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M C I ( P ) 1 1 8 / 0 8 / 2 0 1 8 | VOLUME 9 NUMBER 2 | 2018 SINGAPORE | W W W . D P A . C O M . S G

IN

DEPTH

THE URBAN EVOLUTION OF CHINA

INS ight SEEDING HUBS IN FERTILE GROUND

I N

Pers o n

GLOBAL BUT LOCAL: THE DP FACTOR


London

Istanbul

Beijing Shanghai Dubai Mumbai

Shenzhen Hanoi

Guangzhou

Yangon

Bengaluru

Bangkok Ho Chi Minh Kuala Lumpur

Johor Bahru

Singapore Jakarta

The Centrium, Summit Panorama, Palm Springs are residential projects DP embarked on in the 1990s and completed in the early 2000s. Standing as testimonies of DP’s capabilities and repute, they would later open doors to future projects in China. By the turn of the millennium, DP set up our first base in Shanghai.

Today, DP China is patronised by Chinese corporate clients, and has since expanded its operations with offices in Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Shanghai. Our portfolio of works reveal increasingly exciting architecture and urban design projects ranging from Residential, Hospitality and Retail typologies to Mixed-Use Developments and Business Parks. This expansion is due in part to how the Singapore brand has grown over the last two decades, leading to an increase in Chinese clients seeking the ‘Singapore experience’ and design that offers a fusion of local and international perspective.

Our China offices, comprising Singaporean and Chinese architects, are aligned with a global mind set and practise as One Global Studio with DP’s other strategically located offices around the world. Together, the teams in China bring an interesting synergy to the table, bridging our Chinese and international partners through architectural designs that are globally entrenched yet locally relevant.

Looking back, we had seized the opportunity that came with Singapore’s global city model and the ‘Singapore fever’ sparked by Deng Xiaoping’s Nanxun speech in 1992. It was exciting times. Entering the Chinese market alongside our Singapore clients, our primary purpose was to serve their needs. Today, the opportunity remains, albeit in a different socio-economic climate. DP China harnesses DP’s unique One Global Studio advantage to support our Chinese corporate partners who are actively pursuing overseas ventures in light of President Xi Jinping’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

To understand the mechanics and dynamics of One Global Studio, this issue of Design in Print explores the shared work culture between our Singaporean and Chinese architects, as well as the synergy between our Chinese and global offices. We also delve into the export of DP’s unique Hub Ecology as a response to the social, political and economic transformation of the Chinese cities. Illustrating these through key projects in Nanjing, Nanning, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, Vol. 9.2 offers a glimpse into our design approach and methodology, supported by both design and local knowledge.

Angelene Chan Chief Executive Officer


c on ten ts I N

02-05 B R I E F

01 8 Liangcang 02 Sales Gallery @ Hongtang Bay 03 TCL Corporate Gallery 04 Changzhou Yurun Residences 05 NJITrip Plots 10 to 17 06 Sanya Meilicheng 07 La Riva 08 771 Time Square 09 Chengdu Wenjiang Crowne Plaza and Holiday Inn Express 10 Haishitan No. 3

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06-19 D E P T H

The urban evolution of China Designing innovation; Innovating design Catalysts for economic change

20-21 I N s i g h t Seeding hubs in fertile ground

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22-23 f o c u s

One Global Studio for One Belt, One Road

23 I N D U S T R Y 01 Homes over Tracks, Homes on Bridges (HoT-HoB) 02 Nanjing Fuying Tower wins merit at CREDAwards 2018 03 DP Architects delivers keynote address at the Joint BOA-ACES Conference 2018 04 DP Architects Sweeps Three Melbourne Design Awards 2018

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24-32 P E R S O N

Global but local: The DP factor

D e si g n

i n

P r i n t

Team

EDITOR IN CHIEF Angelene Chan | CONTENT Belle Chung, Toh Bee Ping, Chia Zhao Hui, Josy Koh GRAPHICS Lily Soh | PHOTOGRAPHER Bai Jiwen, Pocholo Mauricio | CONTRIBUTOR Jackie Poh


in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

D P A | 8 LiangCang NINGBO, CHINA A mixed-use development at the junction of Daqing Road and Dazha Road in the Jiangbei District, 8 Liangcang comprises a 17,000sqm office tower and 8,000sqm retail cluster. The flexibility in its retail mix is due to the combination of its scale and site context. Responding to this exciting programmatic possibility, the creation of an intimately scaled open-to-public courtyard is central to the design scheme of the development. This courtyard, encircled by multiple three-storey retail blocks, a 13-storey office tower and its podium extension, is a vessel for vibrant programmatic exchanges.

Envisioned as a city living room, it is ideal for informal everyday gatherings, lively weekend bazaars and creative exhibitions. Referencing traditional Ningbo townhouses, grey tiled walls are strategically inserted with firm yet elegant frames mediating the transition between solid and transparent surfaces. This inspiration also carries through to the retail blocks with its continuous pitched louvered roofs, timber textured sun-shading fins and lined patterns drawn from local art. Serving nearby residents and workers, 8 Liangcang is set to become the ideal city destination.

D P A | Sales gallery @ hongTangBay\ SANYA, CHINA With its islandic sub-tropical climate, sandy beaches, and proximity to famous tourist destinations and local scenery of the Bushan Mountains and the South China Sea, Sanya district is the unrivaled beach destination in China. Taking advantage of its seaside locale, the masterplan which comprises hospitality, commercial and retail typologies, was built on the concept of the Sensory Being with nature. The kick-off phase of the development was the Sales Gallery, a showcase of the development that exemplifies this sensorial concept of resort living. Thus, the form and faรงade took cue from the surrounding elements of nature such as the movement of the waves and the reflective

character of the sea surface at night. Architecture, landscape and interior are interwoven to orchestrate the senses of human experience. The external landscape features tropical plants sprouting into the internal basement atrium and creeping onto the rooftop garden. The serenity offered by the external water feature literally and metaphorically spill into the interior space for reflection and contemplation. Unique glass skylight strategies and elaborate louvres at various spaces allow one to admire the turquoise blue sky and gorgeous sun and shadow through an aperture like never before.


in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

D P A | TCL Corporate Gallery SHENZHEN, CHINA The corporate show gallery was a project commissioned for the real estate arm of TCL, a technology giant in China. Occupying 1,500sqm at the top floor of TCL’s office, it serves various functions which include a gallery of current projects and meeting spaces for VIP guests. The lift opens up to a foyer where one is greeted by an organic reception desk with a screen backdrop, offering a glimpse of what lies beyond. Functions were organically organised such that the spaces flow seamlessly from one to the other while retaining a clear definition of what each space entails. Unlike most showrooms, natural light is crucial to the gallery. The roof in the main discussion area has been partially reconstructed into an atrium, allowing light to stream in. Additionally, internal green walls

and open balconies help create a connection between the exterior environment and interior spaces while providing clear views of the park for guests.

DPA | Changzhou Yurun Residences JIANGSU, CHINA Completed in the first quarter of 2018, Changzhou Yurun Residences consists of eight high-rise residential buildings and a two-storey commercial podium. The architectural design adopts a modern style by introducing a cost-effective window wall system. A similar look with the curtain wall of the building exterior was achieved while wall painting pattern was used to break the rigid vertical window positions. The design of the podium is an abstract of Changzhou’s traditional arts and crafts, with the towers oriented to allow maximum sunshine in to every unit. The final aesthetic is simple yet stylish and modern – a highend look and feel for end-users.

D P A | NJITrip Plots 10 to 17 NANJING, CHINA The design of Nanjing Jiangbei Industrial Technology Research & Innovation Park aims to create an efficient working environment that enhances collaboration and exchange, stimulates creative thinking while promoting physical and mental health to attract modern enterprises. Arranged in a cluster format, the three headquarters share a drop-off and covered walkway. To enhance interactions and a positive working environment, each has a private roof garden and features high volume indoor sky gardens evenly distributed every three floors. The facility centre that holds all other auxiliary spaces, adopts an organic form intended to distinguish itself while the towers and headquarters adopt curves on their façade design. Inspired by the digital age, and envisioned in line with current office trends and needs of modern science and technology start-ups, this project will present a new model of R&D office development in Jiangbei New Area.

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in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

DPA | Sanya MeiLiCheng SANYA CITY, HAINAN PROVINCE, CHINA Social elements are key to Sanya Meilicheng, a development

connector housing shared facilities for residences on the third storey

comprising apartments, as well as cultural and recreational facilities. Understanding this, the architectural intent and vision for it was to create character and facilitate unique user-experiences through form, without neglecting functionality and purpose.

and an arc applied to the corner of the building serves well to echo spatial relationships; thereby, tying them together.

The three main clusters of buildings were inspired by the local Bougainvillea flower. Pushed to the edge of the site, the building shape effectively maximises the courtyard spaces which feature individual themes. Architectural iterations such as a building

Noticeable cut-out voids puncture the building mass. This not only creates a recognisable architectural landscape, it also aids in ventilation of the site. The façade adopts horizontal continuous pattern with the use of wood-coloured aluminium alloy screens. Simple yet modern, the design addresses users’ needs while respecting local culture and climate conditions.

DPA | La Riva GUANGZHOU, CHINA La Riva, one of Capitaland’s key developments located on the Datansha Island in western Guangzhou, is a demonstration of how a viable living environment can be created amidst a challenging site with high density. To fulfill the high plot ratio and stringent solar requirements, three towers were placed north-south along the site’s length. Conceived as independent volumes, the arrangement not only cuts a distinctive silhouette against the suburban skyline, its orientation also maximises the view of Pearl River.

DPA | 771 Time Square NANNING, CHINA Situated in the newly developed area of Nanning, 771 Time Square represents an urban culture phenomenon that is designed for a young community to work, live and play. Positioning itself as a mixed development that includes SOHO and an art-culture themed retail, it sets itself apart from the traditional residential typology. This is articulated in its Detian Falls inspired architectural form where different formations of setbacks mimic the mountains; exterior verticals lines along the façade express water flow through the hills; and a floating amphitheatre, suspended above a cluster of retail islands, is reminiscent of a lake at the bottom of the waterfall.


in brief |

SHORT TAKES ON NEW & NOTABLE PROJECTS |

DPA | Wenjiang Crowne Plaza and Holiday Inn Express CHENGDU, CHINA This hotel development, consisting of Chengdu Wenjiang Crowne Plaza (458 keys) and Holiday Inn Express (142 keys), is located within the city’s urban Green Belt. Leveraging on its site location, its spatial programming effectively combined with its design scheme to position the development as an urban oasis and showcase it as an iconic symbol of the city. The former was achieved by locating the built-up area towards the east, which freed up a large portion of the site for greenery and outdoor landscaping and transformed the development into an extension of the green belt. Simultaneously, the allocation of the Crowne Plaza tower to the southeast corner of the plot enabled the design scheme to utilise it in establishing the whole development as an icon for the city. The architecture massing is an embodiment of different components carefully juxtaposed with a consideration to space-to-function relationship. To tie in these components, the concept of ‘screens’ was introduced in the façade as an inference to the traditional oriental culture; and through the screen’s juxtaposition with the components, formed an iconic artistic composition for the development.

DPA | HaiShiTan No. 3 WENCHANG, CHINA The project, located along Haishi beach in Wenchang City, is

between the neighbours through a key element of the client’s

adjacent to the largest space-themed city in Asia. Sited within a vast coconut forested area with a premium vantage view of the sea, the development is among the key projects that redefine the “Luneng Holiday Destination” product for the client. Drawing inspiration from the characteristics of indigenous dwelling of Hainan, the intent was to portray a modern interpretation of the traditional Chinese way of living – a focus on providing spaces for enhancing interpersonal harmony

“SPORTS PLUS” concept. The zoning takes care to create different thematic sports venues in the various nodes around the site that serve different user groups. The design also extends to the surrounding context and private courtyard space of each house. More importantly, this concept represents the service ethos of the developer to their customers – The Luneng Life Pavilion Platform.

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IN DEPTH |

FEATURED PROJECT |

The Urban Evolution of China DP Architects’ unique hub ecologies and master planning are designed for a digital economy while delighting in the human Since the late 1980s, the world has witnessed the rise of China as a global economic power. The last 10 years have seen the country undergo an unprecedented rate of change, often in tandem with socio-cultural and political shifts; all of which, has brought about an evolution of China’s urban developments. A study of this evolution reveals that it is influenced by the central government and accelerated by the Digital Revolution. Policies and measures introduced and implemented by the central government are primarily in response to the rise of social issues related to urban migration and cost of living. Given that the size of the country and population exceeds that of most developed countries, the scale of the task at hand is daunting. Yet, for better or worse, these policies and measures have had a secondary and more dynamic impact that has since sparked a shift in the strategic direction among public and private sectors alike. Resources spent on innovating for new typologies and products

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have brought about a major shift away from traditional real estate typologies, resulting in a rise in new trends that were unheard of locally and internationally a few years ago. These policies and measures are precipitated by the Digital Revolution. According to China Internet Network Information Center (CINNIC), statistics collated in December 2016 revealed that China has 731 million internet users. This represents 53.2 percent of the nation’s population. It also revealed that the reach of mobile internet in China is at a notable threshold of 50 percent. Dominated by the tech giants (Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent), the country has grown accustomed to the use of mobile apps in their everyday life as well as in the way they do business, purchase goods and engage services. People’s understanding of life in the city have gradually experienced an upheaval.


With this shift in end-user and consumer behaviour, the Digital Revolution has also changed the manner in which spaces are perceived and experienced. At the economic level, the Digital Revolution is disrupting traditional trades. This is evident in the way mobile apps offering retail services are reducing the need for consumers to head into brick-and-mortar shops. At the socio-cultural level, this ‘digital disruption’ erodes the human element. Social Media is an exacting example of how digital platforms are limiting face-to-face interaction with peers. As a result, the community and its various social groups increasingly live and work in silos. While the advancement of technology cannot be avoided, its negative effects can be negated by capitalising on its functions. As a player in China’s multi-faceted world, DP Architects (DPA) recognises the necessity of technology and embraces it, without losing sight of its principle and

purpose. In fact, by harnessing its power, DPA is advancing its design mission of creating architecture of excellence that enriches the human spirit by designing spaces for the delight of end-users in a digital economy. Simply put, our designs are informed by data but defined by people. In addressing the people-issue of the digital age, DPA has designed unique hub ecologies that integrates live, work and play in one development. In the following articles, we exemplify how our designs have become platforms and spaces for people to step out of their silos, and balance online and offline interactions through our latest master planning and mixed-use projects in Nanjing, China. TOP: COMPLETED IN 2002, HONGQIAO LINKONG IS AMONG THE FIRST MASTER PLANNING PROJECTS COMMISSIONED TO DPA.

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IN DEPTH |

FUYING TOWER |

Year : 2016 |

GFA: 47,500sqm

Designing innovation; Innovating design How DPA is conceptualising and building China’s tech-parks today for tomorrow By Lee Shing Yi & Joee Ong DPA participates in NJITRIP (Phase 1) Master Plan Design Competition. Client chooses the 2012

proposal as the winning scheme. Upon winning the competition, client appoints DPA and DPG to design NJITRIP FuYing tower from Concept Design to Design Development

2014

and landscape design, respectively.

In 2014, DPA completes Nanjing Software Park 6.0 sqkm Concept Master Plan.

Client appoints DPA to design NJSP 2015

Chuangyuan Tower in Nanjing Software Park (from Concept Design to the completion of Design Development). The date of completion is end 2018.

2016

DPA completes NJITRIP Fuying Tower. DPA carries out urban design and detailed planning for NJSP Core Business District. The regulatory planning and design control guideline was officially publicised by Client.

2017

DPA conceptualises the design of NJITRIP tech park office development on plots 10-17 (from Concept to Design Development). The project is slated for completion by 2020.

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In July 2015, the State Council approved the application of Jiangsu provincial government to develop the Jiangbei New Area (788 square kilometres), which sits at the intersection of the Yangtze River Economic and the eastern coastal economic zone in Nanjing. Set in accordance with the overall planning of the Yangtze economic zone and the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), the development of the Jiangbei New Area places a greater emphasis on innovation. This in turn, has given rise to a new breed of industrial parks in Nanjing, the second largest city of East China region. Among those at the forefront and contributing to this transformation of tech-parks is DP Architects (DPA). Since 2012, the firm has been involved in numerous tech park office projects in the area with a scope of work that spans from master planning and urban design to project-specific architectural design. These projects include the Nanjing Software Park (NJSP) and the Nanjing Jiangbei New Area Industrial Technology Research and Innovation Park (NJITRIP). So what sets DPA’s design apart from its contemporaries? How are its architects pushing the boundaries of conventional tech-park design in order to deliver spaces that facilitate innovation? Across its various projects, DPA’s approach is straightforward: From aesthetic expression to spatial programming, design must serve the people and meet the purpose it is creating for. In other words, where architecture articulates the surrounding socio-cultural environment, spaces address the socio-economic demands; thereby fulfilling its purpose in relation to the larger economic intent of the nation.

Testaments of this are two key projects: Fuying Tower in NJITRIP and Chuangyuan Tower in NJSP.

Fuying Tower: Dynamic, functional, connected Located in the South-West corner of NJITRIP Phase 1, Fuying Tower was the first development to undergo design and construction after DPA won the Master Plan design competition in February 2012. Completed in 2016, the project recently received a Merit in the 4th CREDAWARD (China Real Estate Design Award) 2017/18. The 90,000sqm development comprises an IT incubator, accelerator office spaces and various business supporting facilities on ground level. Composed of two L-shaped five-storey office podiums and attached 17-storey towers, the overarching theme behind the architectural scheme of the development is that of connectivity. This is embodied in how the attached towers interact and mirror one another around an internal landscaped courtyard, linking the interior with the exterior. It is also evident in the positioning of the public landscape connector, which forms part of the master plan, in the centre of the courtyard; effectively creating a rich urban visual corridor that allows connectivity for the users within the tech park.

TOP: A PUBLIC LANDSCAPE CONNECTOR RUNNING THROUGH THE CENTRE OF THE COURTYARD, EFFECTIVELY CREATES A VISUALLY RICH URBAN CORRIDOR.

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A PERMEABLE DESIGN APPROACH WAS APPLIED TO CREATE INTEGRATED YET OPEN SPACES, AND TO ENHANCE THE IMAGE OF THE DEVELOPMENT. Designed to give a distinctive fifth elevation to the development, the podium roof garden has dual functions. Not only does it provide workers with an alternative resting spot, it also doubles as a communal place for company events and casual gatherings. By collapsing public-private spaces as well as work-play spaces, the office design fosters highly dynamic and collaborative areas where workers and clients alike, can come together to create new and innovative ideas. Creating dynamic spaces: Uniquely functional Functional space is closely linked and diversified in all directions. In the vertical space, work, recreation and entertainment are mixed while service facilities are optimised and brought closer to office spaces; effectively increasing the overall operation efficiency of the development. Shared service facilities are gathered on the ground level with the podium holding the incubator spaces and the accelerators in the tower. Without undermining functionality, the unique organic-shaped panoramic meeting room embedded in the courtyard is an iconic element of the park. Located on the third floor, the meeting room connects to one of the podium via a sky bridge and floats over the courtyard with a panoramic 180° view. Architectural articulation: Human-scale friendly design To break the scale of the building volume, the architectural scheme

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plays with the addition and subtraction of massing. This serves to reduce the pressure of building mass on the end-users, while creating variety in the architectural language. Simultaneously, the use of various façade treatments for different faces of the buildings enhances the characteristics of the park. The overall effect is a more intimate sensory interaction between the users and the environment. Permeable design approach: To foster visual and social interaction In creating integrated but open spaces as well as enhancing the sense of space and image of the development, a permeable design approach was applied. The high volume space on ground level contributes to the porosity of space, thereby creating an open, comfortable and inviting atmosphere for social interaction. By opting for a sunken garden at the basement level, the design allows natural lights and greenery to infiltrate the basement while providing convenient access from car park to ground level. A user-friendly design: Connectivity and circulation An elevated pedestrian bridge connecting the two podium blocks allow users to circulate between their offices at the fourth level. This movement of people between buildings essentially provides new opportunities for employees to intermingle, which fosters a greater sense of community within the development. In addition, the partially open ground level and covered walkways create a


IN DEPTH |

FUYING TOWER |

Year : 2016 |

comfortable environment in which pedestrians are encouraged to walk in; thus, improving connectivity. Herein, the design with its emphasis on pragmatism, spaciousness, durability, versatility, comfort and fluidity, roots back to the one thing that drives innovation today – people and their dialogues. With an optimal workplace that encourages connection, communication and co-creation, highly qualified staff within Fuying Tower are able to fully tap into the resources and exploit their creativity.

GFA: 47,500sqm

BY COLLAPOSING PUBLIC-PRIVATE SPACES AS WELL AS WORK-PLAY SPACES, THE OFFICE DESIGN FOSTERS HIGHLY DYNAMIC AND COLLABORATIVE AREAS WHERE WORKERS AND CLIENTS CAN COME TOGETHER TO CREATE NEW AND INNOVATIVE IDEAS.

FROM FACING PAGE TOP LEFT: SUBTRACTION AND ADDITION OF MASSING COMBINE WITH FIN DETAILING ON THE FAÇADE TO REDUCE PRESSURE OF BUILDING MASS AND CREATE A DISTINCTIVE AESTHETIC. THE HIGH-VOLUME SPACE ON THE GROUND LEVEL IS CREATED BY ELEVATING THE BUILDING. THIS EFFECTIVELY CONTRIBUTES TO THE SENSE OF POROSITY AND OPENESS. SKETCH OF FUYING TOWER. A VARIED FAÇADE TREATMENT ENHANCES THE CHARACTERISTIC OF THE BUILDINGS AND PARK.

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: TI LIAN SENG, WU ZHI WEI, GANI WIJOYO, JOEE ONG, LUO HAO, ZHANG FAN, ALEX XU, CHRISTINA YOGIAMAN, YANUAR KRISTANTO, HARRIET YEO, LI WENNA , JIANG JUNLU, ZHU JIAMEI DP GREEN: YEONG WENG FAI, ONG SIEW LENG, VARIT C, KITTINAI KITTIROJANA

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IN DEPTH | CHUANGYUAN TOWER |

Year : 2018

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Chuangyuan Tower: Open, connected, balanced Chuangyuan Tower embodies permeability and connectivity albeit a different emphasis and messaging from that of Fuying Tower. Located in the north-west of Nanjing Software Park (NJSP), this commercial-office complex attempts to harmonise interactions between human and nature while reflecting the openness of public government service. With this in mind, DPA’s design approach was primarily about creating a landmark that blurs the boundaries between landscape and building. This was simply but powerfully expressed not only in its final architectural form but also in how the design effectively drew the surrounding greenery from the open space into the site. An integrated green belt: Harmonising man and nature In an effort to make the new development as pedestrianfriendly as possible, the ground level landscape was turned

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: TI LIAN SENG, WU ZHI WEI TRISTAN PADONG, ZHAI JIANGANG, JOEE ONG, LUO HAO, WANG BIN, ZHANG FAN, ROLANDO BERNARDO, JORGE NOEL ZABALA ORTEGA, HU HOUBIAO, LI WENNA, HELEN LUNG, ZHANG QIAN, TONGHUI, ZHU JIAMEI DP GREEN: YEONG WENG FAI, ONG SIEW LENG, VARIT C, KITTINAI KITTIROJANA

GFA: 26,700sqm

into an extensive green roof that gradually spirals upwards to rest on top of the circular podium. By thus configuring the space and its flow, the green roof serves two functions. Firstly, it is made accessible to the visitor from ground level. With restaurants and cafes lining the deck, it will encourage public activities and leisure. Here, workers and visitors can delight in socializing, exercise, relaxation and play. Secondly, the scheme renders the building as part of the community park overlooking the nearby Laoshan mountainous scenery. Through its integration with the site, the building becomes a significant imagery of harmony between human and nature. Spatial programme: Maximising vantage points Taking into consideration the various aspects of land use efficiency, low density public space and the necessity for office and hotel privacy, the result was a stacking arrangement


IN DEPTH | CHUANGYUAN TOWER |

Year : 2018

LEFT: INSPIRED BY THE NAUTILUS SHELL, THE PUREST GEOMETRIC FORM FOUND IN NATURE, THE ARCHITECTURAL SCHEME OF CHUANGYUAN TOWER SIMULTANEOUSLY EMBODIES AND INTERACTS WITH THE NATURE SURROUNDING ITS SITE. BOTTOM: SKY TERRACES PUNCTUATE THE FAÇADE OF THE OFFICE TOWER, EFFECTIVELY EXTENDING THE LANDSCAPE UPWARDS WHILE VERTICAL ALUMINIUM FINS CONTRIBUTES TO THE HEIGHT EXPRESSION.

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GFA: 26,700sqm

THE DESIGN APPROACH SOUGHT TO CREATE A LANDMARK THAT BLURS THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN LANDSCAPE AND BUILDING THROUGH ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND SPATIAL PROGRAMMING.

of the 10-storey open-plan office tower atop the five-storey podium of guest rooms and ancillary facilities. This building configuration allows the hotel and office block to be visually separated, maximising the building views while sharing the facility space. Guest rooms in the podium are lined along the south wing, with one side facing the public greenery and an ecological green-island, and the inner room facing a garden view. The narrow width of the podium maximises lighting and landscape views for the rooms.

shifting angle of the larger architectural form. The vertical aluminium fins were adopted on the office tower to not only reduce glare but also emphasise the latitude of the building.

Design punctuation: Creating character Playing into the nautilus form of the podium, an array of vertical alternating pattern of aluminium and laminated dichroic glass fins wrap its glass curtain wall. The combined effect of material and texture does well to accentuate the

By integrating green efforts in the building planning, Chuangyuan Tower exhibits ambitions to take the lead in creating a comfortable, engaging and sustainable urban environment in the technology park. The proposed development is slated for completion at the end of 2018.

Another striking feature of the development is the design of its main entrance. Using a large portal frame integrated with interactive LED panels and a skylight positioned in the middle, the main entrance resembles an elegant and welcoming entryway for visitors entering the development.

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IN DEPTH |

FEATURED PROJECT |

CATALYSTS FOR ECONOMIC CHANGE R EDE F I N I N G U R B A N S C A P E S I N S O U T H E R N C H I N A By Tang Jun Hao

Economic restructuring in China has resulted in a shift of urban function from production bases to regional and national centres of services and consumption. The ensuing urban migration meant that cities that were planned 20 years ago are no longer sufficient for today’s needs. This has brought about a surge in the demand for city renewal. In the last five years, DP Architects has received numerous invitations and direct commissions to participate in master-plan projects because of Singapore’s successful urban renewal and DPA’s experience in

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projects that explored urban regeneration strategies. This experience is relevant, in particular, to the Southern China cities, where climatic and socio-political conditions are similar to Singapore. DP’s urban planning and design are generated from macro to micro level, through critical site investigation, market research, planning policy studies and industrial analysis. The firm’s master planning strategies focus on creating long term vibrancy, with the aim to stimulate the economy and address the varied requirements of diverse


stakeholders. Like all DPA projects, sustainability and communitybuilding are key design goals. The following two projects are examples of recent master-plan developments in Southern China that are designed to encourage the development of knowledge-based industries to invigorate the economy, with the larger goal of configuring and creating positive urban experiences that advance city life. MAIN: TCL CLOUD CITY MASTER PLAN

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IN DEPTH | TCL CLOUD CITY MASTER PL AN |

Year : 2017

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GFA: 730,000sqm

TCL Cloud City Shenzhen has undergone a period of urban renewal in its industrial areas over the last few years, and has introduced policies to contemporarise the city’s industrial developments. In response, TCL Corporation, a Chinese multinational electronics company, undertook an initiative to redevelop a 73-hectare site in Shenzhen’s Bao’an District into a business park. DP Architects approached the master-planning as an opportunity to create a human-centric, integrated business park. TCL Cloud City was conceptualised as a town centre for the district, with offices, apartments and retail located within the development to serve the office users and local communities.

Master planning a new town centre The creative zoning within the master plan configures the building parcels in an organic fashion. Designed as an open-concept development, strategies such as elevated pedestrian links and environmental decks were introduced to create social platforms for community interactions. By integrating multi-layered spaces with extended activity cycles, the district was intended to be a dynamic round-the-clock urban centre. The design curates a modern workspace experience and creates a research-based environment that encourages high-technology developments and higher valued enterprises. The urban framework takes cues from existing road networks and site conditions. Divided into four districts – E-Bizopolis, Innovation

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Nurturpolis, Datapolis and Entrepreneur Hub – each zone takes on varied characteristics. The different business clusters will benefit from economies of scale and in turn act as a crucible for talents, ideas and business opportunities. A green loop mediates the development and connects the four districts. Extending from the nearby ecological corridor,


CONCEPTUALISED AS A TOWN CENTRE FOR THE BOA'AN DISTRICT IN SHENZHEN, TCL CLOUD CITY IS A VIBRANT, INTEGRATED, HUMAN-CENTRIC BUSINESS PARK WITH A COMMUNITY IDENTITY.

FACING PAGE FROM TOP: A PERSPECTIVE OF THE OVERVIEW OF TCL CLOUD CITY. CONNECTING THE FOUR DISTRICTS, THE GREEN LOOP IS AN EXTENSION OF THE NEARBY ECOLOGICAL CORRIDOR AND THE 'CENTRAL PARK' OF THE DEVELOPMENT. THIS PAGE FROM TOP: ELEVATED PEDESTRIAN LINKS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DECKS WERE INTRODUCED TO CREATE SOCIAL PLATFORMS FOR COMMUNITY INTERACTIONS. WITH INTEGRATED MULTI-LAYERED SPACES OF EXTENDED ACTIVITY CYCLES, THE DISTRICT WILL TRANSFORM INTO A DYNAMIC ROUND-THE-CLOCK URBAN CENTRE. THE GREEN BELT OF THE DEVELOPMENT PROVIDES A BREATHING SPACE FROM WITHIN.

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: TEOH HAI PIN, TAN CHEE YONG, TANG JUN HAO, WEN HANG ZHEN, SHI YANG BAO, LAI LE FEI, LI CHEN CHEN, KUANG MING JUN, RACHEL PENG, LI ZHI YUAN, YUAN YANG WEN, QIU GUO XIONG, DENG YU, LUO HUA, ZONG XIAO PEI, XIANG DAN DP GREEN: YEONG WENG FAI, VARIT C, KITTINAI KITTIROJANA

this curvilinear green belt becomes the ‘central park’ of the development. It presents a breathing space from within and creates opportunities for recreation and leisure for the urban dweller. This central park is also located along the direction of the electrical pylons that serve the entire region. Instead of directing the pylons below ground, they are designed as part of the park, forming an identifiable feature of the development.

The design and planning of TCL Cloud City was intended to transform Bao’an District from an incidental industrial suburb into a vibrant, mixed-use civic centre with a community identity. As the scope of the project entailed both a macro vision for the region as well as interventions to specific locations within the site, DP involved its Singapore and China teams as well as its landscape specialist, DP Green in a multidisciplinary approach to deliver the final vision for the development.

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IN DEPTH | GUANGZHOU KNOWLEDGE CITY CORE |

Year : 2014

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Guangzhou Knowledge City Guangzhou Knowledge City (GKC) is the third collaborative project between the China and Singapore governments, after Suzhou Industrial Park and Tianjin Eco-City. Located at the northeast of Guangzhou City, GKC lies at the centre of the Pearl River Delta Region. Being one of the key city developments for Southern China, GKC is positioned as a catalyst for the economic transformation of Guangdong, by way of developing and accelerating the city’s knowledge-based industries. Sitting at the heart of GKC is a district known as The Core, which DP Architects was commissioned to develop its master plan in conjunction with a local architecture firm, GAPD. Conceptualising The Core The complexity of modern life constantly generates new demands which can be broadly categorised as: the need to improve communication and information technology; the need to discuss and debate; the need for innovation of modern devices; and the need for a balanced lifestyle and environment sustainability. These needs inform the contents of the city and drives the creation of themes within The Core.

GFA: 1,277,000sqm

IDENTIFYING THE SITE'S ENVIRONMENTAL STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES BY USING COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION, FORMS ONE OF THE KEY DESIGN INFLUENCES OF GUANGZHOU KNOWLEDGE CITY.

BELOW: ARTIST IMPRESSION OF THE AERIAL VIEW OF GUANGZHOU KNOWLEDGE CITY. FACING PAGE FROM TOP: SITTING AT THE HEART OF GKC IS THE PUBLIC-ACCESSIBLE KNOWLEDGE ISLE. A GREEN AND VIBRANT WATERFRONT GATEWAY.

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A knowledge and innovation hub These themed districts surround a man-made lake. In the centre of this lake is the Knowledge Isle, a publicly accessible island that will exhibit and showcase GKC. The other districts include the Centre of Communications, which is a transport hub and commercial centre; The Forum, comprising a convention centre and hotels; the Centre of Product Innovation, which is a research hub; and Wellness City, which promotes healthy living. Connecting these districts is the Garden by the Lake, a live-work-play environment that integrates nature with man-made spaces.

public bridges that extend along the waterfront, presenting inhabitants with a 360-degree experience of the city. Smart design is informed design A key design approach is the use of computational simulation to better understand the interaction of the site with the physical and climatic environment. This entails identifying the site’s environmental strengths and weaknesses. An example is the sun-path analysis conducted to provide useful information on the shading provided by the buildings, which in turn informs the planning of pedestrian-friendly and interconnected walkways.

Work meets play The Core is encircled by an 80-metre-wide green belt. This belt simultaneously acts as a green buffer and provides dwellers with a place for recreation and leisure activities. Cycling and jogging along the green belt is possible without the disruption of vehicular traffic. An all-weather covered pedestrian-friendly promenade strings the different parcels together by way of

DESIGN TEAM DP ARCHITECTS: TEOH HAI PIN, TAN EU WIE, WU YI YU, LIONEL LEOW, TAY YAN LING, TONG SEE HOW, HU YONG JIA, YVONNE YEO, GOH WEI KIAT, SUN LI LI, LIANG YI, ZHENG FENG, LAI LE FEI, LI CHEN CHEN. DP SUSTAINABLE DESIGN: LEE BOON WOEI, SHRUTI PILARE, TERRY WANG.

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INsight |

HUB ECOLOGY |

Seeding Hubs in Fertile Ground DP's Hub Ecology: A new way of planning town centres By Goh Yong Qin

The Singapore Hub Ecology experience In Singapore, development of the appropriate middle ground for mixing of commercial and community functions has come a long way. Early town centre developments were essentially formed as systematic distribution of community and retail services that worked closely with the broader national transportation network. It later evolved into an explosive growth of neighbourhood malls and early forms of integrated commercial hubs. Although the boundary between commercial and public realms continues to remain clear, it is quickly disappearing with how complex and integrated lifestyles are becoming today. Having grown in tandem with nation building, this concept of ‘Social Hubs’ has always been ingrained in our works at DP Architects. From the earliest prototype, Golden Mile Complex to Our Tampines Hub, DP continuously bridges theory and practice through our accurate grasp of the relationship between social and economic development. Planning with needs We understand that more than just convenient co-location of separated functional entities, town centres today need to operate as truly integrated mixed-developments, capitalising on the mixing of public

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and commercial realms to develop dynamic spatial networks, and allowing for greater programmatic flexibility and possibilities. DP’s Hub Ecology Concept is representative of this new phase in the planning of town centres. The design of Singapore Sports Hub, which was completed under the direction of DP directors Teoh Hai Pin and Seah Chee Huang, demonstrated unprecedented clarity in the re-thinking of the relationship between commercial and public spaces, and overturned the long-standing postulation of the competitive nature between the two realms. Crystallised as our ‘Hub Ecology’, our work on the world’s largest Public-Private Partnership (PPP) project moved on to further influence the way town centres can be planned, as manifested in some of our recent projects such as Our Tampines Hub and

FROM LEFT: SINGAPORE SPORTS HUB DEMONSTRATED UNPRECEDENTED CLARITY IN THE RE-THINKING OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMMERCIAL AND PUBLIC SPACE, IN THIS WORLD'S LARGEST PPP PROJECT. OUR TAMPINES HUB CAPITALIZES ON THE MIXING OF PUBLIC AND COMMERCIAL REALMS TO DEVELOP DYNAMIC SPATIAL NETWORKS, AND ALLOWS FOR GREATER PROGRAMMATIC FLEXIBILITY AND POSSIBILITIES.


Punggol Regional Sports Centre. Riding on the opportunity presented by Singapore Sports Council’s overhauling of public sports facilities in the country, Singapore Sports Hub and Our Tampines Hub represented two ends of the sports-centred hub spectrum. From city-scale sports, community and entertainment to neighbourhood-level sports, public services and retail, sports and recreation have become a magnet in this new mixed-development model with retail acting as the essential catalyst for programmatic integration. Through the successful implementation of these community-commercial mixed development

Beyond business; More than just malls With e-commerce taking the market by storm in China, retail as an end in itself is quickly losing relevancy today. Commercial planners are continuously searching for, and perhaps attempting to create, the next lifestyle experience to fill the next mall in town. Here, DP’s Hub Ecology concept also finds a large field of applicability beyond sporting developments in China.

projects under the Hub Ecology concept in Singapore, we also see a newfound relevance for DP’s design in China.

preparation for the 2019 FIBA (International Basketball Federation) World Cup. Comprising of a city-scale mall, international arena with sports themed retail, waterfront leisure walk, serviced apartments and offices. More than just a sports centre with an integrated mall, this massive 300,000 sqm GFA mixed development will attempt to create a complete lifestyle hub for future city living.

Fertile ground for collaborative sports development Within 40 years of fervent development, China took a phenomenal leap to become the world’s second largest economy, bringing about revolutionary changes to a country accounting for 20% of the world’s population. China is now also influencing the world through multidimensional collaborative initiatives. Its global identity is rapidly changing, and so are the faces of Chinese cities. Density and concentration are key drivers of the cities’ growth, and with them the evolution of highly disparate lifestyle possibilities. In the case of China, this is further driven by the rapid rise of e-commerce. More and more, city communities are defined by lifestyle choices instead of generational transmutation. As such, basic public amenities no longer satisfy the large number of city dwellers aspiring towards metropolitan lifestyles. Successful city spaces in China today must be able to weave different lifestyle trajectories into a complex system of commercial and community services. However, while the tremendous speed of development in Chinese cities is incredible, the lack of resources and motivation from the public sector to catch up with advancing needs has left a growing mismatch between public provisions and lifestyles. The vibrant market economy then sees the opportunity to fill the gap; only to result in sports facilities that are overly dominated by commercial market forces and a skewed perspective to accessibility of healthy city living. City authorities are increasingly aware of this ‘unhealthy’ developmental trend. As government bodies begin taking progressive steps in collaborative efforts with the private sector to upgrade provisions of community sporting facilities, they ultimately created a fertile ground for the seeding of Hub Ecology concept. This is where DP can make a difference in China. From Tianjin to Guangdong, we have witnessed considerable increase in the conception, planning and even construction of sports-related PPP development.

This year, DP’s Foshan Arena Centre will begin operations, in

In Shanghai, drawing from the concept of the lifestyle hub in a business park setting for Hongqiao Linkong 10-3, the newly completed Hongqiao Plot 8 business park, will comprise a community retail cluster set in a modern city courtyard. This connects to the greater Hongqiao business district via elevated pedestrian link ways, serving not just the business community in vicinity, but also residents from the larger district. These are the first of many seeds that DP will continue to sow as our Hub Ecology concept takes flight in China. To date, we have actively been involved in the design of similar community hubs throughout China with the most recent example being the Hangzhou Asian Games Village planning and architectural design competition. It demonstrated the preliminary step towards commercial involvement in large scale community projects. FROM LEFT: FOSHAN ARENA CENTRE, A COMPLETE LIFESTYLE HUB FOR FUTURE CITY LIVING NEWLY COMPLETED HONGQIAO PLOT 8 BUSINESS PARK

Writer Profile Goh Yong Qin has been with DP Architects’ Shanghai Office since 2011, and is currently a Senior Associate. Since his university days at NUS, he has been deeply interested in the urban development of China, taking part actively in workshops, and multiple study tours in China. His three years of Masters in Tokyo provided him with additional perspectives on China, from the wider Sinosphere region.

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IN focus |

ONE GLOBAL STUDIO FOR ONE BELT, ONE ROAD |

One Global Studio for One Belt, One Road With the launch of China's Belt and Road Initiatives, director Tan Chee Yong looks at how the global but local strategy of DPA's One Global Studio uniquely positions the firm in today's market conditions to better service its Chinese clients By Belle Chung

China has great plans. And its ambition is immense. Launched in 2013, President Xi Jinping’s Belt and Road Initiatives (BRI) promises a modern revival of the country’s ancient Silk Road. Like its predecessor, the “One Belt, One Road” (OBOR) project aims to connect China to the rest of the world. This time, doing so via a network of railways, roads, pipelines, utility grids and regional waterways to Central, West and South Asia. Primarily, the initiative will enable China to establish the world’s largest platform for economic cooperation. Secondary to this, OBOR is a bold foreign policy in motion. If successful, not only will the initiative allow China to build a trade zone with it at the centre of global supply and manufacturing networks, it will also enable the country to consolidate its position as a global leader. Using BRI to export China’s excess capacities and capital overseas, the opportunities that the initiative brings are nothing short of exciting. This is because OBOR-related projects may stretch across country borders; and with this cross-border nature, projects will come with its own set of geo-political complexities. The questions that then plague many investors and businesses – DP Architects (DPA) included, are: do we have the capacity and competencies for the successful delivery of OBOR-related projects? Should the company be wary of jumping onto the bandwagon? Mr Tan Chee Yong, a director at DPA thinks otherwise. In view of the increasing saturation of domestic markets, especially in developed countries, he holds that it is imperative for companies to continue to expand by growing beyond its local shores. Embracing incoming opportunities, Mr Tan offers insights from a local firm perspective, “Companies should not be afraid to step out of their comfort zones. The BRI is a good platform for Singapore to conduct its economic diplomacy with China as it represents the Chinese leadership’s most important economic legacy and an opportunity for the republic to benefit economically from meaningful projects that can enhance regional connectivity.” So, far from shying away from the opportunities BRI presents, DPA sees it as a means for greater and more beneficial collaborative

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work between partners and clients. Moving within China’s current economic climate, DPA’s aim is to support and assist its Chinese clients to break into new markets while advancing its foothold in the OBOR regions. This has already begun with projects such as the Princess Cove Master Plan, which comprises a causeway at Tanjung Puteri in Johor Bahru, Malaysia for the R&F Group China and links to Woodlands, Singapore; Township Master Plan in India for the China Fortune Land Development (CLFD) and Country Garden Group; and the currently under construction Agile Mont Kiara and Agile Bukit Bintang in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia for the Chinese developer, Agile Group. Explaining this socio-economic climate, Mr Tan says, “China has been very strategic in the way it has been investing, linking up with countries and building relationships. Chinese companies have spread out, investing in projects that are aligned with the OBOR initiatives. Thus, while we can expect demand for overseas real estate to increase, China’s capital controls have become stricter. This in turn affects acquisitions and real estate developments. As such, it is critical that we work strategically with our partners, and invest time and effort to support our clients and build up particular market sectors.”


INDUSTRY |

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However, those hoping to capitalise on the opportunities of BRI must come prepared. And DPA stands among those who have done its ground work. Over the last 50 years, the firm has worked steadily to build its competencies through its 8 specialist arms offering services from project management consultancy and environmental branding & xperiential design to interior design and spatial planning, landscape & arboricultural consultancy and environmentally sustainable design. At the same time, DP has strategically set up One Global Studio – a network of 17 international offices spanning from Southeast Asia and South Asia to Central Asia and Europe, through which it exports the design skills and knowledge of the practice. According to Mr Tan, it is precisely DPA’s existing presence in OBOR countries, combined with the way the firm leverages on its One Global Studio capabilities and 8 specialist services that gives DP competitive edge over its counterparts. “DP is multi-cultural and multi-disciplinary. This is what governs our design approach and it is what sets us apart from others,” he says. “Leveraging on the competencies of One Global Studio essentially means our teams have 365-day, 24-hour access to DP’s unique and competitive pool of global talents that comprises local market leaders, country experts, typology researchers, technology experts and 8 specialist arms. What this translates to in terms of building design is a holistic architecture that is well-informed by years of local market knowledge, extensive understanding of the local culture and expectations, climate behaviour and typology research.”

LEFT: AGILE MONT KIARA TOP: COSL SINGAPORE

HO M ES OV ER T R AC K S, HO M E S O N B R ID G ES (HOT-HO B) Responding to London’s housing crisis, HoTHoB is a research led by Mr Frven Lim, director of DP Architects’ London studio (DP International UK). The design concept takes cues from Singapore’s government housing system and provides a cost-effective and sustainable yet savvy solution that taps on the capabilities of local talents and Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA) principles in London. Mr Lim will be presenting his research keynote at the upcoming London Festival of Architecture 2018.

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NANJING FUYING T OW E R W I N S M E R I T AT C R E D AWA R D S 2 01 8 DP China’s Nanjing ITrip Fuying Building was conferred the Merit Award in the Commerical and Office category of the fourth edition of China Real Estate Design Awards (CREDAward) 2017-2018. The awards ceremony took place on April 27 at Kerry Centre Hotel in Pudong, Shanghai. CREDAward is an annual awards platform that recognises excellent architecture design and promotes sustainable design in China.

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D P A R C H I T E CT S D E L I V E R S K E Y N O T E A D D R E S S AT THE JOINT B OA-ACES C O N F E R E N C E 2 01 8 Invited as a guest speaker of the Joint BOA-ACES Conference 2018, CEO of DP Architects Ms Angelene Chan, delivered a keynote address under the segment “Building a Singapore Brand”. She shared about how DPA has built a sustainable and successful creative practice outside of Singapore. Ms Chan also provided insight into the proactive steps DPA has taken to stay competitive in a rapidly changing industry landscape and technological advancements. Held on 22nd May at Marina Bay Sands, the conference theme “Collaborative Alliance: Building a Sustainable Business” placed focus on greater collaboration and internationalisation so as to engage the future global economy.

DPA China fully exemplifies this. With three offices – specifically Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, well entrenched and fully operational offices in China, the teams have gained deeper insights to the Chinese business culture through many crosscultural business exchanges with its Chinese clients. Synthesizing this with its mix of global talents from Singapore and China, the firm brings a strong Singapore brand to the table. From concept to completion, DP’s design work, processes and final product are synonymous with hallmarks of innovation, quality of workmanship, service excellence and efficiency of service delivery that the Singapore brand is widely recognised and trusted for. “We’ve delivered such quality of design and service time and time again. One Global Studio allows us to take advantage of the dispersed time zones across the world to seamlessly expedite project operations for greater productivity and efficiency around the world,” says Mr Tan. “This is what we refer to as the seamless experience and quality design of One Global Studio that we bring to partners and clients alike.”

AWARDS & EVENTS |

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D P A R C H I T E CT S SW E E P S THREE MELBOURNE DESIGN AWA R D S 2 01 8 Comprising a hotel, clubhouse and commercial facilities, DP Architects’ Novotel and Mercure Singapore on Stevens clinched a gold award in the category of Architecture – Mixed Use – Constructed in this year’s Melbourne Design Awards. Simultaneously, Project Bus-Stop and Rhizome House each clinched a silver award in the Urban Design and Pop-Ups, and the Display, Exhibit & Set Design categories, respectively. Melbourne Design Awards is a programme that recognises and celebrates the creativity, diversity and excellence of those who are leading the way .


IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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GLOBAL BUT LOCAL : THE DP FACTOR Interview by: Belle Chung

With the rate of urban migration taking place in China, its cities are under immense pressure while undergoing remarkable change. City living is not only more expensive as the cost of living increases, it is also more complex. And a large part of this is due to the influx of digital technology on both a social and economic level as it affects community and consumer behaviour as well as business models and strategies. Exploring the questions of liveability, relevance and possibilities, IN PERSON turns the spotlight onto our directors and senior associates in DPA (China) to understand how the Chinese city is evolving, what its inherent beauty is, and how DP Architects’ unique One Global Studio (OGS) approach and multicultural dynamics can and is contributing to the country’s urbanscape today.

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TEOH HAI PIN Director

On the purpose of architecture. A journey of problem solving. On the beauty of the Chinese city. Full of historical and cultural richness, China is fascinating and almost magical. Her many natural and built wonders such as the Great Wall, terracotta warriors and the magnificent Huangshan is nothing short of fascinating. The rich and diverse cultural preservation has kept China uniquely and uncompromisingly Oriental. Her tremendous economic transformation over the last four decades is magical. It has brought about the extensive urban transformation and massive creation of new cities unmatched in history. On its evolution. This great economic transformation has propelled massive urbanisation at a breakneck speed and scale that strokes the undertones of the urbanscape of modern Chinese cities. A very well planned macro infrastructure from amazing super highways to extensive high speed rail links enable new cities to grow at rapid pace. Skyscrapers have sprung up almost overnight achieving a picturesque image of the city that simultaneously displays the country’s economic might. This regeneration of old and emergence of new Chinese cities has defied organic growth, creating an interesting and vibrant urbanscape. On China as Smart Nation. The technology disruption is amazingly evident in most Chinese cities. Cities will inevitably develop into smarter cities worldwide and those slower in catching up will be left behind. Approach to design must embrace the DNA of smart technologies. Thus, when planning and designing external and internal spaces, the building design must be as flexible as possible to cope with unforeseen and ever-changing user needs in this disruption.

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On DP’s competitive edge. Our competitive edge leverages on the Singapore brand of trustworthiness in delivery, our experience in the various fields as well as being the largest firm in the Asia Pacific with multiple varieties of experiences and expertise. Adding to this, is our global but local approach. Comprising of Singaporean and Chinese architects, we combine industry knowledge with local understanding of the Chinese cultural backgrounds to produce excellent and relevant architecture. On how we achieve this. Key to our success in globalisation is our people’s willingness to travel and relocate to expand our services. The proliferation of our global offices is fundamental to better understand our projects and our clients globally as well as serving them effectively and efficiently. One Global Studio with its network of 17 strategically located offices worldwide are like our arms and legs. They are integral parts of the head office in Singapore. Resources and regional expertise are shared to optimise our resources, and achieve a speedy and seamless experience to our clients. On value-adding to China’s urbanscape. Our extensive experience in master planning, specialisation in the field of large scale retail developments and numerous experience in designing successful community hubs will enable us to contribute meaningfully to China urban landscape. On our Design + Partnership principle. DP has always been known as a firm that places emphasis on developing good and lasting relationship with the clients. This is one of the key pillars that has enabled DP to grow from a humble beginning to a global practice of 1300.


THUS, WHEN PLANNING AND DESIGNING EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL SPACES, THE BUILDING DESIGN MUST BE AS FLEXIBLE AS POSSIBLE TO COPE WITH UNFORESEEN AN D EVER-CHANGING USER NEEDS IN THIS DIGITAL DISRUPTION.

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- t eoh h a i pin

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NIEW PEY RAN Director

On the purpose of architecture. Creating spaces that move people. On the beauty of the Chinese city. The Chinese city is essentially about transformations. The sheer scale of the major cities allows them to be remarkable receptacles of a multiplicity of ideas and aspirations. The biggest thrill and also the biggest challenge, is the constant drive for change and the endless possibilities that it presents. On its evolution. The urbanscape of China represents the pure will of the nation and its citizens in their desire for relevance; from the personal realm to the world stage. Untethered by any easily defined spatial language, it has developed with an agnostic appropriation of any number of world cities. As each city works itself through this transitional period, we can see a much stronger dialogue between the city and the aspiration of its citizens. On China as Smart Nation. The adoption of technology in China has been remarkably swift and staggeringly broad, but still shallow; essentially derivative and fundamentally conservative. Predicated on old modes of requirements and unsupported by robust systematic infrastructures, its raison d’etre comes from the growing middle class’ desire for validation and the ‘new’. However, what the strong adoption provides is a massive testbed for any new idea to prove itself. The will of society to search for the next thing will result in transformative modes of living which will fundamentally affect our work in design. The scale of the market will also accelerate this process. On DP and our competitive edge. We believe the Singapore experience does provide a valid and valuable component in the conversation. Coupled with the close cultural affinity and nearly two decades of working in the China market, we can serve as a bridge between the aspiration of the China market and its global relevance.

2 On value-adding to China’s urbanscape. Whether it’s a spatial contribution to the city or a functional model which can benefit both the developer and its customer, we hope to bring to each project a desire to create something more. On how DP achieves this. Through a service and design oriented pragmatism. On DP’s One Global Studio advantage. Being a part of the One Global Studio means that DPA (China) can and have tapped into the resources of the entire group. We constantly collaborate with each of the firm’s 8 specialist arms as well as some of its 17 global offices.

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IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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TAN CHEE YONG Director

On the purpose of architecture. It is the art and science of providing a solution to fulfil the aspirations and needs of the user through a physical form. On the beauty of the Chinese city. There is something fascinating about the duality of Chinese cities – the city in the day versus the city in the night; urban versus rural; towering skyscrapers in juxtaposition to low rise buildings; old versus new. While critics and sceptics have constantly debated on how rapid urbanisation and irresponsible over-developments are ruining Chinese cities, I remain the optimist. The Chinese way of life will eventually find a balance to attain certain order within the disorder. On its evolution. Working for 15 years on projects in China, the urbanscape has transformed from irrational planning that focuses on short term solutions to rational groundwork that emphasises on future proofing; from developments that are power centric to people centric; and developments that have shift from an emphasis on mega scale and quantity to sizeable scale of quality. On China as Smart Nation. This is becoming a loosely used term. We are always excited with anything that calls itself “smart” but does not fully optimise the technology. In China, we are already witnessing how technology can be used to improve the way we live. But it must not be just a trend. Technology should be used with a certain purpose and objective in mind. On DP’s competitive edge. Our global mind-set. DP China comprises of a team of aspiring Singapore and Chinese architects who are able to bridge our Chinese and international partners. On how we achieve this. It is all about ‘designing in partnership’ – DP. Clients do not solely rely on the consultant for advice. We, the consultants do not simply rely on a design brief. In this partnership, projects are conceived collectively as a team of clients and architects along with our specialists and regional offices. On value-adding to China’s urbanscape. Our design seeks to address both domestic and global issues faced by China through an international purview and inclusive design that respects and promotes social interaction between cultures and communities. On DP’s One Global Studio advantage. The power of OGS is its time and geographical advantage. For example, a close client urgently required a feasibility study for a project in Beijing to be presented to a high-ranking official on the 3rd day of Chinese New Year, but offices were closed for two weeks during this festive holiday. So instead of turning it way, our teams in Singapore and Thailand were mobilised to work on projects under my guidance. Our deliverable was handed over punctually and effectively.

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OUR DESIGN SEEKS TO ADDRESS BOTH DOMESTIC AND GLOBAL ISSUES FACED BY CHINA THROUGH AN INTERNATIONAL PURVIEW AND INCLUSIVE DESIGN THAT RESPECTS AND PROMOTES SOCIAL INTERACTION BETWEEN CULTURES AND COMMUNITIES; AND WE ACHIEVE THIS BY DESIGNING IN PARTNERSHIP — DP. - tan Chee Yong

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WU ZHI WEI Director

On the p urp ose of a rch i te ct ure. Wh e re f u n c t io n a nd ar t meet. On the b eaut y of t he C hi nese ci t y. It s d ive r s it y an d v i b rancy. On it s evolut ion. It s pa c e of d e ve lo pme n t is s o ra p i d an d extens i ve that i t is almo s t impo s s ible to re c o g ni s e wh at i t was a decad e a g o . F o r t h is re as o n , t h e C h i nes e c ity has b ecome an a rc h ite c t u r a l te s t in g g ro u n d f o r arc hi tects from al l ove r t h e wo r ld . Ho we ve r, th e breakneck s p ee d of d e ve lo pme n t c o me s at a c ost as the countr y f ac e s u r ban plan n in g a n d e n vironmental i s s ue s . On China as Smar t N a t i on. Th e c o n c e pt of ‘S m ar t N ati on’ i s ad o pte d e ve r yw h e re a n d C h in a is n o excep ti on. Toda y, we s e e t h e a pplic at io n of te c h nol ogy mos t ag g re s s ive ly in t h e c o mme rc ial f i el d . C h ina’s advantage, h o we ve r, lie s in t h e s h e e r s ize of its p op ul ati on and th e po te n t ial in d at a c o lle c t io n, wh ich may al l ow Chin a to le a d in s o me are as o ver g lobal counterpar ts . On D P’s comp et it ive e d g e. We c a r r y t h e pro mis e of the Si ngap ore b ra n d – e f f ic ie n c y, e f f e c t ive n e s s an d qual i ty of des i gn . We als o ad o pt a c o lla bo r at i ve approach, whi ch en s u re s o u r c o - o pe r a t io n a n d c o-par tner s hi p wi th c lie n t s to re a lis e t h e d e s ig n . On h ow we achieve t h i s. F o r t h e c o lla bo r at ive m e thod to work , we mu s t f ir s t e s t a blis h t r u s t . F o r t he c o-par tner s hi p to s u c c e e d , we mu s t c re a te ro o m fo r a win -wi n desi gn s ol ut io n . On value-adding to C hi na ’s ur ba nsca pe . Ou r S in gap ore exp eri enc e a llo w s u s to in te g r a te E a s te rn an d Western cul tures s o a s to pro po s e a n d pro d u ce n e w des i gn concep t s a n d s t r a te g ie s . On D P’s One Globa l St ud i o a d va nt a g e . We h ave 1 7 gl obal offi ces an d 8 s pe c ia lis t arms wo r k in g syn ergi s ti cal l y as one a c ro s s in te rn at io n al bo rd e r s a nd tim e zones – i n sho r t , we pro v id e a o n e - s to p s e r v i ce.

DPA ADOPTS A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH, WHICH ENSURES OUR CO-OPERATION AND CO-PARTNERSHIP WITH CLIENTS TO REALISE THE DESIGN. - wu zhi wei

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IN person |

DP INTERVIEW

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GOH YONG QIN Senior Associate

On the purpose of architecture. Solving real world problems elegantly. On the beauty of the Chinese city. The possibilities and contradictions arising from the intensive exchanges between the world and China’s own cultural diversity is fascinating. Shanghai is an exciting ground for designers to learn and experiment. On its evolution. It is more creative, more humane and more inventive than before. On China as Smart Nation. The availability and application of technology in design is contributing to this evolution. Creative individuals in the design and construction industry are developing efficient computational design tools, like MARS and Xiaoku (小库 ), just to name two. MARS turns design itself

VR and AR projections, while Xiaoku taps on China’s extensive public data (navigational maps, weather statistics, etc.) to help designers generate quick site planning options. Softwares like these are redefining design work in China, and will definitely further influence the construction industry at all scales, from master-planning to interior design. On DP’s One Global Studio advantage. We are a team of highly professional specialists, like DP Sustainable Design, DP Green and DP Lighting to name a few, harnessing the power of technology and working together across geographical boundaries and time zones so as to achieve optimal design solutions and mutual benefit for client and end-users alike. On DP culture across its Chinese offices. Service with integrity.

into an experiential process, allowing designers to work within

On the value DP brings to clients. Trustworthy collaboration.

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WHEN WE LOOK AT THE FUTURE OF ARCHITECTURE... THE BUILDING, CREATED IN CO-RELATION TO THE CITY AND ITS DWELLERS, WILL SEE GREATER OPEN SPACES AND A BREAKING DOWN OF CONVENTIONAL BOUNDARIES DIVIDING PEOPLE, NATURE AND FUNCTION. - luo hao

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LUO HAO Senior Associate

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TANG JUN HAO Senior Associate

On the purpose of architecture. Imagination and order ; experience meets practice. On the Chinese city today. It is evolving so fast and dramatically that more often than not, it forms the pattern of people’s life. It is a pity that it is not the other way around. On its evolution. Three key factors have a significant influence on the urbanscape of China: Residential, City Complexes and High Speed Train. On an upward trend since the 1980s, residential development continues to dominate the skyline of most Chinese cities. Simultaneously, following the regulation of the central government, hub complexes with its large scale become sub-centres of the city and high speed railway will now be the engine contributing and connecting to this development of the city. On China as Smar t Nation. When design meets technology, the concept of ‘sharing’ is increasingly impor tant. So

On th e p u rp o s e of a rc h i te c tu re . C r a f t i ng s pa ce s that are m ea ni ng ful to p eo p l e. On th e b e a u ty of th e Ch i n e s e c i ty. A t r ue m el t i ng p o t of a l l i nfl uences , B ei j i ng ci t y i s uni q ue to m e. As t h e cap it al, fo rei g ner s a nd l o ca l s a l i ke a re l o o k i ng to g a i n a foo tho ld i nto t he ci t y. T ho s e w ho a re ‘ i n’ s ha re a uni q ue dy namism w here t here i s a co ns t a nt b uz z of co m m o n fo l k s , who talk a b o ut a ny t hi ng a nd ever y t hi ng i n ca fes . On i ts e vo l u ti o n . T he evo l vem ent of C hi na ’s ur banscap e o ver t he l a s t 1 0 yea r s ha s b een rem a r k a b l e. T hi s is fue lle d b y m o re p eo p l e- cent r i c p o l i ci es b y t he g o vernm e nt and t he r i s i ng a ffl uence of t he p eo p l e, w hi ch ha s resulte d in a m o re co m p et i t i ve s o ci et y. A new b us i nes s i d ea , a de sign i ni t i a t i ve t ha t a r i s es ca n s ud d enl y ha ve a n i m pa ct o n the l i ves of t he p eo p l e a nd cha ng e t he w a y s pa ces a re use d. On th e S m a r t N a ti o n , d e s i g n a n d te c h n o l o g y. The p reva l ent a d a p t a t i o n of techno l o g y ha s no t o nl y

whether it is in our urban lifestyle or architecture design, this will continue to transform the way we interact and therefore, the way space is designed. The building, created in co-relation to the city and its dwellers, will see greater open spaces and a breaking down of conventional boundaries dividing people, nature and function. On DP’s One Global Studio advantage. It’s the collaboration between global offices with its differing humanities, perspectives and multi-cultural dynamic that is the unique advantage of One Global Studio. Having worked closely with DP’s headquar ters in Singapore, it is inspiring to see the strength of One Global Studio as we suppor t and learn from one another. On DP culture across its Chinese offices. Design to last. On the value DP brings to clients. Responsibility, integrity,

cha ng ed t he w a y p eo p l e i nter a ct ( fi na nci a l l y, s o cially and eco no m i ca l l y ) , i t ha s a l s o a ffected t he w a y ur ba n p lanne r s a nd a rchi tect s und er s t a nd i nfr a s t r uct ure a nd b ui ldings at a ci t y l evel . On D P ’s On e G l o ba l Stu d i o a d va n ta g e . Ma ny regional g o vernm ent s ha ve b eg un o p eni ng up a nd a d o p t ing a m o re g l o ba l v i s i o n a nd t hi nk i ng . W i t h t hi s , S i ng ap ore ’s ci t y p l a nni ng a nd g reen a rchi tect ure ha s b eco m e a p oint of reference. T he exp o r t of S i ng a p o re’s b r a nd t hrough o ur i nterna t i o na l net wo r k of 1 7 s t r a teg i ca l l y l o ca ted office s, ha ve l ed m a ny C hi nes e cl i ent s to a p p roa ch us for this ‘ S i ng a p o re exp er i ence’. On D P c u l tu re a c ro s s i ts Ch i n e s e offi c e s . S ha r ing of res o urces a nd k no w - ho w a m o ng t he d i fferent of fice s. On th e va l u e D P b r i n g s to c l i e n ts . T he p ro ces s of cocrea t i o n i n d i fferent g enres a nd t y p o l o g i es .

self-renewal and excellence.

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DESIGN DOES NOT SIMPLY CREATE VALUE; IT CREATES LIFE. TECHNOLOGY IS A TOOL THAT CAN FACILITATE INNOVATION IN DESIGN SO AS TO FURTHER ENRICH THE HUMAN SPIRIT. - wu xin chun

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DP INTERVIEW

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8

WU XIN CHUN Senior Associate

On th e p u rp o s e of a rc h i te c tu re . I t i s a s p i r a t i on, life , ar t a nd a d vent ure. On th e b e a u ty of th e Ch i n e s e c i ty. S ha ng ha i , i n pa r t i cul a r, ho l d s a ver y s p eci a l p osition in t he d evel o p m ent of C hi na . A s o ci o - cul t ur a l en viro nme nt i s b i r t hed fro m t he i nfus i o n a nd i nteg r a t i o n of various cul t ures . U nd er s uch externa l i nfl uences , S ha n ghai is no w a uni q uel y co s m o p o l i t a n ci t y. On i ts e vo l u ti o n . U r ba n d evel o p m ent i s i nt r i nsically l i nked to t he s t a nd a rd of l i v i ng . T he fi r s t p ha se saw a r a p i d d evel o p m ent of t he na t i o n. T he s eco nd p hase t hen s a w a na t i o n t ha t co ul d s o l ve d evel o p m ent i s s ues d y na m i ca l l y a nd fl exi b l y. T hes e ea r l y s t age s were unco nt ro l l ed a nd d i ffered fro m ci t y to ci t y. This i s b eca us e C hi na i s a l a rg e na t i o n a nd t he d i ff e re nt ter r i to r i es ha ve t hei r o w n uni q ue s o ci o - eco no mic l a nd s ca p e a nd cul t ure. To d a y, t he na t i o n i s i n it s t hi rd p ha s e of d evel o p m ent , cha r a cter i s ed b y se lfrefl ect i v i t y a nd co nt i nuo us rei nvent i o n. T hus , whe n we, a s a rchi tect s , l o o k a t t he ci t i es i n C hi na , we ne e d to und er s t a nd t he cul t ur a l ba ckg ro und – fro m climate co nd i t i o ns to fo o d cul t ures – of ea ch of t hem . On d e s i g n a n d te c h n o l o g y. D es i g n d o es no t simp ly crea te va l ue; i t crea tes l i fe. Reg a rd l es s of t he p rogre ss of techno l o g y, t he ul t i m a te g oa l fo r us i s to cre ate d es i g n t ha t enr i ches t he hum a n s p i r i t . Acro s s our China offi ces a nd a l l o ur g l o ba l s t ud i o s , we a l w a y s e mp hasise t he i m p o r t a nce of crea t i ng p eo p l e- cent r i c d esigns. Thus, i t i s p er t i nent fo r t he a rchi tect to und er s t a nd p e o p le ’s need s a nd w a nt s . Techno l o g y, t hen, i s t he d es i gn to o l t ha t ca n fa ci l i t a te i nno va t i o n i n d es i g n. On D P ’s On e G l o ba l Stu d i o a d va n ta g e . I t hel p s us to l o o k a t ea ch p ro j ect w i t h a g l o ba l p er s p ect i ve and a l l o w s t he t r a ns ference of k no w l ed g e a nd exp e r tise a m o ng t he d i fferent s t ud i o s . W i t ho ut b o rd er s , One G l o ba l St ud i o rend er s i t s s er v i ces g l o ba l l y, b eyo nd the b o und a r i es of C hi na . On D P c u l tu re a c ro s s i ts Ch i n e s e offi c e s . Resp o nsib le , i nno va t i ve a nd co nfi d ent . On th e va l u e D P b r i n g s to . We a re pa r t ner s , m e ntor s a nd fr i end s to ea ch o t her.


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WU YI YU Senior Associate

On the p urp ose of archi te ct ure. To c re a te be a u t if ul an d sp eci fi cal l y p urp o s e d s pac e s . On the b eaut y of t he C h i nese ci t y. G u a n g zh o u is ve r y uni quel y p l aced . C o mpa re d to f a s t- pa c e d Be ijin g and Shanghai , G u a n g zh o u is we ll- ba la n c e d . Its c ommerci al cul ture ma y n o t h ave t h e bo ld bu sin e s s i ns ti ncts of B e ijin g n o r t h e we s te rn is e d ou tlook of Shanghai ; b u t it is s t ro n g , s te a d y a n d pr ag m a ti c. T he ci ty as a w h o le , is als o in c lu s ive w h ic h a l l ows i ts dwel le r s to ad o pt a d ive r s if ie d lif e styl e that i s n’ t as p re vale n t in o t h e r c it ie s . On i ts evolut ion. T he u r ba n s c a pe of C h in a as a wh ole has evol ved a t a ve r y a c c e le r a te d pa c e . Gu an gzhou i s tes tame n t of t h is as it h as lo s t s o me of its vi gour for reform an d u n iq u e c h ar a c te r. Th at said, there i s room for impro ve me n t to re f in e t h e u r ban way of l i fe. Futu re d e ve lo pme n t mu s t e vo lve to take the ci ty’s cul ture an d br an d c o n te x t in to c on sid erati on. On d esign and technol og y. Th e be g in n in g s of a ‘S m ar t N ati on’ b egi ns n o t ju s t w it h t h e a d o pt io n of te c hnol ogy b ut al so t h e a pplic at io n of it . C h in a is in c reasi ngl y payi ng a t te n t io n to te c h n o lo g y an d h ow it val ue adds to arc h ite c t u r a l d e s ig n a n d u r ba n c on str ucti on. On DP ’s One Global St ud i o a d va nt a g e. I t lie s in th e trans ference of k n o w le d g e , in te rn at io n al in sig h ts and exp eri ence applie d lo c ally in re le va n c e to its si te context. T he ac c e s s ibilit y of all t h e s e th in g s comb i nes wi th o u r u n d e r s t a n d in g of t h e lo c a l e n vironment are what g ive s lo c al d e ve lo pe r s lo o k ing in to over s eas p roj ects c o n f id e n c e in DP, ma k in g u s th e f ir st choi ce. On DP cult ure across i t s C hi nese of f i ce s. S h ar in g ; c ollaborati ve; resourc e f u l. On the value DP b r ing s to cl i ent s. C o llabo r at io n an d c o-creati on. In str iv in g f o r e xc e lle n c e , DP wo r k c lose ly wi th cl i ents an d in d u s t r y par t n e r s to g ro w tog e th er to meet the g oals an d re a lis e t h e v is io n .

THE ACCESSIBILITY OF KNOWLEDGE TRANSFERENCE AND INTERNATIONAL INSIGHTS COMBINES WITH OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT AND EXPERIENCE, APPLIED IN RELEVANCE TO SITE CONTEXT ARE WHAT GIVE LOCAL DEVELOPERS LOOKING INTO OVERSEAS PROJECTS, CONFIDENCE IN MAKING DP THE FIRST CHOICE. - wu yi yu

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DP INTERVIEW

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PROVIDING SERVICE EXCELLENCE, WE ARE A TEAM OF PROFESSIONAL SPECIALISTS HARNESSING THE POWER OF TECHNOLOGY AND WORKING TOGETHER ACROSS GEOGRAPHICAL BOUNDARIES AND TIME ZONES TO ACHIEVE OPTIMAL DESIGN SOLUTIONS FOR CLIENT AND END-USERS ALIKE. - Goh Yong Qin

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ZHAO MAN LI Senior Associate

On t he p urp os e of a rch i te ct ure. F u s in g s pa c e , c ul t ure, appl i cati on and nat u re . On t he b eaut y of th e C hi nese ci t y. S h an g h a i, w i t h i t s ope n-mi ndedness a n d d r ive f o r e xc e lle n c e , re pre sent s C h ina’s mos t advanc e d c o n te mpo r ar y c iv ilis a t io n a nd i s th e ep i tome of Eas te rn an d We s te rn c u lt u r a l in te gr a t i o n. It is urban, effi ci ent an d s t ylis h . On i t s evolut ion. T h e e ar ly u r ba n d e ve lo pme n t of t he c ou ntr y was al mos t s u pe r f ic ia l as it me re ly re plic a ted arc h i tectural trends a n d la n d s c a pin g . It la te r to o k a m ore focused dri ve to w ard s s u s t ain able d e ve lo pm ent . Gre eni ng the ci ty be c a me mo re t h an s u pe r f ic ia lly in c orp orati ng p l ant s . To d ay, it h a s e vo lve d f u r t h e r s t i l l ; c are ful l y desi gni ng f u n c t io n alit y f o r t h e f u t u re w i t ho ut n e g lecti ng aestheti c s ro o te d in t h e h is to r ic a l an d c u ltural context of th e c it y.

On d e s i g n a n d te c h n o l o g y. W hi l e t he p ur p o s e of de sign rem a i ns uncha ng ed , i nteg r a ted techno l o g i es , b i g dat a and Ar t i fi ci a l I ntel l i g ence a re t r a ns fo rm i ng t he w a y we de sign; ena b l i ng a rchi tect s to d es i g n ci t y s ca p es a nd ur ban space s t ha t a re wel l - i nfo rm ed , r a t i o na l a nd s ci ent i fi c – the ‘smar t ci t y ’. On D P ’s On e G l o ba l Stu d i o a d va n ta g e . T he wea lth of res o urces co m b i ned w i t h t he co l l a b o r a t i o n b et we e n d i fferent tea m s a nd d epa r t m ent s w i t hi n O ne G l obal St udio ha ve hel p ed us to exceed t he b o und a r i es of t he nat ion i n term s of o ur exp er t i s e a nd techno l o g y. T hi s a l lo ws our d es i g n p ro ces s es to b e effi ci ent , t hereb y enha nc ing D P’s co m p et i t i venes s i n t he C hi nes e m a r ket . On D P c u l tu re a c ro s s i ts Ch i n e s e offi c e s . Res p o nsib ilit y, i nteg r i t y, s el f- d evel o p m ent a nd p ur s ui t of excel l e nce . On th e va l u e D P b r i n g s to c l i e n ts . Res p ect , unde r standing a nd co - o p er a t i o n to m ut ua l l y b enefi t o ne a no t he r.

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51

years of architectural excellence

All Rights Reserved. No material may be reproduced without prior permission. DP Architects accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences including any loss or damage arising from reliance on information in Design in Print. Any opinions in Design in Print are solely those of the named authors of the article in which they appear. Unless named as author, DP Architects, Editorial Panel and other Contributors do not endorse any such views and disclaim all liability from their publication. Copyright Š DP Architects Pte Ltd MCI (P) 118/08/2017

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IN History

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YA N S H A N U N I V E R S I T Y T he m a st e r p l a n o f Ya n sh a n Un ive r s i t y ’s E n g i n e e r i n g S c h o o l i n He b e i p rov i n c e wa s t h e fir st p ro p o sa l t h a t D P A rc h it ec t s u n d e r t o o k i n Ch i n a , i n 1 98 4. Th e 4 8 - h e c t a re c a m p u s was in e ss en c e a s e lf- c o n t a in ed t own s h i p wi t h a p o p u l a t i o n o f 5,0 0 0 st u d e n t s p l u s t h e fa c u l t y a n d st a ff. D P c o m p l et ed a m a st e r- p l a n p ro p o sa l , a l o n g w i t h t h e d e s i g n o f t h e p rim a r y b u il din g s a n d a ra n g e o f s u p p o r t f a c i l i t i e s i n c l u d i n g c a n t e e n s, wo r k s h o p s, st o ra g e , a h o sp it a l a n d a k i n d e r g a r t e n f o r t h e f a m i ly o f f a c u l t y.

1984

Design in print 9.2 - The urban evolution of China  

The urban evolution of China

Design in print 9.2 - The urban evolution of China  

The urban evolution of China