Integral Group 2019 Corporate Social & Environmental Responsibility Report

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Corporate Social + Environmental Responsibility Report OUR ANNUAL COMMITMENT TO OUR PEOPLE AND TO OUR PLANET

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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2019


Black Lives Matter Our Response: “We’re Listening”

Our Acknowledgement

Our Actions

On June 3rd 2020 our leadership reached out to all staff through a firmwide live broadcast that was also posted to our intranet. Bill, our CEO and Kevin, our founder, turned our collective attention to the racial injustices witnessed in the United States. The call to action was made through launching an anti-racism task force. Staff who expressed interest were encouraged to contact the CSER team, who would help to launch the program.

We acknowledge that our values of Trust, Nurture and Inspire become meaningless if they are not in alignment with embedded actions in our organization.

The following are the identified actions to date, which will continue to evolve based on input from the task force:

Although great strides have been made on gender equality, we recognize that we still have a long way to go in attracting and retaining employees from other under-represented groups. Through our commitment as a JUST™ organization, we reflect on the racial and ethnic make-up of our offices and how they reflect our local communities, but we have work to do to close the gap.

• Establish a self-selected employee-led task force to advise on actions and desired outcomes • Start dialogue sessions within the task force on topics of anti-racism, with a focus on highlighting existing key issues within our organization • Provide anti-racism resources to all staff • All staff enrolled in mandatory online training on Unconscious Bias and Workplace Diversity, Inclusion & Sensitivity to be completed by July 1, 2020.

On June 5th we released the following statement through our social media channels: “In the wake of so much pain and justifiable anger, Integral Group holds space and stands with our staff, colleagues, and friends in the United States. We bear witness to the tragic and senseless loss of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and so many other Black lives. We also recognize our own difficult journey towards meaningful and lasting change must be informed by honest dialogue and self-reflection. Through the development of employee-led anti-racism initiatives we resolve, as a firm, to be accountable to each other and to our community. We commit to sharing our next actions informed by those initiatives through our Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility report this summer. For now, we are taking stock, we are creating space, and we are listening because… BLACK LIVES MATTER.”

Anti-Racism Task Force (ARTF) Our Diversity Council was established in December of 2019. Its remit includes action on racism; however we acknowledge that its membership provides neither a broad enough base nor the depth of experience necessary to confidently guide the firm and its leadership on issues of racial injustice. Our Anti-Racism Task Force is intended to fill this gap. The ARTF met for the first time on June 9th 2020, composed of 32 selfselected colleagues, representing all regions and countries within which we operate. Its membership is truly diverse and inclusive - spanning across all levels of leadership and job roles, ages, genders and races. It includes those with deep understanding of anti-racism work and those who are seeking to increase their awareness. As a task force it is action-oriented and time-limited in its initial phase of work, although that does not preclude a recurrent or ongoing role. Its approach is outcome-based. Its proposed action plan spans across three time horizons: now, next and future. The preliminary outline is shared here (right).

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

We acknowledge our lack of representation of under-represented groups (Women, LGBTQIA+, Indigenous, Black, Latinx, Mixed-race, Multiethnic, People with Disabilities, and Veterans) at the leadership table. We are providing this data on page 10 of this report for full transparency and accountability. We understand that efforts to recruit, hire, retain and promote people from diverse backgrounds will only be successful if the culture of the company is truly inclusive. And we acknowledge we have not been proactive enough in taking more meaningful steps to ensure a just and inclusive workplace for all. We have not used our influence within our industry to create more pathways of mobility and access for those who have been marginalized. We acknowledge that communities who have been marginalized based on race have been living with the reality of systemic racism for centuries. We recognize and own our shortcomings to address how this reality is affecting our professional community, as well as the communities in which we work and live.

Our Commitment • To stand in solidarity against all forms of racism • To be guided by our staff • To listen more than we speak • To keep the conversation going (internally + externally) • To embed actions into operational programs • To expand our understanding on the issues of racial injustice, both locally and globally • To deeply and honestly examine the ways in which we engage in a system which is structurally inequitable • To lift the voices of others who are already leaders in this space • To look closely at our recruiting, hiring and promotion processes and make necessary adjustments • To acknowledge that representation matters at the leadership levels • To hold ourselves accountable by sharing the details on the actions that result from these initiatives in our CSER report this year, and in every year to come.

2

Now (completed)

Next (by end of 2020)

• Hold ARTF workshops to develop a detailed action plan on how to become an anti-racist organization • Review the Equity + Inclusion KPIs and Targets within CSER and make necessary adjustments to realign with our desired outcomes • Provide advanced training to all staff in unconscious bias (phase 2) • Re-examine recruiting, hiring and promotion practices to ensure just processes for evaluation, as well as take proactive steps to find qualified candidates from diverse pools at all levels • Roll out dialogue sessions for all staff to participate in, led by managing principals to ensure that anti-racist culture is embedded within every office • Diversity Council to launch the Employee Resource Groups • Integral Gives (IGives) initiative to launch a fundraising campaign and probono projects for #WeAreIntegral month with a focus on supporting underresourced communities and organizations • Create a communications plan to keep the dialogue going for longevity

Future (long-term targets)

• Representation from all backgrounds at the leadership table to ensure that the direction of the firm moving forward takes proper considerations into account in the decision-making process • Bring consultants into our organization to execute training to our staff on how we can best influence as designers for justice • Commit to making the connection between our mission on the environment to health + wellbeing, as well as racial and social justice. • Create mentorship programs (internal and external) that support retention and access into the industry for those from minority groups • Active recruiting from HBCUs and other BIPOC organizations • Create partnerships with minority owned businesses for project pursuits, including design for justice consultants • Explore social justice partnerships with our sister companies within the DAR group to hold each other accountable in the growth process

“The time is always right to do what is right”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


We are a global network of engineering and consulting professionals collaborating under a single deep green umbrella. In 2019 Integral Group operated from five geographic regions under the names: Integral Group, Integral Consulting Engineering, Elementa Engineering DPC, Elementa Consulting, and we welcomed Umow Lai to the Integral family.

Contents

“We are motivated by the same purpose. We share a commitment to innovation, ecological design, engineering excellence and to nurturing the next generation of professionals in our field.

Black Lives Matter

Dominic Lai Founder and Executive Chairman Umow Lai, an Integral Group Company

Umow Lai was founded in 1991 in Melbourne by George Umow and Dominic Lai. Almost three decades later they are recognized in Australia as a leading multi-disciplinary building services firm that is synonymous with design excellence, quality, ecologically sustainable development, and award-winning projects.

Welcome 4 CSER Introduction

Umow Lai’s decision to join Integral Group was guided by three key factors – mutual commitment to protecting the environment, growing client demand for deep green engineering and thought leadership, and most importantly; close alignment of values and culture.

Company Name Elementa Consulting

Office Location

Regions for Reporting Canada

US West

US East

Europe

London, UK

Oxford, UK

Elementa Engineering DPC

New York, NY, USA

Integral Consulting Engineering

Atlanta, GA, USA

Austin, TX, USA

Belgrade, Serbia Brisbane, Australia

Integral Group

Edmonton, AB, Canada

Los Angeles, CA, USA

Oakland, CA, USA

Richmond, VA, USA

San Diego, CA, USA

San Jose, CA ,USA

Seattle, WA, USA

Sydney, Australia

Umow Lai INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Toronto, ON, Canada

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Victoria, BC, Canada

• •

Melbourne, Australia

• 3

7

Environmental Footprint

15

Equity + Inclusion

22

Health + Well-being

30

Education + Impact

36

Safety + Resilience

43

Conclusion 47 Appendices 52

• •

Washington, D.C., USA

Australia

Calgary, AB, Canada

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01

Welcome

We are pleased to welcome the appointment of Bill Overturf as our new Chief Executive Officer and President. Bill succeeds Kevin Hydes, who takes on a new role as Chair of Integral Group’s Board and Founder for the firm, having led Integral’s growth to more than 800 employees across 21 locations over the past decade. Bill is a mechanical engineer with over 35 years of experience in the design and construction industry. For the past three decades he has worked at Ross & Baruzzini, a member of Dar Group and a highly regarded international design and consulting firm with whom he has held various design and operational leadership roles, and from 2016 served as its President.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Bill Overturf

Kevin Hydes

Megan White

Tiffany Elston

CEO & PRESIDENT

CHAIR AND FOUNDER

CHIEF SUSTAINABILITY OFFICER

DIRECTOR, PEOPLE

In joining Integral, my intentions are to deliver on organizational excellence and world class performance across our global business. I am committed to creating a strong operational foundation by which employees can do their best work, while serving their communities and ecologically restoring the environment. A triple bottom line approach gives us the opportunity to give back, leave positive handprints while also reducing our own carbon footprint. The “People First” and “Do Good Things, Good Things Happen” are aspects our our values of Trust, Nurture and Inspire which I look forward to supporting.

In my new role, I will continue to promote the values, vision and beliefs that have been the cornerstone of Integral’s success in the first 11-year chapter of our history. And it brings me great excitement to welcome Bill Overturf to the Integral family as our new CEO and President. While Bill oversees the operation of the organization, I will be directly involved with key global clients on groundbreaking projects. We are committed now more than ever to continue our tradition of offering thought leadership, driving innovation, and taking action that results in positive impacts for both People + Planet.

We believe that aligning our business practices with our deep green mission will accelerate the industry and environmental movement. And we know now, more than ever, the direct relationship between People + Planet + Profit are equally critical in order to bring the earth back into harmony with its natural rhythms and cycles. It is a constant balance between what we know to be true (data-driven and science-based), while also re-imagining the world in which we want to live, work, play, and cocreate. Our outcomes based approach to CSER, much like our approach to sustainability consulting on projects, helps us to think big, bold, and daringly.

At Integral, we employ the brightest people within our field. They are engineers, consultants, planners, modelers, designers, specialists, solutions providers and operations experts. But at the heart of it, Integral is a group of People with a shared mission to positively impact the environment. The People team is committed to servicing our employees in a way which supports and nurtures them in living up to their highest potential through the delivery of high quality projects and meaningful community engagement. In 2019, we focused on rolling out new programs, many of which came by way of the CSER initiative, such as the new parental leave policy and Headspace app.

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Executive Summary

01

Overview

2019 CSER (Virtual) Roadshow

The 2019 Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSER) Report is the third publicly released annual report on our commitment to the Planet and our People through our operations across the firm.

As we continue to build on our CSER process, the annual CSER (Virtual) Roadshow for employee engagement continues to be a critical part of reflection and communication, driving alignment across offices and goal setting for the coming year. The move to a virtual roadshow proved to help reduce corporate travel related GHG emissions, but also improved our inter-office videoconferencing and collaborative capabilities as a global firm.

This report includes an introduction to our firm, our culture, our values, and shares our CSER performance data for the 2019 calendar year. As a missiondriven company, sustainability is foundational to our operations. We are committed to continually engaging employees, improving our practices, and giving back to our communities. The 2019 CSER Report builds off strong foundations set in prior years, shares where we witnessed improvements, and looks into areas of opportunity. Our process will continue to evolve, as we embrace the “Circle of Trust” - a new 5 step, internal change management process that was developed by the 2019 Fresh Voices. The 2019 CSER report introduces a new category through which we will reflect on our internal operations: Safety + Resilience.

For employees, the 2019 CSER Roadshow was an opportunity to dive in and ask questions about the 2018 CSER Report and how we are performing in comparison to our 2020 targets. In order to close the gap, we gained perspective from employees on where they wanted to channel their efforts through CSER employee-led initiatives. Understanding the priorities of employees and what they are looking to be involved in for the upcoming year and beyond is important to our process to ensure corporate and grassroots efforts are in alignment.

A key highlight to celebrate in 2019 was that our Annual All Staff Survey responses increased to 86% as compared to 70% response rate in 2018.

2019 Fresh Voices + Circle of Trust

Integral Engaged: Employee-led Initiatives

Over three days in May 2019, a group of 15 successful applicants from across the firm convened to discuss the current state and future focus of Integral Group. These ‘Fresh Voices’ were asked to focus on the business – “the what and the how” of the company. Conversations were structured around technical topics that were deemed essential to the future success of Integral.

In 2019 the CSER Core Team released a campaign to launch Integral Engaged which included 5 internal initiatives (one per CSER category) to help guide internal efforts locally and globally. They are employee-led with the support of the CSER Core Team. The focus of each initiative was selected through employee input during the 2018 and 2019 CSER Roadshows, as well as voting during the 2019 All Staff Survey.

The FVs defined a process: the “Circle of Trust”, which is a framework for how we move from point A (now) to point B (our future). It is also a process that is designed to define how we work, how we execute projects, how we move initiatives forward and how we incorporate lessons learned. It is cyclical and iterative, and will be Integral’s process for change management, cast in an Integral-specific lexicon, and defines our way to get things done. The Fresh Voices of 2019 have chosen three initiatives to move forward, using the “Circle of Trust” as a framework for implementation: 1. Net Zero Carbon Projects Framework 2. Digital Engineering 3. Project Delivery

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

The five Integral Engaged initiatives selected include: 1. Environmental Footprint: Zero Carbon Operations Plan 2. Equity + Inclusion: Diversity Council 3. Health + Well-being: Happiness, Satisfaction & Culture 4. Education + Impact: Integral Gives (IGives) 5. Safety + Resilience: Safety + Emergency Response Planning Applications for employees to apply for global and local champion positions were opened in the end of 2019, and the initiatives officially launched in early 2020. More details about these initiatives can be found in the Conclusion / Looking Forward portion of this report.

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Gas

Steam

Electricity

Employee Commute

Business Travel

Executive Summary Performance at a Glance We track CSER performance across five categories, establish key performance indicators (KPIs), and set targets for 2020, 2025 and 2030. The following are our key takeaways from 2019 calendar year:

Environmental Footprint • 2019 data prepares us for our Zero Carbon Ops Plan and Zero Scope 1+2 (Gas, Electricity, Steam) building emissions targets by the end of 2020, in alignment with our World Green Building Council’s (WGBC) Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

Equity + Inclusion • 93 - 97% response rate to the optional self-identifying questions on: racial and ethnic diversity, sexual orientation, gender identity. • Overall global female employee representation is slightly down (-0.9%) from 2018, due to the acquisition of seven new design studios in 2019 which are only just introducing Integral’s diversity values into their operations. • In the category of gender distribution at the office leadership level, we reached our 2020 target (10% female) one year ahead of schedule (2019 = 15.0% female). • A new KPI has been added to disclose representation of Underrepresented Groups, as inspired by Salesforce.

Health + Well-Being

01 Firm-wide GHG Emissions (Kg CO by Type Firm-wide GHG Emissions in2e)KgCO e by Type 2 1,400,000

Benchmark

2018 (Baseline)

2019

1,200,000

977,903

1,000,000

787,611

800,000

714,435

600,000

562,440

521,856

495,152 493,036 351,009

400,000 266,473 200,000

144,682

125,062

99,547 0

0 Gas

3,083

37,509

Steam

Electricity

Employee Commute

Business Travel

• Expanded the section in All Staff Survey with new questions on accountability to guide the development of culture, happiness, and satisfaction initiatives. • The global average for workplace satisfaction scores have gone down (-0.32 points) in comparison to 2018.

Education 700,000.00

+ Impact

• We hosted over 600 internal education sessions that took place in 2019 via lunch and learns, design series workshops, and other formats. • Through our fundraising drive #WeAreIntegral, our firm raised c.$24,000 USD for Habitat4Humanity. 600,000.00

Safety + Resilience • KPIs from other categories are being shifted to build this new category,

CURRENT

OUR 2020 GOAL 64

47.6%

50%

How satisfied are you with your organization? 0

1

2

3

% of our global workforce made up of Under-represented Groups (Women, LGBTQIA+, Indigenous, Black, Latinx, Mixed-race, Multiethnic, People with Disabilities, and Veterans)

• Its focus is on emergency response planning, as well as business continuity plans and resiliency within our business model.

4

400,000.00

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

6

Physical

6

7

8

9

2017 7.90

10

Mental

5

2018 7.97

• In 2020 we will explore how to expand this new category with the help from the CSER employee-led initiative team. 500,000.00

4

2019 7.65

Intellectual

5

Option Not Listed

10


02

CSER Introduction

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

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7


Who We Are

02

Our Global Network Integral Group is an interactive global network of engineering and consulting professionals collaborating under a single deep green umbrella. We are a mission-driven company that strives to be transparent. We demonstrate leadership and commitment to social and environmental sustainability. We employ over 700 talented and innovative people who are drawn to Integral Group based on the quality and nature of our work and our commitment to our mission.

Victoria Vancouver

Edmonton Calgary Toronto

Seattle Oakland San Jose Los Angeles San Diego

Oxford London Belgrade

New York Washington DC Richmond Atlanta Austin

Our Design Studios Most of our design studios operate under the Integral name. In Atlanta we are known as Integral Consulting Engineering, Elementa Engineering DPC in NYC, and Elementa Consulting in the UK. In 2019, we established new offices in New York, Belgrade, Calgary, Edmonton, and San Diego. With Umow Lai joining Integral Group, we added three offices in Australia - Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane.

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

Our organization operates in the following regions: Australia, Canada, Europe, United States East, and United States West.

Our Services Our reputation and competitive advantage are built on our ability to distinguish ourselves as experts and industry leaders. In our work we hold ourselves and our clients to a high standard of sustainability, aiming to achieve ever higher levels of performance. • Mechanical Engineering • Electrical Engineering

KEY Office Location Country or territory with an Integral Group project

© Dan Seguin / Patkau Architects

© Dror Baldinger / Gensler

• Plumbing Engineering • Renewable Energy Systems • Energy Modeling • Sustainability Consulting • Refrigeration • Commissioning • Lighting Design • Fire Protection/ Fire Engineering • Technology Yasodhara Ashram Temple of Light, Kootenay Bay, BC Canada

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

8

UPCycle, Austin, TX USA

W Hotel, Edinburgh, Scotland

Waltzing Matilda Centre, Winton, QA Australia


Who We Are

02

Our Mission

Our Pillars

To be the top quality Deep Green engineering and consulting firm with global reach.

Our work is structured around four pillars imagine, perform, accelerate, and sustain.

Our People

Imagine

Our People combine passion with purpose. They are diverse, ready, willing and able. They are committed to innovation, quality and to providing our clients with the best possible service.

We bring creativity and curiosity to solve complex problems.

Our Values We are guided by three core values trust, nurture and inspire.

Trust The basis of every successful relationship, team and collaboration. We build trust by trusting others while keeping our promises and conducting ourselves to the highest levels of professionalism, integrity and honesty.

Nurture We never stop learning or growing. The environment and culture of the firm is supportive and inclusive. We listen openly, respect the opinions and beliefs of others, and provide honest feedback. We mentor and train for success and fulfilment.

Inspire We share our passion and expertise widely. We make time to explain our thinking, challenge clients and project partners with new ways of working. We share innovations in technology and tools drawn from across our firm, and leverage our investment in research and development.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Integral is home to dreamers and innovators, systems thinkers and the people with the big ideas - backed up by the technical know-how to deliver. We question why things should stay the same and work collaboratively across disciplines to find new and better solutions.

Perform Our work is target-driven, outcome-led, and evidencebased. Perform is how we get to what we imagine. We work with clients to define ambitious performance targets and focus our efforts on achieving them. Through analysis we translate data into insights. By working across the entire project lifecycle we are closing the performance gap.

Accelerate Time is short - we need to urgently scale up. Our impact is not limited to our projects. We influence decision making beyond the boundaries of our business - rewriting rules, shaping policy, sharing best practices, bringing new technologies to market and partnering with like-minded firms.

Sustain We grow and thrive so that we can have more impact. We apply the same sustainable business practices across our firm that we advocate in our work. We invest the profits generated by our activities in the tools and resources necessary for our people to excel, and to support game-changing industry initiatives.

9


Our Leadership

02

Integral Group is led by Bill Overturf, CEO and President with Kevin Hydes, Founder and Chairman. We also recognize Dominic Lai, Executive Chairman of Umow Lai.

Operational Leadership Carl Foster - Chief Information Officer, Doug Kerr - Chief Risk Officer, Ed Garrod - Director of Communications, Megan White - Chief Sustainability Officer, Rodney Roberts - Chief Financial Officer, Tiffany Elston - People Director.

EXUAL LGBTQIA+ EROS T E H 1% 2.9%

Regional leadership

97.

Andrew Mather - Asia Pacific, Brian Goldsmith - United Kingdom + Europe, Chris Piche - US East and Ontario, Gerry Faubert - US West, Jason Nelson - Alberta, Canada, and Stuart Hood - British Columbia, Canada.

85.7% 14.3% WHITE

Office leadership

NON-W HIT E

% 17 82.4 E FE .6%

Andrea Traber - Oakland, CA; Andrew Jenkinson - Brisbane, AUS; Andrew Oxley - Australia; Andy Chong - Victoria, BC; Andy Reilman - Los Angeles, CA; Bungane Mehlomakulu - Austin, TX; Calina Ferraro - San Diego, CA; Chris Doel - Vancouver, BC; David Green - Edmonton, AB; Matt Grace - Calgary, AB; Patrick Elliott - Sydney, AUS; Rachel Lieberman - Toronto, ON; Sara Lappano Washington D.C.; Shreshth Nagpal - NY, NY; Simon Umow - Melbourne, AUS; Stanton Stafford - Atlanta, GA; Tom Simpson - Richmond, VA; Tom Marseille Seattle, WA; Zoran Stojkovic - Belgrade, Serbia.

MAL

MAL E

35.3%

Leadership at the office level are further supported by Senior Principals, practice area leaders, Principals, Associate Principals, and Associates.

of leadership team identify with under-represented groups

For further information visit: www.integralgroup.com/people

Representation Matters In response to the Black Lives Matter movement, we now commit to disclosing the makeup of our leadership team. We understand that representation at the leadership level matters and that those from under-represented groups need to have a seat at the table. In June 2020 our leadership group were surveyed to record the proportion who identify with the following under-represented groups: Women, LGBTQIA+, Indigenous, Black, Latinx, Mixed-race, Multi-ethnic, People with Disabilities, and Veterans. See graph to the right.

Dar Group Integral Group is a proud member of DAR Group, whose mission is to provide “the best engineering and design combined, delivered together globally”. DAR Group is a leading, privately-owned professional services group with a diverse history and a global presence. The group includes world-class planning, design, engineering, and project management firms who are dedicated to achieving our clients’ ambitions and supporting sustainable communities worldwide. For further information visit: www.dargroup.com

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

10

E


Our Commitments + Contributions

02

As sponsors of the World Green Building Council, we participated in the 2019 Advancing Net Zero and Better Places for People projects.

Business

Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

|

City

|

States & Regions

integral group

Integral provided technical support to the WGBC in the development of the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment, and became one of three founding signatories. We have committed to Zero Scope 1 and 2 emissions by 2020 across our office locations globally. Additionally, we are committed to actively promote opportunities for net zero carbon on all our projects, by removing technical, financial and other perceived barriers to achieving this goal. Signing up to the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment was a natural next step for us in our drive to build high performance buildings that respect and enrich the earth. We believe that there are two key ingredients to designing net zero buildings: positive people and simple engineering. You can find additional details about our commitment in the graphic to the right.

Global engineering firm Tenant

Company drive to build high performance buildings that respect and enrich the earth. Have designed over 100 net zero energy projects including 10 projects completed that have gone through certification and verification pathways.

Bringing Embodied Carbon Upfront Integral provided technical support and peer review of Bringing Embodied Carbon Upfront, a report and call to action. Additionally, we publicly endorsed the report, taking a stand to advance the MEP design sector through research & development. The report calls for a bold new vision, including: • By 2030, all new buildings, infrastructure and renovations will have at least 40% less embodied carbon with significant upfront carbon reduction, and all new buildings are net zero operational carbon. • By 2050, new buildings, infrastructure and renovations will have net zero embodied carbon, and all buildings, including existing buildings must be net zero operational carbon.

Better Places for People Case Study Library Integral acted as a technical advisor to the creation of the WGBC Online Case Study Library. The platform showcases projects around the globe that demonstrate enhanced performance in relation to health benefits and/or net zero operational carbon as verified by established certification schemes, rating tools or other verification systems.

16 offices

Integral Group submitted all projects that have achieved net zero energy, net zero carbon, WELL and/or Fitwel certifications to the library.

1.7 tCO 2 e portfolio carbon emissions

1

Commit

2

Disclose

3

Act

4

Verify

5

Advocate

Committed to occupying only net zero Scope 1 and 2 carbon assets by 2030 with an accelerated target of 2020; and aspirational target for zero carbon emissions from operational waste, water, business flights, and employee commute by 2030.

Disclose social and environmental metrics through an annual report which includes: environmental footprint, equity & diversity, health & well-being, education & impact.

Implement ongoing energy efficiency upgrades across tenancies and work with landlords on renewable energy procurements.

Verify our annual Corporate Social and Environment Responsibility (CSER) report by 2020 to ensure integrity and alignment with our goals and commitments.

Provide a net zero carbon pathway for every design project undertaken by 2020.

500 employees 4 countries of operation

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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a member of four GBCs globally


CSER Approach

02

Our CSER Report reflects what is important to our company, and is an extension of the company’s mission, vision and values. Our third annual CSER report maintains our commitment to measure and track our social and environmental performance across the company, as it relates to our internal operations. We are committed through our CSER initiative to providing an annual global report. Regional summaries will be shared with employees and leadership during the 2020 CSER Roadshow workshops.

Integral Engaged

We are committed to reporting at a global and regional level on the following five categories, and implementing actions through their respective employeeled initiatives:

CSER

Integral Engaged

Happiness, Satisfaction + Culture

Initiative

PE O C C AC

E

N O SI R E V U S T IE N EN W TA C S B I Y LI T Y

Leadership Initiatives

• Safety + Resilience: Safety + Emergency Response Planning

Our Performance Within the following chapters we report on our performance in the categories listed above across a range of environmental and social indicators. Where these have been recorded for the first time, they enable us to create a baseline against which performance can be compared and targets for progress set. Where we have access to data from previous years, they help us to understand trends over time and to calibrate performance targets for future years. The KPIs address the greater part of our operations. These include inwardfacing KPIs: tracking our policies and grass-roots initiatives that nurture our culture and well-being, and external facing KPIs: focused on fostering a resilient society and nurturing a culture of sustainability. INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

R

• Equity + Inclusion: Diversity Council • Education + Impact: IGives

Diversity Council

• Environmental Footprint: Zero Carbon Operations Plan • Health + Well-being: Happiness, Satisfaction & Culture

MUNIC ATIO COMER SONAL N P

12

TA IO DAECT LO M LL K F E COWOR N EL

W N EN TS

• beta-testing a new waste audit protocol to create a global approach to capture and to record data on waste generated during operations

N REPLIC TATI A B ON LE

• a new reporting category: Safety + Resilience

H S O D A W S RO

LE D Y EE PLO TIVES

• creation of employee-led global initiatives, called ‘Integral Engaged’

Integral Gives (IGives)

Safety + Emergency Response Planning

A EM ITITIGEMENT IN GA WER EN MPO E

In the previous years, we developed an overarching CSER strategy for the firm, established a common set of key performance indicators (KPIs), and a format for CSER reporting. In 2019, we continued improving data quality and the processes linked to those KPIs. The largest updates to our process include:

IG Core Values + Mission ANNUA L R EPO CSER D O C U ME R T

We are committed to publishing an annual report, which incorporates input from initiatives, employee-led activities, and lessons learned from previous years. Our approach to CSER includes employee engagement, tracking our performance, introducing or improving upon policies, and reporting on our progress.

Impact Fund

COM

MO

Zero Carbon Ops Plan


CSER Approach: Triple Bottom Line

02

Emo tio na l

Res ilie nt

Ethical

PEOPLE

Just

ble a t ui q E

tual ellec Int

PLANET

Financi al

al u t i ir p S

PROFIT

Env

700,000.00

ys

Ph

l

in

v

ta

Gi

nm

ic a

l

ir o

en

S o ci a l

gF

600,000.00

orw

ard

Circ

r a l u

Impactful + Actionable

Safe + Inclusive

Equitable + Socially Just

Data Driven, Science Based

Place to Thrive + Feel Supported

Resilient Business Model

Replicable

Culture of Accountability

Real Impact on Relative Economic Environment

Accelerates the Market

Work-Life Integration Re le

Circular Economy

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Our Pathway: JUST Label by International Living Future Institute (ILFI)

This image was adapted from Clarion University’s “Wellness Wheel” which “illustrates a wellness model with seven dimensions: emotional, intellectual, physical, social, environmental, financial, and spiritual. All of the dimensions are interconnected and important to a well-rounded and balanced lifestyle.”

We are committed to being a socially just, equitable and profitable organization. Our journey with being a JUST™ organization informed us on what it means to be an ethical business. We believe that profit happens when we are aligned to our mission of People + Planet.

13

Ethical

This wheel comes from the United Nations “Sustainable Development Goals” also known as SDGs, which provides 17 categories which organizations and projects can track alignment against. See next page for more detail on how Integral maps to the SDGs.

500,000.00

Fitwel Portfolio by Center for Active Design (CfAD)

Just

Our Pathway: WGBC’s Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

sili en t

ab t i qu E Our Pathway:

400,000.00


CSER Approach: Sustainable Development Goals UN Sustainable Development Goals Integral’s operations as a company and the work that we do touches on 14 of the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs are mapped to each of our CSER categories as follows:

Environmental Footprint 7 Affordable and Clean Energy 11 Sustainable Cities and Communities 12 Responsible Consumption and Production 13 Climate Action 14 Life below Water 15 Life on Land

Equity + Diversity 5 Gender Equality 10 Reduced Inequalities

Health + Well-Being 3 Good Health and Well-being

Education + Impact 4 Quality Education 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure 17 Partnership for the Goals

Safety + Resilience 8 Decent Work and Economic Growth The following pages will start to introduce how we measure up against our key performance indicators and our future targets for each of the categories mentioned above.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

14

02


03

Environmental Footprint

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

15

15


Environmental Footprint

03

Overview We have pledged to reduce our scope 1 & 2 emissions as part of our World Green Building Council Net Zero Carbon Building Commitment. The key performance indicators in this category help us to track not only our scope 1 & 2 emissions, but other metrics that are significant contributors to our operational environmental performance. This is the first year we can see how our performance is tracking against our baseline year of 2018. Viewing our progression towards our targets allows us to adjust our focus when we see behaviors out of alignment with our mission, goals, and commitments. This year we drafted and beta-tested a waste auditing protocol. It will help us achieve a consistent approach to gathering data fon waste generated during operations and their associated GHG emissions during disposal. We dedicated more time to reviewing flight emission data, by expanding the data points to include a new category for flights associated with corporate events/ employee retreats. The data collection process for tracking emissions related to business travel continues to be a challenge and key area of investigation. We also improved the questions in the All Staff Survey to give more clarity on our seasonal commuting habits, included requests for vehicle fuel consumptions where they were known, and to find out about accessibility to alternative fuel vehicles.

UN SDGs

Key Performance Indicator

Unit of Measurement

Performance

Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

Total combined gas and electricity emissions per person

(Kg CO2e)

830.07

885.45

+6.7%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Average Energy Use Intensity (EUI)

(kWh/m2)

207.88

210.7

+1%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Total water consumption per person

(m3)

13.18

12.20

-7.5%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Total employee commute emissions per person

(Kg CO2e)

735.59

956.56

+30%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Total business travel flight emissions per person

(Kg CO2e)

1033

1251

+21.2%

Global travel agency to track

100% Offset Flight Emissions

10% Reduction from 2025

Total waste emissions per person

(Kg CO2e)

14.00

4.62

-67%

Set Audit Process + Policy

25% Reduction

50% Reduction

Total emissions for waste, energy, business travel, and employee commute per person

(t CO2e)

2.58

2.99

+16%

100% offset scope 1 + 2

+ flights and employee commute

+ waste

“As knowledge of what can be achieved grows and spreads, our ability to take positive action increases exponentially. Louise Hamot Sustainability Consultant + LCA Research Lead London, UK

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

16


Gas

Environmental Footprint Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Electricity

We have focused our 2019 reporting GHG emissions to building energy uses (Scope 1 gas, Scope 2 electricity, district steam) per the WGBC Net Zero Carbon Buildings commitment (excludes Scope 1 fleet vehicles). Additionally, we are measuring and reporting on Scope 3 emissions related to employee commute and business travel. Water use was excluded from the GHG inventory because the associated emissions are negligible compared to emissions from energy use. Data on water consumption can be found on page 19. GHG emissions associated with waste generated during operations from the beta-test of the new audit protocol can also be found on page 19. In 2021, waste GHGs will be included on the Total GHG Emission graph.

2019 GHG Emissions in KgCO2e by Region (Average Headcount)

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000

-

Benchmark

Performance

Benchmark

Australia (177)

524

passenger vehicles

=

Benchmark

Steam

Europe (102) Electricity

1,000,000

Performance

Benchmark

Corporate

US West (157)

Business Travel

825

3,164

Tons

or

Performance

Benchmark

or

acres

2018 (Baseline)

2019

977,903

787,611

800,000

driven 600,000 for one year

electricity use for one year

of waste recycled instead of landfilled 562,440 521,856

714,435

351,009

400,000

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

17 200,000

Benchmark

US East (74)

Employee Commute

homes

or

1,200,000

Performance

411

Firm-wide GHG Emissions (Kg CO2e) by Type 1,400,000

Performance

Canada (263) Gas

kgCO2e

Business Travel

700,000

Understanding total emissions as well as emissions per capita and per office leasable area are all important indicators that provide information to support future decision making related to office operations.

2,424,426

Employee Commute

03 GHG Emissions in KgCO2e by Region (Average Headcount)

This graph represents the 2019 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per category by region. It is based on actual collected utility data where available, and using benchmarking standards where actual data was not available.

Total GHG Emissions for Integral Group in 2019

Steam

144,682

125,062

99,547

266,473

of U.S. forests sequestering CO2 495,152 493,036 for one year


Environmental Footprint

Energy per Capita (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount)

Total Energy Consumption (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount)

1,000,000

6,000Over

the next three pages we break down each of our KPIs2019 into more detail, Performance revealing the metrics that enable us to track change over time. (baseline) 2018 Performance

5,000These

updates are presented at the regional level, but data by office is available within the appendix. Employees are provided with even more detail at an office and regional level so that our engineers and consultants can do what they do 4,000 best: analyze and optimize. 2018 Average

• Total Energy Consumption by Region (Gas, Electricity and Steam) 2019 Average

400,000

• Flight Emissions (business travel) by region, with corporate flights and flights related to events reported separately

300,000

Europe (101)

US East (74)

NYC (7)

Oakland (104)

Richmond San Diego (11) (3)

Steam

Electricity 150,000

Employee Commute

San Jose (8)

Business Travel

* See appendix100,000 for details

50,000

14.3%

8

20.0%

Europe

US East

US West

Corporate

Retreats / Summits

6

5

2019 Average

100% 81.5%

81.4%

3

85.7%

80.0% 66.7%

Europe (101)

US East (74)

US West (157)

Australia (177)

2018

Canada (262)

2019

Europe (101)

2018

2019

US East (74)

2

US West (157)

2018

2019

2018

EnergyAustralia per Capita Canada (Gas, Electricity, Steam)

Adding 8 new design studios to our portfolio in 2019 affected both the overall quality of data we were able to collect for this year, and the results of our total energy consumption. The quality of the data collected can be seen on the data quality matrix in the appendix:

While understanding the EUI of our design studios offers us a standardized way of looking at our energy consumption, it may not tell the full story.

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

• 11 of our design studios are all-electric : there is no gas heating serving the buildings where they reside. Of the remaining 11 offices, over half are at the ‘BETTER’ or ‘BEST’ target which means we have actual data from the utility Waste Generated (kg) + Associated Emissions (kgCO2e) provider or landlord. 2018 Performance (Baseline)

7

0 Canada (262)

• 7 offices10,000 have achieved “BEST” targets for electricity data quality (up Garbage (kg) (kg) from 4 last year); while 7 had to Recycling use “GOOD” (benchmarked) data 9,000

Organics (kg)

Emissions (kgCO2e)

500

7,000an increase in energy consumption in every operational region, The data shows Seattle Sydney IG Sydney UL Toronto Vancouver Victoria with (3) a 55% increase energy consumption overall in 2019. 6,000 (19) in total (35) (35) (176) (13)

400

5,000 300

4,000 3,000

200

2,000 100

18 0 Atlanta (23)

DC (16)

London (62)

San Diego (3)

Vancouver (176)

Europe

US E

Non-Technical

If we have used benchmarking proxy, or whole building data to do our analysis, it assumes that all space in a building is used exactly the same way. By looking at the energy consumption levels per capita (per person) we are able to view the data through a different lens. Where the level of energy consumption per capita is high, this(Business isWater an indicator that; Flight Emissions Consumption Travel) (Kg CO2e) (m3) by Office (Average Headcount) • The space we inhabit is inefficient, or 400,0005,000

700

• 14 out of 22 locations analysed in this report are performing better than 600 8,000 the benchmark for total GHG emissions.

0 Canada

18.6%

1

1,000

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019 Australia

18.5%

9

Total Energy Consumption (Gas, Electricity, Steam)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline) Oxford (15)

200,000 Gas

1,0

1,000

Benchmark • The space we inhabit2019 is under-populated and the consumption levels we see 4,500 2018 2018 (baseline) are over-balanced by base-building utilization. 350,000

2019 4,000 In 2019, our overall Energy per Capita ratio reduced by 20.4% to 2,638 kWh 300,000 per person, mostly3,500 due to densification of staff workstations within offices in

Canada and Europe. 250,000

3,000

kgCO2e

London 250,000 Melbourne (62) (98)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

300,000

US E

33.3%

81.3%

kg Waste Per Annum

A 9)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

• Energy Star score by Office*

350,000

Europe

4 2,000

• Energy Use Intensity (EUI) by Office*

2019 2018

2018

3,000

Australia (177)

US West (157)

• Metrics on employees with access to Alternative Fuel Vehicles by region

400,000

2019

2018 Average

0

Commute GHG Emissions by region

Flight Emissions (Business Travel) (Kg CO2e)

2018

100,000

• Water Consumption (m3) per region Canada (262)

11.1%

4,000

200,000

Waste Audit Pilot Results

12.6%

600,000

• Energy Use per Capita by Region

2,000

Australia (177)

18.7%

700,000

03

10.3%

2019 Performance 2018 Performance (baseline)

5,000

800,000

500,000

3,000

0• Employee

6,000

2019 Performance 2018 Performance (baseline)

900,000

15.8%

12.6%

2018 2019 2018 2019 Energy per Capita (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount) Australia Canada

Total Energy Consumption (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount)

The following data sets are provided here:

9.5%

7.1%

Environmental Footprint Details

1,000• Beta-test

Energy per Capita (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount)

200,0002,500 2,000 150,000 1,500 100,000 1,000 50,000

500 0 Australia Australia Canada (177)

Canada Europe (263)

Europe US East US West (101)

US East Corporate (74)

US West Retreats / (157) Summits


Non-Technical

Environmental Footprint

03

200,000

200,000

150,000

150,000

100,000

100,000

50,000

50,000

8,000

8,000

7,000

7,000

7,000

6,000

6,000

6,000

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000

0 Australia Europe US US West Corporate CanadaAustralia Europe Canada US EastCanada Europe US West US East Corporate USEast West Retreats Corporate / Retreats / Retreats / Atlanta Summits Summits Summits (23)

a

600

600

4,500 600 4,000

500

500

500 3,500

3,500

3,500

400

400

3,000 400

3,000

3,000

2,500

2,500

2,500

300 2,000

2,000

2,000

200

200

1,500 200

1,500

1,500

1,000

1,000

1,000

100

100

100

500

500

300

3,000

300

2,000 1,000 0 DCAtlanta (16) (23)

London AtlantaDC (23) (62) (16)

0 0 SanDC Diego London Vancouver London San Diego San Vancouver Diego Vancouver (16) (3) (62) (176) (62) (3) (3) (176) (176)

Waste

In 2019, total air travel miles were calcuated using data sets from our

In 2019 we created a new waste audit protocol based on best practices outlined by BOMA and LEED to address the data inconsistencies we observed in 2018.

2,500 accounting system, in combination with cost per mile estimation. This approach 2019 2019 to data collection requires assumptions to be made where datasets are 2018 2018

incomplete.

The data for corporate travel was separated out this year from office/ regional travel. The corporate travel category was separated between corporate staff travel for meetings vs. corporate events, including: the Global BIM Retreat, Fresh Voices Retreat and the Vancouver Leadership Summit. This level of 1,500 analysis provides greater insights and transparency on the drivers for GHG emissions from business travel. 2,000

lia

5,000 700

Flight Emissions (Business Travel)

mployee ommute s per Person Commute Emissions (Kg CO2e) Emissions per Person per (KgPerson CO2e)(Kg CO2e)

In late 2019, we began the transition to a new global platform to manage business travel which will help us improve accuracy of associated GHG emissions. 2020 will be the first year with a full data set using this new platform, and so the baseline for business travel will be reset with this data.

1,000

0

700

5,000 4,000

5,000 5,000 Benchmark Benchmark Benchmark 2018 (baseline) 2018 (baseline) 2018 (baseline) 4,500 4,500 2019 2019 2019 4,000 4,000

700

kgCO2e

250,000

8,000

Water Consumption (m3) by Office (Average Headcount) Water Consumption Water (m3)Consumption byWater OfficeConsumption (Average (m3) by Headcount) Office (m3) (Average by Office Headcount) (Average Headcount)

kgCO2e

250,000

10,000 Recycling Garbage(kg) (kg) Garbage Recycling (kg) (kg) Recycling (kg) Emissions Organics (kg) Emissions Organics(kgCO2e) (kg) Emissions (kgCO2e) (kgCO2e) 9,000

kg Waste Per Annum

300,000

9,000

10,000 Garbage (kg) Organics (kg) 9,000

kg Waste Per Annum

300,000

10,000

2019 2018

kg Waste Per Annum

350,000

400,000 2019 2018 350,000

Waste Generated (kg) + Associated Emissions (kgCO2e) (Average Headcount) Waste Generated Waste (kg) + Associated Generated Waste Generated Emissions (kg) + Associated (kg) (kgCO2e) + Associated EmissionsEmissions (kgCO2e) (kgCO2e)

kgCO2e

Flight Emissions (Business Travel) (Kg CO2e) avel) ions ght Emissions (Kg (Business CO2e) (Business Travel) (KgTravel) CO2e)(Kg CO2e)

400,000

Non-Technical Non-Technical

500 0

0

0 Australia (177)

0 Canada Australia Australia Europe Canada (177) (101) (263) (177) (263)

Canada US Europe East (263) (74) (101)

Europe US USWest East (101) (157) (74)

US EastUS W (74) (15

Water Consumption

We beta-tested the protocol and the data capturing tool in 5 offices to verify that the protocol was sufficiently user-friendly to be rolled-out across the firm in 2020. The intention is for at least one waste audit to occur per office in 2020, to allow us to obtain benchmark data for future years. In future years, multiple audits will be completed throughout the calendar year to reduce seasonal outliers in the data. The offices which conducted a waste audit in 2019 have been graphed above, with their data prorated to represent a full year of waste generation and associated GHG emissions.

500

Average Energy Star Average Score by Energy Average Region Star (Average Energy Score Star by Headcount) Region Score by (Average RegionHeadcount) (Average Headcount)

This graph illustrates 2019 water consumption by region, based on actual 90 90 available, and using benchmarking standards where collected utility 90 data where 2019 Energy 2019 Energy 2019 Energy 1Benchmark Benchmark actual data was unavailable . ScoreStar ScoreBenchmark Star Score Star 80 80 80 Seven (7) of our design studios reported consumption figures larger than the benchmark expectation. Data on water consumption for nine (9) studios was 70 70 70 unavailable or incomplete, and therefore benchmarks were applied as proxies to allow for reporting in all 60 60 60 locations. Every region with the exception of US East had an overall increase in water consumption during 2019. However, when calculated50 per person, 50 50 there was a 1.5% reduction as compared to 2018 performance. 40 40global Carbon Zero Operations Plan initiative will Looking ahead, 40 the CSER’s begin to implement strategies to reduce water consumption in our offices 30 30 30 once the initial focus on reducing energy consumption is in place. This could include a flow and flush fixture audit in every location to determine if there are 20 20upgrades 20 to more water-efficient fixtures. opportunities for 10

10

10

Benchmarked data was used for: 0 Brisbane, Calgary, Los 0 Angeles, New 0 York, San Jose, Sydney IG, Sydney UL + Toronto Austin,

1

Canada Australia Australia

Canada

Europe Canada

Europe

US East Europe

US East

US West US East

Remote* US West US West

hof rcentage Access Employees to ofAlternate Employees with Access Fuel with Vehicles to Access Alternate to Alternate Fuel Vehicles Fuel Vehicles

20% INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019 Integral Group Integral Group cs National Statistics National Statistics 18%

Australia (177)

Remote* Remote*

Australia Australia (177) (177) Canada (263)

Canada (263) Canada (263) Europe

EUI Benchmarks and EUI2019 Benchmarks Peformance EUI Benchmarks andRegion 2019 Peformance and (Average 2019 Peformance Headcount) Region (Average RegionHeadcount) (Average Headcount) 19.4%

19.4%

19.4% 19

300

300

Electricity EUI (kWh/m2)

300

Electricity Electricity EUI EUI Gas EUI / Steam Gas / Steam GasEUI / Steam EUI 2 2 2 (kWh/m (kWh/m )(kWh/m ) ) (kWh/m2)(kWh/m2)


50,000

Environmental Footprint Employee Commute Employee commute data was captured via the All Staff Survey, which included new questions to improve accuracy of our environmental footprint as it related to employee’s commute to/from work. The following are the ways in which the data collection was improved:

kg

100,000 Australia

Canada

Europe

US East

US West

Corporate

Retreats / Summits

Australia

Canada

Europe

US East

US West

Corporate

Retreats / Summits

1,000 2,000 0 1,000

Atlanta (23)

DC (16)

London (62)

San Diego (3)

Vancouver (176)

Atlanta (23)

DC (16)

London (62)

San Diego (3)

Vancouver (176)

0 100 0

0

Employee Commute Emissions per Person (Kg CO2e)

03

Employee Commute Emissions per Person (kgCO2e)

2,500 2019 Emissions per Person (Kg CO2e) Employee Commute 2018 2,500

2019 2018

2,000

• Seasonal change to commute (if applicable)

2,000

• Fuel efficiency of cars

1,500

• Access to alternative fuel vehicles • Remote working as a category With an 86% response rate, the data collected was pro-rated to represent a full headcount. The following trends were observed: • US West yielded a large decrease in GHG emissions a result that seems due to matching engine efficiency responses to driving distances which can be reflected in the fact that 19.4% of California-based employees are driving alternative fuel vehicles as compared to 1.3% of Californians per state statistics. • Canada showed an increase in GHG emissions from 2018 due to the reported average engine efficiency of Canadian employees being worse than the global average. • Australia saw a change in their GHG emissions profile for commute due to the newly added offices in our portfolio having different transit options, affecting commuting habits and/or access to public transit. • In Europe the Oxford office moved to a new location, and a new office in Belgrade led to a small increase in overall GHG emissions. • Integral employees with access to alternative fuel vehicles is higher than the national or state averages in every region. To reduce our environmental footprint further, we will continue to encourage employees to use public transit as their first choice commuting method. As well, we will prioritize new office locations in areas with high walk-scores and established cycle infrastructure.

1,500 1,000

1,000 500

500 Australia

Canada

- of Employees with Access to Alternate Fuel Vehicles Percentage Australia Canada 20% Integral Group Percentage of Employees with Access to Alternate Fuel Vehicles National Statistics 18% 20% Integral Group National Statistics 15% 18%

Europe

US East

US West

Remote*

* No baseline data available for the Remote category from 2018

Europe

US East

US West 19.4%

Remote*

Employee Access to Alternative Fuel Vehicles (%) 19.4%

13% 15% 10% 13% 8% 10% 5% 8% 3% 5% 0% 3% 0%

6.3% 5.1%

4.7% 3.7% 4.7%

6.3% 5.1%

1.0%

3.7%

Australia 1.0%

Australia

1.3%

0.2%

0.3%

0.3%

Canada 0.2%

Europe 0.3%

US East 0.3%

Canada

Europe

US East

0.0% 1.3% US West*

Remote 0.0%

US West*

0.0%

0.0%

Remote

* US West is compared to the California statistic rather than whole US dataset

Managing Principals

Managing Principals

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

20


Environmental Footprint

03

Grass Roots Initiatives The following initiatives were led locally around the firm: • Bike to Work Day/Week/Month (Austin, Oakland, Sydney, Vancouver) • Office Carpools (Los Angeles, Oakland) • Bicycle Facilities (Belgrade, Oakland) • Imperfect Produce Deliveries (San Diego) • Office Car Replaced With Hybrid (Melbourne) • Low-Flow Toilets Installed (Oakland) • Segway & Electric Scooter Commute (Edmonton, Richmond, Vancouver) • Office Relocation to Accommodate Public Transit and Number of Employees (Oxford, Seattle, Sydney)

Austin

• LA River & Beach Cleanup (Los Angeles)

Sydney

• Lunch n Learn Vendor Guidelines (Atlanta, Oakland, Vancouver) • Reduction of Single Use Kitchen Items: Coffee, Plates, Bowls, Utensils (Atlanta) • Power Monitoring (Brisbane, Edmonton)

Vancouver

• Earth Overshoot Month: No Meat Week, No New Clothes Week, No Waste Week, Staff Footprint Calculation Week (Los Angeles)

Toronto

• Waste Signage & Source Separation (Edmonton) • Office Biophilia (Los Angeles, Oakland, Vancouver) • Switching to Digital Archiving (Edmonton, Vancouver, Victoria) • Commuter Benefits (Brisbane, Melbourne, Oakland) • People’s EcoChallenge (San Diego) • Daylight Hour (Atlanta, Austin, Calgary, DC, London, Los Angeles, New York, Oakland, Oxford, Richmond, Sydney IG, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria )

London

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Toronto

21

London


04

Equity + Inclusion

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

22

22


Equity + Inclusion

04

Overview We are committed to providing a workplace in which employees thrive. We believe our ability to innovate and the resiliency of our business is underpinned by a diverse and inclusive employee community, rich with a wide array of perspectives. Although great strides have been made on gender equality, we recognize that we still have a long way to go in attracting and retaining employees from other under-represented groups. Through our commitment as a JUST™ organization, we reflect on the racial and ethnic make up of our offices and how they reflect our local communities, but we have work to close the gap. Our 2018 data highlighted the need to focus on not only attracting women to the firm, but also retaining and supporting their growth and development throughout their career. Some of the accomplishments that we have achieved over the past year include:

Principal Promotions Our 2018 data collection showed that we were underperforming at representing females at the principal level. In 2018, our percentage of female principals was at 4.9%, which was significantly lower than our 2020 target of 15%, and out of proportion with overall gender representation within the firm. This year, we were able to identify women who were performing above their grade and acting as great role models. As a result, our improvement in this category was significant, and is now only 0.2% away from our 2020 goal at 14.8% representation.

UN SDGs

Key Performance Indicator

Unit of Measurement

Performance

Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

Gender distribution of all employees

(% Female)

32.9%

32.0%

-0.9%

40%

45%

50%

Gender distribution of all technical employees

(% Female)

28.9%

25.4%

-3.5%

30%

40%

50%

Gender distribution of Associates

(% Female)

34.8%

24.4%

-10.4%

30%

40%

50%

Gender distribution of Associate Principals

(% Female)

10.0%

19.1%

9.1%

20%

35%

50%

Gender distribution of Principals

(% Female)

4.9%

14.8%

9.9%

15%

30%

50%

Gender distribution of Office Leadership

(% Female)

9.1%

15.0%

5.9%

10%

30%

50%

Gender distribution of Senior Management

(% Female)

28.6%

23.1%

-5.5%

20%

30%

50%

x

In Process

-

Third Party Analysis

Third Party Analysis

Third Party Analysis

n/a

47.61%

-

50%

50%

50%

Office Leadership Promotions Our 2018 data also showed disproportionately high levels of gender inequality in office leadership roles, including the Managing Principal role. In 2019 we proudly announced that Andrea Traber from our Oakland office became our second female Managing Principal, joining Sara Lappano from our DC office in moving us towards a more equitable future for women in leadership at Integral.

Gender Pay Equity evaluation Proportion of Workforce from UnderRepresented Groups

Paid Parental Leave In 2019 we announced the launch of our Paid Parental Leave Policy. Our support to all employees during this new and exciting time in their lives covers leave for both birthed and adopted children. More details on this program are on the next page of this report.

Women in STEM Job Fairs Integral supported SCWIST - the Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology - in their inaugural Women in STEM job fair in Vancouver. Four of our outstanding female engineers spoke to attendees at The Society for Women Engineers (SWE) conference and job fair, showcasing the work of our firm, and proudly representing Integral’s diversity. INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

23

(%)


Equity + Inclusion

04

Parental Leave Policy Becoming a parent is a life-changing event, and we want to support our employees through this important transition. As part of our ongoing commitment to equity and diversity, and to provide a family-friendly workplace, in July 2019, Integral Group was pleased to announce a firm-wide Paid Parental Leave Program (PPLP) effective January 1, 2020. This commitment serves both the interests of our business and creates a more inclusive culture for our employees. As global firm with over 20 offices world-wide, talent mobility between our offices is highly valued. Our regions have always met locally applicable statutory leave programs, but these vary significantly. By introducing PPLP we hope to prevent location becoming a limiting factor in an employee’s choice to have a family, and that it not be a limiting factor in their career development. This new program provides fifteen weeks, on a sliding scale, up to 100% of pay, based on employee tenure while running concurrently with statutory, federal, national, state or provincial protected leave programs. For employees whose tenure makes them ineligible for PPLP and who exercise statutory, federal, national, state or provincial leave rights, there will be two weeks of full pay provided above and beyond vacation or paid time off. Employee engagement was crucial to developing this program, and feedback from our employees was instrumental in understanding how to implement it equitably and effectively. Open dialogue continues to steer policy decisions impacting our employees’ lives as we strive to be a forward-thinking employer of choice.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

“I am thrilled that our firm has recognized and adopted a policy to support new parents during a monumental life changing event.

“After starting a family and seeing what other industries offer in parental leave benefits, it made me realise how antiquated the building industry is.

Reflecting on my personal journey, I recall that becoming a parent was very exciting, yet also quite stressful to balance the joy of my addition with a feeling of financial strain during my leave...

As a company and an industry, we need to retain a diverse pool of talent. Our new parental leave represents a positive step forward, we’re saying that business as usual isn’t good enough.

I truly believe that when a company nurtures their employees, trust is fostered which will in turn flourish into inspiration.

Our employees shouldn’t have to choose between a career or a family. I am incredibly proud that our company echoes that ethos.

Stephanie Hammar Principal Vancouver, BC

David Glossop Principal London, UK

24


51,009

Listed

Canada

Europe

US East

US West*

Equity + Inclusion

04 All Employees Gender Distribution

Gender Distribution | Employees Business Travel

ee Commute Employee Commute

mute

Australia

351,009

Business Travel Business Travel

Data for the gender distribution graphs is collected as part of our on-boarding procedures where employees are asked to specify their legal gender. This best allows us to estimate gender distribution as that data source connects gender to roles. We also collect gender data through self-identification questions in the All Staff Survey where employees are encouraged to self report on their gender anonymously - as we recognise that a person’s legal gender may not represent their true gender. See following slide for gender identity reported on a global level to ensure anonymity.

Male Female

70.00%

30.00%

2017

65.2%

65.2% 75.6%

75.6%

31.96%

2018

71.10%

73.30%

71.10%

31.96%

28.90%

2019

2018

31.96%

2019

73.30%

73.30%

28.90%

26.70%

28.90%

2019

90.0%

65.2%

81.0% 90.0%

75.6%

2018

2019

2018

26.70%

26.70% 2019 2019

34.8%

34.8% 24.4%

24.4% 10.0%

34.8% 2018

2018 2019

24.4%

Associate

2018

Associate

2019 Associate

71.4%

81.0%

85.2% 95.1%

95.1%

85.2%

95.1%

19.0%

2018 2019

2019 2018

4.9%

19.0%

Associate Principal Associate Principal 10.0%

2018

2019

Associate Principal

25

85.0%

90.9%

71.4% 76.9%

4.9%

100.0% 28.6% 23.1%

14.8% 9.1%

15.0% 9.1%

15.0%

2018 2019

2019 2018

2018 2019

2019 2018 28.6% 2018 2019

2018 Principal

100.0% 100.0%

14.8% Principal

Office 15.0% Leadership Office Leadership

2019

2018

9.1%

2019

Office Leadership

100.0%

23.1%

23.1%

2019 2018

SeniorTeam Management Team Senior Management

2018

100.0%

76.9%

14.8% 4.9%

Principal

76.9% 100.0%

85.0%

28.6%

19.0% 10.0%

2019 2018

85.0% 90.9%

85.2% 90.9%

71.4%

81.0%

90.0%

In 2020, we will be completing a third-party verified pay equity evaluation in preparation to renew our Global JUST™ Label before January 2021.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

33.06%

2018

• Female engineers on average earn 10% less than male engineers.

Our Global JUST™ Label is valid through the close of the 2019 calendar year. The equity category of the JUST™ label requires a gender pay equity evaluation performed to meet the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) program criteria.

2018

71.10%

68.04%

33.06%

2017

68.04%

68.04%

Gender Distribution by Leadership Level (Global)

• Only 30% of women who earn bachelor’s degrees in engineering are still working in engineering 20 years later.

Gender Pay Equity

33.06%

30.00%

2017

• Only 13% of engineers are women.

• 30% of women who have left the engineering profession cite organizational climate as the reason.

66.94%

66.94%

30.00%

Providing clear pathways to leadership and leading by example are key strategies for encouraging women to step into STEM, and stay in the industry. We are on a journey to improve representation of women across all levels of leadership but have a long way to go. We believe that presenting the data transparently will improve awareness, and support conversations around unconscious bias.

• Over 32% of women switch out of STEM degree programs.

66.94%

70.00%

70.00%

Our goal is to continue to push for fair and inclusive representation at all employee levels and disciplines throughout our organization. The overall proportion of female employees decreased slightly (by 1%) since our baseline year, due in part to the acquisition of several new design studios whose gender distribution levels were below our firm-wide average.

The Society of Women Engineers (SWE) 2018 Research report highlights the challenges that our sector faces:

Technical Employees Gender Distribution

2019

Senior Management Team

2018 2019 Board

2019

Board

2018

2019 Board


1,400,000

Benchmark

2018 (Baseline)

2019

Equity + Inclusion

04

1,200,000

1,000,000

977,903

All Staff Survey + Self-Reported Identity

Disabilities (Global)

Military + Armed Services (Global)

Gathering more robust data on our employee populations helps us develop 800,000 internal awareness, create support programs and drive outreach strategies to make our workplace more inclusive.

In 2019, we expanded our definition of disability to include mental and 714,435 intellectual disabilities. We made this change because we realized that the way we asked this question in prior years was limiting.

In787,611 2019, 28 employees reported as serving for the military or identified as a Veteran. This is an increase of 1% compared to 2018, where 10 people disclosed their Veteran status (military or armed services).

562,440

600,000

For 2019, we continued to refine our All Staff Survey to ensure the language used and response options provided enable the diversity of our employees to be recognized. These questions focus on individual’s identifiers and bring 400,000 visibility to those who are a part of minority groups.

We recognize that mental and intellectual disabilities can significantly impact Understanding our existing demographic will help us make improvements 521,856 495,152 493,036 an individual’s life, in the same way a physical disability can. As we suspected, to support our veteran employees, as well as to attract new talent from this there was a significant increase in the self-reporting on this question. currently under-represented resource in our firm. 351,009

The following pages present the data sets in relation to self-identify and give 144,682 our clearest picture yet of who we are at Integral. 200,000 125,062 Self-identified categories include: • Disabilities

0

• Military + Armed Services • Gender Identity • Sexual Orientation

Gas

This year, 83 employees (10.3%) identified as having 266,473 a disability, with over 75% of this disclosure coming from individuals reporting a mental disability. 99,547

The following from SHRM (Society for Human Resource Managers) are some of the benefits that veterans bring to the workplace:

• Leadership and teamwork 37,509 The expanded definition of disabilities allowed for more individuals to be 3,083 0 • Problem-solving and decision-making recognized for their lived experiences, in comparison to the 2.0% self-reported Steam Electricity Employee Commute Business Travel • Honesty and attention to detail as having a disability in 2018. • Global perspectives To ensure consistency for future reporting years, the 2019 data will be our new baseline for this category.

• Transgender Individuals • Nations represented

64

• Languages spoken • Race/ Ethnicity A key highlight to celebrate in 2019 was that our Annual All Staff Survey responses increased to 86% as compared to 70% response rate in 2018.

10 4 Mental

Physical

Intellectual

Number of employees self-reporting a disability

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

26

5

Option Not Listed

28 employees self-identified as a Veteran or served in the armed services globally


Equity + Inclusion

04

Self-reported Gender Identity (numbers of employees)

The LGBTQIA+ Community Creating a safer and more inclusive workplace for those who identify as LGBTQIA+ helps us to grow stronger relationships between employees, with our clients and within our community. Initiatives in 2019 have included:

Self-reported Sexual Orientation (numbers of employees)

Self-reported Transgender Individuals (numbers of employees)

Heterosexual (588) Lesbian (5)

Woman (203)

• Questions on the All Staff Survey have been refined to provide space for non-binary employees to selfidentify.

Pansexual (4)

Gender Non-Confirming (7) Prefer not to Disclose (10)

Did not Answer (43)

Questioning or Unsure (3)

Questioning or Unsure (1)

Yes (4)

Prefer not to Disclose (28)

Man (464)

• Providing access to gender inclusive rest rooms where feasible.

No (663)

Queer (8)

Asexual (9) Bisexual (19)

• Roll out of unconscious bias training in 2020 across the firm.

Gay (9)

This was a new question in the 2019 All Staff Survey, in an attempt to bring greater awareness, dialogue, and expansion of trans-inclusivity within the firm.

(Annually)

ir o

Financi al

en

nm

97.

l

ual irit Sp

ta

EXUAL LGBTQIA+ EROS HET 1% 2.9%

NON-W HIT E

e abl uit Eq

WHITE

85.7% 14.3%

Gi

v

rd

MAL E

rwa

MAL

in

gF o

% 17 82.4 E FE .6%

35.3%

2019 Volunteer Hours outsid

Canada

Env

ir o

nm

l

Gi

v

rd

ual irit Sp

ta

rwa

Just

Env

Australia

en

gF o

e abl uit Eq

in

27

2019 Personal Development outside Work Hours

90

80

70

60

Transgender Individuals

50

40

30

20

10

0

Financi al

of leadership team identify Europe/UK with under-represented groups

Europe/UK

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

2019 Volunteer Hours outsid

Canada

Just

90

80

In 2019, 57 employees identified as a minority in this category, making up 8.5% of total responses; which is a reduction of 2.3% from 2018. Through providing resources for employees we continue to support this population.

70

In 2019, 11 employees identified as gender non-conforming (GNC) which represents 1.6% of the total responses; +0.04% from 2018. Note that this differs from the data set on gender distribution which uses legally assigned gender for its reporting.

60

Australia

Sexual Orientation

50

40

30

20

10

0

Gender Identity


Employee Commute Emissions per Person (Kg CO2e)

500,000

2,500

2019 2018

400,000

EXUAL LGBTQIA+ EROS HET

97.1% 2.9%

Equity + Inclusion 85.7% 14.3%

200,000

NON-W HIT E

WHITE

1,500

1,000

MAL E

-

Benchmark

Performance

Benchmark

Performance

35.3%

Gas

Race + Ethnicity (Global)

Benchmark

Canada (263)

Australia (177)

Performance

Benchmark

Europe (102)

Steam

Electricity

Performance

Benchmark

US East (74)

Employee Commute

Performance

Corporate

500

US West (157)

Business Travel

65 Nations & 54 Languages Represented -

Australia

of leadership team identify with under-represented groups

Employees reported with a 97% response rate on which race and ethnicity they most strongly identify with.

Afrikaans American Sign Language Arabic Australian Bahasa Malaysia Bangla Bengali Canadian English Cantonese Castilian Dutch English Farsi Fijian Filipino French German Greek Gujarati Hebrew Hindi Irish Italian Japanese Kannada Kiswahili Korean Kutchi

In our desire to represent our employees globally, in 2019 we updated our All Staff Survey to ask questions on the following:

20%

Firm-wide GHG Emissions (Kg CO2e) by Type

1,400,000

Benchmark

2018 (Baseline)

10% 8% 787,611

Financi al

tual ellec Int

Env

ys

nm

ic a

l

ir o

Ph

ta

l Each year, we learn so much about how to collect Social this type of data for a global company. Next year, we look forward to improving how we collect data for employees that identify as two or more races/ethnic groups. Res ble i 600,000.00

a uit Eq

lie nt

500,000.00

Ethical

For 2019, the Race/Ethnicities among individuals of Mixed Race/Ethnicity include: Just

3%

400,000.00

Gi

v

• American Descendant of Slavery

gF

125,062

0

Circ

ard

u

Gas

Steam

Electricity

Employee Commute

US East

Business Travel

64

66.94%

70.00%

10

Physical

71.10%

Intellectual

33.06%

31.96%

28.90%

26.70%

2017

2018

2019

2018

2019

Option Not Listed

75.6%

71.4%

81.0%

85.2%

95.1%

90.9%

US West*

10.0% 2018

85.0%

Middle Eastern or North African (34)

Benchmark

• Indigenous Peoples of North America

Canada (263) Gas

Steam

Europe (102) Electricity

US East (74)

Employee Commute

• Middle Eastern or North African

100.0%

100.0%

2018

Nations of origin (purple) and languages spoken (listed) 28.6%

19.0%

14.8%

4.9%

2019

Associate Principal

2018

2019 Principal

9.1%

2018

15.0% 2019

Office Leadership

2018

23.1%

2019

Senior Management Team

2018

2019 Board

US West (157)

Asian (98) Business Travel

2018

Ass

Corporate

Caribbean (1)

South Asian (38)

Two or more races (mixed-race, multiple ethnic groups) (43)

White (367)

• Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander • South Asian • White We also asked about our employees’ nationalities as well as languages spoken, both represented on the right. 65 nationalities are represented and 54 total languages spoken, with 80 individuals speaking 3 or more languages. 2019 Professional Development through Company Training (Annually) 2019 Volunteer Hours outside Work Hours (Annually) 90

55

80

50

Black, African, African American, Black British, or any other Black/African background (16)

45

70

40

60

35

50

30

40

25

0 US West

60 50

10

5

0

70

20

10

10

Race/Ethnicity not listed (12)

45

Indigenous People of North America (1)

40 35 30 25 20

Hispanic or Latino (26)

15 10 5 0

0 Australia

Canada

Europe/UK

US East

US West

Self-reported Race / Ethinicty (numbers of employees)

2019 Professional Development outside Work Hours (Annually)

55 50

80

30

15

20

2019 Volunteer Hours through Company Events (Annually) 90

40

20

30

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

2018

Prefer not to Say (23)

2019 Benchmark 2019 Benchmark 2019 Benchmark 2019 Benchmark 2019 2019 Performance Performance Performance Performance Performance Performance

Australia (177)

US East

100%

76.9%

Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (2)

• Caribbean • Hispanic or Latino

2019 Associate

100,000.00

Europe/UK

Ma

100% 24.4%

200,000.00

Canada

0.0%

Remote

300,000.00

• Black, African, African American, Black British, or of any other Black/African background

Australia

0.0%

73.30%

5

4 Mental

68.04%

30.00%

34.8%

• Asian

Europe

37,509

3,083

90.0%

orw

Canada

99,547

65.2%

lar

Australia

0.3%

0.3%

0.2%

351,009

• Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin in

1.3%

1.0%

0%

495,152 493,036

266,473

0

700,000.00

3.7%

562,440

521,856

Remote*

6.3% 5.1%

4.7%

5%

714,435

400,000

144,682

Luo Macedonian Malay Malayalam Mandarin Marathi Papua New Guinea (Native Language) Persian Pidgin English Polish Portuguese Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhalese Slovak Spanish Swahili Swedish Tagalog (Filipino) Tamil TElugu Ukranian Urdu Vietnamese

Integral Group National Statistics

15%

2019

US West

19.4%

977,903

600,000

200,000

US East

13%

800,000

2. nation-specific questions on race/ethnic group/ ancestry based on local Emo tio ual na irit l census demographics so that we can compare our results to census data Sp sets and understand if our employees are representative of the local community. The regional graphics are presented to employees in our regional reports, and are in alignment with JUST Label requirements.

Europe

18%

1,000,000

1. a globally-focused question on race/ethnic background, reported in the graphic to the right

Canada

Percentage of Employees with Access to Alternate Fuel Vehicles

1,200,000

en

04

100,000

% 17 82.4 E FE .6% MAL

2,000

300,000

Australia

Canada

28

Europe/UK

US East

US West

Australia

Canada

Europe/UK

US East

US West


Equity + Inclusion

04

Grass Roots Initiatives The following initiatives were led locally around the firm: • Women’s Day Appreciation (Atlanta, Austin, Oakland, Los Angeles, Sydney) • PRIDE March Participation (New York, Oakland) • Georgia Tech Women Alumnae Network Sponsors (Atlanta) • International Potlucks (Austin, Los Angeles, Oakland, Sydney, Vancouver, Washington D.C.) • Diversity & Inclusion Council (Brisbane, Melbourne) • Mother’s/Lactation Room (Atlanta, Oakland, Vancouver) • 40:40:20 Representation at Conferences (Sydney) • USGBC Women in Green Lunch (Atlanta)

Oxford

• Affirmative Hiring (Edmonton) • Sponsorship of NAWIC End of Year Event (Melbourne) • BCSEA Women in Sustainable Energy Appreciation Night (Vancouver) Los Angeles

Vancouver Oakland

Sydney

Atlanta INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

29


05

Health + Well-being

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

30

30


Health + Well-being

05

Overview We continue to develop our understanding of how best to support our employees health and well-being. As health and well-being increasingly becomes a focal point in the work we do for our clients, we also recognize that it needs to be a focus within our own offices and form part of our corporate culture. Personal wellness practices help us optimize how we feel so we can consistently do our best work and create positive change in the world. In 2019, we successfully added our Vancouver and Atlanta offices to our Fitwel Portfolio, bringing our total certifications to 5 offices across the firm, meeting our 2020 target early. Employee-led wellness committees continue to gain traction in organizing recreational activities both inside and outside of the office, proving to be a popular way to bring employees together and share experiences. These activities are broad in scope, and include, among other things: weekly meditations, plank challenges, bike-to-work challenges, joining in organized races, sample exercise classes and workspace ‘greening’. Additionally, data collected through our All Staff Survey has shone a light on the self-identification of mental disabilities, which we know to be a globally growing concern. In response, among other initiatives to increase support for mental health, in 2019 we were excited to work on an initiative to offer Headspace, a meditation app, to all employees as part of our benefits package.

UN SDG

Key Performance Indicator

Unit of Measurement

Average Workplace Satisfaction

Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

(Score out of 10)

8.5

7.64

-0.86

Global survey established

Best places to work - global

Best places to work - global

Employee turnover rate

(%)

Reporting framework in process

Reporting framework in process

-

<12%

<12%

<12%

Average Work Station Satisfaction

(Score out of 10)

7.69

7.5

-0.19

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

Average Workplace Environment Satisfaction

(Score out of 10)

7.47

7.69

0.22

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

Number of Fitwel certified offices

#

3

5

2

5

10

15

Access to Headspace was rolled out at the beginning of 2020.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Performance

31


Health + Well-being

05

Fitwel Portfolio Fitwel is a certification system focused on optimizing building design and operations to support human health and well-being. Integral Group leads our sector being notable for having more Fitwel certifications than any other engineering firm. Our Fitwel certifications demonstrate our commitment to providing healthpromoting workspaces for our employees. As Fitwel Champions, Integral Group are advocates for a healthier workplace environment that is accessible to all. With the remarkable growth of the Atlanta and Vancouver teams, we are proud to employ initiatives that support a healthier work environment. These are the 4th and 5th Integral offices to have achieved Fitwel certification following the certification of our London, Toronto, and Oakland offices. Integral has committed to add a growing number of Fitwel Ambassadors to our employees globally and to work towards certification for additional offices in the coming years. In 2020, the focus will be on starting the certification renewals for the Oakland, Toronto and London offices.

Vancouver Design Studio

Atlanta Design Studio

Our Vancouver office has been awarded a 3-Star Fitwel rating under Fitwel v1.0. To achieve this, it enhanced office wellness through initiatives including a weekly farmers market, planting a herb garden on the office patio, weekly guided meditation sessions, and organizing fresh fruit and vegetable deliveries.

The newly renovated and expanded Atlanta office achieved a 2-Star Fitwel Rating through the v2.0 scorecard. The studio features a dedicated quiet room to be used by employees for meditation, prayer, or relaxation. Lactation rooms are provided, and a multi-purpose room that may be reserved by employees for wellness activities.

The office also converted one of its rooms into a soundproof meditation and relaxation room which also serves as a lactation room. High walking scores were awarded for the office location’s access to public transit, building accessibility, and bicycle-friendly features. Fitwel certification also recognized the abundance of natural light, green spaces, and open-sky surroundings visible from all angles of the office interior.

“Working on our Fitwel certification prompted us to take a really deep look at how well the Vancouver office was aligned with our values, and also how it reflected our work as consultants to promote healthy workplaces around the world. Chris Doel Managing Principal Vancouver, Canada

In alignment with Fitwel’s scoring methods, the Atlanta office has multiple access points to daylight and exterior views, external stairwell options, and is situated within walking-distance to local restaurants.

“It has been wonderful to see our employees inspired and involved in the process. From sharing recipes for the produce received in our CSA to encouraging more healthy and sustainable catering in the office, implementing the Fitwel strategies has been an opportunity to further Integral’s mission of healthy buildings for healthy people and a healthy planet. Marilyn Specht Associate Principal Atlanta, USA

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

32


Health + Well-being Mental Health + Emotional Well-being Mental/emotional health and well-being have become an increasing topic of discussion within the organization, with our clients, and on a global level. As environmental activists, we recognize that our work puts our employees in direct relationships with an additional stressor - eco-anxiety, a growing phenomenon that is a result of the climate crisis that is our current reality. Natural disasters from fires, floods and droughts have already affected our employees directly.

05

8

Reasons scientists say you should meditate* More than 2,000 scientific studies support the positive effects of meditation, and it only takes 10 days to start experiencing the benefits.

The update to the All Staff Survey question on disability to include all forms of disability saw the results climb to 10.3% from 2.0%. Looking deeper into the data we recognised that over ¾ of the self-reported disabilities were linked to mental health and intellectual difficulties. These statistics have started real, open, honest and vulnerable conversations and have revealed stories which many can empathize with cross all levels of the firm. In 2019, we facilitated these discussions with new questions on how employees feel supported around physical health, mental/emotional well-being, mindfulness in the workplace, and if the workplace feels like a place where employees can show up authentically. The results of these questions are shared with employees and leadership during annual CSER Virtual Roadshow workshops and through the regional reports. In the UK offices, Mental Health Awareness Week continues to be supported and celebrated. This activity has inspired others within the organization and we are looking to promote this initiative globally. Employees now have the following tools available to them to support their mental/emotional health and well-being: • Headspace (All employees)

Stress Less

In a study of 30 insomniacs at Stanford, mindfulness helped them to get to sleep twice as quickly as before.

10 days of Headspace resulted in a 14% decrease in stress. Meditation is even shown to have a longer-lasting effect on stress than a vacation.

Keep Cool

Feel Satisfied

Pay Attention

Mindfulness increases patience and rationality, and just 3 weeks of Headspace resulted in a 57% decrease in aggression.

One study showed that mindfulness increased life satisfaction, while decreasing depression and anxiety in college students.

In a study with new meditators, just one 10-minute meditation resulted in increased attention.

Empathize More

Focus More

In a Northeastern University study, Headspace users were 3.3X more likely to respond compassionately toward a stranger.

Just 4 weeks of Headspace resulted in a 14% increase in focus, strongly aligned with productivity.

Cope Better After a 7-week mindfulness course, medical students showed improved coping skills, which were sustained at a 6-year follow-up. *Headspace was only used in studies where indicated. Headspace is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or medical condition, or to improve performance in school or results on academic tests.

“I am so proud our firm is now offering Headspace to all employees. It shows true commitment to the wellbeing of every one of us. I use it on my daily commute and it helps me to have a clear head for the day ahead.

Headspace Through our partnership with Headspace all employees now have access to hundreds of guided meditations on everything from stress to productivity. These meditations are designed to fit into any part of their day, not the other way around, and some are as short as one minute.

• Employee Assistance Program (US, UK) • Employee & Family Assistance Program (CAN)

Andrew Jolly Global Digital Engineering Director London, UK

• Wellness Subsidy (US, CAN) • Workplace Nursery Benefit (UK) • Cycle to Work Benefit (UK)

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Sleep Soundly

33


Health + Well-being

05

Workplace Satisfaction In 2019, we continued the tradition of asking our two standard questions on workplace satisfaction, with results being presented in the graphics to the right. Although the majority of regions’ scores seemed to trend slightly downward, we notice a general trend associated with office size:

2019 7.65

• Smaller offices generally score higher • Larger offices general score lower It is possible that this data is indicating a feeling of disconnection for the larger offices, while the smaller offices have a greater sense of family. The same trend is observed year after year where offices have grown in headcount, and also been reflected anecdotally through conversations with employees.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

2018 7.97 2017 7.90

2019 8.09

In addition to the questions above, we engaged Sharon McGeorge, our Integral Engaged initiative champion from our Victoria office to review the questions asked for this category. With her guidance, we introduced the following new questions to provide deeper insight into the culture of the firm as a whole and how offices differ:

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

• How often do you feel you have done a good job at work? • How often do you feel proud of the work you produce? • How often do you take actions to improve processes, methods, documentation etc. so that things go more smoothly next time?

How likely is that you would recommend your organization as a good place to work?

See Appendix for more detailed results.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

10

How satisfied are you with your organization?

We included questions again this year on workplace/ office environment and individual workstation. These datasets have been provided to our Integral Engaged initiative team working on happiness, wellness and culture to analyze the trends more deeply. We look forward to receiving their proposed ideas on how we can create together a more positive work environment that better supports the needs of our people.

• How often do you acknowledge others for a job well done?

9

34

2018 8.09

10


Health + Well-being

05

Grass Roots Initiatives The following initiatives were led locally around the firm: • Weekly meditation in the office (Calgary, Vancouver) • Fun holiday parties (all offices) • Encouragement of Stair Usage (Calgary, London, New York, Oakland) • In Office Workouts: Planks, Yoga, Circuit Sessions (Belgrade, Los Angeles, London, Vancouver, Victoria) • Bike to Work Day/Week/Month (see slide 18) • Birthday Events (Austin, San Jose, Victoria, Washington D.C.) • Fitwel Map of nearby Restaurants (Atlanta) Atlanta

• Ergonomic Seating/Desk Options (Atlanta, Belgrade, Brisbane, Oakland, Vancouver) • Fruit delivery service (Atlanta, Austin, Brisbane, Oakland, Sydney, Vancouver, Washington D.C.)

Vancouver

• Office Dogs (Atlanta, Belgrade, New York, Oakland) • Office Biophilia (New York City, Oakland, Vancouver) • Social Events: Bowling, Wine tasting, Shrimp boils, BBQ, Picnics, Panic Rooms, Archery, Cruises, Museums (all offices) • Mental Health Day (London, Sydney) • Halloween Contest (all offices) • In-Office or Reimbursed Flu Shots (Brisbane, Sydney, Vancouver) • Team building events off-site (all offices) • Workout & Sport Teams (Atlanta, Austin, Belgrade, Los Angeles, San Jose, Toronto, Vancouver) • Happy Hours (Atlanta, Austin, Belgrade, London, New York, Oakland, San Diego, Sydney)

Calgary

Victoria

London INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Belgrade 35

Oakland + San Jose

Austin


06

Education + Impact

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

36

36


Education + Impact

06

Overview Education + Impact is about our commitment to internal professional training, development, and employee engagement, as well as external outreach and contributions to our local communities. In 2019 we continued to collect data via the All Staff Survey on self-reported hours that employees spent on volunteering inside and outside of work, professional development and personal development activities over the year. Local CSER office champions were asked to gather data on internally hosted trainings and presentations, local campaigns to raise awareness on environmental and/or social issues, and employee-driven charitable contributions including the firm-wide #WeAreIntegral month. The marketing & communications department continues to track data on conference attendance, external presentations, publications and corporate donations to non-for-profit organizations.

UN SDG

Key Performance Indicator

Unit of Measurement

Performance

Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

Company supported volunteer hours (IGives)

hours

Program in development

Program in development

n/a

8 hours annually per employee

16 hours annually per employee

24 hours annually per employee

Amount awarded for Impact Fund

$USD

$190,000

$200,000

+$10,000

5% profit

5% profit

5% profit

Total charitable giving (donation from organization + raised by employees)

$USD

$20,658

$46,567

+$25,909

No Target

No Target

No Target

Utilization rate of annual professional development funds

%

Program in development

Program in development

n/a

30%

50%

80%

“Being a volunteer board member allows me to channel my passion for gender equality by looking outwards to create programs to help others succeed, and find solutions to the inequitable societal systems we live in. Louise Wilkinson Quality Control Manager Vancouver, BC

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

37


1.6%

13.4% 11.2% All Staff Survey (Self-Reported) 19.5%

ged

%

%

In the 2019 All Staff Survey, we asked employees to self-report annual time spent on activities such as volunteering, professional development and personal development; both internally during working hours, as well as time 28.8% spent on such activities outside of work. The purpose of these questions is to get a better sense of how our people 44.8%spend their time so that we may better 32.2% understand their interests, and provide opportunities to explore and develop programs for our employees. We are looking to develop better tracking metrics beyond self-reporting of hours for future years. The following are some highlights from the survey results:

Professional Development

• Professional development is defined as training which has a direct 40.2%an employee’s role relationship within the workplace 32.8%

Employee-led Initiatives

trended up.

6.9% Personal Development

9.0%

5.6%

%

%

%

a

Happiness, 6.1% Satisfaction, Culture

Health + 15.4% Well-Being

IGives (Integral Gives)

Education + Impact Safety + Resilience

12.0%

19.4%

1-5 hours 6-10 hours 11-25 hours 26-50 hours 51-100 hours

42.7%

>100 hours

15.6%

2019 Professional Development through company training

9.3%

2019 Volunteer hours through company events

14.4%

4.7%

4.2%

7.4%

7.2%

33.7% 8.3%

19.2%

16.6%

32.3%

24.1% 29.9%

15.8%

14.5% 31.5%

37.9% 34.3%

9.0%

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Europe

0 hours

33.4%

26-50 hours

• Upcoming for 2020, the launch if “IGives” will work to offer more opportunities for employees to give back through a structured volunteering 16.1% 26.9% program. See more about “IGives” on the next page. 18.4% • Learn more about some of the company’s volunteering events on the Grassroots page of this section.

14.9%

Safety + Emergency Response Planning

06

26.6%

0 hours

ves • Globally, most employees volunteer between 0 and51-100 5 hours annually through hours 4.6% 1.6% company volunteer events. al Gives) >100 hours

Emergency % e Planning

0.3%

4.0% Diversity Council

16.0%

1-5 hours talents/ potential, contribute to the realization of dreams/ aspirations. It may have an indirect relationship to an employee’s role6-10 professionally. hours • Self-reported hours in this category trended as an increase between 2018 to 11-25 hours 2019.

Volunteering

1.5%

+ Inclusion

ya Council Europe US East US West • Personal development covers activities that improve awareness, develop

piness, on, Culture

Zero Carbon Ops Plan

0.7% Equity

16.7%

42.4%

Carbon • Comparing 2018 to 2019 data, Professional Development during work hours Plan trended down, while professional development outside of work hours

Environmental Footprint

Employee-led Initiatives

%

1.2%

CSER Reporting Categories

+

Education + Impact

US East

18.8%

2019 Personal Development hours outside of work hours

2019 Volunteer hours outside work hours

2019 Personal Developm

18.5% US West

26%

38


Education + Impact

06

Volunteering + Fundraising Our employees contribute to their communities in amazing ways. Giving back to organizations is something that allows us to connect with our communities by sharing our passion and resources. This year, we decided to mobilize our global community and make a larger impact by all reaching towards the same goal. In 2019, we made a collective contribution to Habitat for Humanity. In 2019, Harriet Lilley of the Vancouver office, was awarded funds from the Integral Impact Fund, our internal R&D program, to develop a new global corporate initiative focused on giving back to our local communities. This initiative is called “IGives” and it has been adopted as an official CSER global initiative under the Integral Engaged program for 2020.

#WeAreIntegral + Habitat for Humanity

Vancouver

Oakland

#WeAreIntegral is an annual tradition which recognizes our firm’s diverse workforce and our commitment to inclusion with a month-long fundraising event to support local charities. This year, for #WeAreIntegral month we decided to support a single charity that is aligned to our vision, and is also global, but acts at the local level for maximum impact - Habitat for Humanity. Additionally, in locations close to where Habitat for Humanity were either constructing homes or had plans to construct homes, some of our employees were lucky enough to take part in build days. We were able to donate labour hours as well as our dollars to contribute to projects in Atlanta, GA, Austin, TX, Los Angeles, CA, Oakland, CA, and Vancouver, BC. Total Funds raised for Habitat for Humanity in 2019: $24,052 (USD)

Austin

(of which $11,208 was donated by IG to reach minimum donation requirements to attend Build Days across the firm). Our Victoria office also made a generous donation to Habitat for Humanity in the form of office furniture donations during their office refurbishment, which happened in the summer.

Los Angeles INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Atlanta 39


Education + Impact Impact Fund The Impact Fund is Integral Group’s platform for investing in strategic research and development initiatives. It’s a rocket pack that we want to attach to great ideas - to help them become a reality. The Impact Fund allocates a percentage of our revenue directly to R+D initiatives and aims to secure match funding from external sources. The Fund focuses on high impact R+D opportunities that are entrepreneurial in outlook, aligned to our values and Deep Green mission, and clearly defined with tangible outcomes. In 2019, ten teams were selected to receive a $5,000 USD seed funding award, from a $200,000 USD fund. Teams had 8 weeks to make best use of this seed funding, then presented their findings in a brief pitch presentation. The following projects were selected to move to the next round and receive additional funding and support to advance their projects further:

06 “IGives” (Integral Gives)

Whole Life Carbon of MEP Systems

This Impact Fund project will turn into the CSER Integral Gives Initiative in 2020 and will be led by Harriet Lilley of the Vancouver Office. The project examined the importance for Integral to understand how employees are able to give back at work through volunteer activities and how employees are currently giving back to their community on their own time.

As the construction industry continues to strive towards a greener way of operating, the next phase of sustainable construction is understanding the concept of “Whole Life Carbon”, which requires us to consider embodied carbon as well as operational carbon. This new perspective is gaining attention throughout the industry as it grapples with understanding its full global warming impact, and how the business, its projects and clients are affected, coupled with the scarcity of critical knowledge regarding this matter.

Globally, the data shows most employees volunteer between 0 and 5 hours annually through company-led volunteer events. In 2020 this project will help identify more opportunities for employees throughout all of our offices to give back through a structured volunteering and pro-bono program. Employee volunteering outside of company events in 2019 also averaged 0 to 5 hours. This is down from 2018 where the majority of people indicated that they volunteered 1 - 5 hours annually outside of work. This change is likely due to the addition of 7 new design studios to our group and reporting in 2019. Our work in 2020 will be to integrate all offices into the initiative and to continue to support and encourage involvement in giving back to our communities.

In particular, the research has been diving deeper into the Whole Life Carbon of MEP systems and refrigerants, an untouched area of research within the industry to date.

Hidden Energy Hogs: Museums

Sustainable Airport Toolkit

This project aims to give a basic evaluation of the carbon footprint (Scope 1 & Scope 2) of the museum sector at an international level.

The intent is to create an online toolkit for the aviation sector which will facilitate the process of bringing high-level sustainability goals into reality while helping the clients understand where smart design decisions can reduce their operational carbon.

The project includes a partnership with the International Council of Museums, who will facilitate the collection of data from potentially up to 55,000 museums within the ICOM database. The aim is to produce a white paper which can guide conversations within the sector in a way that is responsive to the conservation needs of the facilities. Led by Rachel Moscovich of the LA Office and Janika McFeely in the Oakland office.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

As part of the seed funding research for the impact fund, Louise Hamot of Elementa London and her team have been pioneering the research on Whole Life Carbon in Building Services. The project also submitted for the annual Integral Awards and won the highest honour as the Presidential Award Winner for 2019.

40

Initially, the toolkit will be piloted within two current partners and it has the potential to become a new service-offering for the firm both as part of any sustainable airport master plan scheme and as a stand-alone service. Initially it will focus on US and Canadian market needs. The project is led by Ruffy Ruan of the Vancouver office.


Education + Impact

06

Our employees continue to be actively engaged in industry events, conferences and thought leadership. In 2019 we are proud to celebrate the successes of our colleagues and projects.

Presentations + Conferences • 113 External Presentations • 257 people attended Conferences

Awards • Nika Parsa (LA: Electrical Principal) - CSE 40 Under 40 • Lisa Westerhoff (VAN: Sustainability Principal) - Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) Green Building Champion Award • Kanika Sharma (LA: Snr Sustainability Consultant) - USGBC LA’s Emerging Leader • Clara Bagenal George (LON: Building Performance Associate) - Building Performance Engineer of the Year • Kevin Hydes (Chair & Founder) - Lifetime Achievement Award (USGBC) • Half Moon Bay Library - Landmark Library (Library Journal); Green Building Award (SSMC); Library Building Award (AIA/ALA); Design Awards, Special Commendation for Sustainable Community Infrastructure (AIA: SF); Sustainable/Green Project of the Year (APWA: SV) • Amherst College Science Center - COTE Top Ten Awards (AIA) • Rainbow Recreation Center - 2019 Community Improvement Project of the Year (ASCE) • Temple of Light - 2019 Lieutenant Governor of BC Award in Architecture (Architecture Foundation of BC) • Los Angeles Department of Water and Power - 2019 USGBC Pacific Region Leadership Award for Decarbonization (USGBC) • Pitzer College Robert Redford Conservancy - Bess Garner Preservation Award (Claremont Heritage) • The Arbour - 2019 Award for Best in Concepts: Unbuilt Buildings (Azure Magazine) • UC Berkeley Haas School of Business Chou Hall - 2019 Building Health Leadership Award (USGBC) • Pomona College Millikan Lab - Project of the Year, International (CIBSE)

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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Education + Impact

06

Grass Roots Initiatives The following initiatives were led locally around the firm::

Trainings: • Discipline 101 LnLs (Atlanta, Austin, Belgrade, Brisbane, Calgary, Oakland, London, Melbourne) • Inter-Office Presentations (Atlanta, Austin, Los Angeles, New York, Oakland, San Jose, Washington D.C.) • Hosted 10-20 Manufacturer LnL (Austin, Richmond, Toronto, Victoria, Washington D.C.) • Hosted 30+ Manufacturer LnL (Brisbane, London, Melbourne, Oakland, Vancouver) • Professional Development Training (Atlanta, Belgrade, Brisbane, London, Oakland, Vancouver)

Vancouver

Victoria

Sydney

Oxford

Los Angeles

Austin

• Manufacturer & Site Tours (Atlanta, Austin, Belgrade, Richmond, Oakland, Vancouver)

Fundraising: • Movember Fundraising (Austin, Los Angeles, Melbourne, Sydney, Vancouver) • Dahlia Society’s Can-struction event with donation to local food shelter ($1500, Victoria) • Lunch n Learn vendors to donate to local Food Banks ($750, San Diego) • Holiday Food Drives (Brisbane, Oxford, Sydney, Vancouver).

Volunteering: • ACE Mentee wins $30k College Scholarship (Ramón M - Austin) • LA River & Beach Clean Up (Los Angeles) • Blood Donations (Vancouver) • Earth Day volunteering (Oakland, Austin)

Professional Growth: • $363,097 USD towards employee courses, exams, materials • $167,323 USD towards employee license and membership maintenance • $74,150 USD towards attendance and sponsorship of industry conferences

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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London


07

Safety + Resilience

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

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Safety + Resilience

07

Overview

2019 Leadership Summit + Integral Vision

The traditional approach to Environmental, Health & Safety (EH&S) for code/ compliance is a foundational minimum for us. Since Environmental & Health metrics within our organization will need to go far beyond compliance, we saw the need and opportunity to examine how we look at “Safety”. For us, safety has to encompass “Resilience” from the stance of ensuring a resilient business model and comprehensive contingency planning. Hence this new category within our 2019 CSER report.

Ten years ago, Integral Group began a journey to create an exceptional engineering and consulting practice. Our simple, yet bold mission - to become the leading deep green firm in the world. We resolved to focus our creativity, passion and professionalism to fight climate change, protect our planet and increase equity through our work in the built environment.

With a corporate mission focused on reducing negative impact on the environment, we recognize the role which Integral plays during this time of climate crisis. Our engineering and consultancy services offer resilient design strategies, but we also need to look internally and be proactive in our operations & emergency preparedness. Some metrics from the Health + Well-being category have moved into Safety + Resilience for 2019. Official KPIs and their associated targets have yet to be set. These will, in part, come out of the work of the Integral Engaged initiative on Safety + Resiliency. Additionally, we welcomed Umow Lai to the Integral Group family in 2019, which includes specialty services around Safety + Security.

Key Performance Indicator

To be determined by the Integral Engaged initiative team

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

The 2019 Leadership Summit in Vancouver was where the Strategy 2025 Plan was presented to leadership across the firm. Over the past two year period we have been exploring how we should evolve to meet the challenges of the future while staying true to our vision and values. Our strategy has been formed by engaging across regions, reaching out to trusted friends, listening to Fresh Voices and drawing upon countless conversations between colleagues. We explored how best to translate our strategy into concrete actions and we launched Integral Vision - a day dedicated to sharing technical knowledge and leadership know-how. Over 50 employees contributed to these sessions, a testament to the strength, depth and breadth of expertise that Integral offers. It’s a model that we hope to repeat regularly across the Group in years to come.

Targets

Unit of Measurement

TBD

Ten years later we’re over 700-strong in 21 cities across three continents, making a difference on path-finding projects around the world.

2020

2025

2030

TBD

TBD

TBD

44


Safety + Resilience

07

Anti-Bribery + Corruption (ABC)

COVID-19 Response

In 2019, we celebrated Doug Kerr’s promotion to Chief Risk Officer, having previously served as Regional Director of the UK region.

At the time of completing the 2019 CSER report in preparation for publishing, the world was facing the new realities of the global Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The reality of this new CSER category became even more relevant. As such, we felt it was important to speak into what has already started to occur within our organization during the first half of the 2020 calendar year.

Doug’s role is to help identify risk within the organization, oversee our AntiBribery & Corruption (ABC) policy & procedures, and ISO 9001 certifications. Integral Group is a unique global company and we operate in sectors with fierce competition for business opportunities. We want to be our clients’ preferred provider across all the engineering and consulting services that we provide. To achieve that goal, it is essential that Integral Group are recognized for our strong professional integrity and compliance.

We are deeply committed to the health and wellbeing of our employees and want to ensure our people feel secure returning to work following COVID-19. As we continue to navigate this new normal, we have developed a “Playbook” to raise awareness of new health and well-being protocols and helpful practices to ensure a safe and successful return to office (RTO) for all employees. The Safe Return to Office Playbook (Playbook) includes guidelines, based on recommendations from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization. The Playbook will continue be amended to reflect up-to-date best practices. The document provides employees with protocols for Returning to the office and/or client sites: • Client interactions • Commuting • Personal protective equipment (PPE) • Continuing to work from home (WFH) This has been a difficult time for all, and our aim with this Playbook is to reestablish a workplace where employees are comfortable performing their jobs in a safe and supportive environment.

“As a growing global business, Simultaneously, our engineers and wellness specialists are working closely with it is hugely important that we business partners around the globe on solutions for what we call “Now, Next, continue to demonstrate our Future”: culture of integrity and best • Now = Re-entry into existing buildings practice. The work with our • Next = Supporting projects currently in design & construction who may need ABC, Conflicts of Interest and to pivot Business Continuity policies • Future = Resilient Workplace and building designs of the future is critical to this and the embedding of these policies into our daily work life provides significant support to not only Integral Group, but also to our business partners. Doug Kerr Chief Risk Officer

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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Safety + Resilience

07

Resilience Policy & Planning Our global team of planners, climate policy consultants, urban designers, and district systems engineers are committed to increasing communities’ resiliency to the challenges brought about by climate change. They work with local governments, universities, developers, and industry organizations to create policies and strategies for a low-carbon built environment. The team brings expertise in climate change, sustainability and resilience planning to coordinating projects ranging from zero emissions buildings plans, to postoccupancy evaluations, energy and carbon disclosure policies, and city-wide climate and energy strategies. By integrating emerging trends in mobility, digital disruption, smart grids, healthy cities and reconciliation on urban projects, they approach sustainability & resilience planning with the technical rigor expected of a best-in-class engineering firm. With a focus on city and campus scale action planning and policy change at all scales, we believe that policy, design and education can work together to help people create healthy, thriving places to live, work, and learn. This is accomplished by leading stakeholder and community engagement processes in planning for climate, energy, and sustainability policy.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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08

Conclusion

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

47

47


Conclusion

08

In Summary: 2019 Outcomes

Looking forward: 2020 Opportunities

We are excited to celebrate progress through the 2019 report in the following areas:

In 2020, we are looking to focus our efforts in the following areas to show immediate improvement to our processes:

• Reaching our 2020 target on gender distribution of office leadership one year ahead of schedule.

• In-depth gender pay equity analysis to be undertaken.

• The CSER roadshows went virtual, reducing our environmental footprint while still achieving great engagement in each of the offices. • We successfully added two more offices to our Fitwel portfolio congratulations to Atlanta and Vancouver. • 5 offices took place in Habitat for Humanity build days as part of the #WeAreIntegral initiative. • Created a waste audit protocol and data-collection tool that could be used in all regions, and successfully beta-tested its use ready for full roll-out in 2020. • All Staff Survey with an 86% response rate, up from 70% the prior year. • New & improved questions in the All Staff Survey, including: health + wellness at work, workplace culture, questions which improved reporting on our environmental footprint, and customizing the race/ ethnicity questions to more appropriately represent each region. • Launching Integral Engaged: 5 exciting new employee-led initiatives - one for each category of the CSER report, to engage and inspire employees to make a difference. See next page for more details.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

• Issue a waste audit protocol and target one audit per office in the 2020 calendar year. • Fully integrate aspects of the Umow Lai ISO14001 efforts into the global program. • Headspace application utilization to improve mental wellness in the workplace. • Submitting our baseline information to our Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment run by the World Green Building Council. • The new Parental Leave Policy taking effect. • Release our global Environmental Policy & Sustainable Purchasing Policies. • Witnessing the first deliverables and recommendations from the Integral Engaged Initiatives. • Reviewing our performance against the JUST 2.0 label requirements and resetting our strategy as needed for recertification. • Further developing our Diversity + Inclusion KPIs and metrics regarding all marginalized communities.

48


Conclusion Looking Forward Integral Engaged Integral Engaged develops internal initiatives that promote employee engagement, as well as opportunities to give back to our local communities. The CSER Team is releasing 5 initiatives directed at the report’s KPI categories (Environmental Footprint, Equity + Inclusion, Health + Well-being, Education + Impact, Safety + Resilience). These initiatives are being released to help guide internal efforts locally to achieve global impact. They will be employee-led and driven with the support of the CSER Core Team. Each of the five teams will be made up of local office champions and one global champion, as well as support from a sponsor.

08

Zero Carbon Ops Plan Environmental Footprint

Diversity Council Equity + Inclusion

Integral has committed to zero Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG operational emissions by 2020. This will be a combination of energy efficiency measures, on-site renewables (where applicable), and green power/carbon offset purchases. In order to hit this target, we are looking to pull together a global team that will support developing a decision-making roadmap and carbon off-set purchasing policy.

Aimed at creating a safe and inclusive work environment.

Next steps will be to have Zero Carbon business flights and commutes included by 2025 and then Zero Carbon Waste Operations by 2035.

The goal of this global initiative is to act as an umbrella framework to enable locally relevant action with the opportunity to share the experiences across the offices. The overarching focus is to provide opportunity and support to people of all races, ethnicities, religions, genders, sexual orientations, gender identifications, abilities, incomes, marital statuses, ages, geographic locations, philosophies, and veteran status throughout all levels within the firm.

2019 Professional Development through Company Training (Annually)

(Annua

2019 Volunteer Hours through Company E

CSER +

1.5% 0.7%

Integral Engaged

4.0%

0.3%

5.6% 15.4%

6.1%

16.7% 12.0%

42.7%

Environmental Footprint

Zero Carbon Ops Plan

Equity + Inclusion

Diversity Council

Health + Well-Being

Happiness, Satisfaction, Culture

Education + Impact

IGives (Integral Gives)

Safety + Resilience

Safety + Emergency Response Planning

Employee-led Initiatives

CSER Reporting Categories

19.4%

26.6%

“I am excited to work with the 15.6% greenest and brightest minds within our firm to create a roadmap for Integral Group to realize its zero carbon operation goals.

0 hours 1-5 hours 6-10 hours 11-25 hours 26-50 hours

9.3%

51-100 hours

7.2%

>100 hours

33.4%

14.4%

4.7%

Ramya Shivkumar Senior Sustainability Consultant Integral Engaged Champion Atlanta, GA USA

4.2%

7.4% 33.7% 8.3%

Briana Jeffery Support Services Manager, US West Integral Engaged Champion Oakland, CA USA

19.2%

16.6%

15.8%

14.5%

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

49

18.8%

“My ultimate goals for this initiative are an increased presence in our respective communities, a level playing field for employees of color and women, as well as employee training/education that will help create a safe and healthy workplace for all.

26%


Conclusion Looking Forward

08

Happiness, Satisfaction, Culture Health + Well-being

Integral Gives (IGives) Education + Impact

Safety/Emergency Response Plan Safety + Resilience

Looking into ways in which we can all work together to bring about an engaged and accountable workplace environment, that inclusively supports our personal development:

Integral Gives, known as ‘IGives’, is developing a global framework formalizing Integral’s commitment to giving back - supporting the most vulnerable & unserved through our technical expertise, time and funds. The initiative focuses on:

This initiative will create a structured approach to office safety, training and emergency response planning. It will develop best practices and share lessons learned to ensure every office meets and then exceeds workplace safety standards.

• Engaging employees and creating intentional partnerships with non-for profits aligned with our core values

Global and local emergency response protocols, evacuation plans and trainings will be developed alongside a global business continuity plan. This may also include emergency response preparedness that employees can take back to improve resiliency in our homes and communities.

• employees well-being to encourage balanced lives • workplace and space satisfaction • mentality and social elements to build culture This initiative will also address how we can show up as our most authentic selves, feel connected to the IG mission, and be responsible for creating the community we wish to be a part of. This may also include bringing personal development opportunities into the workplace.

• Improving accessibility to giving back - platforming events and supporting employees with flexible paid volunteer time.  • Financial process to support pro bono work – using our design skills to benefit non-for profits.  • Creating a robust playbook to ensure alignment and IMPACT This initiative, once fully-developed, would allow employees from all locations to utilise a set number of volunteer hours to use towards any of the four streams detailed above. To start, the pro bono stream will be available in two locations to pilot the process before being rolled out globally.

“I am really excited to explore employees experience of Integral group. Take a look at what the default culture is and where we want to be.

“I’m very passionate about the IGives initiative; focused on formalising our approach to giving back, engaging with our employees and improving accessibility via paid, flexible volunteer time.

Sharon McGeorge Senior Mechanical Designer Integral Engaged Champion Victoria, BC Canada

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Harriet Lilley Senior Mechanical Engineer Integral Engaged Champion Vancouver, BC Canada

50

“I’m pleased to be part of this initiative, I’m passionate about ensuring all employees return to their home safely at the end of their working day. David Novak Associate Principal, Security Integral Engaged Champion Sydney, Australia


Acknowledgements The 2019 CSER initiative, including the report and the employee engagement events, is possible due to contributions drawn from across the firm. Our global team of representatives, including a network of Office Champions, Peer Reviewers, and a Core CSER Team provided expertise, effort, passion and dedication which deserve recognition. Additionally, we are grateful to all employees who have attended and participated in workshops. Our “One Team, One Dream” mentality is what will help us to reach our Social and Environmental goals in the long and short term.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Amber Hart Adeel Ahmed Annie Martin Breanne Day Brenna Henry Briana Jeffery Caitlin Stead Charles White Chris Piche Dan Popa David Novak Denis Lvov Derick Thompson Donna Isaia Ed Garrod Ekaterina Dowling​​ Gerrit Atkinson Gerry Faubert Hannah Reilly Harriet Lilley Heather Syvrensky-Campbell James Perakis Jennifer Harvey Jeremy Field Jennie Kim Louise Wilkinson Maciej Wodecki Marco Treglia Marilyn Specht Marissa Clark Marshall Duer-Balkind Matt Colbert Matthew Sykes Megan White Melissa Moulton Melonie Culley Nura Darabi Rachel Moscovich Ramya Shivkumar Rodney Roberts Ryan Chora Shannen Friel Sharon George Suzie Pederson Tania Vazquez Tiffany Elston Tom Marseille Violeta Stojkovic

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09

Appendices

INTEGRAL INTEGRAL GROUPGROUP CSER REPORT CSER REPORT 2019 2019

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52


A 01

Governance, Methodology, Scope Methodology

Scope + Structure

Corporate Policies

This report is based on available data to measure our baseline environmental and social performance. To facilitate future tracking and reporting we developed a process for ongoing data collection. Where data was challenging to obtain, we used proxy values based on industry benchmark data as representative of the local region and building type as possible.

This report contains data from January through December 2019. This is in alignment with our fiscal year. The data in this report pertains to all offices including all newly acquired offices across all of our regions.

Integral Group operates within a framework of policies, some of which are global and others which are regionally specific.

Baselines

• Environmental Policy

For reporting on our carbon emissions, we are currently focused on Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (indirect) emissions globally.

Baselines are set depending on category or key performance indicator in different ways. Most baselines are set using datasets from specific performance years, when we feel a data set has hit a high enough quality standard. Where no previous baseline data exists, the current year will become the baseline if the data quality is deemed good enough. Where the data quality is not yet optimal, the baseline will be set once we hit the data quality target.

We collected employee commute data by analysing the results of an All Staff Survey. We collected flight data by way of travel records and expense forms. In 2020, we will switch to using the data entered into our travel application, Concur. Measuring our diversity and equity performance is done annually through an All Staff Survey, as well as data collected from standard employee records. Data from employee records is scrubbed by our People Director prior to analysis to ensure anonymity. Health and Well-being data is obtained partially through our All Staff Survey. In addition to the survey, data is collected through certification efforts in select offices and from our internal CSER tracking mechanisms with the help of our Office Champions. Education and Impact data is collected through internal tracking mechanisms, as well as the All Staff Survey. Our team has reviewed this report for accuracy and validity. The final report was approved by the CEO, Chairman and CSO.

Audience This report is intended to be viewed by our employees, clients, and others with whom we collaborate. We want this report to inspire employees to continue to uphold our values and support our pillars. We hope our clients will gain a better understanding of what makes us unique and how we are able to continuously strive for innovation and performance in our projects by taking action across all aspects of sustainability.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Baselines have been set or will be set based as follows: • Energy and Water - the first year for which there is GOOD data for an office will be the baseline year. • Business Travel - 2018 data used for comparison only. 2020 data from Concur reporting will be the baseline for future reports • Employee Commute - 2018 performance (prorated by headcount) where available. Where we have new offices for 2019, this data will be the baseline for future reports • Waste - not applicable - our 2020 dataset will be our baseline for future reports • Supply Chain - TBD • Equity + Inclusion - see KPI Table and global targets • Health & Well-being - see KPI Table and global targets • Education + Impact - see KPI Table and global targets

53

These include: • Code of Conduct • Equity and Diversity • Discrimination, Harassment & Bullying • Recruitment and Selection • Parental Leave • Professional Development and Training • Employee Relations • Health and Safety • Wellness • Travel Policy • Anti-Bribery & Anti-Corruption (ABC) Policy • Whistle Blowing Policy


A 02

Assumptions Planet Data

Energy & Water Data For offices that needed to rely on benchmarking proxy data either: • Data was collected from pro-rated landlord building data • Data was benchmarked from publicly disclosed data • Data was benchmarked from other published data These methods introduce a margin of error that is difficult to quantify – as the data is not from raw data, nor is it representative of only office use – it includes all common areas, and can be particularly problematic for mixed-use buildings particularly if the other uses have energy-intensive uses, such as hotels, or have industrial uses. It was assumed that the electricity factor sources listed on page 61 were representative of 2019 energy generation. Knowing that not all factors are not updated annually, the most current data available was used for all calculations. Publicly disclosed data had to be used for: • Austin - old office, water only - National benchmark • Belgrade - water only - Better Buildings Partnership • Calgary - Leased area consumption was calculated from the Canadian Median EUI for offices (SCIEU 2014) • Los Angeles - City benchmarking disclosure • New York - City benchmarking disclosure • San Jose - State of California benchmarking disclosure • Seattle - Whole Building, Landlord shared Portfolio Manager • Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney IG, Sydney UL - base-building data was calculated from the NABERS disclosure where available, and the NABERS regional median where is was not. • Sydney UL - Leased area consumption was calculated from the NABERS regional median • Toronto - Leased area consumption was calculated from the Canadian Median EUI for offices (SCIEU 2014) Using building-specific disclosed data means that we are assuming that energy consumption is equivalent in all leased areas of that building, and for regional benchmarks, it is assumed that the consumption is equivalent to an average building performance.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Whole building bills were used for:

Waste

• Atlanta, London, - water only

A waste audit procedure and tool were created to capture the waste data in a consistent manner to reduce variability in data collection The only assumption made post-collection was that the waste collected was representative of a typical day / week.

• DC • Edmonton • Richmond • San Diego • Vancouver (although some sub-metered data was available) • Victoria Previous Year data was used for: • Calgary - 2018 data used (this was also whole-building data) • Toronto - 2018 data used (electricity used direct utilities, but one was shared with a tenant. Consumption on this bill was assumed to be a 50:50 split. Gas and water were benchmarked to regional disclosures)

Employee Commute Emissions data has been prorated for transportation based on survey respondents and actual employee counts for November 2019 when the survey was completed.

Business Travel Corporate travel was split out from regional travel this year to allow us to analyze the environmental cost of our business in more detail. In doing this, we recognised that the travel data was incomplete for attendance of corporate initiatives such as the BIM retreat, Support Services Retreat, Fresh Voices Retreat and the Vancouver Leadership Summit. As such, for these events, emissions were calculated based on attendee lists. For all other business travel, where the expense record showed the destination, the emissions were calculated based on distance travelled. Where the destination was missing, an average distance / $ value was applied to estimate the distance travelled.

Where employees entered a description of their journey instead of a numerical figure, the average journey distance for that location and method was applied.

People data

Where employees were unable to provide a fuel efficiency for their vehicle, the UK Government DEFRA carbon factor for an average gas/petrol vehicle was applied even if they were not based in the UK where the factor is most relevant due to the difficulty in finding localised carbon factors for vehicles.

Aside from the Gender Representation in Technical Roles, People Data was collected based on a voluntary All Staff Survey during November 2019. Response rates were not 100%, so in turn the data is only representative of employees who completed the survey. Data was not prorated based on actual employee numbers due to the personal nature of the questions asked.

For the metrics on % employees using each travel method, the predominant method was chosen per person to calculate the result. Where two methods were equal, the method taking the most time was chosen. For this year, people disclosing travel by motorcycle were added to the car category, as were people with EV cars. The metrics will be reviewed for 2020 to ensure the categories are more appropriate for alternative transportation methods. All offices were reported by assuming the data collected was representative of 250 working days in the year.

54

Employee numbers listed are average numbers for the calendar year except for those used in relation to calculating employee commute. The values indicated at the top of each Regional Section numbers have been rounded to the nearest whole. These unrounded numbers match what was used for all Environmental Footprint calculations and were collected through our accounting team who shared monthly employee numbers from which we extracted the average yearly employee count. Remote employees were allocated to the office which they most frequent. Corporate employees were re-allocated to the office they most frequent. When calculating transportation data from survey responses, the responses were assumed to be representative of the remainder of the employees and pro-rated to actual employee numbers on the deadline date of the survey.


A 03

Glossary Energy Efficiency: A ratio of service provided to energy input (e.g., lumens to watts in

NGA Factors: National Greenhouse Accounts Factors are prepared by the Department

Agender: Individuals who identify as not having a gender. Some describe themselves as

the case of light bulbs). Services provided can include buildings-sector end uses such

of the Environment and Energy and is designed for use by companies and individuals to

genderless, while others see themselves as gender neutral.

as lighting, refrigeration, and heating: industrial processes; or vehicle transportation.

estimate greenhouse gas emissions

Asexual: The lack of a sexual attraction or desire for other people. One maybe asexual,

Unlike conservation, which involves some reduction of service, energy efficiency

Non-Binary: An adjective describing a person who does not identify exclusively as a

yet romantically attracted to others. Aromantic: Individuals who experience little or no romantic attraction to others of any

provides energy reductions without sacrifice of service. May also refer to the use of technology to reduce the energy needed for a given purpose or service.

man or a woman. Non-binary people may identify as being both a man and a woman, somewhere in between, or as falling completely outside these categories. While many

gender. One may be aromantic, yet sexually attracted to others.

Energy Use Intensity (EUI): The ratio of energy consumption to floor space.

also identify as transgender, not all non-binary people do.

Androgyne/Androgynous: Identifying and/or presenting as neither distinguishably

Ethnicity: A personal identification based on ancestry origin, language, and culture. Can

Pansexual: Describes someone who has the potential for emotional, romantic or sexual

masculine nor feminine.

also be based on religion, beliefs, and customs.

attraction to people of any gender though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same

Audit: A formal examination of an organization’s or individual’s accounts or financial

Fitwel: A building rating system to provide guidelines to design and operate healthier

way or to the same degree.

situation.

buildings. A cheaper alternative to the WELL Building Standard.

Personal Gender Pronoun: The pronouns that individuals self-select. Asking an

Baseline: The baseline (or reference) is the state against which change is measured. A

Gay: A person who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to members of the

individual for their personal pronouns versus assuming based on appearances can go a

baseline period is the period relative to which anomalies are computed.

same gender. Commonly used to describe men who are attracted to men.

long way in allowing someone to self-identify.

Bigender: Individuals who experience their gender identity as two genders at the same

Gender-fluid: A person who does not identify with a single fixed gender; of or relating

Race: A personal identification based on physical/biological attributes, such as skin

time or whose gender identity may vary between two genders.

to a person having or expressing a fluid or unfixed gender identity.

tone, facial features, hair, etc.

Bisexual: A person emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to more than one

Genderqueer: Genderqueer people typically reject notions of static categories of

Queer: A term people often use to express fluid identities and orientations. Often used

sex, gender or gender identity though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree. Biophilia: The practice of incorporating nature and natural elements into the built environment Carbon Intensity: The amount of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) released per unit of another variable such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), output energy use or transport. Cisgender: A term used to describe a person whose gender identity aligns with those typically associated with the sex assigned to them at birth. (i.e. “Cisman” & “Ciswoman”) CO2-equivalent (CO2e, CO2eq) emission: The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emission that would cause the same integrated radiative forcing, over a given time horizon, as an emitted amount of a greenhouse gas (GHG) or a mixture of GHGs. The CO2-equivalent emission is obtained by multiplying the emission of a GHG by its Global Warming Potential (GWP) for the given time horizon. For a mix of GHGs it is obtained by summing the CO2-equivalent emissions of each gas. Decarbonization: The process by which countries or other entities aim to achieve a low-carbon economy, or by which individuals aim to reduce their consumption of carbon. Demigender: Individuals who feel a partial connection to a particular gender identity. Examples of demigender identities include demigirl, and demiboy, and demiandrogyne. Department of Environment, Fisheries, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) factors: The UK government emission conversion factors for greenhouse gas company reporting. eGRID factors: The Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) is a comprehensive source of data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric power generated in the United States.

gender and embrace a fluidity of gender identity and often, though not always, sexual

interchangeably with “LGBTQ.”

orientation. People who identify as “genderqueer” may see themselves as being

Resilience: The capacity of social, economic and environmental systems to cope with

both male and female, neither male nor female or as falling completely outside these

a hazardous event or trend or disturbance, responding or reorganizing in ways that

categories.

maintain their essential function, identity and structure, while also maintaining the

Greenhouse gas emissions (GHG): Greenhouse gases are those gaseous constituents

capacity for adaptation, learning and transformation.

of the atmosphere, both natural and anthropogenic, that absorb and emit radiation

SDGs: 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are an urgent call for action by all

at specific wavelengths within the spectrum of thermal infrared radiation emitted

countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that

by the Earth’s surface, the atmosphere itself, and by clouds. This property causes

ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that

the greenhouse effect. Water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O),

improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while

methane (CH4) and ozone (O3) are the primary greenhouse gases in the Earth’s

tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests.

atmosphere.

Sustainability: A dynamic process that guarantees the persistence of natural and

IGES Factors: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies are a publisher of a global

human systems in an equitable manner. Sustainability is a triple bottom line approach =

list of grid emission factors. This list is used when a regional source cannot be found.

People, Planet, Profit.

Indirect Emissions: Emissions that are a consequence of the activities within well-

Transgender: An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or expression is

defined boundaries of, for instance, a region, an economic sector, a company or

different from cultural expectations based on the sex they were assigned at birth. Being

process, but which occur outside the specified boundaries of the activity.

transgender does not imply any specific sexual orientation. Therefore, transgender

Just Label: A voluntary disclosure tool for organizations to help optimize policies that

people may identify as straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, etc. Transgender is not a noun,

improve social equity and enhance employee engagement.

nor verb and is offensive if used in that manner.

Key Performance Indicator (KPI): a measurable value that demonstrates how

Trans-Man: A man who was assigned female at birth. Can be based on gender or sex.

effectively a company is achieving key business objectives. Organizations use KPIs to

Trans-Woman: A woman who was assigned male at birth. Can be based on gender or

evaluate their success at reaching targets.

sex.

Lesbian: A woman who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to other

Water Use Intensity (WUI): The ratio of water consumption to floor space.

women.

Wellness: An active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy

NABERS Rating: the National Australian Built Environment Rating System, is an

and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process

initiative by the government of Australia to measure and compare the environmental

of change and growth.

performance of Australian buildings and tenancies.

WGBC: The World Green Building Council is a global network of Green Building Councils which is transforming the places we live, work, play, heal and learn.

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

55


A 04

Resources General

Census Data

LGBTQIA+

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager

id – the population experts, Australia Community Profile, Greater Sydney Ancestry

GLAAD

Fitwel

Office for National Statistics (UK), 2011 Census Analysis

GLAAD, Tips for Allies of Transgender People

John Hopkin’s University’s (JHU) “Diversity Wheel”

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Calgary Census Metropolitan Area

Human Rights Campaign

JUST Label - Living Future Institute

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Toronto Census Metropolitan Area

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates

Stanford University Gendered Innovations Project

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates, Allies Tips for the Workplace

UC Davis Student Health and Counseling Services Dimensions of Wellness

Statistics Canada, 2016 Census, Victoria Census Metropolitan Area

UMASS. LGBTQIA+ Terminology

United States Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, Commercial

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts California

Reference Buildings

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Georgia

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Texas

World Green Building Council (WGBC), The Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Virginia

WGBC: Advancing Net Zero

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Washington

WGBC: Better Places for Better People

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Washington, DC

WGBC: Case Study Library World Resource Institute (WRI), The Greenhouse Gas Protocol for the U.S. Public Sector

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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A 05

Environmental Footprint All Metrics UN SDG

Environmental Footprint All Metrics bold = KPI

Unit of Measurement

Total gas use

Global Performance

Global Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

kWh

442,147.55

849,258.44

92%

Better DCQ; 100% Offset

25% Reduction

50% Reduction

Total electricity use

kWh

1,104,842.12

1,228,082.43

11%

Best DCQ; 100% Offset

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

Total combined gas and electricity use

kWh

1,583,426.22

2,077,340.87

31%

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total combined gas and electricity emissions

kgCO2e

396,094.05

664,509.31

68%

100% Offset

100% Offset

100% Offset

Total combined gas and electricity emissions per person

kgCO2e

830.07

873.89

5%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Average energy use intensity

kWh/m2

207.88

210.70

1%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Total water consumption

m3

6,287.10

8,971.00

43%

Best DCQ; 100% Offset

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

Total water consumption per person

m3

13.18

11.80

-10%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Total commute emissions per person

kgCO2e

735.59

956.56

30%

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Employees taking public transit

%

38.00

51.03

34%

Set new targets via survey

TBD

TBD

Employees that cycle/walk

%

35.00

17.01

-51%

Set new targets via survey

TBD

TBD

Employees that drive

%

28.10

31.96

14%

Set new targets via survey

TBD

TBD

Total flight emissons tonnes per person

kgCO2e

1,033.00

1,251.46

21%

Global travel agency to track

100% Offset Flight Emissions

10% Reduction from 2025

Total waste emissions per person

kgCO2e

14.00

4.62

-67%

Set Audit Process + Policy

25% Reduction

50% Reduction

Recycled waste

%

63.80

54.30

-15%

Set Baseline - Waste Audits

0.75

0.9

Total emissions for waste, energy, business travel, and employee commute

tCO2e

1,229.70

2,294.04

87%

Gas + Elec + Water: 100% Offset

=+Flights / +Employee Commute

100% + Waste Offset

Total emissions for waste, energy, business travel, and employee commute per person

tCO2e

2.58

3.02

17%

n/a

n/a

n/a

Sustainable + Wellness purchasing policy

No

No

-

Policy released

Establish targets/tracking

TBD

Environmental Policy

No

No

-

Policy released

Establish targets/tracking

TBD

Average Energy Star scores

1-100

74.00

71.50

-3%

TBD

TBD

TBD

Suppliers who complete a supplier questionnaire

%

-

-

-

Survey created and issued

0.25

0.5

Supplier respondents with procedures compliant with or equivalent to ISO14001

%

-

-

-

Survey created and issued

0.01

0.05

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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A 05

N/A

BETTER

NR

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Electricity

BETTER

BEST

BEST

BETTER

BEST

BEST

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

BEST

BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

BEST

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

District Steam*

BETTER

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BETTER

BETTER

N/A

Water

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BETTER

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BETTER

BETTER

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

BETTER

NR

NR

BETTER

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

BETTER

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

BETTER

BETTER

NR

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

BEST

Victoria (VIC)

N/A

loor 2

GOOD

Vancouver (VAN)

N/A

Floor 1

Toronto (TOR)

N/A

Vancouver (VAN)

Sydney UL (SYD)

N/A

Spring Street

BETTER

Sydney IG (SYD)

GOOD

Walker Street N

N/A

Sydney IG (SYD)

BETTER

WeWork

San Diego (SD)

BETTER

Seattle (SEA)

Richmond (RVA)

BEST

WeWork

New York (NY)

BETTER

San Jose (SJ)

Melbourne (MEL) N/A

Milton Park

London (LON) BETTER

Oxford (OX)

Los Angeles (LA) N/A

WeWork

Edmonton (EDM) BETTER

DC (DC)

N/A

17th Street NW

BETTER

L Street NW

Calgary (CAL) GOOD

DC (DC)

Brisbane (BNE) N/A

Makenzijeva

N/A

Belgrade (BEL)

N/A

Foundry

N/A

Austin (ATX)

N/A

E. Cesaer Chavez

BETTER

Austin (ATX)

Atlanta (ATL)

Oakland, CA (OAK)

2019 Data Quality Performance

Rating

Global Performance

2019

Environmental Footprint Data Quality Matrix

SCOPE 1 - Direct A

Company Facilities - Gas

Gas

B

Company Fleet Vehicles

Fleet Vehicle

SCOPE 2 - Indirect C (1) C (1)* C (2)

Purchased indirect Utilities (Electricity, District Steam*, Heating & Cooling for Own Operations Use; Water)

SCOPE 3 - Indirect Upstream D

Purchased Goods and Services

E

Capital Goods

F G

Office Supplies

Fuel & Energy activities (not included in Scopes 1+2) Upstream transportation and distribution

H

Waste Generated in Operations

Waste

I

Business Travel

Business Travel

J

Employee Commuting

Employee Commuting

N/A

Not Applicable to our Business

NR

Not Reported at this time (Data points not available currently)

GOOD

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Benchmarking Data (i.e. CBECS COM Energy / LEED Water Assumptions); preliminary data collection efforts which could use improvement (waste, flights, commute)

BETTER

Whole Building Metered Data OR Utility Bills - prorated usage by rentable area; better data quality, improvements made (waste, flights, commute)

BEST

Whole Building Metered Data OR Utility Bills - prorated usage by rentable area; better data quality, improvements made (waste, flights, commute)

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A 05

Environmental Footprint Calculations + Benchmarks Calculating Our Emissions

Benchmark

Benchmarking Data Sources

The World Resource Institute (WRI) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol for Corporations outlines three emissions scope categories: direct, indirect, and indirect upstream and downstream:

Benchmarked data comes from third party sources, and does not reflect actual performance of our buildings in any way.

US Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECs) 2018 - US and Canada

It’s primary use is to compare our actual performance to that expected of a similar building, in a similar location. It is also used where actual consumption data was not available for an office. In these cases, standard benchmarking datasets and tools were used to determine typical electric, gas, and water use intensities for office buildings within similar regional zone.

• EIA EUI Median Office Data; EU Average Commercial EUI - Serbia

• Scope 1: onsite combustion of natural gas or other fossil fuels • Scope 2: electricity, district steam, water • Scope 3: waste, business travel, employee commute We recognize our current evaluations may not be in full accordance with the Protocol. As our data quality improves we will strive for full alignment. In addition to using actual consumption data for the majority of our calculations, we measured a benchmark carbon footprint to assess how close to the expected consumption range our buildings are performing. Benchmarked data takes into consideration monthly weather data to more accurately account for predicted use of energy and gas, and so changes year on year. We used industry standard benchmarking datasets and tools to determine typical electric, gas, and water use intensities for office buildings. Wherever possible, those tools were used to adjust the energy use baselines to be specific for each office location, density, and use, to present the energy use that would be expected if the building performed at the industry median. Data were drawn from the sources in the right hand column of this page.

• Benchmarking proxy data was necessary for the following 10 offices: Austin – Water (old office); Belgrade - Water; Brisbane - Water; Calgary - Electricity, Gas, Water; LA - Electricity, Gas (base-building); Melbourne - Water; Sydney (IG) - Electricity (old office), Water; Sydney (UL) - Electricity, Water; San Jose – Electricity, Water; Toronto – Electricity, Gas, Water. • Our Los Angeles, New York and San Jose design studios were not able to provide actual utility bills. However, these offices are located within regions with statutory disclosure, and so usage was computed source-to-site ratio. Likewise, disclosed whole building data was available for Seattle and NYC. • For our Australian offices, if utility data was missing, the NABERS disclosure was used to estimate performance. Where it was not, the regional median NABERS score was used as a benchmark. Where Benchmarked data is not available for non-utility based KPI’s, we will use a high quality annual data set to create a Baseline for which we compare future performance. This is typical of our Scope 3 measurements such as Employee Commute and Business Flights.

Statistics Canada Survey on Commercial and Institutional Energy Use (SCIEU), 2014 Better Buildings Partnership Real Estate Environmental Benchmark, 2019 typical practice Air Conditioned Office – UK National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) - Whole Building Office Data Report 2019 - Australia U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager National Median EUI – US and Canada Real Property Association of Canada, Water Management, 2011 – Canada National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) - Australia US DOE CBECS Water Consumption, 2012 – US (2018 updated data not available at time of publication)

Electrical Grid Carbon Factors DEFRA - UK Government (Canada) eGRID – US carbon factors - US Environmental Protection Agency (USA) ES Portfolio Manager Technical Reference Guide (Canada) IGES List - Global Emissions Factor Listing (Serbia) NGA – National Greenhouse Accounts Factors (Australia)

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

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20

A 05

Technical

Non-Technical

Environmental Footprint EUI + Energy Star 10

0

US East

US West

Australia (177)

Remote*

Generated (kg) + Associated Emissions (kgCO2e) EnergyWaste Use Intensity (EUI) 19.4%

500

7,000

kgCO2e

kg Waste Per Annum

We are exploring opportunities to reduce energy use intensity across all offices 6,000 400 be through the Zero Carbon Operation Plan - a global initiative which will 5,000 reported on in the 2020 CSER Report. Measuring our energy use intensity will allow us to track improvements in efficiency over time, whereas our300 absolute 4,000 6.3% energy use may increase as we grow our employee base and open new offices. 3,000 Our main priority will be to not increase energy use per unit area, maintaining 200 or 2,000 improving relative efficiency. 1.3% 0.0%

0 US East Atlanta (23)

DC (16)

London US West* (62)

300

5,000

San Diego (3)

0.0%

Electricity EUI 2 (kWh/m ) Benchmark

250 4,500

2018 (baseline) 2019

3,000

150

2,500

2,000

100

1,500

1,000

50

500

0

0

Managing Principals

0 Australia Benchmark (177)

Canada 2019 (263)

Europe Benchmark (101)

90

2019

Benchmark

US East (74)

2019

Well

US West (157)

60 50 50%

40 30

75%

20 100%

100%

100%

78.3%

80%

100%

100%

100%

92.3%

100%

100%

100

2018

201

10 0

300

Australia

2019

Average Energy Star Score by Region (Average Headcount) Principals / Senior Principals

2018

250

Electricity EUI 2 (kWh/m 2019 )

Canada

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

Gas / Steam EUI 2 (kWh/m ) 2019 2018 Europe

US East (74)

US West (157) 21.7%

20% 7.7%

2018

2019 US East

60

200

Europe50% (101)

Canada (263)

EUI Benchmarks and 2019 Peformance Region (Average Headcount) 25%

2019

Europe (101)

Benchmark

Benchmark

Australia (177)

2018

2019

70

Remote*

19.4%

US West (157)Benchmark

Canada (263)

2019 Energy Star Score

80

The ENERGY STAR tool does not contain such data for our offices in the United Kingdom, Serbia and Australia. For these offices, where alternative ratings systems were in place (NABERS for Australia, EIA for Serbia and Better Buildings in the 73.30% UK), a dataset representing a similar efficiency rating was used as a reference point, so for those offices, the scores may not fully represent of how the buildings perform relative to their local peers. Under ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, a score of 50 represents the median 100% 100% performance as compared to peers, while a rating of 75 or higher indicates top performers. 13 out of 22 of our design studios are considered top performers according to this scoring, while three fall below the median performance.

US East (74) 2019

Average Energy Star Score by Region (Average Headcount)

All offices were entered into the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool to achieve a rating out of 100. These scores were calculated with normalized data for all United States and Canadian offices - normalization was for climate zone, or location and property use, whichever was more accurate for each location.

US West

EUI Benchmarks and 2019 Peformance Region (Average Headcount)

200 3,500

Vancouver Remote (176)

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager

US West (157)

Gas / Steam EUI (kWh/m2)

Australia (177)

26.70% US East

US East (74)

4,000

100

0.3%

Europe (101)

EUI Benchmarks and 2019 Peformance Region (Average Headcount) Water Consumption (m3) by OďŹƒce (Average Headcount)

EUI is an important metric for reporting our portfolio, as it provides normalized 10,000 700 energy use Garbage data per meter. (kg)square Recycling (kg) Per our World Green Building Council’s Net Organics (kg) Emissions (kgCO2e) 9,000 Zero Carbon Buildings commitment, we are not only required to offset 100% of 600 our scope 1 and scope 2 energy related emissions, but also to show reductions 8,000 in energy consumption.

1,000

Canada (263)

2018

2019 US West

2018

2019 Australia

2018

2019 Canada

Europe


Atlanta (23)

700,000 Austin (17)

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019 Belgrade Brisbane (24) (25) Calgary (34)

GHG Emissions in KgCO2e by Region (Average Headcount) DC (16) Edmonton (5) LA (39)

Gas Steam London (62) Melbourne (98)

Electricity NYC (7)

61 Oakland (104)

Employee Commute Oxford (15)

Business Travel

Richmond San Diego (11) (3) San Jose (8) Seattle (3) Sydney IG Sydney UL (19) (35) Toronto (35) Vancouver (176)

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

2019 Performance

2018 Performance (Baseline)

Benchmark

Environmental Footprint GHG Emissions by Office A 05

GHG Emissions by OďŹƒce (Average Headcount)

300,000.00

250,000.00

200,000.00

150,000.00

100,000.00

50,000.00

-

Victoria (13)


A 06

Equity + Inclusion All Metrics UN SDG

Equity + Inclusion All Metrics bold = KPI

Unit of Measurement

Gender distribution of all employees

Global Performance

Global Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

% Female

32.9%

32.0%

-0.9%

40%

45%

50%

Gender distribution of all technical employees

% Female

28.9%

25.4%

-3.5%

30%

40%

50%

Gender distribution of Associates (% F/M)

% Female

34.8%

24.4%

-10.4%

30%

40%

50%

Gender distribution of Associate Principals (% F/M)

% Female

10.0%

19.1%

9.1%

20%

35%

50%

Gender distribution of Principals (% F/M)

% Female

4.9%

14.8%

9.9%

15%

30%

50%

Gender distribution of Office Leadership (% F/M)

% Female

9.1%

15.0%

5.9%

10%

30%

50%

Gender distribution of Senior Management (% F/M)

% Female

28.6%

23.1%

-5.5%

20%

30%

50%

Gender Pay Equity evaluation

TBD

In Process

In Process

-

Third Party Analysis

Third Party Analysis

Third Party Analysis

Proportion Workforce made up of UnderRepresented Groups

%

Process Determined

47.6%

-

50%

50%

50%

Nationalities represented by employees

#

38

65

29

No Target

No Target

No Target

Languages spoken by employees

#

Not collected

54

-

No Target

No Target

No Target

Races/ethnicities represented by employees

#

Data collected

Data collected

-

Evaluate data & set strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Sexual orientation representation

#

Data collected

Data collected

-

Evaluate data & set strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Gender identity representation

#

Data collected

Data collected

-

Evaluate data & set strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

62


A 06

Equity + Inclusion Employee Gender Distribution Global Global

Category Category

Global

Male Female

69.2% 69.2%

78.7% 78.7%

30.8% 30.8%

21.3% 21.3%

Average Headcount) Average Headcount)

2018 2018

2019 2019

69.9% 69.9%

70.1% 70.1%

30.1% 30.1%

29.9% 29.9%

2018 2018

Australia Australia

34.5% 34.5%

28.8%

64.2% 64.2%

69.6% 69.6%

35.8% 35.8%

30.4% 30.4%

53.8% 53.8%

60.4% 60.4%

2018 2018

Canada Canada

2019 2019

2018 2018

Europe Europe 1,000,000 1,000,000 900,000 900,000

2019 2019

2018 2018

US East US East

92.9% 92.9%

90.5% 90.5%

87.4% 87.4%

84.2% 84.2%

7.1% 7.1%

9.5% 9.5%

12.6% 12.6%

15.8% 15.8%

2018 2018

2019 2019

2018 2018

2019 2019

2019 2019

Australia Australia

US West US West

18.7% 18.7%

700,000 700,000 2018 Average 2018 Average

69.2% 69.2% 85.0% 85.0%

78.6% 2019 Average 78.6% 2019 Average

500,000 500,000 78.7% 79.6% 78.7% 79.6% 400,000 400,000

72.1% 72.1%

66.7% 66.7%

73.6% 73.6%

2018 2018

2019 2019 Australia Australia

Technical Technical

21.4% US West (157) 21.4% US West (157)

2018 2018

20.4% 20.4%

2019 2019 Canada Canada

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

0 0

81.3% 81.3%

33.3% 33.3% 27.9% 27.9% Australia (177) Canada (262) 21.3% Australia (177) Canada (262) 21.3%

2018 2018

2019 2019 Europe Europe

26.4%

26.4% Europe (101) Europe (101)

2018 2018

2019 2019 US East US East

12.6% 12.6%

11.1% 11.1%

8.9% 8.9%

2018 2018

2019 2019

2018 2018

2019 2019

86.9% 86.9%

84.1% 84.1%

13.1% 13.1%

15.9% 15.9%

2018 2018

2019 2019

US East US East

US West US West

18.5% 18.5%

18.6% 18.6%

14.3% 14.3%

20.0% 20.0%

28.6% 28.6%

33.3% 33.3%

44.4% 44.4%

81.5% 81.5%

81.4% 81.4%

85.7% 85.7%

80.0% 80.0%

71.4% 71.4%

66.7% 66.7%

55.6% 55.6%

43.9% 43.9%

37.8% 37.8% US East (74) US East (74)

10.3% 10.3%

Europe Europe

100% 100%

200,000 200,000

30.8% 30.8% Europe (101) US East (74) Europe (101) US East 15.0% (74) 15.0%

91.1% 91.1%

56.1% 56.1%

62.2% 62.2%

300,000 300,000

100,000 100,000

88.9% 88.9%

Non-Technical

800,000 800,000

600,000 600,000

87.4% 87.4%

Canada Canada

2019 Performance 2019 Performance 2018 Performance (baseline) 2018 Performance (baseline)

Technical

89.7% 89.7%

46.2% 46.2%

39.6% 39.6%

28.8% Total Energy Consumption (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount) Total Energy Consumption (kWh) by Region (Average Headcount)

2019 2019

2019 Performance 2019 Performance 2018 Performance (baseline) 2018 Performance (baseline)

Non-Technical

65.5% 65.5%

71.2% 71.2%

Distribution by Category

Technical

40.0% 40.0%

60.0% 60.0%

US West (157) US West (157)

2018 2018

2019 2019

2018 2018

US West US West

2019 2019 Australia Australia

63

Non-Technical Non-Technical

2018 2018

2019 2019 Canada Canada

2018 2018

2019 2019 Europe Europe

2018 2018

2019 2019 US East US East

2018 2018

2019 2019 US West US West


0 0

Remote Remote

Benchmark Benchmark

2019 2019

Benchmark Benchmark

Australia (177) Australia (177)

Canada (263) Canada (263)

2019 2019

Benchmark Benchmark

Europe (101) Europe (101)

2019 2019

Benchmark Benchmark

US East (74) US East (74)

2019 2019

Benchmark Benchmark

US West (157) US West (157)

Equity + Inclusion Gender Distribution by Grade Managing Principals Managing Principals

2019 2019

A 06

Principals / Senior Principals Principals / Senior Principals

Managing Principals

Male Female

Senior Principals / Principals

50% 50% 75% 75% 100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

80% 80%

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

92.3% 92.3%

78.3% 78.3% 100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

85.7% 85.7%

85.7% 85.7%

83.3% 83.3%

14.3% 14.3%

14.3% 14.3%

16.7% 16.7%

2019 2019

2018 2018

2019 2019

50% 50% 25% 25%

2018 2018

2019 2019

2018 2018

Australia Australia

2019 2019

2018 2018

Canada Canada

2019 2019

20% 20%

2018 2018

Europe Europe

2019 2019

21.7% 21.7%

7.7% 7.7% 2018 2018

US East US East

2019 2019

2018 2018

US West US West

2019 2019

2018 2018

Australia Australia

2019 2019 Canada Canada

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%

9.1% 9.1%

Australia Australia

2018 2018

2019 2019 Canada Canada

Associate Principals Associate Principals INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

2018 2018

2019 2019 Europe Europe

US West US West

70.0% 70.0%

83.3% 83.3%

88.0% 88.0%

2018 2018

2019 2019 US East US East

2018 2018

85.7% 85.7%

71.4% 71.4%

2018 2018

2019 2019

64

16.7% 16.7% 2019 2019

Australia Australia

US West US West

33.3% 33.3%

Asociate Asociate

2018 2018 Canada Canada

12.0% 12.0%

14.3% 14.3%

2019 2019

2018 2018 Europe Europe

30.0% 30.0%

28.6% 28.6%

2019 2019

2018 2018

52.4% 52.4%

55.0% 55.0%

47.6% 47.6%

45.0% 45.0%

2018 2018

2019 2019

77.8% 77.8%

58.3% 58.3% 30.8% 30.8%

2019 2019

66.7% 66.7%

100% 100%

50.0% 50.0%

2018 2018

US East US East

41.7% 41.7% 69.2% 69.2%

100% 100%

2018 2018

Associates

50.0% 50.0%

100% 100%

2019 2019 Europe Europe

Associate Principals

90.9% 90.9%

2018 2018

22.2% 22.2% 2019 2019 US East US East

US West US West


A 07

Health + Well-being All Metrics UN SDG

Health + Well-being All Metrics bold = KPI

Unit of Measurement

Total number of employee social events

Global Performance

GLobal Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

#

209

240

31

Tracking process established

Quarterly per office

Quarterly per office

Comprehensive healthcare plan for employees (% of medical, dental, vision)

%

Data collected

Data collected

-

Re-evaluate metrics and targets

TBD

TBD

Employees receiving performance reviews (%)

%

100%

100%

0%

100%

100%

100%

Average Workplace Satisfaction

1-10 scale

8.5

7.64

-0.86

Global survey established

Best work places - global

Best work places - global

Employee turnover rate (%)

%

Reporting framework in process

Reporting framework in process

-

<12%

<12%

<12%

Average Work Station Satisfaction

1-10 scale

7.69

7.5

-0.19

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

Average Workplace Environment Satisfaction

1-10 scale

7.47

7.69

0.22

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

Total number of local Health/Wellbeing Initiatives

# per office

Data collected

Data collected

-

1 per office

2 per office

3 per office

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

65


31.3% 31.3% 16.0%

Health + Well-being All Staff Survey 8.0%

6.9%

9.0%

Australia

Canada

Europe

US East

US West

12.0% 12.0%

11.4% 11.4%

Australia Australia

Canada Canada

How often do you acknowledge others for a job well done? 3.3% 0.8%

3.2% 0.9% 12.8% 23.3%

19.2% 30.1%

4.6% 2.3% 12.6% 18.4%

Europe Europe

9.5% 16.1%

1.9% 1.9%

Never Once a Week A Few Times a Week

13.2% 13.2%

19.4% 19.4%

1.2% 1.2% 19.5% 19.5%

1.6% 1.6% 13.4% 13.4%

Many Times a Day

29.6% 22.0%

11.2% 11.2%

34.3%

31.0%

8.9% 12.0%

14.9% 16.1%

Australia Australia

Canada Canada

Europe Europe

9.0% 4.5% US East

US East

16.0% 19.4%

13.8% 13.2%

1.2% 1.2% 9.2% 19.5%

16.4% 13.4%

Australia Australia

US West US West

36.0% 38.7%

37.6% 39.0%

32.2%

46.5% 42.4%

39.2% 36.3%

39.9% 38.0%

40.2%

32.8% 29.9%

7.2% 5.7%

6.4% 8.0%

8.1% 6.9%

6.0% 9.0%

Australia Australia

Canada Canada

Europe Europe

1.6% 1.6% 5.5% 11.2%

44.8% 47.8%

47.1%

US East US East

40.2% 40.2%

Canada Canada

6.9% 6.9%

Europe Europe

Environmental 3.3% Footprint 3.3%

3.2% 3.2%

44.8% 44.8%

42.4% 42.4% 32.8% 32.8%

2019 Personal Developme

9.0% 9.0%

US East US East

Equity + Inclusion 30.1%

23.3% 23.3%

30.1%

Health + Well-Being Education + 35.8% 35.8% Impact Safety + Resilience

27.4% 27.4%

29.2% 29.2%

Zero Carbon 4.6% Ops Plan 4.6%

18.4% Diversity Council 18.4%

11.8% 16.0%

IGives (Integral Gives)

US West US West

29.9% 29.9%

37.9% Safety + Emergency 37.9% Response Planning34.3%

16.0% 16.0%

US West US West

1.6% 1.6% 16.1% 16.1%

14.9% 14.9%

Australia Australia

Canada Canada

Europe Europe

1.6% 1.6%

2.3% 2.3%

1.2% 1.2%

9.0% 9.0%

US East US East

6-10 hours

32.3% 32.3%

1.6%

11-25 hours 26-50 hours 51-100 hours >100 hours

31.5% 31.5%

18.5% 18.5% US West US West

66

4.6%

0 hours 1-5 hours

34.3%

16.9% 16.9%

8.9% 8.9%

26.9% 26.9%

Happiness, 24.1% Satisfaction, Culture 24.1%

22.0% 22.0%

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

3.2%

2019 Professiona

How often to you take actions to improve processes, methods, documentation etc. so that things go smoothly next time?

34.7% 28.8%

34.5%

8.0% 8.0%

5.7% 5.7%

CSER Reporting Categories

2.3% 1.9%

32.2% 32.2%

Integral Engaged

18.5% 14.3%

How often do you feel you have done a good job at work? 1.6%

38.0% 38.0%

36.3% 36.3%

31.3% 16.9% 11.4%

28.8% 28.8%

CSER +

31.5%

37.9% 40.2%

39.0% 39.0%

38.7% 38.7%

29.9% 38.8%

35.8%

29.2% 34.2%

32.3% 43.7%

Employee-led Initiatives

40.6% 27.4%

38.4%

3.3%

US West US West

US East

Daily

28.7% 24.1%

A 07

14.3% 14.3%

4.5% 4.5% US East

How often do you feel proud of the work you produce? 1.6% 1.6%

26.9% 25.4%

16.1% 16.1%

CSER CSERReporting ReportingCategories Categories

5.7%

1.6% 1.6%


A 08

Education + Impact All Metrics UN SDG

Education + Impact All Metrics bold = KPI

Unit of Measurement

External industry presentations given by employees (i.e. at conferences)

Global Performance

Global Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

#

30+ (tracking process in development)

113

(+) 83

Tracking process in place

10% of FTE; review effectiveness

10% of FTE; review effectiveness

Number of publications

#

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

Tracking process in place

25

50

Hours of educational outreach

hours

Program in development

Program in development

-

Define program; establish policy and tracking process

1 paid day per employee per year

2 paid days per employee per year

Company supported volunteer hours (IGives)

hours

Program in development

Program in development

-

8 hours annually per employee

16 hours annually per employee

24 hours annually per employee

Externally provided CPD (continuing professional development) opportunities offered

days

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

Tracking process in place

2 per office per month

2 per office per month

Hours of external CPD received by employees within office

hours

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

Tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

Internally delivered seminars/workshops

#

200+ (tracking process in development)

300+

(+) 100

Tracking process in place

1 per office per month

2 per office per month

Staff-wide open design reviews

#

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

Tracking process in place

1 per office per quarter

Every significant project as defined by PIC

Amount awarded for Impact Fund

$USD

$190,000

$200,000

+$10,000

.5% profit

.5% profit

.5% profit

Amount raised for Charity (by employees)

$USD

$8,000 (tracking process in development)

$26,174.24

+ $18,174

TBD

TBD

TBD

Campaigns (example Plastic Free July)

#

Target met

Target Met

-

1 per office

2 per office

3 per office

Total donations (from organization)

$USD

$12,658

$20,394

+ $7,736

1% of profit

2% of profit

3% of profit

Total charitable giving (donation from organization + raised by employees)

$USD

$20,658

$46,568

+ $25,910

0

0

0

Total industry/event sponsorships

$USD

$77,000+

$118,334

+ $41,334

Tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

Utilization rate of annual professional development funds

%

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

30%

50%

80%

Total volunteer hours reported (company supported and personal)

hours

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

Policy and tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

Total personal Development hours

hours

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in development

-

Tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

67


A 08

Education + Impact Appendix

019 rmance

porate

2019 Volunteer Hours outside Workoutside Hours 2019 Volunteer Hours 90

55

80

50

70

Employees

80 70

40

60

60

35

50

30

50

40

25

40

20

30

30

15

20

20

10

10

10

5

0

0 Australia

Canada

Europe/UK

US East

US West

0 Australia

2019 Volunteer Hours through Company 2019 Volunteer Hours Events through Company Events (Annually) 90

Canada

Europe/UK

US East

US West

2019 ProfessionalDevelopment Development outside Work Work Hours Hours (Annually) 2019 Professional outside

55 50

80

45

70

40

60

Employees

90

45

g (Annually)

US West

2019 Professional Development through Company Training Training (Annually) 2019 Professional Development through Company

Work Hours (Annually)

35

50

30

40

25 20

30

15

20

10

10

5 0

0 Australia

Canada

Europe/UK

US East

Australia

US West

Canada

Europe/UK

US East

>100 Hours 51-100 Hours 26-50 Hours 11-25 Hours 6-10 Hours 1-5 Hours 0 Hours

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

68

US West


A 09

Safety + Resilience All Metrics Safety + Resilience All Metrics bold = KPI

Unit of Measurement

Offices with Health and Safety Representative or Committee

UN SDG

Global Performance

Global Targets

2018 (baseline)

2019

Change (+/-)

2020

2025

2030

%

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Insurance rate discount based on safety performance

%

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Number of time-loss claims

# claims

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Total work days lost to incendents

# days

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Average number of days lost to incendents (per person)

# days

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Total claim costs paid

$USD

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Offices with formalized Emergency Response Plans

%

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Offices with an operational playbook in place

#

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Senior positions with a training plan in place (redundancy in leadership/management)

#

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Senior positions with a second in command

#

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

% of formalized IT Disaster Recovery Protocol

%

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

Employees undertaken ABC Training

%

-

Proposed Metrics

-

-

-

-

INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

69


INTEGRAL GROUP CSER REPORT 2019

70


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