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Foundations of Liberty: Saving America

Alan Keyes, Ph.D.


Foundations of Liberty

FOUNDATIONS OF LIBERTY: SAVING AMERICA By Alan Keyes, PhD Alethos Press - 2020

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Foundations of Liberty

Alethos Press Woodbury MN 55125

https://alethospress.com

Foundations of Liberty: Saving America

ISBN: eBook: 978-0-9863773-3-4 Copyright 2020: Alan L. Keyes, PhD

All rights reserved. No reproduction in whole or in part in any form is authorized without written permission. Portions may be cited with attribution.

https://freedomsdream.org

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Foreword: Pastor Frank Lanier

Introduction: Dave Racer, MLitt

Despite our Perplexing Times, God Still Knows What He Is Doing

1 5

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Lies are Being Passed Onto Our Children

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Slavery: Right & Wrong

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This is Self-Evident

25 41

Our Refusal to Own Up

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The Good People

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George Floyd

Slavery: It’s Roots &  What Some Call Racism

63 72

Contact Information

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Frank Lanier

Pastor of Adult Ministries First Evangelical Free Church of Maplewood (Minnesota)

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FORWORD

By Pastor Frank Lanier

During the late afternoon of July 19, 2020, a group of some 150 Minnesotans gathered at First Evangelical Free Church of Maplewood for the unique opportunity to hear from Dr. Alan Keyes. A number of people viewed Keyes’ talk via live streaming across the Internet. Dr. Keyes came to share his perspective on the beginning of American polity and how it contrasts with our nation’s drift, and how it ended up in its current state of affairs. He spoke about how the understanding of the Divine Mandate forms the basis for American constitutional government—at its founding—and how the repeated failure of Americans to live out its ideals engendered many of the social maladies America sees today. Humankind, under God’s loving and powerful supervision, puts us all on equal footing, for we are all sinners in need of 1


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reconciliation, not only to each other, but also to our eternal, Almighty God: the one that we have offended with our sinful defiance. Dr. Keyes’ first-hand experience in politics, both as a candidate for the United States Senate and for the office of the President of the United States, affords him unique insights that he shared with us at our gathering. My seminary professors taught that especially in times like these, how important it is to remember that we should teach truth and love well. We heard that message coming from Dr. Keyes’ love for the nation of his birth and her people as well as his love of truth: the truth that undergirds his convictions for an America that should live up to its ideals. I had the privilege not too long ago of speaking to the Summer Senate, a program managed by Dave Racer, President of Freedom’s Dream Foundation. I spoke to the 13 young adults in the Senate about the importance of imago Dei as they interact with people in the public square, in that one thing that we have in common—that we are all image-bearers of God. We are all deserving of the inalienable dignity and respect that our Creator intended for all 2


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humanity. I think if we can begin our human interactions with that supposition, we can look forward to a brighter future for us all. Please carefully consider Dr. Keyes’ timely and critical comments as transcribed from his July 19, 2020 talk. Then take action. –Rev. Frank Lanier Adult Ministries Pastor First Evangelical Free Church of Maplewood, MN

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Dave Racer, MLitt

President, Freedom’s Dream Foundation daveracer.com

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Foundations of Liberty

I NTRODUCTION

By Dave Racer, MLitt

No one will dispute that we live in challenging times. Some of us are watching with great dismay as we see the institutions, which we’ve taken for granted during our lives, seem to be crumbling—lacking a sure foundation upon which to stand. I am coming to grips with the reality that a new history is being written, and not by people who believe as I do, but by those who want to discard faith in God and who seem to fail to understand the fragility of liberty apart from Him. That July 19, after Dr. Alan Keyes had finished his talk, we opened the floor for questions. Chao Yu, a Chinese citizen living in the Twin Cities, stood erect and asked, “Do you believe that Christians in the United States are going to step up and protect America?” Dr. Keyes could not say it would be so, at least with any certainty. Mr. Yu’s question seemed profound as 5


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he is not an American citizen and he is not a Christian – he is a follower of Falun Gong. He, my wife and I had dinner together several days later, and I learned that the Communist Chinese government had imprisoned him for nearly 10 years. They had convicted him of sharing news stories with American journalists during the 1990s. In 2013, Chao Yu, along with his wife and son, emigrated to the United States, admitted on the basis of political asylum. During our dinner together, Mr. Yu asked again about Americans’ resolve to fight for liberty, to which he added, “If America goes down, the world will go down.” He has lived in Minnesota for about seven years, and he sees our people and our self-governance devolving into chaos. “Timing is everything,” we often hear. We had originally scheduled Alan Keyes to visit us in April and deliver his “Foundations of Liberty” speech. We expected to build from it momentum upon which we would launch the Freedom’s Dream Foundation, and Omega National Academy. The Covid-19 outbreak, sidelined that talk until mid-July. God has better timing than we did. 6


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The United States barely took a breath after the attempt to remove President Trump from office failed on February 5. This had followed more than two years of constant media attention given to allegations the Russians had colluded with the Trump campaign to sway the election, and allegations that the president had abused his powers regarding dealings with Ukraine. The impeachment trial ended, and immediately, America and the world got caught up in a new daily drama over a deadly virus that had started in Wuhan, China. The division with which we had already been trying to cope suddenly lurched toward partisan rancor over masks, lockdowns and continuous allegations that elected officials at all levels had failed us. Governors told us to stay home, shut down, isolate ourselves—especially if we were older than 65. Our collective will had been severely damaged and our economy had begun to fail. Even as a little light began to shine in some states during early May, a foul and odious act against George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin, lit the passions of protestors who demanded an end to racism and police violence against 7


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“black and brown” people—a new euphemism for People of Color. Though Governors’ and Mayors’ edicts had banned individuals from gathering in churches, synagogues and temples, they stood aside for mass gatherings of angry crowds fueled by the acts of terrorists lighting fires, looting businesses and burning neighborhoods to the ground. In this context, then, we reached out once again to Alan Keyes and invited him to Minnesota. We asked him to remind us of the principles upon which our Founders had established liberty, and given us the hope that each generation of Americans could build a better life for themselves and their posterity. God’s timing, bringing Dr. Keyes to us in mid-July, was far better than ours as you will see when you read the transcription of his speech. To Chao Yu, then, and to all the good people in America, we can say boldly that if in God we trust, nothing can stop us from once again establishing the United States as a Shining City on the Hill, a beacon for liberty for all the world. This, then, is a particular call to Christians, and to all good people of faith, to take up the challenge of the Founding Fathers, expressed by 8


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Benjamin Franklin. As he left Freedom Hall in 1787, after Congress had adopted our new Constitution, a woman asked him, “What kind of government have you given us?” to which he answered, “A Republic, if you can keep it.” And so today, we ask again—can we, do we want to keep our Republic? –Dave Racer, Mlitt

President of Freedom’s Dream Foundation President of DGRCommunications, Inc. National Campaign Manager, Alan Keyes for President, 1996

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To access the video of Dr. Keyes’ talk from which this book is transcribed, use this link.

Dr. Alan L. Keyes, PhD

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DESPITE OUR PERPLEXING TIMES, GOD STILL KNOWS WHAT HE IS DOING

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e are in the midst of extremely unusual circumstances in the United States and the world. Though we are greatly perplexed, I think God must know what He’s doing, don’t you? I know He does for a variety of reasons but today especially because the talk I had planned to give in April—before government’s shut us down because of the fear of Covid-19—would be quite different from what I’m about to give. That’s because our immediate circumstances this July have revealed something, especially if you look at the world from a Christian perspective, that we are living out in some way, one of 11


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those passages in the Bible when the Israelites, having been abundantly blessed by God, decide to do pretty much everything that He forbids. Today across our country you can see the gathering clouds of the consequences of that neglect of following God’s lead, and the feeling that has to rise within you that, “Any time now, there’s going to be trouble.” It seemed that, in spite of all the current madness fostered by certain elements in our society, the people of this country had something quite different in mind in 2016, that in many ways gave real meaning to that phrase, “Hoping against hope.” This they expressed when they elected Donald Trump as President. Mr. Trump had come forward and done what a lot of our politicians were refusing to do, which is, instead of telling us what is on his mind, he told us what’s on our mind. A lot of people voted for him in gratitude for that expression, though not necessarily in certainty of what would come of it. We were all too used to an experience over the course of the last several decades suggesting that words and deeds seldom match in politics. We have all noticed that. People knew Donald Trump was different, but they also hoped that he would do what 12


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he said he would do if they sent him to the White House. Lo and behold, one way or another, President Trump’s walk did seem to start matching some of his deeds. Quickly, the folks who didn’t like his deeds started to come up with various ways to stop the walk, so that here we stand today in the midst of a time when some folks would like to pretend that Trump’s election was all an accident, but I don’t believe them. That’s my personal view. I’ve spent a lot of time talking and thinking about it. AN IMMEDIATE THREAT

We have been as truly attacked, and are right now as truly in the midst of a crisis that threatens to disintegrate and destroy our country as we were in the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, but it’s worse, you see, because Pearl Harbor galvanized the will of America, whereas the present crisis, far from doing that, has exposed what I think the folks who have made themselves party to this crisis actually expected: that they would be pushing against the fissures and contradictions and difficulties that have always been present, in both our people and 13


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the very idea on which our country is based, and pushing against them in ways more subtle than ever before but also more disastrous in their consequences. They would bring us down. I have to believe personally that that’s exactly where we are, and that over the course of these weeks and months which we have endured and those that lie ahead, we will be deciding the fate of our country. I would not have said that in the past. I have always emphasized the important things that were at stake but, tell you the truth, I wouldn’t have said that I believed, at any given time in my participation in politics, that we were on the eve of destruction—today, I do think everything that’s coming together now smacks of this. Even the fact that a pastor early today has had to come up and talk about what has not been going on in our churches, and whether the justification of what has not been going on is good or ill, I do know one thing: The First Amendment of the Constitution guarantees the right of the people peaceably to assemble to seek redress of their grievances. Assembly—coming together—ecclesia —the coming together of people to discover 14


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and decide upon and act for their common mind and their common heart and their common spirit—this is indispensable to the survival of our self-government. If we cannot come together; if we cannot assemble; if we cannot meet in our homes and in our churches; in our schools and in our public places, then we are no longer a people, and those who wish our destruction know it. I continue to test my theory that the people, in 2016, did exactly what they meant to do in electing Donald Trump, and this provides insight into our current crises. Now, we’re in the run-up to the 2020 election. On election day itself, government of, by and for the people will appear en masse—it’s the only time when a huge majority of the people appear to decide the fate of our nation. I am in the habit of asking audiences sometimes who the sovereign, in a temporal sense, of the United States is, and you get all kinds of answers. They usually start with the president, because people mistakenly understand the reason that we have a federal Constitution. We have it because the Founders decided we would not have one 15


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individual as our sovereign, as our king, as our monarch. Instead, We the People are the sovereign in this country. The Constitution is presented in the voice of the people of the United States. What we forget, however, is that by asserting We the People are sovereign isn’t about our power, it’s about our responsibility. It’s not about our opportunity to have our way. It’s about our commitment to live up to the premises that made this the first nation, and I say this advisedly, in the history of the world in which the people at large were entrusted with the kind of responsibility that we have had, to choose and control the personnel of government. We the People tell them when to stay and when to go; to approve or disapprove of what they decide to do with the authority we have entrusted to them by virtue of our responsibility directly from the hand of God Almighty. There used to be a time when only the nobles and the kings and aristocrats got to claim that they had a special relationship with God, but in the Americas, we were founded based on the explicit statement that we had boldly stepped onto the stage of the 16


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world to assume among the powers of the Earth that station to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitled us. Our authority to assert our liberty did not come from superior military might, or forcing our will on others, but by the will of God. We appealed to Him. Here, however, is the problem from the point of view of our present time. We didn’t come onto the world stage as this or that people. Right? Because the words that followed that appeal to God were words that did not speak for this or that people. They were words that spoke of God’s relationship with humanity itself. It is why every so often we need to spend a little bit of time thinking through our foundations. We have been neglecting this idea and forgotten it.

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LIES ARE BEING PASSED ON TO OUR CHILDREN

Now partly the reasons that you might come up with that we, as a nation, have today discarded or ignored this idea of our relationship with God and how it gives us a justifiable claim to authority, is that we have sadly failed to pass on this understanding to our children. Instead, our children are now raised up in a lie about who they are as citizens of the United States. In truth, however, we have failed to pass it on for a very simple reason: because we now live in an age when under the rubric of what is in and of itself, speeches and false doctrine, somehow or another we’ve come to accept the lie that our Constitution requires the separation of church and state. I won’t go into the details of that lie right now, but it’s so transparently a lie, as I think what I am about to say will make clear, that 19


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I am surprised that we ever fell for it. I think it’s because the perpetrators of this lie played on a distinction. It’s a distinction in some ways without a difference, but it does constitute a difference in practice. The detractors, or perhaps distractors, called it the separation of church and state. What they’ve actually been pursuing, as you’ve probably noticed, especially lately, is the separation of God from our country; the separation of God from our consciousness; the separation of God from our sense of who we are as citizens of the United States; who we are as a people. What I’m about to say is really a critique of what has become a general laxity in our politics, which is that in the vicinity of July 4th, we get together to commemorate our independence, but actually that’s not quite accurate. If we want to be fair to the Founders’ judgement, we would commemorate the act of declaring independence on July 2, 1776. That is the day in which the delegates approved the resolution, very simply worded, that the colonies are and of right ought to be free independent states. That they declared on July 2. What happened on July 4, 1776? Well, today, we would say that what happened on 20


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that day is they decided and approved of the press release—the media release—the public statement that justified and they presented to the world the thoughts, the reasoning, the premises, the principles, but also the deep motivation for the action they took on July 2. I think the Founders expected—some so stated it—that every Fourth of July, citizens should make the Declaration of Independence the center of attention. They hope that leaders would read it’s paragraphs and salient thoughts aloud and that it would be presented and rehearsed so that we would never forget, not just the act of independence which can stand or fall, but the logic of that claim of independence which they made, not just on their own behalf, but on behalf of all humanity then and to come. For in the Declaration we appeal to God in the name of right and rights that belong to us as human beings, not as whites, not as blacks, not as English people or French people or Italian people. That appeal to God in the Declaration at least started out that way even if we have forgotten it. Take some time and go back to read the early tracts that the colonists prepared 21


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during the period that preceded the conflict with the British administration of government. Many of those tracts began and relied upon what they referred to as the rights of Englishmen. Their authors clearly wrote from the point of view of the experience of the British people, and of course, ideas as expressed in the Magna Carta and other historical events and discourse, affirming that different types of people living in England had certain rights that had to be respected. By the time you get to July 1776, the mind of the folks who took the lead in representing the American will for independence had thought through and decided to couch their arguments and actions in terms that reflected thinking that had been maturing for decades—actually a century or more. They had been thinking about the justice that actually authorized government power and defined its proper purpose. This, then, is the salient point for us at the moment, because it’s reflected, as I just pointed out, in the very first paragraph of the Declaration. It’s also reflected in what came to be its most salient and important words. That their assertion of independence was, though they acted against the British 22


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government on behalf of the people of the colonies, they did so based on a claim of a functional role for people in their government, one that had never been claimed by any people on behalf not just of themselves, but of all those who are entitled to the name of “human.” Why is that assertion on July 4, 1776, an especially important moment? Because of two things. One: they made the claim for all humanity, and two, the power which they appealed to to justify that claim belonged to God, not this god or that god, but the Creator God who made the whole and is responsible for its government, for its conception, for the very idea of every creature, including ourselves, within it. What they said in those famous words rang throughout the world: “We hold these truths…”—let’s stop there for a moment. It is important to point out that in viewing the Declaration, we are dealing with people who believed that there is truth—that truth can be observed and known.

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TRUTH IS SELF-EVIDENT

The Founders said truth is self-evident. To be self-evident means “clear to the human understanding in and of themselves” —you simply have to be clear about what you’re saying or writing, and it is automatically affirmed by the very premise of and presentation of its existence to be true. “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…” Now I know many feminist types assert, “They wrote about men and not women!” That is a lie born of either ignorance or purposeful distortion. The folks that assert this know what “men” means in the Declaration. They’re educated people, a lot of them. They know that in 1776 in the Declaration, the authors used the word “man” in that paragraph in a generic sense, understood by all. Everybody who read it at the time, and during most of our history, understood what 25


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the word was—as the Founders themselves would have known because a lot of them studied ancient Greek—a translation of the word anthropos, which refers to human beings in general, not the word aner which referred to males in particular. Well, I just go into that as an aside because I know it’s a neuralgic, at least pretended neuralgic, point with some people. I don’t know, however, why we take it seriously anymore since after all, if I, Alan Keyes, got up this morning and decided I felt like a woman, they claim now I’m a woman, and if one of you born a woman gets up tomorrow and decides you feel like a man, they’ll claim you are a man. Hence, in modern usage, these confused Declaration deniers, who base their disdain on a tortured understanding of “men,” should be greatly troubled by asserting a person can choose their “gender” at will. We chuckle a little bit about this modern construct of “men,” but I raise it because it actually points to the serious nature of the crisis that we’re in. When we say, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are 26


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Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness,” for whose rights are we declaring but all humans, regardless of whether male or female. Okay? Well, the assertion that all persons, regardless of their sex can claim equality, is an echo of the truth expressed in the very first paragraph of the Declaration when the Founders stood forward to claim among the powers of the world that station to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God, laws promulgated by the Creator, laws that we have been learning and discovering and exploring since creation, in order to transform our lives as human beings. These days, instead of taking it as proof that it sure looks like there was a pretty comprehensive and reliable Intelligence at work in all of it, they show themselves foolish in denying it. For every scientific advance seems to prove it; no matter how far we go, we never get beyond the order promulgated by the Being of Beings that set it all in place and in motion in the first place. Every time we make a “new” discovery in nature it turns out that that order and regularity appears. Without it, we cannot advance our science. 27


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The Founders’ assertion is that truth is rooted in the laws of nature and of Nature’s God. When I joke about the fact that we are now playing games with truth—such that if I get up this morning feeling like I’m a woman, I’m a woman, and if you get up feeling like a man, you’re a man— that somehow it doesn’t matter what the laws of nature are, we can turn to observation of the actual conformity of a human body to the difference between the sexes. One cannot honestly, based on biological fact, assert this somehow doesn’t matter. Do you think most Americans realize that by accepting that denying the biological science of life as a valid statement, they have invalidated their claim to selfgovernance as a people? For if there are no laws of nature and there is no God, then none of us have a claim to rule ourselves, for the only way to vindicate the claim to rule once you have banished God and His authority from the picture is to be the power that wins the battle every single time, and in the history of the world, that has never been true of the people as a whole. In such a world, we always lose in the end, and you know why? We always lose because we need leadership. We need those leaders with 28


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special talents and abilities; we need those with special minds and hearts, who have courage—most important of all is courage, but courage must be built on a solid foundation and the whims of humankind are sinking sand. Why are we here, then, as We the People of the United States, having invested our hopes, our dreams and our future based on a premise? It didn’t begin with us, by the way, this form of rebellion against the privileged few. It began elsewhere, but the ideas that informed it were ideas that our Founders picked up on, thought through, and refined. So before I move on to anything else, I just want to say the key premise of it all was the premise of God’s authority. No God, no rule of, by, and for the people. It’s worth repeating: No God, no rule of, by, and for the people.

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SLAVERY RIGHT & WRONG

Now how does God express His rule in the sense of civil government? Well, that’s where that famous paragraph comes in: “... endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable Rights.” What does unalienable mean? Well, it means you cannot give them away, because you cease to be what you are if you give them away. That brings up the conundrum that a lot of people miss, because they think that rights and freedoms are the same. Rights and freedoms are not the same. Why is that? It should be pretty obvious. What’s the opposite of right? Wrong. What’s the opposite of freedom? Some say “slavery,” and slavery could certainly be considered a wrong, couldn’t it? But on the other hand, maybe not, and here I will delve into one of the most neuralgic topics of the day. 31


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First, I have to preface it by saying I’m kind of irritated at people who think today that it’s our job to put an end to slavery in the United States. I’m more than irritated with them. I am angry with them. Why? Because it’s a lie. I’ve spent a fair amount of time, for various reasons in my life, studying the founding of our nation, and especially studying Lincoln, the Civil War, the run-up to the Civil War, slavery in the South—all of these things. I’ve got to tell you that if there was anything at all that first began to cement my love of this nation and its people, it was when I started to learn more and more about the end of slavery in the United States. And people like to say, “Well, we didn’t need that Civil War because the English ended slavery without a civil war.” And I’m thinking, Well, yeah, they sort of ended it, didn’t they? But the truth of the matter is that the predicate of the British ending of it did not resonate with respect for ordinary folks as human beings, not as this race or that race. The American people saw slaves as human beings. Their actions and activities in ending slavery showed it. Why did Americans undertake to oppose slavery? Why was there a civil war 32


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about it? The folks who are, these days, trying to convince us that our history is worthless and nobody ever did any good, spit on the graves of tens of thousands— indeed, hundreds of thousands of people who risked or gave their lives in the course of the battles that were the Civil War. These revisionists totally ignore the fact that war would never have occurred if certain things, including John Brown’s activities and a single novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, hadn’t roused the moral heart of the American people. But of course, they roused the moral heart of the American people because at that time, Christian Americans in particular understood something we appear to be forgetting now: that this nation was founded on the premise of God’s authority. That the people stood up to claim their authority to govern themselves by virtue of an endowment from God.

GOD’S ENDOWMENT

What is an endowment? Well, some people say—and I’m always a little put off by it—they will call the endowment of rights “a gift.” Well, in the sense that yes, if you endow a chair at a college you give a 33


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certain amount of money—that’s the substance needed to set up the endowed chair, right? Or to set up the facility, if it’s a research facility. But usually in the endowment, there’s also something else. If you provide funds for an endowment, you will state, “I’m giving this endowment for the purpose of,” and then you say what it’s purpose is and what you’re hoping will be achieved by the respect for that purpose. In other words, the one endowing establishes the terms on which the funds are provided and how they are to be used. The understanding of how endowments function gives us an understanding of “right” that reveals the usual way in which people talk about it. Even FDR: he talked about this country as if it was based simply on freedoms—the Four Freedoms [Freedom of speech, of worship, from want, from fear]—and a lot of people, including some people who call themselves conservatives and libertarian, talk about freedom. What is freedom? FREEDOM VS LIBERTY

Freedom is the opportunity to make a choice, but it has to be empowered by and 34


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built upon something else before we’ll call it freedom. If you make the choice to go out and walk in a beautiful field you can see through your window, but you happen to be penned up in a federal prison, and you look at that field through the bars of a window high up in your cell, are you free? Of course not! You’ve made a choice to walk in that field, but you can’t carry it out. Choice and power must go together. You can only make the choice if you have the power to make it, and at the end of the day, all by itself, freedom realized in that sense is very little different from making a false assertion of the power to do what you will. Is that what America is about? America is about doing what we will according to such power as we are able to amass? Is it what America is about? Well, the word “freedom” isn’t what’s used in the Declaration of Independence. It uses the word “right,” and not just rights that we assert or rights that we claim or rights that we prove somehow by our own initiative. They are rights endowed by the will of God. And that gets us to the key point, doesn’t it? The difference between “right” and “freedom” is that “right” is a choice made 35


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in the determination of your will to respect the will of God for what is right. Your claim to move forward based on the certainty of that right is not just a claim vindicated by your power; it’s a claim vindicated by the power of God which informs you through your nature and through your conscience of the righteousness of what you do. That the understanding of the word “right”—resident in the Declaration—and its connection with God and righteousness, is child’s play to anybody who has come to faith in Christ. That, we learn as children in the faith, the life we live is completely enthroned on the mercy of God and His endowment, and there it is sitting in the Declaration. I’ll ask you a simple question. You’ve been hearing all these years of people who talk about separation of church and state, but if the endowment of rights stated in the Declaration, which is the basis for the understanding of government that allows us as citizens as a whole—as common folks— to participate; if that understanding corresponds to what I just said, and we turn our backs on God, what happens to our selfgovernment? What happens to it? It’s gone! It disappears! And it is disappearing. 36


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We’re on the eve of that time when we will return to the dark age of human life which extended all through the history of mankind until Christ walked the Earth, until Christianity matured to the point where a people would dedicate itself to the cause of righteousness and establish government predicated on the purpose of securing those rights that were bound upon us and woven into our very nature by the will of God. That people is us. Well, I know what crosses the mind of some folks—not you, perhaps—but there are people out there who would ask— particularly in Congress—“What is that man Alan Keyes doing? He’s actually talking about the founding of this country as if people like him had anything to do with it.” Well, I won’t go through all the history that proved that people like me did have something to do with it; that’s neither here nor there, in one sense. What I will go through is the fact that the statement made as the foundation for the claim of this people to govern itself is a statement that applied to all humanity. The Declaration of Independence and that statement, that all man are endowed with rights by God, is the reason there was 37


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a civil war. There was a civil war because people of conscience in the days leading up to it were able to point to that standard over and over and over again to make the point that slavery was contrary to the very founding premise of this nation’s existence. They didn’t have to create that thought to point it out, contrary to the lies that are now told in order to justify the travesty of destroying our memorials of the founding era. They didn’t have to impose it on Thomas Jefferson and people like those who were responsible for the Declaration, because the Founders knew it. As a matter of fact, Jefferson, in the “Notes of Virginia,” was quite explicit about the effects of slavery. In his discussion he made it very clear, and his conclusion from that discussion and what were the likely prospects of what was going to happen on account of slavery were quite grim. He actually implied that he wasn’t sure the nation could survive the crisis that had to be brought on. Why? Because of the contradiction between the institution of slavery and the premise of America’s emerging national identity. “I tremble for my country,” he said, “when I think that God is just, and His justice will not sleep 38


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forever.” No, God’s justice didn’t sleep forever. It hardly slept for 60 years. Then the troubles started, and the trouble was the conscience of America first revolting on the basis of a simple understanding of what, according to the law of God, brethren owe to brethren. And unlike some, I won’t pretend that it’s necessarily “all owe to all,” because I’m not sure of that. Some people like to pretend that there’s a doctrine that suggests, in various and assorted statements Christ makes and other things, that we can simply say, “What everyone deserves of everybody is to be loved.” Well, I don’t know that I agree with that. God usually abides by and acts according to the simple understandings that He shares with us. If you are to love everybody, He wouldn’t hate workers of iniquity would He? You say He would love everyone, that He wouldn’t hate them? But He says He hates them. God hates the workers of iniquity. He also hates people who murder the innocent, and we’ll get to that as you know that is the shadow hanging over our future. 39


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OUR REFUSAL TO OWN UP

We have to find our way to thinking through why it hangs over our future, and it hangs over our future because we refuse to do what the Founders did. I don’t most admire them, though they did accomplish what I’m about to say. I don’t admire the Founders of the United States—George Washington, Jefferson, all the leaders, people in the Continental Congress, others —just because they won battles and successfully defeated the British army against all human odds. I don’t admire them for that. I admire them for the most important thing, the hardest thing that they did: what we refuse to do. We are a generation, wonderful in our own conceit, but still covered in our filthiness. They, too, were a generation covered in filthiness but who acknowledged the sin by which God’s will condemned their 41


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state. Have we done so? Because as long as the Founders put those words in the Declaration, “created equal, endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights,” not Englishmen, not white people, but all people—all the creatures coming from the hand of God entitled to the appellation of humanity—they held themselves up to a greater truth and acknowledge it clearly. God created rights, not man. And when we forget it, there is nobody in this country who is justified in doing what a lot of people are doing. “Get off it,” some say. “They owned slaves! What a terrible sin they committed! So we have to tear down their statue, destroy their memory, despise everything they did!” We may as well add, “If they said two and two made four, we must deny that truth because they sinned!” Well, ya’ll, I have to say they at least did the world a favor acknowledging, “What we’re doing is wrong,” and admitting when they wrote and when they spoke, at least the decent ones, “We gotta change this.” Now was that John C. Calhoun? No, it wasn’t. Was it Thomas Jefferson? Yes, it was. They understood. They acknowledged that the will of God went against slavery, 42


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and they were going to have to face up to it. The nation, they predicted, would have to inevitably face up to it. What is happening now is just the opposite. What’s happening now is they have put us in a position where if we dare to say, “That reaching into the womb and contradicting the conception of human life is a murder. Not in the will of man, but in the mind of God, that it is intolerable and against His will and against our humanity.” I believe that as a nation we now stand far below in the esteem that really matters, which is the esteem of God. We have fallen far below the Founders of this country, and it doesn’t matter how many slaves they owned or how many times a day they beat them, because they did not lie about the nature of their sin. They did not lie about the nature of that injustice, and because they did not lie, I found my way, as a black American, to be living in a country where I am free to live. And if they had not affirmed the truth of it, well, I would probably have lived my life in other conditions. Do you know what makes our current problem even worse? Hundreds of years from now, the ones whose murder we are countenancing by turning away from the sin 43


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of abortion, the unjust travesty that we are countenancing, no one will be able to say that they lived their life in travail; they lived their life in oppression; they lived their life at all. Yet some of us dare to believe that we can stand in judgement of this country’s Founders. I wanted to go through all of that because, if we remember the beginning, as I’m trying to get you to do, we are forced to remember, aren’t we, that a right is not just the freedom to do something—the power to do something. It is the choice to do what is according to the will of the Creator God, that which corresponds to the laws of nature and of nature’s God. What nature? Well, immediately, you might think we’re talking about all of nature, the cosmos, and of course, we are— physical nature, material nature. But we’re also talking about something more, about human nature, for there are laws that govern our nature. It’s often a little harder to discern exactly what they are, but I think that the rule that Christ repeated, that is stated in the Bible, that is adapted in various ways to try to summarize the moral law, at least at a practical level, still holds pretty good. What is that rule? Well, it’s stated, 44


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“Do unto others as you would have others do unto you.” Some of the philosophers, thinking they were sly, rephrased this as, “Do not do to others what you would not have them do to you.” But, being as how some of us go crazy sometimes, we might just be willing to let people do really insane things to us, so that rule may not be as reliable, but the positive injunction—“Don’t do to somebody else what you wouldn’t want to have done to you!”—that catches our attention. This Golden Rule, as it is known, forces us to put ourselves in the place of the one whose head we’re about to bash in for their wallet and ask ourselves whether or not we would appreciate that favor. Certainly, there are going to be people who lie to themselves and say, “Yeah, that’d be all right with me, so long as I get to do it now.” But we know they’re lying, don’t we? And so it raises the possibility that yes, there is, in conscience, a way for us to determine what it is that we owe to others, but this country wasn’t just founded on that. Pastor Todd Olson, in a sermon which I heard earlier today, reminded me of that, because that rule is related to one of the two great rules that Christ points to and that are 45


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enunciated in the Scripture as the rules of love. And it is the rule that we should love our neighbor as ourselves. This rule of love very much intrigued me. It’s like God actually knows what He’s doing and we should pay attention. There I was, listening to the Pastor talk about that very rule, and I thought, That’s good. I’m glad. That takes some burden off my shoulders when I discuss the rule, because I can skip a lot of my explanations in this talk that go to the heart of it. But the heart of it for me is always the final explication of that love, in the context of Christ’s ministry. In Christ’s sharing of the story, who turned out to be the Good Samaritan in the parable so named? What was that Samaritan doing at the time that he decided to help his neighbor? Because he turned out to be the neighbor, right? Which one of those people passing by with their noses in the air was the neighbor? It wasn’t the guys with their nose in the air; it was the guy who went down into the ditch to help out the fellow who got all beaten up, who had been robbed of his goods, and the Samaritan—the good neighbor—gave him the shirt off his back, helped him to receive medical attention, and 46


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paid his way for him. What would you call such a person? He’s the guy who helped. But what’s another word for the one who helped in that instance where you’re lying there in the ditch, bleeding and about to die? He saved you! He saved you! Oh, who’s the Good Samaritan? The one who saves you, and as the Pastor pointed out, that makes the Second Commandment exactly like the first. The first is, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind;” the second is “Love your neighbor.” Who’s your neighbor? The one who saves you. In no sense at all do you escape from God in those things that are of conscience that hold up the standard of the behavior that we owe to others because it finally turns out, as the Declaration makes clear, that what we owe to others in our love is the same because it is the love owed to God.

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THE GOOD PEOPLE

What are we to say, then? When we look at this business of rights and rightdoing and unalienable rights, for whose sake do we act? We don’t act for our own sake; we act for the sake of God, and that means that our rights are not our freedom to do what we please: They are our answer or responsibility. Answering love with love, we respond to the good will of God by acting according to His will. Do you see that? That makes every right a responsibility: not a freedom, but a responsibility. Now it’s a responsibility about which we have a choice, but I always used to take it as kind of just politeness, when I read in the Declaration and in other documents that they prepared at the time, references to “the good people of the United States.” Do you remember that? You ever read that in the Declaration? “The good people of the United States.” And I used to think, Well, that was just them being polite. You do 49


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realize that it’s not, because if what I just said about the logic of the Declaration is true, then who is it who comes together to found the regime that is ultimately expressed in our Constitution? The good people come together. Many people these days don’t want us to see this anymore, and they’ll try to pretend that what I’m about to say makes some invidious, nasty distinction —no, it doesn’t. Because the whole logic of the Declaration and the understanding of the right that underlies all rights—the understanding of right according to God—who are the people who choose to do what’s right according to God? Are they good people or bad people? They’re good people. It follows that when the Founders referred to the good people of the United States coming together to form a government, they meant it literally! They didn’t mean the crooks; they didn’t mean the gangsters; they didn’t mean the killers; they didn’t mean the murderers; they didn’t mean the cheaters and the adulterers and the fornicators; they meant the good people who were walking a walk as best they could according to the will of God. Who are the people in this country today who remind us that our citizenship 50


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and our role in the government is not a gift from God that we can use for any purpose we please. Rather, that it is an endowment from God to be used according to His will, and if we insist on using it instead according to our perverted will, then we have no right to govern ourselves. Instead, we will fall back into that long oppression which was the story of all humanity until this nation was founded. Now, I must say, we have a choice to make, but not everybody has this choice to make. You see, some people have already made their choice; they are the bad guys, and sad to say, I see some evidence that maybe some of the people who pretend to be representatives of those who are supposed to be the good people are themselves, among the bad people. Did you understand the logic in that regard, by the way, of the idea that in answer to the COVID-19 threat, experts and politicians appealed to our goodwill? They said, “If you don’t want to be hurting other people, you must stop assembling and wear masks and do all these other things we tell you to do.” And the first thing they told us to do was, “Go away from your job. Stay home, even if it means you’re going to lose 51


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your job and your business will fail. Stay home, shelter in place.” In this, they appealed to our goodness, our willingness to sacrifice because they knew we believed it would protect others. However, they often called these “lockdowns.” I love that phrase because it reminds us of prison. So they told us that we had to go home because of the lockdown, and then Governor Cuomo, other politicians, and some activists are telling us that we have to let the prisoners out because of the COVID virus. I’m thinking, Wait a minute. They’re in lockdown already. Why would you put us in lockdown and let them out? And it raises the question for me: Whose side are they on? If you’re listening carefully to what I’m saying, that’s not something I’m throwing out there to criticize Cuomo. It’s because I want you to consider the fact that if we are electing people who actually think it’s their job to let the bad guys out, then we never should have let them into government—at all, ever, anywhere in this country. I assure you, as some of you know from my background, that is not a partisan statement. No, because there are people in both parties whom I wouldn’t have put in 52


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the Senate because they don’t understand this distinction, so I don’t care about the party labels, but I do care about whether or not we are remembering what is the foundation—the founding premise of our existence as a nation build on the idea of liberty. Then all these people coming along now wanting to further divide the good people from each other. The one factor that should offer us hope whenever folks come forward to try and set us at one another’s throat is to remember that our nation is not premised on this group or that group, this color and that color, this national background and that national background, this creed and that creed. It is premised on an understanding of the obligations inherent in our humanity: to do justice toward another as we would want it done to us.

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“Every single decent American heart was outraged at what they saw, not because that man was black, but because every person in this country is presumed innocent until proven guilty.�

Alan Keyes about George Floyd 54


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GEORGE FLOYD

Let me, then, address George Floyd.

When we all saw George Floyd’s plight on that video, the liars tried to contend that all the white people in this country stood up and said, “Get him! Get him!” They were acting like racists—you and I both know it was a lie. Every single decent American heart was outraged at what they saw, not because that man was black, but because every person in this country is presumed innocent until proven guilty. You don’t get to treat anyone like a criminal until after the trial and only if they have been found guilty by a jury. We were outraged at the denial of George Floyd’s right to appeal for justice. Not one of us, not one race, but all races because we, all of us, know that at some time or other, we could end up just like that. And by the way, those who perpetuate the lies about the killing of George Floyd don’t 55


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like to be reminded of these statistics, but in proportion their participation in incidents that involved the police, whites, Hispanics, and other groups are actually more often killed than blacks. Go look it up. You will find that you’ve been threatened and terrorized and made to feel degraded as a racist by something that isn’t even true. Then you have to ask yourself, given what I’ve been saying about why we really have self-government, if we suddenly decide that we’ve lost our interest in enforcing the rules using police, does that make us good people or bad people? Because I think if you’re willing to let other people who live in neighborhoods that are being burned down, with their stores being destroyed and then say, “Well, those protestors just have those strong feelings. We gotta let them show those strong feelings,” you have forgotten about those people we all saw who were saying, “I don’t know. I can’t get food for my babies. How does this do me any good?” That was a black woman speaking. We all have to eat, and when you burn down the stores, you are taking that food out of everybody’s mouth, black or white. Food recognizes no color. 56


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There is no excuse for it, and there is no excuse for a government official for tolerating it, not as a mayor, not as a governor, not as a president, not at all. Our constitution requires that no person—black person, white person, Chinese person, Asian person, French person, British person, no person—shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process. You don’t get to go into the store and burn it down because you feel strongly about that today any more than you get to snuff out someone’s life. Where was the courage of the good people to say that these homeowners, business owners, and people of all races, have the right to protection of the lives and property? Where was the courage to stand the rioters and terrorists down on behalf of the good people of the United States? Well, I gotta tell you, y’all, that was the one difference I mentioned toward the beginning of this talk. That difference that was made, and now I will be talking ex-plicitly to the people who profess to be of the Body of Christ, of the vocation that He exemplified for us, you see, because that’s what’s wrong right now. A lot of people who had talents and 57


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abilities they didn’t know about, made our self-government possible by their cooperation with many others who had different talents and abilities. George Washington, it turned out, became a pretty good general, contrary to the opinion of some silly academics these days, but he wasn’t that way before he started. He had to learn. Others who made their contribution to the founding had some extraordinary talents that probably would never have been revealed if that crisis hadn’t occurred, but did they win our war for independence? They did not; no. What won the war for independence was the courage of people who, in the first stages of the war, were out there with no training, no discipline, and really, in the minds of people who were versed in the ways of war at that time, no chance of doing anything but dying at the hands of the very proficient killers that made up what was arguably the greatest, but certainly one of the most skilled and powerful armed forces then on Earth: the British army. And don’t tell me that a lot of Hessians fought—they did, and they were also very formidable warriors. We had to wait till the next century to learn how well the Germans can fight. Yet the common 58


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folks in the colonies were the ones who fought with courage and honor and were willing to sacrifice, because they believed in God, and could then believe in liberty. No matter how you look at it, ordinary folks, taken not off the training fields of this or that military college, but from behind the plow, from the storefronts, from the butcher shop, from the blacksmith’s shop, these were the ones standing there with their weapons. Some of them had to, in the course of the early days of the war, brave the weapons of superior forces, bound to mow them down like grass. They not only did it, but they came back sometimes and did it again. Where do ordinary folks get that kind of courage? You can read in the ancients all about the Spartans who spent all their time thinking about war, preparing for war, and inuring their hearts to the hardship of war. The battle and the victory and the triumph and the arms—this was everything they were about. But the American colonists— they did learn a little something about war in the course of it—but they were encouraged within themselves, not so much by any training that they had except their upbringing in that faith which ultimately 59


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has, as one of its truest and best fruits, the courage to look death in the eye and not see an end, but a beginning; not closure, but an opportunity—to realize your best hope, so long as you face it in the way that God intends. Christian people and the Christian ethic—in war we have repeatedly proven the naysayers wrong. We have shown that to be courageous and successful in war, you don’t really have to be a noble, an aristocrat or an officer from a prestigious academy. You don’t even have to be somebody who has studied hard in order to inure yourself to the discipline of war and the certainty of death. A lot of people discovered that they could get that very same encouragement— I use the word encouragement because it literally contains the word “heart” in it Ouhn-coeur-rajge—coeur-rajge—the root of it is cœur—the same word in French is “heart.” You get that encouragement from what? From the certainty of your faith. From the surrender of your fate to the good will of God, knowing that however it may go in the eyes of the material world, if I stand fast in the way of God and walk in the way of God and speak in the way of God, 60


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then I will stand and walk and speak forever, however this body falls to the ground. Wherever it is sacrificed, my God will raise me up. He will once again someday make me whole. Now, and this is the beginning of my final point, when I look at what’s been going on in 2020, I’m kind of disappointed in the people of this country, but not the way some folks might think. I have friends who are at least mildly disappointed in people because they didn’t, from the beginning, resist all this mask and social distancing and the lockdown and stuff, especially when it interfered with our right to assemble in an election year to carry out our responsibilities. I’ll get back to that. But they thought the lack of citizen pushback was terrible. I didn’t, because there is a larger question mark hanging over people in America now. We’ve done so well. We’ve gotten so used to the benefits of doing well that you have to wonder sometimes, “Are we still a people of self-sacrifice?” Are we? We proved to be many, many times in the past. Yes, we have done well. I know this goes against all those black people who think I ought to join them and be hating on white 61


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people and talking in a way that suggests white racism to me in a form of hateful, anti-white racism. I refuse to become an anti-white racist. I figured that the worst thing that could happen to me, in some ways, given my background, was that I allow myself to be lured into practicing the sin that I condemned when it was committed against my ancestors. When Martin Luther King said we should judge every individual by the content of their character, not the color of their skin, he convinced me, and I have tried to do it ever since. Are we going to stop now? I certainly hope not.

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SLAVERY, ITS ROOTS, & WHAT SOME CALL RACISM

Are we going to listen to people who tell us we should stop “systemic racism?” I’ve never seen it. All the racism that I ever experienced had individuals involved, acting according to hearts and minds they could have changed at the time. If we forget that, we will allow others to change us from a good people into the worst people who ever existed on the face of the Earth, because we will have betrayed the truth that made us free. Are we going to do this? I sincerely hope not. I sincerely hope that instead, we’re going to revive our understanding of the goodwill that is assumed when we claim the exercise of our rights. It is a goodwill endowed in its substance by our desire to conform to the laws of nature 63


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and of nature’s God. To love God in such a way that we obey His instructions, follow His command, walk the walk of His love all the way to the cross, if need be, and speaking as Martin Luther King encouraged us to do. I read a book once—a long time ago— that described the whole history of black America up through the Civil Rights Movements— Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery. I’ve never forgotten it because it moved my heart as a true statement. As Christian folks, however, no matter our color or our background, what are we called to do by the example of Christ on the cross? “Forgive them, Lord. Forgive them, Lord, for they know not what they do.” I wonder about our times, even. I certainly wonder it about the past. People are and were blinded by the long heritage of humanity. All these folks claiming, for instance, “Slavery: it started with white people!” and “Juneteenth!” and “When the first black slaves came to America!”—do they know where those slaves came from? A lot of them came from a slave trade conducted out of the Mediterranean Basin in Africa with slaves first carried across to 64


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the Caribbean. Slavery has been around a long time—hundreds of years—conducted many times by Muslim slave traders, for the most part. Some of those Muslim slave traders were black like me, while some of them were not so black. But even the Luo tribesmen, from which Barack Obama’s father descended and who were not necessarily dedicated to slave trading, but like many people, if they had some folks who were inconvenient and they wanted to get them out of the way, they wouldn’t be averse to surprising them in the midst of the night or in the forest and carrying them off to the slave trader so that they woke up on a slave ship wondering why they hadn’t been elected chief. There’s nobody on this Earth, I would venture to say, who lives in a place where other human beings did not enslave one another at some time. When people talk about the terrible sins white people committed against Native Americans in terms of slavery, as I recall, there were some Native American tribes that weren’t particularly kind to the folks they conquered in war. When they weren’t torturing and killing the men, they were turning the women into slaves and making 65


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sure the children were brought up forcibly as members of their tribe. That sounds like slavery to me. Doesn’t it sound that way to you? I think the Apostle Paul was right. “There is no one righteous, not even one.” And that’s a good thing to remember, even when you’re on the cross, because the only person who could look down from that position of crucifixion—on all sinful persons—was the one who set the example of what we should do when we find ourselves there. Of all the people who walked in the flesh, who ever existed, Christ is the only one who, with perfect equanimity, could plead, “Never done that. Therefore, I condemn them.” You know, “Bring the thunderbolts, Father. Take care of them.” Is that what He said? No, He said, “Lord, forgive them, for they really don’t know what they’re doing.” Here’s a problem though. If we allow ourselves to return to the mindset as Americans that we are guilty of the worst kinds of sins, of a racism based on the former reality of slavery—or all past and present injustices—that last part of Christ’s statement won’t be true of us. Not only did He walk the Earth and as such, has He 66


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moved many of us to change our lives and receive God’s help in consequence of surrendering ourselves to Him—not only is that true. He has also opened our eyes. He has also opened our hearts. He has been made manifest even in the premises of our nation’s life, even in the actions of previous generations. I hate the way these people are trying to act as if the war against slavery and injustice begins with us. What of all those people who fought that war of emancipation? Frankly, do you know who are the people that I actually find most startling when I think about it? I’ve read enough to know that there were some folks fighting under the Union Standard, who went to war and risked their lives, who if I were to sit down and chat with them at the time, they would probably have slipped into the nword and had a fairly low opinion of me because of the color of my skin. I actually find it quite startling that they were willing, nonetheless, to form their regiments and march south in order to wade through fields knee-deep in their own blood while people that they knew and who cared about them fell all around them in the carnage for folks 67


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for whom they didn’t even have much respect. You ask, why doesn’t it bother me that they didn’t respect my ancestors? Because something in me knows that though they didn’t yet respect my ancestors, they did respect my God. I have lived a life where I met some of their descendants, and God has taught them to love and respect and to work together with those who were once despised—with me. If we battle for the Lord, then we battle for we know not what future, but we can be sure it will be the right one. I look back on past generations of Americans, and I don’t condemn them because they didn’t stand up against the worst injustice of their time. How can I when even today we are not standing up against the worst injustice, the most abhorrent travesty of our time, and battle away at it with everything we have; the battle for human life in the womb. It took some time for our ancestors, for sure, but they did eventually stand against slavery, at a high cost of life and property. They did it not even knowing fully and completely why—knowing God more than they knew their own will, but doing it all the same. 68


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As a result of their actions, I think we better pay attention to the lessons we have to learn from them. It will help us to keep on track. It will help to acknowledge the progress we have made. It will help to discover and claim as our own the love that we have shown to one another. But it will also help in the real sense—not to divide us 69


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and set us hatefully against one another; not to encourage us to tear down our past rather than look at the future which we inhabit and for which that past prepared us. I think what we work for is the future we may not live to see—we surely will not—but which God is seeing for us, and for which we will now stand to fight, not because we hate, but because we love. Because we love, not the country as it was, but the people who lived for the country that would be; not because we love this country as it is, but because we love the thought and hope that is in God’s mind of the future He has prepared for us, and in preparing it for us, He prepares it for all the world. Why are we forgetting this? Why are we letting them drive us back into these separate identities as if we should cling to them as the definition of who we are ourselves. I feel a deep sense of pride and love for the people who were my ancestors, but I also feel a deep sense of love and pride for the people who are my nation. I feel love for them because we are a nation of nations, because they come from every region, every tribe, every creed on Earth. I feel for them because they are willing to stand in the hope that the com70


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mon ground of our humanity will define us as a people, and in defining us, light the way to that future for the world in which our singularities will still shine like the facets of God’s design. If we can once against seize onto and grab hold of the truth of God’s creation of each of us, we will gleam on the diamond of our humanity, and we will stand together, pressed together by our hope and by our love; by our courage and by our battle to retain the understanding of right and walk in the way of true liberty—to stand fast for the nation in that liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free: in that liberty, which our love of God makes possible. This is what gives me hope in this dark time. Our leaders may still be going wrong—I don’t know—but you know something? I still believe that if Christian hearts and Christian people reject the division, reject the violence, reject the lies, reclaim the history, and especially remember our God, in every circumstance and in every way, then as He helped to once make us a nation, so He will help us to preserve that nation—righteous, good, and free. 71


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CONTACT INFORMATION

To contact Dr. Alan Keyes, PhD, Dave Racer, MLitt or others associated with Freedoms’ Dream Foundation: Email: dave@daveracer.com

https://freedomsdream.org

Phone: 651.330.2792

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Foundations of Liberty - Alan Keyes, PhD  

Dr. Alan Keyes lays out the foundations of American liberty with power and authority, dispelling myths, lies and distortions, showing how ou...

Foundations of Liberty - Alan Keyes, PhD  

Dr. Alan Keyes lays out the foundations of American liberty with power and authority, dispelling myths, lies and distortions, showing how ou...

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