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FALL 2018 + WINTER 2019

ASIANS ON SCREEN THE VISIBILITY ISSUE IN HOLLYWOOD

FOOD FOR

'90s KIDS

5

FEMALE ORGASM MYTHS BUSTED

GOODBYE FAST FASHION, HELLO

TIMELESS TRENDS


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CUSTOM SPACES FOR MOVERS & MAKERS 97 INDIANA AVENUE, DES MOINES, IA 50314 | WWW.THEBARNUMFACTORY.COM


fall 2018 + winter 2019

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

16

FOOD WE LOVED AS KIDS Take a sweet and savory tripdown memory lane.

30

IN WITH THE OLD You don’t have to buy new to look fresh.

38

ASIAN REPRESENTATION Fictional portrayals have reallife effects. And Hollywood is doing it all wrong.

44

WOKE MARKETING What happens when social movements and corporate campaigns collide?

50

PLASTIC PLAGUE It’s in our oceans, our foods, and our bodies. Singleuse plastics have a longer lifetime than you may think.


DRAKE MAG EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Morgan Noll

Print ART DIRECTOR

PHOTO EDITOR

Madison Kelly

Ale Diaz

MANAGING EDITOR

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Madi Koetting

Nathan Maughan

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Samantha Jones

Kaili Miller

Online EXECUTIVE ONLINE EDITOR

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Mia Tirado

Emma Brustkern

Media PR / ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR

Samantha Miller

Cheyann Neades

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Nikki Lund

Art PHOTO Jenna Cornick Ella Field Josie Lie Melissa McElin Anna Niedermeier Alex Peralta Cornejo Michaela Spielberger

DESIGN Fatima Calderon Ceron Hannah Cohen Jessica Comstock Ellie Detweiler Abby Lashbrook Courtney McCuddin Kate Segler

Words Megan Bohall Savanna Bous Caitlin Clement Hannah Cohen Bailey Coronis Zoe Hanna Savannah Kluesner Madi Koetting Alexus Kreft Abby Lashbrook Nathan Maughan

Leo McGrath Kaili Miller Megan Mowery Cheyann Neades Lucius Pham Cydne Ratliff Jacob Reynolds Taryn Ripple Hannah Thomas Elizabeth Weyers

Special thanks to: Catherine Staub, Jeff Inman, Sarah McCoy, Kathleen Richardson, Christian Printers, The Barnum Factory, Trixies Salon, Art Terrarium, and all of our models. Copyright 2018 by Drake Mag and Drake Magazine. Drake Mag is published with the support of the Board of Student Communications. Opinions expressed in the magazine do not necessarily reflect the views of Drake University. Letters to the Editor are encouraged and may be published online at www.drakemagazine.com. Please direct any questions, comments, or concerns to drakemag@gmail.com.


fall 2018 + winter 2019

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S BITS + PIECES 6

SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR LIFE

Deliveries you want, items you actually need.

6

BUDGETING APPS

7

GRAPHIC NOVELS + POETRY BOOKS

You gotta save to spend.

Put down the 500-page classic.

8

SPRING BROKE

8

PODCASTS

Travel like a pro (on a budget). Hit the road with our favorite audio.

FOOD + DRINK 10 ENVIRONMENTAL EATING

Diet for the environment.

11 LAST CALL

Could alcohol go extinct?

Sip on these sweet as candy mules.

12 BEYOND KOMBUCHA

Check out these good-foryour-gut beverages.

HEALTH + SEX

14 MULE IT OVER

Six spins on the original moscow mule.

54 RECLAIMING THE BIG 'O'

FASHION + BEAUTY

Your face is thirsty.

23 DIY FACE MASKS

The faces of beauty are evolving.

Sometimes beauty trends are more pain than gain.

More than just the wintertime blues.

57 WORKING (OUT)

26 EXPRESS YOURSELF

Rethink your one-a-days.

56 SAD

25 PRETTY HURTS

NOT TO SHAVE?

It's personal.

56 DAILY DOSES

Pamper yourself without the luxury price tag.

24 BEAUTY BOYS

Oh come on with those tired myths.

55 TO SHAVE, OR

22 FACIAL OILS

14

FROM HOME

Skip the gym, get results when you stay in.

Your face, your canvas.

MUSIC + ENTERTAINMENT

7

Quick reads for your busy life.

58 COLONY HOUSE

Living life on the road.

59 MIDWEST MUSIC MATCH

Listen local.

60 LAUV

Fall in Lauv with this artist.

26

Bring on the drama.


fall 2018 + winter 2019

EDITOR'S LETTER

N

ow that the magazine is off the press and out of my hands, I know that its impact matters more

than its intent. But behind the scenes of making the magazine, intentions made all the difference. The team and I focused on being intentional in how we communicate and collaborate internally, and how we represent our brand to the public. We wanted to close the gap between how we see ourselves and how we’re perceived. That started with making sure we’re all speaking the same language. To those who love and know our magazine, we’ve always been Drake Mag in conversation—now it’s just official. The name change isn’t a change in identity. Rather, it's a more intentional representation of our identity. And in the media, representation is much more than a branding buzzword—it affects everything. One writer explored how Asian-Americans are represented in Hollywood (page 38), while another dives deep into the misconceptions about the female orgasm (page 54). We didn't cut any corners on this vintage fashion shoot. It was shot entirely on film in an old paint factory (page 30).

While we work to be forward-thinkers, every now and then we need a blast from the past. We cooked up some of our favorite ‘90s after-school snacks (page 16) and dressed up in clothes that have aged in style (page 30). Whether we’re covering pop culture or working to challenge it, we don’t want to just talk at you. We’re telling you now, it’s okay to talk back. Reach out to us at drakemag@gmail.com and read on at DrakeMagazine.com.

Forget eating like kings, we wanted to snack like kids. So we made it happen (page 16). Check our website to meet the team and see how our personality pics turned out.

—Morgan Noll, Editor-in-Chief


DRAKEMAGAZINE.COM Showing Support for Those Who Struggle with Mental Health The rates of those with mental health illnesses are on the rise—and many will deal with it alone. Recovery is a journey and bringing succor to those who struggle may be just what they need.

#MyTimeAtDrake In the aftermath of multiple racist hate crimes on campus, Stacey Berry shares her experience as a student of color at Drake University.

Story ideas or inquiries about writing for online? Reach out to Executive Online Editor Mia Tirado at mia.tirado@drake.edu.

Grow and Care with Air All you need is air and a little love. Air plants bring life to your personal space without the hassles that come with maintaining typical houseplants.

LET'S CONNECT

INSTAGRAM

@drakemagazine

FACEBOOK

@drake.magazine

TWITTER

@drakemag


BITS + PIECES

BUDGETING APPS STOP FIGHTING WITH YOUR BANK ACCOUNT. WORDS KAILI MILLER

It’s always nice to treat yourself to a night in the city or a little shopping spree—but we’ve all had those mini heart attacks when we remember the scary-low numbers in our bank accounts. Well lucky for you, with these money managing musthaves, you’ll be on your way to a well-budgeted life within the tap of an app.

Subscriptions for Life SKIP THE TRIP TO THE DRUGSTORE—FIND THESE EVERYDAY ESSENTIALS ON YOUR DOORSTEP. WORDS MADI KOETTING | PHOTO ALE DIAZ | DESIGN FATIMA CALDERON

BILLIE: Listen up, women: This razor subscription service is made just for you— but it has more than cute packaging to offer. The razors are infused with aloe gel and soap to hydrate skin and combat pesky razor burn. Every month, you’ll receive four five-blade razor cartridges for $9 total. You can even customize your delivery based on how often you shave. Find at mybillie.com.

THE PILL CLUB: Who knew that birth control could be fun? Every month, The Pill Club sends you a little blue package containing your monthly dose of the pill along with fun freebies like laptop stickers, skincare items, condoms, and even chocolate. This service is covered by most insurance companies and is as little as $20 for three months’ worth without insurance. Find at thepillclub.com.

QUIP: This compact, electric toothbrush is all you need to maintain healthy gums. Brushing too hard or forgetting to replace your brush head every two to three months can result in poor oral health. And so became Quip: an electric toothbrush with just the right levels of vibration to fight gum irritation. Quip sends new brush heads every three months for just $5, so your brushing routine stays squeaky clean. Find at getquip.com or at Target.

LOTUS BOX: No one truly enjoys their period, but this period kit from Lotus Box makes having your period an extra excuse to take care of yourself. Starting at $15 for one month, you’ll receive a box with items like candles, panties, chocolate, or heating pads. Make that time of the month something to look forward to by treating yourself to fun goodies. Find at lotusbox.net.

6 | fall + winter

THE PAINLESS SAVER We’ve all been told to invest, but where do we start? With Acorns, it’s easy. After every purchase, Acorns automatically rounds up the change to the next dollar and invests it for you. For example, if you spend $10.20 on pizza, Acorns would invest 80 cents. You can transfer this money to your bank account after you’ve reached your savings goal, or see it grow over time in the market. Pro tip: if you want to see your savings rack up even quicker, make regular deposits over time on top of those automatic investments. With Acorns, saving comes naturally—plus, it’s free for all college students! A BALANCED BUDGET If you’re someone who has an app for banking, an app for tracking bills, and an app for managing credit cards, then Mint is your new best friend. This multi-purpose app will send you weekly updates when payments are due and when you’re being charged extra fees. You’ll also receive money saving tips customized to your spending habits. Forget having to remember multiple logins. Try just one with Mint. ALL-IN-ONE BANKING Knowing how much you’ve spent and what you have left to spend is always nice, but is it doable? With Simple, yes. This online banking and savings app allows you to create savings goals for certain areas of spending like vacations, eating out, or gas. You can also choose how often money is transferred into each expense. Simple organizes charts and reports to track your spending, so you can identify areas you might need to cut back on. There’s even a feature allowing you to add photos of receipts and notes to transactions to remember certain purchases. This app makes banking for your budget “simple.”


SKIM BY MARIKO + JILLIAN TAMAKI VIRGIN BY ANALICIA SOTELO

Kimberly Keiko Cameron, a.k.a. Skim, goes to a Catholic school, and lives on the outskirts of cliques. One day, the boyfriend of a classmate commits suicide. While the popular girls form a club to maintain school spirit, Skim’s depression deepens. This graphic novel doesn’t shy away from the realities of being a teenager, especially one struggling with mental illness, sexuality, and love. The striking art and dialogue paint a picture of high school that brings back old memories while forging new ones.

This collection of vibrant, youthful poems explores young womanhood and how we tell the story of ourselves. Sotelo’s detailed descriptions of lemon trees, her mother, and what it means to be a woman come to life through the lens of her Mexican-American identity. Combining myths and parables of the past, Sotelo’s collection feels truly visceral today.

Bit of Lit:

GRAPHIC NOVELS + POETRY BOOKS QUICK BUT FULFILLING READS FOR THE BUSY LIT-LOVER. WORDS ALEXUS KREFT

THE LOTTERY BY MILES HYMAN

DEPRESSION & OTHER MAGIC TRICKS BY SABRINA BENAIM Known for her performance of “Explaining My Depression to My Mother,” Benaim writes about the struggles and triumphs over depression in this poetry book. Her poems, sometimes fractured with statements shattering right on the page, beg to be read out loud. The honest portrayals of depression and anxiety depict the truth of mental illness through distinct, beautiful imagery. In the end, you’ll feel not only enlightened but less alone.

Shirley Jackson’s infamous tale finds new meaning in this graphic novel adaptation. Like the short story, the plot revolves around one small village’s tradition of a local “lottery”—but it’s not the money-winning kind. The beautifully rendered art amplifies the eerie tone of the original story while maintaining themes of violence and conformity. To spoil the ending would be to ruin the magic, but trust that it hits just as hard.

drakemagazine.com | 7


BITS + PIECES

STAFF PICKS:

PODCASTS WALL STREET JOURNAL: SECRETS OF WEALTHY WOMEN This weekly podcast, hosted by Wall Street Journal writer Veronica Dagher, features tycoons like former Editor-in-Chief of Cosmopolitan Kate White, SoulCycle CEO Melanie Whelan, and real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran. If you want to go places, these are the women who have the secrets to get you there. Need something to listen to while traveling?

Spring Broke HIT THE ROAD WITH THESE BUDGET-FRIENDLY TRAVEL TIPS. WORDS BAILEY CORONIS | PHOTO DAKOTA KELLY | DESIGN FATIMA CALDERON

FLYING IN THE SKY Use these insider tips to save a little money when planning your next flight.

• Search Google Flights to find travel destinations within your price range. • Typically, it’s cheaper to fly on a Tuesday, Wednesday, or Saturday. • Flights are more expensive around peak travel times like Spring break or holidays. If your vacation isn’t time-sensitive, try traveling during the month of January or in the fall to save money. • Try kiwi.com to see the cheapest routes to your destination. • Unless the airline has free checked bags, avoid the added expense and take only a carry-on.

FINDING A PLACE TO STAY Hotels can be costly. Here are ways to save money when finding a place to stay.

• Stay at an Airbnb with an available kitchen so you're able to buy your own groceries and save money. • Check out available hostels. Oftentimes these settings are more communal, and you may have the opportunity to make friends with other travelers.

8 | fall + winter

• Plan your getaway so your lodging is close to public transportation. This way you don’t have to rent a car and can get around the city on a subway or bus. • Alternatively, look for opportunities to rent bikes or scooters. You’ll save money while also exploring the city on your own terms.

PLANNING THE ITINERARY A successful trip needs a plan. Follow these steps to make a solid itierary.

• Take into account the season you are traveling in. If you’re traveling when the weather is nice, take advantage of outdoor attractions nearby. • Use Google Maps to find scenic spots around the city. Not to mention, these locations will make for great Instaworthy snaps. • To maximize your time and money, plan stops that are close together. • Check out local coffee shops, museums and national parks. • Don’t just hit the tourist traps. Sometimes this means getting away from the bustling areas and seeking out those hole-in-the-wall gems. • Don’t forget to schedule time to rest and relax. Create balance in your schedule so you can enjoy your vacation without stress.

—Samantha, PR + Ad Director COUPLES THERAPY Couples Therapy shows the good, bad, and ugly of a marriage between wellknown YouTuber Casey Neistat and entrepreneur Candice Pool. The raw discussions they have about breakups, kids, and compromise serve as a reminder that the world isn’t perfect, and relationships aren’t either. —Cheyann, Social Media Editor A PIECE OF WORK I typically listen to heavier podcasts, so this walk through the art museum with “Broad City”-star Abbi Jacobson is the perfect way to lighten the mood. She makes art accessible, like having a conversation with a friend (because most of the time that’s exactly what she’s doing). Just pace yourself—it’s only 10 episodes. —Morgan, Editor-in-Chief DEATH, SEX & MONEY Death, Sex & Money delves deep into some of your grittiest curiosities on just that: death, sex and money. The host, Anna Sale, explores the big questions and hard choices we have every day but often don’t feel comfortable talking about. —Mia, Executive Online Editor THE SPREAD Ugandan sex-queen Karen Lucas shares her perspective with sexual health—a perspective shaped by her upbringing in Africa, where sex talk is often considered taboo. From three-way etiquette to masturbation and kinks galore, she guides listeners through an uncensored world of sex in a fun and light-hearted way. —Ale, Photo Editor


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FOOD + DRINK

Environmental Eating THERE’S A CORRELATION BETWEEN THE CLIMATE AND YOUR DIET. WORDS CAITLIN CLEMENT | PHOTO MORGAN NOLL

C

ows get a lot of beef for their impact on the environment—but they aren’t the only ones to blame. Since the 1970s, plant-based diets were thought to be more environmentally friendly than meat based ones. But a deeper look into the food production industry reveals that the issue isn’t black or white—herbivore or carnivore—it’s a combination of the two. From pollution to pesticides, most of our food is wrapped up in harmful practices to some extent. So, how can we realistically practice environmental eating? Really, it all comes down to knowing where the food comes from and how it was grown or raised. Let’s start with one of the biggest scapegoats for the environment’s problems: cows and their gas. Methane produced by cows has been linked to global warming, which is especially problematic in highly concentrated areas like factory farms. To a beef-loving country, this is hard news to accept.

10 | fall + winter

However, livestock is not as big of a contributor of CO2 and other greenhouse gases as the media, such as the documentary “Cowspiracy,” may have you believe. “Cattle contributes to only 12-14 percent of greenhouse gases,” Valentin Picasso Risso, environmental professor at University of Wisconsin says. “So, to reduce climate change we need to burn less fossil fuels, not worry about cattle.” But the issue isn’t only related to air pollution. Water is also a huge consumption and pollution problem within the livestock and agricultural industry. The United States Geological Society stated that animal agricultural water consumption is 34-76 trillion gallons annually. And growing the feed is the biggest contributor to this. According to Picasso Risso, eating grassfed beef contributes to less soil erosion and water pollution than eating soybeans

or corn. Reversely, eating beef fed with soybeans and corn has even more of a detrimental impact, because of the amount of water used in growing the feed. In addition to large amounts of water consumption, crops are caught up in poor environmental practices with the use of pesticides and overproduction. From plants to animals, pollution and overconsumption repeats in a cycle—but that doesn’t mean there’s no hope. While no individual’s diet can reverse the food systems in place, making some conscious changes can reduce individual contribution. Look for meat that was grass or grain-fed on perennial pastures. Buy pesticide-free foods and be sure to check labels for as much information as possible about where the food is coming from. The more you know, the less you’ll contribute to the environment’s issues.


Last Call

SAVOR EVERY LAST SIP. WE COULD SOON BE LIVING IN THE FALLOUT OF AN ALCOHOL BOOM. WORDS NATHAN MAUGHAN | PHOTO ALE DIAZ

W

hiskey is booming— maybe a little too much. Riding a decade-long bourbon boom, some producers are growing concerned with their ability to continue to meeting demands. The business of aged spirits is one of fortune telling, dependent on predictions of how much consumers will drink six, 10, or 16 years in the future. With a market that continues to grow at a five percent yearly rate, a continually rising demand threatens distilleries past decisions more each year. Japanese and Irish distilleries are already facing the consequences of underestimating demand. The industries in both countries are facing shortages of their aged whiskeys and have begun pulling products from shelves and rationing products until they can meet demand again. We could be next. The fear of shortages is apparent even in the heart of the industry. According to a 2018 press release, Kentucky-based Buffalo Trace Distillery—one of the oldest distilleries in the nation—has spent several years and almost $1.2 billion increasing their means of production to meet demand. This includes constructing new warehouses every four months, and replacing boilers, cookers, and bottling halls. Of course, distilleries can build new facilities and produce more product, but there’s another major factor at play here: the environment. In the case of whiskey, climate change poses a threat to the trees that make the barrels where the alcohol ages. Bourbon has to age in a new, charred oak barrel, with white oak being the industry standard. In 2013,

weather conditions created a shortage of white oak in the U.S., which caused production issues that have the possibility to manifest again. Fearing a repeat of the 2013 shortage, Mark Brown, the CEO of Sazerac, Buffalo Trace’s parent company, warned of the dangers of our current lumber practices and urged the industry to adopt more sustainable practices. In a Louisville Courier-Journal article, Brown advocated for Congress to include protective provisions for white oak growers in the next Farm Bill. “The popularity of bourbon will soon outpace the growth of white oaks across Kentucky and the Midwest,” Brown said. With the 80-year maturation period for trees, sloppy forestry management could now completely pull the bottom out of the thriving whiskey business years down the line. Further complicating the issue, many of these oak barrels have a second life with breweries and other businesses. The McIlhenny Company, which makes Tabasco sauce, utilizes used oak barrels to age their products. Any damage that the whiskey industry faces trickles down to the beneficiaries of the secondary market for oak barrels. Unfortunately, other popular drinks may not be out of trouble. The Tequila industry faces a similar supply and demand problem to the whiskey industry. In the Mexican state of Jalisco, a lack of agave—the plant used to distill tequila— has led to the price tripling in only two years. The lack of materials and a similar rise in popularity to the whiskey boom has the industry fearing a shortage of agave spirits. As the U.S. receives over 80 percent of exported tequila, we have reason to worry.

Even the most widely enjoyed alcoholic drink isn’t safe. A study published in October in the scientific journal Nature Plants suggests that climate change could pose a threat to barley, the main ingredient used in beer. Barley is a sensitive plant, and swings in the climate sharply reduce the yield of the plant— leading to unpredictable yields from year to year. This volatility could lead to increased prices in beer, and possibly a downturn in its consumption. So, the U.S. drinks too much alcohol and doesn’t take care of the environment. What’s new? With a myriad of issues beginning to threaten many facets of the alcohol industry, it’s apparent that both consumers and producers have some changes to make.

drakemagazine.com | 11


FOOD + DRINK

BEYOND KOMBUCHA WORDS LEO MCGRATH PHOTO MELISSA MCELIN DESIGN ALE DIAZ + KATE SEGLER

B

y now, you've probably heard of kombucha. This super-food beverage has people willingly drinking a cup of bacteria, and it’s all for the health benefits. Fermented drinks are brewed with probiotic bacteria that help keep your gut balanced and healthy. While kombucha has gotten the most attention, there is no shortage of fermented beverages from all over the world. Many of these are easy to try at home and only require a jar and neglect.

12 | fall + winter


SWEET LASSI

TEPACHE

Lassi is an Indian drink that is widely believed to be a cure for upset stomachs. Traditionally, it is a salty, savory drink, but sweet lassi made with mango is a far more accessible variation of the drink. This drink is much quicker to make, since all the fermenting is already done in the yogurt.

Tepache is a Mexican drink made primarily of pineapple. It’s typically served over ice on hot days and can be mixed with beer for an added kick. 1 cup piloncillo or brown sugar 1 whole pineapple 4 cups water ½ gallon jar whole cloves

½ gallon jar 2 cups plain yogurt 1-2 cups whole milk or water, depending on desired thickness 1 tsp cardamom powder 5 ice cubes, crushed 1 cup chopped mango Honey or sugar to taste Add all ingredients to blender and blend until smooth.

KVASS From eastern Europe and Russia, Kvass is a non-alcoholic drink comparable to beer. Though the main ingredient is rye bread, various fruits can be added to give the beverage more flavor. 1 loaf Rye bread 1½-2 gallons water 2 cups sugar 1 tbsp yeast Toast rye slices until black. Bring water to boil in a stock pot, then remove from heat and add rye slices. Let sit covered for 24 hours. After 24 hours, strain bread using cheesecloth and a fine mesh sieve. Bring to 100 F. Add sugar and yeast, then let sit for 6 to 8 hours, covered, stirring occasionally. Add any desired ingredients like fruit, vegetables, or honey. Strain into ½ gallon jar, and replace lid with secured cheesecloth or coffee filter. Refrigerate for 3 days before serving.

Remove top and bottom from pineapple and discard. Remove core and cut into 1-inch square pieces, leaving the rinds on. Pour piloncillo or brown sugar into jar. Add 1 cup of water. Close lid and shake until sugar is dissolved. Add pineapple chunks. Add more water until pineapple is covered. Toast 2 to 3 whole cloves. Add to jar. Close and shake well. Remove lid and replace with secured cheesecloth or coffee filter. Leave jar in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight for about 1 week, stirring occasionally. For added carbonation, pour tepache through a fine mesh sieve into a fermentation-friendly bottle after 3 days. Make sure to open the bottle a little each day to release built up gas and prevent it from exploding.

drakemagazine.com | 13


FOOD + DRINK

Pineapple Mule

Blueberry Mule

Cran-Cinnamon Mule

Mule it Over

THESE TASTY TWISTS ON THE CLASSIC MOSCOW MULE WILL INSPIRE YOU TO MIX THINGS UP. WE’RE HERE TO PROVE THAT THE COPPER CUP IS A WORTHWHILE INVESTMENT. WORDS MEGAN BOHALL | PHOTO JENNA CORNICK | DESIGN KATE SEGLER

14 | fall + winter


Cotton Candy Mule

Caramel Apple Mule Peppermint Mule

BLUEBERRY MULE

CRAN-CINNAMON MULE

CARAMEL APPLE MULE

This mule is perfect for those classic Moscow Mule lovers.

This twist on the original Moscow Mule is the perfect drink for a cozy night in by the fire.

Enjoy the sweetness of sinking your teeth into a juicy caramel apple without the sticky mess.

2 oz cranberry vodka 5 oz ginger beer ½ tsp cinnamon 1 cinnamon stick handful of cranberries

→1 1 →5 1

Pour vodka and ginger beer into a copper mug. Stir in cinnamon until completely dissolved. Add ice and garnish with a cinnamon stick and fresh cranberries.

Drizzle caramel sauce on the inner walls of a copper mug. Add green apple vodka, caramel vodka, and ginger beer. Add ice and stir gently. Cut green apple into thin slivers and garnish with two slices.

2 oz blueberry vodka 5 oz ginger beer ½ oz fresh lime juice 1 cup sugar 1 rosemary sprig 1 lime handful of blueberries Rinse blueberries with water, then dip into a bowl of sugar to coat. In a copper mug filled with ice, stir in vodka, ginger beer, and lime juice. Cut lime into thin slices and garnish rim. Add a rosemary leaf and top with sugar-coated blueberries.

PINEAPPLE MULE Missing summer? Try this mule that is sure to put you in that vacation mood. 2 oz mango pineapple vodka 5 oz ginger beer ½ oz pineapple juice 1 orange slice Fill a copper mug with ice. Add vodka, ginger beer, and pineapple juice. Garnish with an orange slice.

PEPPERMINT MULE Get ready to be the hostess with the most-est at your next holiday party. 2 oz mint vodka 5 oz ginger beer ½ oz half and half peppermint sticks Place peppermint sticks in a ziploc bag and crush into fine pieces. Dip the rim of the copper mug in vodka, then in crushed peppermint to coat it. Fill with ice. Add mint vodka, ginger beer, and half and half. Garnish with a peppermint stick and a few mint leaves.

oz green apple vodka oz caramel vodka oz ginger beer green apple caramel sauce

COTTON CANDY MULE Satisfy your sweet tooth with this melt-in-your-mouth mule. →1 →1 5

oz whipped vodka oz blue raspberry vodka oz ginger beer cotton candy

Combine ice, whipped vodka, raspberry vodka, and ginger beer in a copper mug. Stir until glass is frosty. Top with a big piece of cotton candy and watch it melt into this delicious drink.

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FOOD + DRINK

I

t’s an age-old dilemma: when you’re a kid, you can’t wait to be an adult, and when you’re an adult, you wish you were a kid again. Although turning back time is impossible, recreating staples of your childhood diet can induce just enough nostalgia to take you back to the good old days.

FOODS we loved as KIDS ONLY '90s KIDS WILL REMEMBER THESE FOODS.

WORDS SAVANNAH KLUESNER + LEO MCGRATH | PHOTO MICHAELA SPIELBERGER | DESIGN COURTNEY MCCUDDIN

16 | fall + winter


rainbow chip

BROWNIES

Whether young or young at heart, everyone loves this colorful Little Debbie inspired treat. With a few simple extra steps, you can upgrade the traditional brownie into a favorite childhood treat.

GANACHE 1 cup unsweetened cholocate chips 1 cup heavy whipping cream Bring cream to a boil in a small saucepan. Add chocolate chips to saucepan and let melt. Stir with rubber spatula until smooth.

BROWNIES 1 stick butter 2 tbsp vegetable oil 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup brown sugar 3 eggs 1 tbsp vanilla extract 1 tsp salt 1 cup flour 1 cup cocoa powder candied chocolate chips Melt butter and beat in oil, granulated sugar, and brown sugar. Beat in eggs and vanilla extract. Slowly fold in dry ingredients. Don’t overmix. Pour into a greased 9 by 13 inch baking pan. Bake at 350 F for about 30 minutes or until batter is set. Do not poke with a toothpick. Spread ganache evenly in a thin layer on top of brownies. Top with candied chocolate chips.

smiley

FRIES

Even as an adult, you may be more tempted to finish your dinner if your fries smiled at you. Gather a few ingredients and your favorite dipping sauces to bring this childhood snack back to life.. 2 Russet potatoes ¼ cup flour 2 tbsp corn starch 2-4 tsp salt 1 tsp pepper ¼ tsp paprika ¼ tsp garlic powder 1 tsp sugar 1 egg Peel and dice 2 Russet potatoes. Boil potatoes until soft and smash with a potato masher or ricer. Add flour, corn starch, salt, pepper, paprika, garlic powder, and sugar. Mix until well combined. Add egg. Roll dough onto well-floured countertop and work into a sheet. Cut smiles out with cookie cutter. Bring 1-inch of oil in a pan to 350 F. Fry smilies until slightly brown. Let them drain on a paper towel-lined plate. Salt to taste.

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FOOD + DRINK

pizza

BAGELS

These tasty tidbits bring the best of both worlds, and each bite is packed full of nostalgia.

BAGELS 5 cups bread flour 3 tbsp sugar 2 tsp salt 1 tbsp yeast 2 tbsp vegetable oil 1½ cups water Mix all ingredients in a large mixing bowl until dough becomes stretchy. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rise for 2 hours. Roll out onto floured countertop. Roll about a 4-inch cylinder from dough and twist into a bagel shape. Repeat until out of dough. Place bagels on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet and refrigerate overnight. After refrigerating, bring a large pot of

18 | fall + winter

water to boil. Boil bagels until they rise to surface of water, then remove with slotted spoon or spider strainer and place onto baking sheet. Bake at 475 F for 15 to 20 minutes or until brown.

ASSEMBLE 8 oz jar pizza sauce Pre-made bagels Shredded mozzarella Pizza toppings

Slice bagels in half. Spread pizza sauce on surface. Top with shredded mozzarella and any desired toppings. Bake at 450 F for 15 to 20 minutes or until mozzarella is slightly browned.


pizza

POCKETS

A natural '90s hit, these pizza pockets are just as successful today as they’ve ever been—and they’re ready for a makeover.

DOUGH 4 cups flour ½ tsp yeast 2 tsp salt 13/4 cups water 2 tsp sugar Mix flour, yeast, salt, and sugar in a large bowl. Slowly add water until dough is tacky but not sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature overnight or until size has doubled and bubbles have formed. Turn dough onto a floured countertop and roll into a ball. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to 2 hours.

FILLING 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp oregano 2 tbsp Italian seasoning 6 oz tomato paste 1 can San Marzano totatoes ¼ tsp onion powder ¼ tsp garlic powder ¼ tsp salt ¼ tsp pepper 1 tbsp sugar 1 tbsp olive oil 4 oz mozzarella cheese Chop garlic and saute in olive oil until fragrant. Add oregano, Italian seasoning, and tomato paste. Mix well. Add can of tomatoes and bring to a boil. Add onion powder, garlic powder, salt, pepper, and sugar to taste. Transfer sauce to blender and puree until smooth. Pour into mixing bowl. Add 4 to 5 oz of mozzarella to sauce. Mix well.

ASSEMBLE Divide dough into 2 equal parts. Roll out onto identical sheets. Transfer sauce to piping bag. Pipe 1-2 tbsp amounts of sauce onto a dough sheet, about 1-inch apart. Wet dough around the sauce, then lay second sheet over the top and press down between the sauce. Use knife or cutting wheel to cut out pizza rolls. If dough doesn’t stick, crimp edges with a fork. Bake at 425 F for 10 to 15 minutes.

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FOOD + DRINK

fruit

STRIPS

Fruit by the Foot made playing with your food perfectly acceptable. This sweet and sticky treat brings childhood memories flooding back—they’re even sweeter when you make them yourself. 2 cups raspberries 2 cups strawberries ½ cup sugar, once mixture is blended, add more to taste 1½ tsp lemon juice

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Chop the raspberries and strawberries, removing any stems or leaves. Puree strawberries, raspberries, sugar, and lemon juice in a blender. Add more sugar and lemon juice to taste. Filter the puree through a fine mesh sieve. Preheat oven to 150 F, or lowest setting possible. Place sheet of parchment paper onto a baking sheet. Pour mixture into center of paper and spread flat using a rubber spatula. Bake 3 to 6 hours and remove when fruit leather is no longer sticky. Cut fruit leather, leaving on parchment paper, lengthwise into 1-inch strips, then roll.


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(515) 274-9981 salon@trixiessalon.com


FASHION + BEAUTY

Facial Oils

THESE MOISTURIZING MIRACLE WORKERS WILL LEAVE YOUR SKIN HAPPY AND REFRESHED. WORDS MEGAN MOWERY PHOTO MELISSA MCELIN DESIGN ABBY LASHBROOK

Oils: They’re skin-ruining, pore-clogging, acne-creating monsters, right? Not necessarily. Using the right oils in the right way can brighten skin, fade scars, and provide a healthy—not greasy—glow. For best results, use one of the following oils at the end of the day, after you’ve cleansed, toned, and moisturized your face. Make sure to pat, not rub, the skin to form a protective barrier that locks in hydration all night long. EVENING PRIMROSE OIL: Look for a facial oil containing this gentle, antiinflammatory oil that’s packed with Omega-6 fatty acids. It’s used to treat acne, eczema, and—not that you need to be thinking about this yet—wrinkles. Our pick: Burt’s Bees Complete Nourishment Facial Oil, $12, Amazon. ROSEHIP OIL: Team dry skin, this one’s for you. Rosehip oil contains beta-carotene, a powerful ingredient for fighting signs of aging, fading discoloration, and softening skin. Our pick: Trilogy Certified Organic Rosehip Oil, $23, Amazon. MARULA OIL: For a non-greasy glow booster, try a treatment containing marula oil. Not only does it absorb easily into skin, it contains brightening antioxidants like vitamin E and vitamin C—a major skincare power couple. Our pick: The Ordinary Marula Oil, $18, Amazon.

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DIY FACE MASKS FROM PANTRY TO PAMPERING IN MINUTES: MAKE THESE FACE MASKS FROM SIMPLE INGREDIENTS FOUND IN YOUR CUPBOARD. WORDS BAILEY CORONIS | ILLUSTRATION MADISON KELLY

GREEN TEA AND LEMON MASK

AVOCADO COCOA DREAM MASK

ALOE + BROWN SUGAR MASK

The green tea reduces under-eye bags and prevents wrinkles, while the lemon prevents acne scarring and adds an energy boost to your facial routine.

The avocado hydrates and relaxes the skin, while the cocoa powder provides it with antioxidants.

The brown sugar works as an exfoliant, while the aloe vera gives your skin a natural glow.

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

1 tbsp. Cocoa powder ¼ of an avocado 1 tbsp honey

2 tbsp Aloe Vera gel 1 tbsp brown sugar

INSTRUCTIONS

Pour aloe vera gel into a small bowl. Add brown sugar and mix until sugar is dissolved. Apply to skin in a circular motion. Rinse with cold water and pat dry.

INGREDIENTS 1 green tea packet 1 tbsp granulated sugar ½ tbsp lemon juice INSTRUCTIONS Brew a cup of green tea. Remove the tea bags and mix in granulated sugar and lemon juice. Using a cotton ball, dab mixture onto your face. Leave on for 15 minutes, and rinse with cold water. Pat dry.

Mash the avocado in a small bowl. Add cocoa powder and honey, mixing well. Apply the mask to clean, dry skin, and leave on for 10 minutes. Rinse with warm water. Moisturize as usual.

INSTRUCTIONS

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FASHION + BEAUTY

BEAUTY BOYS LOOK GOOD, FEEL GOOD—IT’S SOMETHING WE CAN ALL GET BEHIND. WORDS + DESIGN ABBY LASHBROOK | PHOTO ALEX PERALTA CORNEJO + ELLA FIELD

U

ntil recently, the beauty industry was predominately female-oriented. But now we’re starting to see some different faces. Whether it’s through campaigns, Youtube tutorials, salons, or makeup counters, men have shown they care about beauty too. Matt Reichert, a student at the Aveda Institute in Des Moines, found a passion for expressing himself through makeup in high school. His outward transformation inspired him to continue the conversation and challenge societal standards of masculinity. “Makeup has made me much more of a confident person,” Reichert says. “When I leave the house, I don’t look like a stereotypical boy, so I sometimes get these weird stares, but it fuels my fire. Like yes, look at me, I know I look fierce.”

“YES, LOOK AT ME, I KNOW I LOOK FIERCE.” While Reichert proudly uses makeup to express his individuality, the majority of men are just dipping their toes into the beauty industry by investing in grooming and skincare. Still, the trend is significant. Reichert has noticed that more men are booking appointments for male grooming like waxing [eyebrows, legs, arms], haircuts, and coloring. “It’s a whole different ball game,” Reichert says. “Men are realizing that it’s not going to kill you to show your feminine side. It’s not about what you use or how much you use; it’s about how you work it.” Male beauty doesn’t have to be about wearing makeup at all, but rather taking the time to pamper yourself. The Art of Shaving, a men’s shaving and skincare company founded in 1966, has been encouraging men to do just that. Matthew South, the sales consultant at The Art of Shaving in Des Moines, explains how the company has expanded into a plethora of men’s care products like pre-shave oil, concentrated shave cream, luxury razors, beard wash, conditioner, and fragrances. According to Euromonitor data, men’s skincare product sales have increased by 11 percent in the past year. Despite

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what you may think, millennials aren’t the ones driving these sales. A Mintel study showed that men ages 35 to 44—and, listen closely: especially dads—are the ones driving the overall grooming market demand. “In today’s society there is not as much of a stigma about men being labeled as feminine for taking care of themselves,” South says. “Times are changing, and men are feeling more comfortable with wanting to look good and, most importantly, wanting to feel good about themselves.”


PRETTY HURTS HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF. SO DO DETRIMENTAL BEAUTY TRENDS. WORDS TARYN RIPPLE | PHOTO ANNA NIEDERMEIER

F

or many women, the pressure to be beautiful is constant. As a result, many turn to unhealthy or dangerous techniques to achieve the unachievable: societal perfection. From toxic cosmetics to deficient diets, detrimental beauty procedures have extended across history. In the eighteenth century, a pale face was a beautiful face. To achieve the pure white skin that was so coveted, women applied foundation containing dangerous substances like arsenic and lead to their faces. Naturally, this did more harm than good and led to further complications. Today, a sun-kissed complexion is the desired look. While we might be appalled at the thought of applying poisonous substances to our skin, the harmful radiation via tanning beds is this age’s equivalent. One beauty standard that hasn’t fluctuated much overtime is the pressure for a slim midsection. Women once stuffed themselves into corsets to achieve the impossibly slim figure demanded of them. The Elizabethan corset became popular in the 1500s and remained a standard female undergarment for several centuries. Restricting the waist with a corset induced a number of problems like intestinal damage and respiratory issues. Although corsets eventually died out, the practice has resurged in the form of waist trainers. With a new diet trend every year, this age-old weight management method shows no signs of dying out. In the Victorian era, ladies would go so far as to purposely ingest tapeworms to trim their waists. Today, a popular weight control method is the ketogenic diet. While it can be effective, it’s less beneficial than some think. Pam Neff, dietitian at Envolve PeopleCare, says the ketogenic diet can help to practice more restrictive eating habits, but isn’t good for the body longterm. “Any diet that eliminates food groups is not sustainable and not very healthy,” Neff says. Altering the body to fit societal standards is a never ending game. “One size fits all” has never been true for beauty nor health, so sometimes it’s best to ignore the trends and just set your own standards instead.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

IN YOUR CORNER Adding some color to the corners of your eyes can brighten up your whole look. Choose a color that pops (here we used teal) and sweep the shadow in the corner of your eye. For added cuteness, use a felt-tip eyeliner to draw hearts or stars below your eye. No matter how you embellish, you’re ready to rock it.

Express Yourself THESE FUN, SIMPLE MAKEUP LOOKS EMPHASIZE ARTISTIC EXPRESSION—NOT SOCIETAL EXPECTATION.

WORDS ZOE HANNA | PHOTO JOSIE LIE | DESIGN KATE SEGLER + MADISON KELLY

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Product Tip: We used NYX Brights Ultimate Palette ($13, Amazon) for In Your Corner, Rainbow Rebel, and OneColor Wonder. It’s an affordable palette with daring colors that are perfect for letting your creativity steal the show.

RAINBOW REBEL Don’t be afraid to mess around with some color. To achieve the look pictured, apply a red eye shadow in your outer corner. Next, use yellow and apply it towards your inner corner, making sure to blend it into the red. Finally, put bright blue on the lower lash line. Don’t worry too much about precision or blending—this look encourages coloring outside the lines.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

ONE-COLOR WONDER You don’t have to worry about clashing colors with this look. Taking any color of choice (here we used blue) fill in your brows and cover your lids with a pigmented eyeshadow. Next, use a similar shade of lipstick and top off your look with some mascara.

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POWER POUT New York Fashion Week taught us a bright lip is all you need to stand out from the crowd—so why stick to one color? Using two similar shades (here we used pink and purple) apply to the upper and lower lips, respectively.

Product Tip: Looking for a nice, cheap highlighter? Check out the wet n wild Megaglo Highlighting Powders ($5 each, Amazon). The powders come in eight different colors, which can be built upon or blended to create a natural glow or blinding shimmer.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Power Plaids

Whether you’re heading to the office, or taking business casual to the streets, this pattern trend is always a power move. Choose accents or statement pieces and style it your way.

(Above, from left to right) ON CAROLINA: Shirt and skirt, Thrifty Bitch. ON JAYMEE: Vest, Thrifty Bitch. Shirt and jeans, model’s own. ON HELEN: Jacket and pants, Thrifty Bitch. Shirt, model’s own. ON CAITLIN: Shirt and pants, Thrifty Bitch. ON TIYA: Shirt, model’s own. Skirt, Thrifty Bitch. (Polaroid, right) ON CAITLIN: Jacket, Painted Pony Vintage. Dress, Brick and Hoarder. ON SAM: Shirt, Thrifty Bitch. (Polaroid, far right) ON JJ: Outfit, model’s own. ON TIYA: Shirt, model’s own. Pants, Thrifty Bitch. ON KEITH: Jacket and jeans, Painted Pony Vintage. Shirt, model’s own.

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In with the Old

WE COLLABORATED WITH VINTAGE SELLERS ACROSS THE MIDWEST TO STYLE MODERN LOOKS THAT CAN SURVIVE DECADE AFTER DECADE. STYLED BY MORGAN NOLL HAIR + MAKEUP TRIXIES SALON PHOTO ALEX PERALTA CORNEJO DESIGN MADISON KELLY + JESSICA COMSTOCK

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Groovy Girl Bell-bottoms make a statement on their own. But when you find a pair in a bold color (like these red vintage Levi’s) and add a geometric top and chunky heels, the result is a showstopping look. ON TIYA: Pants, Thrifty Bitch. Shirt and shoes, model’s own.

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(Mid)Western

You don’t need to bring out the cowboy boots for this trend. But you should round up some rich textures, like suede and leather in warm fall colors. And bring on the fringe. ON CAITLIN: Jacket, Painted Pony Vintage. Dress, Brick and Hoarder. Shoes, model's own.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Ride in Style Pull up in the upgraded James Dean look with vintage tees and perfectly-worn jeans. Throw on outerwear like this wool-lined jacket or suede bomber to perfect the effortlessly cool vibe. (From left to right) ON SAM: Jacket, shirt, and jeans, Painted Pony Vintage. ON JJ: Shirt, Painted Pony Vintage. Pants, model’s own. ON KEITH: Shirt and pants, Painted Pony Vintage. Jacket, model’s own.

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One-of-a-Kind Finds Look for unique pieces with designs that make you stand out from the crowd. And you can never go wrong with a pair of retro shades. ON KEITH: Sunglasses, Painted Pony Vintage. Shirt, Brick and Hoarder.

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FASHION + BEAUTY

Find the Shops Online Thrifty Bitch: depop.com/thriftybitch Painted Pony Vintage: etsy.com/shop/PaintedPonyVntg Brick and Hoarder: brickandhoarder.com

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Feline Femmes Animal print isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Accessorize with it, luxe it up or dress it down. Any way you work it, you’re sure to look fierce. (From left to right) ON CAROLINA: Jacket, dress, and shoes, Thrifty Bitch. ON JAYMEE: Dress, Thrifty Bitch. Jacket and shoes, model's own. ON HELEN: Shirt and jacket, Thrifty Bitch. Jeans, Painted Pony Vintage. Shoes, model's own.

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FEATURES

Asian

REPRESENTATION

"CRAZY RICH ASIANS" BROUGHT LIGHT TO THE VISIBILITY ISSUE IN HOLLYWOOD—BUT IT'S ONLY THE BEGINNING. WORDS LUCIUS PHAM | PHOTO JOSIE LIE | DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

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A

sian Charlie Brown. That’s what I was for Halloween in sixth grade. But that’s not what I wanted to be. See, I wanted to be Charlie Brown. I’d searched Walmart after Walmart for a solid yellow t-shirt, but couldn’t find one, so I settled for a faintly orange tee with a Nike swoosh on the lapel. Then, using my expert craftsmanship, I constructed a zig-zag pattern across the shirt using strips of black duct tape. When the day came to wear my costume to school, I couldn’t wait to show off my hard work. I was eager on the bus, ready to flex on some sixth graders. Now generally, when someone spends a long time on something, it’s customary to (a) acknowledge their hard work and (b) not be a dick. If you’re eating dinner with your girlfriend’s family and her mom asks how the cauliflower is, you’re supposed to say, “Great.” What you’re not supposed to do is spit the cauliflower out onto the plate. So, there I am, strutting into homeroom with all the confidence in the world, and I hear this snickering behind me. “Asian Charlie Brown,” I heard someone say, “It’s Asian Charlie Brown!” It was at this moment, in Mrs. Vondran’s sixth grade homeroom, that the class collectively took a break from their Halloween celebrations and ruined mine. My class, comprised entirely of white kids, reduced me to my race, and belittled me for doing something I was proud of. They spat out my cauliflower. The Asian Charlie Brown story is a common one among American children of Asian descent. Without iconic Asian characters in mainstream film and television to idolize, Asian-American youth are often forced to identify with characters who don’t look or sound like them. So when Halloween comes around and kids choose their favorite fictional character to mimic, Asian-American children are left to abandon their own culture and adopt another. The struggle to assimilate is often exacerbated when white people see Asian children dressed as characters like Superman or Elsa from “Frozen” and ridicule them for it. The tremendous lack of representation in pop culture is felt at every level of the AsianAmerican experience. Additionally, the little

representation Asian-Americans do have is utterly insufficient, and often offensive. Racist Asian stereotypes—rather than being countermanded by our society—are played to comedic effect in the media.

I

n 1961, the movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” premiered. The film follows two white socialites, played by Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard, as they navigate through a maze of wealth and romance on Fifth Avenue. It’s cute, charming, and hyper-indulgent in its opulence and high fashion. And as much as I might enjoy aspects of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” I will always hate that movie.

Mr. Yunioshi, a Japanese character in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” is played by actor Mickey Rooney. Now, if you’re not familiar with Mickey Rooney or his work, you might be thinking to yourself, “Hm, ‘Mickey Rooney’ doesn’t sound very Japanese.” And that’s because Mickey Rooney isn’t Japanese; he’s white. With help from a prosthetic mouthpiece, eyelid tape and generous amounts of yellowface, this short white comedian was transformed into a grotesque, buck-toothed cartoon of an immigrant whose sole purpose on screen was to elicit laughs from ignorant 1960’s America. And people ate that shit up. So much so that “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” was

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FEATURES

nominated for five Academy Awards and is still considered a cult classic today. To add insult to injury, over 20 years after the film’s release, Mickey Rooney was awarded an Honorary Academy Award for his “50 years of versatility in a variety of memorable film performances." Men who are Asian by birth are seldom given an opportunity to display versatility. Mic Nguyen, comedian and host of the podcast “Asian, Not Asian,” has noticed that the media doesn’t always allow Asian men to be funny on their own terms. “The

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media has had a long-running obsession with making fun of Asian dudes,” Nguyen says. “It sucks because being funny is a good thing, and it's a huge Hollywood mindfuck that they've made being funny a bad thing for us.” Arguably, one of the most harmful and wildly popular cinematic stereotypes—now cemented in our pop culture—occurs in the second act of “Full Metal Jacket.” In the scene, a Vietnamese prostitute, played by Chinese-British actress Papillon Soo Soo, approaches two American soldiers and solicits her services, famously saying, “Me so

horny, me love you long time.” If you haven’t seen the film, you may recognize the phrase from its use in hip-hop music, sampled by the likes of 2 Live Crew and Sir Mix-a-Lot. The joke, projected to an English-speaking American audience, is that Asians with heavy accents are unintelligent, inferior, and easy to laugh at. With a limited number of Asians in the director’s seat, the same jokes are told over and over. “We’re being cast in someone else's version of us,” Nguyen says. “We're not real people, we're dragon ladies, or opium den


operators, or nail salon techs, or doctors, or nurses, or cab drivers, or delivery boys, or not even there at all. If we want to see better depictions, we need to go out there and make our own shit.”

T

hat’s what the people behind “Crazy Rich Asians” did—but that doesn’t mean the problem is solved. We’re at a crucial point in the fight for representation. Following the massive success of Jon M. Chu’s rom-com juggernaut “Crazy Rich Asians,” we have to make sure

not to fall victim to complacency––one movie can’t magically solve this hundredyear-old problem endemic in Hollywood. “Crazy Rich Asians” was not the solution for representation; it was the start of visibility. Joel Kim Booster, an LA-based comedian known for his many appearances on “Conan” and Comedy Central, has fought for visibility throughout his career. “I think the biggest change here is Asian-American creators not waiting for other people to tell stories about and featuring us,” Booster says. “You can’t wait around; you have to advocate

for yourself and your own representation.” After recent success, he’s not alone in this fight. “Asian people show up. We say we want representation, and we buy the tickets to back it up,” Booster says. Booster was born in South Korea and was later adopted by a white family in the suburbs of Chicago. Growing up gay and Asian in a white evangelical family, he struggled to see himself in pop culture. “I still haven’t seen anything even remotely close to my experience depicted on screen, and that’s a bummer,” Booster says. “You

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FEATURES sort of are forced to compartmentalize those experiences—oh here’s a really great gay narrative, but there are no Asian people. Or here’s a great romance with an Asian lead, but it’s not queer.” Still, Booster recognizes the significant progress that “Crazy Rich Asians” along with other recent films and shows with Asian actors in prominent roles has made. “It feels like we’ve moved beyond identity being a part of the story…these stories didn’t have to be told with Asian faces in the lead, but why

shouldn’t they?” Booster says. “It used to feel that any time you’d see a minority on screen, that identity had to be addressed, had to be a part of the story. Only white people were allowed to be neutral faces within the narrative. It was so nice to just see Asian people allowed to exist outside of those stories.” “Crazy Rich Asians” proved that there’s a market for Asian-American films, and that people—Asian or not—will show up for a movie with an Asian-heavy cast. It also

proved that Asian-Americans, without a doubt, have the looks, charisma, and chops to tackle diverse roles beyond taxi drivers and manicurists. But all this progress doesn’t come without some pushback. Now that Asian-Americans have a massively successful movie to their name, they run the risk of people saying “Alright, you’ve got your movie, now stop complaining.” The goal is to get to a point where these moments are not monumental, and are instead simply normal.

A

s “Crazy Rich Asians” proved, Asian faces on-screen get noticed. In the Netflix series “Master of None,” Aziz Ansari plays a fictionalized version of himself––an IndianAmerican actor trying to find success on a popular television program. In the episode, “Indians on TV,” his character, Dev, is in a cab with a television executive; they are discussing why Dev and his friend cannot both be cast in the program. The executive says, “Okay, look, I'll be frank with you. If I do a show with two Indian guys on the poster, everyone's gonna think it's an Indian show. It wouldn't be as, you know, relatable to a large mainstream audience.” To which Dev replies, “Yeah, but you would never say that about a show with two white people. Every show has two white people. People don't say that. People don't watch ‘True Detective’ and go, ‘Ooh, there's that white detective show.’” There is, however, some truth to what the executive says. If a show like “Full House” was casted with an Indian family and premiered on ABC or CBS right now, it would not come off as just another run-of-the-mill familial sitcom, it’d be “that Indian show.” An all-brown cast rarely exists on television without that brownness being central to the story. To American audiences, there are two spectrums of television: the default and the political. Default television includes programs like “Full House,” “Seinfeld,” “Cheers,” “Sex and the City,” and “Friends”––shows that explore the everyday lives of everyday people. Political shows, on the other hand, are just like default TV shows, only

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browner. These are programs like “Blackish,” “Fresh Off the Boat,” “One Day at a Time,” “A Different World,” and “Family Matters” — shows that came so close to being default television, but didn’t have enough white people. Tamara-Lee Notcutt, the casting director for Netflix’s “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,” strives to choose diverse casts of characters whose roles are not defined by their race or ethnicity. “When casting Lara Jean and her sisters, I was able to deep dive into a specific talent pool of actresses, which I had previously not been able to explore as thoroughly,” Notcutt says. “…I always try and think beyond [race or ethnicity], and just think ‘Who is right for the role?’, ‘Who can bring the characteristics and mannerisms of the written word of this character to life?’” The result? A hit special with plots and characters that everyone can relate to—no matter where they are from or what skin color they have. To white audiences, non-white characters typically have to be brown with a purpose. “Full House” would have been completely different if the Tanner family was, say, Pakistani. But would it really? In 2016, the hashtag #StarringJohnCho hit the internet. Accompanying this hashtag were thousands of fan-created movie posters, photoshopped to include actor John Cho’s mug in lieu of various white leading men. Though on the surface #StarringJohnCho may have seemed like comedic parody, the movement at its core proved to be more than just a joke. After scrolling through a couple faux movie posters, John Cho’s misplaced face begins to seem more and more natural in his given surroundings. “Audience perception, awareness, and sensitivity is changing and evolving, and so has the writing [and] content for film and TV,” Notcutt said. “I feel that for this up-andcoming generation of young people who are starting to see more and more representation on screen in leading roles that look like them, and whom inspire them to work hard and possibly try a career in the arts, then the future looks great, and hopefully we will see more of a balance on screen of all groups of people, that reflects the America and world that we live in today.”

Hollywood has a history of using white people as the go-to template for characters. Asian-Americans aren’t seen as regular, everyday Americans in real life, because they aren’t cast that way on screen. Nondescript characters in film and television that could be any race, should be any race. Diversity has to be normalized in order to change the perception of “normal.”

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lack of proper representation may seem like a frivolous complaint, but it’s violently important. How a group looks on screen is how a group is perceived off screen. In order to reshape the way they are perceived, Asian-Americans in entertainment first need to get their foot in the door. Michelle K. Sugihara is the Executive Director of the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment, and her work revolves around the push for better representation. For 27 years, CAPE has been dedicated to educating and empowering Asian-American creators through programs and fellowships focused on championing diversity in Hollywood. Sugihara and her coworkers strive to “create systemic change in the entertainment industry,” and they have alumni staffed on every major network and streaming platform. “We focus on writers because diversity starts on the page. If you start with the actors on screen, it’s too late; you have to go back further down the pipeline,” Sugihara says. CAPE starts with the executives of the Counterbalancing Partner Program. “The executives are the gatekeepers and the ones with the power to finance and greenlight projects and decide which stories get told,” Sugihara says. With these two forces working in tandem, Sugihara and her coworkers at CAPE plan “to change the landscape of what gets to be on screen.” But that doesn’t come easy. “A lot of AsianAmericans, we don’t have a long legacy or history,” Sugihara says. “We don’t have the uncle who’s the president of the studio that could get us a job. So it’s really a lot of our amazing executives who have gone to high places who now want to give back…to open doors for [our fellows] that might not have been open before.”

“We focus on writers because diversity starts on the page. If you start with the actors on screen, it’s too late; you have to go back further down the pipeline." Growing up, I would wear big-rimmed glasses to school to make my eyes look “normal.” Out of fear of public humiliation and vilification, I would suppress my roots–– do everything in my power to hide my Asian-ness. And when I’d come home after a long day of school, I’d turn on the TV and be reminded that it wasn’t just my classmates who hated me––Hollywood did too. But what if Hollywood didn’t demonize Asian-American-ness? What if instead of gas station clerks and sex workers, AsianAmerican actors got to play firefighters and rockstars? And what if, instead of admonishing entire cultures, they were celebrated and represented the way white people celebrate themselves. The answer to this problem of representation is not more movies like “Crazy Rich Asians” or “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” but movies like “The Bourne Identity,” “The Notebook,” and “Mamma Mia!” By simply casting Asian-American actors and actresses into non race-specific roles, we move further and further away from Mr. Yunioshi, and closer to a future we can be proud of. And by providing Asian-American creators with the resources and support they need, we are able to take our image into our own hands. The road to a more representative Hollywood for Asian-Americans is long and winding, and it’s up to the loudest voices and strongest storytellers to lead the way.

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FEATURES

WOKE ma r ke t i n g

MILLENNIALS ARE SPEAKING UP, AND BRANDS ARE LISTENING—BUT NOT EVERYONE IS A FAN. WE TEAMED UP WITH DRAKE POLITICAL REVIEW TO EXPLORE THIS MARKETING TREND. WORDS JACOB REYNOLDS + HANNAH THOMAS | PHOTO ELLA FIELD | DESIGN HANNAH COHEN + MADISON KELLY

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skateboarder grinds on an uneven handrail. He falls off and tries again. A young wrestler with no legs performs a takedown on his opponent. A woman wearing a hijab throws punches at the camera. A 17-year-old Liberian refugee scores for the Canadian national soccer team. A football player with only one hand scores a touchdown and celebrates. All of these scenes are underscored by a voiceover: “Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything.” Nyjah Huston. Isaiah Bird. Zeina Nassar. Alphonso Davies. Shaquem Griffin. These are some of the athletes featured in Nike’s “Just do it” 30th anniversary ad campaign. Each of the 16 athletes in the ad has an incredible and inspiring story, but theirs weren’t the faces that stuck with viewers. It was the narrator that made the most noise: former San Francisco 49ers quarterback-turned-activist Colin Kaepernick. To call the ad polarizing would be an understatement. A Louisiana mayor banned Nike products from public recreational facilities. A private Missouri college banned Nike from its athletic teams. Social media reactions ranged from declarations of undying support for the company to the burning of piles of Nike apparel. Of course, this isn’t the first time that Kaepernick’s actions have led to clothing bonfires. In 2016, Kaepernick started a wave of kneeling during the national anthem as a protest of racially-charged police brutality. In retaliation, former fans burned Kaepernick jerseys. Even President Donald Trump weighed in, calling for those who kneel to be “fired.” Despite all this, things have turned out nicely for Nike: In the weeks following the premiere of the ad, Nike’s stock soared, reaching an all time high. From old tobacco ads to modern beauty campaigns that defy traditional standards, the “woke” marketing strategy Nike has used in the campaign has a long history. The frequency of companies using social issues as marketing opportunities has risen in recent

years, even to the point of endorsing and denouncing political candidates. Why take a bold stance on a social issue and risk alienating a large group of potential customers? Whatever the reason, it seems many corporations have every intention of “staying woke.”

a brand that is in tune with these things that consumers are aware of.” So brands aren’t getting political just for kicks—it’s becoming necessary to stay relevant and connect to consumers. In other words, it’s smart business.

DEFINING WOKE MARKETING

Modern advertisers are still taking notes from advertising breakthroughs of the “Mad Men” era, a time when ads got personal. Ad campaigns shifted to focus less on the product and more on connecting with the consumer. Many modern commercials don’t blatantly reveal the brand until the end— putting more focus on making a personal connection with the viewer, a natural evolution of the “Mad Men” ideas. A 1970’s Coke commercial famously depicted a choir of young people from all over the world singing “I’d Like to Buy the World a Coke.” The advertisement

The term “woke” gained popularity in early 2016, but it’s origins run much deeper. Woke originates from black culture, referring to awareness of social and racial issues. In 2016, MTV posted an online article about the 10 new slang words for 2016 with woke listed at number five. Since then, it’s gained traction all over social media. Now, it’s used as a common phrase, but it’s packed with meaning. “Staying Woke” is about being socially, politically, and racially aware. It raises awareness to these issues, and it’s starting to be used as a marketing tool. So what’s woke marketing? Essentially, it’s a marketing strategy that advertises on the basis of political and social issues. As the internet has continued to surge in popularity, so has woke marketing. Some of this attention is attributed to the polarized political climate in the United States, which creates more opportunities for brands to sink their teeth into meaty issues and communicate with consumers. According to Cause Good, a marketing blog, 90 percent of shoppers want to hear about a brand’s cause, and are more likely to switch to a brand that takes a stance on certain causes. Kyle Hanson, account supervisor at Two Rivers Marketing in Des Moines, works with brands to create company images that connect to their target audience. In his experience, woke marketing is an extension of the internet age. “I think it has to do with how we have evolved as consumers–our expectations of organizations,” Hanson says. “In turn, [brands are] seeing what they have to do to raise their bar if they want to [become]

GETTING PERSONAL

BRANDS AREN’T GETTING POLITICAL JUST FOR KICKS— IT’S BECOMING NECESSARY TO STAY RELEVANT AND CONNECT TO CONSUMERS. “delivered a message of peace and camaraderie” in the midst of the Vietnam War, as the jingle’s writer Roger Greenaway told ASCAP in 2015. While it wouldn’t have been called woke marketing, the message of the “I’d like to buy the world a Coke” plays on similar social tensions. The ad not only champions a political issue to speak to their audience, but also continues the conversation on a controversial topic.

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Dorothy Pisarski, associate professor of advertising at Drake University, notes that controversy is relative to the time in which it takes place. And the Coke commercial is a strong example of just that. “That commercial may be considered mild by today’s standards, but in 1971 to show a group of young people from so many different ethnic backgrounds standing and singing together was revolutionary,” Pisarski says.

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The integration of social issues into marketing strategies was revolutionary by different standards in the past, but the trends have continued to make headlines ever since. Unilever’s Dove brand has been working to redefine beauty standards in their “Real Beauty” campaign, which first started in 2004. The campaign focuses on celebrating the differences in women’s bodies and helping women be comfortable and

confident in their own bodies. However, Dove knows the risk of woke marketing all too well: After carelessly handling racial representation in several of their ads, Dove drew sharp criticism, with many calling their ads blatantly racist. In the mid-2010s, activist marketing became even more popular. The popular ice cream brand Ben & Jerry’s announced support for the Black Lives Matter movement in 2016 with a tweet proclaiming “Black


QUESTIONING MOTIVES DAVID SCHMID, POP CULTURE PROFESSOR AT UNIVERSITY OF BUFFALO GIVES HIS TWO CENTS ON THE DECISIONS SURROUNDING WOKE MARKETING.

DRAKE MAGAZINE: What is the function of controversy in marketing?

SCHMID: On the whole, controversy sells. If people are talking about your product, they are more likely to buy it. On the other hand, if the controversy is negative… and if the company causing the controversy is small and producing products for a niche market, it could be disastrous.

DM: What do you think are the primary driving factors behind brand decisions to make political statements?

S: Money. Companies would have zero incentive to make political statements if they thought they would lose money as a result. Conversely, if they make money, they will say anything. Woke marketing is instrumental politics in its purest form: it is emphatically not motivated by the fact that these companies have suddenly developed a social conscience.

DM: What is the role of consumers in response to some of these campaigns?

S: These campaigns could have the salutary effect of increasing pressure on companies to produce their products ethically, including not using sweatshops, unionizing their workers, and paying them a fair wage. If they want to talk the talk, in other words, they also have to walk the walk.

DM: How can consumers assess the authenticity of brands supporting social movements? Does this matter?

S: It's very difficult, but personally, I

Lives Matter. Choosing to be silent in the face of such injustice is not an option.” The tweet gained over 30,000 retweets and 85,000 likes–much more than their other tweets. In the aftermath of President Trump’s election and inauguration, several other companies showcased activism in 2017 Super Bowl ads: Starbucks promised to hire 10,000 refugees as employees, while Burger King proposed wrapping its burgers in rainbow paper to support the

LGBT community. Meanwhile, Google, Apple, and Facebook all spoke out against President Trump’s travel ban in early 2017. Patagonia is another apparel company that has been making statements on political issues. The brand protested the Trump administration’s decision to remove protected land in Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments by posting on Twitter: “The President Stole Your Land.” In 2018, Patagonia went even

don't think it matters. If you assume that companies don't mean what they say and are exploiting your beliefs and emotions in order to make a profit, you won't go far wrong.

DM: What do you predict to be the future of marketing and brand identity now that more brands have positioned themselves as more socially/politically aware?

S: These campaigns will spread until they stop being effective. Once that point is reached, companies will instantaneously shed whatever social conscience they appeared to have.

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“MANY PEOPLE WOULD RATHER SEE A BRAND TAKE A STANCE THAN ATTEMPT TO BE NEUTRAL OR SILENT ON ISSUES.”

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further, and endorsed Democratic Senate candidates in Nevada and Montana. Brands are beginning to realize that taking a stance on social and political issues has benefits that can outweigh possible harmful outcomes. “People in leadership roles within large global organizations or privately owned companies are thinking more thoroughly or more in depth about the types of people or issues they're supporting,” Hanson says.

BURNING WITH PASSION Shortly after the advertisement’s debut, Nike began to receive hateful posts online. People posted photos of them burning the company’s apparel. Angry customers and politicians formed boycotts, threatening to purchase from other competing brands like Under Armour and Adidas. While negative comments towards Nike’s message swarmed social media, YouGov, a follower of brand consumer perceptions, found that 46 percent of Nike’s customers continued to support the brand, which was 10 percent higher than the general public. Hashtags like #ImWithKap combated the negative posts, supporting both Kaepernick and the brand itself. Analysts even found that despite the backlash, Nike’s revenue failed to decrease. AdAge tells us that the company reported a 13 percent increase in revenue to $9.8 billion. The Kaepernick ad sent a wave of political turmoil throughout the country. But this wasn’t the first time we’ve seen Nike’s voice in politics. After news broke out about the truth behind Nike’s decision to move their factories to third world countries in Asia, the company has received criticism from the public. Developing countries provide an abundance of cheap labor, so Nike capitalized on the opportunity to increase production, even if it meant the hands making their products were those of children. “Half the time [Nike] is in the news, it has been for child labor issues,” Hanson says. “I guess that’s the risk you run as an organization. To position yourself as this socially responsible organization, then you’re going to be put under a microscope.” Even with the extra criticism, Hanson doesn’t think being put under a microscope is going to negatively impact Nike’s overall success as a profitable and popular brand.

“I’m sure we’ll see this campaign go on and continue to draw headlines,” he says. “But we’ve probably already seen the most negative of the backlash and we’ve already moved on.”

NOT BUYING IT

MOVING FORWARD

Some consumers want more separation between politics and purchases. Crossfit athlete, Hannah Chesley, was a loyal Nike customer for years, competing in national Crossfit events sporting Nike Metcons, before this news broke. Chesley, like many others, didn’t want to support the brand’s involvement in politics and their deliberate choice to take a certain stance. “Do I still own their stuff? Yes. Do I still wear it? Yes. Will I spend more money on their stuff? Probably not,” Chesley said. “They took a successful brand that people freely purchased and engaged with and made their customers pick a side—if I wore their brand, I was for the ad; if I didn’t, I was against it. It was selfish to pigeonhole the consumer into deciding.” Conversely, many other consumers are more than comfortable deciding which brands to support based on political and social reasons. And these decisions are affected by more than just controversial campaigns. Hobby Lobby, Chick-fil-A, Jimmy Johns, and Urban Outfitters are common picks for boycotts based on their unethical practices or contributions to certain social groups. Elena Dietz, who received degrees in international business and sociology, is conscious of how her money supports brands on a larger scale. “When you purchase a product, you are voting for that product or brand with your dollars,” Dietz says. “I only want to 'vote' for brands that align with my own values, so I look for brands that support those values, or at the very least, don't diametrically oppose them.” One Facebook user, Cadence Tatem, expressed an effort to only buy secondhand, in order to avoid direct financial contributions to corporations. “Most corporations, no matter their affiliations or advertisements of “wokeness,”...only exist for profit and disenfranchise and oppress whoever they need to make money,” Tatem says. Consumers will continue to spend money, but overall trends among younger generations show that many are putting more thought into where and how they choose to spend.

But even after the dust settles on current issues, woke marketing has potential to go beyond the Trump era and continue developing in future decades. People— particularly younger generations—seem attracted to companies that champion certain causes, and as long as that trend continues, companies have little reason to fix what isn’t broken. Cone Communications, a marketing company based out of Boston, found that over 70 percent of millenials are more likely to buy from companies that express interest in causes the audience cares about. In the same study, they recorded that millennials are more likely than other generations to switch brands to one associated with a cause. The story doesn’t have to end with the close of a successful ad campaign either— Donald Roy, a professor of marketing at Middle Tennessee State University, says there is a big potential for more corporations to begin taking political stances in their business plan. “I believe we will see more companies take a stand on issues of the day. Consumers seem to have greater expectations of companies to use their platforms to lend support to issues,” Roy says. And while this has the potential to alienate some audiences from the brand, Roy says he believes the risk is worth the reward. “It’s a cost of doing business today—a brand cannot represent all things to all people,” Roy says. “It is acceptable for a brand to take a stand, knowing that it will attract some people and turn off others. Many people would rather see a brand take a stance than attempt to be neutral or silent on issues.” It looks like the woke era of marketing is here to stay. Ready your hashtags for a long future of capitalist controversy.

Pick up a copy of Drake Political Review for more exclusive content.

FROM BURNING TO BOYCOTTING, CONSUMERS ARE MAKING STATEMENTS TOO. WORDS SAMANTHA MILLER

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IT'S A DETRIMENTAL DISEASE THAT CAN BE FOUND IN EVERY HOUSEHOLD IN THE COUNTRY. WORDS CYDNE RATLIFF | PHOTO ELLA FIELD | DESIGN JESSICA COMSTOCK, MADISON KELLY + JONDAVID OTTENBACHER

O

ur ecosystems are connected by an unexpected material: plastic. Disposable plastics aren’t exactly what they sound like. While they may be temporarily out of sight, plastics stick around long after we throw them out or recycle them. Plastic waste and particles pollute our oceans, our food, and our bodies. Plastic has become such a natural part of our everyday routines that its cycle of life almost resembles nature. Global plastic production is rapidly increasing to meet our demand, and we consume so much that most of our interactions with the material aren’t conscious. The cycle continues when we dispose of plastics, with some 18 billion pounds of plastic flowing into the oceans every year from coastal regions, according to National Geographic. Plastics break up in the oceans, fish eat them, we eat the fish, and so on. Aaren Freeman, associate professor at Adelphi University, is primarily a marine ecologist studying conservation-related issues so he’s come face to face with the issue of plastic in oceans. “As both a concerned citizen but also as someone who [directly] sees the impact of plastics and sees that it’s a prevalent problem, it’s unavoidable to be concerned,” Freeman says. Freeman explained that the issue with plastic in oceans is that they don’t break down—they break up. So plastics cycle through our food chains, soaking up and transporting pollutants along the way. The impact of plastic on the environment and human health are compounded, making the issue all the more ominous. “These impacts may multiply across different ecosystems,” Freeman says, “and there might be a threshold at which some ecosystems won’t recover.”

PLASTIC AROUND THE GLOBE Plastic pollution affects everyone, everywhere. No country, state, or individual is directly accountable for the overuse of plastic, and that’s the problem. Let’s look at the numbers. Worldwide, about 20 percent of plastic gets recycled, but the U.S. recycles less than 10 percent of its plastic, according to Our World in Data. Even if individuals recycle plastic, there’s no guarantee it will be recycled by the facilities in the U.S. So, what’s keeping it from being recycled? According to a 5 Gyres Science Solution article, facilities can’t keep up with the excess amount of plastic we’re using. Since 1964, production of plastic has increased by 2,000 percent in the U.S. So recycling is only part of the solution to a multifaceted issue. But there are solutions that target facets closer to the root of the cause. Some countries have begun to address the issue by adopting initiatives to reduce their plastic waste. Denmark and many other countries have imposed taxes on plastic bags used at groceries stores, reducing their usage of plastic bags to only four per year per person (while the average American uses about 365 plastic bags in a year). According to a National Geographic article, the tax has encouraged people to reuse the bags since they’re paying for them. While still plastic, the bags are reusable and thus more effective. Similarly, Ireland introduced a plastic bag tax in 2002, requiring customers to pay 22 euro cents at the register if they want a plastic bag with their purchase. According to The New York Times, the results were near immediate. Within weeks, plastic bag usage dropped 94 percent, and the public attitude around plastic bags changed from an expected part of shopping to a frowned upon decision. Following suit, cities like

Seattle and San Francisco have implemented taxes or complete bans on plastic bags. Other initiatives are putting the pressure on limiting or banning plastic straws and other single-use plastics to reduce waste. Starbucks made headlines in July with their plans to stop using single-use plastic straws at their stores around the world by 2020. Although these initiatives only attack small parts of the overall issue, they can have a large impact when applied to entire countries—Ireland has reduced yearly plastic bag usage from 350 to 14 per person since the law was introduced.

SINCE 1964, PRODUCTION OF PLASTIC HAS INCREASED BY 2,000 PERCENT IN THE U.S. In the past few years, the movement to reduce plastic waste has started to gain attention on a more universal scale. In December 2017, the United Nations passed a resolution to at least address the issue of plastic pollution in the ocean. By simply starting the conversation, the UN has impacted several countries: China and the EU have both launched strategies to adjust their plastic consumption. From one restaurant banning plastic straws to entire nations addressing the issue of plastic consumption, the strides that have been made surrounding the plastic issue are headed in the right direction.

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ON AVERAGE, EACH PERSON IN THE UNITED STATES USES

365

PLASTIC BAGS A YEAR. IN DENMARK, THE AVERAGE IS

4

Information from: National Geographic

PLASTIC IN OUR BODIES There are many ways plastic can harm our bodies, but they’re much less visible than public litter or garbage patches in oceans. A recent study in Environmental Health Studies shows that most plastic products and plastic waste release a chemical that behaves similarly to estrogen, a sex hormone—even if they’re labeled BPA free. Additionally, microwaving meals in plastic tupperware and eating out of plastic containers allows plastic particles to leach on to food during consumption. According to USA Today, researchers have found that by simply drinking a liter of water from a plastic bottle, we consume 10.4 plastic particles. Plastic is often on our bodies too. Many of the synthetic articles of clothing worn everyday contain high amounts of harmful chemicals from plastic as well. While plastic exposure is widespread, the information about the exact effects of these chemicals in our bodies is not. According

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to Newsweek, scientists say that BPA is a factor in various health concerns like, “obesity, diabetes, problems with fertility and reproductive organs, susceptibility to various cancers and cognitive/behavioral deficits like ADHD.” The food industry and the FDA, on the other hand, say humans are in the clear. Although there is no clear consensus yet, the effects of BPA and other plastic chemicals are worth keeping an eye on.

CONVENIENCE WITH A COST After exploring the detrimental effects of plastic on the environment, wildlife, and human health, the question arises: why do we continue to use it? The short answer is that plastic is inexpensive and simple to manufacture for many uses. The convenience of plastic makes it easy to prioritize short-term use over long-term environmental impact. However, most of the things plastic is used for can be accomplished using other

materials such as metal, glass, paper, and other more bio-friendly materials. Replacing plastic with other materials seems like an ideal solution, but the issue then becomes one of complete cultural shift. Plastic is ingrained in our everyday lives to the point that we aren’t consciously aware of all the plastic we use. Additionally, at the consumer level, plastic alternatives can be limited and financially restrictive. However those who study and are invested in the environment, like Freeman, argue that these changes are worth the sacrifice on our convenience and wallets. “I think as a society we need to start paying those expenses rather than using the simple, polluting and disposable plastics that are clearly becoming more of a problem,” Freeman says. But with limited choices on the consumer level, part of the responsibility to replace plastics lands on the manufacturers of plastic products.


Information from: Ocean Conservancy + World Economic Forum

8,000,000 METRIC TONS OF PLASTIC GOES INTO THE OCEAN EACH YEAR.

IF THIS CONTINUES, BY 2050 THERE WILL BE MORE PLASTIC THAN FISH IN THE WORLD'S OCEANS. According to Beth Terry, author of Plastic-Free: How I Kicked the Plastic Habit and How You Can Too, the movement to break free from plastic has been organizing brand audits to hold companies accountable for the plastic they produce. “When they collect plastic on the beach or do various cleanups in their neighborhoods, they’re not just looking at what the items are, but what brands are on them,” Terry says. Brand audits are becoming a more common way of keeping brands accountable for their plastic management. According to the Break Free from Plastic website, CocaCola, PepsiCo, and Nestle are among the top offenders when it comes to improper disposal of plastic.

PRODUCTIVE REDUCTION Committing to reducing your plastic waste can be a scary, intimidating step, which is why most experts recommend starting slow and working your way up.

“Pick the low-hanging fruit first, and work on the hard stuff later,” Terry says. Essentially, give up the things that won’t impact your life on a large scale, build less-wasteful habits, and slowly work on continuing to reduce your waste. When Terry began her plasticfree journey, she researched ways to replace items that typically involved plastic so she could purchase better alternatives the next time. “It was a step-by-step process, and I think that’s why I didn’t get overwhelmed,” Terry says. Besides just helping the planet, reducing plastic use adds a whole host of other benefits to your lifestyle. Possibly the most obvious is the vast improvement of your diet that accompanies refusing plastic packaging, and virtually all processed foods. “When I first started this, eleven years ago, I was living off frozen, microwaveable meals, which is really no way to live,” Terry says. “Now I eat real food, and I think my diet is a lot healthier.”

Another benefit to this lifestyle includes saving money. While some plastic-free reusable items can seem pricey initially, Terry recommends that we “think about the cost of one plastic-free bottle versus all the disposable bottles you would’ve bought over time.” Using reusable items can be a bit of a longer-term investment, but it’s worth it in the long run. Anne-Marie Bonneau, the blogger behind ZeroWasteChef.com, also noticed an improvement in her mental health with her lifestyle shift. “I am so much happier. That side-effect really surprised me,” Bonneau says. This change in mood stemmed from the sense of purpose she gained from reducing her waste. Working to diminish your plastic waste can be a huge commitment, but it can lead to a positive impact on not only our planet’s oceans and animals, but also your own personal health and well-being.

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RECLAIMING THE BIG ‘O’ DON'T BE SHY—IT'S TIME TO TALK ABOUT FEMALE ORGASMS. WORDS CHEYANN NEADES | DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

W

e need to shine a light on something before we turn the lights down: the female orgasm. It’s that dark, uncharted territory no one talks about. The missing chapter from your sex-ed textbook. The deleted scene from sexy romance movies. And that’s a problem. “Women aren’t even told about their orgasms… Lots [of women] don’t even know they have a clitoris because they’re not told or shown early on,” said Dr. Marilyn Volker, sexologist of the International Institute of Clinical Sexology. It’s time to pull back the sheets and set the story straight. Get off preconceived notions about the female orgasm and move on to a better sex life.

MYTH 1: IF YOU DON’T ORGASM EVERY TIME, YOU’RE NOT DOING IT RIGHT. The number of times an orgasm occurs during masturbation or sex depends on the practices and what works best to achieve a climax. “You can have caprice orgasms, wild, and strong orgasms. Women can experience different kinds multiple times if they know and communicate about their bodies,” Volker says. Whether there are multiple or none, overall pleasure is the priority. MYTH 2: YOU GOTTA FAKE IT TO MAKE IT. In 2017, studies published by the Archives of Sexual Behavior revealed that 76 percent of those who identify as a woman have faked an orgasm at least once. Whether you’re trying to satisfy your partner or have given up on the idea of climaxing all together, there’s no need to test your acting skills. Instead, find practices that make you feel good, so you can relax and enjoy the ride. MYTH 3: VAGINAL SEX IS THE BEST WAY. The clitoris says hello. According to The Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, the number of American women requiring clitoral stimulation to reach an orgasm neared 37 percent compared to the 18 percent who said that vaginal penetration did the job. While it usually goes under the radar, clitoral stimulation can be key to reaching the female climax. MYTH 4: ORGASMS ARE PURELY PHYSICAL. Mentality is everything. If you’re worried, concerned or distracted, orgasming won’t come easily (pun intended). “If there's that feeling of nearly climaxing and something interrupts, that orgasm can instantly fade,” Volker says. Finishing is about relaxation and contentment, which are not usually done through actions of your physical body. Pleasure is a collaboration of your mind, body, and soul. MYTH 5: MORE MASTURBATION = LESS ORGASMS WITH A SEXUAL PARTNER. Taking the time to self-explore what feels good for you is completely normal. The better you know your body, the better you’ll know how to please it. When having sex with a partner, communicate what works and what doesn’t— it’ll be better for everyone involved.

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To Shave, or Not to Shave? IT’S A HAIRY SITUATION. WORDS ALEXUS KREFT PHOTO ANNA NIEDERMEIER DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

T

o shave or not to shave? Body hair: we’ve all got it and we all have our own grooming habits that work for us. While grown-out body hair isn’t a new phenomenon, some still find it taboo. Whether you’re an avid shaver or choose to embrace it all, it’s all about figuring out what works best for your body. For Ren Culliney, a non-binary student, it’s all about comfort. Ren tried growing out their leg hair for a while but just didn’t find it to be the right fit. “I found that I’m just more comfortable shaving my legs,” Ren says. “It comes down to: I like feeling smooth.” Even they found themselves surprised by the outcomes of their experiment. “I expected to be more comfortable not shaving ... because I don’t identify as a woman, and I also, you know, it is a patriarchal thing. Like, you’re expected to shave your legs,” Ren says. Mollie Clark, a grassroots lobbyist from Saint Saint Paul, Minnesota, skips shaving as a matter of convenience. Mollie is a practicing Muslim and presents herself in more modest attire. She covers most of her body, usually wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants in public. “There’s no need to shave your legs if no one’s going to see them but you and your bedsheets, you know?” Clark says. “Why not save yourself 15 minutes in the shower?” Still, she’s experienced some negative reactions because of it, specifically from her mother. “She is just aghast that I don’t shave my legs and armpits all the time.” But Clark handles this by moving on and embracing every interaction with humor. Simple practicality is a factor for some, like Amulya Kakumanu, a computer science major. Because of skin irritation, she only grooms her upper lip hair and eyebrows by threading. “For me it was more physically because [my hair] would irritate me when I would sweat or do anything.” As for the rest of her body hair? “I don’t worry about it . . . I think honestly body hair is something that’s different for everybody, and I think as long as we do what makes [us] feel comfortable and confident, that’s all that matters.”

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Daily Doses WE'VE ALWAYS COUNTED ON THE FLINTSTONES TO GET THE NUTRIENTS WE NEED — BUT VITAMINS MAY NOT BE DOING THE TRICK. WORDS ELIZABETH WEYERS ILLUSTRATION HANNAH COHEN

Most of us remember those daily reminders from our parents to take our vitamins. But are vitamin supplements or pills enough for getting our daily nutrients? Not necessarily. Let’s start with the basics. By definition, vitamins are essential substances for the body’s normal growth and nutrition. There are 13 vitamins that our bodies need— vitamin A, the nine B vitamins, vitamin C, D, E, and K. “Each vitamin has a specific job within the body and proper levels can be obtained by a healthy, balanced diet with a variety of foods,” registered dietitian Lucas Flaherty says. “Vitamin supplementation is also an option.”

SAD FEELING THAT WINTERTIME FUNK? IT COULD BE MORE THAN YOU THINK—READ UP TO LEARN ABOUT SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER. WORDS TARYN RIPPLE DESIGN HANNAH COHEN

With winter comes colds and nasty flu bugs, but a sore throat and the sniffles might not be the only maladies you find yourself plagued with this season. When the days get shorter and the skies get darker, many people find themselves afflicted with a bad case of the winter blues. But if you feel down for days on end, it may be more serious than you think. If this feeling progresses, it may be connected

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Because vitamins are mostly found in food, maintaining a well-rounded diet is key for consuming the nutrients needed to stay healthy. As for supplements, they aren’t entirely necessary. According to heart.org, supplements can help fill in the gaps where a diet is lacking, but they shouldn’t be the primary source of vitamins and nutrients. Flaherty explains that if supplements are added to an already balanced diet, then they will leave our body through our urine rather than being absorbed. Unless a healthcare professional advises taking supplements, maintaining a wellrounded diet is the primary goal for receiving the vitamins necessary for our health.

to Seasonal Affective Disorder—a condition linked to the wintertime shift of fewer daylight hours and less vitamin D. SYMPTOMS According to Kristen Hopkins of Associates in Psychotherapy, SAD is characterized by low energy and motivation during the “gray” months of the year: those with shorter days and less hours of sunlight. This condition can be caused by a lack of vitamin D, a nutrient that affects mood regulation.The key difference between SAD and depression is that the former is not a chronic disorder; those affected by SAD usually come out of their slump once the days get longer again. “If your symptoms don’t resolve themselves when the weather gets nicer, it’s probably chronic depression or a major mood disorder,” Hopkins says.

If you’re looking for a way to help your digestive health, foods rich in probiotics or probiotic pills are the best option. Probiotics are a good kind of bacteria that supports gut health, overall digestive health, and a number of other health benefits. Foods like kefir, yogurt, and fermented foods like kimchi, tempeh, and sauerkraut are good sources for adding more probiotics into your diet. “Probiotics help balance the good and bad bacteria in the gut and have been linked to digestive health,” Flaherty says. At the end of the day, vitamins are naturally found in the foods we consume, so supplements aren’t necessary unless otherwise mentioned by a health professional. Maintaining a healthy diet mixed with some good-for-your-gut probiotics will help your digestive health and help your body absorb the necessary nutrients needed for growth and nutrition.

DIAGNOSIS Diagnosing SAD can be difficult since mental health can be so ambiguous. Generally speaking, Hopkins says that this condition is fairly self-diagnosable, since treatment options are harmless. Mental disorders aren’t the same as a virus; a doctor can’t simply run a few tests and prescribe the perfect medicine. TREATMENT/SOLUTIONS Because SAD is largely caused by a lack of sunlight, the best treatments include light therapy and vitamin D supplements. Specialists at the Mayo Clinic suggest using light boxes to imitate actual sunshine, which could help reduce feelings of sadness. However, light boxes can be rather pricey. If you don’t want to break the bank, try journaling or exercising to help improve your mood.


Working (Out) From Home HERE ARE 8 SIMPLE WORKOUT MOVES TO INTEGRATE INTO YOUR DAILY ROUTINE FROM THE COMFORT OF YOUR HOME—MAKING “THE GYM IS TOO FAR” A NON-VIABLE EXCUSE. WORDS + DESIGN HANNAH COHEN | PHOTO ALE DIAZ

Legs

Abs

CALF RAISES

SIDE PLANKS

3 sets of 25 reps

4 sets, 60 seconds each

Hold a dumbbell in both hands. Keeping your body straight, slowly push off on your tippy toes, lifting heels off the ground.

Lie on your right side. Put your left hand on your hips and push off the mat with your right arm, holding your body in a side plank. Repeat on left side.

LUNGES

RUSSIAN TWISTS

4 sets of 25 reps

Butt SQUATS 3 sets of 25 reps (Pictured above) Stand with your legs shoulder-width apart. Place your hands behind your head and squat until your thighs are parallel to the ground, keeping your chest up and back straight.

HIP BRIDGES

(Pictured below) Hold a dumbbell in each hand. Step forward with your right leg and bend at the knees, making a 90 degree angle between yourself and the floor. Push off of your right leg and return to a standing position. Switch your leading leg between sets.

3 sets of 25 reps

Arms

(Pictured below) Lie on your back. Bend your knees and raise your feet and back off the ground. Holding a medicine ball, twist your core from side to side, touching the ball to the ground with each twist.

DUMBBELL RAISES 3 sets of 15 reps (Pictured above) Stand with your feet hip-width apart. With a dumbbell in each hand, extend arms above your head so that your dumbbells meet above.

KETTLEBELL SWINGS

2 sets of 15 reps

3 sets of 15 reps

Lie on your back with your arms resting by your sides. Keeping your shoulders straight on the ground and knees bent, lift your hips upwards.

Stand with your feet hip-width apart and knees bent. Hold the kettlebell with both hands, stretching your arms out in front. Squat and swing the kettlebell between your legs. Return to upright position.

WHAT YOU'LL NEED Dumbbell set, $23, Amazon Yoga mat, $18, Amazon Medicine ball, $21, Amazon

drakemagazine.com | 57


ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

COLONY HOUSE WORDS SAVANNA BOUS | PHOTO JENNA CORNICK | DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

Tennessee indie rock band Colony House brought their high energy show to Des Moines. On the tail end of a national tour supporting their sophomore album "Only the Lonely," we sat down with Colony House's Caleb Chapman as he reflected on life on the road and what’s to come. DRAKE MAGAZINE: You’ve been touring together for a long time. Does one of you take on the “tour mom” role? CALEB CHAPMAN: We call Scott and our tour manager mom and dad, but they debate over who’s mom and who’s dad on any given day. I don’t feel like there’s really a mom. We’re a progressive band—we have two dads… I think people have tried at keeping it tidy and stuff, but you know when you’re dealing with seven dudes in a really confined space—it’s kind of a lost cause I think. DM: When you’re creating and performing your songs, what sort of interaction are you hoping for with your fans?

58 | fall + winter

CC: Making it feel two-way. Making it feel like they have a voice as much as we do to respond to the songs because we feel like that’s a very important thing these days-to not just talk, but to listen… As a band who’s more or less viewed as the people talking, how do we actually turn the tables to be like 'We’ve said what we think, now you respond, and we want to listen. Then we’re going to write and hold another round and keep this conversation going.’ The end goal is to make people feel inspired and hopeful, and we’re definitely trying to communicate with people. DM: From your experiences in your music career thus far, what advice would you pass on? CC: Do the thing that you feel is gonna make you feel alive. I think that the most important thing we can do for our relationships, our families, our kids, our wives, or boyfriends-girlfriends-whatever, just a friend, is to do something that you

feel passionate about and find that purpose in… Don’t look for what makes you happy because that will always let you down. Look for the thing you find purpose in. It’s not as fickle. Happiness is fickle. DM: With the band being at the end of a long tour, what do you do to keep the show fresh and new each night? CC: It definitely can get monotonous on the road when you do the same thing every day. Get to the venue, load in, try to find a cup of coffee, go to soundcheck, go get dinner, do the show, load out, and drive to the next city. And so, it’s easy if you don’t take intentional steps to break it up or kind of clear your head. It’s the really small decisions that help you stay sane on the road and keep it exciting… All it takes is one really excited person in the front row for you to be like ‘Oh, this is going to be good.’ DM: So, what’s next for the band? Do you plan to record after the end of the tour? CC: The idea is to dive like head first into recording, writing. We’ve been writing for a long time [so we just record] a few of the ideas we feel really strong about and finesse the ones we don’t.


MIDWEST MUSIC MATCH The Midwest is a place of culture, nice people, and cornfields as far as the eye can see. There’s a strong atmosphere to cultivate musicians. Artists and acts like Prince, Kanye West, Fall Out Boy, and Eminem originated here. New entertainers from the Midwest are hitting the airwaves from all genres and cities. WORDS SAVANNA BOUS | DESIGN KATE SEGLER

WHAT GENRE DO YOU LISTEN TO? ALTERNATIVE

RAP

What artists do you listen to?

Listen to A$AP Ferg, Migos?

Janelle Monae, Erykah Badu, Solange

Walk the Moon, DNCE

HAIM, Halsey

ROCK Listen to Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, Wolfmother?

TRY

POP What artists do you listen to?

Zara Larsson, Alessia Cara

Maroon 5, Jon Bellion

TRY TRY

TRY

Valee

TRY

Chicago, IL TRY

Whosah Minneapolis, MN Chances are, you’ve had an opportunity to see one of indie pop outfit Whosah’s high-energy live shows. The hardworking band carries their good-vibe, danceable anthems across the Midwest with startling frequency.

A recent addition to Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music label, Valee is more understated than his social media anticprone contemporaries. With his trap beats and a proclivity for the constructive process of rap (as well as Yorkies), Valee murmurs in a sea of shouts.

TRY

Quinn XCII

Greta Van Fleet

Detroit, MI

Frakenfurth, MI

A mixture of reggae and electronic hip hop forms the basis for rapper-singer Quinn XCII’s unescapably catchy sound. His music is the perfect “take-me-backto-summer” soundtrack.

Each song is its own love letter to Led Zeppelin, from the cutting guitar riffs to the striking similarity between the wailing of vocalist Josh Kiszka and Robert Plant. Michigan’s Kiszka brothers spew an obsession with classic rock so genuine that their music feels out of place even on technology as modern as the cassette tape.

Emily Kinney Ravyn Lenae

Wayne, NB

Chicago, IL

Best known for her time on AMC’s “The Walking Dead,” Kinney’s musical career takes on more optimistic themes. Originally hitting the scene as a guitar-wielding singer-songwriter, Kinney’s more recent work ventures into twinkly pop that showcases her crystal clear vocals.

Chicago’s 19-year-old R&B enchantress boasts an impressive stylistic palette, from upbeat club tunes to vulnerable, neo-soul ballads. Lenae’s eclectic arsenal is threaded together by her cooing falsetto and off-kilter, synthetic grooves.

Flint Eastwood Detroit, MI Former pop-rock band Flint Eastwood has become a solo project helmed by frontwoman Jax Anderson, who consistently pumps out dance jams worth singing to. With a particular focus on the production of the music, Flint Eastwood hits a sweet spot between overdone and anemic with the heavy synths and vocal manipulation.

drakemagazine.com | 59


ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT

THIS ELECTRONIC-POP BAND MOVED THEIR AUDIENCE IN DES MOINES WITH ENERGETIC MUSIC AND HUMANIZING LYRICS. WORDS MADI KOETTING | PHOTO MICHAELA SPIELBERGER | DESIGN ELLIE DETWEILER

Alternative pop band Lauv hit Wooly’s stage this October. Known for their up-tempo electric beats and songs about getting over breakups, the band not only provided an energetic performance, but revealed personal struggles of heartbreak and the human experience. Opening with the first few lines of fan-favorite “Like Me Better” and transitioning into “Paris in the Rain,” Lauv got the crowd on their toes with some upbeat tracks from their newest album, “I Met You When I was 18.” Lead singer Ari Leff hopped off stage and started singing in the crowd during the concert’s first three minutes, creating an immediate connection with the audience inside the intimate venue. Once the mood was set and the crowd was energized, Leff took a moment to talk to the

60 | fall + winter

audience and show some personality: “I can’t really dance, so I just kind of flail around awkwardly around stage,” Leff said to the crowd. “These shows are my favorite because it’s a lot more intimate and I can be more of a weirdo.” Lauv slowed it down by playing mellow tracks like “The Story Never Ends” and “Getting Over You”—getting the crowd in “the feels.” Before the song “Enemies,” Leff asked the crowd to raise their hands if they were trying to get over somebody—setting the mood for what was to follow. He opened up and talked about the inspiration behind the lyrics, explaining his honest thoughts about heartbreak and the things you can’t easily share with close friends or family. Leff said that he started something called his “blue box,” which is a box where he

keeps written notes about what he’s feeling in the moment along with other topics that are hard to open up about. He encouraged the crowd to do the same and write down any thoughts of theirs to leave in the blue box at the venue. Towards the end, his artistic style really flowed by breaking out the electric guitar and piano. He played one of his personal favorite songs, “Chasing Pavements” by Adele. This moment of him playing the piano and showing the audience his personal side set him apart as a human, not just a musician. He ended the show with his most popular songs, “Like Me Better” and “The Other,” and told the crowd, “Let’s just have some fucking fun, please.”


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