Detroiter Magazine - September 2022

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A RADICAL TRANSFORMATION: AS CARS BECOME COMPUTERS ON WHEELS, NEW SKILLS NEEDED ACROSS INDUSTRY

BATTLING IT OUT: AUTOMAKERS JOCKEY FOR A NEW GENERATION OF TALENT

NO SILVER BULLET: 8 STEPS TO SECURING MICHIGANʼS HIGH-TECH TALENT

A PUBLICATION OF THE DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER • SEPTEMBER 2022

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MOBILITY TECH STARS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

FROM THE PRESIDENT Politics Places America’s Global Mobility Leadership at Risk

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FUTURE TALENT CONTROLS EV/AV DESTINY Adapting to Trends Key to Addressing Skills Gap, Winning in the 21st Century

TRENDS AND RISKS

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LEADERSHIP DETROIT

ACTION

STATE OF TALENT

MOBILITY TECH STARS

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MEMBERSHIP

CONTENTS

S E P T E M B E R 2 0 2 2 • V O L U M E 114 , I S S U E 3

IF WE LOSE … What Michigan’s Economy Might Look Like if We Fail to Win High-Tech Talent

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A RADICAL TRANSFORMATION As Cars Become Computers on Wheels, New Skills Needed Across Industry

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MOBILITY TECH STARS Michigan’s Premier Talent Is Creating the Cutting-Edge Vehicles of New Mobility Era

Publisher Tammy Carnrike, CCE Managing Editor Melissa Read Art Director Bethany Saner Editor James Martinez Photographers Andrew Potter Courtesy Photos Advertising Director Jim Connarn Advertising Representatives

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MICHIGAN AUTOMOTIVE TALENT The Workforce and Assets That Define Michigan’s Automobility Ecosystem

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BATTLING IT OUT Automakers Jockey for a New Generation of Talent

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HIGH-STAKES COMPETITION Innovation Districts Racing to Become Tech Hub, Talent Magnets

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A NEW TALENT SOLUTIONS STRATEGY Kerry Ebersole Singh Is Leading MEDC’s High-Wage Skills Strategy

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2022 DETROIT AUTO SHOW This Year’s Show Is a Celebration of Mobility on Land, Water, and in the Skies

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NO SILVER BULLET Steps to Securing Michigan’s High-Tech Talent

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MICHAUTO Helping Michigan Stay Ahead of the Curve

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CONGRATS CLASS XLII Graduates Share Their Reflections

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IN THE NEWS Good Things Are Happening to Businesses Throughout Metro Detroit

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ON THE ROSTER Welcome These New Members to the Chamber

Laurie Scotese Research and Analysis Christyn Lucas Austeja Uptaite Back Issues 313.596.0391 Published by Detroit Regional Chamber Services Inc. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission. Detroiter (ISSN 0011-9709) is published four times a year (April, June, Oct. and Dec.) by the Detroit Regional Chamber, One Woodward Avenue, Suite 1900, Detroit MI 48226, Phone: (313)964-4000. Periodical postage paid at Detroit MI Subscription price: members, $14: nonmembers, $18. Individual copies: $4; plus postage. POSTMASTER Send address changes to: Detroiter, One Woodward Avenue, Suite 1900, Detroit MI 48226. Copyright 2007, Detroit Regional Chamber Services Inc.


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Executive Summary FROM THE PRESIDENT

POLITICS PLACES AMERICA’S GLOBAL MOBILITY LEADERSHIP AT RISK Political polarization touches every aspect of American life today. Apparently, nothing is immune from becoming a political football. In many cases, arguments in the public square are made from an ideological – or even worse – a ‘tribal’ perspective. Rationality and fact need not apply. The debate about transitioning to a more electrified vehicle fleet is no doubt caught up in this political polarization. Those on the political left tend to overlook the substantial hurdles for wide scale adoption and portray electric vehicles (EVs) as a panacea for our environment. Those on the political right downplay the impact of our changing climate on our environment and economy and argue that since EVs are not ideal today, they never will be. Others dismiss EVs simply because liberals seem to like them. The political extremes miss the most important point: A successful transition of our mobility fleet to electric is absolutely critical to the future of the American economy – specifically the Michigan economy. THE AUTOMOTIVE/MOBILITY INDUSTRY IS ARGUABLY THE MOST VALUABLE Every other nation on the planet is trying, has tried, or seeks to try to develop an automotive industry. The reason is: More economic value is created by the automotive industry than any another. The research and development, engineering, design, manufacturing, marketing, sales, and services associated with the automotive industry create more economic output and create more jobs than other industries. While the United States (and Michigan) has been a dominant player in the global mobility industry since its inception, our leadership position is not a birthright. The balance of the industrialized world, including China – the world’s largest automotive market – are leading the charge toward EV adoption using a combination of government mandates and incentives as well as leveraging higher consumer concern of environmental issues compared to their U.S. counterparts. While some Americans may find this anti-free market, it does not change the fact that the global automotive market is being pushed and pulled into an EV future.

The risk to the U.S., particularly Michigan, is being the last market clinging to the internal combustion engine (ICE) as our primary mode of transport. If that happens, U.S.-based automotive companies will be put at a tremendous competitive disadvantage by having to serve a regional ICE market and global EV market while the rest of the global industry focuses on EVs. This would be especially troubling for Michigan’s economy should we miss the opportunity to transition our companies to the EV marketplace before it’s too late. Without our automotive industry, Michigan’s economy would be in a world of hurt for generations. HOPE IS NOT A STRATEGY While we will not run out of fossil fuels tomorrow, we eventually will run out or extracting it will incur an even greater financial and environmental cost that even climate change deniers must acknowledge. The trends are increasingly clear – EV adoption is poised to skyrocket. Consumers are expressing more interest, the number of compelling EV products coming to market is multiplying – and more and more people are finding their way into their first EV experience. Those who are sour on EVs are those with little or no experience with them. True, EVs are not for everyone today – and there may be segments of the market that may never transition to EVs. But for everyone else, they may have an experience similar to mine. I’m a car guy. I love my high-horsepower cars. In 2021, we leased our first EV – an impulse purchase. Despite having other ICE-powered cars, we fight over our EV, which led to the purchase of another. Once you start driving an EV you get hooked quickly – it’s just a better driving experience. Scores of consumers are coming to the same realization and the primary motivation for an EV purchase may not be a desire to save the planet, but a desire for a better driving experience. Let’s not allow politics to detract from the importance of maintaining our global mobility leadership, and recognize that it is increasingly an electrified one.

SANDY K. BARUAH

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER


DISCOVER NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR YOUR BUSINESS. No matter what stage your business is in, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation is here to help you succeed. By connecting you to the resources your business needs, granting access to necessary capital and introducing you to the right partners, the MEDC helps your business reach new potential. Find out how we can help propel your business forward with customized support at michiganbusiness.org/pure-partnership


HIGH-TECH TALENT HOLDS THE KEY TO MICHIGAN’S INNOVATIVE

MOBILITY

FUTURE

Today’s cutting-edge vehicles function more like a smart phone than a traditional automobile. Electronics systems, software, and digital technology increasingly comprise more of the vehicle as the industry pursues electrified and autonomous mobility and replaces current jobs with higher tech roles. The growing need for new high-tech talent is fueling an intense competition across industries amid historic investment. No state is better positioned to lead in next-generation mobility than Michigan. However, it must take steps to build on its highly talented workforce to remain a global automotive and innovation leader as its signature industry undergoes a massive realignment of the division of labor between humans and machines. The September 2022 Detroiter focuses on the high-tech talent needed to continue to create the vehicles featured annually at the North American International Auto Show and drive Michigan’s economic future.


Executive Summary

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ELECTRIFICATION AND AUTOMATION IMPACT 42% OF MICHIGAN WORKERS ARE AT HIGH RISK OF AUTOMATION. RANKING 30TH IN THE NATION FOR AUTOMATION RISK.

85

MILLION JOBS DISPLACED

Source: Commodity

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY U.S. DIGITAL ECONOMY ACCOUNTED FOR 10.2% OF U.S. GDP OR $2.1 TRILLION IN 2020, SUPPORTING 7.8 MILLION JOBS NATIONWIDE. Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

97

MILLION NEW ROLES MAY EMERGE

85 MILLION JOBS MAY BE DISPLACED GLOBALLY BY THE SHIFT IN LABOR BETWEEN HUMANS AND MACHINES BY 2025, WHILE 97 MILLION NEW ROLES MAY EMERGE. Source: The World Economic Forum

ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS AS PERCENT OF TOTAL CAR COST 1970

5%

2030

50%

Source: PwC

MONETIZING THE DATA AND SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

2022 $ 6 BILLION

2030 $ 30 BILLION

Source: Precedence Research

MICHIGAN’S INVESTMENT IN EV/AV

THE MOBILITY INDUSTRY CONTRIBUTES $304 BILLION TO MICHIGAN’S ECONOMY ANNUALLY AND

$10 BILLION INVESTED IN MICHIGAN IN

SUPPORTS ALMOST 1.1 MILLION JOBS.

AV/EV FIRMS BETWEEN 2010-2020

Source: MICHauto’s Mobility Contribution Report, 2019

Source: Center for Automotive Research


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Executive Summary

FUTURE TALENT CONTROLS EV/AV DESTINY For automotive companies “controlling their destiny” will be determined by their ability to attract and retain the high-tech talent needed to transition to the electric and autonomous vehicle (EV/AV) future. Understanding the talent pipeline and how best to cultivate the workforce needed will determine the winners and losers of the new mobility era. 40,000 NEW ENGINEERS NEEDED ANNUALLY

BERNIE MONGILIO SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT CGI, U.S. GREAT LAKES

Most industry reports predict a skills gap of more than 100,000 U.S. workers by 2025. Of these, 40,000 will be engineers with college degrees, while the rest are comprised of skilled tradespeople needed for repair, service, and recycling. While U.S. universities produce 70,000 engineers annually, only 1% of those choose to take their talents to the automotive industry. The industry needs at least 40,000 new engineers each year to address their

capability gap when moving to the EV/ AV era. SEVERAL FACTORS EXACERBATING SKILLS GAP That massive skills gap is being exacerbated by several factors. The cost for higher education continues to rise exponentially, increasing barriers to enrollment and making the return on investment of that education more elusive, which further deters enrollment in traditional postsecondary education. In addition, the type of skills required in the EV/AV era, is not fully addressed by the traditional college curriculum. It’s anticipated that more than 25% of the talent supply will come from non-traditional sources like custom-built apprenticeship programs run by industry associations and companies. NEW TALENT STRATEGIES CRITICAL As the industry-wide approach from thinking in terms of components


Executive Summary transitions to systems and shifts focus from mechanical engineers to software engineers, there’s a growing need for non-traditional talent strategies. Utilizing apprenticeship programs, companies will need to both absorb talent from noncollege avenues, like coding academies and non-technical college programs, while conducting rapidly updated on-the-job training in emerging technology areas and turning to crowd-sourcing platforms to find the right talent. Companies may also opt to have a common employee pool from other industries, essentially renting employees involved in non-differentiated work when one company has a peak load of resources but others may be slower. OPTIMIZATION, GLOBAL TALENT NETWORKS CAN LESSEN THE PAIN One way to beat talent supply challenges is to reduce demand systematically by optimizing the number of employees required. Agile development practices, common in software engineering, have proven to use 25% less capacity than traditional development practices and offer an opportunity to optimize employee utilization. Globalization also offers a path to a broader talent pool as many new software roles in automotive are conducive to remote work from any part of the world. Setting up talent networks amongst cities with similar cultures and allowing the free exchange of talent, ideas, and capital inside the network and across networks -- think Detroit, Pittsburgh, and Toronto -- are a classical example of a neo mobility talent corridor or network that industry leaders may need to resort to more frequently moving forward. EV/AV SHIFT TO BE TOP 10 EVENT OF 21ST CENTURY When the horse-and-carriage gave way to internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, ICE mobility became one of the most important socioeconomic changes that resulted in the U.S. and North America’s rise to economic prosperity. The new era of EV/AV mobility—and being able to pivot to its unique needs—will be just as transformational. Those companies, regions, and countries that are destined to own that EV/AV future, first must win the competition for talent. Bernie Mongilio is the senior vice president and head of the U.S. Great Lakes business unit at CGI. CGI is one of the largest IT and business consulting services firms in the world.

One way to beat talent supply challenges is to reduce demand systemically by optimizing the number of employees required. Agile development practices, common in software engineering, have proven to use 25% less capacity than traditional development practices and offer an opportunity to optimize employee utilization.”

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8 Trends and Risks

IF WE LOSE… By Robert McMahan, Ph.D.

WHAT MICHIGAN’S ECONOMY MIGHT LOOK LIKE IF WE FAIL TO WIN HIGH-TECH TALENT High-tech mobility is already a $300+ billion – and growing – industry in Michigan. Today, it draws on over a quarter of our private-sector workforce. The shift away from traditional automotive manufacturing is part of an unstoppable and accelerating digitalindustrial revolution that, for Michigan, is both rich in opportunity and fraught with peril. Automobiles have evolved into rolling computers, and many new vehicles sit idle awaiting chips, not pistons. To win, we must truly become a high-tech state.

EDUCATION MUST BE JUST-IN-TIME, PROJECT-SPECIFIC PREPARATION Today’s technology skills are perishable, but the needs of the mobility industry are not. To “secure our spot,” we must become a full participant in today’s much more fluid, vast, and rapidly evolving digital talent ecosystem. To produce irresistible talent, our academic institutions must pivot toward working more directly with industry while providing a lean education focused on just-in-time, project-specific preparation. We must place less emphasis

on degrees and more on competency and establish a wide variety of non-traditional partnerships across institutions. Industry is already engaged. According to findings by Capgemini Research, nearly 70% of manufacturers had smart factory initiatives in place in 2019, up from 43% only two years before. Smart factories, though, are only the tip of the high-tech iceberg; the larger part includes a constellation of technologies related to autonomy, semiconductors, the cloud, connectivity, big data, AI, and advanced


analytics, each of which have spawned a vast array of sub-specialties. Ironically, at the core of our challenge is our prior success: our traditional preeminence in automotive manufacturing and engineering education. The automotive background of our colleges and universities pre-positions us to lead in mobility, but it can also make us dangerously comfortable – and we are often failing to respond with appropriate urgency – or creativity – to the workforce needs of the Industry 4.0 economy. MOBILITY GRADUATES WILL LOOK ELSEWHERE, TAKING 1000S OF GOOD JOBS WITH THEM States like California, North Carolina, Texas, Georgia, and Massachusetts have long been serious high-tech players and are very skilled at attracting, and producing, the best talent. Michigan now competes with these states in developing its high-tech workforce. Gone are the days when all the best engineers aspired to come to Michigan. Technology professionals now have many options outside the state, as do our own graduates.

So, if we do not adapt… if we do not find ways to recruit and produce the nation’s best digital workforce… if we lose the competition for digital talent, we will reduce the Michigan economy to relying on the holdover elements of an industry that is being rapidly replaced. People wanting to work in the exploding mobility industry will gravitate to competing states. With them will go thousands of high-tech jobs, with an average compensation at $65,000 compared to just under $30,000 for all other jobs. And with them will also go a powerful engine of future economic growth and prosperity for our state. Michigan is poised to compete and win. We would, however, do well to heed the words of the Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland. “My dear,” she said to Alice, “here we must run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that.” Robert McMahan, Ph.D. is president and professor of physics of Kettering University, and a MICHauto board member. He is also a former entrepreneur and venture capitalist with expertise in innovationbased economic development.

Trends and Risks 9

ROBERT MCMAHAN, PH.D. PRESIDENT AND PROFESSOR, PHYSICS, KETTERING UNIVERSITY; BOARD MEMBER, MICHAUTO

Dedicated to being a leading global manufacturer of EV Charging products.

Ensuring EV for Everyone. WWW.DUNAMISCHARGE.COM @DUNAMISCHARGE


10 Trends and Risks

A RADICAL

TRANSFORMATION AS CARS BECOME COMPUTERS ON WHEELS, NEW SKILLS NEEDED ACROSS INDUSTRY By Paul A. Eisenstein The Diego Rivera Murals at the Detroit Institute of Arts capture a time when it didn’t take much to work in the auto industry. But these days, it requires a lot more than just brawn, even down on the line, where assembly workers increasingly must learn about things like statistical process control. The auto industry is in the midst of its most radical transformation in more than a century. Whether you’re designing and engineering a vehicle, manufacturing it or marketing and selling it, there’s a good chance you’ll need to learn new skills going forward as automakers migrate from internal combustion to battery-electric propulsion, develop cars connected to the cloud, and shift to online retailing. Making the transformation work “is all about the talent,” said Ford Chief Executive Officer Jim Farley. And he’s underscored that point since taking the top job with Detroit’s second-largest automaker by reaching outside the industry to fill some critical posts. In March, Ford brought in Jennifer Waldo, a former Apple exec, to run its human resources operations. Six months earlier, it hired Doug Fields, former head of Apple’s secretive car program to run advanced technology and embedded systems operations. General Motors and Stellantis have made similar moves to nab top talent from Silicon Valley and other tech centers – as have suppliers and foreign-owned brands, like Hyundai and Toyota, who have major technical operations in the Detroit area. “The type of skills – and the workers the industry needs – has changed,” said Kristine Coogan, a managing director with consultancy KPMG. “Once, the focus was on mechanical system. But cars are becoming more and more complex. Consider that the Ford F-150 has 150 million lines of (software) code to make it go.” Indeed, today’s typical vehicle is something of a computer on wheels, often with over 100 separate microprocessors onboard.


Trends and Risks 11

The type of skills – and the workers the industry needs – has changed. Once, the focus was on mechanical system. But cars are becoming more and more complex. Consider that the Ford F-150 has 150 million lines of (software) code to make it go.”

KRISTINE COOGAN MANAGING DIRECTOR, KPMG And that requires a very different skill set at every level, industry insiders agree. But the shift is disruptive. Ford in July announced up to 8,000 job cuts as it ramps up its electrified Model e unit, while cutting back Ford Blue, focused on traditional gas and diesel-powered products. The final number could depend on how many of those employees can be retrained, according to Coogan, who added that there will be “a large population of people who need to be reskilled for the jobs of the future.” There’s little doubt a sizable share of this new talent pool will need to come in from outside. So far this year, GM has hired in more than 7,000 new employees, noted Cyril George, the automaker’s chief talent officer.

A sizable share, as many as “70% to 80%,” said George, have been assigned to areas that might not have existed only a decade or two before, such as the carmaker’s battery-electric vehicle program – GM is planning to launch around 30 battery electric vehicles (BEVs) just by 2025, including the new Cadillac Lyriq and recently unveiled Chevrolet Blazer EV. Others will focus on self-driving technologies, infotainment systems and new marketing and distribution technologies such as CarBravo, the carmaker’s online used car website. The transformation of the industry is only accelerating, said David Cole, director-emeritus of the Center for Automotive Research. And when it comes to shifting directions on the talent needed to make the “new” industry work, “This is a big deal, and it’s only going to get bigger.”

Paul A. Eisenstein is publisher and editor-in-chief of automotive news site TheDetroitBureau.com.


12 12 Mobility State of Talent Tech Stars

MOBILITY

By James Martinez

The transition to electric, autonomous, and fully connected vehicles is driving a once-in-acentury transformation of the automotive industry. Designing, developing, and producing history’s most complex consumer products requires world-class talent with rapidly evolving skill sets and unprecedented industry collaboration. Mobility Tech Stars profiles some of Michigan’s premier talent who are creating the cutting-edge technology and vehicles of the new mobility era – and redefining how the world moves.


A RISING STAR IN A NEW FRONTIER MARGARITA MANN HYDROTEC Hydrogen Fuel Cell Business Leader, General Motors The Long Beach-Los Angeles metro area has two of the world’s busiest ports, notorious traffic congestion, and the nation’s “worst smog pollution” per the American Lung Association. It sits at the southern end of California, a state battling worsening heatwaves and wildfires. Long Beach and California are not alone, of course. Cities and states everywhere are grappling with climate change. However, the solution to its problems may sit over 2,000 miles away in Pontiac, Michigan, in a relatively small blue metal box designed by one of Long Beach’s own. That “box,” GM’s HYDROTEC fuel cell power cube, is packed with over 300 precisely crafted hydrogen fuel cells that serve as an emissions-free energy source that can power everything from cars to airplanes to generators for homes. The lead engineer behind HYDROTEC’s power-packed cube is Margarita Mann, who at 37 is a rising star in zero emissions technology with a string of patents and pioneering work on Chevy’s electric vehicle line. At GM’s fuel cell lab engineering center in Pontiac, Mann leads a team of over 100 engineers and is spearheading efforts on its first ever commercial production fuel cell

system – an accomplishment she sees as critical to offering clean-energy solutions to the world, including her hometown. IMPACTING THE COMMUNITY THAT MADE HER Growing up, Mann and her family, including her grandparents, lived in a onebedroom apartment in an underserved immigrant neighborhood bearing the brunt of nearby industrial activity. “Where we lived the air quality was pretty bad and it caused breathing problems and health issues to many of the people that I knew,” said Mann, a point underscored when her grandmother, a non-smoker and avid walker, passed away of lung cancer in 2019. Seeing the impact on her family and neighbors inspired Mann to pursue a

career that would provide solutions to the pollution that tormented her neighbors and loved ones. “Growing up with all of that, I had to do something about it. I knew I wanted to pursue a field where I could make a positive impact to the community that made me,” said Mann. PUTTING NASA’S ‘MAGIC’ IN CARS In college, Mann focused on science and space technology as stories of NASA’s space exploits in the 1960s and a “magical device” captured her attention. “The fuel cell helped the astronauts get to the moon. It powered their command module, it even created the water they drank,” Mann said. “I was so fascinated continued


14 14 Mobility State of Talent Tech Stars that I wondered: ‘Why aren’t we doing this?’” That question sparked her research into hydrogen fuel cells – where she led the way in validating and commissioning the first set of retail hydrogen stations in California. After graduating with degrees in mechanical and material science engineering at UC Davis, Mann was pursuing her master’s degree at UCLA when she learned of GM’s “Project Driveway,” a pilot program using Chevy Equinoxes to test fuel cells. “That role gave me hands on experience. The Chevy Equinox fuel cell was the first car I ever tore apart and put back together,” Mann said. From there she landed her dream job as a fuel cell engineer in 2007, gaining expertise in fuel cells and battery electric

vehicles that is culminating with helping set up GM’s fuel cell business unit, HYDROTEC. CLEAN EV CHARGING AND A NEW FRONTIER GM’s HYDROTEC technology is an alternative power source that runs hydrogen through a stack of fuel cells creating an electric current that powers an electric motor. It is lighter than EV battery packs, runs relatively quietly, and produces clean water as its only byproduct. HYDROTEC has wide applications beyond traditional vehicles, including commercial trucks, locomotives, and aircraft. For instance, commercial truck manufacturer Navistar uses HYDROTEC fuel cell power cubes as part of a zeroemissions alternative to diesel engines.

The power cubes also offer clean, mobile power generation with a broad set of applications including charging EVs or powering homes during outages. “We can put it in so many other spaces other than just vehicles,” Mann said. “It's a new frontier for us. We're a car company, but now it's all these other spaces, too. It really touches people's lives.” Perhaps most importantly, it could hold the key to helping create a clean-energy future. “We're all affected by climate change in one way or another, whether it's rising sea levels or extreme weather or, in my case, air pollution,” said Mann. “These are all things we worry about, but they are also opportunities to solve.”

THE JOB: Plays a key role in developing the on-board diagnostics needed to enhance performance and safety of the electric motor components BorgWarner sells to OEMs. Vilson, 31, essentially creates algorithms and helps provide the tools to measure critical aspects of EV performance such as thermal management, powertrain efficiency, and detecting circuit faults in the system. This data is provided to the R & D team to inform product development, or as she puts it, her work helps identify “the next advancement or improvement we can make to the system itself.” THE INDUSTRY JOURNEY:

ATHIRA VILSON Power Electronics Engineer, BorgWarner

EVs popped onto Vilson’s radar as she worked on her master’s degree in electrical engineering at Lamar University in Texas after completing her undergraduate work in India. Intrigued by the advanced technology in vehicles, Vilson, a lifelong learner in the U.S. with a H-1B visa, eventually came to Michigan and secured contract work with Ford Motor Company. Working on emission testing for hybrid vehicles, she gained experience in both gas and electric vehicle technology. Joining BorgWarner in 2019, Vilson dove deeper into diagnostics and assessing the performance of inverters. PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS: 800V SiC INVERTER Relatively small, inverters have an outsized impact on EV driving range and performance. Much how fuel injectors ensure the proper fuel and oxygen mix for internal combustion engines, inverters convert the direct current from an EV’s battery to the alternative current needed to drive the motor. BorgWarner’s 800V silicon carbide (SiC) inverter allows for higher voltage usage and includes a proprietary power switch that ensures more powerful propulsion systems that enhance driving performance, longer battery ranges, and faster charging times. It is currently being used by two global OEMs for numerous future EVs.


BETH LOOMIS

Mobility State ofTech Talent Stars 15

Executive Program Manager, Toyota North America

DARREN PALMER Vice President, Electric Vehicle Programs, Ford Model e

THE JOB:

THE JOB: Loomis, 48, spearheads Toyota’s North American mobility R & D efforts and oversees the vehicle development program as the company develops next-generation mobility solutions and services. Based out of Saline, she works as a part of an eightperson Mobility as a Service (MaaS) team that brings together engineering and business as part of “Toyota’s approach to making sure we have the right kind of transportation at the right time in the right method.” THE INDUSTRY JOURNEY: A couple of years into teaching high school social studies and social sciences, Loomis “pretty much decided that that was not going to be the career I retired from.” So, the Eastern Michigan University grad began a job search that led her to the Toyota R & D center in Saline near Ann Arbor. What started as contract work in 1998 evolved into a full-time position in the product development office and 18 years working on the Sienna minivan before taking over management of mobility R&D in 2018. PRODUCT HIGHLIGHT: SIENNA AUTONO-MAAS VEHICLE PLATFORM The Toyota Sienna Autono-MaaS is the base vehicle to help startup companies develop and test autonomous vehicle systems and is built from the ground up ready to be controlled by a computer. The Michigan-based vehicle production team strips down the Indiana-produced 2022 Sienna minivans and rebuilds them with a control interface to create a new vehicle platform that communicates with third-party autonomous vehicle driving kits that integrate unique hardware and software into Autono-MaaS. Toyota currently collaborates with Aurora Innovation and May Mobility on autonomous mobility services with the goals of increasing safety by removing human error, eliminating the need for drivers, and closing transportation gaps.

Leads product development for Ford Model e – the recently formed division of Ford Motor Company focused on creating cutting-edge electric vehicles (EVs). Palmer, 49, works with a global team stacked with talent and now includes hardware and software engineers formerly employed by the likes of Apple, Amazon, and Disney as well as current employees of startups in Israel. It’s the combination of experience in his teams now that motivates him. THE INDUSTRY JOURNEY: Palmer’s affinity for electronic gadgets started as a child in England in the 80s and came in part due to his father, who once served as a radar operator in the British Royal Navy in World War II. In college, Palmer earned an electrical, electronics, and technology degree and focused on cars over planes and trains because “they were accessible to more people.” Starting his career in Ford in 1995, he held various international positions in global product development playing an influential role in the Ford Explorer, Puma, Mustang, Fiesta, and Focus. About five years ago, Ford brought Palmer to the U.S. to work in Michigan to develop the next-generation Mustang. Following the move, he became part of the founding group behind Team Edison, the internal startup company that served as a precursor to Ford Model e, originally based in The Factory in Corktown. PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS: MUSTANG MACH-E, FORD E-TRANSIT, F-150 LIGHTNING With the last three vehicles developed under Palmer – the Mustang Mach-E, Ford E-Transit, and F-150 Lightning all thriving – Ford says it is now the second-best EV selling brand in the U.S. behind Tesla. “Every car we’re developing now is completely gamechanging,” said Palmer. The innovations that stand out most to him are the “technology that brings people together” through communications. An example, on a recent 110-degree day in Florida, Palmer converted the cab of his Ford Lightning into an air-conditioned office, hooking his laptop to the console and knocking out conference calls.


16 16 State of Talent

MUJEEB IJAZ Founder and CEO, Our Next Energy

VINCE GALANTE Global Head of User Experience Design, Stellantis

THE JOB:

THE JOB:

Leads Novi-based battery technology startup Our Next Energy (ONE), which specializes in energy storage solutions and has grown to nearly 150 employees in just over two years. Ijaz, 55, started the company around the goals of doubling the range of EVs, using safer and more sustainable raw materials, and establishing a local supply chain. Ijaz’s team is working to address perceived shortcomings in battery chemistry technology “that would impede the electrification transition from being successful,” such as the potential to lose 50% of range at higher speeds and in winter conditions.

Overseeing a global design team spread across seven countries, Galante, 40, is a traditionally trained exterior designer who shapes the user experience (UX) across Stellantis’ 14 brands. Over the past five years, his team has exploded from eight interior and exterior designers to more than 100 talented designers from numerous industries with a multitude of backgrounds to provide the next-generation experience consumers expect from connected, electric, and autonomous vehicles.

THE INDUSTRY JOURNEY: As a mechanical engineering student at Virginia Tech, Ijaz participated in the 1990 GM Sunrayce USA, a competition for college students to build and race solar-powered vehicles. The experience sparked his interest in an automotive career and led him to electric vehicles as “a better way to move around.” Working on electric battery and fuel cell technology at Ford for more than 15 years, he led the team that developed its first zero-emission hybrid plug-in vehicle. Ijaz eventually left Ford to help A123 Systems launch its automotive batteries and also worked on energy storage at Apple in California, before returning to Michigan in 2020 to launch ONE. PRODUCT HIGHLIGHT: GEMINI BATTERY ONE’s Gemini battery offers 600 plus mile range per charge by deploying dual chemistry technology incorporated in an experimental BMW iX. Gemini uses two types of batteries, one focused on power delivery and one for energy storage, because according to Ijaz, the battery nickel-cobalt based chemistry that “started to become the norm was having more evidence of vehicle recalls due to fires” due to the failure of the lithium ion cells. Gemini is designed to increase range while reducing the need for expensive and hard-to-get raw minerals such as nickel and cobalt while also reducing the need for graphite and lithium.

“We need motion and visual effects, sound designers, typographers, and interactive design, it’s like I have to hire the whole art school because I need someone from every department,” said Galante, noting he’s hired designers from the likes of Disney and Microsoft. THE INDUSTRY JOURNEY: Growing up in Illinois, Galante couldn’t draw, paint, or sculpt enough to satisfy his passion for art. He also enjoyed comic books and video games, dreaming of designing his own characters and worlds. Late in high school he discovered industrial design’s application to another passion – cars. He eventually found his way to the College for Creative Studies in Detroit and instructor and renowned auto designer and executive Ralph Gilles who now serves as Galante’s boss at Stellantis. “I just loved art, and I loved cars, and one day, I found out I could do both – and make a job of it.” PRODUCT HIGHLIGHT: NEW GRAND WAGONEER Stellantis’ “fullest expression of modern UX on the road,” according to Galante, the Wagoneer offers over 75 inches of display area and state-of-the-art technology to better connect passengers to their SUV. It provides a customized experience for every passenger in the vehicle from easy-to-read displays for drivers to screens for passengers to stream their own entertainment.


Mobility State of Tech Talent Stars 17

NATALIE KING Founder and CEO, Dunamis Clean Energy Partners

THE JOB: Leads the first Black-woman owned electric vehicle (EV) charger manufacturing company that builds charging units designed to serve residential, business, and commercial fleet consumers. King, 48, founded Dunamis in 2012 as a technology, manufacturing firm focused on energy efficiency and environmental service solutions. It is now set to open a manufacturing facility in Detroit later this fall as it expands into the EV space. The plant is expected to hire 30 assembly workers and technicians, with hopes of quadrupling that number by 2025. THE INDUSTRY JOURNEY: Returning home from a church service in 2018, King lay down for a nap. She awoke with a directive: “You’re going to do electric vehicle charging, and you’re going to manufacture in Detroit.” A few days later she sat down with her lead engineer sketching out a plan that integrated her knowledge of energy efficiency solutions and LED lighting into manufacturing EV charging stations.

The move to automotive further taps into King’s lifelong passion for clean energy dating back to law school clerkships at the EPA and later work representing a solar energy firm as a corporate attorney. It also positions King and Dunamis to help ensure that an industry primed to “create billions and billions of dollars in wealth transfer” brings more minority entrepreneurs into the field with the goal of building a more equitable economy. PRODUCT HIGHLIGHT: SMART LEVEL II CHARGING STATIONS Dunamis is set to produce level II chargers that include 24/7 driver support, cloudbased software with easy-to-use features, and maintenance. Real-time system monitoring and control, redundant connectivity and communications, along with integrated management software mitigates the primary causes of most system failures and provides immediate notification of problem details to the owner, operator, and/or maintenance technician. Tested vigorously, the chargers will offer 99% reliability and the charging speed needed to usher in wider spread EV adoption, according to King.

24/7 DRIVER SUPPORT CLOUD-BASED SOFTWARE 99% RELIABILITY


18 State of Talent

MICHIGAN'S AUTOMOTIVE The assets and resources of the automobility ecosystem in Michigan are unparalleled. Michigan’s highly skilled workforce, cutting-edge research, and development facilities and top-notch institutions of higher education is the reason it is still the innovation hub of the automotive industry. The challenge of course will be keeping it.

MICHIGAN'S AUTOMOTIVE WORKFORCE & ASSETS

60.1%

MICHIGAN'S Working Age Population

Labor Force Participation Rate

6.4M

RANKED #39 IN THE NATION

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Mobility industry's annual contribution to Michigan's economy

#1

285,300+

Michigan's rank in business funded automotive R&D Source: National Science Foundation

Source: MICHauto

1,19 0

6X 11X

THE NATIONAL AVERAGE

THE NATIONAL AVERAGE

MICHIGAN RANKS #3 NUMBER OF ENGINEERS I N T H E N AT I O N

105,200

ENGINEERS IN THE WORKFORCE Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

MICHIGAN'S TOP IN DEMAND TECH JOBS JOB POSTINGS

MODEL MAKERS METAL & PLASTIC

25, 6 4 0

I N D U ST R I A L ENGINEERS

32 , 52 0

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS

IN THE NUMBER AND CO N C E N T R AT I O N OF

4X

Source: MICHauto

22 SMART ZONES throughout the state growing technology based businesses and jobs Source: MEDC

MICHIGAN RANKS #1

THE NATIONAL AVERAGE

Automotive or mobility jobs representing 20% of Michigan's employment

RANKED #15 IN THE NATION Source: Lightcast

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

$304B

1.1M

Tech Related Jobs

Software Engineers

3,380

System Engineers

1,515

Controls Engineers

1,335

Software Developers

1,311

Data Analysts

1,161

Java Developers

998 Source: Lightcast Note: Job postings July 2021-June 2022

15,500 AV E R AG E T E C H J O B P O ST INGS PER MONTH Source: Lightcast

MICHIGAN TOP IN DEMAND SKILLS TECH INDUSTRY

Science •Computer Methodology •Agile •SQL •Software Development AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

Science •Computer Product Development •New Marketing •Electrical Engineering • Source: Lightcast



20 State of Talent

BATTLING IT OUT AUTOMAKERS JOCKEY FOR A NEW GENERATION OF TALENT

By Paul A. Eisenstein A decade ago, when General Motors went looking for eager young talent, it knew where to turn. Schools like Kettering University, up in Flint, the University of Michigan and Indiana’s Purdue University, could be counted on to turn out a steady stream of graduates skilled in mechanical engineering. But these days, cars are more like computers on wheels, filled with microprocessors and requiring millions of lines of code. And that transformation is accelerating as the industry migrates to battery-electric vehicles filled with high-tech features like GM’s hands-free Super Cruise system. So, when the automaker needed to fill 7,000 jobs earlier this year, it spread its net significantly further than ever, according to Chief Talent Officer Cyril George. “We’ve become university agnostic. In the latest batch, we hired from 500 universities,” George said in a telephone interview. And, looking forward, he added, “We have to change the way we go after talent.”

While there’ll remain a need for mechanical engineers, said David Cole, directoremeritus of the Center for Automotive Research, the industry is ramping down development of internal combustion technology and shifting to battery-electric propulsion. And there’s a fast-growing need for those who can develop infotainment and autonomous vehicle technologies and write the underlying code. But the auto industry isn’t alone. That’s the same sort of talent Apple, Google and other companies in Silicon Valley, Austin and other high-tech centers have long chased. “They’re known as software companies and have more visibility in the sector,” said Kristine Coogan, managing director at consultancy KPMG. And those tech firms have had a sexier image than old line automotive manufacturers, which has often made it difficult to recruit top talent, she added.

SOFTWARE TALENT IS ONE OF THE MOST VOCAL IN WANTING TO

WORK REMOTE. GIVING WORKERS THE

FLEXIBILITY HAS HELPED WITH AUTOMOTIVE RECRUITMENT EFFORTS.


State of Talent “It’s a fairly large challenge,” according to Coogan, and one requiring the auto industry to “use unconventional ways to find talent.” Automakers say they have no choice but to take that challenge. And the recent number of new hires suggests they’re having some success. It has helped for manufacturers to bring in big names with big reputations and plenty of connections, such as Doug Fields. Until recently the head of the Apple car program, he was poached last September and will now be running Ford’s advanced technology efforts. Several insiders, speaking on background, say Fields has been able to recruit some of his former team members and reach out to some of the schools and other sources that he had turned to while at Apple. “It’s a war for talent,” said GM talent chief George, and it has required the automaker “to change the fundamental way we go after talent.”

That not only requires expanding the number of schools the carmaker targets, but opening up to potential recruits who might not have a degree but can demonstrate significant experience in areas of demand. Coogan calls that “skillbased, rather than requirement-based hiring.” Automakers are learning that good high-tech workers can be “the most expensive talent” they hire, according to Ford chief executive officer Jim Farley. But industry recruiters also have recognized that they have to consider what George calls “the employee value proposition.” That includes not only pay and benefits but promotional opportunities. Talent teams are finding strong interest among younger applicants in the potential to be involved in creating breakthrough products, and having a positive impact on society. The COVID pandemic has shaken the job market up, millions of workers taking part in what has been described as “the Great Resignation.” Perhaps surprisingly,

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21

the pandemic has also had at least one positive impact on the auto industry recruitment push, according to Coogan. “Software talent was one of the most vocal in wanting to work remote,” she noted, and by giving workers that flexibility – even as some Silicon Valley giants begin requiring workers return to their cubicles -- that has helped with automotive recruitment efforts. Automakers are becoming ever more creative. GM has developed software that analyzes an applicant’s records, often spotting potential jobs that the recruit hasn’t applied for. But the talent war is only likely to intensify, experts agree, as the auto industry continues accelerating its hightech push.

Paul A. Eisenstein is publisher and editor-in-chief of automotive news site TheDetroitBureau.com.


22 Action

HIGH-STAKES COMPETITION INNOVATION DISTRICTS RACING TO BECOME TECH HUB, TALENT MAGNETS By John Gallagher

Detroit-based automakers face many challenges, from supply chain delays to brisk competition from afar. But perhaps the biggest challenge is finding enough tech-savvy workers for today’s and tomorrow’s needs. At the General Motors Tech Center in Warren alone, the talent website Indeed. com in mid-July listed hundreds of job openings, and that’s common throughout the domestic auto industry in Detroit, said Glenn Stevens Jr., executive director of the Detroit Regional Chamber’s MICHauto program, the state’s only automotive and mobility cluster association.

When you look at a lot of rankings and a lot of profiles we are not viewed as a growing tech hub in North America. We’re not at the forefront where we believe we can be and should be. We have a lot of work to do.”

GLENN STEVENS JR. VICE PRESIDENT, AUTOMOTIVE AND MOBILITY INITIATIVES, DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER; EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MICHAUTO


MICHIGAN'S “This is our number-one priority,” Stevens said. “When you look at a lot of rankings and a lot of profiles we are not viewed as a growing tech hub in North America. We’re not at the forefront where we believe we can be and should be. We have a lot of work to do.” INSTITUTIONAL FIREPOWER, MISSING INVESTMENT It’s not that the Detroit region and Michigan lack the institutions to produce talented hightech workers. With training and operational centers like TechTown in Detroit, Ann Arbor SPARK in Ann Arbor, Kettering University in Flint, and the GM Tech Center in Warren, the infrastructure for training and employing tech talent is in place. But a couple of things are missing, and they are related. First, the Detroit region, and Michigan more broadly, lacks the cachet of a Seattle or Boston as a magnet for talented and educated tech workers. Among the missing pieces: Good public transit as found in Boston and Chicago, and enough walkable urban districts like those slowly developing in Midtown and Corktown neighborhoods in Detroit. Those deficits are partly the result of a failure in public policy, said Ned Staebler, vice president for economic development at Wayne State University. State revenue sharing dollars to Michigan cities have dropped dramatically over the years, leading to fewer parks, libraries, and other public amenities in Michigan cities. The state’s investment in venture capital for startups, once robust, is less now than before. “We don’t invest in innovation like we used to,” Staebler said. MORE ON THE WAY The good news is that Detroit is adding to its tech-talent resources with major projects. Ford’s huge investment in turning the old Michigan Central Station into its hub of mobility research is nearing completion, along with related investments in the surrounding Corktown area. TechTown itself, now nearly 20 years old, continues to expand and works with more than 1,000 startup firms. And the University of Michigan’s planned Center for Innovation in the Ilitch family’s

District Detroit will bring hundreds of advanced tech students and researchers into the heart of the city when completed in a few years. "By bringing together top researchers and students, along with early-stage startups and established tech companies like ServiceNow, the Detroit Center for Innovation will support the development of home-grown talent while attracting resources and investment from around the country," said Andrew Cantor, executive vice president of development of related companies and president of Related Michigan.

TALENT AND EDUCATION PIPELINE The automotive and mobility industry depends on top graduates to power Michigan’s workforce. This highly skilled talent pipeline is propelling the industry forward into the next generation.

K-12

NO TIME TO WASTE Staebler agreed on the importance of those new settings but points out that, in many ways, other regions have gotten the jump on Detroit. Pittsburgh created its technology council back in the ’90s. The OhioX program, a nonprofit entity that rallies companies, universities, and others involved in the talent creation pipeline to keep Ohio moving forward, is already well underway. Referring to the UM Center and Ford’s train station project, Staebler said, “All those are good things, and we need more of them, but it’s to make up for the fact that at a high level we’re far behind.” Stevens echoed that concern.

#1

in the nation for robotics competition teams Source: Michigan FIRST®

24,500 Michigan students participating across all programs

Source: Michigan FIRST®

“We’re not retaining enough of the tech talent and we’re not creating enough of the right tech talent,” he said. “The companies themselves are looking at their workforces and saying, ‘We don’t have enough software engineering fire power, we don’t have enough electrification propulsion system firepower.’’

36%

With every job classification in virtually every industry, not just automotive, requiring more digital skills than ever, the job of attracting, creating, and retaining tech talent must become a priority.

POSTSECONDARY 30%

“There’s a lot of energy going into this,” Stevens said. “But there has to be a great deal more to position Michigan as one of those leaders where people say, ‘That’s a tech hub.'" John Gallagher is a freelance writer and author in Detroit, and formerly of the Detroit Free Press.

OF MICHIGAN'S 8TH GRADERS

ARE PROFICIENT OR ADVANCED IN MATH Source: CEPI

OF MICHIGAN'S POPULATION 25 AND OLDER HOLDS A BACHELOR'S DEGREE OR HIGHER Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2020 5-Year Estimates

111,840+ DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED AT MICHIGAN'S INSTITUTIONS IN 2020-21 Source: CEPI


The Chamber's new website makes it easier to locate the latest news related to economic indicators, talent, advocacy, business data and research, and so much more. Enjoy the new 360-degree-view of the Southeast Michigan region.


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26 Action

A NEW TALENT SOLUTIONS STRATEGY

KERRY EBERSOLE SINGH L E A D I N G M E D C ' S H I G H -WAG E S K I L L S S T R AT E GY their needs from Day 1. We’re continuing to invest in programs and customized solutions that upskill our workforce, including programs like Michigan Reconnect and Going Pro, which are funded in the bipartisan state budget Governor Whitmer signed for fiscal year 2023. WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FACING MICHIGAN IN TERMS OF TALENT?

Every state faces a universal challenge of how to attract, keep and grow their workforce to meet employer needs. Here in Michigan, we’re taking bold steps to attract and retain talent while upskilling our workforce to remain competitive, ultimately working to reach the Governor’s statewide goal of 60% of our workforce having a postsecondary degree or credential by 2030. HOW DO WE “FUTURE-PROOF” OUR WORKFORCE TO ENSURE IT HAS THE SKILLS FOR THE JOBS OF TOMORROW?

The competition for high-tech talent is causing states to shift their economic development strategies. In November, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) announced a new position and hire – Kerry Ebersole Singh as chief talent solutions and engagement officer. Her focus is on developing high-wage skills growth by working with businesses, higher education institutions and communities to attract, retain and cultivate talent critical to growing its economy. The Detroiter recently connected with her on all things talent – including the state’s Talent Action Team.

We need to embrace a culture of lifelong learning while also investing in programs and partnerships that equip our workforce with the skills they need to remain competitive and meet employer needs. That’s why at MEDC, we’re engaged with education partners at all levels to facilitate public/private partnerships with employers that will help our workforce begin preparing today for the jobs of tomorrow.

WHAT’S YOUR VISION FOR MICHIGAN’S TALENT 10 YEARS FROM NOW?

WHICH OF THE STATE’S TALENT INITIATIVES ARE YOU MOST EXCITED ABOUT?

Through my work at MEDC, I’m laser-focused on cultivating a culture of lifelong learning throughout the state so that as industry evolves, our workforce is primed to adapt along with it. To make this a reality, we’re strengthening the collaboration between industry and academia by working with educators to create flexible training courses that meet industry needs while supporting employers in offering mentorship and experiential programs for future talent.

Building on our commitment to providing concierge-level support to businesses looking to grow and expand, the MEDC convened a Talent Action Team to launch the first focused effort on supporting the talent transition in the EV and mobility sectors. The team’s goal is to train thousands of workers in the first year by delivering professional development programs that engage workers in improving their skills and competencies in line with in-demand roles.

GIVEN THE SPEED OF INNOVATION, WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO DIFFERENTLY TO ENSURE OUR WORKFORCE KEEPS PACE AND CAN MEET EMPLOYER NEEDS?

This new model of workforce development aims to reshape a once-fragmented and dispersed landscape of resources and programs into a hub of innovation and collaboration, all centered on the people that have made Michigan a powerhouse of the auto industry for over a century.

We know talent is the top priority for CEOs deciding where to locate and grow, and in Michigan we have the resources to address


ENERGIZING MICHIGAN’S FUTURE

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2022 DETROIT AUTO SHOW This month – from Sept. 14 -25 – media, industry and visitors will experience a citywide auto show like never before – one that takes them on a mobility journey inside Huntington Place, outside into Hart Plaza, and even into the skies.

look for free programming and entertainment at various downtown parks throughout the show.

This year’s North American International Auto Show (aka Detroit Auto Show) is a celebration of mobility on land, water and in the skies, leaving no opportunity unexplored to showcase that Detroit and Michigan are at the epicenter of the mobility transformation. There will be plenty of “wow” moments on display this fall, including a transformed indoor and outdoor auto show campus, brand-defining vehicles, product ride-and-drives, dynamic experiential activations and air mobility demonstrations, all presented with the city of Detroit as a backdrop. This year’s show plays an especially important role in promoting emerging technologies and educating audiences particularly in the EV space. While the entire 12-day show offers a peek behind the curtain of these next-generation technologies, Industry Tech Days (Sept. 14-15) offer an immersive deep dive into the new mobility ecosystem.

ROD ALBERTS

Also look for the return of the Black-Tie Charity Preview on Sept. 16, an event that has raised more than $100 million for children’s charities in southeastern Michigan over the past 25 years. Charity Preview will be a celebration with new outdoor activations and entertainment in Hart Plaza, in addition to inside Huntington Place. This important night of giving sets the stage for the Public Show that brings thousands of visitors downtown and generates significant economic impact. In fact, the auto show has long been recognized as one of Michigan’s leading industry and consumer events, providing $430 million+ in annual economic impact to the southeast Michigan region. This year’s show will help provide a much-needed boost to Michigan businesses after an unprecedented time.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DETROIT AUTO DEALERS ASSOCIATION & DETROIT AUTO SHOW

Industry Tech Days attendees will get an inside look at future mobility platforms at the show’s AutoMobili-D (AMD) technology showcase. Presented by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation, AMD features 43+ global tech companies, 80+ startups and 17 powerful Executive Briefings on mobility and electrification trends. Now in its fourth year at the auto show, AMD is an excellent catalyst for attracting and retaining talent as well as new technology companies and creative startups. The show’s laser focus on technology is complemented by its energized emphasis on community. With this community-centric focus in mind,

We have a full slate of activities in store for the auto show. Whether that’s families coming to find their new set of wheels, media looking for industryshaping news or future mobility innovators exploring the show as a hands-on classroom, the 2022 Detroit Auto Show will be a “destination.” A destination for family adventure with new themed attractions, and a destination for showcasing cutting-edge automotive technologies and advances in vehicle electrification. But, perhaps, most importantly, a destination that cements the long and rich automotive legacy that has become synonymous with our great city of Detroit and our great state of Michigan. Rod Alberts is executive director of the Detroit Auto Dealers Association and the Detroit Auto Show.


PROUD TO INVEST IN MICHIGAN Located in downtown Detroit, MGM Grand Detroit is the only hotel in the city to receive Four Stars from the Forbes Travel Guide and AAA’s coveted Four Diamond award.

A STRONG & DIVERSE WORKFORCE

80%

Employees represented by unions

53%

2,184

72%

Minority employees

EMPLOYEES

Female employees

64%

Minorities in leadership roles

45%

49%

Women in leadership roles

Employees who are Detroit residents

INVESTING IN OUR COMMUNITY Since opening in 1999, MGM Grand Detroit has contributed more than $2.9 billion to the State of Michigan and City of Detroit through gaming, municipal and state taxes. Through the MGM Resorts Foundation, employees have donated over $3.9 million. MGM Grand Detroit has partnered with local organizations to invest in our community, and our employees volunteer thousands of hours annually supporting Detroit Public Schools, Michigan Veterans Foundation, Volunteers of America, Life Remodeled, St. Patrick Senior Center, Franklin Wright Settlement, and Covenant House Michigan.

47%

Spend with Diversity and Detroit-based companies

$36.4

Invested in local Detroit businesses in 2021

MILLION

$139

Tax contributions to Detroit in 2021

$133

Tax contributions to Michigan in 2021

MILLION

MILLION

$42

MILLION

Diversity spend in 2021

GameSense is a player-focused program that encourages players to gamble responsibly. It’s designed to educate people and help players make informed and responsible decisions. ©2022


30 Action


Action 31

NO SILVER BULLET 8 STEPS TO SECURING MICHIGAN'S HIGH-TECH TALENT

With Michigan’s manufacturing workforce aging, the state lagging behind competitors in population growth and educational attainment, the state could face a talent crisis in the decades ahead as competition increases for its signature automotive industry. There is no silver bullet to ensure the Detroit region secures the high-tech talent it needs to drive future innovation and maintain its automotive leadership. It’s going to take a multi-faceted approach across the public and private sectors with academia and business working together in new ways. The Detroiter and MICHauto asked thought-leaders working in education or talent related fields to opine on the key steps Michigan needs to take to secure its innovative future and businesses need to address their talent issues.


STEP 1 FIX OUR LEAKY TALENT PIPELINE

GREG HANDEL VICE PRESIDENT, EDUCATION AND TALENT, DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER

Too many students leave our educational system before earning a postsecondary credential, a pre-pandemic trend that’s only getting worse. That’s why achieving the Chamber’s regional goal of 60% postsecondary educational attainment by 2030 is so critical. As the demands of the workforce continue to evolve and new high-tech career paths unfold, a focus on credentials of value is underway to help elevate the region’s labor market opportunities. However, more partnerships between industry and education are needed to identify future credential needs and we must replicate national best-practices to improve graduation rates, particularly for underserved student populations, as we work together to patch our leaky talent pipeline.

STEP 2 INVEST IN SCHOOLS TO HELP STUDENTS PURSUE HIGH-TECH TALENT Roles traditionally known for supporting students with career guidance, such as school counselor, are at a critical state. The American School Counselor Association recommends a student to school counselor ratio of 250:1. Nationally, the ratio is 415:1, and in Michigan, 638:1. The answer to improve support to students with career planning -- hire more counselors and engage all education professionals in career guidance.

JACINDA SUMARA DIRECTOR, CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION AND EARLY COLLEGE WAYNE-WESTLAND COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

In response, school districts are designing new models to make students career ready. Career Focused Advisory Committees are reimagining a more holistic approach to educating students about their choices for the future. Membership consists of school administrators, teachers, counselors, support staff, parents, students, and industry professionals. Business should reach out to a local school district to learn how to get involved in the school-to-work redesign and help guide students toward high-tech careers.

STEP 3 SUPPORT CHILDCARE AS CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE FOR MICHIGAN WORKFORCE

DEEANA AHMED VICE PRESIDENT, STRATEGY AND GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS, OUR NEXT ENERGY

Michigan’s workforce is in a unique position to be at the forefront of the climate tech revolution as the U.S. onshores EV manufacturing. Women are incredibly valuable to growing this industry, but since 2020, over 130,000 across the state have left the workforce due to childcare. On average, childcare is over $10,000 per child per year in metro Detroit, a barrier that keeps many women at home. For Michigan to lead in the green industrial revolution, we need to offer wraparound services as employers, in partnership with the state, to drive equitable workforce development, starting with childcare.

STEP 4 BUILD A BEST-IN-CLASS DIGITAL INFRASTRUCTURE

MELISSA WOO EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATION AND CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER, MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

The pandemic demonstrated how critical digital infrastructure is to our society. Projects such as MOON-Light, a partnership between MSU and Merit Network Inc., will help address critical infrastructure gaps in Michigan by enabling technologically advanced, middle-mile fiber optic infrastructure across the state. It will help interconnecting local Internet service providers (ISPs) to bring affordable, robust, high-speed broadband Internet to homes and businesses in Michigan’s underserved/unserved population areas. MOON-Light showcases the strength of public-private partnerships and its ability to overcome obstacles that hinder a sole entity's ability to decrease the digital divide. Investments and partnerships of this nature are a major step toward eliminating discrepancies in broadband access across the entire state and have the potential to make Michigan a better connected state.


STEP 5 CLOSE THE STEM GAP WITH INTERNATIONAL TALENT While Michigan’s auto industry undergoes a revolutionary transformation due to autonomous and electric vehicles, its shortage of skilled STEM talent remains unprecedented. Michigan has a higher percentage of job openings (7.2% of total workforce) than the national average (6.6%). Although many STEM graduates leave Michigan for the coasts, organizations like Global Detroit have succeeded in attracting STEM students to pursue optional practical training (OPT) with potential employers. Businesses can also take advantage of other strategies (H-1B, TNs, or O-1 visas) to attract and retain valuable STEM students. Companies interested in exploring options for obtaining international talent should contact our office.

RAMI D. FAKHOURY MANAGING DIRECTOR, FAKHOURY GLOBAL IMMIGRATION

STEP 6 INCREASE DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION ACROSS AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY Employers benefit from recognizing that incredible talent can arrive at your door by many paths, and we empower a diverse workforce when we identify success stories that haven’t followed the expected route. We often attract applications from people without traditional industry experience, but whose previous successes, earned skills and experience prove to be an asset to our bottom line. When we explore ‘beyond the resume,’ we remove institutional barriers and make investments in diversity, creating value at every level. With that mutual commitment to self-improvement, you provide a path to a better career, and you earn the loyalty of people with the drive to succeed.

LISA LUNSFORD CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, GLOBAL STRATEGIC SUPPLY SOLUTIONS; CHAIR, MICHAUTO BOARD OF DIRECTORS

STEP 7 PROMOTE DETROIT LIFESTYLES DIRECTLY TO YOUNG TALENT Thirty-six percent of college students leave the Detroit region within a year of graduating. Unlike previous generations that moved for their jobs, the new workforce is choosing jobs where their lifestyle needs are also met. With the region’s reasonable cost of living, opportunities for outdoor recreation and travel, and diverse culture, it’s the ideal location for young talent. To attract talent for the growing high-tech industry, we need to promote the lifestyle the Detroit region has to offer, showcasing what living, working, and playing here looks like – especially compared to other regions – and connect them with opportunities to grow their life here.

JENNY ORLETSKI-DEHNE MANAGER, LET’S DETROIT, DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER

STEP 8 AGGRESSIVELY UPSKILL OUR WORKFORCE K-12 students are a shrinking demographic that won’t provide enough skilled talent to meet all future employer needs, requiring us to look elsewhere. There are nearly 700,000 adults in the Detroit region with some postsecondary experience but no credential, and most of these adults are working at Detroit companies. Providing upskilling and continued education to incumbent workers builds a diverse talent pipeline from within, improving economic conditions for employees while reducing business costs related to turnover and recruiting. Employers can offer tuition assistance paired with flexible scheduling so workers can take classes, provide workbased learning experiences, and create education-friendly policies that incentivize and reward continued education.

CHRISTI TAYLOR SENIOR DIRECTOR, TALENT INITIATIVES, DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER


34 Action

HELPING MICHIGAN STAY AHEAD OF THE CURVE

MICHauto's Automobility Day at the Capitol

By Paul Vachon

By Paul Vachon

MICHauto on the Island panel discussion

The ancient Greek philosopher Heraclitus famously wrote “All is Flux”—meaning that continuous change is a universal constant. He could well have been writing about the automotive industry, particularly the movement toward electric vehicles (EVs) and other emerging forms of mobility. The Detroit Regional Chamber responded to this trend in 2010 when it took leadership of MICHauto, the state’s only automotive “cluster association,” which promotes, grows, and retains the industry through education, mentorship, and advocacy. Since then, the program has emerged as a prominent voice for the entire industry and has grown to over 70 investors, which includes some of the biggest automotive and business brands in the world. SECURING NEXT-GENERATION TALENT Discover Auto is MICHauto’s “hands on” outreach to high school and middle school students interested in the industry.

GLENN STEVENS JR. VICE PRESIDENT, AUTOMOTIVE AND MOBILITY INITIATIVES, DETROIT REGIONAL CHAMBER; EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, MICHAUTO

“We connect and bring the students into R & D and technical centers, headquarters, and the manufacturing facilities to show them the exciting careers available,” said Glenn Stevens Jr., executive director of MICHauto and vice president of automotive and mobility initiatives at the Chamber. The experience is immersive. Students are given an overview of what the host company does, and are then introduced to a cross section of employees: top executives, young


professionals, and line workers. The goal is to give an honest, unvarnished look at what working in the industry is like. To measure effectiveness, students are given surveys before and after the oneday program to gauge their interest in an auto career and how much the presentation “moves the needle,” according to Stevens. THE EMERGING AUTOMOTIVE VOICE IN LANSING Education and advocacy involving policy makers in Lansing is another MICHauto priority and investor benefit. “MICHauto is unique in that we’re the only association that is both automotive and Michigan focused,” said Stevens. “We work with the governor and the state legislature to be a voice for the industry.” Because of the rapid turnover in the state House of Representatives and Senate due to term limits, MICHauto continually offers educational programs to legislators to emphasize the size and economic impact the industry has on the entire state. “A few times a year we take representatives from various auto related companies to Lansing to offer presentations to lawmakers,” he added. MICHauto’s advocacy work usually concentrates on specific pieces of legislation and involves highly detailed work with legislators, including the Auto Caucus of the Michigan Legislature – a bipartisan group of House and Senate members that MICHauto helped create. Current MICHauto priorities include encouraging regulatory and tax policies that promote investment in automated and electric vehicles, recruiting the immigration of highly skilled foreign workers to Michigan, and fostering diversity, equity and inclusion. Paul Vachon is a freelance writer in Metro Detroit.

CALLING ALL ENTREPRENEURS I N N O VAT O R E X C H A N G E O F F E R S CONNECTIONS TO CONSUMERS O F I N N O VAT I O N MICHauto’s Innovator Exchange takes a cue from the earliest days of the industry, when able investors nurtured budding entrepreneurs like Henry Ford and Ransom Olds. Emerging automotive technologies have created opportunities for startups with fresh ideas to meet the industry’s most pressing challenges. To give these newcomers every advantage, Innovator Exchange welcomes them into the MICHauto network through direct engagement with OEMs, suppliers, and other consumers of innovation. “The founders of these companies are given a membership and full access to the MICHauto network

as if they were a large automotive company,” explained Glenn Stevens Jr., executive director of MICHauto and vice president of automotive and mobility initiatives at the Chamber. This allows the startups to engage with their more seasoned peers while providing access to essential information and larger established prospective customers that can help grow their companies. “This will allow the development of connections between the startups, who are developing new technologies, and companies that will be the consumers of that technology.”


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Leadership Detroit is a signature initiative of the Detroit Regional Chamber that offers a once-in-alifetime opportunity for professionals to take their leadership skills to the next level. It provides participants a unique behind-the-scenes approach to understanding the inner workings of the region and how they can create positive change in their organization and beyond.

CONGRATS CLASS XLII

GRADUATES SHARE THEIR REFLECTIONS In January 2022, the Detroit Regional Chamber launched Leadership Detroit Class XLII, the program’s first since it paused activities in June 2020 due to the pandemic. The six-month transformational leadership program challenged 60 emerging and existing leaders to bring about positive change through informed leadership as it has since 1979. Representing a cross-section of Southeast Michigan − including business, organized labor, government, education, media, civic groups, health services and community organizations − this year’s graduates join an alumni network of over 2,000 who continue to create awareness and drive conversation of key issues that affect the Detroit region. Several graduates shared thoughts on their experiences.


"It was a great benefit to learn from the diverse speakers we heard from during our various sessions. I found the opportunity to sit and listen was inspirational and helped recharge and recenter my focus in different areas of leadership." KHADIJA WALKER-FOBBS CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER, JUDSON CENTER


38

JULIANNE CASSIN SHARP

JARELL D. BROWN

SENIOR PRINCIPAL AND ATTORNEY, MILLER CANFIELD

HEAD OF ANALYTICS AND BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE, THE HENRY FORD

“My Leadership Detroit experience taught me that it is OK to be open – even vulnerable – as a leader! Responding to others in a state of wonder and curiosity leads to successful, conscious leadership.”

“This was one of the most rewarding person-to-person experiences allowing participants (now friends) to not only learn about the city of Detroit and current policies, but to learn about each other, each other’s work, and backgrounds.”

HIS DEDICATION IS OUR INSPIRATION

DTE Energy is proud to congratulate our own Jay Williams, as well as his fellow Leadership Detroit alumni. With a commitment to educational preparedness, human services and more, individuals like Jay ensure Detroit’s promising future.


39

LAURA CHAVEZ-WAZEERUD-DIN

KIMBERLY JOHNSON

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, COMERICA BANK

FOUNDER, PRESIDENT, AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, DEVELOPING K.I.D.S.

“Leadership Detroit helped me see the wide path of opportunities and encouraged me to continue to leave a powerful and positive legacy in this world.”

CONGRATULATIONS

Gabriel J. Edelson

and the entire Leadership Detroit Class XLII

■ Partner on Varnum’s Business and Corporate Services Practice Team

■ Specializes in mergers and acquisitions, divestitures and corporate governance

■ Represents private equity firms, portfolio

companies and a wide variety of other businesses in domestic and cross-border M&A

■ Community leader, mentor, role model

“I was honored to have engaged with such thoughtful leaders who brought their intellect, experiences, and ideas, evolving into a body of empathetic individuals who’ve become friends that are ignited to collectively impact this world.”


40

JEFF SMITH

VAN NGUYEN

VICE PRESIDENT, INFORMATION SERVICES, PRIORITY HEALTH

CHIEF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER, SCHOOLCRAFT COLLEGE

“I came into this program curious and open-minded, but I left the program as a better version of myself. We laughed, cried, challenged each other, and united, leveraging the power of strong relationships and motivation to make our region even stronger.”

STEVE LORENZO VICE PRESIDENT, BARTON MALOW COMPANY

“I had a tremendous opportunity for personal and professional growth through Leadership Detroit. I gained a better understanding of the region’s challenges, invaluable relationships with classmates, and insight into each other’s lived experiences.”

“I had the opportunity to network with like-minded, dynamic people, with the same core qualities. I was able to apply the learning outcomes of the program to my life, both professionally and personally. I learned to focus on resilience and not perfection.”

ns o i t a l tu a r g n Co to our colleague Krista Jahnke

and the Leadership Detroit Class XLII for your outstanding contributions and achievements. kresge.org


The law firm of Dykema congratulates Member

Boyd White III

and the entire 2022 Leadership Detroit Class XLII www.dykema.com California | Illinois | Michigan | Minnesota | Texas | Washington, D.C. | Wisconsin

LEADING IN JOY, TRUST &

CONGRATULATIONS, BOB DOYLE,

ON COMPLETING THE LEADERSHIP DETROIT PROGRAM Bob’s leadership, anchored in service and positive change, is on display in his role as President and CEO of the Michigan Association of CPAs, an organization focused on supporting a profession dedicated to moving the region forward.


42

SEAN DE FOUR

KRISTA JAHNKE

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, SOUTHWEST SOLUTIONS

SENIOR COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER, THE KRESGE FOUNDATION

“This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to network with some of the best up-and- coming leaders in Detroit. I learned a lot about myself, the region, and how to be a better leader for my organization and the community.”

MATT KOVACK VICE PRESIDENT, BANK OF AMERICA

“As a transplant to the region, Leadership Detroit allowed me to better understand the history of the Metro Detroit region while looking forward together with some of the most influential rising leaders.”

“Getting to know so many smart, thoughtful people and having the opportunity to learn together, both about ourselves and the region, was a positive experience that will shape my leadership posture and approach for the foreseeable future.”

MEAGAN BROWN DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS, CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

“The Leadership Detroit experience was enlightening. I learned more about myself as a person, and the sessions allowed me to be introspective about my decisions and interactions with others.”


Bank of America and the Local Detroit Leadership Team are proud to congratulate our own Matthew Kovack on his graduation from Leadership Detroit. Your dedication is an inspiration and gives us confidence in the future of our community. Visit us at bankofamerica.com/about.

©2022 Bank of America Corporation | MAP4117394 | ENT-217-AD

Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2022 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. MotorCity Casino Hotel REGISTER NOW AT DETROITCHAMBER.COM

Congratulations! Sigred Solutions congratulates our partner Kristi Stepp and the entire Leadership Detroit Class XLII (Best Class Ever!) for your dedication to building a stronger community. www.sigredsolutions.com


THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT

CONGRATULATIONS

GEORGE RENJI DIRECTOR — PERFORMANCE OFFICE, HEALTH PLAN BUSINESS

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Blue Care Network are proud to congratulate George Renji, our director of the performance office for health plan business, on his graduation from Leadership Detroit Class LD XLII. We’re certain that George’s commitment to his community and our organization will drive our future to new heights.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Blue Care Network are nonprofit corporations and independent licensees of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.


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management information and services to Michigan employers, released the results of the organization’s 2022 Michigan Compensation Survey. It is the 70th year that ASE has published annual wage and salary data. Dickinson Wright is pleased to announce that Dennis Archer, Chairman Emeritus of the firm, received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2022 Burton Awards Ceremony. The ceremony took place at the Library of Congress on June 13, 2022. Plunkett Cooney associate attorney Stephanie M. Brochert was recently elected president of the Women’s Bar Association, Oakland Region of the Women Lawyers Association of Michigan (WBA | Oakland). Brochert, who was sworn in during the WBA | Oakland annual dinner on May 26 at the Birmingham Athletic Club, will serve a oneyear term as president. D. Scott Brinkmann, former City of Detroit Director of Development and Special Projects for the Housing & Revitalization Department, has joined Butzel’s growing Real Estate Practice. Brinkmann is a Shareholder practicing in the firm’s Troy and Detroit offices.

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JOHN RAKOLTA, III 777 Woodward Avenue, Suite 300 Detroit, MI 48226 313.963.8000 www.walbridge.com Walbridge, a U.S. top-50 construction, design, and real estate services firm, is built on a century of growth, innovation, and uncompromising commitment to its core values. Regularly named among the Nation’s Best & Brightest Companies to Work For, Walbridge is an industry pioneer in safety, sustainability, diversity, equity and inclusion. Founded and headquartered in Detroit, the company started in 1916 and serves customers through efforts in mobility, manufacturing, mission critical, energy, education, commercial, government, healthcare, metals, public works, emergency response and more. With more than 1,500 team members, and offices in the U.S., Mexico, Canada and Brazil, Walbridge utilizes its integrated approach to serve our suppliers, customers and communities to build for good.

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THE POWER TO GROW MICHIGAN’S FUTURE BCBSM INTERNAL

Imagine a thriving future for Michigan, powered by solar, wind, and other clean

energy sources. A more connected future, with a smart electric grid powering a world of smart homes, smart businesses, and smart cars. DTE is investing today to provide the clean, affordable, and reliable energy Michiganders will need. Powering our state’s growth now, and into a bright future.