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SUMMER 2019


S U M M E R 2 0 19 VISIT RHBE ACHHOUSE.COM TO VIEW THE COLLECTION AND REQUEST A SOURCE BOOK


Ghurka 781 Fifth Avenue | 65 Prince Street | ghurka.com A v a i l a b l e a t B a r n e y s N e w Yo r k


CONTENTS / SUMMER 2019

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ON THE COVER Leaf ring in 18-karat gold, $16,000, and hammered cuff in 18-karat gold, $39,500, DAVID WEBB, davidwebb.com. Low-cut one-piece swimsuit, $59, GUESS, guess.com.

Van Cleef & Arpels’ Perlée necklace.

SUMMER 2019

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Photographed by VICTOR DEMARCHELIER Styled by SARAH GORE REEVES

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Wild Ink restaurant, in New York City’s Hudson Yards.

BEAUTY

STYLE

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SUMMER SPLASH

Delightful fragrances inspired by nature’s loveliest ingredients.

48

A DAY IN THE LIFE

Celebrity makeup artist Mai Quynh walks us through a day in her jam-packed life.

50 BEAUTY NEWS

Everything you need to know about summer beauty; Swiss spa secrets.

51

THE LONGEVITY KING

Dr. Richard Firshein on how integrative medicine can change your life.

29

ALL THAT GLITTERS

Eye-catching jewels will elevate your summer ensembles.

34

FASHION NEWS

Covetable new releases, from Orlebar Brown to Stella McCartney. 52 TREND REPORT The season’s styles we’re loving are inspired by feathers and world travel.

36

BODY BOOST How to get a glow from head to toe using the latest technology in cosmetic treatments.

40 SPARKING JOY

88

The Relaxation Room at the Auberge Solage in Napa Valley.

LIFE 55

A DAY IN THE LIFE

Comedian Jordan Klepper on his new show and life in the biz of making people laugh.

58

THE BRITISH HAVE COME

Restaurants from the United Kingdom are flocking stateside to open new eateries.

60

THE ENTERTAINING EMPRESS Style and business maven Claire Olshan is setting the standard for snacking.

62

SMASHING SPIRITS

Impress guests with these unique summer cocktail recipes.

French jeweler Van Cleef & Arpels reigns supreme with its latest collections.

66

ON THE WATERFRONT

A buoyant new trend in real estate.

42

WATER WORLD

68 M C LAREN’S SUPERCAR

An array of attractive timepieces that you can plunge into the pool with this summer.

70

MIAMI NICE

Outdoor furnishings get a major South Beach–style face-lift.

44

CANDY LAND

Richard Mille launches a confectionary- inspired watch collection.

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Magda mule, $695, MALONE SOULIERS, malonesouliers.com.

The 720S Spider is as purposeful as it is sexy.


CALIBER RM 07-01

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN BAL HARBOUR BEVERLY HILLS BOSTON BUENOS AIRES LAS VEGAS MIAMI NEW YORK ST. BARTH TORONTO VANCOUVER www.richardmille.com


CONTENTS / SUMMER 2019 Tiffany T Two ring in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $2,950, and Tiffany T Two ring in 18-karat gold, $1,600, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Jumpsuit, $4,400, and lambskin belt, $1,600, CHANEL, select Chanel boutiques nationwide, 800-500-0005.

CULTURE 73

ARTISTRY AFLOAT

The 58th Venice Biennale captures the zeitgeist of our contemporary era.

76

A THRILLING COMEBACK

Global Wildlife Conservation steps up the fight to save endangered birds in New Zealand.

79

BALAZSING AROUND

The travel-maven daughter of hotelier André Balazs shares her favorite nature- centric hot spots.

80

BEHIND THE MUSIC

Irish singer-songwriter Glen Hansard on his latest album.

82

CARTAGENA COOL

Writer Jonathan Soroff shares his top picks for a trip to Colombia’s famous city.

84

CHÂTEAU LIFE

France’s château scene will make you rethink booking a traditional hotel.

88

THE LUXURY GUIDE TO NAPA VALLEY

An upscale handbook to some of wine country’s must-visit locations.

FEATURES 94

NAOMI TAKES THE PLUNGE

Multidimensional star Naomi Watts is having quite a resurgence. Here, she shares the scoop on her new ventures.

104 GIANCARLO THE GREAT

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Baseball hotshot Giancarlo Stanton models the latest menswear.

112

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL, REDEFINED

Rock darlings Alexandra and Theodora Richards on life in the spotlight.

120 GIRLS’ TRIP

A psychedelic therapy changing women’s lives.

Cover star Naomi Watts.

V I C TO R D E M A RC H E L I E R

SUMMER 2019

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TRAVEL


BOLD GOLD COLLECTION| robertocoin.com


CONTENTS / SUMMER 2019

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CITIES

A project from San Francisco’s Redmond Aldrich Design.

126 ASPEN

A new wine director takes the helm at The Little Nell.

128 CHICAGO

Jewelry savant Jill Alberts opens a store in Glencoe.

130 DALLAS

Artist Blake Hackler tackles delicate subject matter.

132 HAMPTONS

Where to stay, eat, and shop this summer.

134 HOUSTON

Chloé Di Leo is changing the rules of cocktail making.

How a nightlife exec created a whole new spirit.

138 LOS ANGELES

1 Hotel takes over West Hollywood.

140 MALIBU

Helene Henderson’s Malibu Farm restaurants are going global.

142 MARTHA’S VINEYARD

Workout guru Taryn Toomey brings her popular class to town.

144 MIAMI

Nightlife impresario Michael Gardner makes his next move.

146 NANTUCKET

Fashion label Veronica Beard comes to the island this summer.

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148 NEW YORK CITY

Chef Gabriel Kreuther debuts a new culinary program at the Baccarat Hotel.

150 ORANGE COUNTY

Lilly Pulitzer sets up shop in Newport Beach.

152 SAN FRANCISCO

The Prisoner Wine Company’s Tasting Lounge in St. Helena is a summer destination.

Scallops at The Maidstone Hotel in East Hampton.

142 The waterfront Harbor View Hotel in Martha’s Vineyard.

154 BINNSHOT/PARTIES

ARTIFACT 160 A ROYAL PEACOCK

The diamond brooch fit for a maharaja.

144

Maison F.P. Journe in Miami.

H A R B O R V I E W : A L I S O N S H AW

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136 LAS VEGAS


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BIG BANG MECA-10 SHEPARD FAIREY

BOUTIQUES 4(+0:65(=,5<,ₔ-0-;/(=,5<, ),=,93@/033:ₔ)(3/(9)6<9 40(40ₔ3(:=,.(:ₔ7(34),(*/ +(33(:ₔ693(5+6ₔ/6<:;65 :(5-9(5*0:*6ₔ:*6;;:+(3, ;LS!

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EDITOR IN CHIEF

CEO/PUBLISHER

Kim Peiffer

Jason Binn

CR E ATIV E D I R EC TO R

B U S I N ES S D I R EC TO R

Alexander Wolf

Ed Cortese

CO NTR I B UTI N G PH OTO D I R EC TO R

M A R KETI N G AS SOCIATE

Ria Dhuper

Kim Riordan

D I R EC TO R O F O PE R ATI O N S

CO NTR I B UTI N G M A N AG I N G E D ITO R

William Pelkey

Ellen Fair SENIOR FAS H I O N E D ITO R

Jessie Ajluni PRODUCTION

CO NTR I B UTI N G CO PY E D ITO R

IT M A N AG E R

Jamie Beckman

Kevin Singh

S E N I O R E D ITO R PR I NT CO N S U LTA NT

Kasey Caminiti

Calev Print Media

CO NTR I B UTI N G I M AG I N G S PECIA LI ST

PA PE R SO U RCI N G

Travis O’Brien

The Aaron Group

FINANCE FINANCE DIRECTOR

Danielle Bixler SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Veronica Jones

DUJOUR CITIES REGIONAL EDITORS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen), Holly Haber (Dallas) Grace Bascos (Las Vegas) Jeremy Kinser (Los Angeles & Orange County) Jennie Nunn (Malibu & San Francisco) Natasha Wolff (Martha’s Vineyard & Nantucket) Jamie Beckman (Miami)

Tweed handbag, $5,300, CHANEL, select Chanel boutiques nationwide.

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC, 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-710-4051. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs, and drawings. Copyright © 2019 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 800-783-4903, or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com.


Undeniably Rare Exceptionally Beautiful Exquisite designs featuring Argyle Pink™ Diamonds @jfinediamonds

RARITY WITHIN REACH

Tiny Jewel Box Washington DC

Tappers Michigan

London Jewelers New York

Betteridge Jewelers Colorado, Connecticut

Hyde Park Jewelers California, Colorado

Barmakian Jewelers Massachusetts, New Hampshire


ED LETTER / SUMMER 2019

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F from top:

The Yankees’ Giancarlo Stanton and DuJour editor in chief Kim Peiffer; behind the scenes with cover star Naomi Watts; the Peiffer family at home in Wisconsin.

inally, my favorite time of the year is upon us. Perhaps it’s the fact that I grew up on a lake in Wisconsin, so summers were quite literally spent boating, swimming, and grilling out with family and friends for three months straight—heaven on earth. Now that I’m an official resident of New York City (nine years running!), summers for me mean long weekends at the beach, traveling back home to the Midwest to enjoy that aforementioned lake time, and exploring new places along the East Coast. On my bucket list this season? Checking out one of the French châteaux in our Travel section. Writer Lauren Hill shares the secret to choosing the most luxurious ones. Summer is also prime time for us East Coasters to spend some rosé-filled weekends in the Hamptons, which is why it was perfect timing to kick off the new season with our cover star, Naomi Watts, at a weekend celebration in Sag Harbor over the Memorial Day holiday. Between her acting career (she has several exciting projects in the works, both in TV and film) and her gig as a cofounder of natural, nontoxic wellness spa Onda Beauty, she’s a multihyphenate with no signs of slowing down. In our cover story, shot on location at the Baccarat Hotel in New York City, the blond beauty talks about her life as an actress and all the things she is still planning to accomplish. It’s a great read— ideal for when you’re lying on the beach. And I couldn’t write this letter without talking about some of the other amazing features inside our summer issue, including a fashion story with style darlings Alexandra and Theodora Richards, daughters of rock star Keith Richards and supermodel Patti Hansen. They were a delight to shoot and interview, and I’m looking forward to seeing where both of them head next. Also in this issue is an interview with baseball badass Giancarlo Stanton of the Yankees, who is looking dapper on our pages in the latest men’s fashions. No matter where your summer months take you, I hope you enjoy each of these sunny days to the fullest. And meanwhile, we’ll be hard at work coming up with our fashion-packed fall issue to inspire all your shopping purchases this autumn.

Kim Peiffer Editor in Chief Instagram: @peifferk1


The Breitling Surfer Squad Sally Fitzgibbons Kelly Slater Stephanie Gilmore

#SQUADONAMISSION


BINNSHOT / SUMMER 2019 KIM KARDASHIAN WEST AND KOURTNEY KARDASHIAN AT AMFAR GALA NEW YORK

STEPHANIE NASS AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY

HANNAH FALLIS BRONFMAN AND DUCKIE THOT AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY

ELSA HOSK, KENDALL JENNER, HAILEY BIEBER, AND JOAN SMALLS AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

S

KHALID AND TAYLOR SWIFT AT THE TIME 100 GALA DINNER

WITH KATE BECKINSALE AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

ummer for me is always a time to truly appreciate friends and family. It’s the season when I spend much downtime in the Hamptons, a place near and dear to my heart. And it’s also where I kick off every summer with a Memorial Day party toasting DuJour’s cover star. Brooklyn Chop House’s Southampton pop-up restaurant hosted the perfect fete for our cover girl, Naomi Watts. Guests started the holiday weekend sipping Whispering Angel rosé and getting a first glimpse at the buzzy summer restaurant. The Hamptons are also special to me because I am fortunate to be able to deliver the magazine from my backyard with our exclusive Hamptons estate drop, targeting some of the most prominent homes from Westhampton to Montauk. Whether you’ll be frequenting the Hamptons this summer or another beach town that brings you joy, there are plenty of reasons to take a copy of our Summer issue along for a lazy day at the beach. This issue is rich with travel inspiration and entertaining celebrity features, including our summer fashion story with rock ’n’ roll It girls Alexandra and Theodora Richards, daughters of legendary Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards and supermodel Patti Hansen. I’m also excited about our exclusive photo shoot with baseball legend Giancarlo Stanton, outfielder for the New York Yankees. Make sure not to miss out on our City Guide section for summer travel ideas; last summer marked its expansion into the resort communities of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard—these beautiful New England destinations capture the beauty and essence of what DuJour represents. No matter where your voyages take you, DuJour will be there for you. Here’s to enJason Binn joying and celebrating all things DuJour on Twitter/Instagram: @jasonbinn behalf of myself, my family, and our team.

P O R T R A I T BY M I C H A E L S T E WA R T

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JOE JONAS AND SOPHIE TURNER AT THE “GAME OF THRONES” SEASON 8 PREMIERE AFTER PARTY


HANDPICKED Travis Brauer Mary Putter TOMMY HILFIGER, LEWIS HAMILTON AND DEE HILFIGER

WINNIE HARLOW AT AMFAR GALA NEW YORK

HENNESSY CAROLINA AND CARDI B AT BEAUTYCON NEW YORK

SEAN O’PRY AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY

ANNE HATHAWAY AT WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND HUDSON YARD STORE OPENING

Heather Rimsky Jennifer Barre Melina Ronk Dana Lauren Berry Ashley Spencer Brittnee Leger-Tecchio Daniel Luzniak Marcie Haley

GIANCARLO STANTON, CHASE CARTER, BRITTANY PEIFFER AND JASON BINN AT DUJOUR’S APRIL DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT TAO DOWNTOWN =

Katharina Plath Jennifer Pintaluba FRANK ROGERS, MAXWELL, AND ERIC RUTHERFORD AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

Courtney Flint Colleen Scott Robert Castro Christa Allen Athena Chen

Negi Darsses Jimmy Gabriel Allison Walsh

Nathalie Diamantis Selda Bensusan Pierre Goyenetche Lindsay Paterson Krista Beyrer Shawna Schmitz Adrianna Carello Ferah Mohammed Nicolette Vocaturo Nolo Simon Erica Krauss

DWAYNE JOHNSON, LEANA WEN, TREVOR NOAH AND RAMI MALEK AT THE TIME 100 GALA DINNER

Melanie Cardoza Prima Formica Kelly Foster Shapiro Rachael Pistory Terri Han

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Jessica Kim Robert Dunn NAOMI WATTS AND JASON BINN AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY AT THE BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

Kristen Caggiano Laura Parsons Steve Zacks Jamie Kesselman

SUMMER 2019

DEBRA MESSING AND ALAN CUMMING AT PERFORMANCE OF “LEGAL IMMIGRANT”

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Jonathan Hamilton

DUJOUR.COM

Judgie Graham

EMILY RATAJKOWSKI AND CIARA


BINNSHOT / SUMMER 2019 PHARRELL WILLIAMS, JOHN SYKES, SHAWN MENDES, AND PAUL TUDOR JONES ATTHE ROBIN HOOD BENEFIT REBECCA KINGCREWS AND TERRY CREWS AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS

KATIE HOLMES AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER

JOAN COLLINS AND HARPERS BAZAAR’S GLENDA BAILEY

JASON BINN AND MARK SELIGER AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

JEFF GORDON AND INGRID VANDEBOSCH AT THE HOT PINK PARTY

DEVON WINDSOR AT THE AMFAR GALA NEW YORK

MODELS SHOWCASING JEWELRY AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY DYLAN LAUREN AND CORALIE CHARRIOL PAUL AT THE FAAFC GALA

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AURA VELASQUEZ, MORRIS MOONIAN AND DUCA’S MAX GIROMBELLI

ALEC BALDWIN, ANTHONY CENNAME, HILARIA BALDWIN AND CARMEN GABRIELA BALDWIN AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY

WITH DYLAN MCDERMOTT AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

DIANE KRUGER AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER

ANGELA SARAFYAN AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER

PRIYA SHUKLA AND JILL KARGMAN AT THE HOT PINK PARTY BRAD GORESKI AT WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND HUDSON YARDS OPENING

KATE BOSWORTH AT THE DVF AWARDS

NIKITA WIOREL AND JAY ROYCE AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY

CANDICE SWANEPOEL AT THE AMFAR GALA NEW YORK

EVA LONGORIA AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS


ATMOSPHERE AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

WILLIAM P. LAUDER, AND GRACE ELIZABETH AT THE HOT PINK PARTY

TIM MALONE AND DON LEMON ATTEND THE 30TH ANNUAL GLAAD MEDIA AWARDS

KRIS JENNER AND COREY GAMBLE

OLIVIA WILDE AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS

ASHLEY BENSON AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER

DUJOUR.COM

ALEXANDER SKARSGARD AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER

ALEXANDRA RICHARDS, JASON BINN AND THEODORA RICHARDS AT DUJOUR’S MAY DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT JAMES HUDDLESTON’S GOSPEL

KARLIE KLOSS AND CHRISTIAN SIRIANO AT ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION OF THE CURATED NYC

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CARLA GUGINO AND FASHION DESIGNER ZAC POSEN AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER

NATALIE JACKSON, JULIA MOSHY, ANDREW WARREN, PETRA HALLORAN, REYA BENITEZ AT DUJOUR’S MAY DIGITAL COVER JAMES HUDDLESTON’S GOSPEL

COCO ROCHA AT THE SHOPS & RESTAURANTS AT HUDSON YARDS PREVIEW CELEBRATION

PARIS HILTON, CAROLYN MURPHY, NICKY HILTON ROTHSCHILD AND TESSA HILTON AT THE ANIMAL HAVEN GALA

SUMMER 2019

PIERPAOLO PICCIOLI, NAOMI CAMPBELL, RYAN MURPHY AND JANET MOCK AT THE TIME 100 GALA

BRIE LARSON AND NANCY PELOSI AT THE TIME 100 GALA


/ BINNSHOT / SUMMER 2019 SHARON AND SIRIUS XM RADIO’S SCOTT GREENSTEIN AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

PAGE SIX’S BEVY SMITH AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

DANE AND DYLAN DANTUONO, JOHN AND JOYCE VARVATOS AT THE JOHN VARVATOS GAME OF THRONES EVENT

ASHLEY ACEVEDO, WHEEL’S UP KENNY DICHTER, AND RUSSELL WILSON

ALICIA VIKANDER, EMMA STONE AND MICHELLE WILLIAMS AT LOUIS VUITTON CRUISE SHOW

DANNY A . AND NOAH TEPPERBERG AT “CROWN VIC” SCREENING

CARA DELEVINGNE AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

LISA AND ACCOUNTING GURU JAY SHULMAN AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

RJ KING AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

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DIANE VON FURSTENBERG AT THE DVF AWARDS JESSICA LEDON AND DAVID GUETTA AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS

SOUTHERN BLONDE AND SPIRTS DIRECTOR LEE SCHRAGER AND + TITLE JONATHAN TISCH AT LAUNCH OF “LIFE IS A PARTY”

KELLY BENSIMON AT WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND HUDSON YARDS STORE OPENING MARC JACOBS, DEMI MOORE AND CHAR DEFRANCESCO

JENNIFER HUDSON AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS ERIN AND SARA FOSTER AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS


KAREN UZEL AND LISA POLAK AT DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE COCKTAIL PARTY

RICHARD FIRSHEIN, BRAD WALSH, SCOTT FELDMAN, JASON BINN AND KEVIN LAW AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD CHARLESHENRI AND MARGUERITE MANGIN AT THE FAAFC GALA

SCOTT SARTIANO AND ALLIE RIZZO AT THE ANIMAL HAVEN GALA

PRITIKA SWARUP AT THE “HOTEL MUMBAI” SCREENING

DUJOUR.COM

PETER BRANT, JR. AND THEODORA RICHARDS AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

TERRENCE J, MICHAEL EALY, AND LENNY S. AT “THE INTRUDER” PREMIERE

27 SUMMER 2019

BILL RUDIN, MADELEINE RUDIN JOHNSON, GRANT S. JOHNSON AND SAM RUDIN AT THE “NIGHTHAWKS” AFTER PARTY

SUKI WATERHOUSE AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

LA LA ANTHONY AT THE 14TH ANNUAL TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL ARTISTS DINNER JANE HUDIS AND ELIZABETH HURLEY AT THE HOT PINK PARTY

JAMES HUDDLESTON AT THE DUJOUR’S MAY DIGITAL COVER PARTY JARYN BLOOM, MATTHEW KIPP AND DANIELLE KIPP AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

SYDNEY ENGEL AND JASON BINN AT DUJOUR’S APRIL DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT TAO DOWNTOWN


D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

Ray, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Stores New York: 150 E. 58th Street - 135 Madison Avenue Other B&B Italia Stores: Austin - Dallas - Houston - Los Angeles - Miami San Francisco - Seattle - Sun Valley - Washington DC - Belo Horizonte - Sao Paulo Please call 1 800 872 1697 - info.usa@bebitalia.com Time_Less Program: select B&B Italia pieces now in stock: www.bbitaliatimeless.com Milan Design Week: April 4th/9th 2017 B&B Italia Store Via Durini, 14 - B&B Italia, B&B Italia Outdoor and Maxalto new collections Microsoft House by Herzog & De Meuron, Viale Pasubio, 21 - B&B Italia Outdoor special presentation


D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

Ray, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Stores New York: 150 E. 58th Street - 135 Madison Avenue Other B&B Italia Stores: Austin - Dallas - Houston - Los Angeles - Miami San Francisco - Seattle - Sun Valley - Washington DC - Belo Horizonte - Sao Paulo Please call 1 800 872 1697 - info.usa@bebitalia.com Time_Less Program: select B&B Italia pieces now in stock: www.bbitaliatimeless.com Milan Design Week: April 4th/9th 2017 B&B Italia Store Via Durini, 14 - B&B Italia, B&B Italia Outdoor and Maxalto new collections Microsoft House by Herzog & De Meuron, Viale Pasubio, 21 - B&B Italia Outdoor special presentation


STYLE

BEAUTY

ST YLE LIFE

C U LT U R E

T R AV E L

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All That Glitters

SUMMER 2019

Rose and yellow gold reign supreme with these eye-catching jewels. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

Boule ring in white gold with turquoise, amethyst, and tsavorites, $13,300, and Boule bracelet in pink gold with opal, quartz, and fuchsia sapphires, $38,800, DE GRISOGONO, degrisogono.com.


STYLE

BEAUTY

LIFE

C U LT U R E

T R AV E L

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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Les Galaxies de Cartier bracelet, 18-karat rose gold, diamonds, moonstone, and milky quartz, limited edition of eight numbered pieces, price upon request, and Les Galaxies de Cartier earrings, 18-karat rose gold, diamonds, moonstone, and milky quartz, limited edition of 30 numbered pieces, price upon request, CARTIER, available by appointment only at select Cartier boutiques nationwide, 800-227-8437.


DUJOUR.COM 31 SPRING 2018 Chain earrings, yellow gold and pavé diamonds, $24,200, and large medallion pendant, yellow gold and pavé diamonds, $28,500, LOUIS VUITTON, available at select Louis Vuitton stores, 866-884-8866, louisvuitton.com.


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FROM TOP: Tiffany T wire ring in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $2,300, Tiffany T True diamond link ring in 18-karat gold, 4mm wide, $1,200, Tiffany T Two ring in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $2,950, Tiffany T wire ring in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $1,700, and Tiffany T Two ring in 18-karat gold with pavé diamonds, $6,900, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com.


CALIBER RM 67-01 EXTRAFLAT

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN BAL HARBOUR BEVERLY HILLS BOSTON BUENOS AIRES LAS VEGAS MIAMI NEW YORK ST. BARTH TORONTO VANCOUVER www.richardmille.com


STYLE

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The Name’s Brown, Orlebar Brown This luxe British resort label is getting a decidedly debonair makeover.

DUJOUR.COM

clockwise from top:

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Orlebar Brown’s Diamonds Are Forever shirt; Thunderball swim shorts; Sean Connery in 1965’s Thunderball.

From the moment that Daniel Craig stretched out by the pool wearing a pair of baby blue Orlebar Brown swim trunks in Skyfall, a perfect partnership was born. Fast-forward to July 2018, and the union between these two juggernauts of British style was cemented in the form of a series of limited edition Bond swim shorts. Now, another year on, this collaboration has evolved into a full-range capsule collection. Featuring an expanded offering of swimwear as well as polo shirts, jackets, espadrilles, and one particularly iconic robe, all referencing outfits worn by some of the most indelible 007s in film history, Orlebar Brown’s new line manages to pay homage to this larger-thanlife character while creating a distinctly modern take on must-have summer styles. —JESSIE AJLUNI

Beatle Mania

Stella McCartney’s quirky new collection channels her rock ’n’ roll roots. One, two, three, four. Can I have a little more… of Stella McCartney’s latest collaboration, inspired by the classic Beatles film Yellow Submarine? With a series of prints designed around the legendary 1960s movie and slogans taken directly from some of the band’s most memorable songs, McCartney’s new pieces convey a psychedelic spirit that remains effortlessly chic and wearable. Items such as printed T-shirts with “All Together Now” written in multiple languages across the front and an eclectic reimagining of the Falabella Mini Tote Bag, featuring the brand’s logo merged with little cartoon submersibles, are just a couple of the new items that create a fantastical collection sure to be just as unforgettable as its animated counterpart. —JA

clockwise from above :

Stella McCartney’s Stars & Moon T-shirt; Lucy in the Sky shirt; Yellow Submarine-inspired Falabella bag.


Happy Birthday, Miss Sicily

In celebration of this groundbreaking bag’s first decade, Dolce & Gabbana releases two new evolutions. The year was 2009 when designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana launched what was to become one of the brand’s top-selling handbags, the Sicily. Now this coveted beauty is getting two stylish sisters in the forms of the Sicily 58 and Sicily 62, whose names were inspired by the designers’ birth years. Both new versions maintain the original Sicily’s elegant lines; however, the 58 features a classic external flap and back pocket component, while the 62 comes in the form of a shopper, with a central opening on either side of the bag. Crafted from the highest quality leathers in a kaleidoscope of color options, these new purses are sure to become as prominent as their predecessor. —JA

Barbour and the Belle This legacy label is teaming up with a stylish star for exciting new results.

Golden Hour

Look sharp all summer in these limited-run Roberto Cavalli frames. Finding the perfect sunglasses is difficult. Nabbing a pair not worn by millions of fashion enthusiasts? Almost impossible. But in May, Roberto Cavalli will release 150 pairs of golden shades—each inscribed with a numeral for utmost exclusivity—featuring the brand’s iconic snake pattern, baguette-cut Swarovski crystals, and a yellow and pink gold plate. Grab your pair now. —JA

Just in time for festival season, British heritage brand Barbour is partnering with indie fashion darling Alexa Chung’s namesake line, ALEXACHUNG, for a capsule collection of stylish outerwear, totes, and one particularly perfect-for-summer bucket hat. The collaboration comes naturally to Chung after a lifetime of wearing the brand, from riding through the rainy fields of Hampshire as a child to stomping through the mud-drenched fields of Glastonbury. “Some of my happiest memories have unfolded in a Barbour,” she says. “The smell of the wax alone makes me feel like I’m home. For me, Barbour has been part of my coming-of-age, and I am extraordinarily proud that it is now part of my future.” Coming in seven variations this June, each jacket is inspired by the Barbour archives. The Pip, for example, harks back to a nylon smock introduced in the 1970s—it’s the ideal piece of outerwear for festivals, dog walks, or rainy-day commutes to the office. —JA


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Okiku dress, $3,940, BROCK COLLECTION, modaoperandi .com.

Cindy flower jacquard bag, $890, THE VOLON, shopbop.com.

White feather drop earrings, $420, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, Oscar de la Renta boutiques.

Magda mule, $695, MALONE SOULIERS, malonesouliers.com.

A look from Givenchy’s Pre-Fall 2019 collection.

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Arya dress, price upon request, PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI, similar styles at preenbythornton bregazzi.com.

Divas’ Dream watch, $29,700, BULGARI, bulgari.com.

Green Lurex dress with pink feathers, $958, THE ATTICO, modaoperandi.com.

Hérons clips, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleef arpels.com.

Light blue slip dress, $169, SLEEPER, the-sleeper.com.

Feather-trimmed silk georgette skirt, $1,390, PRADA, net-aporter.com.

Birds of a Feather

From pretty plumes to stunning ornithological motifs, this season, designers are going exotic. BY JESSIE AJLUNI

Maharaja sandal, $1,200, ROGER VIVIER, rogervivier.com.


grand-seiko.com

Grand Seiko Boutique 439 ½ North Rodeo Drive Beverly Hills, CA 90210

Grand Seiko Boutique 510 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10022

Grand Seiko Boutique 130 NE 40th Street Miami, FL 33137


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T R AV E L Passport cover, $295, MARK CROSS, markcross.com.

Rebelle Rebelle low-back bodysuit, $124, CAMILLA, camilla.com.

Black Hole Sun crop top, $450, and Egyptian Conceptuality pant, $695, JOHANNA ORTIZ, modaoperandi.com.

Canyon necklace, price upon request, DAVID WEBB, davidwebb.com.

Leisure backpack, $3,995, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com.

Portofino pump, $725, JACQUEMUS, modaoperandi.com.

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Shanna duster, $108, GUESS, guess.com.

Formula 1004 rolling suitcase, $8,000, BERLUTI, berluti.com.

Women’s knit, $2,830, ETRO, Etro boutiques. Aviator 8 Chronograph 43 Curtiss Warhawk, $5,565, BREITLING, breitling.com.

Bohemian Rhapsody Formula 1004 rolling suitcase, $8,000, BERLUTI, berluti.com

Take a fashion journey with these global-inspired pieces. BY JESSIE AJLUNI

Embroidered peacock baguette handbag, $6,000, FENDI, fendi.com.

A look from Chanel’s 2019 Métiers d’Art runway show.


M O N D AY- F R I D AY 5 P M - C L O S E | S U N D AY 4 - 9 P M | 2 1 2 . 6 3 2 . 5 0 0 0


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An archival design of Van Cleef & Arpels’ Couscous watch; Perlée watch in coral and malachite; Perlée transformable necklace.

Three new jewelry collections from the renowned French jeweler Van Cleef & Arpels are a magnificent fireworks display of color, heritage, and innovation. BY AMY ELLIOTT

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Sparking Joy

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wo new Van Cleef & Arpels boutiques have opened recently in New York (Hudson Yards) and Boston (Newbury Street), ensuring ample opportunities to see some of the famed French jeweler’s extraordinary collections firsthand, should your summer travels take you to the Northeast. One unique feature of the Boston location is that it’s the first in the U.S. to house a Salon 1906, a curated showcase of the brand’s heritage and iconic jewels. Because to truly enjoy newly minted Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry with the appreciation of a seasoned collector, it pays to have an understanding of the company’s history. As CEO and president Nicolas Bos explains, “The maison is over 110 years old, so we always refer to our heritage and look through the archives for inspiration, but we bring a contemporary vision to our creations. It’s a question of balance between historical sources of inspiration and aesthetic or technical renewal.” The company’s newest collections ref lect this past-meetspresent point de vue with a compelling array of jewels, from stacking rings to museum-quality masterpieces. They’re set to start arriving in stores in early summer, bringing all the glamour—and color—you need for this season and beyond.

BEAD TIME One of the maison’s most enduring contemporary collections, Perlée is distinguished by tiny golden beads. The distinctive motif, in use since the 1920s, reached its fullest expression in the 1960s, when Van Cleef & Arpels’ Twist series (mainly torsade bracelets) came into vogue; the little gold beads also popped up on the famous four-leaf clovers of Alhambra, the company’s very chic answer to the flower power movement. Perlée launched in 2008, as Mad Men was heading to the peak of its popularity, prompting many heritage brands to consult their archives for inspiration. Over the years, the collection has expanded to pair the shimmering handworked beads with diamonds, lapis, malachite, and other gemstones. This summer, Van Cleef & Arpels welcomes several new additions to the Perlée range, including a long necklace featuring a pendant formed by three rings; one may be swapped with one of three different circles made of turquoise, coral, or onyx beads. For the first time, the maison is also introducing a series of Perlée timepieces. Play ful yet practical, the bracelet watches borrow several design elements from the Couscous watch (circa 1949), including a similar peekaboo mechanism and mushroom-cap shapes. All three Perlée watches conceal and reveal a mother-of-pearl and diamond dial, while the exterior adornments are available in all-diamond, malachite/coral, or lapis/diamond variations—the latter two would seem particularly suited to poolside looks, or as something to pack for that Mediterranean cruise.


MIST OPPORTUNITY In July, Van Cleef & Arpels will release its latest high jewelry designs, including Brume de Sapphir, which highlights variegated sapphires in light-as-air openwork settings. Available in two pastel-to-vivid color stories—lilac/pink and sky blue/cornf lower—each stone is intended to represent a droplet of water, as in a veil of mist. The cascading earrings and the drape of these bracelets and collars invoke the design vocabulary of Van Cleef & Arpels’ Palmyre collection from 1978. Named for an oasis in the Syrian desert, the pieces were composed of diamonds secured by four-claw rounded bezels and had a f luid quality, a subtle movement that made the jewels feel as supple as cloth, like a second skin. This gentle articulation is reprised in the new Brume de Sapphir creations, while the colored gems feel uniquely suited to the season. The blue sapphires alternately evoke underwater bubbles or undulating waves. Meanwhile, the pinks point to sunny landscapes, says Bos: “The pinkish gradation reminds you of the beauty of a sunset.”

Brume de Sapphir earrings and necklace.

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Brume de Sapphir rose bracelet.

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Rubis Kolam “between the finger” ring.

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Rubis Impérial transformable necklace; Rubis Berunda bracelet.

SCARLET FEVER Unveiled this spring in Bangkok and currently touring internationally, Treasure of Rubies encompasses 60 one-of-a-kind high jewelry pieces. More than 3,000 carats’ worth of rubies have been worked into the designs. “This is really a major first for the maison,” says Bos. “When we started to work on this collection a few years ago, we did not have certainty that we would be able to bring together enough rubies that met Van Cleef & Arpels’ stringent criteria. The challenge was high, as rubies are much soughtafter and often even rarer than diamonds. Because of that, it might be more and more difficult to create a comparable collection in the future.” As such, the sheer magnitude and caliber of the collection is an extraordinary opportunity for connoisseurs to invest in a part of what’s destined to become a history-making debut. (It’s also a chance to fete a very special July birthday girl with an unspeakably luxurious birthstone bauble.) “Ruby is probably the stone which is the most associated with Van Cleef & Arpels, in particular with our great historic Mystery Set pieces,” says Bos. Patented by the maison in 1933, this technique places tiny stones within a design without revealing any metal prongs or supports, creating a seamless, velvety wall-to-wall carpet effect. It’s perhaps the brand’s most recognizable signature. In Treasure of Rubies, the new Amour Sacré clip embraces a f loral theme, its heart-shaped petals accented with Mystery Set rubies paired with round brilliant white diamonds. Other Van Cleef & Arpels stylistic signatures are also represented, from a double-finger ring (a style beloved since the 1970s) to the collection’s many convertible jewels, like the Rubis Impériale transformable necklace that can be worn in variations of four, five, or nine rows of fiery ruby beads. ■


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Water World

Take the plunge into serious style with summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most alluring dive and regatta timepieces. BY ROBERTA NAAS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

FROM LEFT: Oyster Perpetual 36 in Oystersteel, $5,400, ROLEX, rolex.com for retail locations. Aquaracer Calibre 5, 41mm titanium case, carbon fiber details, 300-meter water-resistant, $4,050, TAG HEUER, tagheuer.com. Tambour Regatta Navy 44, $4,650, LOUIS VUITTON, select Louis Vuitton stores, 866-884-8866, louisvuitton.com. Seamaster Diver 300M, stainless steel and Sedna gold, $9,700, OMEGA, omegawatches.com and boutiques nationwide. Diver 42mm Blue Shark limited edition, $6,800, ULYSSE NARDIN, ulysse-nardin.com.


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EASY TO LOVE. HARD TO LEAVE.

THE BAKER HOUSE 1650 AND THE BAKER CARRIAGE HOUSE stand as the most exclusive Bed & Breakfast accommodations in the Hamptons — unsurpassed in sumptuous, yet casual luxury.

“THE MOST DISTINCTIVE B&B ON THE EAST END IS SO MIND BOGGLING GORGEOUS THAT IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE ANYONE IS ACTUALLY ALLOWED TO SLEEP HERE.” –Time Out New York

BAKERHOUSE1650.COM 181 Main Street, East Hampton, NY 11937, United States | 631.324.4081


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Candy Land

Cécile Guenat, designer of the Bonbon collection.

Earlier this year, Richard Mille unveiled a new collection of watches called Bonbon in an effort to sweeten the watch offerings on the luxury market and take the word delicious to a new level. BY ROBERTA NAAS

The RM 07-03 Automatic Marshmallow, from the Sweets series.

P O R T R A I T BY J A B U L A N I M A S E KO

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n a bold and daring move—something to which this independent Swiss watch brand is accustomed—Richard Mille recently revealed a delectable new line of watches geared toward women and men. Colorful, bright, and totally in the spirit of a child, the Bonbon collection consists of 10 models inspired by fanciful confections: gumballs, cupcakes, licorice, and other sweet delights. The talk of the show at the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie in Geneva earlier this year, Bonbon is all about embracing the things that delight us in life. Each watch is created using a broad spectrum of candy-inspired colors, including lemon yellow, lime green, marshmallow pink, citrus orange, and so many more hues. The collection was the brainchild of Cécile Guenat, artistic director for the brand. The daughter of Richard Mille co­ president Dominique Guenat, she first collaborated with the company in 2018, when she created the RM 71-01 Automatic Tourbillon Talisman. According to Guenat, it was her desire to bring the spirit of childhood to haute horlogerie using art and craftsmanship. “The idea was to revisit the existing collections while playing with color,” she says. “This allowed me to bring out a Pop-inspired sense of fun. In all, we developed a palette of 60 colors for this unisex collection.” Richard Mille, CEO of the eponymous firm, says that when Guenat brought the idea to him, he loved it immediately. Because the collection utilizes already existing watches and movements (iconic models such as the RM 07-03, RM 16-01, and RM 37-01), it was just a matter of using the brand’s extant artistic skills and expertise with materials and colors to execute the line. Make no mistake, though. This was no easy feat. Creating the spectrum of colors for each of the whimsical watches required a precise recipe that involved layering high-tech materials such as Carbon TPT (Thin Ply Technology) and Quartz TPT with graphic designs and bold colors. The collection even marks the debut of a new hue of turquoise not yet achieved in the technology. The design and development of the line took more than 18 months, and the resulting 10 different models were each created


Inside the RM 16-01 Automatic Réglisse, from the Sweets series.

Construction of the RM 07-03 Automatic Litchi.

DUJOUR.COM 45 A tiny licoriceinspired mold for the RM 16-01 Automatic Réglisse.

Miniature hand-painted titanium lollipops specially created for the Bonbon collection.

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in a limited edition of only 30 pieces. The Bonbon collection consists of a Fruit series and a Sweets series. The Fruit series visually emulates si x mar velous f lavors—lemon, strawberr y, blueberry, litchi, kiwi, and cherry—naturally created using colorcoordinated designs. The Sweets series recalls the cakes, marshmallows, lollipops, and other coveted candies of youth. To whip up the three-dimensional look of the watches, a total of 3,000 miniature sculptures made of hand-painted titanium were concocted and integrated into the designs. The colors were achieved through a variety of methods depending on the watch, including the art of Grand Feu enamel, acrylic, and lacquer painting. The brand’s master artisans also developed a unique sugarcoating effect using fine sand and powdered enamel for certain watch parts. A black chrome coating creates the licorice and other black textures. While the cases were crafted using tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia ceramic or Carbon TPT—depending on the model—the colors and accents were inspired by the individual confections: black licorice, gumballs, and more. The crowns on each of the watches echoes the sweet, such as a cupcake or swirled gelato, that is depicted on the movement parts, the case side colors, and dials. Richard Mille has even developed new colors of ceramic (including lavender pink and sky blue) for the bezels of certain watches. A pick from the “The watches are playful, colorful, and Fruit series: fun, yet totally respect the brand’s core values the RM 37-01 and non-compromising approach,” Mille Automatic Kiwi. says. “The demands on the painters were extraordinarily high, and everything has to look fabulous, even under the microscope. The team went so far as to even add visual sugarcoating on miniature sweets for realism. These timepieces are disruptive and daring on the outside, yet fully representative of very serious watchmaking skills on the inside. Most important for me is that these w at c he s m a ke p e ople smile immediately with childish, secret pleasure. That’s a wonderful thing for a watch to do.” As mentioned, each of these timepieces houses a highly complex R ichard Mille movement that has been specially decorated for this f lavorful collection. The watches retail from $122,500 to $158,000. ■


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Summer Splash

The botanicals infused into this season’s fragrances are as appealing as the scents themselves. Choose one and make it your warmweather statement. DUJOUR.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

47 SUMMER 2019 from top: Do Son eau de toilette with tuberose, orange blossom, and jasmine, $140, DIPTYQUE, diptyqueparis.com. Light Blue Sun Pour Femme eau de toilette with Granny Smith apple, bourbon vanilla, and coconut, $98, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.com. No. 4 Après l’Amour eau de parfum with lemon zest, amber, and musk, $175, THOMAS KOSMALA, thomaskosmala.com.


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A DAY IN THE LIFE

Mai Quynh BY KIM PEIFFER

P O R T R A I T BY J U N G K I M

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The celebrity makeup artist walks us through a day in her jet-setting shoes.


Makeup artist to the stars Mai Quynh is a beauty boss on the go. From perfecting the faces of Jessica Chastain, Elizabeth Olsen and Chloë Grace Moretz on the red carpet to serving as a complexion expert for beauty brand La Prairie, she makes makeup dreams come true worldwide. Below, a day in her crazy, travel-packed schedule.

La Prairie Skin Caviar Powder Foundation; La Prairie Powder Foundation Brush; La Prairie Skin Caviar Loose Powder.

9 p.m. When I’m getting ready for bed, I always do a good, thorough job of washing my face and removing all traces of makeup. I use La Prairie’s new cleansing balm—I love a balm because I can travel with it. It breaks down everything, even waterproof makeup, and when I wash it off, my skin is extremely hydrated and totally clean. I have to get my beauty rest, and after a long day working, I’m usually down for the count! ■

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9:30 a.m. Because of my freelance career, every day is totally different. My call times vary and could start as early as 4 a.m.! Or my client may not need me until closer to 6 p.m. Sometimes I’m on set all day on location—and this is when my skincare routine is really critical. If I’m outside, I need to make sure I have good, strong SPF protection (even if it’s cloudy), and I am loving La Prairie’s Cellular Swiss U V Protection Veil. Before I get to the sunscreen, I always start with my La Prairie Skin Caviar Essence-in-Lotion. This is an amazing preserum that prehydrates and treats my skin to make sure all my other products absorb and activate efficiently. Then I use the Skin Caviar Liquid Lift. I love this serum and its gravity-defying component—a lifting and firming effect. It’s like magic! After those products are applied, then I use my UV Veil. It’s SPF 50, goes on totally clear, absorbs easily into the skin, and is lightweight—and I know I’m being protected from both UVA and UVB, so I never have to worry about sun damage.

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8 a.m. Home from the gym, f irst things f irst: Gotta walk my 9-year-old terrier mutt, Ziggy. I rescued Ziggy when he was about a year old. He has a funny personality! He’s usually a little aloof with other dogs, he loves to chase squirrels, and he loves to eat (just like his mom!). Lucky for me, he’s patient and lets me finish at the gym before I walk and feed him.

8:30 a.m. Shower using my favorite products from Davines—I’m really into the Love shampoo and conditioner. They smell so fresh and make my hair so soft and shiny.

6 p.m. Depending on what time my workday ends, I love to go out to eat with my boyfriend. One of our favorite spots these days is Nightshade Downtown for the congee—it’s a traditional rice porridge from China that’s hard to find here. My friend [Top Chef winner Mei Lin] is the owner. Another place we love is Sushi Fumi in West Hollywood—it has interesting, fun, and exotic rolls. The sushi is so fresh and delicious. For a look that’s a little more special, I will amp up my own makeup routine and use a mix of La Prairie’s liquid and powder foundations. I’m especially loving the new Skin Caviar Powder Foundation for its luminous yet mattifying properties. The foundation is medium coverage but can be buildable depending on how my skin looks and feels. I apply the pressed powder with La Prairie’s Powder Foundation Brush—I like using the brush to apply the foundation, as it buffs the formula smoothly and naturally onto my skin, and I can also sculpt with it. I w ill of ten apply a little shimmer or sparkle to my eyes. I love Jill Stuart Beauty’s eye jellies: They are really light and easy and quick to apply, and offer a lot of shimmer.

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6 a.m. Coffee, always, first! I take it iced with almond milk, no matter what the outside temperature is: quicker caffeine into the bloodstream. Once I’m pepped, then I try to hit a class at the gym. My favorite is a workout with my amazing trainer, Paul Brian, at Pauly Solo Athletics in Beverly Hills. I love to use this opportunity to clear my mind and jump-start my day. Health and wellness are a top priority, and because I work in the beauty business, I’m so fortunate to always know what workouts are hot and trendy, and discover what works best for my body.

2 p.m. If I’m in-studio or popping in for a “do and go” with a client, I always keep my own skincare and makeup routine minimal. I will use La Prairie’s Skin Caviar Essence-inFoundation cushion compact, which is portable and offers just the right amount of coverage. I also make sure to carry the travel size of La Prairie’s Skin Cav iar Loose Powder for touch-ups on the go for a ny u n ne c e s s a r y s h i ne t h a t o c c u r s throughout the day. I curl my eyelashes with Surratt Beauty’s Relevée Lash Curler, and I use my favorite mascara by Clé De Peau: Perfect Lash Mascara in black. Everywhere I go, I have many, many lip balms. I never leave the house without them coming out of my purse, pocket, wallet, and car.


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Hair Tales

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Scalp health leads to gorgeous locks with these salon treatments.

Lifestyle changes and rises in stress levels often result in an inevitable thinning of hair, and the Mandarin Oriental in Barcelona (mandarinoriental.com) is catering to the needs of those with diminishing strands with the opening of the world’s first HairSpa Studio, which gives travelers the opportunity to treat their manes while on vacay. Offering exclusive hair and scalp services, such as Anti-Aging Hair Rituals, which begin with a scalp analysis using an iMicro camera, the studio will give guests the full 411 on their locks, including hair density and condition of scalp. Following the assessment, guests can choose from an array of treatments, including a scalp scrub. Can’t make it to Barcelona? New York City’s FourteenJay salon in Tribeca offers a similar approach (scalp camera included) and HairSpa marries hair health with the Studio in Barcelona’s perfect cut, color, and blowout Mandarin ( fourteenjay.com). —KIM PEIFFER Oriental.

The Fountain of Youth

The secret to youthful-looking skin is hidden in the Swiss mountains.

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o the Swiss have the secret to eternal youth? It appears that way. As the birthplace of high-end skincare lines including Valmont, La Mer, and La Prairie, Switzerland takes skincare seriously, so it comes as no surprise that some of the world’s most exclusive spas and wellness clinics lie within the country’s pristine mountain ranges. “The secret to Swiss skincare is rooted in the country’s pure water, which is rich in minerals and sourced from natural springs and lakes,” says Therese Martirena, spa director at Zurich’s famed Dolder Grand hotel. “Switzerland is also known for being efficient in production and using natural, high-qualit y ingredients for clean-beauty skincare.” The Dolder Grand Spa is magnificent, featuring 43,000 square feet of pamper-

clockwise from left :

The hammam at Gstaad Palace Spa; Dolder Grand hotel; the Snow Paradise room at Dolder Grand Spa.

MIST-IFYED Summer is upon us, and given the potential heat index, we’re pumped for facial mists in any and all varieties to cool us off and give us that dewy glow. Enter Bronty Beauty, a brand-new line of multipurpose, supercharged tonics and hydrators that shield skin from harmful pollutants. Each of the six cruelty-free tonics has its own benefits, but all are packed with low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid to nourish skin. Our favorite from the line is Refresh—a preand post-workout cooling spray with coconut and Tasmanian pepper leaf for an antioxidant boost. brontybeauty.com —KP

ing grounds, including multiple hydrotherapy pools and an ice room that actually snows inside. The hotel partners with luxury beauty brand Dr. Burgener to offer Dr. Pauline Burgener’s one-of-a-kind haute couture spa treatment, which includes a skin analysis sent off to her lab in Lausanne, where a team of Swiss derms create a personalized skincare treatment delivered straight to the guest’s home. The spa also boasts a fitness and body-composition analysis and a GenoType nutritional analysis that uses 90-plus pieces of personal information from the client to help them take back their diet. Over a few mountain ranges is Gstaad Palace, a celebrity haven where the spa is an oasis of relaxation, with specialty massages and facials. “We focus on 100 percent organic skincare and are the exclusive carrier of local alpine skincare brand Jardin des Monts,” says Estelle Gomes, manager at the Palace Spa . “ The products are sourced from the natural wonders of the charming Jardin des Monts chalet garden, located in the high Swiss mountain altitudes of Bernese Oberland. Blooming over 30 varietals of herbs, plants, and f lowers, each ingredient is plucked and processed by hand, prepared into skincare without preservatives.” —KP


The Longevity King

Dr. Richard Firshein is changing the landscape of your health with his innovative approach to medicine.

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BY KIM PEIFFER

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eated behind a majestic mahogany desk in his Upper East Side office, Dr. Richard Firshein sits with absolute perfect posture as he sifts through charts and papers that hold the answers to my past, present, and future state of wellness. As he meticulously makes his way through the results, he emphasizes repeatedly that his plan to get me into the healthiest version of myself involves a highly customized and ongoing program, as well as individualized testing, to determine why I am fatigued, get frequent headaches, and often feel foggy (among many other complaints). He runs me through a series of blood tests, then moves on to DNA testing and very thorough allergy testing. This is my plan, but it differs for everyone, and that is really his point when it comes to the field of medicine and optimization. His namesake practice, the Firshein Center, is an integrative and precision-based medical practice in which everything—from the testing to the long-term longevity plan—is custom. “I practice old-fashioned medicine with a high-tech approach,” he says with utmost precision. “My practice focuses on a holistic approach, which looks at your DNA, allergies, gut biome, hormones, toxicity, autoimmune conditions, and nutritional levels, to name a few.” His approach was inspired by his own life-threatening experience with his health. “Growing up, I suffered from severe food allergies and asthma that landed me in the hospital,” he says. “For many years, I was seen by doctors, prescribed medications, yet nothing was helping. No one was trying to dissect what was really wrong.” Things got a lot worse before they got better. A stint in intensive care was his aha moment that eventually led him to found his practice. “I was with friends [in the hospital], colleagues, doctors, but again, no one was able to do anything for me. I took about a year off to get off all of the medications I was prescribed at that time. At that point, I dedicated myself to finding a treatment for myself. If I was able to figure out my own health, I would be able to convey that knowledge to patients.” For him, the process of starting his center began with gaining an internal concept of creating a better way to think about medicine for others, based on his experience with going undiagnosed for so long. “Once I learned and understood what I was passionate about, I embarked on my journey and opened my own practice, the Firshein Center for Integrative Medicine, in 1991—my own version of what I call today precision-based medicine or ‘me medicine.’ ” How does a visit with him differ from those with the doctors you’ve been seeing your entire life? “Traditional medical practices generally work with a formula—you make a diagnosis and either that person needs a drug or they need to go for surgery, and there may be some follow-up care,” he says. “My practice offers patients a curated experience where we take a deep dive and look at all the

factors that each person may be dealing with. For example, looking at a patient’s gut biome, DNA, nutritional vitamin levels, hormones, allergies, and toxins they may have been exposed to. From there, we’ll put together a specific program for each individual.” Firshein also speaks to the importance of thinking about longterm health instead of putting a Band-Aid on current issues. “What we really should be talking about is health extension and then longevity. Although I use words like ‘antiaging’ or ‘detox,’ I really find them too narrow and often too negative. Most of my patients don’t want to just live longer if they can’t be healthy. So, I came up with the idea of health extension and longevity, or HEAL. And really, who doesn’t want to be HEALed? Because if we are to maintain our health, we need to extend our health and life span.” He warns that if doctors don’t customize their approach to each patient, they’re bound to miss issues. “We understand uniqueness and that everyone has specific differences—how we respond to our environment, the medical problems we’re prone to—and it really requires a deep understanding of all those factors to understand someone’s health,” he says. “We’re at a new frontier in medicine. We know that each person has a very unique set of genetic markers that determine the direction that their health will take, and we have the technology available to test these now.” ■

Dr. Richard Firshein, founder of the Firshein Center.


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Body Boost

Full-body cosmetic treatments are more popular than ever. Here’s how to get an all-over glow. BY KIM PEIFFER

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s more Americans dip their toes into the world of cosmetic rejuvenation, there seems to be a bit of an aha moment at play. According to a new report by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Americans spent more than $16.5 billion on cosmetic plastic surgery and minimally invasive procedures in 2018. And experts say that increasing numbers of patients are focusing on more than just their face. “Lately, the trend has been all about facial and lip fillers paired with facial and body contouring for an all-around more youthful, defined appearance that looks well balanced,” says Dr. Howard Sobel, dermatologist and founder of Sobel Skin in New York City. “The upper arms, abdomen, butt, and legs are major concerns

these days.” Manhat tan-ba sed der matolog ist Dr. Dendy Engelman agrees. “Antiaging does not stop with the face,” she says. “More and more people are focusing on youth-boosting treatments from head to toe.” Patients are realizing the importance of spending time and money on other telltale areas of the body that can be dead giveaways of aging (hands, neck, décolletage, legs) and taking action, asking their derms what they can do to create a more youthful appearance for the entire body. Among the most common complaints that patients bring to their doctors’ offices: leg veins; discoloration and age spots on arms, legs, and chest; and overall sagging skin. Below, we divulge your best bets for achieving that youthful glow on the rest of your body, broken down by skincare concern.

M A RC U S O H L S S O N / T R U N K A RC H I V E

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LEG VEINS

SAGG I N G S KI N

With age, your legs can fall victim to damage from hormones, childbirth, sun damage, standing too much, and, of course, genetics, Dr. Sobel says. “Leg veins are a constant worry. Many of our patients are looking for solutions to help address them.” It’s important to note that there are two types of leg veins: varicose veins and spider veins (you can have one without the other). Dr. Sobel says sclerotherapy, which has been around for quite some time, remains the gold standard when it comes to treating varicose veins. The procedure involves an injection of Aethoxysklerol directly into the veins. The solution irritates the lining of the blood vessel, causing it to collapse and stick together, and the blood to clot. Over time, the vessel turns into scar tissue that fades from view. When it comes to treating spider veins (which get their name from the weblike appearance of red or blue veins that often become visible on your legs as you age), Dr. Engelman recommends the Nd:YAG laser. “While sclerotherapy is more common, the smaller, f ine, reddish spider veins are harder to inject and respond best to laser treatment,” she says.

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CELLULITE

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“There is still no easy cure for cellulite,” Dr. Sobel says. “But a combination of skin-tightening laser, massage, and diet can help.” Sobel a lso uses f illers to smooth out some of the irregularities in the skin. For an easy cellulite solution you can have right in the comfort of your own home, Vargas recommends dry brushing. “Dry brushing increases circulation, which helps with cellulite, aids in lymphatic drainage, and exfoliates the skin,” she says. “Apply gentle pressure, brushing upward toward the heart.” Regardless of your cosmetic goals, many doctors agree that the best results will likely come from a mix of treatments that are customized to your specific problem areas, so talk to your derm about the best skincare plan for you. ■

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To treat these perennial aggravations, many are turning to Fraxel, the pioneer in fractional skin resurfacing. “In one treatment, you can diminish discoloration, improve sun damage, and improve the tone and texture of the skin,” Dr. Sobel says. “It is great for freckles on the face, chest, arms, and legs.” He also recommends use of the new cutting-edge PiQo4 laser for discoloration: “I can effectively treat individual spots on the body.” Treatment with Fraxel Restore Dual is very popular, and zaps and peels the dark pigment in your skin’s surface layer. Once the discolored cells absorb the heat from the laser, they temporarily darken, scab on the surface, and then f lake away. If you don’t have the downtime to spare after Fraxel (recovery can require anywhere from a day to a week, depending on treatment settings), there are less aggressive lasers, such as IPL (intense pulsed light) or the alexandrite lasers, that are not as intense, Dr. Engelman says. “Chemical peels on problem areas are also good for lightening superficial brown spots,” she says.

For that loose skin on the legs, arms, and chest, the Sublime skin-contouring laser combines bipolar radio frequency and light energies to precisely heat dermal tissue and stimulate collagen production. “The most exciting addition to my practice is the Emsculpt,” Dr. Sobel says. “For patients who are in good shape but want to look amazing, this technology is for them. It is the equivalent of doing 20,000 sit-ups in one treatment. You can have sculpted abs or lift your behind in two weeks. The newest addition to the Emsculpt is the attachment for the upper arms. Just in time for the summer, you can have definition in your arms.” If you’re not quite ready to go to a derm, you can achieve similar benefits at a spa when you’re already there for your favorite facial or massage. Many spas are adding full-body treatment options to facia ls. “Light-therapy facia ls and body treatments are known for reversing the signs of aging and damaged skin, so that’s a growing category for us,” says Joanna Vargas, celebrity facialist and founder of Joanna Vargas spas and skincare. The growing trend inspired Vargas to launch a new add-on body treatment called the Body Booster, in which the client slips on compression air boots during their facial. The boots are used to assist in lymphatic drainage to instantly detox and depuff the body. The treatment ($110) can be added to any facial at Vargas’ New York City salon.

AT-HOME MIRACLE WORKERS

Can’t make it to the derm? These products will help you get a leg up on the competition, either in tandem with treatments or all on their own. 1  Sunscreen Sunscreen is essential if you’ve had laser treatment anywhere on your body and to prevent future sun damage. Dr. Sobel recommends ample amounts of sun protection. DDF Weightless Defense Oil-Free Hydrator with Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 45, $55, ddfskincare.com 2  Multiuse Skincare Oil “During my pregnancy, I used Bio-Oil all over my body,” Dr. Engelman says. “Studies show that usage helps prevent stretch marks.” Bio-Oil Skincare Oil, $15 for 4.2 oz, amazon.com

3  Dry Brush Dry brushing boosts circulation, which helps minimize cellulite, assists in lymphatic drainage, and exfoliates skin, Vargas says. Joanna Vargas Ritual Brush, $30, joannavargas.com 4  Leg Concealer Concealer can be used to camouflage imperfections. “I like Dermablend Quick-Fix concealer—or Sally Hansen’s Airbrush Legs is good for larger areas,” Dr. Engelman says. Dermablend Quick-Fix Body Foundation Stick, $29, dermablend.com

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A DAY IN THE LIFE

Comedian Jordan Klepper

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While polishing his new Comedy Central docuseries, this Daily Show alum is taking advantage of every hour in the day—and making time to laugh.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y BY J U N G K I M

BY SETH WEITBERG

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quick look around Jordan Klepper’s Midtown Manhattan office tells you all you need to know about the man: an electric typewriter, a bar cart, original artwork by a friend, a Peabody Award. This is someone who prefers tactile experiences to efficient ones, and as a result, his perspective has been celebrated. It was no surprise during this photo shoot, when he tasked me with playing a ’60s psychedelic rock album on a cardboard record player. This is a performer whose talent for exploring the present is rooted in a passion for the past. But his reaction to digital progress isn’t without a purpose. “Technology ups the speed of what we can all ingest,” he says. “I think if we can slow it down and sit in something, we have the greater opportunity for revelation.”

Jordan Klepper in his New York City office.

Full disclosure: I’ve been friends with Jordan for 16 years. He’s always been a tall drink of water with a puff of well-coiffed hair, directed by a moral compass that unfailingly points to Michigan nice, playing the egotistical dummy for show. Klepper came up on the legendary comedy stages of Chicago before becoming a national figure as a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. He soon found himself behind his own late-night desk, portraying an alt-right newsman on The Opposition. Now he’s back out in the field for his new Comedy Central docuseries, Klepper, exploring not just what Americans are angry about, but what they’re fighting for. “The more time you spend with people, the harder it is to put them in a box,” Klepper opines. He claims this is a point of view he’s discovered over time; I’d argue that knowing it innately has always been the secret to his success.


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When a Polaroid camera appeared during the photo shoot, his eyes predictably lit up. “That’s what it should be! Wait for it, and get your moment.” In a world in which most content is disposable, Klepper still wants to do work that deserves permanence. Here’s a look at his day, in his own words, as he prepares his new show for your screens. 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. A regular day when I’m on the road filming involves waking up in a Hilton Garden Inn in Texas/Georgia/Arizona/Texas/Michigan (but probably Texas) and eating a 76-egg omelet before getting swept into a whirlwind of interviews and activities that are totally different every day. Sometimes I’m in a ring with veterans who are battling PTSD through professional wrestling; other days I’m on a bike ride with open carry activists cycling with AR15s. They are strange days that usually end by watching footage in the director of photography’s hotel room, drinking beer, and eating delivery from the best Indian restaurant in Temple, Texas. But luckily, filming only lasts so long. As we near the launch of our show, I’m back in New York grinding out the final cuts:

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7:15 a.m. I’m up. No alarm clock, just anxiety. It never runs out of batteries. I try not to check my phone. My goal is for the first idea of the day to be internal and not belong to a pundit on Slate. 7:30 a.m. I’m carefully crafting my morning pour-over coffee, a process that I’ve miraculously transformed from what’s normally a three-minute activity to a full 10. Simultaneously, I’m scrolling through news stories to get my juices flowing and catching up on network emails about the show’s launch. The free-spirited artist in me has always been excited by integrated corporate brand rollout strategy. 8:40 a.m. I listen to the New York Times’ “The Daily” podcast to get a quick deep dive into today’s headline news. My meditation app dings on my phone—I will get to it tomorrow. They say you should meditate every day to stay calm and focused. I say screw them…and something else that I can’t remember. 9:50 a.m. I walk to work, which is a great way to collect my thoughts and watch sightseeing guides prey on tourists who don’t know the protocol for getting to the top of the Empire State Building. 10:20 a.m. Check-ins with everyone around the office to get all the balls in the air. I talk to executive producer Kim Gamble about our edit delivery schedule, writer Russ Armstrong about an upcoming bit we’re doing on The Daily Show, and then executive producer Stu Miller to see if we’ve locked in plans for me to pal around with a certain presidential candidate on the trail this week. 11:15 a.m. I head across the street to our edit bays and bounce among work on three different episodes. We have a final cut due today on a piece covering Texas gun protests and a rough cut of a story on America’s current role in the space race due tomorrow, and we are three days out on sending the network its first look at a story about the implications of legalizing marijuana in California. Guns, space, and weed: I’ve got myself a cable television programming bingo.

from top:

Klepper interviewing veteran Roberto Reyes in Texas; filming in Hawaii with director of photography Joel Sadler; strategizing in New York City.

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MEETING DEADLINES FOR EDITS IS ALWAYS A SPRINT. IT’S A SLOG, BUT DAMN IS IT FUN.

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1:45 p.m. Lunch. I escape the edit bays and grab a chicken shawarma sandwich from Omar’s up the street. 2:20 p.m. I text my wife a picture of an adorable Brussels griffon dressed like an accountant. This is how you keep a marriage working. 3:30 p.m. I need to punch up the jokes in the voice-over for our marijuana story. Luckily, weed puns are layups. But maybe I’m wrong and this whole story will go up in smoke. 3:45 p.m. Afternoon coffee run to Culture Espresso. Best chocolate chip cookie in New York. Test me. 5:30 p.m. This is my least favorite part of the day—I have to kill babies. That’s the industry term for cutting the things you love, which usually happens about this time of day. We’re three minutes long in the cut, and as much as a tangential bit I filmed in a Hawaiian Mars habitat makes me laugh, it’s got to go.

8:30 p.m. Tonight is a late one. Meeting deadlines for edits is always a sprint, cramped in small rooms, eating old Pret A Manger sandwiches, and arguing over minutiae. It’s a slog, but damn is it fun. You have all these stories that you have to build up and break down and build up, over and over again. I’m lucky I have an incredible staff that stays late and works hard. I’d name them if I wasn’t so selfish and deserving of all the credit. 10:30 p.m. I’m with my wife at home, where we talk about the important things, like dog accountants and her insistence that we watch Terrace House, a Japanese reality show that she is obsessed with. I pour myself a bourbon and get ready to read some subtitles. 11:30 p.m. I do some light reading in preparation to interview the Clintons in a few weeks. Did you know former President Bill Clinton’s autobiography is 3,000 pages long? Tonight I make a two-paragraph dent, and then lights out. ■

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Klepper reviews notes for his Comedy Central docuseries.


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The British Have Come

Restaurateurs from the United Kingdom are flocking stateside to open new restaurants.

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BY NATASHA WOLFF

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ecades ago, Britain—and London in particular—wasn’t known as a foodie destination. But over the past 10 years, things have changed on the U.K. food scene. Now, New York City is the beneficiary of this culinary evolution, excitement, and recent global expansion. This year, four British imports between Midtown and downtown Manhattan are garnering a lot of attention from aficionados far and wide. Whether classical European/British or Asian fusion cuisine, there is a restaurant for everyone’s taste. Bluebird London recently opened at the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle and Queensyard at Hudson Yards, both serving up English-tinged fare, while Wild Ink (also at Hudson Yards) offers an East-meets-West menu. The hotly anticipated British steakhouse favorite Hawksmoor is set to debut stateside this fall in the historic United Charities Building in Gramercy. Its cofounder and CEO, Will Beckett, has been trying to bring the restaurant and cocktail bar to New York since 2014 (there are eight locations in the U.K.). “We’ve had a love affair with the city for well over a decade now...as tourists, then as restaurateurs looking for inspiration, and now as people who spend a lot of time here,” Beckett says. “The idea that in a few months we’ll be a part of what makes the city’s restaurant scene tick is really exciting for us.” Bogdan Danila, executive chef at Queensyard and Bluebird, both operated by London-based restaurant group D&D, thinks

clockwise from top:

Queensyard overlooks Hudson Yards’ famous Vessel; the interior of the restaurant; the Fab! cocktail, featuring vodka, prosecco, lavender, and elderflower; Eton mess, with wild strawberries and verjuice sorbet.

“there is a need in the New York market for sexy British restaurants with great food, service, and also a bar scene. New Yorkers, in my opinion, love the European restaurant vibe; however, the majority of the great restaurants here are French or Italian.” At Bluebird, an offshoot of a beloved King’s Road eatery in London, classic dishes like Dover sole (flown in daily), beef Wellington (an elegant substitute for a classic roast), and London gin-cured salmon (from Nova Scotia) get a modern spin. Queensyard’s desserts include English favorites like sticky toffee pudding, Jammy Dodgers (shortbread filled with jam), and Eton mess (a trifle). Wild Ink, from U.K.-based restaurant group Rhubarb, is Asian-inspired but ever evolving thanks to its innovative chefs, who are constantly traveling and concocting new f lavor profiles. Sharing is strongly encouraged with such crowd-pleasers as shrimp and bacon siu mai, lobster and shrimp har gow, a braised short rib for two, and Japanese risotto.


WILD INK, HUDSON YARDS

HAWKSMOOR, GRAMERCY clockwise from above :

Hawksmoor’s Sunday sharing roast, with potatoes, carrots, greens, Yorkshire puddings, and roasted shallots and garlic; lobster; the chocolateand-hazelnut Ambassador’s Reception dessert.

Hospitality group D&D is known for opening restaurants in up-and-coming neighborhoods like Kings Cross and Battersea Power Station in London, so the new development of Hudson Yards made sense. “I felt, particularly in the context of Brexit, that our business was too focused on London and the U.K.,” says D&D’s chairman, Des Gunewardena, who was considering expansion overseas when real estate developer Related approached him about Hudson Yards. “We were enormously excited about the project’s boldness and scale.” With cultural attractions, a hotel, shopping, and bustling offices, Hudson Yards is busy day and night, making it an ideal hub for good restaurant offerings—as is Time Warner Center, while an older development. “We had looked at many sites in New York over several years but felt that Hudson Yards is incomparable,” says Rhubarb CEO P.B. Jacobse. The 1893 Gramercy building with 30-foot ceilings that will house Hawksmoor is being reimagined by British design and architecture studio Macaulay Sinclair. “We’re putting a lot of time and money into trying to restore it to its rightful state and building a restaurant in it that is sensitive to its surroundings,” Beckett says. The menu will be similar to those of its U.K. counterparts, but with a twist. Beckett’s team has been meeting with cattle ranchers in the U.S. who are doing innovative things and don’t sell to many New York restaurants. “That’s what we love—finding the best ingredients and cooking them simply but perfectly.” Clearly, these restaurateurs are coming to New York City to do just that. ■

clockwise from top: The Wild Ink main dining room; a lazy Susan featuring snow crab rangoon, yellowfin tuna, hamachi crudo, and English breakfast dim sum; executive chef Peter Jin.

BLUEBIRD, COLUMBUS CIRCLE

clockwise from above : The bar at Bluebird; Maine scallop crudo; lobster chawanmushi, with bonito jelly, radish, and spring onion salad.


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The Entertaining Empress Style and business maven Claire Olshan is setting the standards for snacking (and throwing a party). BY JESSIE AJLUNI PHOTOGRAPHY BY DELLA BASS

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o say that entrepreneur Claire Olshan has accomplished a lot in her life would be an understatement. She was 24 years old when she launched her first company, the successful luxury retail space Fivestory, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in 2010. Nine years later, with both a marriage and baby under her belt, she is embarking on her latest endeavor, a surrealist-inspired snack and lifestyle brand called Dada Daily. “After I got married and life got quieter,” she recalls, “I was just kind of listening to myself and searching for what really excited me in the morning, and that was this fascination with food and health consciousness. So I got my degree in integrative nutrition, and I started building this lifelong-dream company that bridged all my passions.” Those interests in food, art, and entertaining led to the formation of the idea behind the business. “To me, Dadaism is the

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most interesting art movement theoretically. I loved how they stripped down all the rules that came before them and created art that challenged people and made them think. I wanted Dada [Daily] to do that for the health food industry.” With snacks like crispy almond butter brussels sprouts, hot turmeric cabbage petals, and matcha latte– and Schisandra chocolate–flavored truffles, Olshan has created an elevated curation of edibles not only for the health-conscious customer, but also for the lover of a certain type of indulgent maximalism previously unknown to the casual noshing newbies. “We really wanted to change the culture around snacking; the word has this connotation of being taboo,” Olshan says. “At Dada, we think it is a choice, like any other in a day. It’s like picking out the clothes you wear, the shampoo you use, or the restaurant you go to at night. We feel you should be so proud of the snacks that you bring them to a dinner party instead of a bottle of wine. That’s not a faux pas. If it’s so chic and so good for you, then serve it as an hors d’oeuvre or dessert.” The packaging itself plays a major factor in what enhances the brand from basic bites to ideal host gifts. The look is an expression original to Olshan, a mix of hyper-conceptual visuals and decadent accents that combine to create a distinctly unique finish that is sure to speak to her stylish clientele. That is Olshan’s greatest gift: her ability to engage with the fashionable elite of Generation Y and give them the products that they want with an aesthetic to match. She recalls a moment recently when she was referred to as the millennial Martha Stewart and responded, “That’s what I want to be. I want to teach people that it’s really easy to create beauty in their life. I want to bring ease and joy into those daily moments.” Just like Stewart, Olshan is evolving Dada Daily into a full-service lifestyle brand. “We really wanted to create this whole dinner party moment, where you serve Dada as an hors d’oeuvre, you have our napkin rings, place cards, and candle. It’s called a dinner party hack set because it’s easy to create a beautiful and ceremonial moment around food, and I think people overthink that. So we wanted to create a really simple how-to experience.” The appeal of Dada Daily is Olshan’s authenticity. One glance around her stunning home, and you see elements of the company’s style everywhere, from a gorgeous brass melting clock coffee-table accent to an eclectic wooden hand-shaped chair in the corner. Olshan lives and breathes the Dada lifestyle; she is the embodiment of her customer. Like a stylish best friend you always turn to for advice, the Dada patron turns to her. ■

F LO R A L A R R A N G E M E N T S BY I V I E J OY F LO W E R S

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from far left : Claire Olshan, founder of Dada Daily; the interior of Olshan’s home.

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• It’s really fun to make centerpieces edible. I like to arrange dips around so that people are continuously eating. It creates a casual nature for the dinner party that is less formal and restrictive. • I never serve one dessert course. I find that it feels like an abrupt end to a meal. I prefer things to last as long as possible. So I always buy a bunch of exotic dark chocolates and crack them up and

clockwise from above left :

Olshan’s own wooden hand chair; the Dada Head acrylic serving tray, with truffles; a Dada Hand Candle alight; hot turmeric cabbage chips.

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• I always overbuy the ingredients for a dinner and then place them as the centerpiece of the table. For example, using artichokes or brussels sprouts in the meal as well as within the tablescape.

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CLAIRE’S PARTY TIPS

A napkin ring from the Ta-Dada Dinner Party Set.

put them in the middle of the table with nuts and dried fruit so that people can just sit, eat, and linger. Obviously, the Dada Daily chocolates are perfect for that. • To get inspiration for decorating your home, I think you should look to places besides an interior magazine. If you just sit researching decor references all day long, you’ll end up being pulled in a hundred different directions. Find other things—like favorite songs, movies, or cultural areas—that you gravitate toward, and ask, “Why do I like it?” Once you discover that language, then you go down the design road and bring in the magazines.


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Smashing Spirits

Distilled to their very essence, these fruit-forward summer cocktails are composed of premium liqueurs, seasonal ingredients, and delectable homemade simple syrups. Read on for the recipes so you can throw a bash of your own. RECIPES AND STYLING BY FRANCES BOSWELL

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID PRINCE

Slim Profile to the Wind MAKES 1 DRINK

Combine all ingredients except for the basil in a cocktail shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass filled with ice and serve with holy basil.

FINGER LIME SYRUP Peels of 2 finger limes (fresh yuzu or regular limes can be substituted) ½ cup sugar ½ cup water Combine lime peels, sugar, and water in a small saucepan. Set over high heat and bring to a boil. Cook, swirling pan, until sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and cool. Strain syrup, pressing down on peels. Refrigerate until needed.

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

1 ½ ounces gin, such as Nikka Coffey Gin ½ ounce Green Chartreuse ¼ ounce St-Germain Juice and pulp of ½ small finger lime (should be about ¾ ounce juice) ½ ounce Finger Lime Syrup (see recipe at right) ½ ounce celery juice Pinch salt Pinch Madagascar peppercorns 2 dashes celery bitters 1 sprig holy basil


Alternative Facts MAKES 1 DRINK

2 ounces Lillet Rosé ½ ounce vodka ¾ ounce blood orange juice ¼ ounce lime juice 1 ounce Beaumes-de-Venise 1 small sprig rosemary 1 large sprig mint 2 culinary-use rose petals (or one drop rose water) 1 orange twist Combine all the ingredients except for orange twist in a cocktail shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass filled with ice. Twist orange over drink to release oil, and serve.

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GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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Prenup MAKES 2 DRINKS

3 ounces fino sherry 3 ounces dry vermouth 1 tablespoon Hibiscus Simple Syrup (see recipe below) 6 Luxardo cocktail cherries and a little juice 4 dashes orange bitters Combine all ingredients except cherries in a tall glass filled with ice. Strain mixture into two cocktail glasses. Add ice and cherries.

Combine hibiscus flowers, sugar, and water in a small saucepan. Set over high heat and bring to a boil. Cook, swirling pan, until sugar dissolves and liquid is bright pink. Remove from heat and cool. Strain syrup and discard flowers. Refrigerate until needed.

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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HIBISCUS SIMPLE SYRUP 2 dried hibiscus flowers ½ cup sugar ½ cup water


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MAKES 1 DRINK

½ teaspoon demerara sugar, a pinch more to taste Juice of ¼ ruby red grapefruit and 1 strip of grapefruit peel 2 dashes orange bitters 2 ½ ounces Makrut-Infused Rye Whiskey (see recipe below) 1 piece dried wild mountain sage Combine sugar, grapefruit peel, and bitters in a glass, and muddle. Fill glass with ice, add whiskey and grapefruit juice, and stir until the drink is ice cold. Serve with flamed sage (pass the edges through the flame from a small torch for a few seconds to slightly brown the edges).

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

MAKRUT-INFUSED RYE WHISKEY ½ makrut lime 750 ml rye whiskey In a jar fitted with a lid, combine makrut and rye. Cover tightly and store in a dark place for at least four days, up to two weeks. Strain and store in a sealed bottle or jar until ready to use.

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On the Waterfront

Floating villas with 360-degree views could be the future of housing.

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BY MARCELLE SUSSMAN FISCHLER

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f Arkup’s new $5.9 million avant-garde “livable yacht” is any indication, luxury floating villas may someday replace waterfront condos as the way to savor incredible marine views with nary a concern for sea rise. The first off-grid floating villa—a 75-foot-long, two-story, next-generation houseboat—combines the features of a yacht and a f loating residence with the form and function of a coastal mansion, down to the kitchen’s quartz-topped center island, the master bedroom’s private balcony, and a composite deck with a natural hardwood look and glass railings. During its February debut, the villa was surrounded by the calm waters of Miami’s Biscayne Bay. “We want to provide the feeling that you are in a luxury house or waterfront villa—the stability, safety, and comfort of the house—with the view of being on the water,” says Nicolas Derouin, Arkup’s managing director. Glass walls and sliding glass doors stretch from f loor to ceiling. Closets abound. Bathrooms “are big as in a villa or a house, not as in a yacht.” Since the villa’s height is adjustable, sea level rise isn’t an issue. When the wind whips up, four spud-like legs use an automatic hydraulic system to drill down into riverbeds or harbor bottoms, creating a stable foundation in up to 20 feet of water. The 4,350-square-foot houseboat is simultaneously raised out of the way of storm surge and f looding. The vessel can be as stable as a home on land amid 155 mph Category 4 hurricane winds.


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Arkup’s first off-grid floating villa; inside the livable yacht, surrounded by Biscayne Bay; the home’s contemporary furnishings are by luxury Brazilian brand Artefacto.

ONCE YOU ARE IN THE HOUSE, IT IS EXACTLY THE SAME, LIKE A NORMAL HOUSE. YOU DON’T FEEL ANY MOVEMENT.

Rooftop solar panels provide ample power for lights, air-conditioning, and a state-of-the-art kitchen, as well as electric propulsion to soundlessly cruise 20 miles along estuaries or coastlines on a single charge. “You can move the boat wherever you want, so you can change your view, change your neighbors,” Derouin says. The sustainable vessel also has systems for harvesting and purifying rainwater. Koen Olthuis, an architect who founded the firm Waterstudio.NL, has built more than 150 floating residences in the last 15 years, including a neighborhood of buoyant villas with terraces in the Netherlands, before partnering with Arkup, combining Dutch technology with Arkup’s newfangled spud foundation system that enhances stability and banishes seasickness. While yachts use the space in the hull, the new houseboat is built on top. “This is like building on land, but it’s on a f loating foundation,” Olthuis explains. “Once you are in the house, it is exactly the same, like a normal house. You don’t feel any movement.”

On the outside, the four-bedroom, four-and-a-half-bath hybrid has a yacht’s white fiberglass composite cladding and maintenancefree Brazilian hardwood trim that’s also suited to a contemporary abode. Modern gray and beige furnishings by Artefacto, the luxury Brazilian furnishings brand, seamlessly bridge the home’s indoor and outdoor spaces. Although Arkup’s first non-rocking, liftable floating villa is “a toy for billionaires,” Derouin says it ultimately opens doors to initiate more affordable housing solutions and develop real estate on the water in a sustainable way, “not just a unit that would be sold alone to one buyer.” Having worked with urban planners and government officials from Europe to the Maldives, Olthuis foresees marinas, harbors, and abandoned areas of coastal cities transformed with floating restaurants, ecoresorts, shops, and museums. Arkup’s spud system will make it possible to build a 20- to 25-story floating apartment building. “It will just touch the ground a little bit—a little stability, and you can go up,” the architect says. “This kind of thing will happen in cities all around the world.” ■


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ear windows don’t generally get called out too often in supercar reviews, and certainly not for their providence of any sort of view rearward, but the little rear window of the new McLaren 720S Spider is not only larger than most, but, unlike that of its coupe counterpart, it also rolls down just like the side windows, even getting its own switch between the seats next to the one that makes the roof itself silently disappear beneath the rear deck in just 11 seconds. Thanks to that “rear drop glass,” as McLaren calls it, I am unable to report on the various nuances of the Spider’s uniquely tuned optional 12-speaker Bowers & Wilkins audio system. I’m quite sure it’s lovely, and had McLaren left its gorgeous, shimmering teal roadster with me for more a few additional days (or years), I’d surely get around to listening to it. But, alas, I returned having switched on the audio system once. Maybe. No regrets, though. My music would be there later; I had only a few days to savor the twin-turbo V-8’s clear, baritone voice, crooning a repertoire ranging from prickly pulsations at idle to a full banshee wail near its 7,000 rpm power peak. Its rorty tones rise and fall in concert with my right foot while wispy swirls from the turbos whoosh in the background, with periods of spirited driving punctuated by an occasional firecracker “bang!” during downshifts, especially after twisting a dial on the dash to activate the separate Sport or Track settings for the engine and suspension.

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The textured and dynamic and highly addictive sounds of the 720S’s mellifluous, high-revving 710-horsepower V-8 are intense enough with all windows sealed, given that the only things standing between it and your ears are the rear cabin wall and that vestigial rear window. Drop said glass, and all that character and energy is effectively mainlined directly into your cerebellum. You get the point: It sounds good. And being both a supercar and a convertible, the 720S Spider can overload most of your other senses, too, with explosive acceleration, face-bending cornering grip, and brakes strong enough to dislodge your eyeballs from their sockets. Admittedly, those same words could be used to fairly describe the 720S Spider’s primary competition, namely the Ferrari 488 Spider and the Lamborghini Huracán Spyder, and while the McLaren boasts a nearly 200-pound weight advantage over its lightest Italian counterpart, when the slowest among them hits 60 mph in 3.1 seconds—the 720S gets there in 2.8, says McLaren—the statistical differences are purely academic. They’re all thrilling. What makes the beautiful, sparkling $411,300 roadster by an esoteric British race car company so strikingly different—and worth featuring in DuJour—is its clarity of purpose. The 720S is the superlative supercar, a lean, fastidiously engineered instrument of speed: nothing sentimental, nothing evocative of anything else, no superfluous frippery. This is particularly apparent inside the 720S’s cabin, which, like those of other McLarens, is rather narrow, set within a carbon fiber tub structure that McLaren leaves exposed on the door sills. Very sexy. Getting in requires some practice, but McLaren points

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The 2019 McLaren 720S Spider in Belize Blue.

McLaren’s Superlative Supercar

Lean and meticulously engineered, the new 720S Spider is as purposeful as it is sexy. BY STEVE SILER

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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Motorsports fans are familiar with the late, great Bruce McLaren and the McLaren brand, with its remarkable bona fides as Great Britain’s preeminent builder of Formula 1 race cars, but most other folks don’t know Bruce McLaren from Bruce Almighty. Founded by New Zealand–born racer Bruce McLaren, who tragically passed away in a car accident in 1970 after assembling his own successful racing team in the early 1960s, McLaren has manufactured vehicles that have, for the vast majority of the company’s existence,

featured a seating capacity of one and been illegal for street use. McLaren did build about 100 of its 240 mph, three-seat F1 supercars in the mid-’90s and partnered with Mercedes-Benz to produce the SLR McLaren a decade later. Only in 2011 did McLaren go all in with street-legal supercars, but it now offers a range of products, including Sport Series cars like the 570S, starting at about $200K; Super Series products like the 720S, from around $300K; and Ultimate Series cars, such as the new $837,000 Senna hybrid hypercar.

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farther back, a really active rear spoiler not only rises and lowers to optimize aerodynamics but also pops up during moderate to hard braking to enhance stability, its angle of attack commensurate with how firmly one is braking. My personal favorite innovation is the side engine air intakes, which are hidden behind what appear to be separate outer door skins, thus eliminating the unsightly holes on the body sides of most mid-engine supercars. Each intake is fed by a groove in the body that starts about eight feet forward, at the leading edge of the frunk, rising over the front fenders before dipping down deep into the body aft of the door, an arrangement that also creates a nice, clean hiding place for the electric door switches. As for the feature that gleaned the most smiles from the crowds? Clearly the 720S’s upward-swinging dihedral synchrohelix actuation doors, which are not only fun to watch but also fun to operate, and are better than you might expect in tight parking spaces. And, yes, they’re exactly the sort of furnishing that helps elevate mere sports cars into proper supercars. And to that end, the 720S is superlative. ■

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out that the tub is cut low near the front to make it easier for passengers, particularly those wearing skirts, to swing their legs in. The interior decor is remarkably stylish—indeed, it’s the first McLaren interior I’d consider a truly designer space. The dashboard’s harmonious forms and textures stand in stark contrast to the Ferrari’s frenetic arrangement of switchgear and satellite pods and are delightfully free of oppressive visual themes, like the overpowering hexagons that attempt to conceal the Lamborghini’s many Audi-sourced components. Even when dolled up in the Luxury trim’s fragrant, butter-soft, hand-stitched leather and copious other sybaritic delights, the 720S Spider feels like a supercar first and a luxury car/design statement/anything else after that. The steering wheel, for example, is an elegant, thin-rimmed, flat-bottomed sculpture utterly devoid of switches, dials, or controls for anything other than the horn. Sure, it requires the driver to reach a few inches to the comprehensive eight-inch portraitoriented infotainment system to change the volume or radio station (had I turned it on) and f lick the feathery stalks sprouting from the steering column to engage cruise control or cycle through the gauge cluster displays, but I didn’t miss them. Speaking of gauges, not only are there reconfigurable displays, but the entire module also motors down and away at the touch of a button to minimize distraction, leaving a simple readout of engine rpm, current gear selection, and speed. Outside the car, the 720S Spider does anything but minimize distraction. Low and extremely wide, the 720S is wrapped in sculptural carbon fiber bodywork that seduces the eye like the flowing robes of ancient Greek statues, only with lessons learned during McLaren’s 60-year history in racing, so these robes can travel 212 mph, according to McLaren—or 202 with the top down. Set within the bodywork are so many ducts and grilles and scoops and vents channeling air to the various places it’s needed, it might look like Swiss cheese were it not for McLaren’s talented designers. But especially in the pearly turquoise hue that McLaren calls Belize Blue, the 720S Spider strikes a rare balance between aerodynamic proficiency and loin-stirring emotion. The 720S draws a crowd pretty much everywhere it goes, so I learned quickly to point out its many clever design touches, starting with front turn signals that strike through the darkened triangles that also contain the LED headlamps and small radiators behind them. A modestly sized “frunk” is located in the nose, supplemented by another shallow cargo space under the rear deck lid atop the engine that can hold another two cubic feet of really flat things that hopefully aren’t chocolate. Flanking the special-order gloss carbon fiber engine cover—one of many such accessories that elevated the price of our tester from the $315K base cost to $411,300—are see-through aero buttresses that make the rear view through that little rear window a bit more expansive, while


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Miami Nice

Outdoor furnishings are getting a major South Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;style face-lift. From clean lines and geometric shapes to pops of pastels, these colorful pieces will elevate your home and garden. BY JESSIE AJLUNI

Captain armchair in gold, $540, BEND GOODS, available by special order at abchome.com.

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Agra outdoor rug in aqua/multi, $40 to $685, ONE KINGS LANE, onekingslane.com.

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Globe flowerpot, $42 to $180, AYTM, modaoperandi.com.

Dundee citronella candle, $30, CRATE AND BARREL, crateandbarrel.com.

Dip bench, $10,300, and Double Dip bench, $10,827, B&B ITALIA, bebitalia.com.

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Zag end table by Toni Grilo, $1,115, ROCHE BOBOIS, roche-bobois.com.


A pastel palette in Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South Beach.

Architectural outdoor speaker by Sonance, $799 for pair, SONOS, sonos.com.

Outdoor Gregg lamp by Ludovica and Roberto Palomba, $413 to $745, FOSCARINI, suiteny.com.

Ojai round fire table, $4,196, RESTORATION HARDWARE, rh.com.

Kew outdoor cushions, color 159, in size 16x16, $268, and color 170, in size 24x24, $399, MISSONI HOME, Missoni Home New York Showroom, 212-719-2338.

Bitta daybed, $9,752, KETTAL, casadesigngroup.com.


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Njideka Akunyili Crosby And We Begin to Let Go (2013).

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Artistry Afloat

The 58th Venice Biennale captures the zeitgeist of our contemporary era. BY MEGHAN WATSON-DONALD

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one wanted to travel overnight to somewhere incomparable, to a fantastic mutation of normal reality, where did one go? Why, the answer was obvious.” —Thomas Mann, Death in Venice Perhaps it’s the light. Reflecting everywhere in shimmering, stippled brilliance off the cerulean blue of canals, lagoons, and occasional open expanses of the Adriatic. Casting its glow over the ornate splendor of palazzi fronting the labyrinthine waterways, marble balconies f lanked with carved lions and bursting with f lowers, the domed cupolas of San Marco dominating the skyline like a crown. Or is it the fact that no matter how many times you visit, you can always get lost, finding yourself in some forgotten corner of the city with


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only the sound of water lapping up against pavement underfoot, the hubbub of the crowds receding like a distant echo. Despite the maddening tourist hordes snapping selfies at the Bridge of Sighs, Venice will always be a magical place. But Venice is more than a time warp, a sinking, centuries-old monument to human artistic achievement. Every two years, it plays host to the most important event on the international contemporary art calendar—the Venice Biennale d’Arte. While biennials have proliferated in recent years as interest in contemporary art has gone viral, few would dispute that the Venice Biennale reigns supreme. Founded in 1895 to mark the silver anniversary of the accession of King Umberto I and his consort, Margherita of Savoy, the Venice Biennale has become a world fair for the art world, with 90 countries represented in national pavilions concentrated primarily in the Giardini (public gardens) and Arsenale, a complex of former shipyards and armories. National culture ministries nominate their best and brightest artists to create what are often monumental projects as they vie for the coveted Golden Lion prize for best national pavilion. Opportunities for new discoveries abound. In recent years, the Golden Lion has been won by Germany (2017), Armenia (2015), and Angola (2013). This year, four countries will be participating in the Biennale for the first time: Ghana, Madagascar, Malaysia, and Pakistan. But the beating heart of the Biennale is its central exhibition, organized around a unifying theme and presided over by a rotating cast of prestigious curators who step into the role of artistic director—The Art Newspaper recently referred to the role as “the most scrutinized curatorial job in the world.” This year, for the 58th edition, American curator Ralph Rugoff of London’s Hayward Gallery takes the helm. His enigmatic theme is “May You Live in Interesting Times”—an apparently mythical Chinese curse misquoted by a British politician in the 1930s. If this feels like a mantra for the post-truth era, you’re on the right track. Rugoff has chosen to work with 79 living artists who respond to the times we live in, making art that is richly ambiguous, full of paradox and contradiction,

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and which ref lects on the divisions that have emerged in social discourse in a way that generates open conversation rather than pushing a particular point of view. Among the artists selected by Rugoff is current art market darling Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Nigerian-born and Los Angeles– based, whose multi-textured, color-saturated domestic scenes in paint and collage contain layers of personal, political, and art historical references. Akunyili Crosby was awarded the esteemed MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship in 2017, with the foundation praising her large-scale works that “convey meaning across multiple registers and speak to disparate times and places simultaneously.… Many layers of materials from different sources overlay one another, with the final effect being that of an image that refuses to stay fixed, vacillating across different cultures and traditions.” Also singled out by Rugoff is Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Joi Bittle’s Cosmorama (2018), which was inspired by Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles (1950) and The Illustrated Man (1951). Their immersive diorama of a dreamlike Martian landscape is part science fiction, part current events (in a year when NASA successfully launched the InSight mission to Mars), and perhaps an evocation of dystopian chaos in our near future. The exhibition will also showcase work by the young Thai artist Korakrit Arunanondchai, who was given a solo show at MoMA PS1 in 2014. His installation No history in a room filled with people with funny names 5 (2018) includes three-channel videos and green LED lights emanating from a phantasmagorical garden of seashells and plants. Arunanondchai has said he often contemplates “the collapse of nature”; however, the work also draws together references as diverse as verbal storytelling and mythmaking in modern-day Thailand, spirit mediums and monks, the American military, Elon Musk, and the artist’s grandmother, hospitalized with dementia. The 58th edition of the Venice Biennale is open to the public from May 11 through November 24, with the VIP-only vernissage preview taking place May 8 to 10. While the carnivalesque vernissage attracts a glittering crowd of collectors, dealers, artists, curators, and partygoers wheeling and dealing at exclusive events and pop-up nightclubs, if you go later in the season, you might actually get to see the art. ■

F R O M T O P : F R A N C E S C O GA L L I ( C E N T R A L PAV I L I O N ) ; A N D R E A AV E Z Z Ù ( S H I P YA R D S , R U G O F F ) . A L L I M AG E S : C O U R T E S Y O F L A B I E N N A L E D I V E N E Z I A

clockwise from top: The Venice Biennale’s Central Pavilion; No history in a room filled with people with funny names 5 (2018); Cosmorama (2018); the Gaggiandre shipyards; 2019 Biennale artistic director Ralph Rugoff.

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A Thrilling Comeback

Global Wildlife Conservation steps up the fight to save endangered bird life in New Zealand.

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ne million species of plants and animals are heading toward annihilation, and it’s our fault,” said the New York Times in May of a sobering United Nations report that states these species risk extinction by midcentury, due to the unprecedented— and accelerating—pace of habitat loss incurred by human activity. “How can we possibly live with that truth?” Fortunately, it turns out not everyone is willing to concede to doom just yet. Groups that have long known the importance of biodiversity to our planet’s health are in fact working tirelessly to preserve and strengthen threatened species worldwide, with some inspiring results. In New Zealand, home to more than 90 bird species that live nowhere else on earth, everyone has heard of the fuzzy and flightless Kiwi. But two other species, the stilt-walking Kakī and the rotund and playful parrot known as the Kākāpō, have needed a helping human hand after habitat destruction and the introduction of non-native predators, such as cats, rats, possums, and stoats, have decimated their populations. The New Zealand Department of Conservation and the Maori have partnered with the Austin, Texas–based organization Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC)—with additional support from the Sheth Sangreal Foundation—to help bring both the Kakī and

the Kākāpō back from the brink of extinction. Kākāpō, the world’s largest parrots, are green f lightless birds that were once found across New Zealand and among the most common birds in the country. By the 1970s, biologists thought the species had been wiped out until, in 1977, two remaining populations—just 51 individuals—were discovered. In 1995, the Kākāpō Recovery Programme was established, and the tide turned for the beleaguered birds. The program’s success has been hard fought, with researchers and thousands of dedicated volunteers working to monitor the population and reduce threats by everything from feral cats to a lack of genetic diversity. The main Kākāpō population currently lives on three sanctuary islands, where the researchers and volunteers continue their steadfast efforts, often spending months at a time without connection to the outside world. Kākāpō breed only every two to four years, when rimu trees blossom into fruit. The Department of Conservation removes the eggs from their nests and puts them in incubators, leaving “smart eggs” in the nest and returning the chicks only after they’ve hatched. Each nest is fitted with sensors and cameras, and each bird is fit with a small radio transmitter backpack to monitor its movement, making Kākāpō one of the most intensively managed species in the world. The results speak for themselves: 2018 was a banner breeding year for the species, with the hatching of 76 chicks, 60 of which are expected to reach adulthood. This is double the number hatched during the last breeding season, in 2016.

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The Kākāpō parrot.


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Rimu trees; Aoraki/ Mount Cook National Park; stilt-walking KakÄŤ.

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A ranger with telemetry gear on Anchor Island; a close-up of the Kākāpō.

WE’RE VERY LUCKY TO HAVE A CHANCE TO HELP RECOVER AND REWILD THESE POPULATIONS ACROSS NEW ZEALAND.

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“The dedication of the volunteers and staff is incredible,” says Wes Sechrest, Ph.D., chief scientist and CEO of GWC. “The vision of the Department of Conservation, the Maori, and other local communities to restore this native species across its natural range is inspirational. We’re very lucky to have a chance to help recover and rewild these populations across New Zealand.” Kakī, also known as Black Stilt, have distinct black plumage, long pink-red legs, and the unique ability to survive hurricaneforce winds as well as temperatures ranging from more than 100 degrees to well below zero. Kakī, like the Kākāpō, were once widespread, residing in a unique system of braided rivers on New Zealand’s South Island. They are the world’s rarest wading bird, but their population of 132 is up from 1981, when there were just 23 known Kakī left in the world. The Kakī Recover y Programme’s success has been bulwarked by a six-bay aviary that provides suitable habitat for groups of young birds raised together from hatching. With the help of a contribution from the Sheth Sangreal Foundation, GWC is supporting the construction of a 10-bay aviary that will boost the program’s rearing capacity by some 60 birds each year. GWC also supports the Te Manahuna Aoraki Project, which aims to restore 310,000 hectares of Kakī habitat in the mountain lands of Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park, and the lakes and iconic drylands of the upper Mackenzie Basin. This will help protect not only Kakī, but also at least 38 other endangered species, according to Simone Cleland, Department of Conservation biodiversity ranger and the Te Manahuna Aoraki Project manager. “GWC has helped put Kakī on the international stage,” Cleland says. “Their support has allowed us to increase the size of our ecosystem and species management from a few key sites to cover a massive landscape. What a dream! It’s a wonderful feeling knowing as a team we have worked so hard to save these birds and have given them a real chance of survival.” May these uniquely charming birds—and the successful efforts on their behalf—continue to serve as the example we all need. ■

F R O M T O P : L A U R A PAT I E N C E , D I A N N E M A S O N

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Balazsing Around

The travel-maven daughter of hotelier André Balazs and CEO Katie Ford takes us on a tour of her favorite nature-centric hotels and experiences. BY ALESSANDRA FORD BALAZS OMAN

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Hud Hud Travels leads private luxury camps and expeditions in Oman that are a combination of staying in a vibrant Muscat hotel and visiting some of the most remote places in the desert and mountains. A truly bespoke experience. hudhudtravels.com

grew up traveling with my mother and my father, who both had their own growing businesses. My mother was CEO of Ford Models, and my father started The Mercer and The Standard hotels and has operated the Chateau Marmont as long as I’ve been alive. My mom was fascinated by languages and religions, and my dad has always been an adventure seeker and design enthusiast. Between the two of them, I cannot remember a single instance in which “Let’s sit and relax” was brought up in conversation. For better or worse, I am definitively related: These excursions helped satisfy my insatiable appetite for knowledge and adventure.

K E N YA There is nothing tame about Offbeat Safari’s horsebackriding safari in Masai Mara. Lions come within mere feet of your horse, ready to pounce. off beatsafaris.com DUJOUR.COM

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I love Deplar Farm so much. The interiors are chic and comfortable against the dramatic and harsh backdrop of northern Iceland, and the turf-and-moss-covered roofs are magical. The food and views make it a must-visit. elevenexperience.com

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CHILE Emerging from the southern Andes is the Montaña Mágica Lodge, made of volcanic rock. The waterfall shows how lava would spew out of a volcano and trickle down. huilohuilo.com

FINLAND This might be the best place to see the northern lights. At Kakslauttanen, you’ll spend your nights in a thermal glass igloo, which gives you a 360-degree view and keeps the heat in at 58 degrees. It also has the world’s largest smoke sauna. kakslauttanen.fi


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Behind the Music with Glen Hansard The Irish singer-songwriter on his latest album and newfound motto of saying yes. BY KASEY CAMINITI

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nostalgia is real, and whatever is real is permissible. And I love that I can be in a relationship now and say, ‘This song is about my ex-girlfriend, and that relationship was a reality.’” Hansard doesn’t completely know what the future holds for him at the moment, but he’s adopted a newfound motto of saying yes more often and being open to all possibilities. “I’m taking my foot off the gas. I spent a long time declaring myself, and now I’m at a point where I’m like, ‘Surprise me,’” he says of his career. From supporting his longtime friend Eddie Vedder on tour to embarking on his own tour this year, Hansard is ready to embrace what every opportunity, collaboration, and decision brings. “I’m much more attracted to ambiguity these days and seeing where things take me,” he says. Hansard will be touring his album This Wild Willing throughout 2019. ■

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P H O T O G R A P H Y BY J U N G K I M

I’VE BEEN THE MOST IMPORTANT PERSON IN MY LIFE FOR SO MANY YEARS. I WANT TO HAVE MY OWN KIDS SOON.

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inger-songwriter, actor, and charismatic Irishman Glen Hansard has a song called “I’ll Be You, Be Me” on his newest album, This Wild Willing, which features a sample from Queen, the band that made Freddie Mercury into the icon he will always be remembered as (most recently thanks to the biopic Bohemian Rhapsody). Hansard reached out to his friend Bono from the band U2 to see if he had any connections to the remaining Queen members in order to get the sample cleared for approval. “Glen, U2 is a big band, but Queen is a big band,” the U2 frontman told Hansard, adding that even he could not help out. This is the type of surreal conversation Hansard endured while making his album. Eventually, the sample, from a cassette tape demo of the Queen and David Bowie session for “Under Pressure,” was approved and really adds an edge to the opening track on the album. As I sit across from Hansard in a charming and typically Brooklyn-esque space with sprawling greenery, vintage books, and wooden chairs, the artist reveals that while his accumulation of musical achievements and accolades is impressive, and he shows no signs of slowing down, he has another item on his list that comes as a surprise to me: kids. “I’ve been the most important person in my life for so many years. I want to have my own kids soon,” the 49-year-old tells me while taking of a sip of much-needed coffee following a long night performing at the Van Morrison tribute concert at Carnegie Hall. Though he has a girlfriend of a few years now, Hansard admits there is a song on this album called “Who’s Gonna Be Your Baby Now” that’s about his ex. “It is basically me missing my exgirlfriend. And that’s totally OK to do that. Humans do that. When you spend years with someone, you develop all these beautiful shorthand jokes and habits, and it’s those things that you miss the most.” Hansard adds that he isn’t longing for his past relationship on the song—just wishing her well. “That kind of

Musician Glen Hansard’s new album explores the past.


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clockwise from top: Cartagena, Colombia; a guest room at Tcherassi Hotel and Spa; the hotel’s rooftop pool.

Cartagena Cool

This historic city is a perfect summer getaway, with its upscale hotels, chic shops, and luxe beach clubs. BY JONATHAN SOROFF

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n the past decade, Cartagena, Colombia, has emerged as a white-hot destination for one-percenters—an ancient and absurdly picturesque colonial city perched on the edge of the Caribbean, an easy five-hour f light from New York. Whether you’re wandering the labyrinthine streets of the cotton candy–hued Centro Histórico, people-watching at a café in the vibrant hipster haven of Getsemaní, or catching an eagle’s-eye view from one of the magnificent high-rises that line the city’s beachfront, there’s a delicious Latin sizzle and a sense of magic captured so famously in the novels of native son Gabriel García Màrquez. While the year-end holidays and New Year’s are high season, the temperature varies little throughout the year, so July and August are an ideal time to visit, with little to no rain and somewhat reduced prices.


W H E R E T O S T AY The Movich Hotel Cartagena de Indias A member of Small Luxury Hotels of the World, this blend of colonial architecture and boldly contemporary interiors perfectly captures the yin and yang of Cartagena. Ideally located inside the walled city, some of its rooms boast balconies with views of the ocean or the surrounding architectural treasures, but it’s from the rooftop infinity pool that the view really wows, looking out over the Old City and toward the more modern neighborhoods of Bocagrande and El Laguito. From $309 per night; movichhotels.com

As one of the oldest colonial cities in Latin America, Cartagena has no shortage of sights to see. The dominant feature of the Old City is the Castillo de Don Felipe de Barajas, whose fortifications are among the oldest in the Americas. The Palace of the Inquisition shines a delightfully macabre light on one of the darker chapters in Spanish colonial history, while the Gold Museum highlights the spectacular metalwork of the indigenous Zenú people. The newly chic neighborhood of Getsemaní features endless boutiques and cafés, and an afternoon of shopping for local crafts at Las Bóvedas is a haggler’s dream. But ultimately, the charm of Cartagena lies in simply walking the streets and happening upon a sculpture by Fernando Botero or an arresting piece of graffiti, turning a corner

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Shopping in Cartagena de Indias; Centro Histórico; the bar at the San Pedro Café/Mirador Restaurante.

WH E RE TO S HOP Colombians take their fashion seriously, and three standout retailers are Ketty Tinoco, which sells exquisite linen clothing; Silvia Tcherassi, one of Colombia’s most revered designers; and Jon Sonen Privé, which carries fashion-forward men’s attire. Of course, Colombia is famed for its emeralds, and there is no shortage of jewelers catering to foreign trade, but you may want to ask your concierge for a reference to a private dealer. (Bonus hint: The emeralds from the famed Muzo mines are said to be the finest in the world.)

W H E R E T O E AT Leisurely lunches and dinners are Cartagena’s stock-in-trade, and two of the biggest hot spots are La Vitrola and the San Pedro Café/Mirador Restaurante. Both attract an international clientele like New York fashion icon Lauren Santo Domingo, Mick Jagger, and Javier Bardem, but you can’t go wrong with most of the smaller cafés lining the backstreets of Getsemaní. ■

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and stumbling upon a riot of bougainvillea, or strolling along the bustling beachfront. An absolute must is a trip out to the Rosario Islands, which feature beach clubs where you can soak up the sun. Our favorite: The Blue Apple Beach Club, on Tierra Bomba, a 30-minute boat ride from the city. The beach is sublime, and the club’s paella rivals any in Spain.

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Casa San Agustín Housed within three conjoined 17th-century mansions, this stylish boutique hotel

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Tcherassi Hotel and Spa The brainchild of Colombian fashion designer Silvia Tcherassi, her namesake hotel offers only seven rooms, guaranteeing intimacy and recreating the ambience of staying in someone’s superchic home. The courtyard pool is dominated by a vertical garden with more than 3,000 plants, and the Italian restaurant is one of the city’s finest. From $324 per night; tcherassihotels.com

has a swimming pool as its lobby’s focal point and its own private beach on one of the nearby Rosario Islands (which can be booked for the day at an additional cost). The award-winning Restaurante Alma serves regional cuisine, and the location is convenient to sites like the Cartagena Cathedral, the Gold Museum, and the Palace of the Inquisition. From $412 per night; hotelcasasanagustin.com


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Château Life

Step into these French châteaux, reimagined as lavish hotels. BY LAUREN HILL

France just wouldn’t be the same without its châteaux and the myriad stories each historic estate reveals. Of these revered sites, a select few provide the breathtakingly grand surroundings for some of the country’s most exclusive hotels.

Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey Bordeaux

Following Villa René Lalique and Château Hochberg, this is the third property in French lifestyle brand Lalique’s hotel portfolio. Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey sits on a hillside overlooking Premier Grand Cru Classé vineyards of the Sauternes appellation in southern Bordeaux. This 89-acre estate has a history dating back to the 13th century, and last year saw the 400th anniversary of its winery, the same year that the first-growth estate saw the fall opening of its lavish new hotel. Lalique designers Lady Tina Green and Pietro Mingarelli led the renovation of the property, integrating art, crystals, and burgundy and green accents into each room, and displaying Damien Hirst’s artwork Eternal Belief (2017) in the chapel. Four underground cellars hold 350,000 bottles of wine, and a crystal barrel of the estate’s 2013 vintage was unveiled earlier this year. A modern glass extension by architect Mario Botta houses the newly Michelin-starred restaurant. Take a seat here to dine on seasonal Sauternes-inspired dishes by chef Jérôme Schilling under a ceiling embedded with 120 gold sémillon vine leaves. lafauriepeyragueylalique.com

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Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey; Dungeness crab and smoked avocado with iodized hollandaise sauce; the château’s chapel; a Superior room.

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Château de Montcaud Languedoc-Roussillon

MAÏTÉ BALDI

Château de Montcaud’s pool, heated when summer ends; the Collain Suite, including a freestanding tub with a view of the property’s parkland; the hotel’s salon.

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Debuted last summer, Château de Montcaud celebrates the unique heritage of the area. When the husband-and-wife team Rolf and Andrea Bertschi took the property on, they set about giving the 1875-built château back its identity. Drawing on the region’s history of silk production, the Bertschis decided to weave the silk theme into every aspect of the hotel. French silk features in the Iria Degen and Sophie Petit–designed interiors, chef Matthieu Hervé incorporates silk inspiration into his menus, and the château’s own perfume contains silk enzymes and ingredients from the Silk Road. The couple planted mulberry trees to eventually make silk at the château, and a specially commissioned artwork representing the property’s silk connection hangs in the restaurant. The estate’s parkland also celebrates this rich history, with elements of its design representing the original garden plan, which the couple found in one of the old walls. Stay in the Collain Suite or the two-story gatehouse, La Maison. Dine in the restaurant and bistro, which spill out to shaded spots beneath chestnut trees. And use the château as a base to visit local vineyards such as Domaine la Réméjeanne.


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Relais de Chambord Loire Valley

ANNE-EMMANUELLE THION

When UNESCO declared the Loire Valley a World Heritage site in 2000, the organization named the area an outstanding cultural landscape of great natural beauty for its historic towns and architectural monuments. More than 100 châteaux in this region are open to the public, of which Château de Chambord is the largest. It stands on a vast 13,440 acres of woodland and heathland, where wild boar and deer roam freely. Since its opening last year, the château’s hotel, Relais de Chambord, has made it possible to stay within these sprawling grounds. Prominent designer Jean-Michel Wilmotte led the architectural and interior design of the hotel’s centuries-old building and its new wing, using black-and-white photos of the château as wallpaper and incorporating furnishings by Patricia Urquiola. Make the most of your stay by navigating the estate’s trails with a fitness trainer, cycling along its canal, and taking a hot-air balloon ride over the valley. Back at the hotel, unwind in the intimate spa, and enjoy casual fine dining plates on the terrace of Grand Saint Michel restaurant. relaisdechambord.com

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One of Relais de Chambord’s Junior Suites; a selection from the menu at Grand Saint Michel; one of the hotel’s common areas; the Château de Chambord, the largest castle in the Loire Valley.


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Château du Grand-Lucé was completed in 1760 as the summer palace of Baron Jacques Pineau de Viennay and is now considered one of the finest examples of neoclassical architecture in France. Art has always had its place here. Louis XV commissioned statues for the property, and during World War II, the château housed paintings belonging to the Louvre. The estate eventually passed to the French government, which restored the gardens and buildings, and sold it in 2003 to acclaimed designer Timothy Corrigan, who set about renovating it as his private home. Corrigan sold the property to a new owner in 2017, and it became Hotel Château this year, opening in June. Expect interiors of limestone and white oak f loors, walls adorned with boiserie, Persian rugs, chandeliers, and custom fabrics by designers including Pierre Frey, Christian Lacroix, and Jean Paul Gaultier. The Baron Suite stands out for its abundant art, private library, and casement windows overlooking the garden. Savor seasonal French gastronomy and Sancerre in the chapel turned restaurant Le Lucé, relax in the spa and outdoor pool, and explore the 80acre estate’s classic French gardens and white oak forest.

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Hotel Château du Grand-Lucé DUJOUR.COM

clockwise from top left : The dining room at Hotel Château du Grand-Lucé; the property’s ballroom; an exterior view of the château; the marble bathroom in the hotel’s gardenview King Suite.


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THE LUXURY GUIDE TO

Napa Valley

A glass of crisp regional sauvignon blanc at your constant disposal is just the beginning of this destination’s charm—luxurious hotels, decadent spas, and Michelin-starred restaurants are popping up all over the Northern California map. BY KIM PEIFFER

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t’s hard to pinpoint exactly what makes Napa Valley so magical, because it’s the combination of its many charms that makes it what it is. Whatever is so enchanting about the area, no series of fires or devastation has been able to ruin it—and the valley has proved it by bouncing ba c k a f t er t hou sa nd s of a c re s were scorched. If anything, Napa is better than ever, boasting a slew of luxury hotels, Michelin-starred restaurants, and exclusive wine tasting experiences that will have you coming back for more. Just a short drive from San Francisco or a quick f light from L.A., but equally well worth the journey from the East Coast, too, Napa continues to be a top contender in the world of luxury travel. Here we spotlight our picks for a perfect Napa Valley getaway.

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Four Seasons There’s been quite a lot of buzz around the anticipated opening of the Four Seasons in Calistoga, and the property is finally ready to launch in late fall of this year. In addition to its wellness spa, farmhouse-style accommodations, and what we can only imagine will be delectable farm-to-table fare at the on-site restaurant, the property will also feature an exclusive vineyard and winery run by Calistoga resident and renowned winemaker Thomas Rivers Brown. fourseasons.com/napavalley

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Auberge Solage Nestled way up in the charming region of Calistoga, the Auberge Solage (one of two Auberge properties in Napa), is the place to come if you want pure luxury plus escape. Each guest room is its own private cottage with a garden, but you’ll find it a challenge to stay indoors when you’ve got a massive pool (rumored to be the longest in Napa) just steps from you and a world-class spa to play around in all day long. The Mudslide treatment—a 60- or 90-minute service that starts with a self-application of essential oil–infused mud and finishes in a vibrating sound chair—will send you into a state of pure bliss. aubergeresorts.com/solage

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Las Alcobas Las Alcobas Napa Valley made its debut less than two years ago, pegging itself as the first luxury hotel in the region since 2010. And it certainly lives up to its billing. The property’s well-appointed guest rooms are literally steps from the vineyard, with sweeping views of the hills behind. Grab a glass of wine and stroll outside to your private patio to take in the view and flip a switch to ignite the flames of your very own firepit. Just don’t feel guilty if you can’t be bothered to leave the room—it’s bound to happen. With a day of tastings under your belt, belly up to the Atrio spa, a relaxation haven featuring Naturopathica products and a roomy coed steam room. Detox, here we come. lasalcobas.com

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Napa Valley’s rolling hills are home to more than just grapes; they’re the nesting grounds for some of the most luxurious vineyard-centric hotels you can find. Whether you’re looking for a completely remote locale with barely any cell service for a true escape or you want to be front and center in one of Napa’s adorable towns, there’s an extravagant property for you.

The pool at the Auberge Solage; Las Alcobas’ exterior; vineyard views from Las Alcobas; a Junior Suite at Las Alcobas; Atrio spa; shaded outdoor dining at the Auberge Solage.


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W H E R E T O TA S T E One of the many great things about Napa is that you can bop around all day without a plan if you want to, thanks to wineries offering same-day tastings without reservations required. But if you’re looking to take your tasting experience up a notch, many of Napa’s finest wineries are offering their guests exclusive tasting experiences that are a step above the rest. Round Pond Estate Surrounded by the natural beauty of the vineyards and the Mayacamas Mountains lies the Rutherford estate, an exquisite property that houses the tasting for Round Pond wines. You can do a bar tasting, but we recommend the Estate Tasting, an experience including three limited-production estate wines paired with an amuse-bouche arrangement hand-prepared by the property’s executive chef. The lovely second-f loor tasting lounge with panoramic views is the perfect spot to take a load off as you wine and dine the afternoon away. For those who want an even more decadent experience, book the Il Pranzo, which includes a tour of the winery garden and olive grove, followed by a curated multicourse lunch on the winery terrace. roundpond.com Stony Hill Just a few miles north of St. Helena, up a winding mountain road well away from the hustle and bustle of the main drag, is the historic estate of Stony Hill Vineyard. Tastings are private here, held at the midcentury home of the founders atop Spring Mountain, giving it a very exclusive feel. Sip the brand’s handmade, smallproduction wines that are lean, bright, and elegant in their flavor profile. stonyhillvineyard.com

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Alfresco dining at Round Pond Estate; Stony Hill’s vineyards; an acclaimed chardonnay from Stony Hill; a selection of Round Pond wines.


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Farmstead’s exterior; the bar at Brix; a Press salad; fireside dinner at Press.

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Thomas Keller’s legendary French Laundry is any gourmand’s first stop in Napa, but it’s far from the only spot worthy of a return trip. Give these restaurants a try, and let us know if they end up on your repeat-visit Napa roster.

Brix Restaurant and Gardens Yountville’s Brix Restaurant has reopened after an expansive makeover, and it’s chicer than ever. The 16-acre culinary oasis includes indoor and outdoor dining with stunning views of the estate gardens, the Kelleher Family Vineyard, and the sprawling hills behind it. (It looks more like a storybook setting than reality.) Once you take a seat in the agricultural-chic dining room, however, don’t be surprised if you are distracted from the view, because the farm-to-table California fare is nothing short of spectacular. Don’t dare pass up the tempura green beans with spicy mustard sauce, and the same goes for any of the pizzas decked out with local ingredients from the garden and crisped to perfection in the wood-fired grill. brix.com

Farmstead For something a little more down home but not lacking in mouthwatering cuisine, head to Farmstead, a former nursery barn with a farmhouse vibe, cathedral ceilings, and a smoker right outside the doors. Everything—from the meat to the produce to even the wine—is sourced from the property’s ranch, farm, and vineyards. When you dine here, don’t hold back: The grass-fed cheeseburger, made with Vella cheddar and topped with a farm egg, melts in your mouth. Do yourself and your dining guests a solid and order up a side of cheddar biscuits with honey butter; they’re warm, savory, and sweet, and filled with pillowy goodness. longmeadowranch.com/eat-drink/restaurant

Press Like many of the top Napa restaurants, Press prides itself on its local farm-grown dishes, but the menu rock stars here are the steaks. Hand-selected, dry-aged, and roasted over an almond and cherry wood fire, they’re a beef connoisseur’s dream. Ditto for the Bacon Tasting; it’s not featured on the regular menu, but you can order it from the bar menu, and the waiter will gladly deliver it to your dining table. Slabs of curated bacon—double cut Nueske’s from Wisconsin and dry-rubbed Fatted Calf from the Golden State are two of them—will arrive hanging from something that resembles a clothesline, and the waiter will cut off pieces for all to try with his special bacon scissors. pressnapavalley.com ■

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Oro classic designer gold earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $1,750, ROBERTO COIN, us.robertocoin.com. V ruffle neck minidress in black sequins, $2,390, DUNDAS BY PETER DUNDAS, dundasworld.com.


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KIM PEIFFER  PHOTOGRAPHY BY VICTOR DEMARCHELIER  STYLING BY SARAH GORE REEVES

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NAOMI WATTS IS BACK AND TAKING HOLLYWOOD BY STORM WITH A SLEW OF NEW PROJECTS.

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It’s a rainy morning in New York City (cue traffic jams and very angry locals), but inside the Baccarat Hotel, everything is coming up roses. We’re stationed in a lovely penthouse atop all the hustle and bustle, dry as the Sahara, and Naomi Watts has a closetful of gorgeous gowns that are ready to be worn. During our shoot, the actress showed off her many sides in couture and even offered to jump into the hotel’s gorgeous pool for the final shot. So it comes as no surprise that the multihyphenate excels at many things in life, given her cheery disposition and willingness to experiment. It does, however, come as a surprise to me that given her decades of experience in the industry, she still feels a little shy when it comes to being photographed. “I’m not super comfortable in front of a stills camera,” she says with a sheepish smile. “There are many things about my business where you go, ‘Wait, why haven’t I relaxed about this? At this point, surely I’ve got this!’ ” A few days later, I meet her for brunch at Greca, a neighborhood Greek spot nestled in Tribeca. As we order up some green tea, acai bowls, and strapatsada, we chat about the many projects the English-born, Australian-bred 50-year-old actress has on the docket these next few months. It’s no short conversation—the girl’s been busy. First up is Ophelia, a film drama that in summary is a reimagining of Hamlet, told from Ophelia’s perspective. Ophelia, played by Daisy Ridley, is the lady-in-waiting to Queen Gertrude, played by Watts. “It is truly a story of female empowerment,” Watts says. The filming, which took place in Prague, appealed to Watts, who brought her kids, Sasha, 11, and Kai, 10, along for the two-month filming schedule. “It was a great experience making it,” she says. “Daisy is brilliant, and George MacKay [who plays Hamlet] is so wonderful—he’s a star in the making. And getting to work with Clive [Owen] again was so great.”

The waiter comes over and nonchalantly delivers our meal. While Watts takes a bite of eggs, she tells me about her other movie role for fall in a play turned film called Luce, a dramaslash-mystery about a liberal-minded couple who are forced to reconsider their image of their adopted son after he writes a disturbing essay for a class assignment. “I read the script, and it was such a page-turner,” she says. “Julius Onah [the f ilm’s director] is himself black and living in America, educated in America, so he had lots to say about it,” she says. “Even though I’m slightly uncomfortable and afraid of getting involved in that level of controversy, I’m drawn to it because it invites us to open up the conversation.” She continues: “By opening it up, are we getting closer to normalizing it? We’re not tr y ing to solve problems. We’re not trying to answer all of these questions. But if we address the fact that they’re there, and they’re awkward, hopefully we can get closer to feeling comfortable with the uncomfortableness of it.” With those two films, you would think she’s got a full plate, but we’re not even halfway through her 2019 projects. She also stars in The Loudest Voice, a miniseries about the rise and fall of Roger Ailes, the former chairman and CEO of Fox News. “It’s such brilliant writing and feels like it’s ref lecting the current times—the whole world of questioning the media and that level of narcissism and abuse of power.” She also has a few other projects that will be coming out in the near future. “I’m excited about this little film I did with Frank Grillo, which I can’t give you a title of yet, but it’s set in Staten Island, about a family who are going to see the third part of Rocky,” she says as her face lights up. “And the island goes mad for it, and it’s just like a day in that world, and there’s a real sweetness to it.” But the project that really has everyone abuzz is her role in the upcoming Game of Thrones prequel, which takes place “thousands of years” before the events of the original HBO series. Naturally, Watts is sworn to secrecy on all things GOT. What we do know is that she will play a “charismatic socialite hiding a dark secret,” according to HBO. “I know nothing,” she says with a smize, revealing both figuratively and literally that her lips are sealed. Then she gives me one tiny crumb: “We have not started shooting yet. I can say that much!” I start laughing, and she expands on that comment. “You know, sometimes that can be a whole paragraph,” she laughs back, quoting herself. “Just add in, ‘she answered as she twitched and looked down.’ ” I pry for more. “Have you watched the show?” I ask her. “As soon as I got asked to play the part, I binge-watched it. It was a brilliant way to do it, actually. I happened to have a lot of long international f lights.”

Black faux leather dress with Chantilly lace trim, $3,650, TOM FORD, tomford .com. B.Zero1 Design Legend ring by Zaha Hadid, $2,300, and B.Zero1 XX Anniversary ring, $2,400, BULGARI, bulgari.com. Black patent leather strappy sandal, $775, GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI, giuseppezanotti.com.


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Nanogram earrings, $660, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Tiffanyâ&#x20AC;¯T Two ring in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $2,950, and Tiffany T Two ring in 18-karat gold, $1,600, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Black metallic Milady Nageur swimsuit, $329, MARIE FRANCE VAN DAMME, mariefrancevandamme .com. Japanese wool jacket, $1,975, and Japanese wool pant, $980, ROCHAS, modaoperandi.com.


“MULHOLLAND DRIVE, being given the opportunity to play both those roles really changed everything... I went from really struggling as an actor to the phone ringing with all the best kind of people on the end of the line.”

B.Zero1 Design Legend necklace by Zaha Hadid, $2,900, BULGARI, bulgari .com. Black floral lace dress, $5,400, FENDI,  fendi. com. Black satin briefs, $325, DOLCE & GABBANA, select DG boutiques and dolcegabbana.com. opposite :

Leather top, $3,575, MIU MIU, miumiu.com.


GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK


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Hair: Renato Campora at The Wall Group. Makeup: Mary Wiles for Dior Backstage Face & Body Foundation at The Wall Group. Manicure: Gina Viviano for Gucci at traceymattingly.com. Photographed on location at the Baccarat Hotel, New York.

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White dress shirt, $525, and black satin briefs, $325, DOLCE & GABBANA, select DG boutiques and dolcegabbana.com.

ack at the restaurant, we finished our meal quite a while ago, but our conversation still rambles on, like on one of those rare first dates during which you instantly feel a spark. I switch subjects, this time diving into another love in her life, her brand Onda Beauty, which specializes in clean beauty products and treatments. There are locations in New York City and Sag Harbor, and the brand is rapidly expanding, with a store recently launched in Sydney and another in the works in London. Watts was inspired to open the health and beauty shop after her own skincare woes. “I had really problematic skin while filming Gypsy because of hormones changing, and stress, and work, and the sheer number of hours and reapplications,” she says. “I would come home and be scratching because the chemicals in the products were basically melting into my skin under the hot lights.” When her friend Larissa Thomson came to her with the idea for the business, she knew it was the perfect fit. “I started trying the products and could see that my skin was suddenly calming down, and that got me interested really, really quickly.” As for her favorite products, she says, “Right now my number one favorite is the Marie Veronique Retinol Night Serum. I stick with that all the time. I also love Vintner’s Daughter. Saint Jane has a great CBD face oil. I love Joanna Vargas’ products, too.” As for her favorite facial at Onda, she leans toward anything with a facial massage. “I find it just puts me out,” she says. “I snore like a buffalo on the table.” It’s clear that she stays young by taking care of her skin, but Watts is also dedicated to a consistent workout. “I like to change it up. I’m not as fanatical about exercise as I used to be because I have changes in my body as I’ve gotten older, so I have to work with what I have,” she says. “I do yoga and Pilates,” and she keeps her petite frame petite with a healthy diet. “If I’m hungry, all bets are off,” she laughs. “I’ll just eat whatever’s in front of me. But for the most part, I eat well and consistently. When I get outrageously hungry, I start to fall apart.” Obviously, she is witty and relatable IRL, but she shares that with the world as well via Instagram. Watts will post comical pictures of herself making faces, clowning around at the gym, just being silly. “I have a little mini panic attack almost every time I post,” she says. “But I also feel like everyone’s doing it. Everyone’s being goofy. So why not?” As for future endeavors, don’t rule out seeing even more of her. “I still am yet to tread the boards—it’s a theater term,” she says of wanting to do Broadway. “I’ve been procrastinating, and I’ve simply got to get it done. There’s some fear around that; I’m just putting that out there! But I’m not usually one to let fear stop me. If I trusted myself in my younger years, I would have been able to be the best, most authentic version of myself. I know I lost time because of not trusting myself.” ■

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Small details aside, it’s clear that this will be a massive win for Watts and the rest of the cast, and I can tell, all smizes aside, that she is beyond excited about it. When it comes to Watts’ career highlights, it’s hard to narrow down top contenders given her many accolades. From her role as the leading lady in King Kong to her harrowing performance in 21 Grams, she says it’s nearly impossible to choose a favorite. “That’s like asking me to choose a favorite child,” she laughs. But she does credit one particular film—and director David Lynch— for helping to cast her into the limelight. “Mulholland Drive, being given the opportunity to play both those roles really changed everything… I went from really struggling as an actor to the phone ringing with all the best kind of people on the end of the line,” she says. “I’ve been really lucky to work with some really fantastic directors in the span of my career.” Considering the star has been in the biz since the late 1980s, she shocks me yet again when she tells me she’s rarely recognized in public. “I still get surprised when I’m recognized,” she laughs. “I’m short, I don’t have any particularly striking feature that sets me apart from blending in. Sometimes people will look at me and think, Oh, it’s her? Who’s she? Sometimes I get that. I’ve even had people say, ‘Do you know who you look like…? You look like that actress Naomi Watts,’ which I think is very amusing. Sometimes I might just go, ‘Oh, really?’ or ‘Yes, I’ve heard that one before.’ Or I might say, ‘That’s me!’ It’s mood dependent.” Perhaps the fact that she’s not as recognizable as, say, a Kardashian, leads me to inquire about the dating world for her and if she would ever consider a dating app. (Watts split from longtime boyfriend Liev Schreiber, father to her children, in September of 2016. The couple dated for 11 years.) “You know, here I am, and I’ve tried to push some of my friends who are hesitant to join dating apps, and they’re like, ‘Well, you wouldn’t do it.’ Which I won’t.” Of course, for a celebrity, joining a dating app is no easy matter. “I just don’t know if I could. But I am in a situation where I’m meeting people all the time, different people, like on a set or traveling.” And she speaks my language when she tells me it’s all about timing. “At the risk of sounding corny, [when you’re in] a place where you feel ready for it, that signal goes out there,” she says. When it comes to her style, Watts says she’s a jeans-and-tee girl on the daily, but for the red carpet, she likes to take risks. “I like to think I have an edge,” she says. “I like to always be chic, and I don’t mind being a bit sexy, but obviously not over-the-top sexy. I’m very into a nerdy, androgynous kind of feel as well.” But one thing you won’t catch her wearing at an event? The color red. “I don’t know why. I just feel it makes me look cheap,” she laughs. “I’ve got a psychological block about it. I might wear a red pant or a red shoe, but never head-to-toe red.”


GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Gray cotton longsleeve jersey, $295, and green cargo pant, $2,595, DOLCE & GABBANA, select DG boutiques. Big Bang Unico Titanium timepiece, $18,800, HUBLOT, hublot.com. Yellow gold knurled cuff bracelet, $6,900, LUIS MORAIS, shop.luismorais.com.


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BY KIM PEIFFER  /  PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN SINCLAIR  /  STYLING BY GREGORY WEIN

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How NEW YORK YANKEES outfielder GIANCARLO STANTON, one of the highest-paid athletes of all time, plans to catapult his team TO THE TOP.

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G GIANCARLO THE GREAT


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Black and blue nylon Nastro sweatshirt, $1,425, VERSACE, versace. com. Classic Fusion blue titanium timepiece, $7,700, HUBLOT, hublot.com.


GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Cayenne cotton T-shirt, $445, brown bomber jacket, $2,995, and brown wool-blend trouser, $750, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.us. Black ceramic “Dark Side of the Moon” Speedmaster Moonwatch, $12,000, OMEGA, omegawatches.com. Yellow gold and ruby roundel bracelet, $12,104, LUIS MORAIS, shop.luismorais.com. Metallic leather croc-embossed slipon sneaker, $795, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com.


opposite page : White cotton lace short-sleeve T-shirt, $1,145, DOLCE & GABBANA, select DG boutiques. Large round and octagon yellow gold tag necklace, $5,720, and yellow gold small screw bracelet, $2,720, LUIS MORAIS, shop.luismorais.com. Steel Navitimer Chronograph 43 on black crocodile strap, $7,710, BREITLING, breitling.com. Lightweight jean, $1,030, KITON, available at Kiton Bal Harbour or kiton.it.

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Gold necklace with chili pepper, $625, DOLCE & GABBANA, select DG boutiques. Yellow gold small screw bracelet, $2,720, LUIS MORAIS, shop.luismorais.com. Defy El Primero 21 watch in brushed titanium 44mm, $11,200, ZENITH, zenith-watches .com. Slim tapered ultimate flex jean, $108, GUESS, shop.guess.com.


GIANCARLO STANTON is leaning against a balcony high above the white sands of South Beach, with sweeping views of the turquoise waters below during our DuJour photo shoot. But despite the fact that we’re shooting in one of the most beautiful locations in Miami—a massive luxury penthouse at the top of the Fontainebleau hotel—it’s Stanton, with his statuesque 6-foot-6 frame, who is stealing the show. He is quiet and composed, but no words are needed to make us realize we’re in the presence of greatness. After all, the 29-year-old Panorama City, California, native managed to seal the deal for a 13-year, $325 million contract with the Miami Marlins in 2014, at the time the most lucrative sports contract in history. In 2017, the National League MVP was surprisingly traded in the off-season to the New York Yankees, whom he helped make the playoffs during his first year with the team, thanks to his 38 home runs in 2018. Aside from his all-star status and impressive roster of accolades, this is only the beginning for the outfielder and designated hitter. After a season spent adjusting to his new team, he now feels more ready than ever to take that team to victory—many experts have faith that Stanton will be the Yankees’ insurance card to catapult them to the World Series. “I’m pumped for the upcoming season,” he says. “I’m more excited than ever to get out there with my team and get after it.” Although the young athlete has accomplished a remarkable amount before even turning 30, he has his eye on the prize when DUJOUR.COM 109

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STANTON HAS HIS EYES ON THE PRIZE WHEN IT COMES TO PROFESSIONAL BENCHMARKS. “MY CAREER GOAL IS TO WIN A CHAMPIONSHIP. TO HELP MY TEAM ACCOMPLISH THAT IS THE ULTIMATE GOAL FOR ME.”

it comes to professional benchmarks. “My career goal is to win a championship,” he says. “I’ve accomplished a lot personally, and I have plenty of time to accomplish more in my personal life; I’m still young. But in my professional life, I definitely want to bring my team to a championship and experience that with them. To help my team accomplish that is the ultimate goal for me.” At the moment, Stanton is down in Florida in the midst of spring training, so his workout routine is about to get intense. “In the off-season, I’ve got a five-day-a-week routine that includes running, weights, and yoga,” he says. “But then, during the five to six weeks of spring training, we kick it up and add in much more baseball-centric activities. We start to slowly build up and creep that all in, which can be a struggle because your body is super sore from all the intense workouts.” He says the objective is simply to get through it. “You’re going to feel a little bit different coming out of spring regardless, so the goal is to reenact that muscle memory and do your best.” Back at the fashion shoot, Stanton is fully enjoying his afternoon sans pinstripes and grassy fields. Despite the fact that the athlete is most often seen in his signature uniform, he has quite

Yellow gold knurled cuff bracelet, $6,900, LUIS MORAIS, shop. luismorais.com. Tan cotton mesh sweater, $630, tan leather zipfront jacket, $4,700, and tan cotton linen flat-front trouser, $730, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, ferragamo.com. RM 033 Extra Flat Round Automatic watch, red gold case on black rubber strap, $120,500, RICHARD MILLE, richardmille.com.

the penchant for fashion off the baseball diamond. “I like to dress up and ‘fashion out’ a bit,” he says. “I’m not the guy who’ll want to wear a suit every day, but I like to switch it up. I’m right in the middle.” Which explains why he pulls off the luxury designer looks from our session like a pro. “I had a blast with all the fashion at the shoot. My favorite look was the cover shot [a white Dolce & Gabbana angel-embroidered T-shirt]. I mean, I wouldn’t necessarily wear that to dinner [laughs], but I think it’s cool as hell.” As he cracks that joke and f lashes a smile, it becomes apparent that Stanton definitely has another side to him than his serious athlete persona reveals. “I think something most people don’t know about me is that I love to goof around,” he says. “On the field, most people think I’m super serious all the time, but I actually love to joke around and be very sarcastic.” It is his die-hard work ethic, coupled with his outlook on life, that makes him such a success. “I do tell myself to enjoy every moment of this incredible life I’ve been given and to enjoy both the good and the bad times,” he says. “My whole thing is no what-ifs.” ■


T-shirt in gray jersey, $78, HIRO CLARK, hiroclark .com. Nappa suede jacket with zipper and snaps, $4,845, and travel pant in blue, $1,000, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com. Master Tourbillon white gold timepiece, $94,500, JAEGER-LECOULTRE, jaeger-lecoultre.com.

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Grooming: Eduardo Garcia at Rouge Artists using Mr. Smith hair products and Danny Jelaca makeup products. Production and creative direction by Jung Kim. Photographed on location at Fontainebleau Miami Beach.


They may have been raised by one of the most infamous men in rock ’n’ roll history, but sisters Alexandra and Theodora Richards, daughters of legendary Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards and supermodel Patti Hansen, are just about as down-to-earth as any girl next door. During our cover shoot in New York City, the women danced around to ’90s rock while photographer Philip Gay snapped them in their element, modeling some of summer’s hottest trends. Sure, the clothes were extraordinary, but the sisters’ other favorite part of the day was getting to hang together. “To work with Alexandra so intimately is such a beautiful moment,” says Theodora. “We don’t get to work together on things like this all that often, so this was really special.” Below, the It girls share their thoughts on style, their famous parents, and how they’ve each come into their own as adults. BY KIM PEIFFER  /  PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHILIP GAY  /  STYLING BY KRISTEN INGERSOLL

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Rock ’n’ Roll, Redefined

How do each of you describe your style? Theodora: I’m eclectic when it comes to fashion; I like a little bit of everything, from punk rock to elegance and grace. When it comes to my style, I can be colorful and in your face and loud, but it totally depends on my mood. Alexandra: I don’t take as much time putting an outfit together. When I do, I can take hours. I am a jeans and T-shirt kind of girl. I love the new high-waisted straight-leg Levi’s. What they’re doing at the moment with women’s empowerment is really great. Having a product with a purpose is what this year is about, I feel. Has your dad influenced your style? Theodora: He’s definitely inf luenced my style. I think I have a stage persona because of him, for sure. He gave me this freedom and love of clothing. It’s given me a zest for life. I have a general love of style. Alexandra: Because he’s so comfortable in his style and what he wears, I think that’s a huge ref lection on what I wear. I think also for women to feel confident in what we wear is so important. Big smile, and hold your own. Item you’re most likely to steal from your sister? Theodora: Her accessories are insane—I steal them often! They’re not f lashy; they’re delicate and fun to stack. Alexandra: She steals my jewelry. I know that because I will go over to her place and find it! She’ll usually steal one earring, not two, so I guess that’s a style as well. I don’t really steal makeup, but when I’m out doing errands and I stop by, I do use her makeup. She’s going to love hearing that in this interview. That’s touché for the jewelry!

Do you raid your dad’s closet? Theodora: I raid his closet all the time. He gets mad at me! We do it to each other. The definitive piece I steal is a silk cotton-blend button-down top from the ’80s with skulls and swords printed on it. Alexandra: Not so much anymore, but he works a lot in these YSL button-down T-shirts, so those kind of end up in my closet. I wear them, but then I get them dry-cleaned for him, and I put them back. What has your mom taught you about skincare? Theodora: She always taught us that less is more. She was taking care of her skin since day one. Alexandra: She’s always taught us to go get facials every few months because things build up, so I think that kind of routine is a good lesson for everybody. Especially living in New York, it’s always good to cleanse and detox. Theodora, you model, and you’re so good on your radio show, “Off the Cuff” on SiriusXM. Who are you dying to interview next? Theodora: I’d love to interview Billy Idol. And Ric Ocasek from the Cars. For me, music is what ties me to this earth. Alexandra, you’re an artist, model, and DJ, but you’ve got so many amazing things up your sleeve. What’s next for you? Alexandra: Music supervising is a goal I’ve been working on, so doing stuff for TV and film is something I’m trying to get into next. It’s amazing the platform that DJing has been able to offer me. I’m also part of an ocean conservation program called Project Zero and just designed a long-sleeve sweatshirt with all the proceeds going toward restoring the mangrove trees. There’s a lot of layers to this onion! ■


on alexandra : Long-sleeve dress with allover glass beads and allover embroidery, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. on theodora : Allegra ring in white gold, black ceramic, and diamonds, $13,800, DE GRISOGONO, degrisogono.com or De Grisogono New York, 212-439-4220. Black dress, $1,845, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it and select DG boutiques.


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on alexandra : Tiffany T Two circle pendant in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $4,200, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Cardigan, $3,425, and dress, $3,845, MISSONI, missoni.com. Whitney espadrille platform slide, $295, AQUATALIA, aquatalia.com.


on theodora : Black velvet dress with pailletteembroidered plastron, $4,390, SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO, ysl.com.


on alexandra :

Allegra necklace in pink gold with diamonds, $49,000, DE GRISOGONO, degrisogono.com or De Grisogono New York, 212-439-4220. on theodora :

Tiffany T wire bar earring in 18-karat rose gold with diamonds, $3,600 for pair, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com.


on alexandra : One-shoulder silk embroidered dress, price upon request, SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO, ysl.com. on theodora : Tiffany T True wide ring in 18-karat white gold, 5.5mm wide, $1,350, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Ninety-Six spliced minidress, $3,150, ZIMMERMANN, us.zimmermannwear.com.

Hair: Michael Silva. Makeup: Angela Davis Deacon at De Facto using Paula’s Choice. Manicures: Jackie Saulsbery at Factory Downtown for Dior Vernis. Production and creative direction by Jung Kim.

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GIRLS

TRIP

A PSYCHEDELIC THERAPY changing WOMEN’S LIVES. BY

HILARY ELKINS 


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consequence of her mental health issues and a love triangle that spiraled out of control. “I was the one who discovered their bodies,” Lori ticks the detail off with a clean tone that seems to communicate, How else would you like me to describe the indescribable? It was, she continues, “horrific.” Then the storm. “Here was a collective sense of grief and trauma,” Lori says of the 2005 hurricane. “It overshadowed my ability to deal with what had happened to me.” So the cumulative effects of these traumas went unaddressed. And in the chaos and disorientation that was reigning over New Orleans, Lori was raped by someone she considered a friend. During the attack, Lori says, “I remember I just froze. That’s the only response I had.” So an arduous decade elapsed, marked at turns by all of her attempts to find relief. In December 2017, MAPS clinicians administered a battery of psychometric tests, and she was diagnosed with PTSD. A month later, she joined the study. MDMA—also known by its street names Molly, Ecstasy, or “E”—is a psychedelic drug first developed in 1912 as a potential drug to control bleeding. When that effort failed, the substance drifted out of awareness until it was rediscovered by the military and tested as an interrogation tool. When ingested, it can create intense sensory experiences—Technicolor landscapes, for instance, or a fish-eye lens perspective. Someone once saw visions of pretty girls with butterflies on their eyelashes. Another person kept seeing images of men with horse heads. It’s also known to induce a deep sense of peace and well-being, creating, in particular, an openness to confronting painful memories and emotions because it reduces the intensity of fear. It’s a potential aid to breakthroughs in treating psychic injuries due to sexual assault, abuse, and other trauma. This therapeutic possibility caught the eye of psychologists and, by the 1970s, the idea that MDMA might assist psychotherapy began to filter through the culture. Some thought the combination could lead to a “neuroconsciousness revolution.” But the rise of raves in the 1980s—and ravers’ hunger for MDMA—gave the substance a “party drug” rep. Against the backdrop of the war on drugs, the Drug Enforcement Administration declared an emergency ban in 1985 and placed it on the list of Schedule I drugs, a group of substances deemed to carry a high potential for abuse with no accepted medical use. It cemented a taboo that has eased only in the past few years and cut off any potential for serious research until the late ’90s, when MAPS first began its work.

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legal in the books, short of electroshock therapy,” Lori, 40, says with a dark laugh. For more than 10 years, the russet-headed New Orleans–based mixologist, who asked to have her last name withheld, had tried to quell waves of depression, acute anxiety, and a raw fight-or-f light response. “I’d been on antidepressants and antianxiety medication. I’d seen psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers. I’ve seen internists, dietitians, endocrinologists.” She takes a breath. “I’d actually gone to see a witch doctor. I’d been to physical therapy, acupuncture, massage therapy. I had…a Rolfer. I became a certified yoga teacher. I went on meditation retreats.” But nothing managed to bandage the lingering wounds of trauma. “I could flip out in a second,” she remembers, her nerves like a fuse on the bundle of lit dynamite tattooed on the inside of her left wrist. “People would make fun of me because they’d say, ‘Oh, Lori will jump out of her skin.’ ” The bottom would drop out on her mood for seemingly no reason, but she’d chalk it up to her personality. Sometimes, a certain touch or feeling would trigger her during sexual situations, and she’d literally scramble out of bed and flee the room. She’d race through her day, mixing up delicately balanced old-fashioneds at the Ace Hotel bar, all while battling her startle response with every clink of the glass. Back at home with her boyfriend and toddler son, she’d sit exhausted, depressed, numb. “I was just like, ‘This is who I am.’ ” And that’s the narrative she continued to accept. In the fall of 2017, she was anxiously scrolling through Instagram one night and saw a post that mentioned a research trial recruiting participants who were experiencing some of her symptoms. The intervention incorporated an illicit method but also an incredibly revolutionary one: the psychedelic drug MDMA. Conducted by MAPS, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, the study aimed to determine whether administering the hallucinogenic drug MDMA—what participants routinely call “medicine”—during psychotherapy could successfully relieve post-traumatic stress disorder and its attendant battery of symptoms. “I really didn’t equate it to my life,” Lori says she remembers thinking when she first considered PTSD as a possible cause of her difficulties. “I thought of it as something that soldiers had. My image was a shell-shocked veteran.” With increasing numbers of Iraq and Afghanistan war vets struggling with the disorder, PTSD has become inextricably corded to that image and, inevitably, to men. But the inadvertent gendering can be misleading. In the general population, women are twice as likely as men to develop PTSD. Lori felt she couldn’t possibly have been suffering enough to qualify, especially in a place like New Orleans. “They’re gonna get thousands [of applicants],” she recalls thinking. “The air is PTSD.” Still, she emailed study researchers, describing some of her history. Born in New Orleans, Lori saw her parents split before she hit high school. Her mom had bipolar disorder, so childhood felt “very unpredictable.” Her brother struggled too; the chronic lack of a calm home life left him battling a drug addiction. When she was 20, he fatally overdosed on pills in her home. Six years later, about a month before Hurricane Katrina made landfall, her mother murdered two people and then killed herself, a


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“I’ve always been, on some level, a high-functioning person,” says Karen Diamond, 62, a brunette with kind green eyes and a no-nonsense delivery. She lives outside of Boulder, Colorado, where MAPS conducted another, earlier trial. “But there are so many things I’ve lost out on because of how PTSD and repeated traumas have held me back.” Raised in a small Connecticut town by a drug-addicted single mother, Karen spent her early childhood looking for connection that remained elusive. She remembers her mother nodding off in a chair in their apartment, high on a cocktail of heroin and LSD, oblivious while 5-year-old Karen was repeatedly molested by upstairs neighbors. By the time she was 12, she’d lost both her parents to suicide. She was shuffled from one foster home to another, where more sexual trauma occurred. Ultimately, she dropped out of high school and fled to Virginia Beach to live with a friend and her mother. “I always did have this feeling that basic things that people take for granted—waking up, brushing your teeth, making your bed—I had to really fight to, like, keep all that together,” Karen says. She underwent decades of therapy, trying different antidepressants, but never really found a solution.

IT’S LIKE DOING YEARS OF THERAPY IN ONE DAY. IT’S NOT SCARY. I NEVER FELT OUT OF CONTROL.

W

hen Karen started the trial in 2015, she received three sessions of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy over the course of three months. The MDMA used in the study is 10 0 p e r c e nt pu r e —u n l i k e street versions—and par ticipants tend to stay fairly present in their bodies and retain their sense of self. For her first session, Karen chose to lie down on a couch with blankets. Some trial participants prefer an eye mask and headphones with a combination of tribal and classical music playing. Participants take one dose of MDMA at the beginning of the six to eight hours they spend with therapists, and there’s an option to take another half dose after several hours. Then, you can “go in,” as they say. Karen wrote a letter to her friends and family, documenting how she felt after her first experience.

What they say about the process is all true. It’s like doing years of therapy in one day. It’s not scary, I never felt out of control, and I didn’t feel high.… I did have these metaphorical visions in my mind and I’ve decided I like calling them “self-metaphors.”… If I started to see something I did not want to look at, I could and did easily move away from it. For me, that was the sexual abuse and I will be revisiting that for sure. The great thing is I was able to take the principles that I’ve intellectually known after decades of therapy and make a huge guttural connection.… Fucking amazing. The core of that for me, my main story, is that I’ve felt broken and unworthy. But I now know I’m whole and worthy.… A beautiful bud on a strong stem, some outer leaves crushed and bruised, but still able to bloom.

The following day, participants have an intense 90-minute therapy session in which they integrate the experience. “When you have an experience in an altered state, it can remain just as that. It’s not a part of [the participant’s] everyday life,” says Marcela Ot’alora, the study’s principal investigator in Boulder. “When they say, ‘These are the insights I got, these are the feelings I had in the session,’ and you allow that to really sit in the body, and you start exploring what that really feels like and how that relates to their life now, a change begins to happen. Finally, acceptance.” Ot’alora describes that session as a kind edge that demarcates the experiences of the past from “the possibility of what can be.” Participants remain in close contact with therapists in the weeks between sessions as they continue to process their experience. When Karen finished the program, her PTSD score was a 3, down from 99 (participants need a minimum score of 50 to meet inclusion criteria). After a prolonged physical illness—coupled with the current political climate—she recently experienced a setback in her progress and began ketamine-assisted psychotherapy with Ot’alora, who serves as her private therapist now. Ketamine, a gentle anesthetic commonly used on children that has been shown to produce psychedelic effects, is an approved drug prescribed off-label to treat depression. In the absence of access to MDMA, the psychedelic-curious have turned to ketamine clinics and physicians willing to prescribe the drug for their symptoms. A year and a half after her participation, Lori sums up the trajectory of her work in therapy as such: “Before, it would be my therapist saying, ‘Let’s just keep you alive.’ Now it’s like, ‘Let’s talk about your career.’ ” As the co–executive director of the Psychedelic Society New Orleans, Lori raises awareness around the use of psychedelics as well as their possible legalization, which could arrive in the not-too-distant future. In August 2017, MDMA received “breakthrough therapy designation” from the FDA, a signal that the agency acknowledges the treatment may have a meaningful advantage over available medications for PTSD, which could speed up the approval process. As the final phase of MAPS trials enrolls participants across 14 sites, the potential for legalization grows. If approved, the drug could be available by 2021. This marks a cultural shift between the past and the possibility of what will be. “I think right now, with the political climate we’re in, a lot of women have suffered sexual assault. But now all of that’s coming to the forefront,” Lori says with an air of hope. “We’re starting to talk about and recognize our trauma and how it affected us…and I think these types of therapies are radical.” ■


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R E S TA U R A N T | N I G H T C L U B | E V E N T S PA C E

TA O D O W N T O W N . C O M


ASPEN  CHICAGO ASPEN DALLAS CHICAGO HAMPTONS  HOUSTON  LAS VEGAS HOUSTON LOS ANGELES  MALIBU LOS MARTHA’S NANTUCKET  NEW YORK CITY SAN ORANGE COUNTY  SAN FRANCISCO DALLAS HAMPTONS LAS VEGAS ANGELES VINEYARD  MIAMI MIAMI  NEW YORK CITY ORANGE COUNTY FRANCISCO

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PRIME TIME

Restaurateur Stratis Morfogen has opened an East End version of his Lower Manhattan steak house, Brooklyn Chop House. The Southampton iteration is setting up shop in the Capri Hotel for the summer season, the same hot spot where the restaurant had a pop-up last year. Menu highlights will include dumplings galore, in addition to signature steaks and seafood. brooklynchophouse.com


ASPEN

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

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Interior designer Kam Davies.

POWER PLAYER

Family Tradition

Kam Davies draws on the past for interior inspiration. BY AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

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or close to a decade, interior designer Kam Davies of Davies Design Group has been curating interior spaces for families throughout the Aspen Valley with a mix of traditional beauty and contemporary innovation. Davies spent much of her childhood helping her mother comb European markets and antiques fairs in their home state of Connecticut, which fostered Davies’ love of homes that tell a story. This art form has carried over into her design sensibility, which balances custom crafted pieces and found treasures from across the United States, France, and the rest of Europe. Her goal: to create spaces of integrity where her clients can entertain, raise children, work, and recharge. “My style and design are influenced by my East Coast roots, extensive global travel, and my current home in the Colorado mountains,” Davies says. “The bespoke spaces I create are layered and authentic and weave together timeless classics and beautiful innovative design. I love clients who are looking to create a home with warmth and interest.” daviesdesigngroup.com

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M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

THE W TAKES ASPEN

Hublot CEO Ricardo Guadalupe (left) and Bode Miller.

W Aspen—the brand’s first alpine property—is scheduled to open this summer with 88 rooms and 11 fractional ownership units, one of only two hotels at the base of Aspen Mountain with ski-in/ski-out access. Beyond its location, W Aspen has also been receiving high praise for its modern chalet exterior. “Our strategy was to layer various stories of Aspen throughout,” says Anurag Nema, principal at New York’s Nemaworkshop,

A NEW WINE DIRECTOR FOR THE LITTLE NELL

The wine cellar at The Little Nell.

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Just four years after joining The Little Nell, Chris Dunaway, 30, has succeeded Carlton McCoy, managing the resort’s Grand Award–winning wine program. Trained at the American Sommelier Association and in New York’s best wine programs, including those at restaurants by Daniel Boulud, Dunaway has taken the helm just in time for the June Food & Wine Classic in Aspen, where he will host his predecessor in McCoy’s new position as CEO and president of Heitz Cellar at a Friday night dinner and tasting. Assuming Dunaway’s previous role as head sommelier is Erik Elliott. thelittlenell.com

Hublot hosted a decadent fondue and raclette dinner at Casa Tua recently to celebrate its new partnership with Aspen/Snowmass, where the Swiss watchmaker has become the resort’s official timepiece. The evening was hosted by Hublot CEO Ricardo Guadalupe and Olympic gold medalist and world champion skier Bode Miller, a part-time Aspen resident. hublot.com

which designed the hotel. “We drew from Aspen’s history as a silver mining town. This informed everything from the lobby lounge to miner-style lamps. We implemented clean, modern forms and palettes, as well as reflective and metallic surfaces—chrome, silver, and glass. We feel the rooms capture W’s youthful vibe within a mountain resort town context while transcending chalet-style conventions.” marriott.com/ hotels/travel/asewh-w-aspen


CHICAGO

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

from top:

A historic photo of Chicago’s Loop and “L”; Chicago Then and Now; the Loop and “L” now.

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OMAKASE, PLEASE

A new culinary gem has landed in West Loop. Created by one of the country’s premier sushi chefs and owner of acclaimed restaurant Juno, chef B.K. Park’s Mako is an intimate dining experience created for the avid gourmand. Served omakase style with a set menu of up to 25 bites crafted exclusively by Park himself, the food at Mako is an exploration of unique cuts of fish and luxurious seasonal ingredients. With the option to include a beverage pairing to complement the dishes, the dining experience is sure to delight. But hurry and make a reservation. With only 22 seats available, bookings are sure to be in hot demand. makochicago.com

A TALE OF TWO CITIES

The mind behind the travel book Cool Chicago, Kathleen Maguire, is at it again with a second book coming out in July. Chicago Then and Now is a gorgeously crafted photographic retrospective featuring historic images of the Windy City juxtaposed with their modern-day

counterparts. Highlighting historic locations such as the Biograph Theater, Navy Pier, and the remnants of the 1893 World’s Fair, the book shows the breathtaking transformation the city has undergone over the last 150 years. Highly curated archival footage paired with stunning modern photography creates a showstopping addition to any coffee table. Rizzoli Bookstores and rizzoliusa.com

Hello, Hoxton

Yet another British invasion is coming this season, to the heart of Fulton Market District, with the opening of the latest UK hospitality import from the Hoxton Hotel chain: The Hoxton Chicago, the third hotel to be opened in North America by developer group Ennismore. Unlike its counterparts, however, the hotel will be the first from the brand to feature a rooftop pool, a wellness studio with mind-and-body programming, and a coworking space perfect for visitors and locals alike. With comfortable and stylish midcentury modern– style rooms featuring artwork curated by gallerists from local Johalla Projects, two fantastic restaurants, and an intimate cocktail lounge, we are sure this space is to become a firm favorite among even the most discerning guests. thehoxton.com

H I S T O R I C P H O T O : C H I C AG O A E R I A L S U R V E Y I N G C O M PA N Y /C H I C AG O H I S T O R I C A L S O C I E T Y

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A seasonal selection of sashmi at Mako.


M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O clockwise from left :

Inside the new Jill Alberts store; Jill Alberts; Lauren K geometric mirror morganite Mischa ring, $4,389, jillalberts.com.

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POWER PLAYER

Moving on Up

Jewelry savant Jill Alberts opens a second store, in Glencoe. BY JESSIE AJLUNI

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ince launching her eponymous studio in 2008, which later evolved into a highly successful boutique in the Ravinia District of Highland Park, Jill A lberts dreamed of creating a space that would “allow for more events, trunk shows, and a wider selection of jewelry, accessories, and home decor.” Now her hard work and vision are paying off, with the May opening of her new location at 311 Park Avenue in Glencoe. Speaking to her choice of neighborhood, Alberts says, “My husband and I recently moved to Glencoe. We have come to love the community and its people. It is vibrant and welcoming.” Inspired by her love of design, the look of the store is an homage to the Hollywood Regency and midcentury

modern eras, featuring custom brass fixtures, chandelier lighting, and hardwood f loors. The decor is “Bergdorf Goodman meets Malibu Beach boutique!” she says. “Elegant but accessible and warm.” The gorgeous environment and impeccable service are just some of the many reasons to visit this soon-to-be retail hot spot. Along with her own custom designs, Alberts has gathered a veritable who’s who of coveted labels, including Mateo, Zoë Chicco, Adina Rey ter, and Elizabeth Cole, to name a few. With the addition of a highly curated estate and antique jewelry collection, a plethora of home accessories, and one-of-akind gifts, there is no shortage of treasures to discover. jillalberts.com


DALLAS

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

POWER PLAYER

Story Time

Artist Blake Hackler tackles delicate subject matter.

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lake Hackler has been a storyteller since the age of 3, when he began inventing long, surreal tales that astonished his speech therapist and his mother, who was watching, unseen, through a two-way mirror. But Hackler, who grew up in the windswept Texas Panhandle city of Amarillo, didn’t think he could actually become a writer until he penned a musical on a lark at the Yale School of Drama. “As actors, we were always complaining about the playwrights, which was ridiculous and typical, and my friend said, ‘Why don’t you write one for us?’” he recalls. The musical wound up in FringeNYC, and Hackler graduated into a multifaceted career as an actor, director, playwright, tenured faculty member at Southern Methodist University, and codirector of the Yale Summer Conservatory. The artist swears he is slowing down (“I’m actively trying to do less,” he says), but not before Second Thought Theatre and Circle Theatre copremiere his latest play, What We Were, August 28 to September 21 at Bryant Hall. Hackler’s plays explore modern ills, from loneliness to divisive politics, and What We Were is no different. The story centers on the reunion of three sisters who were sexually abused as children. It was loosely inspired by the true tale of Treva Throneberry, a Texan who posed as an abandoned teenager in town after town for more than a decade. Even after she was arrested for fraud, Throneberry asserted she was 16 in depositions, Hackler points out. “What would have to happen to make someone disassociate that way and want to relive those years over and over again?” he reflects. As he was writing it, however, he shifted focus from the troubled charlatan to a tribute to sisterhood. “I don’t have siblings, but my entire life I’ve observed the relationship between my mother and her two sisters,” Hackler explains. “Even though the story in the play is not their story at all, I wanted to honor that spirit, that level of family.” He’s also working on a commission for Dallas’ Undermain Theatre, where he is a company member. It’s a reimagining of Ibsen’s Brand as a meditation on the intersection of politics and faith. Stay tuned. secondthoughttheatre.com

P O R T R A I T BY J O R DA N F R A K E R

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BY HOLLY HABER


M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O from top:

A portrait of Kate Moss by photographer Mario Sorrenti; the book Kate.

GLOW, KATE, GLOW

Even if you’ve already got a copy of Kate, Mario Sorrenti’s photographic paean to a teenage Kate Moss, there’s nothing quite like seeing the originals. The Dallas Contemporary presents “Kate,” 58 of Sorrenti’s black-and-white portraits of his then girlfriend along with something far more exclusive: the photographer’s first Super 8mm film of the as-yet-undiscovered supermodel. “We’re talking nobody’s ever seen it except Mario and Kate,” says gallery executive director Peter Doroshenko. “Kate” will be on view through August 25 with a complementary show: “Self Service: Twenty-Five Years of Fashion, People and Ideas Reconsidered,” an exhibition celebrating the biannual Parisian periodical through photography, graphic design, and more. dallascontemporary.org

A tabletop spread at The Henry.

SUMMER 2019

Fox Restaurant Concepts, which brought you tasty, healthful eating at True Food Kitchen and Flower Child, goes for the gusto at The Henry. There are few limits on indulgence at this buzzy new watering hole, coffee bar, and restaurant in Uptown. Case in point: The bread pudding is made with croissants and topped with caramel ice cream. The Henry and its peacockish subtitle, The Greatest Neighborhood Restaurant, originated in Phoenix when restaurateur Sam Fox conceived and built it for his own enjoyment for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. The Henry’s third iteration here is suitably Texan–it’s the biggest at nearly 16,000 square feet and the only one with two stories. Bilevel outdoor seating is a godsend in a city that’s starved for patio dining, and the scene indoors is hopping. A precisely edited menu of New American cuisine doesn’t disappoint. Don’t miss the seared ahi tuna over green curry rice in lemongrass broth, the jalapeño creamed sweet corn, or the aforementioned whiskey raisin croissant pudding. Creative cocktails like Wake the Angels tickle the palate. This divine blend of gin, rose petals, grapefruit, yuzu, and sparkling wine might just be heaven sent. thehenryrestaurant.com

Don Morphy Privé Clothiers is only a few years old, but the bespoke atelier already claims Emmitt Smith, Dwight Howard, and Tyra Banks as clients and won Fashion Group International’s 2019 Rising Star Award. Crafted in Italian factories of Italian textiles, the Don Morphy look is crisp and polished with a bit of swagger. “I get inspiration from Italy and also from my background in Cameroon–you see a lot of colors in my designs,” says founder Daniel Mofor, pictured below. “Also, I like the 1940s, long story short.” donmorphy.com

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HAMPTONS

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

W H E R E T O S T AY : The Maidstone Hotel A local gem in East Hampton, this hotel is marking its 10-year anniversary this summer. With the introduction of a latenight menu of entertainment, food, and cocktails, the festivities won’t stop when the sun goes down. The main event will take place on June 8, with an inaugural Rosé Day at the hotel. Perhaps you’ll spot celebs like Alec Baldwin, Martha Stewart, or Brooke Shields. themaidstone.com

Gurney’s Star Island Resort & Marina The third resort under the Gurney’s name, this is a boater’s paradise. Dock at the marina and enjoy waterside food and beverage delivered via bicycle. Stop in to Gurney’s Showfish, the restaurant that will be celebrated for its Sunday brunch menu. gurneysresorts.com

Left Hand Coffee Grab a cup of java at this locally owned coffee roaster in Montauk and feel good about it. Dedicated to producing organic coffee that pays homage to surf culture, Left Hand Coffee uses recycled materials, and its beans are sustainably produced. lefthandcoffee.com Coche Comedor Featuring vibrant Mexican cuisine and colorful design elements, this new restaurant in Amagansett is a must-visit. A Brooklyn-based graffiti artist painted the indoor wall mural, while seven local artists are responsible for making custom tabletops. Handcrafted local products add to the flair, as does the authentic regional Mexican fare. facebook.com/cochecomedor

The Menhaden Newly opened, this 16-room boutique hotel on the North Fork offers nautical charm with quirky vintage vibes. Every guest room floor will have a specially curated art gallery and a fridge stocked with local delicacies and beverages for guests to indulge in. themenhaden.com

clockwise from above : The Menhaden’s lobby; a rendering of a room at Gurney’s Star Island; The Maidstone Hotel’s dining room; the entrance to The Maidstone; preparing iced brew at Left Hand coffee; Coche Comedor’s colorful seating scheme; The Shop x Tarin Thomas.

W H E R E T O E AT:

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WH E RE TO S HOP: The Montauk Beach House: The Shop x Tarin Thomas The summer’s must-shop pop-up experience is curated by jewelry designer Tarin Thomas and hosted at The Montauk Beach House. The Shop x Tarin Thomas will feature stylish accessories, fashions, and more. Plus, the Beach House will also be holding Sunset Chats with Female Founders, the best pool parties, and much more throughout the season. thembh.com FIN Montauk Stop by this boutique for a gold- or silverdipped fossilized shark tooth. Founded in 2013 by shark wrangler Bella Ornaf, the shop sells necklaces she creates, inspired by her passion for the environment. Each piece comes from far below the ocean’s surface, no sharks are harmed in the process, and a percentage of sales goes to shark conservation orgs. finmontauk.com


M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

POWER PLAYER

Picture Perfect in Montauk

Cocktail and oyster bar Sel Rrose Montauk is the newest outpost from Kristin Vincent. BY KASEY CAMINITI

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from top:

Oysters at Sel Rrose; Kristin Vincent.

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he creative and cool atmosphere curated at New York City’s Sel Rrose restaurant was no accident. Former DJ and current restaurateur Kristin Vincent has successfully captured a specific mood and clever moments at her Lower East Side Sel Rrose location with the help of her trusted team of creatives, so why not take her talents to Montauk? “[Sel Rrose] is still the place where fashionistas, artists, and the avantgarde professionals can gather and be inspired but now is located right on the water in the Hamptons,” Vincent says of her new locale, opening this summer. With a picturesque waterfront backdrop, Sel Rrose Montauk will offer an Instagram-friendly outpost that feels just as chic and stylish as the LES venue, but with more of a Hamptons vibe. Vincent tapped Francine Monaco of D’Aquino Monaco to design a hand-painted mural and custom banquettes that parallel the LES designscape while simultaneously showcasing a new personality embodied by Montauk. The Candice Kaye Design team, which created the whimsical custom wallpaper for the LES, brought the banquette fabric to life—it will serve as one of the focal points at Sel Rrose Montauk. “There will be a curiosity cabinet, where guests can view fresh oysters being shucked, and windows that will open to the beach, connecting people to the water. People can expect a lavish but relaxing, beachy feel while being served our beloved cocktails and the Hamptons’ best oysters,” Vincent says. Taking cues from the stunning new location, Vincent has integrated the freshest seafood and premium oysters into the restaurant’s menu, paying homage to the space’s proximity to the water. Oh, and there will be homemade dipping sauces as well. On the spirits front (because what looks better on Instagram than a pretty cocktail?), the brand’s signature Lavender Piscine will be on the menu, along with an all-natural wine list. “We’re the only place in Montauk focusing on a natural wine list, which is one of the next big trends for the summer. I’m also very excited about our orange wine—it’s the new rosé and the perfect drink for summer,” Vincent reveals. Inspired by famed interior decorator Dorothy Draper, the newest cocktail and oyster bar to join Montauk’s roster will feature a giant oval bar made of marble where patrons can sit. The golden hour beach photo ops are truly special to the Hamptons. “There are Instagram-worthy backdrops and details around every corner,” Vincent says. She adds that Sel Rrose Montauk will open earlier and close later than most places nearby, making it its very own travel destination on Eastern Long Island. selrrose.com/montauk


HOUSTON

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

POWER PLAYER

Explosive Ideas Houstonian entrepreneur Chloé Di Leo is changing the rules of craft cocktail making. BY JESSIE AJLUNI

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ince she was young, Chloé Di Leo has been developing a mind for business. Growing up watching her mother sell jewelry in Vietnam and later immigrating to America and working alongside her family when they opened Salt Lake City’s first Asian grocery store, Di Leo learned the values of an entrepreneurial spirit firsthand. “My mother put us all to work, you know, packing and unpacking products, running the cash register,” she says. “She worked really hard. So I guess we got a lot of that from her.” That zest for creating companies led her down the path of fashion, and from there she started the first of her successful brands, a namesake fine jewelry business, Di Leo Diamonds. It wasn’t until one fateful night with her children, however, that the idea sparked for her second company. “My 12-year-old daughter has eczema, so she, of

course, loves bath bombs. One night we ran out of them, so I thought, I need to make some; it can’t be too difficult. At the same time, my son came down the stairs eating Pop Rocks. As he was popping them in his mouth, I shouted at him to drink more water and eat less candy. It was then the idea popped into my head, so I said, ‘I’m going to make you a fizzy drink bomb.’” This serendipitous moment started the first iteration of her company, My Drink Bomb, which kicked off with Bomb Squad For Kids, a flavored all-natural edible treat designed to mix with water to encourage children to drink more. Di Leo didn’t stop there: When the idea to use the bombs as mixers for adult beverages came to her, she created Mixologi. “We contacted a chemist and worked together to formulate the technology to dehydrate all the ingredients of a cocktail into a powder so that it can easily dissolve in alcohol and sparkling soda. By using natural f lavors such as cane sugar, dry fruits, and bitters, as well as edible f lowers, we create a handcrafted drink bomb with no artificial elements.” Fast-forward just one year, and the company now boasts more than 29 cocktail f lavors and seven children’s varieties, and has become a tour de force on the Houston events scene. Creating custom orders for special occasions such as weddings and gender reveal parties, the brand shows no signs of slowing down. With a health and wellness line called Fit Bombs coming out this summer—which includes CBD and detox options—My Drink Bomb is set to explode onto the beverage and spirits market in a major way. mydrinkbomb.com

clockwise from left : Chloé Di Leo; the Lavender Lush Drink Bomb; a Mixologi four-pack; Drink Bombs mix with a variety of spirits.


M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

James Harden of the Houston Rockets, shot by Erik Madigan Heck.

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PICTURE PERFECT

H A R D E N : C O U R T E S Y O F S TA L E Y - W I S E GA L L E RY, E R I K M A D I GA N H E C K / T R U N K A R C H I V E

SUMMER 2019

A new hotel is looking to make its mark this summer. Serving as the hospitality anchor to the Allen Center, the C. Baldwin will debut downtown with surely as much gravitas as its namesake, the “Mother of Houston” herself, Charlotte Baldwin Allen. Featuring more than 350 luxuriously appointed rooms designed by Lauren Rottet, and photography and artwork curated by Elizabeth Conley, the minimalist palette creates a sleek and sophisticated stay. Thanks to amenities that include more than 14,000 square feet of meeting space, a nail salon, and a restaurant created by Top Chef Masters winner Chris Cosentino, this boutique destination is certain to become a fixture on the Houston hospitality scene. cbaldwinhotel.com

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Sleeping in Style

VEGGING OUT

Things are looking a little greener in The Heights neighborhood with the opening of vegan restaurant Verdine. The brainchild of owner and executive chef Stephanie Hoban, this highly successful local food truck has now been joined by a fully fledged brick-and-mortar restaurant. With familiar powder blue accents and shiplap walls, the charming, rustic interior creates a relaxed yet elegant environment perfect for a casual lunch or evening happy hour. Featuring a 100 percent plant-based seasonal menu, including such culinary delights as jackfruit carnitas and Beyond Meat burgers, this healthconscious café’s mantra is to “Eat with a Purpose,” and that, as well as the food, will keep hungry Houstonians coming back for more. eatverdine.com

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The exhibition “Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography” will make its heralded appearance in Space City this summer at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The selection of vivid images examines diverse views of style through the lenses of the medium’s pros as well as lesser-known yet influential artists. With examples that

range from portraits of celebrities including Selena and Run-DMC to the inner pages of several of the world’s glossiest magazines, the show encapsulates some of the most important cultural touchstones of the last century and how fashion is intertwined with those moments. For the style, art, and history enthusiast, this captivating curation is a must-see. It runs June 23 through September 22. mfah.org


LAS VEGAS

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

Return to the Palace Palace Station has long been thought of as “that reasonably priced locals casino closest to the Strip,” but after a two-year renovation, the resort shows visitors it’s one to compete with the big boys. The much-needed $192 million upgrade spread the love, modernizing the casino floor as well as 575 guest rooms in the 21-story hotel tower, plus adding some of the hottest spots to dine in town right now, including the cool bBd’s (Burgers, Beers, Desserts) and a revamp of the Feast Buffet. Never fear, Oyster Bar fans: That 24-hour seafood institution has not moved an inch. Because even in an ever-evolving city, some things should never change. palacestation.sclv.com

BURGER BLITZ Las Vegas–born Secret Burger turns you into the ultimate dining insider. A quick visit to its website lets you know when a restaurant will feature an offmenu, out-of-the-ordinary, lavishly adorned dish for one day only and lets you reserve it ahead of time.

Eateries both on- and off-Strip have jumped on this fun concept, which recently expanded to San Francisco, L.A., and Portland. It’s not just burgers that are waiting to be discovered— check out the Vampire Tacos at Border Grill and more. secretburger.com

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from left : Boathouse restaurant; Palace Station’s new exterior.

Honey Salt restaurant’s Secret Burger.

I N TH E KNOW Secret Manhattans: Rosina at the Venetian How many different ways can you improve on the combination of whiskey, sweet vermouth, and bitters? According to classic cocktail heaven Rosina’s Secret Manhattan Menu, six. Feel truly royal with The King of Scotland, a dose of Laphroaig and Monkey Shoulder whiskeys, Gran Classico, Carpano Antica Formula vermouth, salt, and an orange twist. venetian.com Secret Side: Camelot Steakhouse at Excalibur If you want true extravagance, it’s all in the truffles. The off-menu mac and cheese adorned with truffles is a favorite among regulars who know how to feast like a king. excalibur.com Ghost Donkey, the secret bar at the Cosmopolitan.

Ultimate Surf and Turf: Le Cirque at the Bellagio While surf and turf is hardly a secret, the temple of French cuisine found a way to make it even more special. Start with the Kobe A5-grade rib eye blanketed in Perigourdine sauce made from truffles and topped with seared foie gras and more shaved truffles. Then pair that opulence with a two-pound, butter-poached Maine lobster tail, capped with Russian osetra caviar and crowned with edible 24-karat gold leaf. bellagio.com Ghost Donkey: the Cosmopolitan We’ve covered the secret menus. How about an entire secret bar? Tucked behind Block 16 Urban Food Hall, the cozy, low-lit mezcal and tequila speakeasy seats only a handful of folks at a time. If you get lucky and nab a coveted seat, you won’t want to give it up anytime soon. cosmopolitanlasvegas.com


M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

Ambros whiskey founder Jeff Tomastik.

POWER PLAYER

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Go Bananas

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How a nightlife exec created a brand-new spirit. BY GRACE BASCOS

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great time for new f lavors to make their mark. Ambros is short for ambrosia, which means “something especially good to taste,” he explains. “Whiskey is usually defined by where it comes from or how old it is, but Ambros is defined by being able to deliver truly authentic f lavor into spirits.” Produced in Henderson, Nevada, it’s the first spirit on the market that uses 100 percent real fruit, with no artificial f lavors, added syrups, or sugars. Each batch requires more than 50,000 fresh, hand-peeled Cavendish bananas from Ecuador or Costa Rica that are infused into a relatively young Irish whiskey, aged only about three years. The proprietary infusion takes about two weeks, and the result is a wonderful surprise. Too often people associate banana-f lavored anything with it being too cloying or fake-flavored. Ambros delivers a fresh, mild banana splash that tames the whiskey. Several Strip spots have even given the spirit of a life of its own. “Many mixologists loved the new challenge in delivering a cocktail featuring banana whiskey,” he reports. Seersucker at Caesars Palace offers the Bananas Foster Old Fashioned, which involves Ambros, brown sugar, baking spices, and bitters, while Yellowtail at the Bellagio features the fresh Banana Blossom, accompanying the whiskey w ith peach liqueur, lime, and lychee. Or you can be like Tomastik and simply enjoy Ambros on the rocks. “The versatility attracts drinkers who otherwise may not normally drink whiskey, while at the same time, we find that many whiskey drinkers enjoy it as well,” he says. ambroswhiskey.com

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rom stiff martinis to free-flowing bottle-service vodka to popping champagne over an extravagant dinner, you’ll never go thirsty in Las Vegas. Now you can add banana whiskey to the mix thanks to Ambros founder Jeff Tomastik, who had the crazy idea to infuse the tropical fruit into the brown spirit. Before Tomastik got into the banana booze business, he built a career in Vegas nightlife starting in 2011 and eventually worked his way up to become a VIP marketing executive for Hakkasan Group, whose clubs include Hakkasan at the MGM Grand, Omnia at Caesars Palace, and 1 OAK at the Mirage. “Las Vegas nightlife really taught me some of the greatest skills when it comes to hospitality, marketing, and guest relations that are key in successfully running any F&B business,” he says. It wasn’t long until he managed to translate those skills into his own endeavors. “I have never been artistic but always had a desire to create,” he admits. “Developing brands and products are my way of showing that creativity. When I turned 30, my entrepreneurial spirit really took over.” As he was transitioning from his role as a marketing executive in 2016, he set out to create Ambros. In the meantime, in 2017, he launched Tail & Fin, a fast-casual sushi burrito and poke bowl spot at TMobile Arena, where the Vegas Golden Knights play. Tomastik has witnessed nightlife evolve over the past eight years from a heavily DJ-driven, bottle-service experience to one of more midsize clubs and lounges on the scene that concentrate on craft cocktails rather than how much premium vodka they can sling. And he thinks that now is a


LOS ANGELES

A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

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Designer Inghua Ting.

POWER PLAYER

Fasten Your Seat Belts Inghua Ting has turned vintage leather belts into her line’s signature design statement. BY JEREMY KINSER

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f you think recycling doesn’t lend itself easily to high-end design, prepare to change your mind when you see the exquisite design products of Inghua Ting. The innovative British-born designer, who oversees studios in both Los Angeles and London from her Hollywood Hills home, has always maintained a design ethos centered around the reuse and repurposing of old and existing materials.

Ting’s stunning bespoke tiles, made from the finest vintage leather belts, are perhaps the most sterling examples of this ethos. These glossy, hard-wearing modular surfaces grace the floors, walls, and doors of hotels, restaurants, and yachts. “Our clients say the leather floors age gracefully, and as time passes and foot traffic works the leather, it develops its own patina and story, which we feel adds to the character of our product and the ownership experience,” Ting says. “We source and recycle worn belts and create a product that celebrates their history and the patina that comes with being worn for decades.” It was right after her 2000 graduation from the Royal College of Art with a degree in textile design that she recalls being filled with a sense that it was possible to shape her own career path and incorporate her passion for recycled leather. One of her favorite and most popular products is among her earliest creations: the Ting Sling, a thoroughly modernized version of a hammock. Hers will allow you to spend the summer months relaxing in a body-conforming yet comfortable patio accessory. The clean aesthetic of polished stainlesssteel hardware combined with the sleek appearance of a woven automotive seat belt seems to resonate in a wide variety of environments. “We have been making the Ting Sling for over 15 years and have seen them installed in homes of all styles, as well as hotels and ocean liners,” she says. “We understand that our clients are often looking for something unique,” Ting says. “The combination of a sustainable surface that is handmade and bespoke has a strong appeal. We work closely with clients to understand their project and environment and develop designs specifically tailored and complementary.” While Ting’s clientele consists predominantly of architects and interior designers who specify a product for a project, there are also private individuals who reach out when they have a space they’re renovating and want something as simple as an area rug or leather tiles. Items from her collection have been included in exhibitions at such esteemed venues as Selfridges in London, Colette in Paris, Bergdorf Goodman in New York, and Adrian Grenier’s SHFT in L.A. With her solid-gold feel for textures that resonate, you could say Ting has the Midas touch. tinglondon.com


M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

R E S E R VAT I O N R E Q U E S TS

ONE MORE NIGHT

Audrey at the Hammer’s interior.

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While the expression goes that nothing lasts forever, sometimes good things get even better. Less than two years ago, The Jeremy Hotel opened and instantly established itself as L.A.’s newest cool aesthetic icon. Gorgeous midcentury furnishings, concrete ceilings, and geometric-patterned headboards made it the hippest place to stay on West Hollywood’s Sunset Boulevard. Its killer panoramic views of the city didn’t hurt, either. Now the hot property has been transformed into 1 Hotel, the latest luxury brand inspired by nature from awardwinning investment firm Starwood Capital. The update cultivates the best of eco-conscious design and sustainable architecture, coupled with extraordinary comfort and an unrivaled level of service. As Starwood chairman Barry Sternlicht notes, “The opportunity to acquire this new extraordinarily located real estate in such an important destination with all of its amenities was extremely compelling to our brand and team.” 1 Hotel upholds the brand’s vision by channeling nature through design and culinary partnerships, connecting with the local community, and taking sustainable steps to make a big environmental difference. See for yourself: The 186 rooms offer floor-to-ceiling windows, native greenery, reclaimed wood, marble bathrooms, and organic cotton linens. 1hotels.com

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Crab cakes at Red Herring.

bring the classic dinner party to life with a selection of hearty dishes (the Duroc pork chop with lentils, cauliflower, soft egg, tomato, and pepper sauce is a must), along with the brand’s first-ever full cocktail and bar program. redherringla.com Audrey at the Hammer, L.A.’s latest culinary masterpiece, is situated in the venerated Westwood-based museum, just a few feet from the landmark’s other works of art. With a nearly 30-footlong inside-outside bar as its dazzling centerpiece, the Audrey, named for noted philanthropist and Hammer board member Audrey Irmas, is ideal for a sit-down dinner, casual cocktails, or just a light daytime meal. You’ll dine on a blend of soulful cuisine with a genuinely contemporary SoCal feel that’s yoked to the region’s growing seasons. Order up the carta di musica, a mouthwatering bottarga with Persian lime and chives, or perhaps the turmeric roasted chicken with charred sweetheart cabbage and pickled golden raisins. audreyatthehammer.com

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Red Herring stands out as one of the city’s most popular eateries. Already a destination restaurant thanks to its ultrachic flagship Eagle Rock locale and delectable made-from-scratch small plates and entrées from chef and co-owner Dave Woodall, the brand will bring its menu of elevated American comfort food (using locally sourced ingredients) and vintage glamour to Downtown Los Angeles this summer. The new location will be highly personalized with customdesigned wallpaper to offer bona fide Hollywood-glam design elements and eye-catching details, which range from light fixtures to barstools to wallcoverings. The culinary program will

A Deluxe King room at 1 Hotel West Hollywood.


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

Originally opened 45 years ago in Malibu, Fred Segal, the beloved purveyor of laidback menswear, womens wear, activewear, and accessories, has just teamed up with Jameston and Maris Collective for a brand-new store in Malibu Village. The modern, 4,000-square-foot emporium is outfitted with a large selection of eyewear, a multibrand men’s and women’s footwear shop, and brands like Mara Hoffman, LNDR, Proenza Schouler, 324 New York, and, of course, Fred Segal Originals. fredsegal.com

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CALIFORNIA CLASSIC

Home Front

Offerings from the Vince Home concept store.

For design insight and a compilation of refined California-inspired goods, head to the first-ever Vince Home concept store. Lined with a polished concrete floor, rattan pendant lamps, and a crème-hued leather sofa, the tranquil 800-foot space (located adjacent to Vince with ready-to-wear, footwear, and handbags) is stocked with comfy cashmere blankets, suede slippers, design tomes such as Leslie Williamson’s Interior Portraits: At Home with Cultural Pioneers and Creative Mavericks, skincare serums by Campo, and gold necklaces by Los Angeles–based designer Loren Stewart. vince.com

from left :

Fred Segal in Malibu Village; a look at the curated picks.

TABLE MANNERS Seventy-six years ago, David H. Murdock, founder and owner of Four Seasons Hotel Westlake Village, returned home after serving in World War II with two things in his pocket: a nickel and a penny. Now, the property is paying homage to Murdock’s modest beginnings with the new restaurant Coin & Candor. Designed by EDG (of Ojai Valley Inn and Andaz Scottsdale), the stylish, light-filled brasserie features an oculus bar, a guild station for guests to view pastry sculptors at work constructing the eatery’s 33-layer croissant, and menu items by executive chef Jose Fernandez, including heirloom tomato tartare with local tomatoes plucked from Thorne Family Farm, and grilled cauliflower steak with corn mole and chive oil. coinandcandor.com

The oculus bar at Coin & Candor.


MALIBU

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

POWER PLAYER

From the Farm

Helene Henderson’s Malibu Farm restaurants are going global. BY JENNIE NUNN

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hef and restaurateur Helene Henderson, founder of Malibu Farm, wakes up every morning at 6 a.m. “I play with my phone for a bit to not wake anyone else in the house, then it is animals first: I feed the cat, then I let the dogs out, I feed the front yard animals, the pig and the chickens, and then down below to the goats,” says the busy chef, who tends to her own two-acre Malibu farm and splits her time between the café and restaurant on the Malibu Pier known for locally sourced organic fruit and vegetables, grass-fed beef, and free-range eggs. “Then I eat my first breakfast—green tea and a little yogurt—while I read the Los Angeles Times. Around 9 a.m., I go for a run or to the gym and usually arrive on the pier by 10:30 a.m. Once I’m at the pier, I drink coffee and eat the staff meal. I visit both the café and restaurant and run up and down the pier many times per day.” Henderson, who spent her childhood learning cooking, foraging, and smoking skills from her grandmother in her native town of Lulea, Sweden, first moved to New York after

graduating from high school. “I didn’t have a plan, money, or any connections—not sure what I was thinking, but I was taking a gap year before returning back home to go to university, which was a very common practice in Sweden at the time,” recalls Henderson. “There were no women in the kitchens in Sweden then, at least not in the north where I lived. Going to culinary school was not something I had heard of or something anyone did where I was from. It never even occurred to me that it was a possible career path. I was moving around life with no direction, taking odd jobs here and there, and cooking was something I knew how to do. I stumbled into it professionally.” After doing some modeling and working at a few clothing boutiques in New York, she followed a close friend to Los Angeles. “I did a lot of cooking at home for family and friends and almost accidentally started a catering company,” says Henderson, who began growing and serving veggies from her backyard garden, teaching cooking classes from her home, and spearheading a blog, Malibu Farm, with recipes from the classes. These days, Henderson has amassed several Malibu Farm restaurants, with outposts in Miami, Lanai, and Rosewood Miramar Beach in Montecito, and she has two more in the works, with New York’s Pier 17 location set to open this summer and another outside Tokyo opening next year. “I love food, cooking, organizing, planning, serving, bussing tables, and being a hostess,” Henderson says. “It’s a lways rewarding to see guests and staff begin to incorporate more vegetables and produce into their daily meals.” malibu-farm.com

from top:

Helene Henderson; with her pet pig, Arnold.


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

POWER PLAYER

Head of the Class

Fitness instructor Taryn Toomey is taking over Edgartown in July. BY NATASHA WOLFF

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Taryn Toomey; last year’s Martha’s Vineyard Retreatment.

itness guru Taryn Toomey has become famous for her signature mat-based class, a cathartic and grounding blend of yoga, strength training, and cardio called The Class, which she conducts in her Tribeca studio. Toomey, who started teaching the method out of the basement gym of her apartment building, now counts Jennifer Aniston, Naomi Watts, and Christy Turlington Burns as devotees of the workout. For the sixth consecutive summer, Toomey is offering The Retreatment, a weeklong retreat for 40 students taking place July 14 to 20 at Vineyard Arts Project in Edgartown. Instructor Kevin Courtney will begin each day with a morning meditation, followed by Taryn-taught classes for two hours, and then restorative gentle yoga in the afternoon. “Some guests return year after year with a sense of coming back home,” Toomey

Why is this a good location to host The Retreatment? Martha’s Vineyard is easy for New Yorkers and Bostonians to hop over to, and yet it still remains quiet and private. They can leave their worries and responsibilities behind without having to travel too far. The island, with its six old-fashioned neighborhoods and beautiful beaches, feels like a home away from home. What’s special about the island for you? Being here allows you to disconnect in a different way. It gives you a sense of peace and disconnection from the daily city grind. I love going up-island with my kids, working out, packing lunches, and spending the day at the beach. Why is Vineyard Arts Project a great venue for this event? It’s perfect because it has a variety of room types, a gorgeous practice space for The Class, lots of room for family meals, and is a hop, skip, and jump away from downtown Edgartown, so guests have access to quite a lot during their free time. I spent my summers coming to Martha’s Vineyard, and the Vineyard Arts Project has always had a special place in my heart. What type of attendee do you normally attract? The environment that the leaders create for the group is one of inclusivity, so that no matter if it’s your first Class or your ninth Retreatment, all are welcome, and a deep community is formed. What’s new for the brand? I’m excited to bring our work and mission out to the world on a bigger scale. We’re always growing and thinking of ways to better serve our community.

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says. “Others join us for the first time knowing that this week in July holds a special place in our hearts, as it was the first Retreatment program we ever offered.” Jan Buhrman of Kitchen Porch presides over the three daily gluten-, sugar-, and dairy-free meals, which feature farm-to-table fare. Also on offer are healing sessions by Thomas Droge, a cacao ceremony by Not Your Sugar Mamas, and a special beach dinner. We checked in with the trainer and mother of two to see why she loves Martha’s Vineyard and what she does on the island. From $3,200 per person; taryntoomey.com


MARTHA’S VINEYARD

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

JUST DANCE

Tee Time

From Cuba to Brazil to Boston, there is no shortage of farflung dance and performance art offerings coming to The Yard arts center in Chilmark. New works from modern dance companies Taylor 2, Ronald K. Brown/Evidence, Joanna Kotze, and Malpaso will be staged, as will tap performances from Leonardo Sandoval and Gregory Richardson. dancetheyard.org

H A R B O R V I E W : A L I S O N S H AW

ROOMS WITH A VIEW

brass furniture, and cobalt blue walk-in showers. Rooms in The Amity are more casual and island-chic, with a vintage surfer vibe. Think glossy whitewashed wood planking on the walls, blue-striped upholstered headboards, modern furnishings with a weathered-driftwood finish, and pops of red. Chef Patrice Martineau, who worked under Daniel Boulud at Daniel in New York City, has been brought on to oversee the new restaurant venues, Bettini Restaurant and Roxana Bar. The 95-seat Bettini features lacquered deep-blue-gray walls, expansive windows with ocean views, and red leather banquettes and booths. “I love the windows that frame the coastal view just outside,” says Martineau. “That reinforces our relationship with the local landscape and creates a more seamless island-to-table dining experience for our guests.” Just-caught seafood bouillabaisse and steak cooked on a lava stone grill are on the restaurant’s menu, while at Roxana Bar, dishes like lobster fried rice and citruscured hamachi take center stage. harborviewhotel.com

SUMMER 2019

legacy and to utilize as many local businesses as possible in its renovation,” says Chris Bird, the Harbor View’s general manager. “As an Edgartown resident, he understands the importance of the hotel to the community and to the generations of guests who consider it part of their family.” The rooms in the Historic Building have gotten a modern makeover in a palette of brown, blue, and cream, with lattice-patterned carpeting, high-gloss mahogany-and-

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The island’s largest year-round waterfront resort, within walking distance of Edgartown and close to the beaches, the Harbor View Hotel has reopened after a large-scale renovation that lasted nine months. The Victorian exterior has been reshingled, gardens redeveloped, and guest rooms, public spaces, and event venues all reimagined under the purview of Boston-based designer Peter Niemitz. “It was very important to our owner, Bernard Chiu, to maintain the property’s

from top: Robbins pullover; Herron shirt; Ward sweater (on model); Fischer belt.

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Friends and avid golfers Alex Holderness and John Bourne loved to play the links together but long bemoaned the fit and style of golf shirts before taking matters into their own hands, founding men’s golf apparel and lifestyle brand Holderness & Bourne. “The shirts we saw on the market always seemed to fall into one of two categories: classic or hyper-athletic,” Holderness says. “The classic shirts were cut much baggier than we preferred and didn’t wick moisture well on hot days. The athletic shirts lacked the understated style we associate with the game.” The duo spent more than a year researching fabric mills and manufacturers before finding well-established operations to help execute their vision. Expanding on collared shirts, they’ve just debuted belts, weekend bags, sweaters, and vests. The Ward crewneck and Egan striped polo are new and sold at the Royal & Ancient Chappaquiddick Links golf course. holdernessandbourne.com


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

Poolside at The Lennox.

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A tight-knit pair of sumptuous culinary concepts are making their entrance this summer in the Design District: L’Atelier, the restaurant made famous by the late Joël Robuchon, and Le Jardinier, a vegetable-centric eatery helmed by chef Alain Verzeroli, a longtime Robuchon protégé. L’Atelier will serve French dishes, including beloved classics like crispy langoustine papillote, and caramelized free-range quail with foie gras and potato purée.

Natural Habitat

After a $71 million renovation, the former Peter Miller Hotel, built in 1936 and designed by legendary South Beach architect Russell Pancoast, will reopen this summer as the Lennox Hotel. An eco-chic vibe is evident throughout the four-building hotel, which retains the original façade but features an entirely updated interior, replete with luxe touches such as naturally preserved moss on the walls surrounding the plunge pool; upcycled furnishings sourced by Argentine interior designer Juan Ciavarella and made in Patagonia; and vegan bath products. The beach is just a few blocks away, but the property will spirit you there in a golf cart if you prefer. lennoxmiamibeach.com

Contemplate buying a Swiss-made chronograph over preembargo Cuban rum and jamón Ibérico, Soviet-era vodka and Petrossian caviar, or all of the above at Maison F.P. Journe, a just-opened boutique in the Kimpton Epic Hotel. The curvaceous two-story glass atrium displays F.P. Journe wristwatches surrounded by a 10-seat cocktail space, Bar Journe, and an outdoor cigar lounge with furnishings designed by Spanish yacht-builder Astilleros Astondoa. Make a reservation at the bar to access a cabinet of vintage spirits, including 1980s Suntory Japanese whiskey. (Members can opt for their own private locker to hold favorite libations.) For a nonalcoholic alternative, ask the in-house coffee expert to whip up a caffeinated beverage made with single-origin beans or steep one of several fine, rare Japanese teas. epichotel.com

L’Atelier’s caramelized free-range quail.

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COCKTAIL TIME

from left : Bar Journe’s Age of Aquarius, made with Empress 1908 gin and East Imperial tonic; Maison F.P. Journe.


MIAMI

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

Michael Gardner, founder and CEO of Headliner Market Group.

BY JAMIE BECKMAN

P O R T R A I T BY Y E S I

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or a nightlife impresario who’s been dubbed a kingmaker by Miami media, Michael Gardner, founder and CEO of promotions company Headliner Market Group, certainly keeps a low profile. To seek out the mastermind behind LIV Nightclub’s weekly bash LIV on Sunday, nicknamed the Best Party in the World—a pulsating, hip-hop-heavy, performance-packed models-and-bottles bacchanal regularly name-checked on rap tracks—you’ll have the best luck behind the scenes. As the night winds down, Gardner often stands at the door as clubgoers file out, thanking them for coming. That moment, when he sees the smiles on revelers’ faces—many of them tourists who’ve come to experience Magic City’s storied club scene—is what makes his 18 years in the competitive Miami nightlife industry worthwhile. “This may be their only time they get to see a Lil Wayne or a Drake or a Puff Daddy,” Gardner says. “Just to hear them come out of there—that’s the

SUMMER 2019

Miami nightlife virtuoso Michael Gardner sets his sights on new territory.

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POWER PLAYER

joy that I get out of doing it at this point, because I love to see people happy.” Soft-spoken and self-effacing, the Midwest-born Gardner is reluctant to take credit for his role not only in producing the Best Party in the World—see: New Year’s Day 2012, when more than 100 celebrities, including Leonardo DiCaprio and Nas, were in attendance—but also making bona fide stars out of performers like his friend Meek Mill. During LIV’s 2011 Watch the Throne album release party, Gardner allowed Mill to get onstage and perform in front of Jay-Z. “All the attention shifted to him,” Gardner says of Mill, now a prominent rapper and activist. “I think that was a turning point of his, and we’ve discussed it over the years, so I think it’s safe for me to say that.” Gardner is also the coordinator of Miami’s Overtown Music & Arts Festival, a free annual event that he describes as a way to give back to the community. The one-day fair, coming up on its sixth year July 13, will feature live music and an all-day gospel stage, a new addition for 2019. And then there’s Gardner’s Harlem Square cigar bar, slated to open in Overtown around Super Bowl time, near Marcus Samuelsson’s Miami outpost of Red Rooster: The upscale lounge’s vibe is inspired by early-20th-century Harlem. “We’re not necessarily saying you have to come in a zoot suit, but we just want to play off that ambience, with jazz, R&B, live entertainment, and cocktails,” he says. Gardner’s success has been a long time coming, ever since he was plucked from his Virginia high school and courted for the University of Miami’s basketball team. After setting foot on Miami’s beaches and meeting celebrities, including several Miami Heat players, Gardner was starstruck. He played point guard for the Hurricanes until 1994, later completing his marketing degree at Chicago’s DePaul University. But Miami wasn’t finished with him yet: Gardner moved back to help his cousin with his barbershop, sleeping in the back room to avoid inconveniencing his relatives with families. Thanks to a push from that same cousin, Gardner used his degree and his celebrity and athlete connections to create a star-studded Player’s Ball event, which he promoted himself, setting his career in motion. But it was in 2008 that Miami Marketing Group’s Mo Garcia called Gardner about throwing a weekly party at LIV that history was made—not just for Gardner, but for the city as a whole: “Traditionally, a lot of nightclubs wouldn’t allow hip-hop here in Miami until the venue was going down,” Gardner says, “but it was in the two months that LIV was open that Mo reached out to me… and it’s been on the up-rise ever since.” Despite his proximity to the high life and his friendships with famous folks like DJ Khaled, an undercurrent of humility and Christian duty runs through Gardner’s life. “I know where my blessings come from,” he says frequently—and for good reason. In 2005, Gardner had a heart attack at the South Beach nightclub State. Throughout his 11-day stay in the hospital, he was lucid, watching day by day as fellow intensive-care patients succumbed to their illnesses. Of the eight people in the room with him, seven died. As his fear grew, he prayed. The experience drew him closer to God, Gardner says, strengthening his faith, despite what some might consider a contradiction between praising the Lord and orchestrating the often-debaucherous nature of nightlife. The duality bothered him so much he sought counsel from an uncle of his, a pastor. “He gave me the OK—that it was OK that I continue doing what I’m doing,” Gardner says. “But I always give—always give—praise and honor to God every day for the success, for the failures. I’m just grateful and thankful to be alive.” Up next for Gardner? Taking Headliner global. Consider this the tip-off. headlinerworld.com


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

Veronica Swanson Beard (left) and Veronica Miele Beard.

POWER PLAYER

Polished Pair BY NATASHA WOLFF

S

isters-in-law Veronica Miele Beard and Veronica Swanson Beard launched Veronica Beard in 2010, and since then, their functional yet fashionable label of polished wardrobe staples has expanded to many different categories and all over the world. This summer, in partnership with Perch Nantucket, the brand has opened its first store on Straight Wharf, which will carry the full product range, plus a special collection with home furnishings brand Kassatex that includes leopard-print beach towels, a terry cloth jacket, beach totes, and pouches with cute catchphrases. “Straight Wharf is a picturesque area with great shopping, and Perch has been a great partner, so this pop-up felt like the perfect next step to bring the brand to the VB customer who spends her summer in Nantucket,” says Miele Beard. We spoke with the Beards to find out why the island was such a fit for the American fashion house—and for them personally. veronicabeard.com

How often do you visit Nantucket? VSB: I go for a few weeks every summer. It’s a great escape for the entire family. What are your favorite local haunts? VSB: The White Elephant hotel, restaurants Cru and Lola 41, and Siasconset Beach. VMB: The Wauwinet hotel, restaurants Galley Beach and The Nautilus, and Darya Salon & Spa. What pieces are you excited about from your summer collection? VSB: Shorts and sundresses like the Marla dress are perfect for lunch in town, denim for those cooler nights, and blazers like our Gaya Dickey jacket for layering. What made you partner with Kassatex on a capsule collection? VSB: We love fashion and interior design, so we’re excited to be partnering with Kassatex on a capsule that was inspired by one of our favorite films, Overboard.

from left :

The Robin dress; the Veronica Beard pop-up at Perch Nantucket.

What do you love most about summer? VSB: Entertaining outdoors is the best part about summer. That and our summer dresses! VMB: I love traveling because it inspires me in so many ways. I’m always looking at what people are wearing in other cities and countries. And I’m looking forward to spending extra time with my kids!

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Two fashion mavens are bringing their Veronica Beard label to Nantucket.


NANTUCKET

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

SEA OF TRANQUILITY

the living room, dining room, kitchen, and outdoor areas. Situated between two private beaches, the resort is tucked away on one side of the island and is extremely intimate, private, and calm (no young children are allowed). “People looking to escape a busy lifestyle come to stay here,” Landt says. “This is a comfortable place where they can put their feet up and relax and feel a sense of being.” wauwinet.com

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Juices at Lemon Press.

After a successful 10 years operating in town, Darya Salon & Spa has opened a second outpost inside the White Elephant hotel, featuring three treatment rooms for massages, facials, and body treatments. Special offerings include the DNA CryoStem Skin Therapy System facial, which seeks to repair free-radical damage with a rich protein serum, and dermaplaning to remove dead cells that sit on the skin’s surface. whiteelephanthotel.com

Health Haven

The Sperry x Vineyard Vines Americana Patchwork Authentic Original Boat Shoe.

Located in town, Lemon Press, a new coffee shop, juice bar, and restaurant, features a range of healthy dishes made with organic ingredients, like smoked salmon toast, acai bowls, and shakshuka for breakfast, and sandwiches and salads for lunch. At night, enjoy craft cocktails and small plates by chef Soni Akshay. lemonpressnantucket.com

The White Elephant hotel.

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DARYA SALON & SPA AT THE WHITE ELEPHANT

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SOLE MATES The lifestyle apparel brand Vineyard Vines was founded in 1998 on Martha’s Vineyard by brothers Shep and Ian Murray with the goal of creating classic clothing and accessories with a preppy aesthetic. This summer on Nantucket, the brand will unveil its collaboration with another famed American brand, footwear company Sperry. The label’s Authentic Original Boat Shoe, Seaside Slip-On, and Striper II CVO Sneaker have been emblazoned with Vineyard Vines’ signature whale designs and patchwork prints. “This release evokes the nostalgia of simpler times, youthful fun, and family vacations at the shore,” says Tom Kennedy, Sperry’s president. A fitting partnership, indeed. vineyardvines.com

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The Wauwinet hotel is celebrating its 30th anniversary with a multimillion-dollar renovation of its lobby, library, and 32 guest rooms and cottages (the first since it opened). Nantucket’s only Relais & Châteaux hotel has gotten a top-down update from Gauthier-Stacy, a Boston interior design firm, with the goal of giving a more modern feel to the rooms and public spaces while highlighting the island’s natural and nautical landscape. “The property has never fallen below a very high standard, as we’re always updating and keeping the hotel fresh, but we felt it was time to do something more extensive,” says general manager Eric Landt. The rooms have been updated with a soft palette of blues and seafoam green, new lighting, marble bathrooms with walk-in showers, floor coverings, and furniture. “The design firm had to find a way to incorporate a charm that was already established and blend it with the new,” Landt says. As part of the restoration, the owners have remodeled the stand-alone three-bedroom Anchorage House in partnership with lifestyle brand Serena & Lily, and it’s outfitted with its furniture in

A guest room at The Wauwinet hotel.


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

RUNNER’S HIGH

The setting for Equinox’s Precision Run class.

CHILL OUT Ancient acupuncture gets a modern twist at WTHN, a Flatiron-based studio with all the extras. Lie on a heated table and slap on noise-canceling headphones that deliver exclusive sound therapy while your acupuncturist creates a customized program based on one of three main approaches: Prevent (for immunity and anxiety), Heal (for acute and chronic pain), or Glow (to calm inflammation, increase collagen production, and even reduce wrinkles). wthn.com

Chef Du Jour

Gabriel Kreuther debuts a new culinary program at the Baccarat Hotel. Two-Michelin-starred chef Gabriel Kreuther is ringing in summer with the launch of a brand-new Alsatian-inspired menu at the Baccarat Hotel, where he just celebrated his appointment as culinary director. Kreuther grew up in the French region of Alsace, and his offerings speak to his roots and his classical French training. Highlights include the Maine lobster cappuccino with smoked salmon grilled cheese sandwich, and the Burger a la Façon Rossini: Black Angus patty, liverwurst, onion, comté cheese, and black truffle sauce, with the option to add bacon and/or foie gras terrine. baccarathotels.com

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clockwise from above :

The Burger a la Façon Rossini; chef Gabriel Kreuther; the Baccarat Hotel’s Grand Salon; Maine lobster cappuccino with smoked salmon grilled cheese sandwich.

C O U R T E S Y O F B AC C A R AT H O T E L N E W YO R K ; O P P O S I T E PAG E : P O R T R A I T BY B R A D F O R D R O G N E

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Equinox is expanding its wildly popular Precision Run treadmill class to its own studio space. The luxury lifestyle gym has opened a Flatiron studio devoted solely to the signature 50-minute group cardio class, in which everyone has their own Woodway treadmill. Classes include a variety of speeds, inclines, and formats fueled by motivating music, mood lighting, and even oxygen-enriched studios. precisionrun.com


NEW YORK CITY

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

from left :

Lisa Holladay; the St. Regis Hong Kong’s Drawing Room.

POWER PLAYER

Leader of Luxe Lisa Holladay runs the St. Regis and Ritz-Carlton worlds. BY KIM PEIFFER

What’s your favorite Ritz-Carlton or St. Regis property of all? Don’t make me choose! Usually my favorite is the one I have visited most recently.… I just stayed at the newly opened St. Regis Hong Kong, which is an incredible property. The hotel was designed by André Fu and incorporates Hong Kong’s heritage, culture, and history in a really modern way.

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What do you think is the biggest trend you are seeing in travel at the moment? I have seen an increased desire for experiences that feel local and authentic to a destination. People want to immerse themselves in a destination and are now looking for curated access to local people and culture. And more than ever, our guests are seeking those unique, one-of-a-kind moments that they can’t get anywhere else.

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The entry to the Royal Suite at The Ritz-Carlton New York, Central Park.

Tell us about all the new developments at The Ritz-Carlton New York, Central Park. The Ritz-Carlton just completed a major renovation of its guest rooms, Club Lounge, La Prairie Spa, and lobby, and debuted Contour, a new lounge. Ritz-Carlton hotels are now being designed so that each one is unique and tells a story about the destination, and our Central Park property is a great example of this new direction. I love the new design of the guest rooms, which really bring New York City’s style and spirit to life in a thoughtful way.… The last time I was there, I asked when I could move in!

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he Ritz-Carlton brand has been busy as of late; the luxury group will open its 100th hotel this year, in addition to its Central Park property undergoing a massive renovation. Since its founding, the hotel has been recognized as one of the 20th century’s premier grande dame hotels and a New York landmark, and it couldn’t have happened without the leadership of Lisa Holladay, global brand leader and vice president of St. Regis Hotels & Resorts and The Ritz-Carlton. “I feel incredibly fortunate to oversee two such iconic hospitality brands,” she says. Below, the hotel guru shares the exciting scoop on what’s happening with them both.


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

For Art’s Sake

Collectors and connoiseurs flock to Jessica Glasier for her white-glove advisory skills. BY JEREMY KINSER

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t was a youthful whim that led Jessica Glasier to her thriving career as one of Orange County’s foremost fine art consultants. While studying in Paris, she impulsively decided to take a class that focused on Picasso. Immediately she fell in love with art history, changed her major, continued her education across the capitals of Europe, and, as she says, “I have not looked back since.” If she’d peered into a crystal ball during her university days, Glasier would have seen a vital role at prestigious Heather James Fine Art in her future. Here in Newport Beach, she’s become known for delivering impeccable whiteglove service to her many distinguished clients, whether they’re local residents or global connoisseurs of such renowned artists as Julian Schnabel and Pat Steir. “When I know and understand my clients’ personal values, goals for collecting, and art preferences,” she says, “I am able to offer a higher level of art advisory services for each client individually.” When Glasier begins her process, it’s usually with a simple conversation with the client. “I ask them various questions to get to know more about their collecting values, their collection, if they have one, their goals, and motivations for collecting,” she shares. Once she acquires the necessary information, she researches the client’s existing collection. “I am very lucky in that I have a dedicated research team at Heather James Fine Art—our researchers are based all over the country, and they have access to top art libraries,” she adds. “We col-

Fine art consultant Jessica Glasier.

laborate in finding out as much as possible about the client’s collection, including updated values, exhibition history, and details of provenance.” Her clients find this helpful for their records, which in turn helps Glasier to understand their collecting style and trajectory. “I research works that may be a good fit for their collection, based on our conversation and research, and we work together from there.” Some collectors are just beginning to acquire art, so Glasier helps them form a strategy that’s right for their interests and budget. Conversely, when clients decide to sell works from their collections, they can call on her to provide current market values. The range of taste and preferences in the OC holds enormous appeal and helps makes it a unique territory for Glasier. “I love that Orange County clients have a variety of collecting interests,” she notes. “Some love California Impressionism, while others love French Impressionism and the European modern masters. Others here are drawn to postwar and contemporary works, some collect Latin American, and still others prefer street art. I enjoy the diversity of art collections in Orange County.” Only someone who’s never visited the area could possibly express surprise that it has an established fine art community. “Laguna Beach is an important town in the history of California art,” Glasier says. “We also have many great museums. What I love about working with OC clients is often finding they have an association, or interest, connected to local institutions.” heatherjames.com

P O R T R A I T BY T I M O T H Y T O M P K I N S

POWER PLAYER


ORANGE COUNTY

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

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BEAUTY AND THE BEACH

Stroll into the just-opened Lilly Pulitzer shop in Newport Beach, and you’ll instantly be surrounded by breathtaking floral vines that rival the brand’s designs. Walk past the stunning bespoke mural frames that decorate the sales floor and head toward the fitting rooms, which are uniquely painted with Cali-inspired designs, including mirrors customdetailed with seashells. Yet what truly sets the OC Lilly Pulitzer location apart from the 60-plus others across the U.S.—besides that it’s the first of the popular retail shops in the Golden State—is the debut of its beauty bar, which will host pop-up shops with beauty and wellness brands. Discerning consumers can test products, receive expert consultations, and pick up complimentary samples from some of the world’s most coveted brands. CEO Michelle Kelly recalls that Pulitzer herself often commented that her designs reflect the notion that it’s always summer somewhere. “Southern California certainly embraces that aesthetic and attitude,” Kelly adds. lillypulitzer.com

The dining area at Monarch Bay Beach Club.

SUMMER 2019

Lilly Pulitzer’s Newport Beach store.

Nestled among the scenic hillsides of Dana Point and offering breathtaking views of the Pacific, the AAA Five Diamond–rated Monarch Beach Resort has become an Orange County mainstay for discriminating lovers of surf and sand. The resort’s exclusive club for its guests and members has just undergone a lavish renovation. Bearing the new name Monarch Bay Beach Club, it will offer private beach access, luxurious canopies, lawn furniture, better accessibility, and an ocean view the moment you enter to create a true sense of arrival. There’s a spacious bar with an enhanced experience of sweeping ocean vistas and a much larger counter space, ideal for cocktails and communal dining. The warm color palette adds a bright, airy feel with the relaxed furnishings. This is beachside relaxation at its finest. monarchbeachresort.com

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Down by the Seaside

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Both modern and rustic, Cultivation Kitchen is Anaheim’s most guilt-free new eatery. Set in a greenhouse and built on the importance of mindful eating as seen in its dishes made from picked-witha-purpose ingredients, it’s situated within the lush two acres of Farmers Park, adjacent to an olive grove and a redwood boardwalk. The restau-

rant, described as a shovel-to-fork dining establishment, accommodates all diets, offering options including glutenfree, vegetarian, and vegan dishes. Patrons can wash down the delectable blood orange ricotta pancakes with the restaurant’s own branded coffee, or enjoy sunflower hemp hummus with tap kombucha from San Diego–based Bambucha. cultivationkitchen.com


A S P E N        C H I C A G O        D A L L A S        H A M P T O N S        H O U S T O N        L A S V E G A S        L O S A N G E L E S

San Francisco may be known for cable cars, fog, and a booming tech scene, but it’s also home to some of the finest restaurants and hotels in the world. Enter Virgin Hotels San Francisco, in the city’s SoMa district. The 192-room property—replete with five on-site restaurants, including a rooftop bar with sweeping city views and a library-like coffee shop—is the brainchild of Sir Richard Branson, founder of Virgin Group. The two-room guest rooms, or “chambers,” as dubbed by the hotel, are lined with Virgin’s patented ergonomically designed lounge beds and cherryred Smeg mini fridges stocked with snacks. Feel like venturing out? Download the hotel’s app, Lucy, and get insider, don’t-miss tips from local tastemakers. virginhotels.com/ san-francisco

Lasting Impression

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VIRGIN TERRITORY

Designfocused wares at Prevalent Projects.

The dressing area in one of Virgin Hotels San Francisco’s guest rooms.

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CREATIVE LICENSE

Conceived by San Francisco architect Matt Hollis (of Joseph Cellars and Kenzo Estate wineries) and Napa Valley interior designer Richard Von Saal, The Prisoner Wine Company’s Tasting Lounge and The Makery private tasting gallery, in St.  Helena, are appointed with a 57-foot-long vaulted cathedral glass ceiling, a diesel tank turned chandelier, and reclaimed wood fixtures from the original Bay Bridge. The winery’s first-ever property also features a series of artisan studios, such as Amanda Wright Pottery, a Bay Area ceramicist; Carrie Saxl Studio, a San Francisco–based jeweler and metalsmith; and Batle Studio, a local maker of graphite objects. theprisonerwinecompany.com

For design inspiration and a selection of modern home wares from Scandinavian-style dining chairs to wooden pendant lamps, head to Prevalent Projects in downtown Mill Valley. Owned by husband-andwife duo Floyd and Julia Albee (she’s a photographer and he’s an interior and product designer), the minimalistic 1,800-square-foot store and design studio features pieces from Floyd Albee’s own furniture collection; sculptural, solid white oak Mikado tables by Alain van Havre; artwork by Los Angeles–based artist Alia Malley; and limited edition Shinola Runwell Turntables in rose gold. prevalentprojects.com

The Makery at The Prisoner Wine Company.


SAN FRANCISCO

M A L I B U       M A R T H A’ S V I N E YA R D       M I A M I       N A N T U C K E T       N E W Y O R K C I T Y       O R A N G E C O U N T Y       S A N F R A N C I S C O

Shape Shifter

Designer Chloe Redmond Warner is becoming female entrepreneurs’ first choice for interiors. BY JENNIE NUNN

SUMMER 2019

POWER PLAYER

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hen Oakland–based interior designer Chloe Redmond Warner landed her first internship at a design firm, she took it upon herself to redo the company’s entire supply closet. “I replaced all the pens and pencils with my preferred brand and style,” says the founder of Redmond Aldrich Design, who attended Mount Holyoke College and Harvard University Graduate School of Design. “They should have murdered me, but I was just so sure I knew best. I learned at my first job and at subsequent internships that I am not a great employee.” More than a decade ago, Warner, who originally wanted to be an architect, got her first big break in the Bay Area design scene when her then apartment near Dolores Park in San Francisco was featured in Domino magazine. “That was all she wrote,” says the native of Missoula, Montana, and mother of two. She launched her own firm shortly after the magazine debut and went on to transform residential spaces in Hillsborough and the East Bay, and a now-defunct San Francisco restaurant, South, headed up by restaurateur Anna Weinberg. But now, Warner, a self-admitted “speckled” fan (think polka dots, linoleum, and terrazzo), has made a name for herself in the commercial design arena, outfitting spaces such as Ayla, a bright and airy natural beauty shop in San Francisco, and McMullen, a women’s clothing boutique in Oakland with pops of blush and mustard hues, vintage family photographs, Hans Jakobsson fringe lamps, and mannequins powder-coated to match the skin tone of the store’s owner, Sherri McMullen. “A lot of the commercial projects we have done are for female entrepreneurs,” Warner explains. “And I love the idea that I could become the go-to designer for female entrepreneurs. It’s something that feels like it’s just happening organically.” She’s also busy working on offices for New York–based media company Man Repeller as well as Friends and Family, a cocktail bar opening this fall in Oakland with a wink to the 1980s and Miami Vice. For Warner, though, scheming thoughtful spaces is more than just a job. “I love creating atmospheres,” Warner says. “I always have been sensitive to my surroundings and felt like I knew that having the power to create, change, or charge atmosphere would be great. And so it’s like an art that combines all of these materials [furniture, tile, and paint color], but it all adds up to the backdrop of a great life.” redmondaldrich.com

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from left : Chloe Redmond Warner; the Redmond Aldrich room from 2017’s San Francisco Decorator Showcase.


/ BINNSHOT / SUMMER 2019 GUSTAF, TRACY AND ELLA DEMARCHELIER AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY FOR NAOMI WATTS AT BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

BEN STILLER, HEIDI SCHRECK, MERYL STREEP, AND ROSDELY CIPRIANi BACKSTAGE AT “WHAT THE CONSTITUTION MEANS TO ME”

PRODUCING MOGUL ALASTAIR SIMPSON AT THE MERCER HOTEL

CHARLES LOPEZ AT RHUBARB

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KHALID, DWANY JOHNSON AND GAYLE KING AT TIME 100 GALA

JASON BINN AND MISAHARA’S JANICE WINTER

AMBASSADOR PAOLO ZAMPOLLI AND 5W PR RONN TOROSSIAN

NICOLE JOHANSSON

WITH VICTOR DEMARCHELIER AT DUJOUR’S SUM MER COVER SHOOT AT THE BACCARAT HOTEL

NIGEL BARKER AND CAROL ALT AT ZANG TOI, NYFW

ROB GRONKOWSKI AND CAMILLE KOSTEK AT THE 2019 BILLBOARD MUSIC AWARDS

KITON’S ANTONIO PAONE AND ANDRES ARELLANO AT CIPRIANI DOWNTOWN

WITH JASON WEINBERG, AND GUESTS AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY FOR NAOMI WATTS AT BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

WITH CEO OF RELATED AND FOUNDER / CREATOR OF HUDSON YARDS JEFF BLAU

WITH GETTY IMAGES’ KATIE CALHOUN AT CIPRIANI DOWNTOWN

WITH JULIAN POLAK, KEITH ROSEN AT THE DE GRISOGONO BOUTIQUE

JONATHAN GLASS AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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FRANK ROBERTS AT THE EDITION HOTEL


MAXWELL, VERA WANG AT THE HOT PINK PARTY

ANTOINE VERGLAS, ANDREA SIMMEL, JASON BINN AND NELLY MOUDIME

MAYE MUSK AND JASON BINN

ALEX VON BIDDER AND CARRIE ROGERS

MATT ASSANTE

JASON BINN AND JERRY BLOOM

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FAISAL SYED AND JORY WOOD SYED

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JASON BINN, KATIE KINSELLA AND TATIANA IMAMURA

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USHER AND DR. HOWARD SOVEL

RICHARD FIRSHEIN AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY AT THE BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

COLE COTTRELL, KAREN WATKINS, ANNE MARIE MEE, MILESWATKINS AND LESLIE DWIGHT

JORDAN FINE AND KELLY MCGLONE

STRATIS MORFOGEN AT DUJOUR’S SUM M ER COVER PARTY AT THE BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

ANDREW BERG AND DAVID LIPMAN

VERONICA AND RAYMOND KELLY, JASON BINN REENA ROY AT DUJOUR’S APRIL DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT TAO DOWNTOWN

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

JASON MORRISON

JASON BINN AND BELLA HADID

DYLAN LAUREN AND PAUL ARROUET AT THE HOT PINK PARTY

KAREN PAVLIN AND KIM HATCHETT AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTYAT THE BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON


BINNSHOT / SUMMER 2019

WITH JOHN HARDY’S ROBERT HANSON

TAG HUER’S ANDREAS SORIANI AND JOSH SHERMAN

FRANCES RUFFELLE, SALMAN RUSHDIE, NATALIE RUSHDIE AND BROOKE JOSEPHSON BACKSTAGE AT “FRANCES RUFFELLE LIVE”

TATIANA IMAMURA AND BRYAN HOGAN AT THE DISTRUPTIVE INNOVATION AWARDS AT THE FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT

SANTINO FONTANA AND MAX KLIMAVICIUS AT THE SANTINO FONTANA PORTRAIT UNVEILING AT THE PALM RESTAURANT

JASON BINN, CHRIS COZZONE, SARAH NARICI, AND CAROLINE STENBACK AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

NAOMI CAMPBELL AND FULL PICTURE’S DESIREE GRUBER

KATE BECKINSALE AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

JASON BINN AND BILLY CRUDUP AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY AT THE BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

BILL HEMMER AND VERONICA VAREKOVA AT THE DISTRUPTIVE INNOVATION AWARDS AT THE FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT

FORMER POLICE COMMISION BILL BRATTON, JASON BINN, AND MAYOR BILL DE BLASIO AT THE BEEKMAN HOTEL

FAAFC CO-CHAIRS WENDY WEILER AND FRANCESCA DRICOT

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WITH JEFFREY, JONATHAN, AND MORETON BINN


ADRIA AND BRIAN SHETH

A$AP FERG AND IDRIS ELBA IN THE DJ BOOTH AT THE MET GALA “BOOM BOOM AFTERPARTY”

MARK MCINTIRE, JILL FRITZO, AND JASON BINN AT THE BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

RESTORATION HARDWARE’S GARY FRIEDMAN AND JASON BINN

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BRETT FAHLGREN

GEORGE WAYNE AT DUJOUR’S APRIL DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT TAO DOWNTOWN =

BEN PUNDOLE AND IAN SCHRAGER AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION

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LOU IACOVELLI AT THE FOUR SEASONS

DAVID AND SYBLE YURMAN AT PETER LUGERS WILLIAM P., LEONARD AND JUDY LAUDER AT THE HOT PINK PARTY

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

OSCAR, JASON, AND MORETON BINN

DERRICK BASKIN AND OPRAH WINFREY BACKSTAGE AT “AIN’T TOO PROUD -THE LIFE AND TIMES OF THE TEMPTATIONS”

TOM BRADY AND JASON BINN AT HUBLOT, HUDSON YARDS

PENNY AND CECE BINN

MARIO LOPEZ TAPES “EXTRA”

GUESTS AT DUJOUR’S SPRING COVER PARTY AT MATT ASSANTE’S PHD

SOHO PROPERTIES SHARIF EL-GAMAL AND DR. RICHARD FIRSHEIN

SUMMER 2019

GURU OF EVERYTHING KEVIN RYAN AND JASON BINN AT CIPRIANI DOWNTOWN

JASON BINN AND GIANCARLO STANTON AT DUJOUR’S APRIL DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT TAO DOWNTOWN


BINNSHOT / SUMMER 2019

LAUREN, HENRY, AND OLIVER SCHNEIDER AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY AT BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

JACQUES NAUDE, ALEXANDRA RICHARDS, AND JASON BINN AT DUJOUR’S MAY DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT JAMES HUDDLESTON’S GOSPEL

JASON BINN, ADRIANA ANGULO, AND NICHOLAS STREFF

MAXWELL OSBORNE AT THE TIMES SQUARE EDITION FRANK UCCIARDO AND FRANCESCO ‘ROCKY’ COLAVITO

ANDREW SAFFIER AND JASON BINN

SUMMER 2019

SHARON BUSH, NDABA MANDELA, LAUREN BUSH, AND JASON BINN AT THE DISTRUPTIVE INNOVATION AWARDS AT THE FOUR SEASONS RESTAURANT

DAVID UNGER AND EMANUELE DELLA VALLE AT THE TOD’S BOUTIQUE, HUDSON YARDS

JASON BINN AND MOËT HENNESSY’S CEO JIM CLERKIN

VISTA CAPITAL’S BRIAN SHETH AND JASON BINN AT GLOBAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION FUNDRAISER IN MIAMI BEACH PARTY

CHRIS LAVISH AT DUJOUR’S MAY DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT JAMES HUDDLESTON’S GOSPEL

EDWARD TRICOMI

CORY BAKER, BELLA BAKER, AND BRIAN COOPER AT DUJOUR’S SUMMER COVER PARTY AT BROOKLYN CHOP HOUSE SOUTHAMPTON

ROMY, HARVEY EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN AND MANAGING PARNTER OF EQUINOX AND PIPER SPEVAK

WITH WEMPE’S RUEDIGER ALBERTS AND IMG’S IVAN BART

GREGORY WEIN AT DUJOUR’S APRIL DIGITAL COVER PARTY AT TAO DOWNTOWN

WYCLEF JEAN PERFORMS AT THE ROOM TO READ GALA

VISTA EQUITY PARTNERS AND COFOUNDERS ROBERT F SMITH AND BRIAN SHETH

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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SEUNGMIN AND HYUNJIN OF ‘STRAY KIDS’ AT BUILD STUDIO


JULIE JUMONVILLE, ADRIA SHETH, AND KELLY GREEN

DON CHURCH

VIEW OF THE GALA TAMECA JONES

BRIAN SHETH

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JOHN UTENDAHL, BOB MANCARI, BRIAN SHETH, AND OMAR EISSA

SHAUNA ROBERTSON AND EDWARD NORTON

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DJ CHICKEN GEORGE

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

WILD NIGHT FOR WILDLIFE Deep in the heart of Texas Global Wildlife Conservation hosts a night to remember.

TATE DONOVAN


ARTIFACT / SUMMER 2019

Regal Regalia

This avian adornment, once worn by Indian royalty, is just one of the opulent items found in the upcoming Christie’s auction “Maharajas & Mughal Magnificence.”

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BY JESSIE AJLUNI

or generations, India has had a rich cultural history centered around gemstones, and regimes have risen and fallen in the pursuit of these tiny treasures. It is the 17th century, however, that truly saw this country become one of the largest commissioners of jewelry around the globe, as well as a stylistic inspiration to the rest of the world. This inf luence has continued to the present day and has led Christie’s auction house to spearhead a stunning curation, “Maharajas & Mughal Magnificence,” composed of pieces from the Al Thani Collection. With rare items including a jade cup so realistically carved that the Chinese Emperor Qianlong composed a poem in its honor, and the enamel-and-diamond peacock ornament pictured above—crafted by Mellerio dits Meller and purchased in 1905 by the Maharaja Jagatjit Singh of Kapurthala—this landmark trove is perhaps the most valuable collection of Indian jewelry and objects ever to come to auction. Showcasing pieces that span five centuries, the catalog depicts almost 400 lots, which highlight the illustrious craftsmanship from the Mughal period and the age of the maharajas. The collection covers the 17th century through modern day and focuses on the ruling dynasties and their collaborations with renowned jewelry houses that resulted in some of the world’s most coveted ornaments. The exhibition finishes with a selection of contemporary examples inspired by Indian motifs from Bhagat and JAR. Make sure to catch the exhibition, which runs June 14 through 18 in New York City, followed by the June 19 auction, to secure one of these spectacular pieces for yourself.

C H R I S T I E ’S

SUMMER 2019

160

DUJOUR.COM

An enamel-anddiamond aigrette, or headdress ornament (est. $500,000 to $700,000), to be auctioned at Christie’s New York on June 19.


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Summer 2019  

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