? “We believe you value what you pay for and you make the most out of the experience when you’ve paid for it,” SoulCycle’s SVP of PR and brand strategy Gabby Etrog Cohen tells us. “If SoulCycle has created accountability to show up and challenge yourself to be the best version of yourself then we hope we’ve set that precedent.” “We were just looking at the competition, ultimately, and the market there,” Warner says of MHRC’s pricing, “and I’m still not sure if everyone’s quite figured it out, the pricing in boutique. It’s a little bit—the feedback from the customer tends to be that it’s on the high side, right? So, it’s something we’ve given a lot of thought.” Whitney Casey, founder of fashion app Finery and avid studio frequenter, shares that exact sentiment. For Casey, boutiques offer the trappings of her regular gym (Equinox) and then some. Casey has tried them all—Rumble, MHRC, SoulCycle (her preferred studio), the list goes on. But at the end of the day, even to someone

Not only do studios like SoulCycle, Rumble and Mile High Run Club offer incredible workouts—the benefits of cycling, boxing and running are indisputable—they also offer a level of brand awareness that goes beyond merchandise, and lands somewhere between experiential lifestyle and cult-like community. Everyone who clips into a bike at SoulCycle is encouraged to tap into their emotions; lit candles are a meditative touch in each studio. Runners at Mile High Run Club are told to encourage each other; at MHRC, running can be about as much of a team sport as anything else. At Rumble, the moment you’re given a pair of boxing gloves is empowering and, to some, excitingly new. All three sell branded merchandise in-store and online—SoulCycle has become known for meaningful fashion collaborations with the likes of industry darlings Public School and PE Nation. And all three studios nail the art of the newsletter (Neiman claims that Rumble’s are so engaging because he and his co-partners author them personally). But walk in as one person to workout at each studio, and you’ll leave a better version of yourself. Therein lies the therapy—the real product for sale. These studios aren’t just selling a workout here—they’re selling a feeling, a consistent experience and a brand in which you will entrust your fitness journey. Just recently, SoulCycle announced the launch of SoulAnnex—the brand’s foray into offbike workouts offered at a standalone boutique in New York’s Flatiron neighborhood. Sans bikes, fans of the brand can now take everything from yoga to HIIT classes, instructed by the SoulCycle instructors (and held within a comparably luxe venue) they’ve come to know and love. Mile High Run Club provides offtreadmill running programs for anyone who wants to train for a race (or who simply wants to run outdoors with a pack of equally dedicated people). Neiman, who envisions a similar growth for Rumble, says that their brand will eventually signify more than just someone’s daily workout. From a line of juices to an expanded collection of merchandise, “you’re gonna see a whole line of Rumble everywhere,” he says. “In New York, fitness is like a Starbucks—you’ve got a million different [options to choose from]. So we really wanted to be unique and create something you could only get here.” Here, and in a handful of studios coming to a city near you. ■


LIFESTYLE

   LIFE

KETO-CRAZY

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Fat is a dieter’s new best friend, according to health enterepreneur Tricia Williams

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ounded by executive chef Tricia Williams, Food Matters NYC has been the ultimate health-conscious food subscription service among celebrities and entrepreneurs for almost 10 years. Williams specializes in helping dieters adopt forward-thinking trends, from paleo to plant-based regimens. And while diets are traditionally about taking out, according to Williams, the latest trend insists on adding in fat. The keto diet, as it’s called, subscribes to the theory that you “eat fat to lose fat,” Williams explains. In practice, that breaks down to 70 percent fat, 20 percent protein, and 10 percent carbohydrates. Williams says that the demand for the keto diet has increased across the industry, and it’s not reserved for the celebrity set; also the founder and CEO of the relatively affordable food service Daily Dose, Williams has developed high-fat diet plans for those on lean budgets as well. “Some people make it a lifestyle, but others do it to promote their bodies to an advanced stage of fat loss,” Williams says of the versatile keto diet, named for the process known as ketosis, or fat-burning, which takes effect after four days. “It’s interesting—women often transition out of it into a more paleo style of eating, while men seem to thrive staying on it.” In each of its delivery programs, Food Matters NYC offers individualized menus based on lifestyle, adding to this holistic approach through partnerships such as one with WellNEST, the members-only network of holistic practitioners. “We don’t use gluten, dairy, refined grain or sugar.” Simply put: it’s a categorically clean way of eating, emphasizing all organic food, pasture-raise meat and wild-caught seafood. “We’re really particular about sourcing,” she says. Though it’s tempting to derive our fat from dairy, Williams warns of its tendency to disrupt digestion and cause bloating. “We cook with a lot of animal fats—duck, chicken—and use darker meat, lots of avocado, coconut oil and MCT oil; we try to use really healthy fats. Our clients feel so full from the fats they don’t really even cheat.” As an example, she cites her “Fat Bomb” truff le, a popular recipe in the keto movement that’s composed of raw cacao, almond butter and coconut milk. One bite makes you feel like you’ve downed an entire slice of Milk Bar birthday cake—minus the 500 calories. If you’re skeptical—because aren’t we all until we’ve tried it firsthand?—Williams vows that the proof is in the pudding. When I ask her if she’s on keto herself, she chuckles. “I am right now. I always do what I take my clients through.”

UPSCALE FOOD DELIVERY SERVICES ARE EMBRACING THE HIGH-FAT KETO DIET


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BUSINESS

Wave Maker

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Bruce Deifik will breathe new life into Atlantic City when he opens Ocean Resort Casino this summer

quartered in Henderson, NV, which maintains a presence in real estate, media, communications, travel and tourism, gaming and technology. Atlantic City has seen its ups and downs over the last few decades. When Revel opened in 2012, the economy was still in recovery—compounded by the fact that the property itself had some f laws. “The problem with Revel was that it was hard to get around, it was hard to find places, and it was nonsmoking. With Ocean Resort Casino there won’t be any confusion with getting around or limitations on what you can do.” Currently the property is working to add sports betting to the region, which would come with a 24-hour players lounge. Other highlights include golf simulators offering pros and amateurs alike their hole-in-one fix, and an outdoor deck offering ocean and boardwalk views. At 1,399 rooms, Deifik says the casino will employ between 2,500 and 3,000 people. “You’re on the beach, boardwalk and ocean,” Deifik says, “making Ocean Resort Casino stand out from the rest of the properties in AC.”

B U I L D I N G E X T E R I O R : K I M T Y L E R . D E I F I K : D E N I S E T R U S C E L LO/ W I R E I M AG E

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ruce Deifik is about to bring Las Vegas–style glamour and gaming to Atlantic City. In time for the summer season, he will open Ocean Resort Casino Atlantic City in the property formerly known as Revel. With his Sin City savvy and years of experience, Deifik is sure to lend the East Coast vacation spot a level gaming and amenities normally associated with Las Vegas. “All the properties in Vegas—I have seen them all and know everything behind them. This is a property designed just like those, but better,” Deifik says. Deifik is founder, president and chief executive officer of Integrated Properties, Inc., and handles acquisition, development, asset management, and property management. Those properties have included such assets as the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort in Palm Springs as well as numerous prominent office and retail centers in the Denver and Phoenix metropolitan areas. His Las Vegas expertise is the result of serving as president and chief operating officer of the Greenspun Corporation, head-

Ocean Resort Casino Atlantic City


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NFL star Eli Manning talks fashion, football, and how he values his time

M A N N I N G : C O U R T E S Y O F H U B LO T . WAT C H : DAV I D X P R U T T I N G/ B FA . C O M

BY ATALIE GIMMEL

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li Manning currently ranks second for most consecutive regular-season NFL game starts by a quarterback. He also led the New York Giants to victory in Super Bowls XLII and XLVI as their captain. Athletic accolades aside, equally notable (especially to a magazine editor) is his style. “I think it’s important to look sharp,” he says. “As a football player I don’t know if I’d be known for jewelry, or accessories or fashion or anything like that, but I think I always try to look sharp for my press conferences. I [don’t] know if people notice that or not.” Take, for example, Manning’s Ermenegildo Zegna suit at the elaborate launch for his latest campaign with Swiss watchmaking company Hublot (Zegna is typically his suit of choice). The evening was held at the tony Metropolitan Club on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, and the legendary athlete couldn’t have picked a better ensemble to pair with such an elegant night. Man-

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ning follows Victor Cruz as Hublot’s new face, and this year’s debut timepiece is especially fashionable. The Classic Fusion Chronograph New York features embellishments of blue throughout the dial, case back, and pebbled “pigskin” football-inspired strap. The watch comes encased with a commemorative box and is limited to 22 editions—one of which now belongs to Eli Manning. “I look at old pictures and I always had a watch on [ever since] I was six years old,” he says of his relationship with the accessory. “And [anyways], I hate being late, I always like being on time, and I always like to know what time it is.” Though Eli Manning may have a penchant for sharp style and a great taste in watches, he’s not ready for that to be his new calling card. “I try not to think too much past football, just because this is what I love to do,” he says of a professional future beyond the game. “As a quarterback, if you’re known for football that’s a good thing. That means you’re doing your job well and you’ve done it long enough.” When it comes to what the sports icon still hopes to achieve, football is very much on the brain. “Each year starts over, which is kind of unique and different [to football]. What you did the year before kind of gets washed away and you have to reinvent [yourself].” Even Manning, who has dominated his literal field, always finds room for improvement. “I work hard to be a good person, and that ma kes the people around me better as well.” We’d say all of that work amounts to a touchdown. ■

Classic Fusion Chronograph New York, $13,500, HUBLOT, hublot.com


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Out of the Octagon

As the new face of Ralph Lauren’s Polo Ultra Blue fragrance, UFC Champion Luke Rockhold is polished and powerful

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merican mixed martial artist Luke Rockhold may strike you as the ultimate fighting machine. And without a doubt, he is. But beyond the ring—Rockhold was crowned UFC middleweight champion in 2015—Rockhold embodies both style and humility. Blood, sweat and gear aside. As the new face of Ralph Lauren’s Polo Blue Ultra Blue fragrance, Rockhold is polished and styled to perfection. And it’s a side of the champion that he says he’s excited to share. “Look good, feel good, fight good,” he says. “As I’ve graduated in the race of fighting, so have I graduated with my style. It has to keep up the same pace as my level of fighting.” The ocean-inspired campaign has also brought a favorite pastime of Rockhold’s to the forefront. During his childhood in Santa Cruz, California, surfing was a Rockhold family tradition (his older brother is professional surfer Matt Rockhold). “Surfing taught me how to move my body in ways I could have never learned from my training—it requires balance and f luidity,” he says. Today it’s still one of the many ways Rockhold leads an active lifestyle, alongside golfing and really, anything competitive. “I’m a very competitive person so if I’m not challenging myself, it’s usually not for me.” Ultimately for Rockhold, mixed martial arts became the competition most worth fighting for. “MMA is really a mental activity as much as it is a physical one,” he says. “I’ve carried the discipline,

respect and honor that were taught to me at a young age from my practice.” Hailing from the Bay Area, Rockhold trained in jiu jitsu, wrestling and judo before he eventually found his way to mixed martial arts. His first MMA competition was all it took to hook him for life. “[It was] my a-ha moment,” he says. “I knew then and there that was what I was going to do and that I would become the best in the world.” However, it’s one thing to say you’ll be the best, and it’s another to actually put in the work to get there. Therefore, he says, he believes in the “first in last out” method. But aside from his punishing work ethic, there’s also the nerves factor—something Rockhold uses to his advantage. In fact, for someone so confident about his game, what may surprise fans most is Rockhold’s reliance on nervousness— without which, he says, he becomes vulnerable to the possibility of loss. “I wasn’t nervous when defending my title against [Michael] Bisping—and I think that was part of the problem,” Rockhold says of the moment his opponent beat him to became the first British champion in UFC history—one of MMA’s biggest upsets last year. For the future, he says, “a little bit of that nervous energy helps keep me focused.”

Polo Blue Ultra Blue, $86, RALPH LAUREN FRAGRANCES, ralphlauren.com

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P L AY

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Are You Experienced?

More and more luxury buyers value participation with their purchase. And high-end brands are here to provide both BY RHONDA RICHE

I M AG E : C O U R T E S Y O F C H A N E L

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Soho’s all-female workspace The Wing, where Chanel hosted an exclusive pop-up last year

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can afford to buy a watch, you have access to a whole lot of experiences already,” says Antonio Seward, Audemars Piguet’s North American CEO. “Our relationship with our brand ambassadors and our clients is more than transactional. For customers that love golf, we are taking them behind the velvet rope.” “Everybody talks about experience now,” says Seward. “It has become a platitude. It’s become our challenge to create an experience that gives you goosebumps.” For example, Audemars Piguet’s most recent golf invitational brought 72 watch collectors to Dubai to not only play at the exclusive Els Club, but hang out with pros of the course. “We get messages from our guests saying it was the best day ever,” he adds. Audemars Piguet is also a patron of the arts, and at Art Basel in December invited clients to a private dinner inside Lars Jan’s “SlowMoving Luminaries” installation. Prepared by chef Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park, the intimate, family-style service was truly a once in a lifetime “goosebumps” moment. After all, one may not recall the contents of a swag bag after a month, but “you will always remember how you interact with the people,” says Seward. For 2018, Audemars Piguet will offer new experiential highs by opening a lounge on the 29th f loor of its New York headquarters. Here, guests can view exceptional timepieces and take in a World Cup match in a relaxed atmosphere. All this is not to say that e-commerce doesn’t have a place at the experiential table. Luxury conglomerate Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy’s new online platform Clos19 is actually selling services, excursions and hosting opportunities through its famous champagne, wine and spirits houses. Launched last November, founder and CEO Stephanie Watine Arnault describes Clos19 as a concierge support team that helps its clientele create their own exceptional experiences. Clos19 is also organizing trips that offer exclusive access to the finest accommodations, cuisine and locations. In 2019, for example, you’ll be able travel by private plane to the South Pole and sleep in a luxury campsite. Or indulge in a week-long sailboat excursion off the coast of New Zealand by sailboat, with trips ashore for fine-dining experiences and Clos19 tastings. The advantage of this unique service, says Arnault, is that customers benefit from direct access to luxury brands and their history of hospitality, while using “the digital world to communicate in a contemporary and playful way the values of the art de vivre, always putting the consumer at the heart of the experience.” Maybe money can buy happiness after all.

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e were told that the future of shopping was ordering your next pair of Louboutins from a carefully curated online shop while in the comfort of your own home, curled up under cashmere covers and sipping tea. But as the rise of pop-ups, limited-edition drops and exclusive events proves, buyers of high-end goods want to get out and be part of the action. In fact, many reports suggest that buyers—especially millennial buyers—prefer to spend their money on experience rather than possessions. And luxury brands are happy to oblige. Last fall Chanel hosted a one-day-only pop-up at Soho’s trendy workspace The Wing. Guests such as Jacquelyn Jablonski, Hanne Gaby Odiele, Cindy Bruna, Sistine Stallone and Leigh Lezark were given membership cards, which provided access to makeup touch-ups, charcoal-infused cocktails and tarot card readings. What made the experience unique was the ability to network with other inf luential women over a game of ping-pong (and if you wanted to purchase a Chanel Boyfriend watch on your way out, well that could also be arranged). Hermès also recently travelled across the country with the Hermèsmatic dip-dye scarf concept shop. This interactive and orangehued “laundromat” let loyal customers refresh their favorite scarves with a complimentary dip-dye. The pop-up travelled to cities and neighborhoods that don’t have Hermès boutiques, which, according to Robert Chavez, chief executive officer of Hermès USA, allowed the company to “surprise” both loyal and potential clients by showing the scarves “in an unexpected way.” In Los Angeles, the pop-up also attracted prominent guests such as socialites China Chow and Jade Iovine and blogger Jenny Cipoletti. These experiential moments help buyers bond with other interesting people. (It’s one thing to buy a scarf, it’s another to share the story of how your grandmother bought it for your mother in Paris when she was a young student and now you are updating it to give to your daughter.) They also help buyers connect with the brands. But that engagement also has to feel authentic. The luxury Swiss watchmakers Audemars Piguet have been creating experiences for their customers since the 1980s. The company has a long association with golf and twice a year, they invite select customers to play with brand ambassadors including Vijay Singh, Lee Westwood and Danny Willett. “The average price of one of our watches is $40,000. If you


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CO L L A B O R AT I O N

The Wheels of Time

With today’s auto-inspired timepieces, you can wear your need for speed on your wrist

BREITLING FOR BENTLEY GT DARK SAPPHIRE

ZENITH CHRONOMASTER EL PRIMERO RANGE ROVER VELAR SPECIAL EDITION

TAG HEUER MONACO GULF

Actor and racecar driver Paul Newman was an avid fan of the Daytona, and his watch became known to collectors as the “Paul Newman” Rolex. Suddenly, every Daytona with similar dial colors and seconds scale became hot commodities in the watch collection arena—and remain so today. In fact, Paul Newman’s own Rolex Daytona just sold at auction last year for an incredible $17 million, attesting to the iconic status of both the watch and the legendary actor. Today Rolex is firmly entrenched in the auto sports world, sponsoring the Rolex 24 at Daytona, the famed Pebble Beach Classic Car Week, among others. The brand supports the worlds of Formula 1 and LeMans racing as easily as it slides into vintage rallies like Goodwood and Concours d’ Elegance in Pebble Beach. Rolex even has a host of automobile drivers onboard as brand

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ambassadors—Sir Jackie Stewart, Tom Kristensen and Mark Webber, to name a few—and it, naturally, continues to build its highly esteemed Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona watches. Similarly, TAG Heuer has deep roots in auto racing, timing events in the 1950s such as the Twelve Hours of Sebring, and producing iconic, racing-themed watches such as the Autavia, Carrera and the Monaco (the first-ever, square water-resistant watch). In fact, the Monaco garnered international fame in 1970 when actor and racer Steve McQueen wore it on the movie Le Mans—making it forever an icon. Today, TAG Heuer remains highly visible in the auto-racing world. The brand is the official timekeeper and watch of the Red Bull Racing team; sponsors a host of other events; and employs numerous drivers as brand ambassadors. It also continues to create all three of its coveted auto-inspired lines, including the Formula 1 watch. The list of top watch brands that have joined forces with the automotive world goes on and on—and takes on many different forms. Some watch brands are official timers of races, others choose to sponsor races, drivers or teams, and others have actually partnered with automobile brands to create watches inspired by their cars. Breitling, for instance, has teamed with Bentley Motors since 2003, creating exclusive Bentley by Breitling watches, as well as in-car dashboard clocks. Similarly, Parmigiani Fleurier joined forces with Bugatti back in 2001 and, as a result, created one of the most complex watches on the market at the time. Today, the newest Bugatti watches continue to be mechanical marvels that rival the brand’s automobiles. Even luxury jewelry and watch brand Bulgari has teamed with Maserati for a collaboration that recently produced a Bulgari Octo jump-hour

BULGARI OCTO MASERATI

IWC INGENIEUR CHRONOGRAPH SPORT 50TH ANNIVERSARY MERCEDES-AMG

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Above: Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion at Laguna Seca. Left: Paul Newman wore the Rolex Daytona

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xotic, fast-paced and sometimes even furious, the world of automobile racing and luxury cars captures global attention. The love affair with cars, racing and rallies has existed ever since Louis Chevrolet and Henry Ford invented the first motor coaches back in the early 1900s. Around the same time, wristwatches began their debut on the scene—what were once pocket watches evolving into mechanical masterpieces for the wrist. Since that first quarter of the 20th century, these two mechanical worlds have grown enormously. In each realm, mechanics continually strive to put hundreds of perfectly placed components together under the hood for the maximum performance. In one case, it’s a car engine and in the other it’s a watch engine, sometimes no larger than an inch in diameter and packing hundreds of tiny parts. This may well be why the two industries have partnered together for decades, recognizing the synergies of their shared quests for innovation and mechanical perfection. At the turn of the last century, brands such as Minerva, TAG Heuer, Omega, Rolex and Breitling consistently pushed the envelope of invention, creating watches that could time races with ever-increasing accuracy. Watch brands soon recognized that in order to keep pace, they had to perfect their mechanisms so that f inishes could be timed to hundredths of a second without f law. In accomplishing this endeavor, they swiftly drew the attention of the automotive world. Rolex was already deeply entrenched in auto sports back in the 1930s when the brand formed close ties to Sir Malcolm Campbell, who set the world landspeed record by being the first driver to break the 300-mile-per-hour barrier. In 1955, Rolex launched its Chronograph Reference 6234, which began appearing on wrists of drivers—including Campbell—giving Rolex a strong presence in endurance motor racing at Daytona. It wasn’t until 1962 that Rolex served as the official timekeeper of Daytona, and shortly thereafter unveiled the new Cosmograph Chronograph Reference 6239, nicknamed “The Daytona” to celebrate its relationship with the races.

timepiece ref lective of the automobile brand. Bremont works with Jaguar in a similar vein; while IWC partnered with Mercedes-A MG and unveiled a tribute watch earlier this year. Chopard has a long and storied relationship with the Mille Miglia vintage races, as well as being the off icial Timer of the Porsche Motorsport LMP1 team. Swiss watch brand Zenith—known for its innovative watches and interesting alliances—teamed with luxury sport-utility vehicle company Range Rover a couple of years ago. Their newest watch, the Chronomaster El Primero Range Rover Velar Special Edition, was unveiled this year to celebrate the release of the new Velar SU V. In fact, rather than launch this watch at the large international watch fairs, Zenith opted for the Geneva International Motor Show—underscoring its commitment to the automotive world. The watch features an all-new brushed gray dial with copper-colored details—color concepts inspired by both brands’ design and engineering departments.

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BY ROBERTA NAAS

WATCH BRANDS RECOGNIZED THAT IN ORDER TO KEEP PACE, THEY HAD TO PERFECT THEIR MECHANISMS SO THAT FINISHES COULD BE TIMED TO HUNDREDTHS OF A SECOND WITHOUT FLAW.


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CREATIVE COLLABORATIONS While the collaborations amongst watch brands and the automotive world seem as endless as a cross-country highway, one thing remains true: auto-inspired watches must be highperformance pieces that adhere to the strictest standards of excellence. Typically crafted with high-tech materials including titanium alloys, ceramic and carbon, they offer racing-inspired looks and color schemes and have only the finest mechanisms under their hoods, so to speak. One wizard in the world of watches, Richard Mille, spends a great deal of time developing ultra-lightweight, extra durable materials and movements for his watches. His eponymous brand is the first to insist that every brand ambassador wear their watch while performing their sport. From tennis players to golfers and even racecar drivers, these athletes need a powerful watch that can withstand the intense beatings built in to their job descriptions. A lover and collector of cars, Mille has multiple involvements in the auto world: he counts several famed names, from French motor-sport executive Jean Todt to the entire McLaren Formula 1 team, as brand ambassadors. It is in honor of that McLaren F1 team alliance that Mille recently unveiled the world’s lightest split-seconds chronograph: The RM 50-03 Tourbillion Split Seconds Chronograph Ultralight McLaren F1. The million-dollar timepiece weighs less than 40 grams—including the strap. Mille worked with North Thin Ply Technology to create the materials for the watch, which is made of titanium and carbon TPT, as well as a new material in watchmaking called Graph TPT, so that, like the cars, the watches are technically advanced inside and out. The material is 200 times stronger than steel and six times lighter in weight. Even the movement of the watch is incredibly complex and uses these high-tech materials—ensuring they work no matter which twists, turns and mishaps their drivers encounter. Hublot, which has been involved with Ferrari in a synergistic partnership since 2011, also consistently works on developing new materials and alloys. With its “Art of Fusion” tag line, the brand takes creativity in metals and design to new heights.

Experimenting with three-dimensional designs that resemble an actual Ferrari engine, these horsepower-inspired timepieces are more avant-garde than the cars themselves. In fact, the recently released Techframe Ferrari Tourbillon Chronograph features an open-worked case that was modeled in the Ferrari Design Center after car design concepts, and then was built in Hublot’s Nyon, Switzerland manufactory. A super high-tech movement with 253 individually assembled components powers the watch. That caliber is equipped with a tourbillon escapement that compensates for errors in timekeeping due to the effects of gravity when the watch is in different positions on the wrist. It also offers a column-wheel chronograph for measuring speed, and is equipped with 115 hours of power reserve—making it a highly functional yet incredibly stealth watch. As one can imagine, with all of the research and development packed into the making of these watches, the majority of the high-tech pieces are also typically exclusive and hard to come by. In some instances, only limited numbers are made and sometimes there is even a waiting list to obtain one—much like the exotic cars they have come to align themselves with. ■

Top left: Richard Mille partners with McLaren Formula 1 racing team. Above: Inside the Richard Mille RM 50-03 McLaren F1

HUBLOT TECH FRAME FERRARI TOURBILLON CHRONOGRAPH

The sleek LaFerrari Aperta


IS WHERE LUXURY LIVES Connect with the most affluent individuals where they LIVE, WORK and PLAY

Bevy at Park Hyatt New York


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Famous for its chronographs and its strong link to aviation, Breitling has launched a new pilot’s watch collection: the Navitimer 8. The 8 in its name is a nod to the Huit Aviation Department, which was set up in 1938 to produce cockpit instruments as well as classic pilot’s watches for civilian and military use.

Breitling CEO Georges Kern

Time Flies

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reitling, famous for its chronographs and its strong link to aviation, has just launched a new pilot’s watch collection: the Navitimer 8. The collection is the first under the direction of Georges Kern, Breitling’s CEO since the summer of 2017. “With the Navitimer 8,” he says, “we are honoring not only our rich heritage but also our pioneering role in building chronographic instruments. But while the Navitimer 8 pays tribute to our past, it also does something considerably more important. It opens the door to a very exciting future.” The future is vast for Kern, who is more than experienced in the watch industry. In 2000, he joined Richemont and was an active influence in the integration of the brands A. Lange & Söhne, Jaeger-LeCoultre and IWC Schaffhausen following their acquisitions. In 2002, at the age of 36, he was chosen to run IWC Schaff hausen, becoming the youngest CEO within Richemont. Now, Kern’s mission is to foster the global development for Breitling and to focus on further developing the company’s digital and retail footprint while accelerating growth in the Asian markets. At the very least the Navitimer 8, with its eye-catching case, contrasting satin and polished surfaces, and blend of elegance and athleticism, is bound to take the brand’s profile to new heights.

K EURTN G T :E R A NCDRRE EDAI TS HREERNET Z TK /G E T T Y I M AG E S . A L L O T H E R I M AG E S : P P R / B R E I T L I N G

Breitling announces a new CEO and a stunning collection inspired by aviation


Clopay ® Avante® Collection

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For a FREE consultation, call 800.225.6729. imagine.clopay.com


CULTURE

Diamond of Light

The Silo Hotel and Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town reimagine contemporary design BY AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

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The Silo Hotel (opposite) designed by Heatherwick Studios with interiors by Liz Biden (top) sits above and adjacent to the Zeitz MOCAA (opposite), Africa’s first contemporary art museum

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s I approached Cape Town’s Victoria & Alfred Waterfront, a towering building came into view. The South African sun bounced from its 82 convex windows, 25 feet tall each, like massive diamonds of ref lecting light. The 56 panels that made up each window formed a kaleidoscope of changing colors. As if in homage to the history of South Africa’s diamond mining history, they dazzled. I could not turn my eyes away. Like a rare jewel, people are drawn to this place, formerly a 1920s-era grain-storage facility. Now, the 42 columnar silos house the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (MOCAA) and the grain elevator tower has been turned into the six-story Silo Hotel. The dual-purpose building was transformed over a three-year period by celebrated designer Thomas Heatherwick’s Londonbased Heatherwick Studio. Today crowds are milling about its exterior walls, wanting to stand next to it and explore inside of it, spinning in Heatherwick’s signature Spun Chairs outside of it, and absorbing the metamorphosis of what is South Africa’s most discussed recent work of architecture, art and interior design. At the root of the ambitious project was the intent to preserve and display the best of African contemporary art. After scouring the continent for a suitable location to house his collection of contemporary African and diasporic art, ex–Puma CEO and Chairman Jochen Zeitz settled on the silos, partnering with the waterfront to meticulously redevelop them. Now, Zeitz’s collection (on long-term loan) makes up the museum’s foundation, considered the most extensive and representative showcase of its kind. “Zeitz MOCA A constitutes a re-imagining of a museum within an African context: celebrate Africa preserving its own cultural legacy, writing its own history and defining itself on its own terms,” says Mark Coetzee, the museum’s executive director and chief curator.

Converting these tightly packed concrete tubes into spaces suitable for displaying art began with carving out an atrium to form the museum’s heart. It provides access to the gallery floors, but walking through it feels like an exploration of a newly discovered cave, or the nave of a Brutalist cathedral. While the building and museum are an achievement, so too is the extraordinary Silo Hotel. Although the hotel is located on the six stories above the largest collection of contemporary African art in the world, it houses its own impressive, complementing collection, showcasing both up-and-coming and established artists such as Cyrus Kabiru and Pieter Hugo, alongside commissioned pieces by Frances Goodman, Jody Paulsen and Pierre Carl Vermeulen. In addition to art, the hotel houses several restaurants and lounges, a rooftop bar with 360-degree views of Cape Town and a small but spectacularly effective spa, plus 28 spacious rooms and one penthouse. Complementing the building’s stolid exterior, the hotel’s interiors—executed by its owner-cum-designer Liz Biden—animate the concrete walls with color and eclecticism. Upon entering, one is immediately inundated w ith color by way of photography by Athi-Patra Ruga and light from Haldane Martin’s contemporary chandelier, which hangs from the entryway’s


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The hotel’s groundfloor entry (right) is filled with works by artists featured in the museum, including Cyrus Kabiru (left). The Willaston Bar and the Granary Café (below)

I M AG E S : C O U R T E S Y O F G U I D E D O G F O U N DAT I O N

In addition to being one of our most glamorous actresses, Isabella Rossellini raises dogs to help the visually impaired BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

Rossellini poses with one of her Guide Dog Foundation foster dogs (top); A young Rossellini takes a canine for a swim

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double volume ceiling. Continuing up to the sixth f loor, where the check-in desk, the Granary Café and the Willaston Bar are located, one is greeted by an original machine head emerging from the former distribution f loor of the grain silo–working house. Each room is unique. My two-level suite represented the images and colors of Africa through fabrics, and an Ardmore ceramic sculpture in the entry. Biden draws inspiration from her travels around the world, making use of her collection of art and artifacts in the hotel’s designs alongside commissions by local artists and designers. Light fills every space, thanks to several balloon-like windows, which offer guests views of the city below and of the iconic Table Mountain. In the morning I watched from my bed as the flattop mountain was illuminated by the sun, and later in the afternoon as clouds dropped over her like a shroud, which locals call her “tablecloth.” Later, as evening set, I walked along the waterfront, and could still see The Silo Hotel’s illuminated windows shining in the darkness, beckoning the city and the world. ■

C Y R U S K A B I R U : A N T O N I A S T E Y N . A L L O T H E R I M AG E S : M A R K W I L L I A M S

LIGHT FILLS EVERY SPACE, THANKS TO SEVERAL WINDOWS WHICH BALLOON OUT OVER THE CITY, AS IF THE ENERGY AND IDEAS INSIDE CANNOT BE CONTAINED.

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f the many model-actress hyphenates out there, Isabella Rossellini is arguably our most established; in addition to being David Lynch’s original muse, she has steadily starred in fashion and beauty campaigns since the ’80s, from Lancôme to Sies Marjan last year (the latter alongside her son Roberto). But unlike most model-actresses, Rosselini is also a bona fide dog whisperer. Rossellini has helped raise 10 dogs to become lifesaving companions for the blind and visually impaired as a volunteer for the Guide Dog Foundation, which works to place eight-week-old future service dogs in homes across the eastern United States. “I was looking for a way for my children to give back by doing something that was pleasant and interesting for them,” says Rossellini of her path to dog husbandry—as if eight-week-old puppies weren’t enough of an incentive. Of course, you need not be a model or actress to volunteer for the Guide Dog Foundation. “A lot of people say, ‘I could never [volunteer] because I take the train,’ or ‘I commute.’ I tell them, I take the dogs everywhere: restaurants, the train, the theater, the set,” says Rossellini. The trainees, she goes on to explain, are allowed to follow the trainer wherever he or she goes, just like an on-duty service pup. But, she adds, fellow pedestrians should never pet a guide dog. “He [the dog] shouldn’t be distracted. He’s on duty and following the instructions of the handler. And if you offer him a treat, he’s not taking it [laughs]. He’s working,” Rossellini says. Compared to the rest of Rossellini’s qualities, the label of “animal rights activist” may not seem especially exotic, especially in Hollywood. But, as one learns when attempting to label Rossellini, there is always another layer to this demigoddess’s work. After she became an icon of film and fashion, Rossellini went back to school to study animal behavior and conservation at Hunter College—which naturally comes in handy when training her high-achieving furballs. “The [dogs have] to be very well behaved,” she says. “You cannot allow them on sofas. You cannot feed them at the table. They even have to pee on command.” (Puppy raisers are required to teach basic obedience, according to the foundation’s website.) Outside of her causes, Rossellini has made her love for animals a part of her acting career. In Green Porno, her must-see 2008 short film series for Sundance Channel, Rossellini dons full-body suits to reenact nature’s most bizarre sexual rituals (e.g., the sadomasochism of snails). The lesson? Mother Nature gets graphic and that’s just part of life. As a dog foster-parent, Rossellini has also learned this lesson f irsthand; the Guide Dog Foundation offers volunteers the opportunity to become dog doulas. “It’s called ‘whelping,’” Rossellini explains, “which is helping the mother have the pups and then keeping everybody for about eight weeks.” After that, reenacting the birth in a short film is optional. Learn more about the Guide Dog Foundation at guidedog.org.

   CULTURE


ART

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SMALLER GALLERIES HELP MAKE HONG KONG A TRUE DESTINATION CITY FOR SOPHISTICATED GLOBAL COLLECTORS, WHILE ALSO HONORING THE CITY’S CULTURAL ROOTS.

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE

Left: Light installations have become a hallmark of Art Basel Hong Kong. Below: preparing for opening night at satellite fair Art Central

SPRING 2018

Art Basel, the world’s buzziest art fair, has transformed Hong Kong into a cultural capital. But that’s only the beginning.

Below: Celebrating the start of Art Basel along Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbor waterfront. Bottom: This year’s fair will welcome 250 galleries from 32 countries

museum is constructed. Eu also recommends visitors in town for Art Basel pay a visit to the satellite Art Central fair, which curates works, most of them contemporary or experimental, from 100 Asian and non-Asian galleries, and offers performances and art talks from local organizations like the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art and the Asia Society. Of course, anyone who’s been to any version of Basel knows that seeing art is only part of the fun; in terms of extracurriculars, Hong Kong certainly makes for a worthy destination. In addition to the fair’s fringe events that include pop-ups, gallery parties and a full slate of performances and installations put on by corporate partners like Christie’s and American Express— which also offers Platinum and Centurion cardholders access to advisory services and VIP events—Hong Kong offers design aficionados plenty to see, from I.M. Pei’s Bank of China to the justopened Kennedy Town Swimming Pool, a curvilinear complex in the heart of the city designed by starchitect Terry Farrell. While the Mandarin Oriental is the official partner of ABHK, 2018 sees the opening of two hotels worth considering for their design chops: The Rosewood, the brand’s second location in Asia, a long t he bust ling V ic t or ia Ha rbour wat er f ront , set t o permanently alter the iconic skyline, and The Murray, a reported $435 million Norman Foster redesign of the landmark 1960s-era Murray Building. Other highlights include The Upper House, in Central, designed by Hong Kong’s own Andre Fu to feel more like a friend’s hyper-minimalist, if undeniably fancy, apartment than a hotel. The Peninsula, meanwhile, never disappoints, both in location and luxury, and offers the city’s only rooftop helipad, with tours of the city available to both guests and non, as well as views of Hong Kong island from the Philippe Starck–designed Felix restaurant. Nunnerley also recommends Gaddi’s at the Peninsula, as “by far the most romantic, old-world dining experience in Hong Kong—a throwback to a generation of genteel dining.” Eu insists that for anyone traveling to Hong Kong for the first time, however, authentic dim sum is a must, gentility optional. “Anywhere is good, but Tim Ho Wan is a safe bet,” she says. “It’s probably the world’s most inexpensive Michelin-starred restaurant.” There’s also yakitori hotspot Yardbird, which boasts one of the city’s most in-demand tables as well as museum-worthy design in the form of skateboard art and custom-designed sake bottles. And yet, for all its undeniable ostentatiousness, Hong Kong delights in the undiscovered, and some of the city’s most exciting spots are also its most discrete, from restaurant speakeasy Mrs. Pound, located in a storefront masquerading as a stamp shop, to Fu Lu Shou, a rooftop bar that requires a trip up a rickety elevator and a passcode to get in. Another unexpected find: amazing tacos at 11 Westside, which opened this year as the city’s first authentic Mexican restaurant, in a Jon Chan–designed space featuring midcentury furnishings and concrete walls. Most of the city is connected through malls and walkways, and, for shoppers, choosing between them is more about location than preference. Skip the major brands—not so easy to do in a city that’s got eight outposts of Céline alone—and instead head to the iconic Joyce, one of the oldest and most prestigious retailers in a recently redesigned Paola Navone building, now covering 25,000 square feet in the Central district. On that note: Nunnerley recommends capping any visit to Hong Kong with an authentic Hong Kong foot ma ssage (her personal go-to is Foot Reflexology & Acupressure on Queens Road in Central), perhaps followed by afternoon tea at the Peninsula, and maybe a nap. As Eu puts it, “Hong Kong is pretty vibrant. Do it right, and you might find that four days is enough. But also know that you can always come back.”

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“Collectors here take their collecting very seriously,” says Nunnerley. “And the smaller galleries in particular help make Hong Kong a true destination city for sophisticated global collectors while also honoring the city’s cultural roots.” There’s also the boundary-pushing Pearl Lam Galleries, one of the city art scene’s original champions, whose newest Hong Kong location is credited with helping establish the Central neighborhood as one of the city’s most culturally exciting, and the M+ Pavilion, which serves as a temporary site for art, architecture and film exhibits while the highly anticipated Herzog & de Meuron–designed M+

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andra Nunnerley puts it this way: “Hong Kong is fast.” The New Zealand–born, Manhattan-based interior designer has worked on high-profile projects around the world, from ski chalets in Telluride to penthouses in the Mitte district of Berlin. “But whenever I’m in Hong Kong, I immediately feel the pace,” she says, “and how very quickly it’s changing.” Which has made Asia’s most developed—and priciest—city a natural fit for the Basel brand. This spring, the lucrative fair returns for its sixth year in Hong Kong, bringing together nearly 250 galleries from 32 countries. Like its Miami Beach and original Switzerland iterations, Art Basel Hong Kong promises a wide range of historic and cutting-edge works by both established and emerging artists, many of them represented by Asiaand Asia-Pacific-based galleries who don’t often show beyond the region. “The very first thing you’ll notice about Art Basel Hong Kong is how very Asian it is,” says Emi Eu, the director of STPI, a Singapore–based contemporary art gallery and workshop, and a member of the ABHK Selection Committee. “From North Asia down to New Zealand, it’s an excellent spectrum of Asian art. So even if you’re not buying, it’s a great way to get a taste of Asian art—and some of the very best Asian art—even if you can’t travel to all these places.” But, of course, this is Hong Kong, and so while the fair offers plenty of eye candy in the form of experimental installations and museum-quality—and museum-size—works, it’s most definitely designed to satisfy the city’s other great love: shopping. That means the focus is on offering collectors something to take home. There are advisors on-site through the fair’s VIP relations team to help buyers navigate the fair efficiently and with purpose, and Eu suggests serious shoppers take them up on their services. That said, doing a bit of homework is advised. “Most definitely study the list of exhibitors and artists before you come,” she says. “Make some calls to your favorite local galleries before you go, and say, ‘You know my taste. What, and who, should I look out for?’ Familiarize yourself with Asian art so you don’t get culture shock—or sticker shock, for that matter.” And while Eu also says that ABHK has matured enough that it’s possible to find some very special pieces from non-Asian galleries, “If you’re coming from the west,” she says, “you should make that effort to really look at something new.” Local branches of international galleries make that easier than ever. Since Art Basel landed in Hong Kong in 2013, the art scene in the city has moved, true to form, particularly fast, welcoming local outposts of dealers like Gagosian, Sotheby’s, and Pace Gallery, as well as standouts like the Rem Koolhaus– designed Lehmann Maupin and the just-opened David Zwirner.

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SPRING 2018 I M AG E : PAT R I C S H AW

We catch up with Hollywood royalty Sistine Stallone as she embarks on her top-model destiny and white-hot actor Billy Magnussen on his upcoming film Game Night. Once a bohemian stopover, Belgrade is the new go-to urban escape. Sofia Vergara reflects on married life and her post-Modern Family plans in our Spring 2018 cover story. Plus, the story behind a mysterious jewel and a look inside Erika Jayne’s headquarters.

Dress, $9,700, CHANEL, select boutiques


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Spring Awakening

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

Patric Shaw STYLED BY

Joseph Delate

Model on the rise Sistine Stallone doesn’t shy away from the spotlight—and neither do these bright, playful looks


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SPRING 2018

Jumpsuit, $2,820, MISSONI, missoni .com. Shoe, $1,995, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, christianlouboutin.com. Opposite: Top, blouse, pant, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, select boutiques. Previous spread: Dress, $5,295, corset belt, $2,295, DOLCE & GABBANA, select boutiques.


76 SPRING 2018 Top, $2,200, choker, $1,225, VERSACE, versace.com. Opposite: Dress, $5,275, jacket, $1,375, VERSACE, versace.com.

SPRING 2018

— R ACH E L BARB E R

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Even as our shoot wraps up at 5 p.m.— after a very early call time—Sistine Stallone is filled with energy. And the 19-year-old model, daughter of actor Sylvester Stallone and model Jennifer Flavin, has reason to be excited. Just days before, she had moved to New York City to focus on her modeling career, already with a few major milestones under her belt including an appearance in LOVE’s Advent Calendar along with Kendall Jenner, Gigi Hadid, Emily Ratajkowski and countless other powerhouse names. Despite her upbringing in the entertainment industry, Stallone isn’t the kind of girl who leaves the house in a full face of makeup or hits all the latest boutique workout classes. She finds workout routines on Instagram and admits she still gets nervous on the red carpet. Although she has learned one major takeaway from growing up in front of the camera: “I should’ve never agreed to do matching dresses with my sisters on those red carpets,” she laughs. As for what’s next in 2018, she says eagerly, “I don’t know, but I hope it’s my year. I want to do more runway. I’d love to see Victoria’s Secret again at the end of the year. I’m trying to have a few goals in mind.” As Stallone navigates what is sure to be a major year in her career, she plans to keep in mind her model mother’s biggest piece of advice: “‘Be kind to everyone.’ It’s so much easier to be nice to people,” says Stallone. “People don’t forget.”

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MEET SISTINE


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Coat, $2,990, MAX MARA, 212-753-7300. Jumpsuit, price upon request, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Opposite: Dress, $7,800, CHANEL, select boutiques. Hair: Alberto Guzman for Bumble & Bumble at raybrownpro.com. Makeup: Regina Harris. Manicure: Geraldine Holford using Dior Vernis for Atelier Management.


B I L L Y

Adrienne Gaffney PHOTOGRAPHED BY David Roemer STYLED BY Kareem Rashed BY

CHARMING

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FROM HIS HIGH-OCTANE CAREER TO HIS UNCONVENTIONAL HOBBIES, ACTOR BILLY MAGNUSSEN HAS STAR QUALITY LIKE NO OTHER

IF THE MODERN CLASS OF HOLLYWOOD STARS TENDS TO BE cautious and cynical, then Billy Magnussen is working against the tide. The ebullient and energetic star of the upcoming film Game Night has built a career that, though relatively young, uniquely spans both genre and medium. He’s been on Broadway in a Tony-nominated role in Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, in films like Bridge of Spies and Into the Woods and on memorable television arcs both comedic (Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt) and dramatic (Black Mirror). But if his career is serious, Magnussen himself has made an effort to remain light-hearted. In a free-wielding conversation, he uses the word “magical” generously and is full of praise for the things he loves: the opera (“It’s an art form that I don’t think we appreciate,” he says), his co-stars (Sharon Horgan, Tiffany Haddish and Jane Krakowski are all given rapturous praise) and singing (something he encourages everyone to do more of). He also extols his girlfriend Meghann Fahy, star of the Freeform series The Bold Type, whom he met on the set of the 2011 Hallmark movie The Lost Valentine. At 32, he has entered a new stage and a new way of approaching work. “It’s funny: 20-year-old Billy was totally different than now 30-year-old Billy,” he says. “The hype of show business, just being totally naïve and thinking, ‘Oh, this is what I really want.’ Then at 30 you want to build a life and a family and whatnot. That’s the more important thing.” This shift has included a move to the Dumbo neighborhood of Brooklyn and a quieter pace of life. “I’m adulting really hard,” he says. Adulting, as he puts it, has also included embracing his personal passions and some less-than-orthodox hobbies. Last year he traveled to Kyrgyzstan for the World Nomad Games, where he represented the U.S. in the sport of Kok-Boru. The Central Asian game, in which players on horseback endeavor to lob a 70-pound animal carcass through a goal, can be brutal, making it an unusual choice for someone whose livelihood depends on his face staying intact. “The horses are ramming each other. Everyone fell off. I fell off. It’s intense. It’s barbaric awesomeness. We all didn’t know what we were getting into,” he recalls.


Coat, $1,950, BOTTEGA VENETA, 800-845-6790. Opposite: T-shirt, $75, VINCE, vince.com. Jeans, $285, 3X1, 3x1.us. Boots, $1,850, JOHN LOBB, johnlobb.com. Necklace, $710, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Watch, $6,700, ZENITH, zenith-watches.com. Previous spread: Jacket, $3,175, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com. T-shirt, $39, GUESS, shop.guess.com. Pants, $285, 3X1, 3x1.us.

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“YOU DON’T WANT TO PLAY THE SAME NOTE OVER AND OVER. JAZZ ISN’T PLAYED THAT WAY. IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MIX.”


Jacket, $5,290, TOM FORD, tomford.com. Shirt, $1,010, BERLUTI, 212-439-6400. Groomer: Scott McMahan at Kate Ryan Inc.

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Growing up as a jock in Georgia, Magnussen’s path to acting began accidentally. After pulling a hamstring while wrestling, he found himself taking high school theater to fulfill his gym requirement. He was surprised by how much he enjoyed the craft and eventually decided to pursue it post–high school. “I grew up in a cabinetmaker’s house. My father was a carpenter. I always knew that kind of stuff, working with my hands. I didn’t want to get into it as much as my father was. I just didn’t,” he says. “I found out I could go to college for acting and was like, ‘I’ll try that.’ Luckily, North Carolina School of the Arts accepted me and then it just kind of progressed from there. I surprise myself every day, with every opportunity I’ve gotten. It’s really wild. My mom is always like, ‘I can’t believe what you’ve done.’” Currently Magnussen is enjoying a rare quiet moment, awaiting the rollout of several recently completed projects. February will see the release of Game Night, a comedy in which a group of friends’ regular game night turns into a dangerous thrill ride. The starry cast includes Rachel McAdams, Jason Bateman, Kyle Chandler, Sharon Horgan and Michael C. Hall. Magnussen lights up when discussing Horgan, his girlfriend in the film. “I fucking love that woman! I love her. She is so talented, so smart, just a sweetheart,” he says. That affection is critical for Magnussen, who values the relationships he’s made on set as much as he does the credits on his IMDb page. “It’s crazy I’ve worked with these people. It really is. Even just saying this in this interview, I’m floored,” he reflects. “To actually have that phone call, ‘Spielberg’s on the line.’ ‘No, Spielberg is really on the phone.’ I was like, ‘Oh, shit.’ It’s crazy. I’m so lucky. I’m thankful.” Magnussen recently completed filming his role in Guy Ritchie’s live action adaptation of Disney’s Aladdin, one of the largest productions he’s been a part of. He plays a new character created for the film, a prince who competes for Jasmine’s attention. “The scale of that film is massive and you’d be on set and there’s 500 extras. I’m so glad I got to play on that and come up with this character,” he says. He’ll also appear alongside Emma Stone and Jonah Hill in Cary Fukunaga’s upcoming Netf lix series Maniac and in the indie film The Oath, with Tiffany Haddish and John Cho. Trying new things and not sticking to the same script, whether on stage or film, is a priority for Magnussen. After bouncing between studio films and celebrated indies, like this summer’s Sundance fave Ingrid Goes West, he’s seeing his career flourish. “I think it’s a mixed bag of things, like seeing what you’re capable of doing and mixing it up,” he says. “You don’t want to play the same note over and over. Jazz isn’t played that way. It’s all about the mix. I don’t know what it’s going to be next but when it comes, be ready for it.” ■


A BR E AT H OF NEW LIFE BY LANE NIESET 

Out of isolation, the city of Belgrade has become a hip and happening urban travel destination

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAHESH SHANTARAM

WALKING ALONG DOBRACINA STREET, I’M CONVINCED I MUST BE IN THE WRONG neighborhood. Paint is peeling off the sides of old warehouses, exposing a layer of red brick tagged with graffiti. Each block appears more deserted than the last until I start peering down alleyways and inside some of these seemingly abandoned buildings, and realize that the industrial spaces have been converted into concept shops, beer gardens and hip cafes. I finally stumble upon the place I’m looking for, Przionica D59B. About the size of a doctor’s waiting room, this is one of Belgrade’s first micro-roasters, where artisanal coffee is expertly brewed and poured in a style unlike the traditional Turkish roasters in town. “We have a legacy from Turks and bad Italian commercial companies, and people here still expect coffee must be bitter and black,” says Przionica D59B’s Nenad Stojanović, a national barista champion who is leading Belgrade’s craft coffee revolution with his recently opened pop-up café, Bloom Coffee, at Luff Gelato. “We were isolated in the 1990s but Belgrade is growing now as people are starting to travel more around Europe and bring back this culture.”

INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

The Pobednik (The Victor) monument, of a man holding an eagle, commemorates Serbia’s victory during the Balkan Wars; Kalemegdan Fortress. Top right: Intricate chandelier inside the temple of Saint Sava

The café is just one of a handful of new spots redefining the industrial district of Lower Dorćol, the first neighborhood to develop outside the infamous Kalemegdan Fortress, whose walls once contained Serbia’s entire capital of Beograd, the “White City,” named after the limestone-white ridge where the fortress sits. During Ottoman times, Lower Dorćol served as a trading center and Jewish quarter, but after World War II, only one street—Jevrejska or “Jewish” Street—still remains. Belgrade was bombed four times in the 20th century alone, most recently in 1999 by NATO, and Lower Dorćol’s look hasn’t changed since the last world war. While Belgrade was still the capital of Yugoslavia, this neighborhood became heavily industrialized with workshops and power stations, but it has taken decades since these companies shut their doors for empty spaces to finally find new tenants. Now it seems as if every day there’s a new café or boutique popping up


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between old craft shops like Belgrade’s last traditional perfumery, Parfimerija Sava. “Here in Belgrade, we may stick with shopping at the same market or drinking coffee at the same café, but we also want to try new things,” says local guide Bojana Šestovi. Belgrade sits strategically at the meeting point of the Sava and Danube rivers and is often referred to as the Berlin of Eastern Europe, with its riverside bars that carry on until dawn and street art–lined neighborhoods yielding craft coffee shops and a newly emerged Design District. And while its gritty streets and affordable prices may seem vaguely reminiscent of the German capital, it has a distinct energy all of its own. “You can maybe compare Belgrade to Athens or Rome, but in former Yugoslavia, there’s no other city that has the same spirit or style,” Stojanović says. “We don’t have a strict way of life where we only go out on weekends; here, people go to a club on a Monday or Tuesday.”

THE CITY THAT DOESN’T SLEEP My first night out in the city happened to be a Friday. After a lengthy dinner in Skadarlija, the old Bohemian quarter whose cobbled streets mimic those of Paris’s Montmartre, I hopped in a cab for the quick drive over to another emerging part of town, Savamala. I stepped out under the Brankov Bridge, which connects the historic center with New Belgrade, and made my way through the throng of people swaying to deep house on the terrace of Tranzit, a nightclub sandwiched between brick buildings on the bank of the Sava, just next to the train tracks. The club is said to close at 4 a.m., but when I left around 3 after finishing a bottle of Serbian rosé with a group of friends, the line to get in still stretched down the block. While Savamala’s recently renovated industrial spaces cater more to the nightclub scene in a style reminiscent of Budapest’s ruin bars, the neighborhood’s newer development, Beton Hala, is a more sophisticated setting. Beton Hala translates to “Concrete Hall,” and the waterfront district is just as its name suggests: a strip of white warehouses built in the 1930s with glass façades opening out to views of the Sava. Restaurants like the tapas-style Cantina de Frida add a modern spin to the one-time industrial space, with art painted on the exposed brick in a style playing off of its namesake, Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. When my friend Alex and I arrived at Frida around 9 p.m., every table was full, from the ones on the riverside patio to those lining the wraparound upstairs terrace that overlooks the bustling center bar and cover band. We squeezed into a space at the end of the bar and started ordering from a menu that bounced between Spanish and Latin American cuisine, with small plates like tuna ceviche, patatas bravas and beef fajitas. “You def initely have more variety now than 10 years ago when your main options for eating out were only Italian or Serbian restaurants,” explains Vlastimir Puhalo, co-owner of fine dining restaurant Homa. “People don’t have enough money to

sit in a restaurant and then go to a club, so they would rather go for a late dinner and then continue with music and drinking at a restaurant.” Fine dining is still a foreign concept in Belgrade, where options range from traditional meat-heavy eateries to street stands and bakeries serving Serbian staples like flaky cheese– or minced meat–filled burek pastries. Take a seat at most restaurants in the city and you’ll find a similar meat-based menu served family style, tables piled high with platters of ćevapčići, fingersized pieces of grilled minced meat; kulen, paprika-spiced salami; and pork crisps called čvarci. When Homa debuted seven years ago in Lower Dorćol, the restaurant was one of the first to move into the district’s decaying warehouse-like spaces, as well as one of the first to attempt a fine-dining concept. “The whole idea was to create something that had never been done before in my city,” Puhalo says. “I want to leave a mark; I want to push things forward. To create the city’s first serious fine dining restaurant, I had to push boundaries.” Homa’s whimsical eight-course tasting menu features dishes like fried Adriatic squid on a bed of ink-coated pasta and a beef trio of fillet, oxtail and tongue with mustard ice cream and Bordelaise sauce—dishes that would fit perfectly in a culinary capital like Copenhagen instead of on a quiet side street in Serbia. Not only are the meat and seafood dishes beautifully prepared and presented, so are the vegetarian ones. As a vegetarian himself, it is clear to me that Puhalo wanted to ensure plant-based dishes are executed just as thoughtfully as the meat. For example, traditional clotted cream–like kajmak is breaded and served alongside black truff les and walnuts, while classic produce like peppers are dried and stuffed with mung bean ragout and smoked plums. “Through history, Serbian people like to eat a lot of meat; it’s our culture,” Puhalo explains. “[People think] you can’t create a decent meal without meat, so one of my goals was to give people options.”

Opposite: Hotel Moskva. Left: Nightlife at Beton Hala. Below: Beograd Cafe on Kneza Mihaila, the main pedestrian and shopping zone in Belgrade


An old, wellfurnished apartment in Vračar, Belgrade

EAT HERE

SIGHTS DUJOUR STAY HERE Square Nine: The swanky 45-room boutique hotel (a member of The Leading Hotels of the World) sits in the historic city center steps away from the main pedestrian boulevard. While the spacious Scandinavian–style suites are one draw, the rooftop Japanese restaurant, Ebisu, is also worth a reservation. Studentski Trg 9

While Belgrade is still lagging far behind fashion capitals like London or Paris, it’s managed to use its tumultuous past to its advantage, with a fashion scene that is characterized by its “boldness, strong identity and fresh ideas,” says Iva Ljubinković, who started a shoe collection in 2013 called ABO with her sister, fashion designer Ana Ljubinković. Ana first showed her line at Belgrade Fashion Week in 2004, but it wasn’t until 2012 that she made a name for herself internationally with a Tiffany-blue dress dotted with pearls worn by pop star Miley Cyrus. When asked how she sees Serbia’s fashion scene evolving, Ana responds, “At the moment, we have really promising emerging designers, which we haven’t had in a while.” Case in point: the seven-year-old Design District, housed in a repurposed 1930s shopping center near Republic Square. While larger labels like ABO and wellknown concept stores like Supermarket sit in other parts of Stari Grad, the Old Town, the Design District places the spotlight on a handful of up-and-coming fashion designers and shops like IMI, as well as galleries like four-year-old Gallery 1250, which features ceramics from local artists. ■

Above: Taxi stand at one end of Kneza Mihaila, the main pedestrian and shopping zone in Belgrade. Left: Supermarket Concept Store

St. Sava’s Temple: Perched on Vračar Hill, this Orthodox temple — one of the largest in the world — can be seen almost anywhere in the city. While the foundations were laid in 1939, work was delayed during the Communist era and the white marble–clad exterior was only just completed in 2004. Krušedolska 2a Museum of Contemporary Art: After a 10-year closure, New Belgrade’s modern art museum reopened last fall and features a permanent collection of 20 th -century work from around the globe. Ušće 10, Blok 15

Josip Broz Tito is everywhere; seen here on an artwork at the Museum of Contemporary Art Belgrade (MoCAB)

Cveće Zla: A combination deli, bar and wine shop, this is Belgrade’s version of a bistro, with an open kitchen prepping salads, sandwiches and Serbianinspired snacks like beef tongue-filled burek. Nevesinjska 12 Dva Jelena: Dva Jelena, or “Two Stags” in English, is one of three famous inns lining Skadarlija’s cobblestoned streets, where poets and actors gathered back in the 19 th and 20th centuries. Balkan bands serenade tables while diners sample traditional dishes like pljeskavica, Serbian-style burgers, and kobasice, or spiced sausages. Skadarska 32 Klub Književnika: This local institution began as a writer’s club over 70 years ago where the likes of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir would gather. Now the glass-encased winter garden serves as a fashionable spot to seeand-be-seen while dining on upscale Serbian cuisine. Francuska 7 IL Grappolo: Belgrade is home to over two dozen wine bars, but this is deemed one of the best by the city’s sommeliers. Get schooled on Serbian wine and the national grape, red Prokupac, while nibbling on a selection of handmade cheeses and meats like gouda and smoked beef. Obilićev Venac 27

Mosaic of Sveta Petka (Saint Parascheva of the Balkans) at Ružica (Rose) Church, a Serbian Orthodox church at Kalemegdan Fortress, once used as a military chapel and to store gunpowder

Pamaro Bar, Nikola Tesla Airport, Belgrade

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Luff Gelato: A few months ago, specialty roaster Bloom Coffee popped up in this retro-chic gelato shop. While your cappuccino is brewing, survey the selection of handcrafted flavors like decadent dark chocolate and smooth elderflower sorbet before settling into a seat by the window. Prote Mateje 30

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EXPLORE HERE Zemun: The historic neighborhood once straddled the border of two empires and still maintains part of its Austro-Hungarian charm today with its cobbled streets lined with pastelcolored Baroque-style buildings. Get your bearings over all of Belgrade from the 360-degree viewing platform on top of the brick 19 th -century Gardoš Tower, aka the Millennium Tower.

Mandarina Cake Shop: Bakeries dot almost every corner of the city, but this contemporary cake shop in Old Belgrade stands out for its gorgeous confections (chef and cofounder Krsto Radović did a stint at London’s five-star Claridge’s) and flaky French-style croissants. Gračanička 16

Menu at Przionica D59B

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Hotel Moskva: It’s hard to miss the landmark, yellow-tiled façade sitting in the center of town. One of the oldest operating hotels in Belgrade, this was once the meeting place for Albert Einstein and Alfred Hitchcock — two of the six stars who have suites named after them. Don’t leave without sampling the hotel’s signature cake, the moskva schnitt, Belgrade’s version of the Viennese sachertorte. Terazije 20

Ferdinand Knedle: Think of Lana Nedeljković as Serbia’s version of Dominique Ansel (the pastry chef behind the cronut craze), who added a cool factor to grandma’s traditional plum-filled knedle dumplings with flavors like Nutella and amaretto. Gavrila Principa 58


Modern One of TV’s highest paid actresses talks motherhood, marital bliss and what she still has to learn BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

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HEN MODERN FAMILY WRAPS ITS last season, it will end a decade-long run that has seen Sofia Vergara receive four Emmy nominations, become an international spokeswoman, host Saturday Night Live, get married and earn $41.5 million in 2017. Aware that she will soon venture from the comfort of a blockbuster role on one of TV’s longest running comedies into the deep waters of post-Modern life, Vergara says she has never forgotten how lucky she is. In January, it was announced that the beloved series will bow out at the conclusion of its tenth season in 2019. “It’s going to be very sad for all of us to finish a show that has been so good to us. We’ve had the best schedule, we’ve had the best people working on the show, it’s been a dream job, I think, for all of us,” says Vergara. “It’s sometimes once in a lifetime for an actor to find a show as amazing as Modern Family.” After studying dentistry in Colombia before relocating to Miami where she worked as a TV host for Unvision, Vergara, 47, expertly used Modern Family—her first taste of mainstream American fame—as a springboard to lucrative business deals. Since the show began, she’s been featured in campaigns for Pepsi, State Farm, Head & Shoulders and CoverGirl. Forbes reported that only a quarter of her eight-figure income comes from her work on the series. She’s launched a clothing line, Sofia by Sofia Vergara, at Kmart and in 2017 co-founded Raze, a digital media company producing Latin-focused content. She’s also working on EBY, a company that sells underwear by subscription and contributes 10% of its net sales to microfinance programs for women.

Dress, DIOR


Bra & Corset, AGENT PROVOCATEUR. Brief, CULOTTE GEMMA.

Her attitude and her work ethic have been shaped by her circumstances. Married when she was 18, Vergara divorced soon after the birth of her son Manolo, now 26. Knowing she had a child at home was a tremendous motivator for her. “When you’re single and you have a kid, you worry. You worry everyday, you wake up and if you don’t have enough money to pay for his medical insurance, for his food, for someone to help with him while you work, a nanny,” she says. “That drove me to never be lazy, [not fear] failure and always try to create opportunities for myself. I think that helped me [with] the motivation and [to] keep me walking straight.” It was those years, the nose to the grindstone period when it was just her and Manolo, that set her up to achieve worldwide fame in her mid-thirties. “When you’re young it’s fun opportunities and partying, and you lose a lot of time. Because of my son, I always felt that I didn’t have the right to lose any time, and I think I was able to do so many things that have made me very happy,” she explains. Happily married to actor Joe Manganiello since 2015, she credits her son, who has appeared with her in Head & Shoulders ads, with allowing her to pursue her dreams. “I think I was able to do all the things I wanted to do in my career because Manolo never gave me a problem—I never had to be after him or worried about him. As a mother, that gives you a lot of peace and time to think about things that you want to do,” she says. Knowing that she has a small empire of ventures that demand attention helps Vergara as she nears her transition from her show. “I know that the odds of me finding another

Modern Family are going to be very small so I think it’s better for me to focus on doing more movies when I’m done. Now there are more options on TV, because there’s Netf lix, HBO and all of that miniseries stuff,” she says. “But I’m kind of happy that I worked very hard throughout these nine years so financially I [don’t have to] go crazy after it’s done.” While starring on Modern Family Vergara appeared in films like Hot Pursuit, Chef and Machete Kills, but in coming years she will have the time and capacity to do much more in film. Vergara recently appeared in The Female Brain, a relationship comedy directed and cowritten by Whitney Cummings. The ability to work with a female director was incredibly appealing to her. “My agent asked me if I was interested in having a part in this movie and even before reading the script I was like, ‘Yes, of course I would love to,’ because I think Whitney is a very talented woman,” she says. “Then I read the script and said, ‘Oh yeah, I can do this.’ But my main thing was no matter what the role was, I was going to do it because I thought it was a great project done by a woman.” As illogical as it may seem, TV’s comedic queen insists that she’s far from having her pick of roles. In fact, she’s generally grateful just to receive offers. “I can’t be that picky because the truth is that I’m very new to acting, I’ve never had an acting class in my life. I always feel very honored to have a director or my agents call me to offer me a part,” she says. “Unless it’s something that I know I can’t do, like if they’re [looking for] singers, of course I’m not going to go to that audition! If it’s a role I think that I can do I’ll do it because for me it’s all a learning experience.” ■

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“I’M HAPPY THAT I WORKED VERY HARD THROUGHOUT THESE NINE YEARS SO FINANCIALLY I [DON’T HAVE TO] GO CRAZY AFTER IT’S DONE.


HIDDEN

JEWELS DUJOUR.COM

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After discovering a mysterious piece of jewelry known as the Boivin starfish, named after pioneering jeweler Jeanne Boivin, author CHERIE BURNS couldn’t shake the allure of its ruby and amethyst gems. In her new book, DIVING FOR STARFISH, Burns details her quest into the minds and jewelry boxes of its collectors, who, she quickly realizes are not showing off so much as keeping their precious pieces under lock and key.

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F R O M D I V I N G F O R S TA R F I S H BY C H E R I E B U R N S . C O P Y R I G H T © 2 0 1 8 BY T H E A U T H O R A N D R E P R I N T E D BY P E R M I S S I O N O F S T . M A R T I N ’S P R E S S

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I NEEDED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE STARFISH AND THE world that had produced them. They obviously had a quality that had survived the f luctuations of taste and value over time while other jewelry slipped into oblivion. When I spoke by phone with British jewelry expert Vivienne Becker, who listed the Boivin ruby and amethyst starfish as one of the hundred most valuable pieces in the world in her book, The Impossible Collection of Jewelry (Assouline), she explained to me what she considered the starfish’s enduring appeal. “It was a superb piece of design timed so well. It was so avant-garde at the time, the size, the mix of colors. The material was used brilliantly to reflect nature in a very unsentimental way. There was the audacity of making something so big and colorful. It was an expression of femininity at the time, strong and bold.” She added that the value, and perhaps the design, were inf luenced by “who owned and who wore them,” in much the same way that celebrities boost the value of styles and design today. “Really good jewelry designers are so rare and so exceptional and a good piece of design made in precious materials is even more rare.” She had first seen an actual starfish in 2012 in New York when Lee Siegelson had Millicent Rogers’s in his salon. Because I had not handled the starfish at Verdura I had not yet experienced the marvel of its articulated rays, a mechanism so finely tuned that the rays did not dangle loosely when pinned on but [rather] gently conformed to the body of the wearer. The articulation made them versatile. There were many curves and contours where they could be pinned and molded to a woman’s figure. ILLUSTRATIONS BY

Meagan Morrison

The starfish brooches are outsized, but their gems and price tags are not, which can be confusing to novice collectors who consider stones as the best measure of value. Counting carats misses the point. Vintage jewelry as exceptional as the starfish is about equal parts craft and style and history and romance, not gemstone size. Even though the latest sale of a Boivin starfish fell not far beneath a million dollars, many diamonds will exceed that any day. A Boivin ruby and amethyst starfish appeals to a different side of a collector’s fancy than does a big rock. Rather than mineral value and financial worth, it is a piece of art, and art typically has a story attached that helps a sophisticated collector appreciate it. The starfish’s value was rooted in its history. Jewelry design, like both fine and decorative arts once you get beyond the first scratches on the walls by cave dwellers, always owes something to the design ethos that came before. The period of jewelry-making in the 1930s that had spawned the starfish was a golden—and bygone—era. Its best attributes were represented in the starfish. That’s one reason they are counted among the most spectacular pieces of the twentieth century. I stopped for a bemused moment to consider my own qualifications as a chronicler of such exotic and sumptuous pieces. Beyond being a reporter and a writer, I had none. Except, I noted whimsically, the brooches had a lot of rubies, and ruby was my birthstone. So why not, I reasoned, start my research there? I was given a ruby about the size of a grain of cracked wheat, set in a gold ring, by my grandmother when I was seven.


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ship and design rather than the worth of gems. The balance between the value of the stones and the less tangible aesthetic appeal was invariably tipped toward the latter. It’s a bit like the execution of a good French pastry that owes more to its baker than the raw, albeit high-quality, ingredients used to make it. Amethysts, on the other hand, are semiprecious stones, a quartz crystal in fact. It was bold of Boivin to pair them, purely for their purplish color, with precious red rubies. Before the 19th century amethysts had been nearly as expensive as precious stones and appeared in the crowns and jewelry of royals, but a large deposit discovered in Brazil in 1902 lowered their price and flooded the gem market. They have been a favorite of mass-market jewelers ever since. The name amethyst, which means “not drunk” in ancient Greek, has caused some wearers to believe the stones protect against drunkenness. Others claim they stave off seduction, and I suspect there’s rightly a connection to drinking there. A whole list of metaphysical properties have been assigned to amethysts, including the inducement of peace and calm, reduction of compulsive behavior, reduction of grief, and healing. I was reminded of a huge pinkish-purple quartz that decorates the entry of a hotel in Taos that aims to conjure up a metaphysical and mystical atmosphere, considered “woo-woo” by skeptical locals. The mix of precious and semiprecious stones can puzzle the inexperienced jewelry connoisseur. Starfish are not Hope diamonds. They do not command the price of large showpiece gems. Gemstones, “rocks” in some jewelers’ parlance, come and go, but the design and workmanship of a jewelry master from the early nineteenth century cannot be replicated. So while the starfish

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My parents replaced it later with another, a slightly larger oval stone set in a little gold mesh screen. It was purchased at the town jewelry store on Main Street around the corner from our house in Richmond, Indiana. That store, like so many small-town institutions that dotted main streets before merchants moved to malls, sold mostly engagement rings, charms for charm bracelets, lavalieres and high school rings. Its big storefront window and interior glass jewelry cases made it a favorite place for me and my junior high girlfriends to burn time when we walked home after school. The clerks were endlessly patient as we asked to see this charm and that, to try on rings we had no chance of buying and to look at post earrings, although we didn’t have pierced ears. That was about the extent of one’s jewelry needs in Richmond, until you graduated from high school or became engaged, and I did neither there. My grandmother, an antiques dealer, gave me another ring with two small rubies cupped in open gold roses. It snagged on sweaters and towels. I left it on the edge of the bathtub in the Jefferson Hotel in Washington, D.C., many years later and never saw it again. I never bothered to think about the quality of stones or where they came from until I encountered the Boivin starfish. But now I was making the connection between that storefront in Indiana and the glorious pieces that had captivated me. Design is the crowning glory of the brooches, but their attraction for me had started with the stones. The raw elements of these pieces, even before the storied French creators and the glamorous owners, have their own illustrious history. Rubies were first mentioned in recorded history in literature about the Northern Silk Road of China in 200 B.C. Always valued highly in Asian countries, they were used to ornament armor, scabbards, and harnesses of Indian and Chinese noblemen. Cleopatra draped herself in both precious and semiprecious jewels, rubies among them, when she reclined under her gold-spangled canopy. They came into more popular usage and fashion in Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. Some thirty years later, Boivin’s starfish were spawned on a drawing desk in Paris. I did some homework. The most desirable ruby stones are bloodred, or “pigeon’s blood.” Legend has it that they were named by the Chinese who prized them for matching the shade of a drop of pigeon’s blood on a silver tray. For 800 years the best have been mined in Burma (Upper Myanmar), in the Mogok Valley, a region four hundred miles north of Rangoon. They have been mined in Thailand, Cambodia, India, Afghanistan, and even more recently in Kenya and Montana in the United States, but the best have most often come from Burma, as did the stones in Boivin’s ruby starfish. The 71 rubies that went into each of Boivin’s ruby and amethyst starfish were cabochons, stones shaped and polished to a rounded dome with a fat bottom, rather than faceted. They were prized for their intense color and often used in crowns of kings and noblemen. But normally, Boivin made a point of not buying the best gemstones because the value of its jewelry, in the minds of the Boivins and their designers, was derived from workman-

are not as highly valued as a large raw diamond they are certainly worth more than the sum of the values of their rubies and amethysts and their eighteen-karat-gold setting. It is the alchemy between design and gems that determines the worth. The dash of daring in the creation of the starfish displayed by pairing rubies with amethysts was part of the Boivin appeal and one reason French jewelry historian Françoise Cailles, who authenticates Boivin jewelry for dealers, noted, “I have frequently noticed that collectors develop a surprisingly strong attachment to Boivin jewels. Very few pieces, in fact, ever come on the market because no matter when they were made, their resolutely modern concept permits them to adapt perfectly to the lifestyle and dress of today.” This observation by Cailles, which has the sturdy ring of a sales pitch, is nevertheless an apt description of Boivin jewelry’s appeal. It was eerily echoed in many conversations I have had with the sellers and dealers of Boivin’s starfish. “Emeralds go up and down with the market. Diamonds go up and down, but beautiful pieces never go out of style. If you look at anything that has a name and is beautifully made it never goes out of fashion,” explained Daphne Lingon, a senior vice president and jewelry specialist at Christie’s in New York. The starfish, in her opinion, are immune from fluctuations in value and changes in fashion. “People will always want them,” she said. Cailles told me that Jeanne Boivin did not need to travel to Burma or other ports where the stones used in her pieces were found. In the booming jewelry business of the 1930s, everything came to Paris. Boivin had a lapidary in the workroom behind her salon who helped acquire, cut, polish and set gemstones. A picture of the bustling world of gem sales and dealers was given me by another jeweler and focused on a pearl merchant in London as late as the 1970s. In a scene that sounds more like the current stock exchange, stones would be auctioned at gem markets. Jewelers remember that one man, Abe Cohen, had a corner on the pearl market and so sharp was his eye and astute his valuations that when the representatives of major jewelry stores watched from the balcony to see what he bid on, they hurried to follow suit and price their acquisitions accordingly. Cohen’s ability to judge a pearl or stone was considered prescient, uncanny even. And after a while, his judgment was self-fufilling. What he pronounced became fact. He was feared. As I moved through the jewelry community I noted that even in modern times and northern climates, when merchants and sellers wear suits and wingtip shoes into the marketplace, the customs and expressions of gem merchants are barely removed from the culture of the souk, where stone trading first began. Of course, with jewelry, perception is as important as any science, perhaps more so. One does not buy a diamond ring because it is hard enough to score a plate-glass window. One buys a diamond ring because it symbolizes commitment and lasting love. It was De Beers, the world’s largest diamond merchant, that proclaimed that connection with its creation of the legendary slogan “A diamond is forever.” Who is to say it isn’t so? Similarly, rubies come to mean more than a July birthday. Passion, desire, opulence and power are all suggested by small red stones the size of a pomegranate seed. With people, it is what is conjured in the mind and senses that counts. If I had ever doubted it, a scene from a fine arts fair in New York’s Armory on Park Avenue made me a believer. I watched a man whom I supposed to be a dealer take a gold Boivin ring from its case and give it a sniff. I asked him what he was doing. “You can smell who owned it,” he explained haughtily as he threw a glance at me as though I’d asked about his sex life. I didn’t ask him who it smelled like. It was probably unromantic of me to think it would most likely carry the scent of hand cream from whoever had tried it on before him. But this was not the last time I would be told that jewelry carries history in its scent. ■

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“EMERALDS go up and down with the market. Diamonds go up and down, but beautiful pieces never go out of style.”


ERIKA atEASE BY

SAMUEL ANDERSON  PHOTOGRAPHED BY

AMY NEUNSINGER

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Peek inside the old Hollywood oasis where Erika Girardi, wife and mother, becomes Erika Jayne, pop diva extraordinaire


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Below: A painting by Mark Ryden hangs against pink flamingo wallpaper

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Above: A tray accented with the Beverly Hills Hotel banana leaf pattern sits on Girardi’s table

HEN VIRGINIA WOOLF PROPOSED IN A ROOM OF ONE’S Own that women need their own domain in order to create, she might not have imagined that one day Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Erika Girardi would carry on this feminist tenet in Barbie-pink high relief. In addition to sharing a 17,000-square-foot Pasadena mansion with her powerlawyer husband, Girardi maintains a lush Hollywood studio decked with chandeliers, pink fur and neon signs. It’s here that Girardi nurtures her alter ego, dance-pop doyenne Erika Jayne, known for lyrics such as: “It’s expensive to be me / looking this good don’t come for free”—nothing if not a modern-day echo of Woolf’s assertion that “a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write.” Granted, Girardi isn’t exactly chained to a writing desk (although she is co-authoring a memoir, Pretty Mess, with Vulture columnist Brian Moylan, out March 20). “We have music meetings here. We have fittings [here],” she says of the need for her pied-à-terre. “And then, all the glam. I come

here to get ready for work.” Indeed, Girardi’s glam squad has acquired near mythic status; she retains a full-time creative director Mikey Minden and spends a reported $40,000 a month on hair, makeup and accessories. But through the glamour, the 46-year-old’s devil-maycare diva attitude shines—it’s an empowered irreverence that’s also ref lected in her clubhouse’s playful aesthetics. “[The décor] is pop culture: Biggie Smalls, Mark Ryden and Lowbrow Art,” says Girardi. While the “Pretty Mess” brand blends high and low, there’s nothing “messy” about the clubhouse space. Overlooking Capitol Records and the Hollywood sign, the interiors evoke an old Holly wood Shangri-la, with f lamingo wallpaper, Beverly Hills Hotel–style banana leaf accents and a sweeping vanity mirror. And while creating it may have been a high-budget production, for Girardi, it’s now a nostress zone. “This is my play space—my pop-culture playspace,” she says. “You can do no wrong here.”


Left: While Girardi added her own creative touches to the space, she kept some of the unit’s preexisting art collection

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This is my play space. You can do no wrong here. Top left: Custom neon “Pretty Mess” sign. The floor-to-ceiling shelf (bottom left) and chandeliers (above) came with the unit.

Hair: Castillo Bataille. Makeup: Etienne Ortega


ASPEN  CHICAGO  DALLAS  HAMPTONS  HOUSTON  LAS VEGAS  LOS ANGELES  MIAMI  NEW YORK CITY  ORANGE COUNTY  SAN FRANCISCO

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3000 MILES TO GRACELAND

Designed to embody a “dream house,” Napa Valley’s Ink House inn has a history steeped in rock ’n’ roll. Elvis Presley made the inn his home during the filming of his 1961 film Wild in the Country, and while the interior’s bright neutral palette doesn’t quite conjure a “Heartbreak Hotel,” new owner Maria Castellucci was sure to keep around some of the King’s influence. Flip to San Francisco for the rest of the story.


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MIKE KAPLAN The CEO of Aspen’s largest employer taking Trump to task

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 Club Monaco: Club Monaco’s first Aspen outpost epitomizes Galena Street with casual luxury and its mix of women’s clothes, shoes and accessories. clubmonaco.com

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 Pitkin County Dry Goods: Aspen’s oldest independently owned boutique, this landmark Cooper Avenue destination offers high-end but functional men’s and women’s clothing. pitkincountrydrygoods.com

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  T heory: Occupying a prime corner on Galena Street, this clothing store for men and women provides chic basics, outerwear and accessories. theory.com

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 Pierre/Famille: With more than 30 years in Aspen, this emporium of antique and period jewels would make even a royal swoon. pierrefamille.com

ICE, ICE BABY

Aspen not cold enough for you? Then pop into Hotel Jerome’s seasonal Hotel Jerome Ice House through ski season — or until it melts. Once you’re within its ninefoot-high ice walls, you can warm up with vodka shots courtesy of a “vodka czar” who provides samples from a 50-plus selection from more than a dozen countries. Inside the house hangs a twinkling four-foot “vertical branch” chandelier made specifically for the space by the lighting and design company Paul Ferrante. Before entering, guests are furnished with luxury down coats. The experience will be available for $50 per person. hoteljerome.aubergeresorts.com

RESERVATION REQUEST

A part of its $4-million renovation, the Viceroy hotel’s TORO Kitchen and Lounge will open in Snowmass, offering a pan-Latin menu with flavors of Peru, Mexico and other South American regions. Cozy up to the new signature restaurant at the St. Regis hotel, Velvet Buck, named

for the fur that grows on the antlers of a male deer. The restaurant’s menu celebrates the culinary rituals of the Rocky Mountain West, with authentic cooking techniques and special focus on local ingredients. viceroyhotelsandresorts.com; stregisaspen.com

SHOP TALK

Toro Kitchen and Lounge

For the outdoor-obsessed Aspenite, London-based activewear brand Sweaty Betty will open a seasonal pop-up shop on Cooper Avenue through spring with a new retro-inspired ski collection and statement prints. sweatybetty.com

IN A 2017 OP-ED HE WROTE FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, KAPLAN DENOUNCED THE “XENOPHOBIA RADIATING FROM THE OVAL OFFICE.”

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 The Boutique at The Little Nell: Tucked into the entry of this five-star, fivediamond hotel is a small luxury gift shop curated by artist and owner Paula Crown, a scion of one of the nation’s wealthiest families. thelittlenell.com

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n Aspen’s business landscape, Aspen Skiing Company looms largest — literally and figuratively; it owns and operates four ski slopes (virtually all of Aspen’s ski terrain), three hotels, 15 restaurants, dozens of shops and employs 4,000 people. At the top is Mike Kaplan—a ski bum-turned-CEO who uses his high office to uphold the town’s legacy as both a natural playground and a spiritual and intellectual Eden. “Aspen’s roots are about being much more than a recreational escape,” says Kaplan. Indeed, before it was a luxury hotspot, Aspen was a physical and intellectual retreat after WWII for the 10 th Mountain Division, a regiment trained to fight fascism in Italy’s rocky terrain. Capitalizing on this athletic and intellectual spirit, Walter Paepcke founded both Aspen Skiing Company and the nonprofit think tank Aspen Institute in 1947. “Walter [believed that] Aspen had everything you could want — fishing, hiking, skiing — so the other things that make life worth living, like the arts and engaging in intellectual dialogue, should be here [too],” says Kaplan. Today, Kaplan continues that dialogue as an advocate for social and environmental responsibility. Since becoming CEO in 2006, he has fought climate change locally, overseeing the installation of three methane-capturing megawatt generators at a nearby mine, and nationally, traveling to Washington to lobby for climate taxes and efficiency incentives. If Kaplan’s mission is to “make Aspen great again,” his definition of “great” runs contrary to the current administration. “We were founded by a lot of immigrants,” he says. “We want to continue to embrace that diversity; this community is very dependent on people coming from Central and South America and Mexico to supplement the workforce.” Recently, Kaplan’s advocacy reached new heights. In a 2017 op-ed he wrote for the Wall Street Journal, he denounced the “xenophobia radiating from the Oval Office,” and attributed a 30 percent drop in visitors to Donald Trump’s anti-immigration policies. “[We have] always been about civil discourse and not about agreement or group-think,” says Kaplan. “So everything I’ve put forward has been opinionated but civil and hopefully fairly objective; it’s about proposing solutions as well.” Despite the dip in international tourism, the company continues to grow; in November 2018 it will open its fourth luxury hotel, the Limelight Hotel Snowmass. With its social consciousness and everexpanding luxury portfolio, Aspen Skiing Company may not be a utopia, but it sure comes close.

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Shopping Spree

L I T T L E N E L L : C H R I S C O U N C I L A N D E M I LY C H A P L I N ( 2 )

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 Felt: Logan Square’s first high-end women’s boutique showcases designers from London, Paris and L.A. while devoting rack space to local talents. But for those on the go, co-owner Catherine Dunton also offers a Trunk Club–like service, shipping personalized outfits to clients. feltchicago.com

Whether you trace the food hall trend back to recent coastal iterations in New York and L.A., or all the way back to its deep roots in medieval Europe, you can’t deny it’s finally arrived in Chicago. Ignited by the success of Revival Food Hall, which houses barbecue mecca Smoque and James Beard–winner Mindy Segal’s Hot Chocolate Bakery, the local food hall scene has already spawned forthcoming copycats like Forum 55, which opened last fall with high-profile concepts including a barbecue joint from Food Network star Jeff Mauro and a premium sandwich counter compliments of the Butcher & Larder. Wells St. Market followed with cheeky offerings like Piggy Smalls, an authentic take on Greek street food. And there’s no sign of these communal destinations slowing down. In fact, the next development will come from an unlikely yet famously reliable source: London-based, taste-making media company Time Out Group, publisher of the Chicago edition of Time Out. Next year, it will unveil a tri-level, 600-seat food hall in Fulton Market featuring a collection of local purveyors curated by the magazine’s editorial staff. With the star-power of big-name chefs and the enthusiastic patronage of locals and tourists alike, it appears the food hall trend has plenty more courses to come. revivalfoodhall.com; forum55chicago.com; www.wsmchicago.com

Chicago has landed its first Christian Dior boutique. Modeled after the couturier’s Peter Marino–designed flagship in Paris, this bi-level outpost is housed in the Bertrand Goldbergdesigned former home of Universal Records. Inside, women’s apparel, shoes, bags and fine jewelry are presided over by a large star – a “symbol of good luck from Monsieur Dior,” per the brand. More sculpture – a striking wrought-iron commission from Julie Gauthron – festoons the second floor, where shoppers can rest on plush sofas from Parisian furniture maker Hamilton Conte. dior.com

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 Ikram: Inside this world-renowned women’s couture destination’s glossy red walls, you’ll find Lanvin, Givenchy, Moschino and more. Eponym Ikram Goldman also offers light bites and pick-me-ups at an in-house café so you won’t shop till you drop. ikram.com

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  R  ider: Nestled among the city’s hottest restaurants in the West Loop, this retail grab-bag offers vintage furniture, apothecary goods and women’s clothing — all inspired by the owners’ world travels. In keeping with its foodie environs, a coffee bar sells upscale concessions like organic cotton candy and small-batch chocolate. shoprider.us

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 RSVP Gallery: This Kanye-approved lifestyle boutique combines thoroughly curated pop art with hard-to-find men’s streetwear sourced everywhere from Tokyo to Milan. Labels include Pierre Balmain and Acne Studios and yes, Yeezy. rsvpgallery.com

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“I GREW UP GOING TO SEOUL, KOREA, WHERE THEY HAVE THESE CONCEPT LIFESTYLE STORES, AND I’VE ALWAYS BEEN OBSESSED.”

 Brimfield: Named after owner Julie Fernstrom’s favorite plaid, this tasteful store skews English cottage–chic. In addition to plaid aplenty, you’ll find reclaimed furniture and antique curios. The shop also offers custom furniture. brimfieldus.com

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f “having it all” is an art, Heiji Choy Black is a master; the entrepreneur and tastemaker lives in a dream apartment overlooking Lincoln Park with her husband (hedge-fund manager Brian Black) and four kids, while serving on the boards of some of Chicago’s best cultural institutions. But like any great master, Black knows how to reinvent herself. In her nearly 20 years in the city, she’s also owned Chicago’s hippest store, the directional boutique Hejfina, and Chicago’s chicest job, Style Editor for Chicago magazine. Through it all, Black’s most valuable asset has also been an intangible one: her eye. It was her eye that drew her here in the first place; while on a business trip from New York, the beauty of the city’s architecture against Lake Michigan was enough for her to change careers and relocate simultaneously. “I had been working as a consultant in corporate America,” she recalls. “It was a bit of a transition, but a very happy one.” In 2004, she opened Hejfina, a concept lifestyle store cast in the image of Europe and Asia’s museum-quality boutiques. “I grew up going to Seoul, Korea, where they have these concept lifestyle stores, and I’ve always been obsessed with stores like Colette in Paris,” she says. Black stocked the store with then–fellow fashion hopefuls like Alexander Wang and Rag & Bone, as well as boldface imports like Comme des Garçons. Ahead of its time for Windy City retail (Rei Kawakubo’s conceptually similar Dover Street Market opened in London the same year), the store predated the exaltation of the cult brand. In fact, reigning cult designer Virgil Abloh passed through the House of Hejfina long before the rise of Off-White. “I enlisted design students to propose designs to the store,” Black says, “And one of them was Virgil. I ended up passing on [his design], but we became good friends and collaborators.” After a successful five-year run, the store closed in 2009. A stint as Chicago magazine’s Style Editor followed but since 2016, Black has taken a step back from fashion to focus on art and architecture. While serving on the boards of the Renaissance Society and the Architecture & Design Society, Black and her husband Brian have added local Chicago art stars like William J. O’Brien and Theaster Gates to their personal collection. Now, Black says, she’s ready for a fashion comeback: “I’m working on a business more in-depth in 2018 that’s design- and fashion-related.” She may have it all, but with an eagle eye like Black’s, there’s always more waiting to be discovered.

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ROOM REQUEST

The South Loop has entered the hotel scene in a major way with the 40-story, 1,205-room Marriott Marquis Chicago. The contemporary, sophisticated property is geared toward the professional, but also looks to lure gourmands with the polished American brasserie Woven & Bound. The nearly 2,000-square-foot presidential suite has space and amenities to entertain up to 30 people (55-inch LCD TV, anyone?), and offers killer skyline and lake views from the hotel’s top floor. marriott.com

The mother of three who helped discover Virgil Abloh

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Dallas

ASPEN

CHICAGO Brunello Cucinelli blazer; Sylva & Cie earrings

DALLAS

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LOS ANGELES

D’ANDRA SIMMONS The White House appointee-turned-“housewife” with a skincare empire

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 Ylang 23: This high-end jewelry store blends earthy designs and precious materials – think Cathy Waterman, Jennifer Meyer and Irene Neuwirth – luring an international clientele of jewelry junkies. ylange23.com  Stanley Korshak: Dubbed the “Bergdorf’s of the South” by proprietor Crawford Brock, this palatial department store caters to the Highland Park set with brands from Carolina Herrera and Valentino to Public School, plus suits from Zegna and Isaia for men. stanleykorshak.com

ROOM REQUEST .

SHOP TALK

Cos Bar, the luxury cosmetics boutique founded in 1976 by beauty maverick Lily Garfield, opened late last year. The shop brings a carefully edited selection of treatment and color to the Plaza at Preston Center. “Everything I disliked about a department store, we don’t do,” Garfield avers. “It needs to be fun.” cosbar.com/dallas

After a $30 million, downto-the-studs renovation, the Hotel Crescent Court, which debuted as a luxury hotel in 1985, now serves opulence for the modern traveler. Unveiled in January, the rebuilt and newly furnished rooms boast sound-dampening windows, smart TVs and a new look throughout. Plus, the hotel has added on its first lobby bar, Beau’s. crescentcourt.com

Hotel Crescent Court

P O R T R A I T : J E R E M Y LO C K

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 Ceylon et Cie: Hip interior designer Michelle Nussbaumer deftly curates this enchanting trove of global goods and textiles both new and antique. ceylonetcie.com

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“IN THE BEGINNING, SOME OF THE BIGGER LABS MIGHT NOT HAVE TALKED TO YOU BECAUSE YOU’RE A WOMAN.”

SPRING 2018

 Grange Hall: This multi-hyphenated boutique houses an apothecary, a florist and a restaurant, as well as a jewelry counter boasting Rihanna-favorite Lydia Corteille, porcelain from the famed Nymphenburg manufactory and Viennese glass. ufgrangehall.com

Asian fusion and 100 kinds of sake are on the menu at Musumé, the newest eatery in Dallas’s burgeoning Arts District, and the latest from Dallas-based Rock Libations group. The name means “daughter” in Japanese and according the co-owner Josh Babb, the menu will bear a strong family resemblance to the group’s recently shuttered outpost Kenichi. “Eighty-five percent of the menu will be Kenichi staples,” he says, citing sake-marinated miso black cod and yellowtail sashimi. musumedallas.com

s a Real Housewives of Dallas cast member and skincare maven, D’Andra Simmons is no stranger to environmental toxins. Despite the recent second season’s many sordid hijinks, which included everything from death threats to sex toy gags gone wrong, Simmons managed to stay above the fray. “Even though I’m on a Housewives show, a huge part of what I do is about being ethical,” she says. Indeed, as CEO of Hard Night Good Morning skincare, she’s fought against her fair share of questionable ethics. “In the beginning, some of the bigger labs might not have talked to you because you’re a woman,” recalls Simmons. “Most of the people I deal with are men. And they may think, ‘Oh you’re just a woman.’ But I think we’ve been here long enough now that we’ve proven ourselves.” Whether she’s persevering in the face of patriarchy or developing skincare responsibly, Simmons doesn’t turn the other cheek when it comes to ethics. Launched in 2008, Hard Night Good Morning is vegan and cruelty-free, utilizing wellness secrets developed by her mother Dee, a cancer survivor and matriarch of the line’s parent company Ultimate Living. Despite Simmons’s family tree of entrepreneurs (her father and uncle were the legendary corporate raiders Glenn and Harold Simmons) her path to business wasn’t linear. After studying political science at Sweet Briar College, she moved to L.A. to give acting a try. But her mother’s cancer diagnosis in 1987 set her on a new course. “I went along with her around the world to meet with nutritionists and herbalists,” she says. “We went to Tijuana to get all these detox infusions and IVs.” But as Ultimate Living grew, so did tensions between mother and daughter. “Because of our strong personalities, I’d work for her for a little bit and then be like, ‘I can’t do this anymore.’” Simmons’s form of rebellion was to move to Washington, D.C., as an employee of George W. Bush’s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. While she was eventually offered a role as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency, Dee ultimately proved less volatile than nuclear waste management. “My mother said, ‘You’re never going to have another chance to have your own business,’ so I came home.” But these days, Simmons is politically engaged as ever. “The best thing about Housewives is that it’s allowed me to give my causes a much bigger platform,” says Simmons, a UNICEF board member and ambassador for Glenn Beck’s Nazarene Fund. And with a resumé like hers, there’s no Housewives mess Simmons isn’t equipped to handle. “I went to a women’s college,” she says. “When Brandy put a dildo in my bag, I didn’t bat an eyelash.”

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 Forty Five Ten: Chic, spirited pieces for her and him from Gucci, Givenchy, Comme des Garçons, Saint Laurent and more, plus home décor, are whimsically presented in a posh, art-filled environment. fortyfiveten.com

ORANGE COUNTY

POWER PLAYER

RESERVATION REQUEST

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NEW YORK CITY

OPERA IN A NEW AGE

Contemporary English opera Sunken Garden will make its stateside debut on March 9 at the Dallas Opera. Spearheaded by the house’s recently departed CEO Keith Cerny, the production will blend live performance and dazzling 3-D cinematic elements. “[It will] stretch boundaries like no one else,” Cerny says. Created by Dutch composer Michel van der Aa, and based on Cloud Atlas novelist David Mitchell’s libretto, the critically acclaimed show follows a young filmmaker protagonist on an Oz-like journey set against realistic computer-generated images of greenery and insects. dallasopera.org

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MIAMI


Hamptons

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

POWER PLAYER

Need inspiration for your summer renovation project? Look no further than this cozy East Hampton home. According to KA Design Group, the team behind the home’s facelift, the weekend retreat “was designed with entertaining the homeowners adult children in mind.” The abode accommodates recreation for the whole family, with a capacious bar and sitting room with high, wood-beamed ceilings, and a sub-level rec room boasting a classic beige, taupe and gray color-scheme plus added citrus color-pops.

The visionary designer bringing eccentricity to the Hampton’s billionaires’ lane

 Cynthia Rowley: The designer herself can often be found surfing in Montauk and her clothes and bold patterns are popular all over the East End. cynthiarowley.com

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 Zimmermann: The brand known for its elegant and ethereal dresses is perfect for those long beach days that turn into nights. zimmermannwear.com

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 Blue & Cream: The fashion boutique for men and women is the place in East Hampton for upscale designer lines and the house brand. blueandcream.com

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  C  hristopher Fischer: As an Englishman now residing in the Hamptons, Christopher Fischer’s fashion-forward cashmere styles and innovative details have a European design sensibility. His cozy knits are the perfect way to warm up in the chilly ocean air. christopherfischer.com

charms, like close proximity to Montauk’s beloved St. Patrick’s Day parade on March 25th and an indoor seawater pool for climatecontrolled spring swimming. But for weekenders with serious wanderlust, Gurney’s will offer the best of both worlds this summer with 15-minute seaplane service between Montauk and Gurney’s Newport.

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 MILLY: Designer Michelle Smith specializes in contemporary women’s fashion merging American sportswear with Parisian atelier techniques. Her designs are a favorite among women in the Hamptons who know style when they see it. milly.com

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C L A U D E ’S : E R I C S T R I F F L E R

On May 15, Claude’s at Southampton Inn is reopening as Claude’s 18 under the tutelage of a yet-undisclosed celebrity chef. The menu will remain true to its 5-year legacy (read: classic, garden-totable American fare) with added light bites dishes like avocado toast. Expect al fresco dining and gatherings on the lawn all season.

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RESERVATION REQUEST

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ROOM REQUEST

When the historic Gurney’s Montauk fell under new ownership in 2013, it set in motion a renovation blitz; by 2016, the 90-year-old hotel boasted 42 refurbished rooms and a new restaurant, Manhattan import Scarpetta Beach, offering trendy delights like sriracha lobster rolls. Last year, the Gurney’s brand expanded to New England, launching Gurney’s Newport in Rhode Island. But the tried-and-true East End outpost offers unique

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ORANGE COUNTY

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“I HAD ROMANTICIZED IT FROM MOVIES AND BOOKS MY WHOLE LIFE, SO WAS GREATLY RELIEVED WHEN I FINALLY MOVED HERE AND DISCOVERED IT WAS ALL THAT AND MORE .”

NEW YORK CITY

EAST END INSPIRATION

KELLY BEHUN

s with many wealthy enclaves, it’s easy to imagine the Hamptons as a symbolic destination – a Nancy Meyers kitchen in the sky – rather than a physical place. But it was the land’s natural beauty that has drawn interior designer Kelly Behun to the East End for a quarter-century. “In the fundamental ways, the ones that really matter, it hasn’t changed a bit — it’s still one of the most beautiful places anywhere,” she says. In that quarter-century, Behun’s immediate surroundings have evolved. Today, she shares a 22,000-square-foot beachfront estate on Southampton’s Meadow Lane (a.k.a. “billionaires’ lane”) with her husband, iStar Financial Chairman and CEO Jay Sugarman, and their two kids, flanked by neighbors such as Ian Schrager and Calvin Klein. While their sprawling glass-and-stone masterpiece might be straight out of a Sex and the City dream sequence, Behun’s path to peak Hamptons was gradual. “I’ve been coming to the Hamptons for 25 years, first renting, then buying a small house; then when our kids were born, building our dream house.  Behun splits her time between the Hamptons and Manhattan, where she runs her high-powered interior design firm, banging out projects for the likes of the Delano hotel in Miami, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump, all while producing a line of furniture and homewares, Kelly Bhun Studio. Both in her personal and professional life, it’s clear Behun has a gift for making dreams a reality.   A native of the Pittsburgh suburb of Sewickley, Pennsylvania, Behun always strove toward higher ground. “I moved to New York directly after college because I had always imagined myself eventually living here,” she says. “I had romanticized it from movies and books my whole life and didn’t really have a Plan B, so was greatly relieved when I finally moved here and discovered it really was all that and more.”  But it was her hometown roots that magnetized her to the Hamptons in the first place. “It’s funny, because whenever my family visits the Hamptons, we always remark that it is a bit like Sewickley-by-the-sea, so I guess it wasn’t a coincidence that I was drawn here as an adult.”   That said, Behun’s tastes have made no small impact on the Hamptons landscape. A former protégé of Philippe Starck, Behun’s proclivity toward modernism is in razor-sharp contrast to the archetypical shabby-chic Hamptons home.    Her and Sugarman’s property’s expansive grounds, anchored by a show-stopping infinity pool, have made it the perfect venue for their causes; the home has been the backdrop to fundraisers for God’s Love We Deliver, New Yorkers for Children and the David Lynch Foundation, which teaches Transcendental Meditation to at-risk populations. And while Behun and Sugarman’s 25-year marriage may be one of the most grounded partnerships in all of Long Island, Behun says meditation is no substitute for communication — especially when it comes to decorating. “We generally agree on things, but of course a few times I’ve had to pull out that old chestnut of a threat, ‘Do I come to your office and tell you how to do your job?’” she says. “But I get my way.”

MIAMI


Houston

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

FESTIVAL OF SIGHTS

FotoFest Biennial, the first and longest-running photographic arts festival in the country, returns on March 10 with a South Asian theme, showcasing 48 artists from India and the Indian global diaspora. The six-week festival’s central exhibition, “INDIA: Contemporary Photographic and New Media Art,” will be housed in three adjacent warehouse art spaces in Houston’s Washington Avenue Arts District. “The artists, all of Indian origin, are imagining and responding to what India means today in its myriad complexities, given its ancient culture and more recent emancipation from British colonialism,” says lead curator Sunil Gupta. Highlights include Shilpa Gupta’s large-scale interactive video work, Asif Khan’s documentation of Tibetan refugee camps, and Vicky Roy, a former child runaway who captures the stories of young street children. Dozens of other museums, galleries, nonprofit art centers and corporate spaces will also show photography and host events, including artist talks, tours, culinary events and the International Fine Print Auction as part of the festival. fotofest.org

Shopping Spree

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 Forty Five Ten: 16 years after its founding, this Dallas fashion institution made its Houston debut as part of a rapid expansion. The more intimate but every bit as luxe space delivers the same mix of top and emerging designers from Rochas to Victoria Beckham. fortyfiveten.com

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 Bespoke HTX: A standout in the new Heights Mercantile district, this jewel box offers local artisans an outlet for handcrafted, one-of-a-kind goods, from leather work and jewels to clever cards. bespokehtx.com

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 Space Montrose: Find unique gifts with Houston flair at this treasure trove of indie designers in artsy Lower Westheimer. Expect prints, coasters, candles, cards and accessories of every ilk. space-montrose.com

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 Sloan/Hall: The multifaceted Upper Kirby showroom has diamonds from Nancy Chapman and Lauren Craft alongside antique and apothecary finds, plus fashion from Cesar Galindo, Maison Margiela and more. sloanhall.com

NOMADIC LIVING

From February 21 through March 7, Louis Vuitton’s annual home goods and accessories exhibition “Objets Nomades” will be on view at the Houston Galleria. Each year, the luxury house enlists top designers to create limited edition prototypes honoring its 160-year history as a travel-goods juggernaut. While it is typically put on during Design Miami Week, this year the exhibition, featuring the Campana Brothers, Raw Edge and more, will live up to its nomadic theme — migrating from Houston to Los Angeles, Chicago and Toronto in the fall. louisvuitton.com

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“WE’RE ACTUALLY GOING TO HAVE DEALERSHIPS [INSIDE] THE HOTEL… I CAN GO GRAB [A CAR] WHENEVER I WANT.”

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ilman Fertitta began his career by shucking shrimp at his father’s restaurant in Galveston. Today, he is the wealthiest shrimp shucker on the planet as the sole proprietor of Landry’s, Inc., which operates global fastcasual dining chains including Rainforest Café, Joe’s Crab Shack and Bubba Gump Shrimp Company. But since landing on the Forbes 400 list in 2012, the swashbuckling billionaire has entered the luxury market – bringing everything from luxury sports-car dealerships to a forthcoming, $300 million hotel to the Houston heartland. “We own a Bentley and Bugatti dealership right out front,” says Fertitta, describing the future site of Post Oak. Slated to open in the first quarter of 2018, the megaplex will house a 38-story hotel offices, restaurants, retail and, yes, Bentley, Bugatti and Rolls-Royce showrooms. Once complete, says Fertitta, the luxury fleet will adorn the hotel interior. “We’re actually moving the dealerships [inside] so the cars will be in the hotel,” he says. “It’s something really special; I don’t have to have any in my fleet because I can go grab them whenever I want.” Besides the luxury cars a la carte, the hospitality-meets-retail concept is poised to resemble the mixed-use developments popping up across luxury markets, from Miami’s Faena District to New York’s Hudson Yards. Indeed, Post Oak, which derives its name from the oldgrowth oak trees that surround the area, will include Texas’s first Mastro’s Steakhouse – a New York institution that Fertitta added to his restaurant portfolio five years ago. Despite his status as a business leader and kingmaker (he deploys his Midas touch as the host of CNBC’s entrepreneur competition Billion Dollar Buyer), it ’s clear Fertitta’s heart lies in Houston . In late 2017, he legendarily bid a record-breaking $2.2 billion for the Houston Rockets – thus acquiring the team he’d cheered on courtside for decades. And through it all, he’s never lost perspective. “When one of my kids recently asked for money for Christmas shopping, I said, ‘When I was your age, I always had money.’ I always worked hard.”

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massive master with a freestanding soaking tub and separate shower—and a huge private terrace. Bonus: For guests traveling with security or personal assistants, an adjoining bedroom has its own entrance, while smartphone room keys allow guests to enter with a wave of their device. Rates start at $2,500 per night. hotel alessandra-houston.com

 Kuhl-Linscomb: This 70,000-squarefoot shopping destination is packed with renowned brands in every category, from fashion and beauty to baby gifts and bedding. Think Alexis Bittar, Baccarat, Diptyque and Tom Ford spread across five showrooms. kuhllinscomb.com

P O R T R A I T : D O N N A WA R D /G E T T Y I M AG E S

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ROOM REQUEST

Hurricane be damned; despite weather-related delays, the 223-room, Gensler-designed Hotel Alessandra recently made its downtown debut a modern Art Deco vibe, rooftop pool and a fullservice spa. The penthouse, 1,750-square-foot presidential suite boasts soaring ceilings, walls of windows, a formal dining room with kitchen and breakfast bar, a

The world’s richest restaurateur changing the face of Houston

E M M A L I N E : J U L I E S O E F E R . FOTO F E ST: CO U RT E SY O F T H E A RT I ST

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Sandip Kuriakose (Delhi, India) Interested, 2017. From the series NPNR.

POWER PLAYER


Las Vegas

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HAMPTONS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

SLUG TEEKAY

ELAINE WYNN The billion-dollar hotel doyenne betting on the art world

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 SJP by Sarah Jessica Parker: Las Vegas welcomes the newest addition to Bellagio’s prestigious lineup of shops. To honor her coveted line’s first West Coast standalone, the designer and actress created a new color line – Bellagio Blue. sjp-collection.com

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  Wynn Plaza: The highly anticipated new shopping experience at Wynn is set for an early summer 2018 grand opening. A number of luxury boutiques have opened their doors including Nirav Modi, Saint Laurent and Stefano Ricci. wynnlasvegas.com/ Amenities/Shops/WynnPlaza

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 Louis Vuitton at The Shops at Crystals: This location hosts the Masters collection, created in collaboration with Jeff Koons. Original works by Da Vinci, Titian, Rubens, Fragonard and Van Gogh have been transposed onto the iconic Louis Vuitton bag. louisvuitton.com

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  R  OLEX: More than just a retail store, the Wynn’s “Rolex Experience” allows customers to browse the world’s largest selection of Rolex timepieces and exhibits timepieces dating back to 1905. rolex.com

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  P  hilipp Plein: The Shops at Crystals houses Las Vegas’ only Philipp Plein boutique, which is a perfect compliment to the city’s wild and indulgent scene. plein.com

ROOM REQUEST .

The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas’s refresh across both the Boulevard and Chelsea Towers is slated for completion this year. The project will reinvent 2,895 of the resort’s 3,027 rooms with influence from innovative and inspired designers, including New York–based Virserius Studio.

VIVA ROC VEGAS

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Wynn Las Vegas recently revealed its newest nightlife concept, Intrigue, which captivates the senses with 14,000-square-feet of stunning interiors bathed in a state-of-the-art lighting and sound system. With elements that entice and surprise visitors at every turn, Intrigue offers exclusive, VIP experiences patrons won’t soon forget. Guests are also invited to step onto the luxurious venue’s patio to enjoy a breathtaking view of the property’s waterfall and pyrotechnics show.

Clique Hospitality’s Andy Masi, along with partners Ryan Labbe and Jason “JRoc” Craig, have been tapped by Red Rock Resorts to bring two unique concepts, Apex Social Club and Camden Cocktail Lounge to Palms Casino Resort. The addition of the new venues, set to open in mid-May 2018, is a continuation

of Palms’s $485 million revitalization plan that will touch virtually every aspect of the property. Trendy, warm finishes will greet guests upon arrival to the 55th -floor-venues where they can experience specialty-crafted cocktails, age-old favorites or indulge in tableside bottle service, all while peering down on the city below.

SPRING 2018

“WE HAD THE HIGHEST DROPOUT RATE IN THE COUNTRY, AND I COULD NOT UNDERSTAND HOW THAT WAS POSSIBLE IN THE STATE WITH LOTS OF RESOURCES AND LOTS OF GLAMOUR.”

ARE YOU INTRIGUED?

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n Las Vegas, the name “Wynn” epitomizes good fortune. Every day, thousands press their luck at properties codeveloped by Elaine Wynn, cofounder of the Bellagio, the Mirage and Wynn Las Vegas. But Wynn’s unwavering reign as the Queen Bee of Las Vegas has little to do with luck; since her 2010 break with husband and business partner Steve Wynn and the ensuing legal battle, she has blazed on as an entrepreneur and education and arts advocate — never with a hair on her pristine blond cut-and-color out of place. Since arriving in Sin City in 1967, Wynn has worked for education reform. “I was concerned because we had the highest dropout rate in the country, and could not understand how that was possible in astate that seemed to be flourishing [with] lots of resources and lots of glamour,” she says. In between her social work, which would earn her a position as chair of Communities and Schools of Nevada, Wynn also helped reshape the city’s image as a seedy Babylon to that of a cultural destination by stocking her hotels with world-class art. At the Bellagio, Wynn commissioned Dale Chihuly’s career-defining glass sculpture Fiori di Como, which now hangs in the lobby. “We went over to Dale’s house where he had put a glass art installation at the bottom of his lap pool,” says Wynn. “And I said to him, ‘I want that in my ceiling in the Bellagio lobby.’ So that’s how we got that.” As a member of the board at LACMA, Wynn now plays a critical role in bringing art to the masses. In 2016, she pledged $50 million to the museum’s forthcoming, $600 million dollar addition — the oblongshaped David Geffen Studio designed by Swiss Pritzker Award–winning starchitect Peter Zumthor. “This is [Zumthor’s] first buildings in America,” she says. “He’s very, very rare and very elegant.” With homes in Idaho, Beverly Hills, New York and Miami, Wynn has plenty of space to house her own growing art collection. Last year, in her first major acquisition since her divorce, she bid $142.4 million on Francis Bacon’s Three Studies of Lucian Freud. The gambit paid off; today, the triptych hangs in her Beverly Hills lobby—up the way from where the David Geffen Studio will be unveiled in 2023. The acquisition represents what Wynn calls a “golden” chapter in her life—defined by independence and advocacy. “It was extraordinarily creative and fun to build companies and build communities,” she says. “And now, what’s most satisfying is giving back and focusing not on you, but on others. And that’s why it feels golden.”

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A NIGHT AT THE VICEROY

money. An attractive downstairs bar, Giannini, serves signature cocktails by award-winning Leo Robitschek, but the property’s crown jewel is the rooftop, offering an outdoor café, cocktail bar, and landscaped pool area. “We were drawn to downtown’s energy; there’s so much movement

and possibility,” says restaurateur Will Guidarae. Next up: Proper Hotels, another historic DTLA property, is set to open in March with 151 deluxe rooms. Further west, the eco-conscious 1Hotel will replace the short-lived Jeremy Hotel. thenomadhotel.com; properhotel.com; 1Hotels.com

 Gentle Monster: Whatever your eyewear aesthetic, you’ll find it within this vast, museum-like space, which offers inimitable eyeglasses including a recent collaboration with style icon Tilda Swinton. gentlemonster.com

The patriarch of the L.A.’s first family of fashion

 Indochino: The ascendant custom-suit brand offers countless combinations of fabric and tailoring options to create the perfect suit, which you can then have shipped directly to your door. The made-to-measure retailer plans to open 18 showrooms across the country this year, while maintaining its under-a-month wait-time guarantee. indochino.com

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 MadaLuxe: The leading luxury fashion distributor recently expanded to brick and mortar with its MadaLuxe Vault located in Commerce, California. “We are thrilled to build on this exciting new consumer shopping experience,” says company president Adam Freede of the space, where you’ll find Prada, Gucci and more at unparalleled prices. madaluxe.com

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 R.M. Williams: This Aussie retailer is taking the U.S. by storm with its meticulously made leather footwear. Founded in 1932 in a wood shed down under, the company has become an international retail player thanks to chic, long-lasting designs. rmwilliams.com

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ast November, 48-year-old Jennifer Lopez became the new face of Guess – setting a record as the oldest model to wear the Guess Girl crown. Looks aside, Lopez was the perfect fit; both she and the California denim brand represent wellsprings of youth and longevity – notions have animated Maurice and Paul Marciano’s company since they founded it after relocating from the South of France to California in 1977. “When my brother and I came to Los Angeles, we thought it was going to be just a two-week vacation,” Paul says. “The beach, the palm trees and beautiful California girls seemed to all just be a dream but it actually was real life.” From the outset, Guess designs reflected fun and femininity, emphasizing blinding acid-washes and skin-tight silhouettes. But, Paul continues, the clothes were in service of a larger philosophy. “Throughout my career, I’ve always focused more on what the image was,” he says. “The key to success for us has been remaining consistent with our brand messaging and never changing what we stand for.” That said, the brand has adapted to the ever-changing retail market, embracing the trendy-again ’90s streetwear aesthetics it originally helped popularize. In 2016, it launched the Guess Originals collection with fashion icon A$AP Rocky, rolling out in premium boutiques like New York’s Opening Ceremony and RSVP in Chicago. In the meantime, the Marciano family crest has established a legacy that transcends trend. In 2017, Maurice and Paul opened the Marciano Art Foundation, a sprawling contemporary art museum housed in a refurbished Masonic temple on Wilshire Boulevard. “The entire foundation really is Maurice’s work,” Paul says. “[He] has spent a tremendous amount of time and energy to make it what it is today.” After last year’s acclaimed inaugural exhibit, “Jim Shaw: The Wig Museum,” which drew on the history of the Freemasons, the Foundation’s forthcoming exhibit, “Olafur Eliasson: Reality projector,” will fill the 13,500 square-foot space with abstract, threedimensional projections on March 1st. Whether through flirtatious fashions or abstract art, the mission all along has been to promote artistry through image. “Our goal is to help new artists, the same way we helped new photographers and models become well known,” Paul says. “It ’s important for [us] to be recognized for what we have and what we always will stand for. I’m going to keep dreaming big.”

“THE KEY TO SUCCESS FOR US HAS BEEN REMAINING CONSISTENT WITH OUR BRAND MESSAGING AND NEVER CHANGING WHAT WE STAND FOR.”

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At the corner of 7th and Olive, NoMad Los Angeles inhabits the space once occupied by the Bank of Italy. The hotel’s amenities live up to the pecuniary theme, providing king-size beds, plush linens, Persian rugs and Terrazzo-floored walk-in showers. The complex’s multiple dining options are truly on the

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At the crossroads of Ocean Avenue and Pico Boulevard in one of the most desirable neighborhoods in L.A., the Viceroy Santa Monica overlooks the Pacific and is minutes away from a wide array of upscale shopping, dining and entertainment options. Originally built in 1969 as the Pacific Shore Hotel, the property underwent a complete renovation and redesign by Kelly Wearstler to be reborn as Viceroy Santa Monica in 2002. The lush interior’s crisp color palette hints at the English colonial era with trellis and caning patterns while each of the 162 guestrooms are meticulously appointed with applied moldings, custom armoires, Lucite and glass tables, and clean-lined bed frames. Our favorite room is the presidential-caliber Monarch Suite, a penthouse with an ocean-view balcony, marble entry, wet bar-equipped living room, and a lavish bathroom with a whirlpool tub and steam shower. Out back, you’ll find two plunge pools and garden-style landscaping. Comfortable chaises adorn the poolside sundeck, while private cabanas offer guests an escape from the sun. After sunset, Viceroy’s cabanas become some of the hottest seats in town for sipping cocktails — not to mention spotting notables from the L.A. entertainment and fashion scenes. viceroyhotelsandresorts.com

The Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles has become a hotbed for provocative cultural events (recall their bloody Carrie-themed prom party?). Next up is Taylor Mac’s A 24-Decade History of Popular Music, coming to the hotel theater on March 15. As with the show’s wildly acclaimed first run at New York’s Public Theater, the subversive showman will chart the history of popular music and activism in America from 1776 to the present. The show, which earned Mac the 2017 Edward M. Kennedy Prize and a finalist spot for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in Drama, journeys from the Civil War to the 1963 March on Washington. You’ll exit feeling exalted. acehotel.com

 EB Florals Perfumery & Gallery: At this Oprah Winfrey-approved brainchild of designer Eric Buterbaugh, scent-minded connoisseurs can get a whiff of tantalizing fragrances such as Fragile, Virgin and Thorns. ebf lorals.com

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“We were approached to open in several neighborhoods, but something called to us about this area,” says Kristen Lee Cole, owner of Tenoversix, a Dallas-based lifestyle store that recently shuttered its Los Angeles outpost and relocated to Miami. Taking cues from its cultured new digs, the industrial space boasts an artsy aesthetic. “Like the surrounding galleries, we’re displaying items in an

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ALAN FAENA The flamboyant godfather of Miami’s most creative community

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  B  ond No. 9: The New York fragrance brand has followed the snowbirds to Florida with its first foray outside the Empire state, stocking all 70 brightly packaged scents, from Sutton Place to Dubai Citrine. bondno9.com

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  L  inda Farrow: Founder and creative director Simon Jablon shows love for the store’s Bal Harbour locale with palm-filled décor and Art Decoinspired, pastel frames. lindafarrow .com

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  H  ouse of Creed: Seventh-generation perfumer Erwin Creed created new fragrances for his firm’s third U.S. store, like Viking for men and White Amber for women, a fruity floral composition in a gold-etched jewel bottle. creedboutique.com

Crispy gyoza dumplings at Chotto Matte

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  Céline: Through the trippy façade and archway forming the entrance of the brand’s latest outpost, fans will find the latest edition of the iconic Sulky bag – a patchwork leather number in Florida-friendly blue and cream. celine.com

the husband-and-wife team behind New York’s southern-slanted Root & Bone, is reinventing the salty-dog seafood shack. “Coconut fried shrimp is everywhere, but our version is battered with actual shredded coconut,” says Jeffrey McInnis. Details like mermaid bar-hooks and snappers in ice-filled clawfoot tubs add to the South-Floridian charm.

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  P rada: The heritage fashion house pulls off incorporating tropical fever into its signature color palette: pale green curtains and a classic, blackand-white checkered floor accented by a Perspex-paneled façade and midcentury-modern Brazilian furniture. prada.com

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“IT IS AN HONOR TO HAVE HAD ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT FASHION COMPANIES IN ARGENTINA FROM THE MOMENT THAT DEMOCRACY WAS FOUNDED.”

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A construction crane is hardly a rarity in Miami, except when it’s lifting a 19-ton boulder into one of the city’s most anticipated restaurants. “I couldn’t bear to watch,” says Kurt Zdesar, proprietor of Chotto Matte, a fashionable London import specializing in Nikkei cuisine aka JapanesePeruvian fusion. In addition to its volcanic centerpiece, the space features hanging gardens designed by Raymond Jungles and graffitimarked walls – a nod to its West End roots. Complementing the rugged natural interiors is a menu of fresh, light fare from paper-thin vegetables to tomato ceviche. Stiltsville Fish Bar, the latest from

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f Miami’s Faena Hotel has a mascot, it may be the gold-plated woolly mammoth statue parked on its steps. But the hotel’s eponym, developer Alan Faena, is just as much a visual representation of the opulence and grandeur inside. With his signature white suit and hat (which is depicted in his company’s logo) and radiant, bohemian energy, the Argentine hotelier is a testament to what life in Miami can be. Despite the over-the-top glamour he exudes, Faena’s inspiration for Faena District — the real-estate concept he originated in Buenos Aires before importing it to Miami, was egalitarian in spirit. “We wanted a more democratic way of doing art and a way to open it to the public. It was a pioneering concept,” Faena says. When Faena’s partner Len Blavatnik proposed they expand stateside, they held onto those principles. “I think the concept in Miami is very similar because it’s based on culture and art. At the end of the day, it’s elevating people’s lives.” Faena’s stake in culture runs deeper than his career in real estate. In the ’80s, he founded the fashion label Via Vai, which, he says, promoted a freedom of expression that was new to Argentinians at the time. “It is an honor to have had one of the most important fashion companies in Argentina from the moment that democracy was founded,” he says, referring to the fall of dictator Jorge Rafael Videla. “One of the ways people express themselves is through fashion; it was a big statement and a movement at the time. Today, that is my way of doing things.” Indeed, Faena’s own distinctive style is seen throughout Miami’s Faena District, a collection of five structures including Faena Hotel, the Faena House and Faena Versailles Contemporary residences, and Faena Forum, a mixed-use venue for cultural happenings like a recent collaboration with the Museum of Ice Cream. In June, Faena will enter the retail market with Faena Bazaar, yet another platform for spreading arts and culture to the people. “We have been developing all kinds of Feana products … and working with the best minds of the world to create what would be like a utopia,” he says, before adding, “And today it’s no longer a utopia. It’s a reality.”

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all-white setting – save for the shell-pink terrazzo floors,” adds Cole. Prior to the store’s official opening, Marlborough Contemporary christened the space with an exhibit of Andrew Kuo paintings during Art Basel. The store opened later that winter, offering equal parts home goods and women’s and men’s fashion. To make it a real destination, Cole’s restaurateur husband soon plans to launch a café next door. tenoversix.com

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The Ritz is getting crafty when it comes to amenities. At Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach, the chain will offer its first-ever residential art studio — a multipurpose space for sculpture, painting, ceramics, beadwork, art classes and more. “Everyone should have a place in their home to express themselves,” says developer Ricardo Dunin. With a backlit wall that imitates natural light, artists of all skill levels can enjoy ideal crafting conditions any time of day. And the property’s unconventional services don’t stop there; Dunin also created a “luxury sharing room,” wherein owners can swap goods like surfboards and sofas. theresidencesmiamibeach.com

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The Highs and Lows Take it high in the sky to Bar SixtyFive at Rainbow Room on the 65th floor of 30 Rockefeller Plaza. With windows soaring 10-feet high and 30-mile views to the north, west and south, Bar SixtyFive is an experience featuring some of the best cocktails in Midtown, created by their in-house mixologist. If you want to go low, Sushi by Bou the 30-minute, $50-omakase restaurant from chefowner David Bouhadana, along with

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restaurateurs Michael Sinensky and Erika London, has a new permanent location underneath Jue Lan Club inside the space that formerly housed Limelight. The new location seats 10 guests at a time and pairs perfectly with the speakeasy ambiance, lively music, sake and cocktail offerings. rainbowroom.com/ bar-sixty-five; sushibybou.com.

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Bar Sixty Five at The Rainbow Room, Rockefeller Center

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Baccarat hotel bathroom suite

JONATHAN TISCH The exercise junkie bringing humanity to hotels

 Max Mara: Despite being the granddaughter of Max Mara, art-loving retail director Maria Giulia Maramotti has injected the brand with fresh blood. Case in point: the Madison Avenue flagship’s fresh redesign by Duccio Grassi Architects, which attracted Gen-Z patrons like Bella Hadid to its unveiling last year. maxmara.com

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 Everlane: The pioneering e-commerce brand’s first brick-and-mortar store attracted so much footfall in its first month that it had to briefly close for floor repairs. Find high-quality basics from high-waist denim to sanely priced cashmere. everlane.com

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 Dover Street Market: With its assembly line of collaborations, from kicks by Comme des Garçons and Nike to Junya Watanabe/Carhartt outerwear, plus a constant rotation of art installations, DSMNY offers sights unseen for even the most dedicated customer. doverstreetmarket.com

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 Fivestory: Claire Olshan’s Ryan Korban–designed temple to high fashion may be technically four stories, but its meticulous mix of curated fashions, from Balmain to Aquazzura, is as top-tier as New York retail comes. fivestoryny.com

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an a corporation have a soul? If you ask Jonathan Tisch, who leads the hotel division of the Loews Corporation, the answer is arguably yes — one that he channels every morning at his ritual 6:00 a.m. SoulCycle class. “I have found that a lot of the principles I’ve taken from SoulCycle are very much a part of what I try to articulate to our team members,” says Tisch. Though a longtime Soul apostle, Tisch traces the spirit of his company much further back. “It goes back to my father, uncle and their parents making a risky decision back in the mid-’50s, the early ’60s,” he says at the company’s Upper East Side headquarters, referring to his grandparents Al and Sadye’s first business – a boys’ summer camp in the Poconos. “Bob Tisch, my father, and Larry Tisch, my uncle, turned a summer camp into today what is Loews Corporation with assets of about $80 billion.” As the family’s empire grew, absorbing the Loews Corporation theater chain in 1960 and expanding to 24 hotel locations across the U.S. and Canada, community remained the bedrock of the business. “Work, family and community are issues that are really important to us,” says Tisch. “And it’s incumbent upon us to ensure that every member of this organization understands our goals and aspirations.” In late 2017, the company announced a full plate of new goals and aspirations, pledging to add approximately 7,700 rooms across six hotels to its existing 13,500-room portfolio. “When you add it all up there are approximately 2 billion dollars worth of hotels in development or under construction,” says Tisch — a nugget representing about 10% of the company’s total market value. The expansion represents uncharted territory for the company; while much of its existing real estate is concentrated around coastal pockets of the U.S. from SoCal to Seattle, the proposed blueprint includes flyover country like Arlington, Texas, and St. Louis. But Tisch says he leaves nothing to chance when it comes to location. “This is not about looking at a map of the United States and picking a city and putting a pin in that particular central business district,” he says. “They’re not cookie cutter.” Indeed, from Orlando to New York, each Loews hotel seems to possess its own unique spirit. But when it comes to Tisch himself, his heart and soul can still be found in the studio of a spin class. “When I was a freshman in college, which was a long time ago, I weighed 255,” he says. “So exercise and commitment have been really important to helping me understand that there are really no barriers to you can’t break through.”

“WHEN YOU ADD IT ALL UP THERE ARE APPROXIMATELY 2 BILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF HOTELS IN DEVELOPMENT OR UNDER CONSTRUCTION.”

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doors. The marble bathrooms abound with amenities crafted exclusively for the hotel by Parisian perfumer Maison Francis Kurkdjian, and a lavish, custom-designed Baccarat-red enamel minibar offers delicious delights from French gourmet house Ladurée with Baccarat glasses and stemware for guest use. baccarathotels.com

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 KES: A favorite among Gwyneth Paltrow, Solange and J.Lo, this sustainable line of Grecian-inspired threads is flattering on just about anyone. While the UWS and recently opened UES locations cater to the uptown customer, the brand’s no-waste policy and organic dyes have the whole planet in mind. kesnyc.com

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A new insider hotspot, Never Never serves as a nightlife lure for the who’s who of New York City. Located beneath the new Mondrian Hotel managed by Journal Hotels, the club’s guests are whisked through a dedicated hidden entrance into the venue. With a flair for local culture and hip dining and nightlife, Mondrian Park Avenue is poised to become an epicenter in the NoMad neighborhood. mondrianparkavenue.com

The sanctuary-like guest rooms and suites at Baccarat Hotel New York have been designed to feel like pieds-à-terre and combine the noble heritage and perfect craft of the legendary French crystal company with a modern flair. The Baccarat Suite is the crown jewel spanning a sprawling 1,740 square feet. All rooms feature floor-toceiling windows, plush four-poster beds, custom jacquard linens by Mascioni and glass showers concealed by hand-painted French

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Beachy meets luxury at Lido House, a Nantucket-style resort facing the Newport Beach marina coming this March. Just steps away, retail and dining complex Lido Marina Village offers highend boutiques and restaurants. The property will feature gastropub Mayor’s Table, along with Topside, the only rooftop bar in Newport Beach. Other highlights include a saltwater pool with private cabanas, a luxury fitness center and a deluxe spa. marriott.com

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Frisky foodies rejoice: the Hello Kitty Café pop-up at Irvine Spectrum Center will become a permanent, 1,700-squarefoot space this spring. Despite its adorable feline namesake — the worldfamous cartoon mascot for the Japanese lifestyle brand Sanrio – the café isn’t only for the kids; in addition to offering pastries, pies, cakes and cookies based on cutesy characters from the Sanrio universe, it has a full liquor license. Talk about a meow mix.

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 A’maree’s: What began as a small boutique in the ‘70s has evolved into Newport Beach’s undisputed mecca for haute couture. Just as stunning as the floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking Newport Bay is the hanger-sized atelier’s collection of ultra-luxe designs, from George Esquivel shoes to Dries van Noten threads. amarees.com

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  C isco Home: Combining sophistication and sustainability, this ecofriendly chain offers a floor-to-ceiling range of home goods, from plush John Derian sofas to reclaimed wood bed frames. ciscohome.net

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 Marc Pridemore Designs: Whether it’s a baroque headboard or a silk dining chair, this 42,000-squarefoot luxury showroom has something to fulfill your wildest design wishes. marcpridmoredesigns.com

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  Roger’s Gardens: Situated atop seven verdant acres in Corona del Mar, this garden of Eden offers fine art, Italian pottery, patio furniture, and even gourmet edibles to satisfy every green thumb. rogersgardens .com

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  N orth: Pete Surprenant’s impeccably curated merchandise is as rugged yet inviting as the Laguna Beach terrain that surrounds his standout menswear retailer. northmenswear.com

SHOP TALK

Irvine-based luxury house St. John, known for glamorous knitwear, is innovating close to home. This spring, the brand is joining forces with Irvine’s Fashion Island for a new concept shop. As chief executive officer Bruce

Fetter shares, “This St. John boutique, inspired by ‘quintessential California living,’ will feature a light and airy palette and introduce some new elements not seen by us before.” stjohnknits .com

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“THE MODEL FOR [THE HOTEL] IS MY PERSONAL HOME. LITERALLY, THE FINISHES, THE CONCEPT – EVERYTHING HAS BEEN BROUGHT INTO THIS HOTEL.”

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ob Olson, president and founder of Irvine-based R.D. Olson Development, lives on Newport Beach’s exclusive Balboa Island in a home he built to emulate a grand Nantucket aerie. Just across Newport Bay sits its jumbo-size doppelganger: Lido House Newport Beach, Olson’s latest development, which was designed in the image of his private residence. “The model for it is my personal home. Literally, the finishes, the concept – everything has been brought into this hotel [to achieve] a very residential, Nantucket feel,” he says. Despite his penchant for Cape Cod architecture, Olson’s roots are more blue-collar than blue blood. Growing up in Northern California, he apprenticed for his carpenter stepfather, skipping college to start his own woodworking business at 23. “College was not an option for me,” he says. “Working with my stepdad, I learned everything from finished carpentry to concrete work. And I started off on my own before I knew any better.” In the early ’80s, Olson moved to Southern California for his first major construction project: a West Hollywood eatery started by Sonny Bono. While the aptly named “Bono” restaurant was short-lived, Olson’s brush with the ’70s icon proved auspicious; like Bono, who went on to govern Palm Springs, Olson would become a force in L.A. suburbia, going on to establish R.D. Development in Irvine and build over 300 restaurants and 25 hotels across the western U.S. and Hawaii. Along the way, he also conquered higher education. At 34, Olson enrolled at USC, earning his MBA a decade after founding R.D. “I don’t recommend that as a way to go, but that was what I did,” he says. “That really put me on a course to start my development company.” In 1997, R.D. Olson Construction became R.D. Olson Development, branching out from bricklaying to land acquisition and architect scouting, and becoming a go-to collaborator for hotel megacorporation Marriott. In late 2017, R.D. Olson cut the ribbon on the $120 million, 271-room Marriott Hotel at the Irvine Spectrum — a high point in the fruitful partnership and a symbol of once-dormant Irvine’s rapid rise. “Our focus is [on] what the market wants – to fill what we call the ‘donut hole’ – or what’s missing in the market,” says Olson. Next up, he’ll break ground on two new hotels in Hawaii (“Yeah, I have to travel there. It’s hard,” he says with a laugh). But for Olson, the project that’s closest to home, quite literally, is Lido House. “I am involved in a lot of decisions that I normally would not be because I live in Newport. It’s more personal than most,” he says. So will he be stay-catioining there once it ’s complete in early 2018? “Oh yeah,” he says. “I’ll be there quite a bit.”

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The powerhouse developer with a personal touch

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 Jay Jeffers The Store: This designer’s paradise is full of chic, high-concept furniture and accessories from Tom Faulkner, Amanda Wright and Jeffers himself. Once you’ve picked out your pieces, the Jay Jeffers Studio next door offers full-service design consultation. jayjeffers-thestore.com

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 Serge Sorokko Gallery: This fine-arts gallery, helmed by eponym Serge Sorokko and his ’90s supermodel wife Tatiana Sorokko since the ’80s, offers original works by art world superstars like Donald Sultan, Jannis Kounellis and Hunt Slonem. sorokko.com

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 Heath Ceramics: Renowned for its minimalist tableware and tile since 1948, this wedding gift go-to’s styles and patterns have remained relatively unchanged since its midcentury beginnings. heathceramics.com  Hero Shop: The brainchild of former Vogue writer Emily Holt, this welledited boutique offers an array of ready-to-wear by Creatures of the Wind, Rosie Assoulin and more, and chic accessories like Edie Parker clutches. heroshopsf.com

Of Rare Origin, Aviary Classic earrings, $1,450.

LIVE LIKE THE KING At The Ink House, a wondrous four-bedroom boutique inn located in California’s Napa Valley, you’ll find the luxurious oasis of your dreams – literally (the property was designed to evoke the concept of a “dream house”). The 1885 building was built as a single-family home, undergoing a full renovation when propreitor Maria Castellucci’s family purchased it in 2013. Each room received an amenities update while retaining a connection to the property’s rich history: the Elvis Room, for example, is named for the legendary entertainer who stayed there during the filming of his 1961 film Wild in the Country. “We incorporated fun touches like a California King blue suede bed, houndstooth pillows, movie posters, and black-and-white photographs of Elvis and the cast.” Castellucci says. The Ink House delivers warm, one-on-one hospitality; guests can opt for personal maître d’étage service, educational wine tastings or post-dinner digestifs with the Castellucci family. inkhousenapavalley.com

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The eight-course tasting menu at Eight Tables by George Chen is inspired by the si fang cai or “private room cuisine” tradition – which dates back as far as the Ming Dynasty. Housed above Chen’s less formal restaurant and marketplace China Live, the eight-table, supper club–like dining room is accessed through a back-alley entrance. Prepared with a reverence for seasonal ingredients, the prix fixe courses, according to Chen, are designed to evoke the feeling of dining in his own home. Each $225 meal begins with the jiu gong ge appetizer, which encompasses the nine essential flavors of Chinese cuisine, followed by traditional mainstays symbolizing wealth and prosperity like black cod in banana leaf and velvet chicken. eighttables.com

GAVIN NEWSOM The political heavyweight promoting equality

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INDOOR OUTDOOR Active lifestyle brand Outdoor Voices, founded by 29-year-old wunderkind Tyler Haney, continues its West Coast takeover with a recently opened Hayes Valley location. Inspired by local architecture, the interiors echo the layout of San Francisco’s teahouses; regional plant life and locally sourced redwood planks provide a serene energy, complete with a street-facing plant alcove where customers can relax with a cup of tea. Meanwhile, exclusive gray-, slate- and blue-hued tees and totes reflect the foggy landscapes of Northern California. outdoorvoices.com

ately, California gubernatorial frontrunner Gavin Newsom has been spending a great deal of time on the campaign trail. But as former mayor and native son of the Golden Gate city, he always leaves his heart in San Francisco. “The issues I hear from people here [in San Francisco] are the same ones that matter to Californians across the state,” Newsom says. “People are focused on affordability, creating growth and an upward economy. That’s what my gubernatorial campaign is all about.” When asked about what he loves most about his hometown, Newsom cites everything from its inclusive culture to its California cuisine (much of which he has helped to foster himself). “[My go-to lunch spot] is Balboa Café for the famous Balboa Burger on a baguette. Add avocado — I declared it California’s official fruit in 2013,” says Newsom. But, he adds, what defines the city isn’t its millennial-friendly food, but its history as a bastion of social progress and LGBTQ acceptance. “Don’t miss San Francisco Pride,” he says. “It’s a philosophical, iconic destination, where diversity isn’t just tolerated — it’s celebrated. That’s quintessential San Francisco.” With a busy election year ahead of him, Newsom will likely have no time for local R&R. But political office is hardly his sole ambition. He is also an entrepreneur and oenophile as the founder of the San Francisco-based PlumpJack Group, which operates several wineries in addition to a multitude of hotels, restaurants and bars – from the Bay to Palm Springs. While his business has grown exponentially across the state, Newsom is proudest of its local philanthropic impact. “In the past few years PlumpJack launched the PlumpJack Foundation, led by my sister Hilary [Newsom Callan], to support cancer research initiatives and fight childhood poverty,” says Newsom. And his sister isn’t the only philanthropic powerhouse in his life. His wife and potential First Lady of California Jen Siebel Newsom is a socially minded visionary in her own right. “Jen is continuing her life’s work as a documentary filmmaker,” says Newsom. “She is advancing the cause of women’s equality through her nonprofit The Representation Project. I’m so proud of both of them.”— DAVI D NAS H

“IT’S A PHILOSOPHICAL, ICONIC DESTINATION, WHERE DIVERSITY ISN’T JUST TOLERATED – IT’S CELEBRATED. THAT’S QUINTESSENTIAL SAN FRANCISCO.”

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 Modern Appealing Clothing (MAC): Founded in 1980 by Jeri Ospital with son Ben and daughter Chris, this iconic boutique is a family affair. In the beginning, Simon Doonan would fly up from L.A. to do their window dressings, and today the store remains a fashion fantasy-scape with brands like Sofie d’Hoore, Walter Van Beirendonck and Junya Watanabe. modernappealingclothing.com

P O R T R A I T : J U S T I N S U L L I VA N /G E T T Y I M AG E S

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ASPEN


PARTIES DJ RUNNA

DuJour’s Zenith Watches Launch

MAURO PORCINI, GIANNAURO VELLA

WHAT: Zenith Watches & Swizz Beatz Launch

the New Defy Collection WHERE: The Angel Orensanz Center

RIC PIPINO, STEPHEN NITKIN

KAROLINA KURKOVA, SOFIA RICHIE

ALICIA KEYS

FABOLOUS

LEXI KAPLAN, ALLIE KAPLAN

PARTY GUEST, KEENAN TOWNS, JASON BINN

TAIS SLAVSKAYA, JOSE FRIA

SPRING 2018

ERIC THONASSIAN, ARIELLA WERTHEIMER AND MICHAEL BUCELLA

JULIEN TORNARE, SWIZZ BEATZ

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SAMMY SOSA

MARIUS MORARIU, RACHEL PALETSKY ASH

SCOTT DISICK, SOFIA RICHIE

ZENITH WATCH ACADEMY

JOEY ZAUZIG SWIZZ BEATZ, FABOLOUS

WHO: Sofia Richie, Scott Disick, Karolina Kurkova, Romero Britto WHAT: A celebration of Art Basel Miami Beach sponsored by Whispering Angel and WellNEST WHERE: The Confidante Miami Beach

BIG SAV

FARAH ABASSI ROMERO BRITTO, JASON BINN

GREGORY SIFF

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

DuJour’s Annual Art Basel Kickoff

JASON BINN, DAVID GRUTMAN

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

130

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JON BUES, SWIZZ BEATZ AND JULIEN TORNARE

DUJOUR.COM

SPRING 2018

BENOIT VULLIET, JASON BINN, JULIEN TORNARE

WHO: Swizz Beatz, alicia keys, Fabolous

INGA VOLKOSH

LEXI KAPLAN, ALLIE KAPLAN

SWIZZ BEATZ, ALICIA KEYS, JULIEN TORNARE & ZENITH WATCH ACADEMY

RENEE LUCAS HORAN, JASON BINN


PARTIES DIANE KRUGER

TODD DICIURCIO, MEGAN DICIURCIO

LLOYD DICKENSON MICHAEL PULEIO

DuJour’s Diane Kruger Cover Party WHO: Diane Kruger, Jason Wu WHAT: A celebration of Kruger’s DuJour cover WHERE: The VNYL

SARAH WEIS, SAMANTHA BRAHM

LINDA MANISCALCO AND CARMINE CASSINO

JASON WEINBERG, DIANE KRUGER, JASON WU, JASON BINN JENNIFER MAGUIRE

AIDEEN O’LEARY, JAMES MORRISSEY

DANNY MINNICK

DEBBIE CHRISTENSEN, TOMMY CHRISTENSEN

A L L I M AG E S : G E T T Y I M AG E S

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JASON BINN, MICHAEL SNELL, CHRISTIAN GONZALEZ


BINNSHOT

ETRO’S MARCO PIEVANI PGR MEDIA’S CHRISTIN DIPISA, MARGEAU BARNES, ANSLEY-GRACE PLAETZER

GLOBAL BRAND GROUP’S JASON RABIN

SWIRE PROPERTIES’S KIERAN BOWERS

RANDY WHITMAN AND GIGI WHITMAN OF BAL HARBOUR SHOPS

DEL GATTO JEWELRY’S CHRIS DEL GATTO, CHRISTIAN SIRIANO, VERONICA WEBB

PASCAL SAVOY

HAILEY BALDWIN SCOTT DISICK, SOFIA RICHIE

TAO GROUP’S NOAH TEPPERBERG

MAX MARA’S KRISTINE WESTERBY

DOLCE & GABBANA’S SANJAY HATHIRAMANI

TAO GROUP’S JASON STRAUSS

THE ESTEE LAUDER COMPANIES’ JANE HERTZMARK HUDIS AND JOHN DEMSEY

CHEF JEANGEORGES VONGERICHTEN

LISA LONG ADLER, CAMERON CHALFIN

SHAYNE KUNZELMAN, GAIL KUNZELMAN

BRENT BOLTHOUSE

FONTAINEBLEAU MIAMI BEACH’S JOSH HERMAN

PRESIDENT AND CEO OF VAN CLEEF & ARPELS AMERICAS ALAIN BERNARD

BRICKELL CITY CENTRE’S REGINA LACAYO & MARIOLGA CALDERON

PIAGET’S JENNIFER HINKLE-WILLIS & STEPHANIE SANDLER


BINNSHOT AISHA

HANDPICKED Jane Hertzmark Hudis Ward Simmons Kiyo Taga Venus Williams GLASHÜTTE’S SASHA SHAPIRO

JOHN HARDY’S SUZANNE HADER

CHRIS BORISH, KATIE HOLMES

Elaine Wynn Julien Tornare Benoit Vulliet

ESTEE LAUDER COMPANIES’ GERI SCHACHNER

Howard Lorber Simon Sproule

JOHN HARDY CEO ROBERT HANSO

Dana DeVito Gina Folin

FOUNDER OF DE GRISOGONO OFFICIAL FAWAZ GRUOSI

Ward Simmons BRUNELLO CUCINELLI’S MASSIMO CARONNA, NATASHA CARONNA

RELATED COMPANIES’ JEFF MANCINI AND LISA HERNANDEZ GIOIA

LISA PLINER, BLAIR UNDERWOOD , DONALD J. PLINER

Adam Miller

CRAIG ROBINS, HYATT CORPORATION’S NICHOLAS J. PRITZKER

SOTHEBY’S CEO TAD SMITH JIMMY CHOO’S AMY ROBB

CONDÉ NAST’S JEFF BARISH AND WILLIAM PITTEL

RICHARD MILLE’S JOHN SIMONIAN

Gary Friedman Lauren Snyder Gene Simmons Jane Hertzmark Hudis Michael Shvo Steve Aoki Sean Walsh Larry Silverstein Marty Burger

ROBERTO COIN’S PETER WEBSTER

Louis Cona

SHERATON’S RICARDO IRIARTE & TERRY WILLIS

Allison Shafii Kenneth Wyse Greg Calejo

STUART WEITZMAN’S SUSAN DUFFY

STAR JETS’S RICKY SITOMER

MAURICIO XAVIER SOLODUJIN, CHRISTINE MEAGHER

Charles Koppelman

VICTORIA JUSTICE

PRESIDENT & CEO OF NORTH AMERICA - ‎MOËT HENNESSY USA JIM CLERKIN

Lepa Roskopp Keren Eldad

KEVYN WYNN

Mastin Kipp Susan Duffy Nick Cannon Stewart Bain Greg Calejo Jeff Mancini PRESIDENT AND CEO OF ISTITUTO MARANGONI MIAMI, PERRY ELLIS INTERNATIONAL CEO OSCAR FELDENKREIS

CEO OF GOLDMAN PROPERTIES JESSICA GOLDMAN, GOLDMAN PROPERTIES’ JOEY GOLDMAN

MANDARIN ORIENTAL, LAS VEGAS’S PATRICIA GALAS, MANDARIN ORIENTAL, LAS VEGAS’S CAITLIN PAVISHA

Katharina Plath SUSAN CAPPA, STEFANIA GIORDANO, PRESIDENT OF FENDI AMERICAS GAETANO SCIUTO

PRESIDENT & CEO OF INTEGRATED PROPERTIES, INC., BRUCE DEIFIK

Veronique Gabai-Pinsky Andrea Correale Stacy Woods Richard Gossett Andres Arellano

LOEWE’S MAURICIO SOLODUJIN

Michael Baruch Vincent Panzanella Gillian Beck Robert Diamante Michelle Ranieri

PEPSICO’S MAURO PORCINI, OLGA OSMINKINA

Michael Satsky Mark Warfel Sheldon Brody Carol McGuinness

KAROLINA KURKOVA

THE RIDE CYCLING’S SHANNON MCBEATH, THE COSMOPOLITAN OF LAS VEGAS’S BILL MCBEATH

Christine Childs Tom Mastronardi

CLIQUE HOSPITALITY’S ANDY MASI

Robert Vecsler Keenan Towns Andy Masi

THE GOLDEN PEAR’S KEITH DAVIS

ANDRE AGASSI, LONGINES U.S. BRAND PRESIDENT PASCAL SAVOY

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

BAUME & MERCIER’S KELSEY LANDERS & SARAH ZAOUK

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Alberto Junco Stewart Bain Lauren Picciano

OSCAR CARVALLO PARIS

BULGARI’S JOSH GAYNOR

ROYCE NEW YORK’S WILLIAM BAUER

Stefania Girombelli ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA’S SHAUNA BROOK

Andrew Rosen Denise De Luca

SPRING 2018

Ana Martins

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TEDDY WILSON, WARD SIMMONS, JAMIE TISCH

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Rob Goldstein


ARTIFACT 

Winning Dishes

The menu served at the first Academy Awards is not only a look back at the state of American cuisine in 1929, but also a recollection of the era’s financial woes BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

I

t is Hollywood’s glitziest night, but the Academy Awards hasn’t fed its guests for decades. Unlike at the boozy, food-rich Golden Globes, stars on Oscar night go hungry until the Governors Ball after-party catered by Wolfgang Puck. But the ceremony itself wasn’t always so Spartan. At the first ever Academy Awards in 1929, held at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, the likes of Janet Gaynor and Charlie Chaplin dined on multiple courses— from celery stalks to broiled chicken on toast. While the menu might not stand up to Puck’s caviar-laced bites and gold-leaf chocolate statuettes, the smorgasbord represented the height of haute cuisine at the time. “The items were reflective of what Hollywood considered to be sophisticated European tastes and the dining trends of the time,” says Juan Pineda, a director of entertainment at the Hollywood Roosevelt. Even if the food was less than mouthwatering, there was plenty of alcohol to dull the senses. “The champagne was definitely f lowing. They definitely served a lot of champagne and a lot of wine,” says Pineda.

While the gleeful evening, spearheaded by Louis B. Mayer and Douglas Fairbanks, may have seemed at odds with the rest of the country (1929 also spawned the Great Depression), Pineda says the ceremony reflected Hollywood’s sensitivity to the era’s financial woes. “Items like string beans and potatoes represented Depression-era cuisine,” he says. Luckily, the Academy got a good deal on the venue; Fairbanks was also a f inancier of the Holly wood Roosevelt. The then two-year-old hotel’s celebrity cache had made it a silent film–era hotspot—and its Spanish-style, 4,500-square-foot Blossom Ballroom was sizeable enough to house the night’s 270 guests. While the ceremony migrated to the Ambassador Hotel the following year, the Roosevelt has been steeped in celebrity ever since. Now operated by Journal Hotels, the hotel organizes viewing parties and special menus to remember its place in Oscars history. Though in 1929 no women were nominated outside the Best Actress category, this year, the hotel’s mixologists will salute the five women who have since been nominated in the Best Director category, with cocktails like the “The Lady Bird,” a blend of Tanqueray Ten, chartreuse, maraschino and fresh limes. So will chicken on toast make a cameo? “That’s a very good question,” says Pineda. “Avocado toast has become such a big thing that maybe we’ll put chicken on toast, too, just like in 1929.”

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Left: The menu served at the first Academy Awards ceremony was a sign of the times. Chicken on toast, celery and ice cream were served to the biggest names in the film industry in the ballroom at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel (below).


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Spring 2018  

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