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D RA KE M AGA ZI NE , S P R I NG 2015 I S S UE

NEVER OUT OF FASHION:

YOUTH REVIVAL MISSING SERIAL?

FIND YOUR PERFECT PODCAST

Philly “Cheesesteak,” recipe on page 17

5 midwest travel destinations Back on their feet:

Running club empowers homeless


Spring 2015 Issue

Drake Magazine Staff

EDITOR’S LETTER

Editor-in-Chief Linley Sanders Art Director Kayli Kunkel

Photo Editor Cole Norum

Managing Editor Kendall Wenaas

Associate Editor Melissa Studach Assistant Editor Katie Bandurski

T

his issue, we started fresh. Last issue, we started fresh. And the issue before that? Fresh, too. The point is, every issue we begin anew. We go back to that proverbial drawing board, which sits with traces of that which has come and gone before us. That concept—honoring past successes and striving for innovation— is tried and true. But not every issue is the same, and I’m proud to have been at the helm of this one. When we sat down to plan this issue, we realized something. Our generation is missing a few crucial conversations. So we traveled to Chicago to connect with men and women experiencing homelessness (pg. 48). We found people breaking the stigma that self-injury is a problem with a single demographic (pg. 30). And we investigated the injustices of revenge porn laws (pg. 27). Here at DrakeMag, we’ve never been ones to back away from the controversial. And we know our readers aren’t either. Even still, I was nervous. Could we begin these conversations? Could we do these stories justice? Could we take Drake Magazine to new heights editorially and artistically? We could, we did, and we didn’t hold back. I’m inspired by a lot of people, many of whom work on this staff. Every writer, designer, and photographer brings something special to the pages of this magazine. They each have a creativity and passion that is truly limitless. Our fearless adviser Lori Blachford is beginning a fresh start of her own. After seven years at this mag, she’s beginning a new journey. But you may still spot her at watering holes across the Midwest, likely with a DrakeMag nearby. I hope you’ll enjoy the mix of stories about the flyover states. Once you finish perusing our fresh start, share questions, comments, and snark with us at drakemag@gmail.com. If you don’t already, connect with us via social media—follow us on Twitter (@DrakeMag), Instagram (drakemagazine) and like us on Facebook (facebook.com/drake.magazine).

Linley Sanders Editor-in-Chief

WRITERS Caitie Allen Andrea Beck Jake Bullington Garrett Carty Taylor Eisenhauer Chris Fairbank Annika Grassl Emily Gregor Avery Gregurich Chance Hoener Lauren Kassien Heather Kilby

Jenny Krane Taylor Larson McKenzie Leier Beth LeValley Turner Olson Adam Rogan Amy Samuel Adam Smith Mary Traxler Angela Ufheil Emily VanSchmus Taylor Zant

ART STAFF DESIGNERS Olivia Curti Greta Gillen Susanna Hayward Maddie Hiatt Alecia McEachran

PHOTOGRAPHERS Rachel Collins Sam Fathallah Carly Laurent Olivia Sun Allison Trebacz

WEB Executive Editor: Hayleigh Syens Social Media Editor: Hannah Bruneman Assistant Editor: Jenna Pfingsten Multimedia Editor: Sam Fathallah

© 2015 DRAKE MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED WITH THE SUPPORT OF THE BOARD OF STUDENT COMMUNICATIONS. OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN THE MAGAZINE DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF DRAKE UNIVERSITY. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ARE ENCOURAGED, BUT WILL NOT BE PUBLISHED. DIRECT ANY QUESTIONS, COMMENTS, OR CONCERNS TO DRAKEMAG@GMAIL.COM


CONTENTS

BITS

Spring 2015 Issue

FOOD + DRINK

FASHION

Quick quips, odds, and ends

Something to feast on

The style scoop

4 REMAK ING MA S CUL INIT Y College advocacy group hopes to redefine masculinity.

10 A FRE SH IDE A

36 BACK T O THE FU T URE

4 TR ANSFORMING THE ATER

10 MA S ON JAR ME AL S

4 ON THE RISE

11 COL D ONE S

5 A HE ATED ISSUE

11 CHARITABL E CHEER S

5 FAK E IT TIL L YOU DATE IT

12 AL L-AMERIC AN VEG AN CL A SSIC S

6 BODY AR T

18 CONQUER THE K ITCHEN

Theaters cater to people with autism. Apartment rents increase across the Midwest. How climate change is affecting our Earth’s future.

New service creates customizable significant others. Five products inspired by the human body.

6 NE X T L E VEL DIGITAL

New technology changes cell phones’ functionality.

7 K NOW YOUR RIGHT S

Quick tips to avoid legal trouble.

7 PAR T Y FOUL

Politicians make humorous social media mistakes.

8 FIND YOUR P ODC A S T PER S ONAL IT Y

Missing Serial? Take our quiz.

9 BIT OF L IT

Reviews on some of the most buzzed about books.

9 SPEED RE ADER

Technology makes reading faster a reality.

Community gardens transform food pantries.

Three on-the-go recipes. Alcohol and ice cream—what’s not to love?

The new DD: drinking and donating.

Meat-free alternatives to cookout favorites.

Three cooking classes for global flavors.

18 TIP S Y TAL LY

Never lose count of your beers again.

19 BE S T MIDWE S T TACO S Four fancy tacos to try.

19 THE BERRY BE S T

Acai’s nutritional values outperform all competitors.

HEALTH + SEX

For the body and the mind

26 L E VEL UP

On a quest for a healthier lifestyle.

26 G AME CHANGER

Device monitors concussion severity.

27 THE BIG PIC T URE

The injustice of revenge porn laws.

28 S CIENCE OF L OVE

Forget Cupid. Love is a science.

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DRA K E MAGA Z INE Spri ng 2015

Marty McFly’s fashion made it to 2015.

38 THE WRIS T L IS T

Time to upgrade your watch.

38 DUGOU T DE SIGN

Negro League-inspired fashion raises awareness.

39 MEN’S S T Y L E L AB

Des Moines entrepreneur delivers fashion.

40 YOU TH RE VIVAL

Fashion goes beyond the elementary.

SAY WHAT

Opinions and cultural commentary

46 VOLUN-T OURISM

The importance of learning before serving.

47 WAGE G AP

Speaking out against the “starvation wage.”

MUSIC

What’s missing from your playlist

54 WAL K ING OFF S TRONG

Caroline Smith empowers women on and off stage.

56 GREENSK Y BLUEGR A SS

Midwestern bluegrass group challenges the genre.

57 THE CRE ATIVE MENTAL IT Y

Up-and-coming rapper Luke Tasler shares his road to fame.

57 BE AT S FOR THE SHEE T S Top tunes for quickies.


26 48 FEATURES

In-depth looks and explorations

20 HIT THE ROAD

Our guide to the Midwest’s top travel destinations.

30 L A S TING HUR T, BUDDING HOPE Fighting the stigma of self-harm and reaching toward recovery.

48 BACK ON THEIR FEE T

How running helps people achieve employment and independent living.

36 10

38

18

20

29


BITS + PIECES

Transforming

quick quips and need-to-knows

Theater

remaking masculinity Athletes start a conversation about sexual assault.

C

hallenging the idea of what it means to be a man, a group of athletes at Colby College in Maine formed Mules Against Violence—a co-ed advocacy group creating dialogue about masculine culture. Chris Millman, the co-President, talks sex, gender norms, and breaking stereotypes.

DM: How is MAV reshaping masculinity? CM: People believe the male norm is to be emotionless and tough. This combination can have serious repercussions. If a man does not feel like he lives in an environment where he would be accepted if he expresses his emotions, it will stay bottled up. We combat male stereotypes by creating venues for open dialogue. DM: How can the average person make an impact? CM: By not shying away from the conversations about these issues. As uncomfortable as society has taught us it is to talk about sex, talking about sex and

Linley Sanders

DM: MAV speaks to high school and middle school students—why such young groups? CM: It can be tough for an hour conversation here and there to combat the 18 years of culturalization that happens before arriving at college. If we get these conversations started earlier, there will hopefully be huge benefits later down the road. DM: Where do you see the group going? CM: Our ultimate goal is to educate people about how the world of gender norms that we often blindly live in can lead to some very negative things, such as sexual violence, and help people find ways to navigate these issues.

Apartment rents are increasing across the Midwest.

Cost of living continues to rise in Midwestern cities. “Apartment rental prices have steadily increased for years because of the demand that baby boomers and Millennials have created,” says Juliana Bartlett, a Realtor with Iowa Realty in Des Moines. “The increased demand is outpacing the ability to build, which is driving prices up, both in the rental and purchasing markets.” Stats from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s regional report list the average cost of one-bedroom apartments in Midwestern cities.

DRA K E M AGA ZINE Spri ng 2015

Annika Grassl

how we engage in sexual relations is the first step to making these relations healthy. Or stop saying “grow a pair” to someone if they are scared—that just supports the dynamic that only men can be brave.

ON THE RISE

4

Theaters cater to people with autism. People with autism often experience sensitivity toward light and sound, which scientists say can overwhelm the brain and spark a reaction from the individual. In an attempt to make live action shows more enjoyable for all audience members, several Midwest theaters have implemented programs that reduce distractions. “Theater has playful dynamos that help people gain interpersonal skills,” says Jacqueline Russell, founder of the Red Kite Project in Chicago. The program works with specialists to learn how to better perform for people with autism. Meeting the needs of guests with autism is the University of Northern Iowa’s Gretta Berghammer’s role. “If I’ve done my job right as a creative artist, there is something in the work that engages every audience member, regardless of age or developmental ability,” Berghammer says. “I hope the work shares the many ways we can communicate with and honor one another.”

Heather Kilby Kayli Kunkel

Monthly Rent $1,500

$1,258 $1,250

$1,000

Up 4 percent from a year ago

$1,034 $752

$750

Up 3 percent from a year ago

CHICAGO

INDIANAPOLIS

Up 2 percent from a year ago

MINNEAPOLIS

$828 Up 2 percent from a year ago

DETROIT

$812 Up 4 percent from a year ago

CINCINNATI


A HEATED ISSUE WHAT’S CLIMATE CHANGE? MORE ENERGY, MORE PROBLEMS Since 1980, worldwide energy consumption has increased by

-Energy Information Association

20 over

percent

IT’S MAKING THINGS HOT

THE TREND MEANS TROUBLE

Burning fossil fuels increases greenhouse gas emissions, increasing the Earth’s temperature.

CO2 levels have increased 142 percent since the 1750 Industrial Revolution, yet 20 percent was in the last 50 years.

-NASA

-NASA

WILL BE IN DROUGHT by the year 2050.

-NASA

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

= $2.3 million

Nat. Gas $4.5 mil

+

DISPLACED BY 2050, including half the populace in 316 coastline U.S. cities.

-New York Times

Recently, the senate voted 98-1 that climate change is “real and not a hoax”

Coal $10.8 mil

+

Oil $61.7 mil

87% to GOP

53% to Democrats -opensecrets.org

-U.S. EPA

20

percent increase IN CHILD MALNUTRITION by the year 2050.

-International Food Policy Research Institute

=

...but only 59 of them voted that humans are responsible.

Fossil fuels $77 mil “HOAX” “CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL” -Senate.gov

FAKE IT ʼTILL YOU DATE IT

Andrea Beck Kayli Kunkel

We’re on track for a 2 degree celsius atmospheric temperature increase by 2100.

SPECIAL INTEREST MONEY SPEAKS LOUDLY.

MONEY BEHIND ENERGY Political party contributions by industry. Alternative Energy

people

percent of the us

-The Guardian

increase IN co2 AS OF 2013

200 million

33

IN CROP YIELDS by the year 2050.

1750 142 percent

THE FUTURE IS HEATING UP

HIGHER TEMPERATURE WILL DEVASTATE THE ENVIRONMENT.

percent drop

OF SEA LEVEL RISE submerging up to 1 million square miles of coast.

CO2 in

-World Meteorological Organization

25

feet

Chris Fairbank Kayli Kunkel

IT’S AN ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM CAUSED BY ENERGY HABITS.

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM WITH CO2? 2.5 to 6.5

How climate change is estimated to affect our Earth’s future.

Aimed at the rich and desperate, Invisible Boyfriend (or Girlfriend) is an online-based service that allows users to design a significant other. Anyone lonely enough to sign up will receive 100 texts, 10 short voicemails, and one handwritten note per month. Much like a real boyfriend, it often takes at least five or 10 minutes to get a response, but unlike reality, subscribers can choose a hometown, profession, personality type (including Witty and Educated, Saucy and Sarcastic, and—

“IT’S THE HUMANS”

“NOT THE HUMANS”

The service for fooling friends and family when a real relationship doesn’t cut it (or exist). nauseatingly—Sweet and Shy), and a picture to perfect their imaginary love interest. And rather than an unemotional robot, users text with real people working for the service. Even a backstory on meeting the boyfriend is provided. For anyone interested in making someone jealous or convincing friends and family that they’re finally in a relationship, the services of Invisible Boyfriend/Girlfriend are available at invisibleboyfriend.com—for the generous sum of $24.99 per month. 5


BITS + PIECES

quick quips and need-to-knows

ART DNA11

Business, meet biology. The brainchild of co-founders Adrian Salamunovic and Nazim Ahmed, DNA11 takes customers’ DNA spirals and transfers the magnified patterns onto canvas prints. “It was two friends combining their expertise,” says Brittany Corry, marketing assistant. “And it ended up blossoming into this company.” The process is painless—all it takes is a simple cheek swab—and is done at home. DNA is then sent back to the company where it’s processed and printed.

SOUNDWAVE ART

Keeping someone wrapped around your finger has a new meaning. From “I Dos” to heartbeats, Soundwave Art customers record a message or upload an audio file for the company to process into a speech pattern. The design is then lasered onto a ring. “Everyone’s voice is unique, so their pattern is going to be different,” says Mike LaTour, co-founder of Soundwave Art. “It’s almost as unique as a fingerprint.”

NEXT LEVEL These three devices are taking smartphone technology one step further. Adam Rogan

6

Alecia McEachran

DRA K E M AGA ZINE Spri ng 2015

Custom-made pieces and prints guarantee a personal touch. Katie Bandurski Alecia McEachran

BUDSIES

Imaginary friends don’t have to be imaginary anymore. Budsies turns a drawing or photograph into a huggable toy. Customers text or email in their artwork, then a team of artists evaluates the piece, sketches patterns, selects fabrics, and brings the drawing to life. “Even though we focus on kids’ art we’ve also done a bunch of work for adults,” says Alex Furmansky, CEO and founder. “If you can draw it, we can make it into a plush animal.”

CICRET

Resembling an ordinary wristband, the Cicret projects a phone screen onto the user’s forearm. Twelve tiny sensors monitor finger placement, allowing full use of a phone without it leaving your pocket. While still waiting for funding, this idea takes hands-free communication to a whole new level.

SPOONFLOWER

Spoonflower’s custom fabric, gift wrap, and wallpaper puts decorating in your hands. Stephen Fraser, co-founder, was inspired by his wife’s fruitless attempt at finding yellow-polkadotted fabric. Users upload a sketch or photograph, and then choose their desired layout, textile, and amount. Those not feeling creative can shop other users’ art. “Independent artists earn 10 percent if you choose to buy one of their designs,” Fraser says. “So a lot of people earn money by selling on Spoonflower.”

RINGLY

Linked with an app, this ring vibrates and changes color, informing its user of a text, email, or other notification. The Ringly comes in 18 karat gold with a choice of gemstones for the fashion-minded. Developers are working to expand the product functions.

HEART ON YOUR WRIST

Keep loved ones close with Heart on Your Wrist. Footprints, artwork, handwriting, and even paw prints are etched onto custom-made bracelets. “We work with the customer quite a bit up front,” says Beth Philbin, owner and president. Once customers are satisfied with their print, the artwork is cleaned up in Photoshop, then sent through a multistep etching process. Four artists work on each piece before it’s perfected.

THE PULSE

Ready to jump for joy? Uncharted Play has found an innovative solution to a phone dying mid-conversation: the Pulse. It’s a portable phone charger that doubles as a jump rope. The Pulse charges through movement, powering your iPhone and body.


KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

PARTY FOUL

If you can’t take the heat, then don’t tweet. Jake Bullington

Legal lingo can be tough. Here’s how to navigate common police encounters.

Alecia McEachran

Parents used to be the most embarrassing thing on social media. But now there’s a new source of concern on Twitter feeds: politicians. In an amusing effort to relate to young voters, the professionalism of our policy makers occasionally falls short of 140 characters. Scott Walker

I

Adam Smith

@ScottWalker

Allison Trebacz

n a world of crime shows (we’re looking at you, “NCIS”) it’s often difficult to determine what’s real and what’s Hollywood bluster. But everyone has rights, and it’s about time we know them.

SCENARIO 1: TRAFFIC STOP

So you’re driving with a few friends when flashing lights appear in the rearview mirror. You were going 5—OK fine, 15—over the limit and get a ticket. The officer says he has reason to believe there is contraband in the car and requests to search the vehicle. What are your rights? If you were speeding, sorry, but pay the fine. If there’s doubt, wait for your day in court. According to the American Civil Liberties Union, if the officer asks to search your car, most of the time you can avoid this by simply saying no. If the officer insists, politely ask why. But if anything illegal is in plain sight, the officer is justified in searching the car and can arrest you.

SCENARIO 2: PROTEST

After hearing that Nickelback is coming to town, you grab your funniest signs and head to the music venue to protest. Upon arrival, a police officer asks you to leave the area. What are your rights? The officer can ask you to leave, but you aren’t obligated to if you’re on public property. However, there are limits. A good general rule is the same as the Hippocratic Oath:

Do no harm. According to criminal defense attorney Grant Gangestad, just don’t instigate violence or cause any fire hazards. Beyond that, there’s little the police can do to stop you from exercising those First Amendment rights.

SCENARIO 3: HOUSE PARTY

After a long week you decide to have a few…dozen friends over. Apparently your neighbors didn’t appreciate you blasting DMX at 2 a.m., and now there are police at your door demanding to come inside. What are your rights? This problem is actually the easiest to solve— just don’t consent. In terms of home searches, police officers’ demands are very much like iTunes update agreements, they only work if you agree, and most people do so without thinking. If you don’t wish for the officers to enter your home, simply tell them they cannot without a warrant, Gangestad says. They won’t be able to get a warrant until the morning—though in the future, turn down your music to prevent recurring police visits.

Follow

College Republicans are hosting a brat (no sushi) fundraiser at Glendale campaign office (311 W. Silver Spring) at 6pm. Cost: $16 (not $16k)

In his potential 2016 presidential bid, Walker is embracing loud and clear that the sausage-fest that travels to Washington every four years is alive and well. The Democrats

@TheDemocrats

Follow

RT to tell these guys that you remember the shutdown, and you vote #ShutDownForWhat pic.twitter.com/ ZKjlR8pwTO

Congressional Democrats tried to fire back at the government shutdown by creating the hashtag #ShutdownForWhat. As failed Twitter campaigns go, this is another drop in the bucket—made up of politicians who are close to kicking one. Chuck Grassley

@ChuckGrassley

Follow

Windsor Heights Dairy Queen is good place for u kno what

I’m afraid, Senator, no, we do not know what. 7


BITS + PIECES

quick quips and need-to-knows

FIND YOUR PODCAST PERSONALITY

START S YES

Missing Serial? Take our quiz.

Have you listened to Serial before?

NO

Kayli Kunkel Alecia McEachran

Did you like it?

OMG. Go to serialpodcast.com, click “Episode One,” and block out twelve hours of addiction in your schedule.

When?

After the bandwagon was already full.

As soon as Ira Glass told me to. Before everyone else, duh. What kind of hipster are you, anyway?

Let’s just say, /r/serialpodcast was my home page.

Nah.

Best part?

Because...

Not enough food.

The cliffhanger ending keeps me up at night.

Hey, don’t call me a hipster.

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DRA K E MAGA Z INE Spri ng 2015

“I heard it first.”

Catchy jingle. Check out “Tiny Desk Concerts,” NPR’s intimate live shows: They knew Hozier was cool before Hozier knew he was cool.

Emphasis on.... The smoothtalking, charming sociopath.

Smoothtalking.

Sarah Koenig’s every “Um...” was scripted.

For some satisfying entertainment with a clear end, listen to “Freakonomics.” More charismatic than the “Economist,” this podcast’s likeably dorky hosts transform stats, numbers, and trends into compelling (and conclusive) narratives.

“I ate it first.”

Charming sociopath. For storytelling in the raw, check out “The Moth.” This intimate show broadcasts different storytellers speaking live on heartbreaking, uplifting, and sidesplitting topics.

Alex Blumberg hails from the same storytelling vein as Ira and Sarah Koenig. Check out his new venture, “StartUp,” a meta podcast-about-a podcast production.

“Joy the Baker” is the podcast for you, foodie. Have your pretentious cake and (learn how to) eat it, too.

“Writer’s Almanac” is right up your alley. Enjoy a daily dose of Garrison Keillor’s smooth-asbutter voice reading perfect prose in this literature- and historyfocused classic.

You’ll love “Invisibilia,” a new podcast from producers of Radiolab. Episodes cover the “intangible forces that shape human behavior.” From fear, to empathy, to “human” computers, this quirky and investigative show’s got it all.


BIT OF

LIT

BAD FEMINIST

Caitie Allen Alecia McEachran Allison Trebacz

R OX A NE G AY

Whether you still say things like, “I’m not a feminist” or have been protesting the patriarchy since you wore baby Birkenstocks, consider “Bad Feminist” the Dummies Guide to Feminism—except it’s really smart. Roxane Gay does away with the bra-burning, hairy-armpit stigma surrounding feminism—though if that’s your thing, keep doing you—and creates a funny, endearing collection of essays. Her topics range from race, class, and Scrabble to “50 Shades of Grey,” all while encouraging people to be feminists. Gay gives free rein to like pink and “The Real Housewives,” while redefining feminism as simply not being a thoughtless, complacent asshole. It has an easy-going, “if I can do it, you can do it” attitude, yet challenges readers to demand more, and embrace being bad.

TRIGGER WARNING

NEIL G A IM A N

Neil Gaiman is the kind of author who makes you love books. And his new collection of short stories, “Trigger Warning,” is no different. Some stories are unsettling or puzzling, “disturbances” as he calls them, while others are more of the warm and fuzzy variety. But his style is the real standout. Gaiman writes beautifully, with his own breed of simplicity— never wasting a word. His conversational tone makes reading the stories feel as if he’s personally relaying the tale—in his British accent, of course—to you over a cup of tea. Go ahead and stretch out now, as you’ll likely be bowing down to Gaiman by the end.

THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN

PAUL A H AW K INS

“The Girl on the Train” has been marketed as the next “Gone Girl,” but with fewer curveballs. Paula Hawkins’ debut novel is a page turner with an initially intriguing plot: A woman riding a train sees something she isn’t meant to and soon finds all is not as it seems. However, the novel’s potential was quickly lost in cliches and weak, predictable character development. The ending, which neither shocked nor provided muchneeded depth, fell flat. If not for the inevitable comparisons to “Gone Girl,” this novel might be slightly more impressive, but standards are high in the wake of Amy Dunne. So if your hope was to once again disturb people in your life, skip “The Girl on the Train,” and try describing a pap smear instead.

Speed Reader

Hayleigh Syens Alecia McEachran

Now there’s a way to catch up on your e-books—fast. Web-based technology, Spritz, makes it possible to read up to 1000 words per minute. Unimpressed? The average is 220. Turns out, 80 percent of reading time is wasted finding the “optimal recognition point” of a word—which allows the brain to register a word’s meaning. Spritz uses a colored dot to draw your eye to the ORP quicker, meaning faster word recognition and reading. Test it out at spritzinc.com. 9


FOOD + DRINK

something to feast on

Check out the recipes online at drakemag.com/meals-to-go


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15


15


FOOD + DRINK

something to feast on


Hit the

ROAD Guide your wanderlust with a road trip to the not-so-well-known. Emily VanSchmus

T

urns out, the Great Plains aren’t so plain after all. Forget coastal destinations—the Midwest holds locations that impress without breaking the bank. So escape the city and discover what we’ve known all along—this is where the heart of the country lies.

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Carly Laurent DRAKE MAGAZINE Spring 2015


The Pizza Farm

WISCONSIN A to Z Produce and Bakery: “The Pizza Farm” Stockholm, WI

I

t may seem odd that Robbi Bannen and Ted Fisher openly welcome strangers to their property, but A to Z Produce and Bakery—affectionately dubbed The Pizza Farm—draws locals from all over the Twin Cities every Tuesday, from March through October. For the past 17 years, the farm’s wood-burning pizza ovens are fired up at the beginning of the week. They’re then used to bake dozens of pizzas—each handcrafted with fresh cheese, as well as vegetables and meat straight from the farm. Customers can see where the ingredients are grown and raised, offering a refreshing take on the locally-grown food movement. The pizza dough is mixed by hand before being baked in a brick oven. Customers unload their picnic blankets and supplies on the farm’s yard and can take a walk in the warmer months. “It’s sort of what you make it,” Bannen says. Rules for the farm are similar to those of state parks—guests take all trash and recycling home with them, leaving the farm exactly the way they found it. Perfect for groups of friends or double dates, The Pizza Farm caters to the palate and the wallet. Torn on which delicious pizza option to try? Don’t worry—you can take some to go. Cost: Large pizza, $22-28, depending on the toppings you choose Address: N2956 Anker Lane Phone: 715.448.4802

21


Hit the Road

KANSAS

Stone Pillar Vineyard and Winery Olathe, KS

W

hen you’re bored of wine nights on the couch and looking for something new, grab a few friends and head to The Stone Pillar Vineyard and Winery—just 20 minutes south of Kansas City. In 2004, brothers George and Frank Hoff took a risk. They decided to repurpose the land that had been farmed by their family for decades, turning it into a vineyard. “It’s definitely grown a lot faster than we expected,” Hoff says. Stone Pillar produces over 25 varieties of reds and whites, and their locally-made wine is available for purchase by glass or bottle. But that’s not all the vineyard offers. Spend the day with a wine glass in one hand and a paintbrush in the other as you craft a canvas masterpiece. For the less artistically inclined, dance classes are always more amusing after a few glasses of red. The best part—these activities don’t come with the price tag of hoitytoity wine venues. The main attractions are the live outdoor concerts, which are held in the pavilion with a view that’s worth the drive. Get there before the show to sip and enjoy the sunset. Cost: Painting or dancing classes with wine tasting: Prices vary. Concerts: $10 Address: 11000 S. Woodland Road Phone: 913.839.2185

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DRAKE MAGAZINE Spring 2015

Stone Pillar Vineyard


Valentine Chamber of Commerce

NEBRASKA

The Cowboy Trail Northern Nebraska

R

ural Nebraska is redefining the classic road trip. Rather than a long, hot excursion in a packed car, this journey is just you, the open air—and your bicycle. The Cowboy Trail is a 195-mile bike route through northern Nebraska’s most scenic natural areas. The trail begins in Norfolk and extends to Valentine, but don’t worry about having to do the whole distance at once. There are 19 communities, each between 6 to 15 miles apart, along the route. Check out the bald eagles nesting in the Elkhorn River Valley. Or, about 35 miles from Norfolk, step back in history with a tour of the Neligh Mills, a water-powered gristmill that still has its original 1880s equipment. One of the best parts of this journey comes from the view on top of a bridge 145 feet above Long Pine Creek, offering a 360-degree view of the natural beauty of the rural Midwest. If you make it to Valentine, you won’t be sorry. Take a kayak, tube, or canoe along the Niobrara River, which is not too far from the trail. The river features areas with smaller waves for beginners as well as heavy rapids that suit expert paddlers. End your day by taking in the view from a former railroad bridge that stretches a quartermile and overlooks the Niobrara. Eventually, the trail may expand to its full 321mile potential, as funding permits. But until then, 195 miles should be enough to keep you busy. Address: The route begins in Norfolk, but

trailblazers can start anywhere.

23


Hit the Road

ILLINOIS W

hether it’s the hectic schedule at work or a to-do list on your fridge, sometimes you just need to escape. Waking up in a guest room in the Aldrich Guest House Bed and Breakfast is like waking up in another time period—no emails to send, no meetings to hurry to. This B&B is the perfect place to relax for a long weekend. Originally built in 1845, the house is now owned by Robert and Douglas Mahan. The couple, both previously involved in the high-end hotel business, stumbled upon the guest house under unusual circumstances. Two years ago, Robert planned to surprise Douglas with a weekend getaway. He looked at staying in the mansion, but decided against it because of the dated decor. They wanted something that would fit their lifestyle and found that there really weren’t a whole lot of options for the younger crowd in the B&B world. Robert and Douglas purchased the mansion and gave it a much-needed design revival—intending to keep the glory of the mansion alive while eliminating the stuffy feel. “We wanted to bring something that doesn’t feel like grandma’s attic,” Robert says. Over the past few years, business has boomed at the Aldrich House, especially with younger customers, which the

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Aldrich Guest House Galena, IL

Mahans attribute to the fact that they are young themselves. Galena has a lot to offer as well. The summer months see various festivals and events, with 120 shops and over 30 restaurants on Main Street. “It’s a little town, but there are so many little hooks

that bring people here,” Robert says. “They come just to get away, and they get wrapped in.” Cost: Starting at $115 a night Address: 900 Third St. Phone: 815.777.3323

Aldrich Guest House


MICHIGAN Weko Beach Brewers Festival Bridgman, MI

Avi Schwab on Flickr, under CC 2.0 license

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ost exotic vacations come with a price tag comparable to a down payment on a house. Bridgman offers a better drinking destination—The Weko Beach Brewers Festival, held September 26. Colleen Ryan, who organizes the festival, says it’s the perfect way to unwind at the end of the summer. “It’s a really nice celebration of the shoreline there,” she says. “Michigan has amazing towering sand dunes. I think

Eric Allix Rogers on Flickr, under CC 2.0 license

when people get there, they’re just so surprised at the beauty.” The event features locally-produced craft beers. Past highlights include Arbor Brewing Company, Greenbush Brewery, and Rochester Mills Beer Company— among other standout breweries. Each year, they showcase a variety of seasonal craft beers, making each festival worth the return. Festival-goers can pair the awardwinning beverages with food from local eateries. In addition to delicious tastes, local bands perform throughout the day as visitors dance under the music tent— with mugs in hand, of course. So grab a ticket—each equals 10 tasting vouchers that can be exchanged for either sips or mugs. Tastes start at one voucher, while full mugs cost five. With a drive that’s just 90 minutes from Chicago or Grand Rapids, Weko Beach Brewers Festival is perfect for a day trip. summer and enjoying the last few weeks of warm, breezy weather. “It’s kind of considered the Hamptons for Chicago,” Ryan says. “It’s the second home destination. You literally go an hour away and you feel like you’re a million miles away.” Address: 5301 Lake St. Cost: Tickets are $20 if ordered in advance

and $25 on the day of the festival

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HEALTH + SEX

for the body and the mind

! P U L E V E L One website brings together nerds on the quest for a healthier lifestyle.

Jenna Pfingsten Olivia Sun

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ome would rather play World of Warcraft than hit the gym. But for those who dream of running a 5K with Sonic or being spotted by Optimus Prime at the bench press, Nerd Fitness is the solution. Nerd Fitness aims to help selfproclaimed nerds live a healthy lifestyle. Founder Steve Kamb created an online program that helps people get healthy by turning life into a video game. The Nerd Fitness Academy, which charges $99 for lifetime access, is a website that contains videos, meal plans, workout programs, and the Quest Module. Much like Kingdom of Hearts, the completion of various quests earns experience points to level up in the program. “It actually walks you through different steps to make changes in your life,” says Rebel Operations leader, Staci Ardison. “One of your first quests is to go for a fiveminute walk because you want to build habit changes.” The goal is to do something each day a little better than the day before. Run faster, eat healthier, spend less time playing video games, have more fun. Like Sauron’s army wasn’t created in a day, long-term changes won’t happen overnight. “Nerd Fitness is more about slow, gradual changes and making 26

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progress every single day,” Ardison says. “That progress could be drinking one less can of soda or that progress could be a 300-pound deadlift, and just celebrating those small changes that are actually changes that stick.” For those not willing to drop that much on a fitness program, the Nerd Fitness blog has helpful articles to get started. The message boards are also a place to talk about workout routines, hitting a plateau, or the latest “Game of Thrones” episode. “Everyone is really there to help and motivate each other rather than just us telling you what to do,” Ardison says. “We’re there to help guide along the way and give directions.” Throughout its quests and message boards, the website focuses on getting healthy as naturally as possible. That means clean eating, no supplements, and working out using body weight rather than fitness machines. But if reading about how to do a proper push-up sounds mind-numbing, fear not. Workout routines like “The Lord of the Rings Workout” include “One-does-not-simply-walkinglunge-into-Mordor” lunges and “Lightof-Galadriel” raises to help make fitness enjoyable rather than a chore. “We’re about having fun,” Ardison says. “We’re open to everyday life, and we’re about living your life according to how you want to live it.”

GAME CHANGER Turner Olson Kayli Kunkel

Injuries are a reality of sports, but damage to the brain can create lifetime complications. According to the “Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine,” nearly one-third of athletes have sustained undiagnosed concussions, and with a growing concern over these injuries, early diagnosis has become a point of emphasis for coaches and doctors. New technology offers a potential remedy to this issue. Products like the Reebok Checklight use sensors to capture head impact data during play. The headgear takes sitting an athlete from the game out of the hands of coaches and referees. “No matter what force the impact is, a concussion is the brain rattling back and forth,” says Marc Molis, medical director of sports medicine at Unity Point in Des Moines. “What causes a concussion in one person may do nothing to another.” The Checklight is able to record the severity of a blow to the head. “When it comes down to it,” Molis says, “the only way to prevent a concussion is to not get hit in the head.” However, Molis isn’t convinced devices like this can reduce the number of athletes who go undiagnosed.


THE BIG PICTURE

Non-consensual pornography, or revenge porn, ruins lives. So why is it still legal in most states? Kendall Wenaas Cole Norum

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nnmarie Chiarini was a victim of revenge porn before any laws challenged it. Chiarini’s ex reached out to her to rekindle their relationship. She agreed, but things soon took a bad turn, so she decided to break it off. When she called him to end it, he threatened to sell a CD of nude pictures of Chiarini on eBay. “I begged and pleaded for him not to do it,” Chiarini says. “The last words he said to me were, ‘I will destroy you,’ and he hung up the phone.” Revenge porn is a pop-culture phrase for non-consensual pornography. Generally, it’s when someone shares explicit pictures or videos, that a victim willingly took, without permission. In most Midwestern states, it’s not a crime. Illinois, however, is saving the Midwest’s reputation. The state’s former governor, Pat Quinn, signed a law, which goes into effect June 1 and makes it a felony to “non-consensually disseminate private sexual images.” Rep. Scott Drury, the driving force behind the bill, says the crime is turning victims into “unwilling porn stars.” Along with the creation of the bill, he’s educating those who blame victims because they originally consented to taking the photo or video—even if they never meant for them to be shared. “The victim never consented to the distribution of the video,” he says. Chiarini now uses her experience to help other targets, 90 percent of whom are women. She’s the Victim Services Director for the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, and she testified in support of laws against revenge porn in Maryland

and Washington D.C. And she knows firsthand what victim-blaming looks like. “I’ve been told I got what I deserved,” she says. “I’ve even received threats for speaking out.” Despite obstacles, Chiarini will continue to help victims whose lives are being affected. “Victims are losing jobs, getting kicked out of school, being shunned by friends and family, being harassed, stalked,” Chiarini says. “Women have been assaulted and have attempted or have committed suicide.” Illinois’ law is a big step in the right direction though. The bill states that the perpetrator can be charged regardless of intent. The perpetrator can have many different objectives, such as to make money or to show off. But with this bill, it doesn’t matter. Drury found that when prosecutors have to prove malicious intent, it’s difficult to make a case. “They’re not thinking about anyone but themselves,” Drury says. “But the victim has still been victimized in the situation.” In 34 states, there are no legal consequences for the person who commits the crime. Drury believes that making revenge porn a felony with a harsh punishment will mitigate the crime. Chiarini agrees that putting all the blame on the person who distributed the photos is important. “When people are blaming the victims, they’re putting culpability on the person whose pictures were distributed and published without their consent,” she says. “They’re not focusing on the behavior of the perpetrator. And that’s the problem.” 27


HEALTH + SEX

for the body and the mind

WHAT””S GOT TO DO WITH IT? Forget Cupid. Love comes down to chemistry—the scientific kind. Hannah Bruneman Olivia Curti

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is for the way you look at me. O is for the Oxytocin. V is very, very Vasopressin—Love. It’s more than just cheeky lyrics and oversized teddy bears. Although Hollywood romanticizes fate, it really comes down to science. The science of love. We sing about love. We dream about love. We’re a love-obsessed culture. But neurobiologists and psychologists seemingly hate love, and they’ve

diluted the phenomenon down to studies and clinical research. Biological anthropologist at Rutgers University Helen Fisher believes there are three brain systems involved while in love: lust, attraction, and attachment. When a couple experiences each of these systems— which can occur in any order and in any combination—they are full-throttle, head-over-heels in love.


LUST portrayed in a Taylor Swift ballad. Fisher It all starts with sex, of course. In the early calls it frustration attraction—when phases of lust, testosterone—found in the obsessive feelings are actually both men and women—fuels sex drive. strengthened when one is hurt. We’re not We’re focused on one goal: adding to the crazy. Heartbreak is simply inevitable. gene pool. AT TACHMENT Stan Tatkin, Psy.D., developer of a In order for two people to fully dive into Psychobiological Approach to Couple a committed partnership, there has to be Therapy, believes people are a bit more familiarity. “That means on some level, complex. He explains we have both far and the people are very much alike,” Tatkin near vision that helps us choose a mate. says. “And not just in terms It starts with far vision— of physical features, but like how someone selects LOVE AT on a much deeper level of a person to talk to at a party. FIRST SIGHT, recognition.” “I see the way you dress, I WHILE IT IS So much for love at first see the way you move, and VERY SWEET, I want to move closer,” Tatkin DOESN’T MEAN sight, right? Wrong. While it takes approximately a year to says. “When I come closer THAT I KNOW fully know someone, the idea to you and start to see your ANYTHING of familiarity can occur almost face, that’s when I start to ABOUT YOU OR instantaneously. use a different neuropathway KNOW YOU.” “I see something in you. I where I’m able to focus on the —STAN TATKIN, PSY.D. see me in you. I see everyone small muscles of your face and I’ve ever know in you,” Tatkin eyes and skin tone. And now says. “I recognize you. You’re familiar to you look different to me.” me, but that doesn’t mean I know anything This transition from far to near vision about you. So love at first sight, while it is the first step toward love. For some, it’s is very sweet, doesn’t mean that I know also the last. The manic pixie dream girl at anything about you or know you.” the bar might have a high-pitched voice Once we’re attached, the love cocktail that makes you back off. Shallow? Yes. A is not as strong. Hormones have subsided. necessary filter? Absolutely. According to Tatkin, ‘exciting love,’ which is AT TR AC TION dopamine-based, must now be generated It’s easy to see why the attraction purposefully by the couple. The drop in phase is sometimes known as a crush— exciting neurochemicals relaxes us: it stops three powerful hormones are crushing the nervous, clammy hands from making the brain, causing constant thoughts of an appearance every time we’re around a significant other. our significant other. Tatkin calls this trifecta of hormones Tatkin refers to this relaxed and mixed with a strong shot of testosterone romantic love as quiet love. Quiet love, a love cocktail. Much like an actual which is serotonin-based, explores a cosmopolitan, the cocktail impairs the deep, intrinsic need for safety and security. ability to choose a mate. Relationships are successful because, once Adrenaline amps up focus. It dilates a couple is in love, they understand each your pupils. It shortens your breath. It other’s needs and protect them. Again, this twitches your nervous heart. is where familiarity comes into play. The Dopamine, on the other hand, is the strongest of ties occur when partners can control center for the reward system in relate to each other’s past and present. the brain. When receptors are activated, Maybe there is magic to it, maybe it’s they can cause the person to want to be all in our heads. There’s no doubt that love around a crush. is a powerful force that drives us to do Low serotonin levels are responsible some crazy things. But at least, for now, for the obsessive nature commonly we can blame it on the love cocktail.

Love Myths Explained PHEROMONES: Nope. Not a thing—anymore, at least. Stan Tatkin says that while humans did use natural scent as a means of attraction at one time, we’ve grown out of it. The use of perfumes and soaps have since masked our identifying smells. We lost the ability to smell each other au naturel, but we gained deodorant. So who’s the real winner here? I’M JUST BAD AT PICKING A MATE: Newsflash: Everyone is bad at picking their own partner. That’s why blind dates exist. A friend’s brain isn’t flooded with testosterone and oxytocin that clouds judgment. MEN ONLY WANT SEX: OK, this one is kind of true. At first. But biologically, so do women. However, once the relationship moves into the attachment stage that biological anthropologist Helen Fisher talks about, men are just as needy for emotional support. KISSING IS FUN: Let’s be honest, it is fun. But there is a reason women tend to enjoy smooching more than their male counterparts. Rooted deeply in biology, women kiss to sense the immune system of their partner. It’s subconscious, but it has always been there.

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Lasting Hurt, Budding Hope For years, self-injury has carried the label of being something people grow out of. For those who struggle, though, it’s a life-long battle. Trigger Warning: Article contains graphic depictions of self-harm. Jenny Krane

Allison Trebacz

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rystal hid in the bathroom of America. The range of people spans all her home with a butcher knife. races, genders, and backgrounds. She whispered hateful things Despite this, there’s a stigma that selfto herself and with every word harm has yet to shake. Stereotypically, brought the blade closer to her people see self-injurers as teenage girls arm. She made the first cut. A strange who cut themselves on the wrist, Vega sort of relief washed over her. says. But this definition comes from a lack At age 15, this was Crystal Vega’s first of credible information and understanding. experience with self-harm. The idea came Lauren Oliver, a New York Times to her in a Catholic church, of all places. best-selling author of young adult novels Images of a wounded Christ surrounded “Before I Fall,” “Panic,” and the “Delirium” her: holes in his hands, a gash in his side, trilogy, is very open about her battle blood dripping down his brow with self-injury. from a crown of thorns. She “There’s such a stigma THESE ACTS was taught each wound came attached to it, even though AREN’T FAILED it’s common, especially from sin, and Christ takes on the burden of these sins. SUICIDE when viewed in roughly the ATTEMPTS— Crystal assumed she should same light as other diseases THEY’RE WAYS of self-punishment, like punish herself for her sins. TO COPE WITH Self-injury is any intentional anorexia, bulimia, or EMOTIONAL act that directly damages the over-exercise,” Oliver says. body. Cutting. Burning. Bruising. CONFLICT. “I wish people understood AND THEY CAN that it comes not from a Scratching. Starving. Often BECOME AN called non-suicidal self-injury form of insanity, but from ADDICTION. these acts aren’t failed suicide an inability to express, attempts—they’re ways to understand, and tolerate cope with emotional conflict. And they emotional conflict and negative feelings.” can become an addiction. Just like For Oliver, these feelings manifested alcoholism and drug dependence, these with her cutting regularly from age 15 to urges can become uncontrollable. Even 22, then relapsing sporadically from age with treatment, there’s always the threat 22 to 28. of relapse. “There was a period of several years Vega continued to self-harm long between cutting incidents,” Oliver after her teenage years. Unlike society’s says. “At points I’d replace cutting with understanding of the act, she didn’t other equally unhealthy behaviors, grow out of it. It’s a battle she still hasn’t including damaging personal and sexual overcome 15 years later. relationships and copious drug use.” “Self-harm can be used to quell Now 32, she’s been without a major overwhelming emotions,” says Patti incident of self-harm for four years. It’s Adler, Ph.D., a professor of sociology at partially due to an antidepressant that the University of Colorado. “It can be a helped stabilize her urges to self-harm, response to both psychological and social and partially through recognizing how problems. There is no typical profile of a dangerous the behavior is. Vega found the self-harmer.” same desire to stop hurting herself. It’s estimated that about 2 million “I’ve been about a year self-harm people in the U.S. injure themselves in free during three separate periods of some way, according to Mental Health my life,” Vega says. “The first two were

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accomplished by having a less stressful home life. The last was because I wanted to stop harming myself, which was pretty momentous because I’d never really been interested in recovery prior to that.” Up until about 20 years ago, little was known about self-injury. Because of the taboo surrounding adults struggling with the issue, many do not report self-injury or ask for help. This leads to inaccuracies in statistics and data. The lack of information spurred research like that of Janis Whitlock, a research doctor at Cornell University who founded The Cornell Research Program on Self-Injury and Recovery. “I had friends with kids who were injuring, and I wasn’t familiar with it. I couldn’t wrap my head around it,” Whitlock says. “I researched and talked to other people, and the consensus I got was, ‘Yes, there’s a lot of it happening—no, we don’t know much about it.’” Whitlock and her colleague, Matthew Selekman, published a study on the lack of understanding of adults who self-harm. Very little research has been done in adults, and what information there is can’t be generalized past specific populations. Being misunderstood makes it even harder for adult self-harmers to come forward.

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“Self-harm starts and peaks in early others who do the same. Finding people adolescence typically, but some people online can reduce feelings of isolation start in adulthood, even retirement age,” and loneliness. Whitlock says. “Our research shows that “All of the things people couldn’t tell self-harm typically appears in people their families and friends due to fear of who are emotionally sensitive and have ostracism, they could tell online,” Adler negative cognition, but where the idea says. “Cyber-communities became very of self-harm comes from is unclear at popular, and a lot of self-harmers turned this point.” there for support.” Outside variables, like neglect, abuse, Under the pseudonym of Gabrielle, depression, and anxiety, can affect a Vega created self-injury.net. Her site person’s likelihood to self-harm, Whitlock provides a safe place for self-harmers says. However, the idea that to share their story and people who self-harm must receive online support. I’VE BEEN automatically struggle with The site also contains a CONTACTED BY list of where self-harm mental illness is a myth, THOUSANDS Adler says. appears in the media and OF PEOPLE. “The largest misconception analyzes how it’s portrayed I’VE HEARD is that self-harmers all have to help injurers avoid FROM MANY psychological disorders,” Adler triggering material. ADULTS— says. “They do not usually. But “I’ve been contacted by THEY TEND TO thousands of people,” Vega now self-harm has become BE THE MOST socially contagious.” says. “I’ve heard from many ASHAMED.” While much is still unknown, adults—they tend to be the research about self-injury most ashamed.” —CRYSTAL VEGA has made headway, and the But while some selfissue is being addressed more harmers find support and more—in teenagers, at least. But online, many sites can foster unhealthy the stereotype that self-injury is only “cutting culture,” by sharing photos, art, associated with teenage girls is misleading. and personal experiences that could “I was always told it was primarily a trigger others who are struggling. Some disease of teenagers—I was ashamed comments and posts even encourage that I continued to struggle with selfinjury or suicide attempts. harm through my 20s,” Oliver says. Vega started her website because “I’ve been blessed to have the support she wanted to have her voice heard of family and friends, although their online, but she also wanted others tolerance definitely wore thin over the to contribute in a healthy way to years, perhaps reflecting the sense that I raise awareness about the prevalence should be ‘over’ behavior that is typically of self-harm. associated with adolescents.” “I wish that it wasn’t thought of as Without support or accurate research, a teenage issue,” Vega says. “There’s many self-injurers reach out to each nothing wrong about being a woman, other online through blogs, websites, and there’s nothing wrong about being and forums. In an article published in the a teenager, but I feel these ways of “Journal of Clinical Psychology,” Whitlock describing it are used to dismiss people and her colleagues state that individuals who self-harm. We should see that all who self-injure identify strongly with genders and ages have self-harmed.”

According to the Cornell Research Program on Self-Harm and Recovery, there are five main reasons people self-harm. Self-punishment: Bouts of depression can cause feelings of worthlessness and poor self-image. Emotional expression: Strong emotions can feel numbing, and the pain from self-harming enables feeling something. Calming mechanism: The pain can be calming, which aids in dealing with strong emotions and stress. Control: With stress and anxiety, there’s a lack of control, and self-harming is a way to manage an aspect of life. Visibility: While internal turmoil is often undetected, scars and burns serve as visible representations. If you or someone else is self-harming, call the Self-Injury Foundation’s 24-hour national crisis line at 1.800.334.4357.

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Back to the

future

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Turns out, Doc Brown was right when he traveled to 2015. Don’t get too excited—his hoverboard and flying car predictions are still a ways off. But 15 years later, Marty McFly’s style has circulated back into fashion. Revamping the iconic ‘80s look is easy by mixing faded denim with modern accessories.

Shoes, $140, Nike.

Written and styled by Garrett Carty Photography by Carly Laurent

ON BRAEDEN, LEFT: Vest, $148, Fossil. Jacket, $68, Levi’s. Shirt, $50, Gap. Jeans, $50, Pacsun. Shoes, $70, Nike. Watch, $25, Casio. Glasses, $200, Ray-Ban.

ON ETHAN, RIGHT: Jacket, $120, Zumiez. Shirt, $17, Gap. Jeans, $70, Gap. Watch, $145, Fossil.

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FASHION

the style scoop

Wrist List

Not every watch needs to resemble a phone screen to be smart. Taylor Eisenhauer

Sam Fathallah

DUGOUT DESIGN

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atches are no longer just functional. These snazzy wrist accessories can benefit every style—and budget—as a classic fashion staple. So preserve phone batteries just a bit longer—hey, every percent counts—and check those forearms instead.

DECREE WOMEN’S CORK WATCH

Adds a pop of color and a touch of craftiness to any outfit while truly challenging watch-reading abilities. Challenge accepted. $26, JCPenney

LA MER “CAIRO” WRAP WATCH

Can’t quite embrace the old-school accessory, but still admit having the time is handy? Those prayers have been answered—stylishly. $115, Amazon.com

OULM MEN’S OM-167

Not only is it a timepiece—it’s a conversation piece. So much more social than a smart watch. $50, Amazon.com

TIMEX ORIGINALS CLASSIC ROUND

Accentuate the earthy, subtle vibes of any style—gender roles are so last season. $65, Nordstrom

MVMT BLACK/BLACK

To match the soul and the suit jacket. $100, MVMT.com

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Andre Wright created a fashion line inspired by the Negro Leagues. Amy Samuel

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Cole Norum

bus picked up Alfred Cartmill from Fort Madison, Iowa, in 1948. He was a senior in high school, and the bus belonged to the Kansas City Monarchs—a Negro League baseball team that signed Cartmill to play second base. Cartmill played with the likes of Satchel Paige and Jackie Robinson before retiring from baseball nine years later. When Iowa City native Andre Wright heard Cartmill’s story, he was inspired. Wright is the CEO and creative director of BLU Collar Fashion, which stands for Born Leaders United. The brand strives to inspire people to be leaders, be original, and have an optimistic outlook on everyday struggles. As an African-American himself, Wright wanted to raise awareness for this important time in American history. “We wanted to tell the history through apparel and make it creative and fun,” Wright says. “It’s about educating the public and creating something unique.” Baseball diamond-shaped patches on the clothes serve as a reminder of the Negro Leagues, which folded in the early 1960s as more African-American players moved to Major League rosters. Now, Wright hopes to keep the league’s memory from fading too. “The idea was based on me being an artist and wanting to share a piece of myself.”


MEN’S STYLE LAB Derian Baugh’s start-up delivers innovative fashion. Linley Sanders Men’s Style Lab

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erian Baugh has always been a fashionable guy. Growing up, male friends would always ask him to go to the mall and help pick out clothes for job interviews or special occasions. “I’ve always had a love for fashion, style, and shopping, unlike most guys,” Baugh says. “I sort of had this epiphany of realizing that other guys struggled with pulling things together that they could feel really confident in.” The Des Moines native created Men’s Style Lab—an affordable alternative to a personal stylist. It curates clothing from brands around the world, with customers creating profiles and speaking with a stylist over the phone. The stylist selects 10-12 items that fit the customer’s look and ships it to him. The customer tries items on at home, pays for what he likes, and ships the rest back. The company aims to provide classic, sensible, high-quality fashion. A common misconception is that men’s fashion is complicated, Baugh says. A few wellfit staples go a long way—and there’s

something to be said for branching away from the go-to jeans and T-shirt. “Guys like to be guys’ guys. And they don’t like to talk about their clothes. It’s this taboo subject that we don’t speak about, and yet it hinders us,” Baugh says. “Clothes are a reflection of who you are, and the impression you’re going to leave on people is an investment worth making.” Baugh carries a Midwestern mindset—he knows looking good doesn’t mean breaking the bank. As his start-up became a thriving business— they broke $1 million in sales in their first year—Baugh remained true to his roots, keeping prices low and headquarters in Des Moines. “Des Moines gets so many accolades and recognition for being a great place to do business,” Baugh says. “People from Iowa are familiar with the term ‘Iowa nice,’ and I think there’s something there that lends to the customer experience and service of what we do. It’s not just about the bottom dollar. We genuinely care.” 39


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Acting like a child is generally frowned upon. But dressing like one doesn’t have to be. From Little League to ballet class, these looks channel elementary roots. Luckily, stepping out in style no longer has to be from mom’s mini van. Written and styled by Melissa Studach Photography by Cole Norum Illustration by Susanna Hayward Hair by Katie Bandurski Makeup by Ulta Beauty

Check out drakemag.com/fashion2015 for behind-the-scenes footage.

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Relive the feeling of wrapping ballet slipper laces with a pair of tassel-tied strappy heels. With an A-line shape that narrows the waist, a tulle midi-skirt makes the look stage-ready.

ON KORRIE: Hat, $17, Windsor. Shirt, $9, Forever 21. Skirt, $39, GoJane.com. Heels, $35, Target.

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Fashion’s latest catch— Converse sneakers and a gingham flannel tied around the waist create an AllAmerican feel. And Little League’s raglan shirt and varsity jacket turn into out-of-your-league style when paired with classic dark denim and leather boots.

ON CYNTHIA: Necklace, $50, Loft. T-shirt, $21, Raygun. Denim shorts, $30, Matilda Muse. Flannel shirt, $35, Old Navy. Chuck Taylor sneakers, $50, Converse. ON LOGAN: Raglan shirt, $15, Target. Varsity jacket, $38, Forever 21. Jeans, $96, J.Crew. Boots, $130, Clarks

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Whether smeared or speckled, the painted-on look is now less mess and more styled to impress. Shirts in dark hues serve as canvases, allowing colorful prints to pop, while statement pieces like neon tennis shoes add to the work of art.

ON LOGAN: Shirt, $38, Fugitive Apparel Co.

Shoes, $140, Fleet Feet Sports.

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ON CYNTHIA: Necklace, $10, Wal-Mart. Shirt, $27, Old Navy. Leggings, $65, Fleet Feet Sports.


Layers of fringe and patterned joggers bring playful prints and bold textures to any outfit. But neutral basics like a lace top and graphic T-shirt keep the outfit from going completely into the wild.

ON KORRIE: Shirt, $46, Matilda Muse. Belt, $40, Loft. DIY Skirt, see instructions below. Bracelet, model’s own. Printed flats, $60, Lucky Brand. ON BAHI: Hat, $26, Fugitive Apparel Co. Shirt, $21, Raygun. Printed joggers, $50, Fugitive Apparel Co. Sneakers, $59, Polo Ralph Lauren.

Create your own fringe skirt with our tutorial at drakemag.com/DIY-fringe

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SAY WHAT

opinions and cultural commentary

The Promise and Perils of Voluntourism American do-gooders are heading overseas to volunteer, but are they hurting more than they’re helping? McKenzie Leier

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s I was sitting in the outdoor patio of a hostel in Durban, South Africa, a young, fellow American sat next to me and struck up a conversation. He had a simple question: “Do you know anywhere I can volunteer? I know life is tough for some people here, and I want to help.” The young man’s interest in international volunteering is not uncommon. Increasingly, young Americans are choosing to spend time abroad in low-income countries, partaking in well-intentioned, altruistic activities— building schools, teaching English, and playing with orphans. The trend is called volunteer tourism, or voluntourism. I’ve spent four months living in South Africa and over a month in Uganda. Both of my experiences have been based in learning, not helping, and I’ve become increasingly skeptical of the business of voluntourism. To be clear, I absolutely believe that young Americans should travel to lowincome countries. However, I ask my peers to first travel with the premise of learning, not helping.

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On the surface, the idea of voluntourism seems to be a good thing. Young Americans, filled with nothing but good intentions, have the opportunity to expand their worldview while assisting in communities of poverty. As many international aid experts have pointed out, though, good intentions don’t really matter when the impact doesn’t match it. The majority of voluntourists are relatively unskilled and know little about the culture of the places they enter. The voluntourist experience tends to be centered on the Americans traveling to the area, rather than the needs of the community itself. The voluntourism industry has exploded in the last two decades. Many for-profit and non-profit companies operate solely by setting up Americans with non-governmental organizations in low-income countries. Projects Abroad, one of the largest volunteer abroad companies in the world, offers placements in over 25 countries. But not all organizations are created equal, and serious damage can be done

when the wrong players are involved. In 2012, undercover journalists discovered that a Cambodian orphanage, linked with Projects Abroad, was separating children from their parents in order to turn a higher profit and provide opportunities for voluntourists to interact with “orphans.” Contrary to what the volunteers likely thought, the operation undoubtedly caused psychological trauma in the Cambodian children and their families. My advice for navigating this treacherous ethical territory? Don’t stay at home. Go abroad to Honduras, Ghana, or Haiti. However, go abroad with the intention to learn, not the intention to help, at least until you develop cultural knowledge, language, and useful skills. At the end of the day, your impact in a low-income country will likely be minimal. Children in Cambodia probably don’t need you to paint the walls of their classrooms or play soccer with them. Improving the quality of life in low-income countries requires much more than a plane ticket and hopeful naivete—it requires understanding global inequalities.


CHANGE FOR THE BETTER The “starvation wage” hurts employees. It’s time for reform. Taylor Larson

Cole Norum

W

al-Mart recently raised the minimum wage for Can you imagine living on only $15,080? nearly 500,000 of its employees to $9 an hour. The Consider your first job and crunch the numbers. Set aside corporation has paved the way for the minimum a mortgage and luxury car payment and consider the bare wage debate in Congress (cue eye roll), and many Americans necessities: rent, utilities, groceries, health insurance, and are applauding the multi-billion dollar corporation for its transportation. selflessness and realization that its employees Could you afford it? CAN YOU are valuable. Statistics show that the cost of living, even in the IMAGINE The corporation that championed low prices Midwest, is not getting any cheaper. According to the LIVING and a “Save money. Live better.” attitude is Consumer Price Index, food prices rose 3.4 percent in ON ONLY now officially treating its employees better than our 2014. Although consumers felt a little relief from falling $15,080? nation’s government treats middle class citizens, and gasoline prices, the cost of energy services (electricity CONSIDER that’s embarrassing. and utility gas) increased 3.7 percent. YOUR FIRST The federal minimum wage has been around since The minimum wage, however, is not indexed. While JOB AND 1938, when it was enacted at 25 cents an hour— the price of fresh food rises annually, the minimum CRUNCH THE wage has flat lined. While heating costs for a home $4.06 after adjusting for inflation. Today, it’s $7.25, NUMBERS. where it has remained since July 2009. in the winter rise constantly, the minimum wage has COULD YOU In July 2009, I was working as close to full time forced some citizens to consider heat a luxury. AFFORD IT? in the Niabi Zoo gift shop as my boss would allow. I In all reality, Americans can’t live without learned how to work a cash register, chased children government assistance while making $7.25 an who had stolen rubber snakes, and cleaned windows marked hour. And the industries that are primarily paying with Cheetos stains. their employees the “starvation wage,” like fast During those three months, I made $7.25 an hour and worked food and retail, consistently report earnings that prove they can nearly full time, I didn’t even make $4,000. In fact, if I had afford to implement a more reasonable wage for workers. worked full time at minimum wage for an entire year, I would’ve American families deserve fruits, vegetables, and a warm made, at most, $15,080 before taxes. home in the winter—they deserve a livable minimum wage. 47


BACK ON 15 48 DRAKE DRAK EMAGAZINE M AGA ZINE Spring Spri 2015 ng 2015


THEIR FEET This Chicago group uses running as a way to improve the lives of people experiencing homelessness. Kendall Wenaas

Cole Norum

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MARK LARSON, 62, joined Back on My Feet in November 2013. Since joining the organization, he’s run one half-marathon and a variety of shorter races.

I

t’s a chilly Monday morning on the Chicago riverfront. The Rivera and Larson are part of Back on My Feet, a national, sun has yet to rise, and there’s a steady stream of cars, but for-purpose organization that uses running to build dedication, Lakeshore Drive isn’t too busy yet. Some Chicagoans are independence, and stability in the lives of people experiencing already on their way to work, while others are heading to the homelessness. gym. But on the corner of Wilson and Marine Drive, a small It’s an unusual concept—that physical fitness could help group of people is forming. someone get a job. But it’s not the exercise that’s The crowd is fewer than 10 people, and amidst changing people’s lives. Rather, it’s the life skills that WHEN a bustling city, the group stands still. They’re come along with it. The organization, which was YOU START friendly—greeting each other with a warm hug founded in 2007 in Philadelphia, now has 11 chapters RUNNING, and “Hello!” whenever someone approaches. nationwide, one of them being the Chicago branch. YOU FEEL It’s 5:50 a.m. now, and it looks like no one else is They’re nearing the tennis courts—the AMAZING. coming, so the group circles up and starts to stretch, turnaround point for 2-milers. Larson was planning YOU’RE DOING counting out loud. Terri Rivera is directing the group on running 3 miles today, but Rivera is only doing THINGS YOU today and announces they’re running north. She asks 2. He chooses good conversation over mileage and DIDN’T THINK if they can make the switch from minutes to miles now turns around with her. YOU COULD.” that it’s getting warmer out. A few people nod and “When you start running, you feel amazing. murmur yes, so she reminds the group where the 2—TERRI RIVERA, You’re doing things you didn’t think you could,” BACK ON MY FEET says Rivera, executive director for Back on My Feet and 3-mile markers are. CHICAGO DIRECTOR Chicago. “And to translate that over to people who They start to move. Some jog at a laidback pace, slowly warming up, while others sore from last week—begin not only have never run, but maybe hadn’t had a huge walking. Mark Larson, 62, though, is feeling good. He’s accomplishment before, really makes sense.” leading the group today. By joining Back on My Feet, members are taking control Larson isn’t a sprinter, but he keeps a steady pace. About of their lives. After losing his job during the recession in a half mile into the run, Rivera catches up to him. He’s able 2009, Larson was on the streets for a few years. He heard to talk while he runs, making him a great running partner. about Back on My Feet from his caseworker and decided to This is Rivera’s first run in a while—she hurt her foot a give it a shot two years ago. He wanted a steady exercise couple weeks back—so Larson slows down to match her routine and to participate in some races. But he didn’t expect pace. These mornings, no one runs alone. to benefit so much. 50 DRAK E M AGA ZINE Spri ng 2015


BACK ON THEIR FEET

BACK ON MY FEET CHICAGO RUNS

90 275 14,300

MILES A DAY

MILES AVG. PER WEEK

MILES PER YEAR

On average, three teams of 10 will run three times a week.

43,954 341 SEPT. 2010 SINCE THE LAUNCH IN

TOTAL MILES RUN SINCE THE GROUP WAS FORMED

RUNNERS

139 SEPT. 2010 93 HAVE FOUND/ GAINED EMPLOYMENT SINCE

MEMBERS

MEMBERS

To get started with the program, a person must attend all three runs in a week. After that, they’re given a set of workout clothes. If they come the following week, they’re given a pair of running shoes, courtesy of national partner, Mizuno. If a member maintains 90 percent attendance for a month— that’s only missing one run—they move on to the “Next Steps” program. “Our members choose to be there,” Rivera says. “They’re very motivated, and to get to 90 percent attendance, it’s not that hard—well, it’s hard in February— but they want to be a part of Back on My Feet. It’s great to be around people who are excited and want to make change.” Six months after joining, Larson ran his first half marathon. He’d lost touch with his family a few years prior, but the race spurred him to call and tell his siblings about his achievement. “I got back in touch with my family thanks to Back on My Feet,” Larson says. He’s now training for his second half marathon, which is coming up in May, and is hoping to cut 15 minutes off his time. The Chicago program is divided into three running teams, depending on proximity to different homeless facilities in the area. All three—as well as every

HAVE OBTAINED HOUSING SINCE

SEPT. 2010

LARSON IS TRAINING for a second halfmarathon in May, so he goes on longer runs on Saturdays. Some weekday mornings, he runs over a mile before meeting up with the group.


team across the country—meet to run start time instills time management. And before the sun comes up on Monday, as far as the importance of goal setting is Wednesday, and Friday. concerned, running is the perfect example. Employees and volunteers must be just On top of running a half-marathon as committed. They run with and reuniting with his the group each morning and WHEN YOU’RE family since joining the are responsible for keeping organization, Larson has RUNNING, track of attendance and alsoISsecured a YOU’RE SIDETHIS A CAPTIONhimself or a mini-sidebar, however you want traveled miles. The Chicago job with one of Back BY-SIDE— branch was founded in September YOU’RE NOT on My Feet’s national 2010, and since then, it’s helped LOOKING AT partners, Marriott. 341 members. Nationally, Back on EACH OTHER When it comes My Feet has served 4,763 people. to finding a job, IN THE FACE. Both Rivera and Meredith Weber, YOU GET those experiencing senior development and marketing TO HEAR homelessness often face director, run weekly with a Chicago PEOPLE’S more hurdles than those team. This reminds them why they STORIES AND in steady housing. Back do what they do, and strengthens REALLY GET on My Feet acts as both a their relationships with runners. mentor and advocate for TO KNOW “When you’re running, you’re SOMEONE its members. Accenture, side-by-side—you’re not looking FOR WHO another partner, helps each other in the face,” Rivera THEY ARE. with both funding and says. “What comes out just programming. Their —TERRI RIVERA, program, Tools for Success, starts to spew, so you get to hear BACK ON MY FEET people’s stories and really get to CHICAGO DIRECTOR is a collection of jobknow someone for who they are. training classes on topics There are few times in life where we really such as organization and interviewing. get to do that in a natural setting.” “Right after the interviewing class, Back The mandatory attendance requires on My Feet helped me get an interview discipline and responsibility. The early with the Renaissance Hotel, and it really

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helped,” Larson says. “During the mock interview with Accenture, they asked me a lot of the same questions that I was asked during the real interviews. So I was prepared. I don’t think I would have gotten the job without the interview class.” A lack of a resume isn’t the only roadblock when it comes to employment—there are sometimes financial barriers in the way as well. Back on My Feet aims to eliminate as many as possible. Members of the “Next Steps” program can apply for monetary aid. The cost must be a one-time fee— such as work boots, a bus card for the first month on the job, or an outstanding parking ticket—and a committee reviews the application. At the end of the workout, the group huddles up, and with their arms around each other, recites the serenity prayer: “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference.” They’re not alone though. Runners around the country recite this prayer every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday morning with their Back on My Feet community.


BACK ON THEIR FEET STARTING AT THE INTERSECTION of Wilson and Marine, the group runs under Lakeshore Drive and turns onto their route, which overlooks Lake Michigan.

“It’s a fellowship,” Larson says. “Men and women, all types of people, in different walks of life. You might be running with a volunteer who’s a multi-millionaire—you don’t know. Everybody is treated the same, gets along, and has fun.”

Step-by-Step COMMIT: To become a member of Back on My Feet, a person must live at one of the organization’s partnering homeless facilities for 30 days. They then sign a dedication contract, goals sheet, and evaluation survey. RUN: Teams are made up of people experiencing homelessness and volunteers. In exchange for fundraising for local races, Back on My Feet pays for its members to run. LEARN: Once a member has maintained 90 percent attendance, Back on My Feet provides job training and coordinates interviews. GRADUATE: Once members secure employment and housing, they’re considered alumni members, but many continue to run with their team. Source: backonmyfeet.org

THE CHICAGO OFFICE collects new running shoes and clothes to give to its members.

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MUSIC

what’s missing from your playlist

WALKING OFF

STRONG Caroline Smith uses her own struggle with self-doubt to empower women. Chance Hoener Rachel Collins

C

aroline Smith walked onto the Vaudeville Mews “The new sound just came from growing up and stage, decked out in gold chains, a ball cap, and finding my own voice,” Smith says. “So, it doesn’t sporting enough swagger to make Frank Sinatra sound like much of a departure to me, which I know jealous. When she sings, everyone in the room gets lost sounds ridiculous.” in the soulful, uplifting sound. Her rhythmic harmonies Smith attributes the change in sound to powerful and jazzy growl make it impossible to stand still. women who helped her find a voice. Nineties R&B However, the 27-year-old native of Detroit Lakes, artists like TLC and Erykah Badu have not only Minnesota, hasn’t always been a pillar of confidence. influenced her music, but empowered her. She explains her struggle with self-esteem in her “I’m inspired by women who write their own music latest album, “Half About Being a Woman.” and women who write for other people,” Smith says. “I think a lot of it has to do with my personal journey “I just like women in the creative arts because we’re to self-acceptance, and that has seemed to resonate kind of few and far between.” with a lot of ladies who listen to it, which was kind of a Now Smith is working to be an inspiration herself. happy accident,” Smith says. Most recently, she released a duet with Lizzo, a female Musically speaking, Smith started at a young age, artist from Minneapolis. The single, “Let ‘Em Say,” was learning to play guitar from her father and listening recorded last fall with a portion of every purchase to her mother’s favorite songwriters, like Carole going to the equality-seeking Women’s Foundation King. She began playing indie folk with her band, “The of Minnesota—just another way Smith hopes to Good Night Sleeps,” and in 2008, it released its debut empower women. album, “Backyard Tent Set.” But recently, the sound “That, to me, is really cool that women could find has changed. The group ditched the band name—and some solace in listening to the record.” instead has capitalized on Smith’s powerful voice while Smith is back on tour this spring and will perform trading rock beats for soulful bass lines. at music venues across the Midwest.

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MUSIC

what’s missing from your playlist

GREENSKY BLUEGRASS Forward-focused bluegrass group brings their frenetic sound to Iowa City.

I

Avery Gregurich Greensky Bluegrass

t’s a blustery night in Iowa City, and the Blue Moose Tap This makes their live shows—much like their touring— House’s neon sign is humming. In the alley next to the bar, adventurous pedal-to-floor affairs. Several times in the twoa tour van and trailer sit stationary—an set show, the five players descended into extended uncommon occurrence considering the wealth improvisations enhanced with effects pedals and THE FIVE OF of road salt and dirt lining their wheel wells. an arena-ready light show. US ARE ABLE Both vehicles belong to Greensky Bluegrass, Solos are passed freely and continuously. Mike an acoustic quintet from Michigan. The band is playing TO TALK TO Bont rips through a banjo solo and hands it over to a show at the Blue Moose after the release of their EACH OTHER Anders Beck, who picks a rollicking, rolling dobro fifth studio album, “If Sorrows Swim.” A collection of THROUGH passage. Paul Hoffman bends in half, coaxing 12 original songs, it peaked at No. 1 on the Billboard MUSIC... IT’S thought and sound from his mandolin. And Bruzza PROBABLY bluegrass chart and even broke the Top 200. closes his eyes, flatpicking a response. Bassist Mike Their music, like their name, is a study in gainful THE Devol stands in the middle of both stage and sound, HAPPIEST contradiction. nodding intermittently, anchoring the journey. While “We’re a rock band,” says Dave Bruzza, guitarist PLACE THAT there are signposts to the end, the roads are winding. and singer in Greensky Bluegrass. “We appeal to THERE IS “The five of us are able to talk to each other FOR ME.” many different kinds of music lovers.” through music,” Bruzza says. “It’s probably the Fittingly, the crowd in Iowa City is anything happiest place that there is for me, in those —DAVE BRUZZA, but uniform. Patagonia sweaters stand straight moments.” GREENSKY BLUEGRASS and tall next to pearl snap button-ups, and PBR Barring a flat, their bus and trailer will keep on cans are held in as equal abundance as $8 micro-brewed trucking, hauling the band and its music to places both new porters. Their live performances encompass similar yet and familiar. Regardless, their outlook remains the same, deviating elements. Bruzza says. “We all come from different backgrounds of music,” Bruzza says. “For us, every night is a Saturday night.”

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THE CREATIVE MENTALITY

After recently opening for Aaron Carter, rap artist LT Mentality talks inspiration, honesty, and what’s next.

B

orn and raised in Des Moines, Luke Tasler started writing music when he was 14 years old. By age 18, he had his first recording. Now 21, and known as LT Mentality, Tasler is working on his third album, “Searching for Answers,” due out this summer. As a storyteller, musician, and artist, Tasler shares the challenges and triumphs that accompany the music industry.

breakup, it’s the good or bad feelings that make the strongest music. You need those extreme emotions. That’s how you get people to relate. When I started writing, it was therapy to me. If I was going through a rough time, I’d write a verse and put it behind me.

I G N O R I N G T H E N AY S AY E R S

“I’ve never been fearful of a reaction. You can’t limit yourself in art. You can’t be concerned with being too personal— you have to be honest. It’s something you have to accept if you’re going to be good at what you do.

R E A L I Z I N G PA S S I O N

“I was born with this creative mind, where I was good at writing music, expressing thoughts, and getting words to rhyme. I’ve always liked performing. It’s funny because a lot of what is easy for me is what everyone thinks is the hardest. I feel like I was born to do this.

F O L L OW I N G T H E D R E A M

“Patience is one of the biggest things you need if you’re chasing your dream. A lot of people see the mansion, but they don’t lay the first brick. Keep laying bricks, and don’t look too far ahead, or it will seem impossible.

S T O RY T E L L I N G

I like to tell stories and write in the moment. Whatever I’m going through at the time, I put on paper. From a great show to a bad

Beats for the Sheets M usic can make or break the mood—which is why the right soundtrack is especially important when it comes to getting it on. Not quite sure what album fits the mood? Here’s a list that covers all the bases (yup, we went there) for any amorous activity.

T H R O W B AC K T R AC K S Usher Confessions, 2004

Mary Traxler Cole Norum

JUST PL AIN SEX Y

Arctic Monkeys AM, 2013

The album you hid Alternating tempos from your parents and lead vocalist in middle school Alex Turner’s turns out to be crooning make surprisingly sexy. this album a Energetic beats stimulating listen. smoothly fade into And with each a slow and steady track, you’re not tempo every few quite sure what songs, and Usher’s to expect next. silky vocals coupled The Goldilocks of with the power hook-up albums, and passion of “AM” isn’t too slow his lyrics up the or too fast, but sensuality factor. just right.

Can’t get enough? Check out our playlist at drakemag.com/quickietracks

Let’s talk about sex— musically speaking, of course. OUT OF T H E B OX Glass Animals ZABA, 2014

Quirky instrumentals flirt with climactic rhythms in Glass Animals’ debut album “ZABA.” Each song is distinct, but the album as a whole offers a consistent vibe. Borrowing from the band’s namesake, the album incorporates primal tones—like the tropical, exotic sounds in “Black Mambo”—into nearly every track.

Katie Bandurski

OLDIE BUT GOODIE

Jimi Hendrix Are You Experienced, 1967

Real, raw, and rough around the edges, “Are You Experienced” is ideal for an upbeat romp. Hendrix’s discernible vocals and definitive bass lines make this album a classic. Familiar hits like “Purple Haze” and “Foxey Lady” amp up the sexiness and appeal to Hendrix diehards and virgins alike.

SOMETHING FA M I L I A R Lorde Pure Heroine, 2013

Even though it includes overplayed radio hits, “Pure Heroine” isn’t any less potent. Sensual rhythms and eccentric tones complement Lorde’s recognizable sound. Tracks are stable yet remain sultry. And when paired with the rest of the album, it almost feels as if you’re hearing “Royals” for the first time.

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COFFEE DICTIONARY

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MAKE YOUR OWN NUTELLA CALZONE

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ROAD TO HEALTH

Afraid of a beer belly? Before your night out, take a look at how your favorite drink adds up on our alcohol calorie round-up.

DRAKE MAG BOOK CLUB

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Profile for Drake Magazine

Drake Magazine Spring 2015  

Drake Magazine is a student-produced lifestyle magazine from Drake University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Drake Magazine Spring 2015  

Drake Magazine is a student-produced lifestyle magazine from Drake University's School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Profile for drakemag
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