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STOKES COUNTY

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PREPARED FOR: Stokes County, NC Town of Danbury, NC Town of Walnut Cove, NC City of King, NC

PREPARED BY:

WITH SUPPORT FROM:


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS STOKES COUNTY

TOWN OF WALNUT COVE

STOKES 2035 VISION PLAN OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

Ronda Jones, Chairman, Board of Commissioners

Lynn Lewis, Mayor

Mike Barsness, Administrator, Town of Danbury

Jimmy Walker, Vice Chairman, Board of Commissioners

Elwood Mabe, Mayor Pro Tem

James Booth, Member, Board of Commissioners

Sharon Conaway, Commissioner

Chelsea Bullins, Health Educator, Stokes County Health Department

J. Leon Inman, Member, Board of Commissioners

Kim Lewis, Commissioner

Ernest Lankford, Member, Board of Commissioners

Natalie Smiley, Commissioner

Rick Morris, County Manager

Monty Stevens, Interim Town Manager

Todd Cox, Planning Director, City of King

David Sudderth, Planning Director, Stokes County

CITY OF KING

Scott Lenhart, Director, Stokes County Health Department Jack Warren, Mayor Dillard Burnette, Mayor Pro Tem

Janet Whitt, Mayor Gary East, Council Member David Hoskins, Council Member Wendi Spraker, Council Member Steve Shelton, Council Member Mike Barsness, Town Administrator

Monty Stevens, Interim Manager, Town of Walnut Cove David Sudderth, Planning Director, Stokes County

Alan Wood, Director, Economic Development

TOWN OF DANBURY

Scott Lenhart, Director, Stokes County Health Department

Charles Allen, Councilman Brian Carico, Councilman Wesley Carter, Councilman Homer Dearmin, City Manager Todd Cox, Planning Director

Alan Wood, Director, Stokes County Economic Development Commission


TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1

CHAPTER 3: LAND USE

73

Background

2

Methodology

74

Planning Process

3

Land Use Framework Maps

76

Public Engagement and Vision

4

Land Use Policies

80

Planning Elements

6

Implementation Matrix

15

CHAPTER 4: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

89

Business Recruitment

90

Small Business and Main Street Development

96

19

Workforce Development

106

Project Background

20

Quality of Life and Tourism Development

108

Planning Goals

22

Planning Process

23

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1: COUNTY PROFILE

25

CHAPTER 5: RECREATION

111

Recreation Goals

112

Recommendations

112

CHAPTER 6: TRANSPORTATION

117

Demographics

26

Physical Environment

34

Existing Transportation Infrastructure Overview

118

Previous Plans and Reports

38

Previous Transportation Plans

121

Framework Maps

40

Transportation Policies

123

CHAPTER 2: PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

45

CHAPTER 7: INFRASTRUCTURE

125

Public Engagement

46

Water Infrastructure

126

Vision

70

Municipal Wastewater

127

Infrastructure Policies

128


LIST OF MAPS

LIST OF EXHIBITS

Map 1: Health by Design Study Area

20

Exhibit 1: The Public Health’s Role

22

Map 2: Total Health Model and Priority Initiatives

21

Exhibit 2: Planning Process Timeline

23

Map 3: Regional Context

34

Exhibit 3: Population Growth

26

Map 4: Population Density

35

Exhibit 4: Stokes County Age Distribution 2013

27

Map 5: Soils

36

Exhibit 5: Stokes County Age Distribution 2040

27

Map 6: Natural Resources and Assets

37

Exhibit 6: Stokes County Poverty Rates

28

Map 7: Stokes County Framework Map

40

Exhibit 7: Cost of Living

29

Map 8: Danbury Framework

41

Exhibit 8: Home Ownership

29

Map 9: King Framework

42

Exhibit 9: Housing Values

29

Map 10: Walnut Cove Framework

43

Exhibit 10: Ethnic Composition

30

Map 11: Public Engagement

46

Exhibit 11: Educational Attainment

30

Map 12: Locations of Online Survey Participants

67

Exhibit 12: Employment by Industry in Stokes County, 2013

31

Map 13: Stokes County Land Use Framework Map

76

Exhibit 13: Unemployment Rates, 2013

31

Map 14: Danbury Land Use Framework Map

77

Exhibit 14: Wages

32

Map 15: Walnut Cove Land Use Framework Map

78

Exhibit 15: Employment Concentration Relative to NC

32

Map 16: King Land Use Framework Map

79

Exhibit 16: Top Five Employers in Stokes County

33

Map 17: Major Recreation Infrastructure

113

Exhibit 17: Employment Trends

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Map 18: Walnut Cove Greenway Corridors and Asset Opportunities

114

Exhibit 18: Food Related Opportunities for Community Action

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Map 19: King Greenway Connections

115

Exhibit 19: Strengths and Challenges in the Piedmont Triad

38

Map 20: Major Transportation Infrastructure

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Exhibit 20: Top 5 Health Concerns Identified by Community

39

Map 21: Planning Organizations Jurisdictions

121

Exhibit 21: Recommended Marketing Initiative with Associated Costs

39

Map 22: Winston-Salem Beltway

122

Exhibit 22: Public Engagement Process

47-54


LIST OF EXHIBITS CONT.

Exhibit 23: Public Workshop Format

55

Exhibit 45: Newsome Road Corridor Industrial Complex

93

Exhibit 24: Major Stokes County Themes

56

Exhibit 46: Steps for Shovel Ready Projects

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Exhibit 25: Major Danbury Themes

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Exhibit 47: Elements of a Marketing Plan

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Exhibit 26: Major Walnut Cove Themes

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Exhibit 48: Enhancing the Heart of Walnut Cove: Main St. and 3rd St.

96

Exhibit 27: Major King Themes

59

Exhibit 28: Mountains-To-Sea Trail Focus Group

60

Streetscape Enhancements Exhibit 49: Streetscape Options in Walnut Cove

97

Exhibit 29: Francisco Focus Group

61-63

Exhibit 50: Downtown Danbury Streetscape Improvements

98

Exhibit 30: Visual Preference Survey

64-66

Exhibit 51: Walnut Cove: Ripe for Redevelopment

99

Exhibit 31: Online Stokes 2035 Survey

67

Exhibit 52: Walnut Cove: Municipal Services District Designation

100

Exhibit 32: High School Seniors Survey

68

Exhibit 53: Downtown Public Parking Improvements

100

Exhibit 33: Danbury Town Survey

69

Exhibit 54: Facade Improvements

101

Exhibit 34: Stokes County 2035 Vision Statement

71

Exhibit 55: Meadows Intersection

102

Exhibit 35: Land Use Transect

75

Exhibit 56: Infill Development at the Walnut Cove Ingles

102

Exhibit 36: Flexible Subdivision Development

83

Exhibit 57: King’s Civic Block Concept “B”

103

Exhibit 37: Developing Rural Neighborhood Commercial Nodes

84

Exhibit 58: King Gateway

104

Exhibit 38: Infill Development at a Walnut Cove Commercial Center

85

Exhibit 59: King Mall

105

Exhibit 39: Architectural and Design Standards

86

Exhibit 60: Walnut Cove Farmers Market

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Exhibit 40: Pedestrian Triangle

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Exhibit 61: Wayfinding Programs

110

Exhibit 41: King’s Civic Block Concept “A”

88

Exhibit 62: The Trail Support Spectrum

116

Exhibit 42: Action Steps to form a Non-Profit Economic Development Entity

91

Exhibit 63: Walnut Cove’s Waste Water Treatment Facility

127

Exhibit 43: Advantages of a Non-Profit Economic Development Entity

91

Exhibit 44: Due Diligence Considerations

92


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY C O N T E N T S A. Background B. Planning Process C. Public Engagement & Vision D. Planning Elements E. Implementation Matrix

A

INITIAL PLANNING GOALS

BACKGROUND

The Stokes Vision 2035 Plan is the first plan of its kind for Stokes County. This comprehensive plan provides a unified strategic direction for not only the County, but also its three municipal areas of Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King. This planning effort was funded with assistance from the Northwest Partnership for Public Health through the Community Transformation Grant Project.

1.0

Engage citizens through a participatory planning process to establish a 20-year vision for Stokes County;

This comprehensive plan is unique in that public health considerations serve as a cornerstone for each policy and initiative. Along with public health, this plan targets efforts that mutually benefit economic development, the natural environment, and equity.

2.0

Create a “design-focused” plan that uses design schematics and visual renderings that illustrate how future growth and development can occur provided the plan’s policies are adopted;

PUBLIC HEALTH

3.0

Establish realistic priorities for how to allocate resources and capital improvements;

4.0

Identify areas appropriate for growth, varying densities, and preservation;

5.0

Encourage community empowerment & citizen action; and

6.0

Capture the planning process and outcomes within a professional document to be shared with grant funding agencies that can assist with implementation.

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Executive Summary

From the onset of the planning process, the planning team established six (6) initial goals for the planning process and final plan:

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EQUITY


PURPOSE B

The Stokes 2035 Vision Plan will provide the county with strategic guidance for the next 20 years as it continues to position itself for an economy. PLANNINGever-changing PROCESS The Vision Plan will serve as a road map to effectively provide government services, ensure an efficient and thoughtful land development pattern, capital improvements.

The planning process involved five (5) phases: direcand make strategic and fiscally-sound tion setting, focus groups and research, public engagement, plan development, and plan adoption.

PROCESS

•Conduct Public Workshops •Present Community Outreach Results to Elected Officials

•Finalize Probable Development Area Concept Designs •Write Plan Policies •Policy Review with Planning Oversight Committee

FEB. - MAY. ’15 PLAN ADOPTION

•Field Visits •Identify Probable Development Areas •Conduct Demographic Analysis •Develop Framework Plans: Walnut Cove, King, Danbury, Overall County •Present Research Phase to Oversight Committee (POC) •Public Kick-Off Meeting at Economic Development Committee’s Business Extravaganza

JULY ‘14 - JAN. ’15 PLAN DEVELOPMENT

FEB. ’14- JUNE ‘14 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

•Establish Technical Advising Committee (County & Municipal Staff) •Project Branding •Develop Project Website for Community Outreach

NOV. ‘13- JAN. ’14 FOCUS GROUPS & RESEARCH

DIRECTION SETTING

OCT. ‘13

•Plan Review with Staff •Present to Elected Officials •45-Day Public Comment Period • Plan Adoption

PLANNING PROCESS TIMELINE

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

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C

Where:

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

A major goal throughout the planning process was to glean ideas and concerns from local citizens to collectively determine a future vision for Stokes County.

STOKES COUNTY F R AThe M planning E W O R process K engaged P L A NStokes County Citizens and officials at locations across the LEGEND county, as depicted on the map to the right.

VIRGINIA STOKES COUNTY

FRANCISCO FOCUS GROUP 704 • MAY 14, 2014 • 18 PARTICIPANTS

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FRANCISCO

STOKES 2035 ONLINE SURVEY

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• MAY 14, 2014 • 100 PARTICIPANTS

WC RE EK

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WALNUT COVE

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KING

PUBLIC WORKSHOP

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DANBURY

• APRIL 1, 2014 704 • +/- 30 PARTICIPANTS

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UNINCORPORATED KING SINGLE FAMILY 66

HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL FOCUS GROUP 704

PRIVATE CAMPS AND LODGES

• MAY 14, 2014 • +/- 20 PARTICIPANTS

LAKES AND WATERWAYS

HIGHWAYS

DANBURY TOWN SURVEY

268

• MARCH 22, 2013 • 9 PARTICIPANTS

RAILROADS 8 89

CONSERVATION REGION COMMERCIAL NODES

HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR SURVEY (3) • APRIL 16, 2014 • 66 +/- 324 PARTICIPANTS

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KING 52

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PUBLIC WORKSHOPS

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• MARCH 10-11, 2014 • +/- 40 PARTICIPANTS R

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• MAY 14, 2014 • +/- 40 PARTICIPANTS

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STOKES COUNTY

HANGING ROCK TRAILS

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DANBURY

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SAURATOWN & NCMTS TRAILS

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

FLOODZONES

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PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

Workshop participants provided the design team with local knowledge and ideas during the public workshops. 4

Executive Summary


Public Engagement & Vision The Stokes 2035 Vision Plan was initially unveiled to the public on January 14, 2014 at the Stokes County Business Extravaganza: Disco Inferno. This event launched a major public outreach effort that subsequently included project website updates, three (3) public workshops, three (3) focus groups, and three (3) surveys.

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IMAGE FAVORABILITY SURVEY INTERACTIVE MAPS

ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION

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Future growth & development respects the county’s history and rural character;

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There are explicit efforts to seek, retain and attract the next generation;

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DEMOGRAPHICS & ONLINE SURVEY RESU LTS

REAL TIME DESIGN

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WELCOME & SIGN-IN

1

Project Website

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THe vision for the stokes county 2035 plan is to create a healthy built and natural environment in which:

Public Workshop Format

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3

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Focus Groups

Future growth preserves and protects the County’s unique natural environment; Small businesses and entrepreneurship can flourish; and Connections are made and “community happens” through unique programs and events.

this vision will be achieved by: 1

Surveys

There are ample and accessible opportunities for active living and a healthy lifestyle;

5

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Encouraging growth and development where infrastructure currently exists; Creating vibrant downtown environments in King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury that support visitation and small business development; Establishing a linear parks and trail systems that link commercial areas with neighborhoods and community assets; Creating unique programs and events that celebrate the people and places of Stokes County; Supporting community based organizations and providing them the capacity to improve their communities. Encouraging the provision of opportunities for workplace wellness and fitness. Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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D

PLANNING ELEMENTS

The Stokes Vision Plan is comprised of (5) planning elements:

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Executive Summary

str u cture

This chapter serves as the cornerstone of the Stokes 2035 Vision Plan, providing guidance for Stokes County and its municipal leaders as they make land use development decisions regarding where and how the community should grow. t

This Land Use Chapter includes three major parts: A) Methodology; B) Land Use Framework Maps; and C) Land Use Policies.

The Land Use Plan provides the overall structure for orchestrating appropriate patterns of growth and environmental conservation throughout the community.

METHODOLOGY The subsequent maps and policies are supported by the Land Use Transect methodology, which defines a series of zones that transition from rural Stokes County to the more urban downtowns of Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King. This model supports the land use priorities identified throughout the planning process, which include: protecting natural resources; developing vibrant downtowns; encouraging pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use development; facilitating infill/ redevelopment; and providing a broad range of housing opportunities. The Land Use Transect includes six (6) major “sectors” moving from preserved lands to the County’s most urban areas. Each sector is conceptually illustrated and defined on the following page.


Image: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

RURAL I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TRANSECT I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I URBAN

O-1 Preserved Lands

Lands/ O-2 Reserved Conservation

• Conservation • Parks and Greenways • Limited Agriculture and Forestry

• Conservation • Parks and Greenways • Limited Agriculture and Forestry

• Water Access Areas

• Water Access Areas

G-1 Low Density Growth Areas • Primarily Residential/ Low Density • Small Scale Multi-Family • Limited Convenience Retail Uses • Civic Uses

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas • Single and Multi-Family Development • Neighborhood Mixed-Use Centers • Neighborhood Scale Commercial • Civic and Light Industrial

Centers G-3 Mixed-Use and Corridors • Medium to High Density • Regional Centers • Industrial Districts

G-4 Downtowns • Mixed-Use • High Density

Uses

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LAND USE TRANSECT ZONES

LAND USE FRAMEWORK MAPS In an effort to encourage neighborhood commercial growth toward major intersections throughout the county, the Land Use Framework Map identifies twelve (12) Rural Neighborhood Commercial Nodes. A one-mile buffer around these nodes identifies a target low-density residential growth area.

The primary land use classification throughout the County includes very low (greater than 4-acre density average) or low-density (1.5 acre density average) residential growth.

The recent sewer infrastructure expansion to the Meadows community will allow for greater density and is necessary to realize a return on investment; a mixed-use and high-density classification surrounds Meadows. This plan recognizes that growth pressure will likely continue along the Highway 66 corridor that extends north from King. There are two neighborhood commercial nodes identified along this corridor.

(O-1) PRESERVED LANDS

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Open Space/ Parks

(O-2) RESERVED LANDS/ CONSERVATION

100 Yr. Floodplain/ 100 Ft. Stream Buffer/ Voluntary Ag District

Executive Summary

(G-1) LOW DENSITY GROWTH AREAS

Primarily Residential/ Low Density

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas

Urban Neighborhoods/ Medium Density

G-3 Mixed-Use Centers and Corridors

Mixed Use/ Medium to High Density

Industrial

G-4 Downtown

Downtown /

Mixed Use

A progression is found within each municipality from single family homes to urban neighborhoods containing mixed use nodes and centrally located historic downtowns.

OPEN SPACE 1 (O-1): PRESERVED LANDS The O-1 Transect Zone is comprised of areas for preservation, conservation, or very limited development. This transect includes existing major public lands, 100 year floodplain, 100 foot stream buffer, and voluntary agricultural districts. Key areas of the O-1 transect zone in Stokes County include Hanging Rock State Park, Camp Hanes, Camp Sertoma, and the floodplains of all rivers and streams.

Floodplain & riparian areas are suitable for linear parks and trails.

OPEN SPACE 2 (O-2): RURAL COMMUNITY The O-2 Transect Zone is comprised of very low density development that includes many of the rural areas in Stokes County. This zone includes areas with very limited or no


water or sewer infrastructure. Some areas located within the O-2 Transect Zone could ultimately transition into the O-1 Transect Zone by expanding public lands and preserving highly sensitive natural resources and riparian areas. The preservation of rural areas accomplishes many planning goals:

Desirbale development in this sector typically consists of cluster development such as conservation subdivisions, or low-density residential development on relatively large lots. Other land uses appropriate for this sector include civic uses such as parks, schools, government uses, and religious institutions.

internal parks, multi-use greenways, sidewalks, and adjacent preserved open spaces. This pattern of development can provide significant public health benefits by creating safe and accessible opportunities for walking and biking.

@ Sandy Ridge

• It discourages sprawl by focusing new growth in and around existing developed areas. • It plays an important role in natural resource protection. • It promotes fiscal stewardship by encouraging growth toward municipal areas to create more efficient use of public facilities and existing infrastructure. • By targeting growth toward municipal areas, the public will have more opportunities to walk or bike daily.

GROWTH SECTOR 1 (G-1): LOW-DENSITY RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS The G-1 sector, indicated by yellow on the Framework Maps, is intended for low-density residential growth and includes areas with limited access to water and sewer infrastructure. Many times, however, these areas are adjacent to target growth areas, such as municipal areas, county areas with water and sewer infrastructure, and existing and planned rural neighborhood commercial nodes. In addition, poor/wet soils that are not typically appropriate for development are included in this sector; soils information should be overlaid and investigated at a detailed level when developing in these areas to avoid the most sensitive soil types.

Single-family homes, such as this farmhouse, are the primary land use type found within the low-density growth sector of Stokes County.

Twelve (12) Rural Neighborhood Commercial Nodes have been identified throughout Stokes County. Design features include reduced setbacks and locating parking on the sides and rear.

GROWTH SECTOR 2 (G-2):URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

GROWTH SECTOR 3 (G-3): NEIGHBORHOOD MIXED-USE

The G-2 Sector, indicated by orange on the Framework Maps, contains denser, mixed-use development at a scale appropriate for neighborhood commercial centers and walkable residential neighborhoods. Many of these areas have access to water and sewer infrastructure where growth should be directed. A local road network should be well connected and link to larger collector streets. Paths should form pedestrian connections linking

The G-3 Sector is indicated by red on the Framework Map. Water and sewer infrastructure and major transportation networks and nodes serve these areas. The G-3 Sector also includes major road corridors for which specific attention is required to avoid unwanted strip development. A full-range of land uses are appropriate in the G-3 sector, including single-family and multi-family residential, civic

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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uses, neighborhood and regional commercial centers, and

The urban core is appropriate for redevelopment and new

light industrial areas.

infill development and is well served by existing infrastructure. Because these areas are already well provided for in terms of urban services, it is one of the most efficient, fiscally responsible, and attractive areas for redevelopment or de-

Food Lion Shopping Center @ Walnut Cove

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velopment of underutilized land.

on-street parking 60% Fenestration (windows) 15’ preferred/ 10 min. sidewalk awnings buildings to edge of sidewalk street trees

GROWTH SECTOR 4 (G-4): DOWNTOWN

downtown core areas, with a relatively dense street grid,

Framework Maps, which include the historic downtowns of Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King.

Stokes County, like many rural communities across North Carolina, is working to attract job growth and investment. Also, like much of rural North Carolina, Stokes County must confront its challenges – lagging population growth, high poverty rates, and an aging workforce – to realize economic growth.

The “pedestrian triangle”, or area between a building’s edge, awning and curb, is the most critical area for creating a well-functioning downtown.

Executive Summary

A

business recruitment;

B small business and Main Street development; C workforce development; and

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Accordingly, the Stokes County economic development strategy must be diverse and provide for a range of initiatives that support:

The G-4 transect zone is comprised primarily of existing

opment. G-4 transect zone areas are shown in pink on the

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Fortunately, Stokes County has an abundance of assets and resources to help meet these challenges. Some of these assets include: the major Highway 52 transportation corridor near King; the distinctive, small town Main Street environments of King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury; and a tremendous natural environment that includes the Sauratown Mountains, Hanging Rock State Park, and the Dan River.

Infill development is encouraged throughout the county’s urban areas.

and is appropriate for redevelopment or additional devel-

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quality of life and tourism development.


BUSINESS RECRUITMENT

SMALL BUSINESS AND MAIN STREET

Stokes County must achieve three distinctive goals to attract new business and industry.

Stokes County and its municipalities must continue to support efforts to cultivate and foster the creation and success of small businesses. Local government must continue to provide critical infrastructure, such as water and sewer, but must also provide other critical public sector investments necessary to attract private sector development.

First, Stokes County must position itself organizationally for success; a public-private, nonprofit corporation structure will provide the necessary flexibility for recruitment negotiations and financial obligations. Second, economic development leaders must be prepared with readily-available land; industry site selection firms will often only consider “shovel-ready” property.

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

Lastly, Stokes County must invest in effective branding and marketing through print and web.

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

EXISTING

The South Main Street gateway can be significantly improved through basic streetscape enhancements such as a wayfinding system, extending King’s streetscape with curbs, gutters, and sidewalk paving, constructing a landscaped median, and improving building facades with murals.

Newsome Road Corridor in King BIRDS-EYE PERSPECTIVE

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

BRANDING

At the public workshop in King, the design team worked alongside community leaders to develop a prelimnary concept for the Newsome Road Corridor.

EXISTING

Traffic calming measures and a town-wide wayfinding initiative will help to create a safer, pedestrian-friendly downtown environment. These changes are critical as Danbury seeks to expand tourism development and generate private sector investment.

The presence of a quality workforce is one of the most critical factors a company considers when deciding whether to grow or expand in an area. Methods to support and foster business development in Stokes County include the creation of a business development center, continuing partnerships Community Colleges, strenghtening agricultural education, and expanding broadband.

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RECREATION GOALS School

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THE BIG THREE 1 inch = 12,000 feet

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NC_HWY

STOKES COUNTY JESSUP MILL RIVER ACCESS

1 Encourage the development of trails and other recreation amenities that are part of larger regional and statewide efforts.

State_Roads US_HWY

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HART’S RIVER C 704 N ACCESS

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Flood Zones

Old Business District

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NC 704704

DAN RIVER PADDLE TRAIL

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SANDY RIDGE

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LAWSONVILLE

General Business

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General Business- Conditional Use

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Neighborhood Business District

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Heavy Industrial

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HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

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Residential - Medium Density - Conditional Use

CAMP HANES MEADOWS 66

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ETJ Mobile Home Residential

Medium Density Residential District

PINNACLE

Residential - Low Density - Conditional Use

US

NC 8

CR EE K

Residential - Multifamily - Townhomes

Residential - Multifamily - Townhomes - Conditional Use

KING NF 52 US

Residential - Multifamily

52 US

Rural Residential District R-3

STOKES COUNTY NC 8 FORSYTH COUNTY

5 &6

R PINA HALL ACCESS AREA

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Residential Manufactured Home - Multisectional

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NC 65

311

65 NC

North

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Residential - Mobile Home

R-8 MHE

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Residential - Multifamily - Apartments

Rural Residential - Conditional Use

311

52

Residential Manufactured single section 0 1.25 Home 2.5- MILES

" " " " " " " " "

PINE HALL

89 NC

A NEAT M

High Density Mobile Home Residential District

89

31 1

Low-Density Residential District

" " " " " "

HEMLOCK RIVER ACCESS

772 NC

Neighborhood Residential District Residential Agricultural

" " " " " "

FMST EXISTING ROAD ROUTE

8 89

Residential-Medium Density

3 Strengthen relationships and support civic organizations that maintain park facilities and manage programming efforts throughout the county and municipal areas.

SNOW RIVER ACCESS

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US 311

R-1

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

Office - Institutional - Conditional Use

MOROTOCK PARK RIVER ACCESS

STOKES COUNTY

Insitutional

772

DANBURY

89

CAMP SERTOMA

68268 NC 2

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

M-1

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2 Focus on the creation of new linear parks, trails, and greenways, and improving (rather than creating new) existing park facilities.

Light Industrial - Conditional Use

R-2

" " " " " " " " "

FMST* PROPOSED ROAD ROUTE

Light Industrial

8&

" " " " " " " " "

HANGING ROCK RIVER ACCESS

NC

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704

G SAURATOWN UR CH YN & LMST*

NC BIKE ROUTE 4

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High Density Residential District

As a rural county striving to attract investment, tourism, young families, and retirees, Stokes County will need to continue creating safe and accessible trails and greenways, inviting parks and open spaces, and connectivity to its public lands and rivers.

704

6

There is overwhelming consensus among citizens and community leaders that recreation serves as a key element of the new economy for Stokes County. As a rural county striving to attract investment, tourism, young families, and retirees, Stokes County will need to continue creating safe and accessible trails and greenways, inviting parks and open spaces, and connectivity to its public lands and rivers. Recreation is not merely a “want,” but a critical component of Stokes County’s economic development strategy.

VIRGINIA

5

DA N

rec r e a t i o n

2.5

Miles

7

ETJ

NC 8

City Jurisdiction

RECREATION INFRASTRUCTURE

LEGEND

NC BIKE ROUTE

EXISTING FMST ROAD ROUTE

PROPOSED FMST ROAD ROUTE

SAURATOWN & MST

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N

*FMST - Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail *MST - Mountains-to-Sea Trail

A major recommendation of this plan is to support the development of the Mountains-to-Sea trail (MST) through Stokes County.

12

Executive Summary


PREVIOUS TRANSPORTATION PLANS The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) works with two regional organizations to identify, coordinate, and prioritize transportation infrastructure improvements in Stokes County: the Winston-Salem Urban Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and the Northwest Piedmont Rural Planning Organization (RPO). Both organizations are heavily involved in transportation planning in Stokes, but each is responsible for different geographic areas of the County. CARROLL CARROLL ve r

PATRICK PATRICK

S ou th M

National Park

Mayodan Mayodan

Danbury Danbury

ke ws

Be

le

dy C reek

ee

k

Ha

reek

Ut

dy

Kernersville Kernersville

Winston-Salem Winston-Salem Fi

dd

GUILFORD GUILFORD

eek Cr er s

I- 4 0

Piedmont Triad International Airport

I- 4

Greensboro Greensboro

0 40

pon d

So

Bu

S o NC Dept. of Transportation - GIS Unit; NC NC OneMap, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis; thFloodplain Mapping Program

uthut Bh uffaB louCff rea eklo

So

Cr

1.0

Improve transportation infrastructure to support the creation of targeted industrial growth areas.

2.0

Increase the safety and functionality of major arteries without adding additional lanes.

3.0

Work with NCDOT & establish community-based organiztions that can create pedestrian-oriented transportation and streetscape improvements at targeted downtown areas and small business growth nodes.

)

29

k

40

0

Cre e

I-4

otts

Lewisville Lewisville

e Re

Abb

nti ng C

p

l

ee k

Cr Fi sh er Hu

Dee

edy Fo rk (Hard Re ys Mill

k

WSMPO

w

Oak Oak Ridge Ridge

Cr ee

Cr

Belew

s

Bethania Bethania

Stokesdale Stokesdale r ve Summerfield Summerfield Ri

29

Mud

FORSYTH FORSYTH

Fo rk

n

Tobaccoville Tobaccoville

eek Cr

Yadkinville u t Yadkinville eek hD e e p Cr

transportation network:

Reidsville Reidsville

La

Ri ve r

7 I-7

421 US 421

Wentworth Wentworth

Haw River State Park

Walkertown Walkertown

S

r ve

US

er Riv

Rural Hall Rural Hall

East East Bend Bend

YADKIN YADKIN

o

Stokes County’s transportation system is comprised of its roads, rail, bike, pedestrian, and transit networks. While Stokes County relies on its road network for the majority of its transportation needs, it is also important to consider how other modes contribute to the overall transportation system.

52

D an R i

ROCKINGHAM

Walnut Walnut Cove Cove King King

Boonville Boonville

Jonesville Jonesville

Eden Eden

Ri ve r

Hanging Rock State Park

Ya d k i

River

at

77

Given the existing transportation network in Stokes County and the groundwork laid by previous planning efforts, the following recommendations are provided for the improvement of Stokes County’s

Stoneville Stoneville

Pilot Mountain State Park

Elkin Elkin

Sandy Sandy Level Level ith

Ar a r

SURRY SURRY

EXISTING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE

Mayo River State Park

STOKES STOKES

Pilot Pilot Mountain Mountain

PITTSYLVANIA PITTSYLVANIA

Sm

ek

NWPRPO

52

e r River

TRANSPORTATION POLICIES

220 0

o May

F

is h

Dobson Dobson

US5858

22

Ridgeway Ridgeway

Cr

ee k

US

iver

R

4

er

US

HENRY HENRY

Ri ve r

NORTH CAROLINACre iv

Big

74

r

Sn ow

Dan

Mount Airy Mount Airy

MithcellhReilvle R

o

VIRGINIA I- 7

Horse Horse Pasture Pasture

ay

Cana Cana

ay o R i

r ve

i tR ara Ar

GRAYSON GRAYSON Blue Ridge Parkway

Patrick Patrick Springs Springs

Stuart Stuart

Collinsville Fieldale Martinsville Martinsville

M rth No

Fancy Gap Fancy Gap

f fa lo

rtreacnrsepaorttiaotnion Stokes County leaders continue to work with NCDOT to improve the state’s road system throughout the County. King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury also maintain a network of municipal roads. This plan includes an overview of existing transportation infrastructure, previous plans and transportation policies.

A main issue identified with Stokes County’s transportation network can be attributed to its physiographic conditions: the Sauratown Mountains, running generally east-west through the center of the county, limit the connectivity between the northern and southern portions of the county.

ee

u

Whitsett

k

The Winston-Salem Metropolitan Planning Organization (shown in orange above) and the Northwest Piedmont Rural Planning Organization (shown in green above) work with the NCDOT on regional transportation planning efforts.

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

13


WATER INFRASTRUCTURE

in f r a

str u cture

With the Dan River and its tributaries, the nearby Yadkin River, and the groundwater supply, Stokes County has an adequate water supply to meet its needs into the future.

The availability of water and sewer is a major determinant of where growth can occur. This is especially true in Stokes County where soils in many locations have characteristics that preclude individual septic systems. This weakness (poor soils) provides an opportunity for Stokes County to target infrastructure development in accordance with this plan.

INFRASTRUCTURE POLICIES

Due to the continual increase of sewer rates by the City of Winston Salem, the City of King must consider the development of its own wastewater treatment facility. INFRASTRUCTURE GOALS: THE BIG THREE 1 Create a new city-owned wastewater treatment facility for the City of King (Explore a wetland treatment facilty similar to the Walnut Cove system).

The Dan River serves as a mojor source for public water in Stokes County.

MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER The existing municipal wastewater infrastructure in Stokes County also has the capacity to meet the county’s needs for the foreseeable future. There are currently three municipal wastewater operations in Stokes County, located in King, Danbury, and Walnut Cove.

14

Executive Summary

2 Strategically extend King’s water system to “fill in” areas between existing water lines, create loops whenever practical to increase the circulation of the system. 3 Capatalize on the newly expanded sewer infrastructure in the Meadow’s community.


DevelopadetailedstreetscapeandtrafficͲcalmingplan,incoordinationwithNCDOT,along Hwy8/89indowntownDanbury DevelopacorridorplanalongHighway66NorthoftheCityofKing Createarchitecturalandsitedesignguidelinesforcommercialusesthatsupportadopted policieswithintheStokes2035VisionPlan. Project/Task

E

IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX

RECREATION SupporttheDevelopmentoftheMountainsͲtoͲSea(MST) ConductatrailmasterplanfortheDanRivercorridorwiththegoalofcreatingacertified sectionoftheMountainsͲtoͲSeaTrail.Theplanningprocessshouldincludeamajor landowneroutreacheffortandrecommendationsforimprovingriveraccess.

rleacnrde a tisoen u

eco

nroemcicr

edaetvieolonp m e

FurtherDevelopRecreationOpportunitiesalongtheDanRiver WorkwithHRSPtoestablishadditionalriveraccessandovernightcampingfacilitiesbetween Project/Task theintersectionofHighways268and89andMoratockPark. LANDͲUSE Formalizeandimprovepublicriveraccessat7Ͳisland UpdateexistingLandͲUseOrdinances/UDOtosupportadoptedpolicieswithinStokes2035 ReͲstablishapublicriverentrypointatWhit‘sAccess. VisionPlan FocusontheCreationofLinearParksandGreenways DevelopasmallͲareaplanandanassociatedzoningoverlaydistrictforMeadows ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheTownofDanbury Developadetailedcorridorplanandanassociatedoverlaydistrictalongthesouthern ConductatownͲwidegreenwaymasterplanforWalnutCovethatincludesalandowner gatewaytowardDowntownKing outreacheffort. DevelopadetailedstreetscapeandtrafficͲcalmingplan,incoordinationwithNCDOT,along ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheCityofKingthatincludesa Hwy8/89indowntownDanbury landowneroutreacheffort. DevelopacorridorplanalongHighway66NorthoftheCityofKing ProvideforanetworkofwellͲmaintainedparksthroughoutStokesCounty Createarchitecturalandsitedesignguidelinesforcommercialusesthatsupportadopted ImplementtheMoratockParkMasterPlancompletedin2009.TheCountyshouldexplorea policieswithintheStokes2035VisionPlan. relationshipwiththeTownofDanburyregardingthemaintenanceandimprovementof Project/Task MoratockPark. nt

RECREATION WorkwithDukeEnergyofficialstodeveloparecreationmasterplanfortheirBelewsLake property. SupporttheDevelopmentoftheMountainsͲtoͲSea(MST) Project/Task ConductatrailmasterplanfortheDanRivercorridorwiththegoalofcreatingacertified sectionoftheMountainsͲtoͲSeaTrail.Theplanningprocessshouldincludeamajor ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT landowneroutreacheffortandrecommendationsforimprovingriveraccess. BusinessRecruitment CreateapublicͲprivate,nonprofitcorporationstructure FurtherDevelopRecreationOpportunitiesalongtheDanRiver DevelopanMOUthatoutlinestheactivitiesofthenonͲprofit,howitwillsupportStokes WorkwithHRSPtoestablishadditionalriveraccessandovernightcampingfacilitiesbetween County,andhowitwillinteractwithallyagencies theintersectionofHighways268and89andMoratockPark. Identifyandpromoteaninventoryofexistingstructures Formalizeandimprovepublicriveraccessat7Ͳisland Identifyandpromoteaninventoryoflocationsforpotentialdevelopment ReͲstablishapublicriverentrypointatWhit‘sAccess. SmallBusinessDevelopmentandMainStreets FocusontheCreationofLinearParksandGreenways Enhancethephysicalenvironmentwithindowntownareas ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheTownofDanbury WorkwithNCDOTtosecureimprovementstopublicspaceanddowntownstreetscapes ConductatownͲwidegreenwaymasterplanforWalnutCovethatincludesalandowner outreacheffort. CreateWalnutCoveRedevelopmentDistrictthatallowscitytoacquireandredevelop ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheCityofKingthatincludesa blightedstructuresinthedowntownarea landowneroutreacheffort. EstablishaMuncipalServiceDistrictinWalnutCove,providingfundstobematchedbyTown ProvideforanetworkofwellͲmaintainedparksthroughoutStokesCounty fordowntownimprovements. ImplementtheMoratockParkMasterPlancompletedin2009.TheCountyshouldexplorea DevelopandfundFaçadeImprovementPrograms relationshipwiththeTownofDanburyregardingthemaintenanceandimprovementof Redevelopandimproveexistingdowntownparks MoratockPark. Createfunctionalandaestheticimprovementsforcommercialhubsandcorridors WorkwithDukeEnergyofficialstodeveloparecreationmasterplanfortheirBelewsLake DevelopanewKingTownHallandcivicblock property. Project/Task WorkforceDevelopment Establisha“businessdevelopmentcenter”or“businessincubator” ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT Partnerwithcollegesanduniversitiestopreparestudentsforfuturecareersintarget BusinessRecruitment industries CreateapublicͲprivate,nonprofitcorporationstructure StrengthenagriculturaleducationprogramsbyexpandingprogramssuchasGAPthroughout DevelopanMOUthatoutlinestheactivitiesofthenonͲprofit,howitwillsupportStokes thecounty. County,andhowitwillinteractwithallyagencies EncourageandsupporteffortstoimprovebroadbandinternetaccessforStokesCounty Identifyandpromoteaninventoryofexistingstructures

N

CityofKing

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

N N

TownofDanbury,NCDOT StokesCounty,CityofKing,NCDOT

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury PartneringAgencies

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Project/TaskType

StokesCounty,FriendsofMST,NCParks

Planning

PartneringAgencies StokesCounty,HRSP StokesCounty StokesCounty StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury

Project/TaskType CapitalProject CapitalProject CapitalProject Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

N N

StokesCounty TownofDanbury,StokesCounty

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Planning

N N

CityofKing TownofWalnutCove

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Planning

40,79

N N

TownofDanbury,NCDOT CityofKing StokesCounty,CityofKing,NCDOT

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Planning Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

86,87 116 PageReference#

N Y

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury PartneringAgencies StokesCounty,TownofDanbury

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Project/TaskType CapitalProject

DukeEnergy,StokesCounty PartneringAgencies

Planning

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N) N N

StokesCounty,FriendsofMST,NCParks StokesCounty,StokesCountyEDC

Planning OrganizationalDevelopment

92 114 114

YN YN YN

StokesCountyEDC StokesCounty,HRSP StokesCountyEDC StokesCounty StokesCountyEDC StokesCounty

OrganizationalDevelopment CapitalProject CapitalProject CapitalProject

96 114

N

StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury,NCDOT TownofDanbury,StokesCounty

Planning

Y N

StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury,NCDOT TownofWalnutCove

Planning

N N

TownofWalnutCove,NCDOT CityofKing

Planning

Y YY

TownofWalnutCove CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury,NCDOT TownofDanbury,TownofWalnutCove StokesCounty,TownofDanbury

CapitalProject

98 40,79 86,87

N CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

PageReference#

112,113 N PageReference# 114 114 114 102 114 86 114 98 115

116

Y Y YN

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

N

PageReference#

Project/TaskType

112,113 91 91 114

96 114 99 115 100 101 116 101 101 116 103

Y Y N CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

PageReference# 106 106 91 107 91 92

CityofKing,NCDOT CityofKing DukeEnergy,StokesCounty StokesCountyEDC

PartneringAgencies

N

StokesEDC,ForsythTech StokesCounty,StokesCountyEDC

Y N N

Ag.Extension,StokesCounty,StokesBoardofEducation StokesCountyEDC StokesCountyEDC

Planning Project/TaskType

OrganizationalDevelopment

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan OrganizationalDevelopment

15


EstablishaMuncipalServiceDistrictinWalnutCove,providingfundstobematchedbyTown WorkwithDukeEnergyofficialstodeveloparecreationmasterplanfortheirBelewsLake fordowntownimprovements. property. DevelopandfundFaçadeImprovementPrograms Project/Task Redevelopandimproveexistingdowntownparks ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT Createfunctionalandaestheticimprovementsforcommercialhubsandcorridors BusinessRecruitment

DevelopanewKingTownHallandcivicblock CreateapublicͲprivate,nonprofitcorporationstructure WorkforceDevelopment DevelopanMOUthatoutlinestheactivitiesofthenonͲprofit,howitwillsupportStokes Establisha“businessdevelopmentcenter”or“businessincubator” County,andhowitwillinteractwithallyagencies Partnerwithcollegesanduniversitiestopreparestudentsforfuturecareersintarget Identifyandpromoteaninventoryofexistingstructures industries Identifyandpromoteaninventoryoflocationsforpotentialdevelopment StrengthenagriculturaleducationprogramsbyexpandingprogramssuchasGAPthroughout thecounty. EncourageandsupporteffortstoimprovebroadbandinternetaccessforStokesCounty residents TourismInfrastructureDevelopment ContinuetodeveloptheNCMountainsͲtoͲSeaTrailinStokesCounty EstablishadestinationͲqualitymountainbiketrailsystematMoore'sSprings FosterecoͲtourismontheDanRiver FinalizetheDanburyArtMarkettoshowcasethevisualartsandattractvisitors Develop"pickͲyourͲownproduce"farmsandotheropportunitiesforvisitorstoimpmerse themselvesinStokesCounty'sagriculturalheritage Improvescenicbywaysignage WorkwithNCDOTtodesignatecyclinglanes Project/Task Pursuefederalscenicbywaygrantfundingtoenhancetourisminfrastructure LANDͲUSE

rec r e a t i o n

101 PageReference# 101 101 103 91 91 106 92 106 107 107 108 108 108 108

ConductatownͲwidegreenwaymasterplanforWalnutCovethatincludesalandowner outreacheffort. ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheCityofKingthatincludesa landowneroutreacheffort. ProvideforanetworkofwellͲmaintainedparksthroughoutStokesCounty ExecutiveImplementtheMoratockParkMasterPlancompletedin2009.TheCountyshouldexplorea Summary relationshipwiththeTownofDanburyregardingthemaintenanceandimprovementof MoratockPark.

N Y Y

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

109 109 PageReference# 109

TownofWalnutCove DukeEnergy,StokesCounty CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury,NCDOT PartneringAgencies TownofDanbury,TownofWalnutCove

Y Y N

CityofKing,NCDOT CityofKing StokesCounty,StokesCountyEDC

N N N N

StokesCountyEDC StokesCountyEDC StokesCountyEDC StokesEDC,ForsythTech StokesCountyEDC

Y

Ag.Extension,StokesCounty,StokesBoardofEducation

N

StokesCountyEDC

Y

StokesCounty,FMST,NCStateParks,LocalTrailOrganizations

Y

StokesCounty StokesCountyEDC,StokesCountyArtsCouncil,TownofDanbury

109

TourismMarketing UpdateexistingLandͲUseOrdinances/UDOtosupportadoptedpolicieswithinStokes2035 VisionPlan Develop"strapͲlines"thatuseasinglephrasetoconnectavarietyoftourismopportunities 110 foundthroughoutthecounty DevelopasmallͲareaplanandanassociatedzoningoverlaydistrictforMeadows 102 Investineffectivebrandingandmarketingthroughprintandweb 110 Developadetailedcorridorplanandanassociatedoverlaydistrictalongthesouthern 86 Createpartnershipswithadjacentcountiestoreachalargeraudienceandleverage gatewaytowardDowntownKing 110 marketingdollars DevelopadetailedstreetscapeandtrafficͲcalmingplan,incoordinationwithNCDOT,along DevelopanextensivewayfindingsignageplanthroughoutStokesCounty 110 98 Hwy8/89indowntownDanbury Project/Task PageReference# DevelopacorridorplanalongHighway66NorthoftheCityofKing 40,79 TRANSPORTATION Createarchitecturalandsitedesignguidelinesforcommercialusesthatsupportadopted WidenUS311fromathreeͲlaneroadtoafourͲlaneroadwithamedian,butnotthrough 86,87 policieswithintheStokes2035VisionPlan. 121 downtownWalnutCove Project/Task PageReference# WidenUS52fromfourtosixͲlanesandupgradetointerstatestandardsfromWinstonͲSalem RECREATION 121 totheSurryCountyLine. SupporttheDevelopmentoftheMountainsͲtoͲSea(MST) ConductatrailmasterplanfortheDanRivercorridorwiththegoalofcreatingacertified sectionoftheMountainsͲtoͲSeaTrail.Theplanningprocessshouldincludeamajor 112,113 landowneroutreacheffortandrecommendationsforimprovingriveraccess. FurtherDevelopRecreationOpportunitiesalongtheDanRiver WorkwithHRSPtoestablishadditionalriveraccessandovernightcampingfacilitiesbetween theintersectionofHighways268and89andMoratockPark. Formalizeandimprovepublicriveraccessat7Ͳisland ReͲstablishapublicriverentrypointatWhit‘sAccess. FocusontheCreationofLinearParksandGreenways ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheTownofDanbury

16

100 116

Y N N

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

N

Planning Project/TaskType

OrganizationalDevelopment OrganizationalDevelopment

Ag.Extension StokesCounty,NCDOT StokesCounty,RPO,NCDOTPartneringAgencies

Project/TaskType

StokesCounty

N N

StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury StokesCountyEDC StokesCounty StokesCountyEDC

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

N N

CityofKing StokesCounty,RockinghamCounty,ForsythCounty,

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

StokesCounty,TownofDanbury,TownofWalnutCove,CityofKing TownofDanbury,NCDOT PartneringAgencies StokesCounty,CityofKing,NCDOT

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Project/TaskType Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury StokesCounty,NCDOT,RPO PartneringAgencies

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments Project/TaskType

N N N Y

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

Policy&OrdinanceAmendments

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO

N

StokesCounty,FriendsofMST,NCParks

Planning

114 114

Y Y Y

StokesCounty,HRSP StokesCounty StokesCounty

CapitalProject CapitalProject CapitalProject

114

N

TownofDanbury,StokesCounty

Planning

N

TownofWalnutCove

Planning

N

CityofKing

Planning

Y

StokesCounty,TownofDanbury

CapitalProject

114

114 115

116


rtreacnrsepaorttiaotnion

ConductatownͲwidegreenwaymasterplanforWalnutCovethatincludesalandowner EstablishadestinationͲqualitymountainbiketrailsystematMoore'sSprings outreacheffort. FosterecoͲtourismontheDanRiver ConductatargetedgreenwayfeasibilityanalysisfortheCityofKingthatincludesa FinalizetheDanburyArtMarkettoshowcasethevisualartsandattractvisitors landowneroutreacheffort. Develop"pickͲyourͲownproduce"farmsandotheropportunitiesforvisitorstoimpmerse ProvideforanetworkofwellͲmaintainedparksthroughoutStokesCounty themselvesinStokesCounty'sagriculturalheritage ImplementtheMoratockParkMasterPlancompletedin2009.TheCountyshouldexplorea Improvescenicbywaysignage relationshipwiththeTownofDanburyregardingthemaintenanceandimprovementof WorkwithNCDOTtodesignatecyclinglanes MoratockPark. Pursuefederalscenicbywaygrantfundingtoenhancetourisminfrastructure WorkwithDukeEnergyofficialstodeveloparecreationmasterplanfortheirBelewsLake TourismMarketing property. Develop"strapͲlines"thatuseasinglephrasetoconnectavarietyoftourismopportunities Project/Task foundthroughoutthecounty ECONOMICDEVELOPMENT Investineffectivebrandingandmarketingthroughprintandweb BusinessRecruitment Createpartnershipswithadjacentcountiestoreachalargeraudienceandleverage CreateapublicͲprivate,nonprofitcorporationstructure marketingdollars DevelopanMOUthatoutlinestheactivitiesofthenonͲprofit,howitwillsupportStokes DevelopanextensivewayfindingsignageplanthroughoutStokesCounty County,andhowitwillinteractwithallyagencies Project/Task Identifyandpromoteaninventoryofexistingstructures TRANSPORTATION Identifyandpromoteaninventoryoflocationsforpotentialdevelopment WidenUS311fromathreeͲlaneroadtoafourͲlaneroadwithamedian,butnotthrough downtownWalnutCove

WidenUS52fromfourtosixͲlanesandupgradetointerstatestandardsfromWinstonͲSalem totheSurryCountyLine. WidenNC65fromWinstonͲSalemtoUS311

Createatwolaneminorthoroughfarewith12Ͳfootlanesandpavedshoulderstartingatthe US311andNC89Intersectionandextendingwest5.6milestoconnectwithSR 1974(MountainViewRd) WidenNC772fromtheexisting10Ͳfootlanesto12ͲfootlanesfromNC704toSR1690 WidenNC704fromtheexisting10Ͳfootlanesto12ͲfootlanesfromNC8toNC770andthen fromNC772totheRockinghamCountyLine WidenNC268fromtwo9Ͳfootlanestotwo12ͲfootlanesfromtheSurryCountyLinetoNC 66 WidenNC66fromtwo9Ͳfootlanestotwo12ͲfootlanesfromNC89totheWinstonͲSalem UAB WidenNC8fromtwo10or11Ͳfootlanestotwo12ͲfootlanesfromtheVirginiaStateLineto theWinstonͲSalemUAB. AdvocateforaninterchangeattheintersectionofTrinityChurchRoadandU.S.Highway52{IͲ 74}toenhanceaccesstopotentialdevelopmentareascurrentlyservedbywater. CreatepedestrianͲorientedimprovmentsintargeteddowntownareas EstablichacommunityͲbasedorganizationtofocusonbicycleandpedestrianinfrastructure Project/Task INFRASTRUCTURE Prioritizeinfrastructureinvestmentsthatmaximize andimproveexistinginfrastructure,targeting plannedgrowthareas. Continuenecessarywaterandsewerinfrastructureupdateswiththeredevelopmentofthe downtownMainStreet Conductanengineeringstudytodeterminethefeasibilityofprovidingacountywastewater treatmentfacilitylocatedonLittleYadkinRiver,southof1Ͳ73toserveareasfromPinnacleto TrinityChurchRoad StrategicallyextendKing’swatersystemto“fill in”areasbetweenexistingwaterlines,create loopswheneverpracticaltoincreasethecirculation ofthesystem. ExtendwateralongVolunteerRoadandChestnut

108 114 108 108 115

N Y N

TownofWalnutCove StokesCounty StokesCountyEDC,StokesCountyArtsCouncil,TownofDanbury CityofKing

Y N Y N

Ag.Extension StokesCounty,NCDOT StokesCounty,RPO,NCDOT StokesCounty,TownofDanbury StokesCounty

109 109 116 109 109 116

N

Planning Planning

CapitalProject

110

N

DukeEnergy,StokesCounty PartneringAgencies StokesCountyEDC StokesCountyEDC

91 110

N N

StokesCounty,StokesCountyEDC StokesCounty,RockinghamCounty,ForsythCounty,

OrganizationalDevelopment

StokesCounty,TownofDanbury,TownofWalnutCove,CityofKing StokesCountyEDC PartneringAgencies StokesCountyEDC StokesCountyEDC

OrganizationalDevelopment Project/TaskType

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

PageReference# 110

91 110 PageReference# 92 121 121 122

122 122 122 122 122 122 123 123

N N N

CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,RPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO,RPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,RPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,RPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,RPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO,RPO

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO,RPO

Y Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO NCDOT,King,WalnutCove,Danbury

Planning Project/TaskType

124 CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

PageReference#

PartneringAgencies

Project/TaskType

128 StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury 128 128

Y

TownofWalnutCove

N

StokesCounty,StokesCountyEDC

Y

CityofKing

128

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

17


WidenNC8fromtwo10or11Ͳfootlanestotwo12ͲfootlanesfromtheVirginiaStateLineto theWinstonͲSalemUAB. AdvocateforaninterchangeattheintersectionofTrinityChurchRoadandU.S.Highway52{IͲ 74}toenhanceaccesstopotentialdevelopmentareascurrentlyservedbywater. in f r a

s t r u c t u re CreatepedestrianͲorientedimprovmentsintargeteddowntownareas EstablichacommunityͲbasedorganizationtofocusonbicycleandpedestrianinfrastructure

Project/Task INFRASTRUCTURE Prioritizeinfrastructureinvestmentsthatmaximize andimproveexistinginfrastructure,targeting plannedgrowthareas. Continuenecessarywaterandsewerinfrastructureupdateswiththeredevelopmentofthe downtownMainStreet Conductanengineeringstudytodeterminethefeasibilityofprovidingacountywastewater treatmentfacilitylocatedonLittleYadkinRiver,southof1Ͳ73toserveareasfromPinnacleto TrinityChurchRoad StrategicallyextendKing’swatersystemto“fill in”areasbetweenexistingwaterlines,create loopswheneverpracticaltoincreasethecirculation ofthesystem. ExtendwateralongVolunteerRoadandChestnut GroveRoadtocompletea“loop”tothePinnacle community. Concentratefutureextensionofresidentialservices toaprojectedgrowthareawestofMountain ViewRoad,westofNC66,andnorthofOld U.S.Highway52toencourageresidentialdevelopment withaccesstoU.S.Highway52/IͲ73fromSouthMainStreetandMountainViewRoad CreateanindependentwastewatertreatmentfacilitytoservetheCityofKing

18

Executive Summary

122 123 123

Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO,RPO

Y Y

StokesCounty,NCDOT,MPO NCDOT,King,WalnutCove,Danbury

124 CapitalExpenditure(Y/N)

PageReference#

PartneringAgencies

128 StokesCounty,CityofKing,WalnutCove,TownofDanbury 128 128

Y

TownofWalnutCove

N

StokesCounty,StokesCountyEDC

Y

CityofKing

Y

CityofKing

Y Y

StokesCounty,CityofKing CityofKing

128

128

128

128

Project/TaskType


INTRODUCTION Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

19


INTRODUCTION I N

T H I S

C H A P T E R

A. Project Background B. Planning Goals C. Planning Process

A

which includes health directors from across the 10-county region of northwest North Carolina, created a regional plan for establishing new active living opportunities throughout their jurisdictions. The plan – Health by Design – was funded by the US Center of Disease Control’s Community Transformation Grant (CTG) and identified forty (40) projects focusing on policy development that would promote active living and public health. Of these projects, eight “Category 1” projects, including the Stokes County Comprehensive Plan, were selected for additional funding for plan development.

PROJECT BACKGROUND

The Stokes Vision 2035 Plan is the first plan of its kind for Stokes County. This comprehensive plan provides a unified strategic direction for not only the County, but also its three municipal areas of Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King. This planning effort was funded with assistance from the Northwest Partnership for Public Health through the Community Transformation Grant Project. In 2013 the Northwest Partnership for Public Health,

3 1

9

5

2 4

7 10

6 8

Map 1: Health by Design Study Area

The Health by Design plan study area includes North Carolina’s 10 northwestern counties, referred to as Region 3 by the NC Association of Local Health Directors 20

Introduction


Making the Total Health Model Map

Social Determinants of Health Percent African American Population Percent Hispanic Population Percent Below Poverty Percent High School Graduate or Higher Percent Spending > 30% of Income on Rent Percentage of the Household on Food Stamps

Community Risk Factors Ratio of Health Workers Population with Access to Grocery Stores

Health Risk Behaviors/ Outcomes Heart Disease Mortality Stroke Disease Mortality Lung/Bronchus/Trachea Cancer Incidence

TOTAL HEALTH MODEL AND PRIORITY INITIATIVES

Total Health Model This map was derived from all the maps, using a spatial analysis method called suitability analysis. Analysis provided by NC Center for Health Statistics.

The Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan was identified as a major priority within the regional Health by Design plan. This planning effort ranked particularly well among regional public health leadership within the Health by Design plan since a unified comprehensive plan had never been developed for the whole of Stokes County. Local government leaders expressed the need and support for the Stokes 2035 initiative, and each jurisdiction provided the matching funds required to receive Community Transformation Grant funding.

Project # County/ Project Alleghany A.1 Alleghany Wellness Center Design A.2 Alleghany Co. Recreation Master Plan A.3 Crouse Park Site Master Plan A.4 Sparta Greenway Phase I Engineering A.5 Downtown Sparta Streetscape Phase II Engineering and Design Ashe B.1 Beaver Creek Wellness B.2 West Jefferson Trail Implementation B.3 Ashe County Outdoor Recreation Plan Davidson C.1 Lake Thom-A-Lex Environmental Education Trail Construction Documents C.2 Thomasville Parks and Recreation Master Plan C.3 Thomasville Bike Plan Implementation C.4 Wilcox Bridge Plan C.5 Hughes Park Planning C.6 Abbotts Creek Greenway Phase II Davie D.1 Davie Co. Greenway Master Plan D.2 Old High School Re-Purposing Engineering and Design Forsyth E.1 Stratford Road Rail-Trail Feasibility E.2 Winston-Salem Downtown Pedestrian Environment Study E.3 Winton-Salem Sidewalk Missing Link Study E.4 Winston-Salem Development Ordinance Review and Overhaul E.5 Wake Forest Innovation Quarter Trail North Planning Stokes F.1 Sokes Co. Comprehensive Land Use Master Plan Surry G.1 Stone Mtn. State Park to Pilot Mtn. State Park Trail Master Plan G.2 Mount Airy Wayfinding Signage Plan G.3 Mount Airy Greenway Feasibility Analysis G.4 Mount Airy Pedestrian Plan Implementation G.5 Surry County Regional Recreation Master Plan G.6 Mountains-to-Sea Trail Foot Bridge Design G.7 Trail Master Plan: Elkin Municipal Park to Crater Park to Chatham Park Watauga H.1 New River Headwaters Trail – Middle Fork Greenway Phase II Design H.2 Historic Valle Crucis Village Trail Engineering Wilkes I.1 Stone Mtn. State Park to Pilot Mtn. State Park Trail Master Plan I.2 North Wilkesboro Parks and Recreation Master Plan I.3 North Wilkesboro Downtown Engineering Yadkin J .1 Yadkinville Community Park Phase II Engineering and Design J .2 Jonesville Greenway Extension J .3 Yadkin County Park Design and Engineering J .4 5-D Engineering J .5 Rockford River Access

Total Health Model and Priority Initiatives ALLEGHANY

ASHE

A.3 Sparta A.1 A.4 A.5 B.3

G.2 G.3 A.2

G.4

Jefferson

G.5

B.2

Danbury

Dobson

B.1

F.1

SURRY

I.1

WATAUGA

WILKES

G.6 J.5

G.7

H.2

Boone I.3

I.2

Wilkesboro

FORSYTH

YADKIN

J.2

H.1

STOKES

G.1

J.4

J.1

Yadkinville E.3 E.2 E.5 E.4 E.1

J.3

Winston-Salem

ÂŽ

Total Health Model Percentage* Based on natural breaks within the data distribution, three tiers have been established to provide a relative understanding of health determinants throughout the region.

Tier Tier 33

11 - 20%

Tier Tier 22

20.1- 27 %

Tier Tier 11

27.1 - 36 %

5

10

Mocksville

C.2

C.1 D.1

Tier 1 areas, or those with higher percentages, are most vulnerable. Note that some Priority Initiatives are county-wide efforts that will impact the entire county or a sub-region.

0

DAVIE

D.2

C.5

C.3

Lexington C.6 C.4

20 Miles

DAVIDSON

*This analysis combines data associated with Social Determinants of Health (poverty, education, and minority populations), Community Risk Factors (number of health care workers and access to grocery stores), and Health Risk Behavior/Outcomes (heart disease, stroke, and cancer).

Data Sources: NC State Center for Health Statistics, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, US Census

Map 2: Total Health Model and Priority Initiatives

The Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan was chosen out of forty (40) identified projects for additional funding for plan development. Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

21


B

INITIAL PLANNING GOALS

PLANNING GOALS PUBLIC HEALTH’S LEADING ROLE

This comprehensive plan is unique in that public health considerations serve as a cornerstone for each policy and initiative. Along with public health, this plan targets efforts that mutually benefit economic development, the natural environment, and equity.

A detailed vision for Stokes County is outlined at the end of the Public Engagement and Vision chapter on page XX. However, from the onset of the planning process, the planning team established six (6) initial goals for the planning process and final plan:

1.0

Engage citizens through a participatory planning process to establish a 20-year vision for Stokes County;

2.0

Create a “design-focused” plan that uses design schematics and visual renderings that illustrate how future growth and development can occur provided the plan’s policies are adopted;

3.0

Establish realistic priorities for how to allocate resources and capital improvements;

4.0

Identify areas appropriate for growth, varying densities, and preservation;

5.0

Encourage community empowerment & citizen action; and

PUBLIC HEALTH STOKES COUNTY M

O

V

I

N

G

T

O

2035 G

E

VISION PLAN

NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

s

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Exhibit 1: The Public Health’s Role

22

Introduction

T

H

E

R

EQUITY

6.0

Capture the planning process and outcomes within a professional document to be shared with grant funding agencies that can assist with implementation.


PURPOSE C

The Stokes 2035 Vision Plan will provide the county with strategic guidance for the next 20 years as it continues to position itself for an economy. PLANNING ever-changing PROCESS The Vision Plan will serve as a road map to effectively provide government services, ensure an efficient and thoughtful land development pattern, capital improvements.

The planning process involved five (5) phases: direcand make strategic and fiscally-sound tion setting, focus groups and research, public engagement, plan development, and plan adoption.

PROCESS

Exhibit 2: Planning Process Timeline

•Conduct Public Workshops •Present Community Outreach Results to Elected Officials

•Finalize Probable Development Area Concept Designs •Write Plan Policies •Policy Review with Planning Oversight Committee

FEB. - MAY. ’15 PLAN ADOPTION

•Field Visits •Identify Probable Development Areas •Conduct Demographic Analysis •Develop Framework Plans: Walnut Cove, King, Danbury, Overall County •Present Research Phase to Oversight Committee (POC) •Public Kick-Off Meeting at Economic Development Committee’s Business Extravaganza

JULY ‘14 - JAN. ’15 PLAN DEVELOPMENT

FEB. ’14- JUNE ‘14 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

•Establish Technical Advising Committee (County & Municipal Staff) •Project Branding •Develop Project Website for Community Outreach

NOV. ‘13- JAN. ’14 FOCUS GROUPS & RESEARCH

DIRECTION SETTING

OCT. ‘13

•Plan Review with Staff •Present to Elected Officials •45-Day Public Comment Period • Plan Adoption

PLANNING PROCESS TIMELINE Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

23


24

Introduction


CHAPTER ONE: COUNTY PROFILE Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

25


CHAPTER 1: COUNTY PROFILE I N

T H I S

C H A P T E R

A. Demographics B. Physical Environment C. Previous Plans and Reports D. Framework Maps

This chapter provides a comprehensive profile of Stokes County. The chapter begins by examining the County’s demographics, including its current and projected population growth, age distribution, poverty rate, education attainment, etc. This demographic profile begins to unveil some of County’s greatest challenges for future growth. Next, provided is an overview of the County’s physical environment. It’s topography, natural resources, soils, etc. have a significant bearing on how and where preservation and future growth should occur. The County and its municipal areas have been part of a variety of previous planning efforts. The topics of these plans range from local food to transportation to economic development. These previous efforts provide a foundation for the Stokes 2035 Vision Plan.

Danbury, municipal population growth has been moderate, with King experiencing a 23.8 percent growth rate since 2000, and Danbury 27.7 percent. However, Walnut Cove’s population declined by 3.4 percent over the same period. Like many rural North Carolina counties, population growth in Stokes is projected to lag the state’s overall growth; Stokes County’s population is projected to grow by 27.03 percent between 2013 and 2038, while the state’s population growth is projected to increase by 37.5 percent during the same period. Regionally, Winston Salem is not projected to experience significantly more growth (33 percent) than the County; the Greensboro-Winston Salem-High Point MSA is projected to experience less growth (21.9 percent) than Stokes County.

POPULATION GROWTH

This chapter ends will a series of maps that geographically highlight the many assets and resources found throughout the County and each municipal jurisdiction. These assets provide a framework for establishing new initiatives and sound land development policies.

A

DEMOGRAPHICS

Population and Population Projections Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc The County’s population in 2013 was 46,588. Stokes County’s population grew by 6.42% between 2010 and 2013 with the addition of 2,908 new residents. In the case of King and

26

Chapter 1: County Profile

Exhibit 3: Population Growth


Age Distribution Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Stokes is an aging county. In 2013, more than 41% of the population was over 50 years old, and the largest age group was 45-60 year olds - nearly a quarter of Stokes County’s population. The retiring Baby Boomer generation will further continue this aging trend. The largest rate of growth over the next 30 years is expected to be in the age group 65 and older; by 2040 Stokes will see a 101% increase in this category. According to 2040 projections, more than 28 percent of Stokes County’s population will be 65 and older, compared to only 19% of North Carolina residents. The number of elderly Stokes residents will increase more rapidly than either the number of children or working-age adults (working-age defined as 18-64 years old).

Stokes is an aging county. According to 2040 projections, more than 28 percent of Stokes County’s population will be 65 and older...

Stokes County Age Distribution 2013

Exhibit 4: Stokes County Age Distribution 2013

Stokes County Age Distribution 2040

The projected increase in the percentage of older adults living in Stokes County indicates a clear need to plan for supportive community design, affordable and accessible housing, and to provide access to needed services.

Exhibit 5: Stokes County Age Distribution 2040

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

27


Households Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Poverty Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Changes to the percent of family households and single-person households in Stokes reflect those experienced at the state level. In 2000 the percentages of family households and single-person households in the County were 74 percent and 26 percent; for the state those percentages were 69 percent and 31 percent. By 2010 the percentages stood at 70/30 in the County and 67/33 in North Carolina.

Poverty rates in Stokes County are generally higher than the rest of the state. The percentage of County population below the poverty line was 17.4 percent (2008-12); for children under age 5 the percentage was 25.5 percent (lower than the state’s child poverty rate of 28 percent). North Carolina’s poverty rate was 16.8 percent. The percent of County population over age 65 living below the poverty line was 13.8 percent, notably higher than the statewide rate of 10.2 percent. Walnut Cove had the highest poverty rate: 25.6 percent. At 100 percent, Danbury had the highest child poverty rate, while for those aged 65 and over, Walnut Cove had the highest poverty rate: nearly 40 percent. King poverty rate was 12.1 percent; for those aged 65 and higher the poverty rate was 15.9 percent.

Stokes County Poverty Rates

16.8 %

North Carolina

17.4 %

Stokes County

17.3 %

Danbury

25.6 %

Walnut Cove

12.1 %

King

Exhibit 6: Stokes County Poverty Rates

28

Chapter 1: County Profile


COST OF LIVING

1 SPEND 1

3 OVER 3 ON

THEIR

Housing and Home Ownership Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

OF HOUSEHOLD INCOME

Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Generally, no more than 30 percent of household income should be used for housing costs. However, nearly 33 percent of County households with a mortgage spent 30 percent or more of their household income on mortgage costs. A significant percentage of Stokes County workers (36 percent) are employed in very low income positions, providing less available disposable income.

OF COUNTY HOUSEHOLDS

Cost of Living

MORTGAGE

Exhibit 7: Cost of Living

In 2013 the number of housing units in the County declined by one (1) percent to 21,674. Approximately 11% of the County’s housing units are unoccupied. Housing stock in the County is relatively old: 70 percent of the County’s housing stock was built between 1960 and 1999; 11 percent of the County’s housing stock was built between 2000 and 2009. Less than 1 percent of the County’s housing stock was built from 2010 to 2012. 69 percent of occupied housing units in the County consist of one-unit, detached structures. 26 percent of occupied homes are classified as mobile homes or other types. Multi-family housing (apartments) comprise only 5 percent of County housing units. Stokes County’s home ownership rate (79%) is higher than North Carolina’s home ownership rate (67%).

HOME OWNERSHIP

Exhibit 8: Home Ownership

HOUSING VALUES

Exhibit 9: Housing Values

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

29


Racial/Ethnic Composition Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

The population of Stokes County is ethnically less diverse than the State’s. In 2010, 93 percent of the County’s population was white, 4 percent was black, and almost 3 percent was Hispanic. North Carolina’s 2010 white population comprised 69 percent of the total population, blacks comprised 22 percent, and Hispanics 8.4 percent.

ETHNIC COMPOSITION

94% WHITE 4.2% BLACK 2.7% HISPANIC

By 2012, the white population in Stokes had increased to nearly 93.1 percent, the black population to 4.2 percent, and the Hispanic population remained flat at 2.7 percent. The significant increase in the state’s Hispanic population has not occurred in Stokes County: the percentage of the County’s Hispanic population in 2013 was 2.8 percent, less than a third of North Carolina’s 2013 Hispanic population of 8.9 percent.

Exhibit 10: Ethnic Composition

Educational Attainment Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Nearly a quarter of the population in Stokes, age 25 years or older, lack a high school diploma, compared with 17 percent for North Carolina. The percentage of people who have obtained a high school diploma (with no additional education) was nearly 10 percentage points higher in Stokes than the rest of the state. Only 10.8% of Stokes County residents possess a college degree compared to 24.5% of the North Carolina population.

Educational Attainment

Exhibit 11: Educational Attainment

30

Chapter 1: County Profile


Economy Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Stokes County’s economic landscape is comprised almost exclusively of small business establishments: 97% of the County’s business establishments have fewer than 50 employees. Of these small businesses, approximately 35% are in the Construction and Retail Trade sector. Notably, 34% of all businesses operating in the County are in the Construction and Retail Trade sector.

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY IN STOKES COUNTY, 2013

5% 9%

6% 12%

10% 17%

97% of the County’s business establishments have fewer than 50 employees.

14% 5%

2%

1%

Exhibit 11: Employment by Industry in Stokes County, 2013

Labor Force Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

The size of the County’s labor force has remained relatively constant since 2000. In 2000 the labor force consisted of 23,922 persons, in 2010 the number increased to 24,590; by 2013 the County’s labor force stood at 23,608. The recession of 2007 significantly impacted the County’s unemployment rate: in 2000 the County’s annual average unemployment rate was 3.5 percent, but by 2010 the rate increased to nearly 11 percent. The County’s 2013 unemployment rate was 7.3 percent.

UNEMPLOYMENT RATES

Exhibit 13: Unemployment Rates, 2013

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

31


Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Location Quotient Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

In 2000, Stokes County’s median annual wage was $22,860; the median hourly wage was $10.99. The County’s 2013 median annual wage was $27,719; its median hourly wage was $13.33. However, in 2014 nearly one third of the County’s workforce was employed in Very Low Income occupations (those that pay less than $25,000 annually). 90% of these Very Low Income occupations are in the County’s largest employment sectors.

The location quotient measures the extent to which jobs are concentrated in a specific area (Stokes County) relative to the larger geographic region (North Carolina).

1

WAGES

MAKE LESS THAN $25,000

OF COUNTY HOUSEHOLDS

Wages

3 ANNUALY

Exhibit 14: Wages

EMPLOYMENT CONCENTRATION RELATIVE TO NC

Compared to North Carolina as a whole, the County’s concentration of employment in the Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting sectors is nearly 5 times higher. Stokes County is also more specialized in Health Care and Construction. However, the County does not capture its market share of higher wage jobs, such as those related to finance, manufacturing, and transportation.

Exhibit 15: Employment Concentration Relative to NC

32

Chapter 1: County Profile


Employment Sectors Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

Since the 2007 recession, average employment in the County’s largest economic sectors have experienced significant losses, resulting in a fundamental restructuring of the County’s economy. Between 2000 and 2013, employment in the Construction sector declined by nearly 60 percent; the Goods-Producing sector by 49 percent; Manufacturing by 44 percent. Conversely, the Professional and Business Services, Education and Health Services, and Leisure and Hospitality sectors all experienced increases during the period: 36 percent, 19 percent, and 13 percent, respectively. Growth in the Services sector (the County’s largest employment sector), was 7.2 % during this time. In 2012, the Winston-Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area (of which Stokes is a part) gained only 100 new jobs. The area lost 1,100 jobs in the Education and Health Services sector alone (most of these layoffs occurred at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center).

TOP FIVE EMPLOYERS IN STOKES COUNTY COMPANY EMPLOYMENT 1. STOKES COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION

500-999

2. WIELAND COPPER PRODUCTS, LLC

250-499

3. COUNTY OF STOKES

250-499

4. PIONEER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL OF STOKES

100-249

5. YMCA OF NORTHWEST NORTH CAROLINA

100-249

Exhibit 16: Top Five Employers in Stokes County

EMPLOYMENT TRENDS

BETWEEN 2000 AND 2013 STOKES COUNTY EMPLOYMENT HAS

CONSTRUCTION 60% GOODS-PRODUCING 49% MANUFACTURING 44% WHEREAS

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS 36% EDUCATION AND HEALTH 19% LEISURE & HOSPITALITY 13%

INCREASED

Source: 2013, Woods & Poole Economics, Inc

In 2013 the County’s top five employers were Stokes County Board of Education, Wieland Copper, Stokes County, Pioneer Community Hospital, and the YMCA. As of 2013, the County’s largest employment sectors consist of Service-Providing; Education and Health Services; Goods-Producing; Trade, Transportation and Utilities; and Leisure and Hospitality.

DECREASED

Employers

Exhibit 17: Employment Trends

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

33


PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

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Ridgeway Ridgeway

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Mayo River State Park

Hanging Rock State Park

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Stokesdale Stokesdale r ve Summerfield Summerfield Ri

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REGIONAL CONTEXT d id

Portions of Stokes County are within the greater Winston Salem area, which serves as the region’s economic hub and key employment center. The city’s economic base has diversified over the last decade, adding jobs in the educational and healthcare sectors - due largely to the presence of Wake Forest University. Biotechnology research is an emerging sector in the city’s econo-

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Planning Organizations Greensboro Greensboro

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B S o NW Piedmont RPO utu u h uffaB S o Urban Area MPO Bt h Winston-Salem louCfrfa eeklo Cr ee k regional leader in my, and the city has long been recognized as a F

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Piedmont Triad International Airport

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Kernersville Kernersville

Winston-Salem Winston-Salem

Lewisville Lewisville

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Oak Oak Ridge Ridge

S o NC Dept. of Transportation - GIS Unit; NC NC OneMap, NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis; thFloodplain Mapping Program

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FORSYTH FORSYTH Walkertown Walkertown

Yadkinville u t Yadkinville eek hD e e p Cr

Reidsville Reidsville

Haw River State Park

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Tobaccoville Tobaccoville

Wentworth Wentworth

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Rural Hall Rural Hall

East East Bend Bend

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King King

Boonville Boonville

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Walnut Walnut Cove Cove

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YADKIN YADKIN

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Eden Eden

Ri ve r

Mayodan Mayodan

Danbury Danbury

Pilot Pilot Mountain Mountain

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Stoneville Stoneville

Pilot Mountain State Park

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Sandy Sandy Level Level

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STOKES STOKES

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PITTSYLVANIA PITTSYLVANIA

HENRY HENRY

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Jonesville Jonesville

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Chapter 1: County Profile

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Map 3: Regional Context

34

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Horse Horse Pasture Pasture

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Commercial airline service is available at the Piedmont-Triad International Airport in Greensboro.

o

VIRGINIA Mount Airy Mount Airy

iver

ay o R i

M

Cana Cana

77

Major transportation arteries in Stokes include US 52 in the southwest portion of the County, and US 311 in the southeast portion; these highways link the County to Forsyth County where a significant portion of the County’s labor force commutes. Nearly 43 percent of commuters work in Forsyth County.

PATRICK PATRICK

S ou th M

National Park

MithcellhReilvlerR

U S585 8

rth

GRAYSON GRAYSON Blue Ridge Parkway

Patrick Patrick Springs Springs

Stuart Stuart

i tR ara Ar

The southeastern corner of Stokes County is dominated by Belews Lake which occupies approximately four square miles of the County. Stokes County is occupied by two drainage basins, the Yadkin – Pee Dee and the Roanoke drainage basins. Only a small portion of the County in the southwest flows toward the Yadkin (via the Little Yadkin River). The remainder of the County flows into the Roanoke River primarily through the Dan River.

No

CARROLL CARROLL

F

The County is divided by the Sauratown Mountains, which extend through the center of the County. The highest peaks range from 1,500 feet to 2,579 feet at Moore’s Knob, the highest point of the Sauras. This range includes Hanging Rock State Park and is the only range in the state that starts and stops within one county.

Collinsville Fieldale Martinsville Martinsville

ay

Stokes County is located in the northwest central portion (Piedmont) of the state, along the Virginia border and north of Forsyth County.

Fancy Gap Fancy Gap

ve r

B

cancer treatment and research. Given Winston-Salem’s proximity to Stokes County, and in light of the County’s workforce commuter patterns referenced earlier, the city’s prosperity and growth are directly linked to past and future growth in Stokes County.

Whitsett


Political Jurisdiction and Density Population is most concentrated within the County’s three municipalities: Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King. Danbury is located along NC Route 8 and NC Route 89 east of Hanging Rock State Park. Walnut Cove is located in the southeast section of the County and is accessed by NC Route 89 and US 311. King, the County’s largest municipality, is located in the southwest portion of the County and is accessed via US 52 and NC 66. With the exception of a few areas immediately adjacent to the three municipalities, most of Stokes County is sparsely populated. Notable areas of density in the County include a section of NC Route 66 immediately north of King, and the Pinnacle area.

LEGEND

LEGEND

Hanging Rock State Park Sparse Less Sparse

Dense Most Dense

Hanging Rock State Park

Urban Municipal Areas

Private Camps and Lodges

Commercial Nodes

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N

Map 4: Population Density

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

35


Soil Quality All forms of development, including residential and small commercial, have consistently struggled to meet soil evaluation tests for septic systems in rural areas where sewer infrastructure is unavailable. Using data from the North Carolina Center for Geographic Information, it is evident that key road corridors and other areas appropriate for development are restricted by poor soils. Even areas identified as “More Suitable” are known to have issues throughout the County. The County’s poor soils direct growth and encourage density toward areas with existing infrastructure, which is appropriate and a major recommendation on this plan. However, businesses that serve local rural communities and tourists, such as B & B’s, event venues, and small commercial businesses, will continue to struggle to find suitable locations due to poor soil conditions.

LEGEND

Hanging Rock State Park More Suitable for Septic

Pacolet-Cecil

Pacolet-Rion

Less Suitable for Septic (Shallow Bedrock) Sauratown-Hayesville-Brevard

Mayodan

Rion-Pacolet-Wateree

Masada-Dogue-Hornsboro

Poindexter-Wilkes

Map 5: Soils

36

Chapter 1: County Profile

Less Suitable for Septic (Shrink & Swell)

Riverview-Toccoa-Chewalca

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N


UN NT TY Y

ELASTOMETRICS COLLINSTOWN - STATE LINE (VACANT) COMMUNITY CENTER

Natural Resources and Assets

VIRGINIA STOKES COUNTY

JESSUP MILL RIVER ACCESS FRANCISCO COMMUNITY BUILDING

DA N

89

HART’S RIVER ACCESS

FRANCISCO

RIV ER

FRANCISCO ELEMENTARY

704

PINEY GROVE MIDDLE LAWSONVILLE ELEMENTARY

NANCY REYNOLDS ELEMENTARY

ODGES

770

LAWSONVILLE COMMUNITY CENTER

SERTOMA SINGLE TREE LODGE MOORE SPRING MANOR

66

PARK

SANDY RIDGE ELEMENTARY

LAWSONVILLE

NORTH STOKES HIGH

WESTFIELD

SANDY RIDGE

WC RE EK

89

EK BIG CRE

Stokes County benefits from a wide range of natural and cultural assets - the most notable of which are Hanging Rock State Park and the Dan River.

704

SN O

Centrally located and within driving distance of all three municipalities, Hanging Rock State Park reported 443,899 visitors in 2012. The park has approximately 22 miles of trails and is the County’s primary destination for outdoor recreation activities and tourism. Given the park’s central location and close proximity to the Dan River, opportunities exist to funnel visitors to and from the park via trails and river access points into other areas of the County.

704

8

NORTHVIEW COMMUNITY CENTER

HANGING ROCK RIVER ACCESS

704

HANGING ROCK ENTRANCE

TRAILS

DANBURY

HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

DA NR IV ER

YMCA CAMP HANES

SAURATOWNTRAIL / MOUNTAINS TO SEA TRAIL

8 89

MOUNTAIN VALLEY

STOKES COUNTY CENTER

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

S

SNOW RIVER ACCESS

268

STOKES COUNTY

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

772

MOROTOCK PARK RIVER ACCESS

MEADOWS 66

GRACELAND LIVING CENTER

MT. OLIVE ELEMENTARY

PINNACLE

PRIDDY MANOR

52

N

CR EE K

SOUTH STOKES HIGH

GERMANTON ELEMENTARY

KING

WEST STOKES HIGH UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE

POPLAR SPRINGS ELEMENTARY

REC. ACRES FOWLER PARK

WALNUT COVE ELEMENTARY

WALNUT COVE ROSENWALD SCHOOL

FOWLER PARK EAST WALNUT COVE COMMUNITY PARK

NW FORSYTH TECHNICAL CENTER

PINE HALL ELEMENTARY PINE HALL ACCESS AREA BELEWS LAKE DUKE POWER STEAM PLANT

W

MILES YMCA KING ELEMENTARY CENTRAL PARK AMERICAN LEGION

PINE HALL

STOKES SMALL BUSINESS CENTER

WALNUT COVE INTERMEDIATE & LONDON ELEMENTARY

R.J. REYNOLDS STORAGE CREEK RK WALNUT RIDGE & WALNUT COVE TO ASSISTED LIVING 65

311

SOUTHEASTERN STOKES MIDDLE

O

MOUNTAIN VIEW COMMUNITY BUILDING

MEADOWBROOK SCHOOL

WIELAND COPPER

89

NF

PILOT MOUNTAIN

CHESTNUT GROVE MIDDLE

A NEAT M

PINNACLE ELEMENTARY

8

STOKES COUNTY FORSYTH COUNTY

The Dan River bisects the County, flowing from the northwest to the southeast for approximately 58 miles. The river offers a range of recreational options for residents and visitors, including canoeing, tubing, boating, fishing, and swimming. These activities are facilitated by the existence of the six river access sites identified on the asset map. The river offers a unique way to observe many of the County’s natural assets, local landmarks, and other cultural resources.

311

65

LEGEND Parks

River/Lake Access

Senior Living

Forsyth Technical

Community Center

Commercial

Mixed-Use

Industrial

Hanging Rock State Park

Office / Institutional

Private Camps and Lodges

Schools

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N

Map 6: Natural Resources and Assets

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

37


PREVIOUS PLANS AND REPORTS The 2013 study “Forsyth County’s Community Food System: A Foundation to Grow”, examined the potential to develop Forsyth County’s local agricultural economy. Stokes County was in included in the study. The study’s 15 key findings focused on the need to foster the growth of local food businesses and stimulate entrepreneurial development, improve coordination among stakeholders, develop processing and distribution facilities, and improve access to potential markets. The study can be used as a guide for similar evaluations

TABLE 7. Identified Opportunities for Community Action

FOOD RELATED OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMMUNITY ACTION OPPORTUNITIES FOR COMMUNITY ACTION

System

Infrastructure

1. Develop a Community Food System Consortium 2. Create a Community Food System Coordinator Position 3. Explore Local Food Directory Options 4. Examine Branding Opportunities 5. Provide Food System Training Opportunities 6. Develop Job Training Programs for Food Related Businesses 7. Expand the Piedmont Farm School Production

Forsyth County’s Community Food System: A Foundation to Grow (2013)

8. Adopt a Farmland Preservation Plan 9. Promote Internship Referral Services 10. Expand the Community Garden Resource Program 11. Amend the Unified Development Ordinance 12. Develop Policy for Use of City and County Land/Resources for Urban Agriculture

Processing

C

of the local food economy in Stokes.

13. Complete a Feasibility Study for the Development of a Shared-Use, Processing Facility 14. Promote Existing Entrepreneurial Resources 15. Work Regionally to Explore Need for a Mobile Poultry Processing Facility

Distribution

16. Strengthen and Expand Food Hubs Serving Forsyth County 17. Promote Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) Certification 18. Educate Farmers and Chefs 19. Establish Institutional Purchasing Policy

Consumption

20. Convene a Farmers Market Association

Exhibit

Piedmont Together: If-Then Survey Results (2013) / Piedmont-Triad Sustainable Communities Planning Project (2012)

21. Launch a Consumer Education Campaign 22. Introduce Local Food Sales to Convenient Stores

BACKGROUND 23. Research and Establish Mobile Markets

In24.the springProcess of 2011, the Piedmont undertook Streamline of Accepting SNAP/EBTTriad at Farmers’ Markets an ambitious, 3-year planning effort desig by strengthening each community in our region. Formerly referred to as the Sustainable Co Piedmont Together takes a comprehensive look at the potential impacts of jobs, housing an 18:the Food Related Opportunities for Community Action lives of citizens within our 12-county region. Hundreds of project participants from comm are working together to identify opportunities and develop practical solutions for creating healthier and more livable communities and a greener environment. These efforts are not j more competitive – they are focused on making the Piedmont Triad a true winner in the new

The 2013 Piedmont-Triad Sustainable Communities Planning STRENGTHS AND CHALLENGES IN THE PIEDMONT TRIAD Project was comprised of a series of workshops with the inTop Strengths 40 FORSYTH FUTURES | Community Action tention of determining the region’s BACKGROUND strength and weaknessx Excellent higher education opportunities x Viticulture and Productive Farmland In the spring of 2011, the Piedmont Triad undertook an ambitious, 3-year planning effort designed to strengthen our region es (shown right). x Access to Excellent Health Care by strengthening each community in our region. Formerly referred to asand theRecreational SustainableResources Communities Planning Project, x Scenic Piedmont Together takes a comprehensive look at the potential of jobs, housing and transportation choices on x impacts Small Town Charm thehousing, lives of citizens within our 12-county region. Hundreds of project participants communities throughout our region Several sectors such as employment, and transporx Strong volunteerfrom & religious organizations that help create a are working together to identify opportunities and develop practical for creating a stronger local economy, sense solutions of community tation were evaluated. The survey revealed a concern on and a greener environment. healthier and more livable communities These efforts are not about x Good highways & utilities to just support job making creation our & region more competitive – they are focused on making the Piedmont Triadeconomic a true winner in the new global economy. development

the effects of urban sprawl on the region’s rural character, Top Strengths the ability of the transportation system to meet futureopportunities dex Excellent higher education x Viticulture and Productive Farmland mands, and the negative impact of xgrowth theHealth regions Access to on Excellent Care x Scenic and Recreational Resources recreational assets and natural resources. Additionally, x Small Town Charm x Strong volunteer & religious organizations that help create a preparation for future population diversity was identified as sense of community an important priority.

38

Chapter 1: County Profile

Top Challenges x x x x x x x x

Lack of transportation option The “New Economy” – post-m Abandoned Job Centers –un Capitalizing on Assets –suppo Healthy Communities – transp space Sidewalks & Bike Lanes – mob Access to fresh food sources Energy Conservation – constr

ByTop theChallenges spring of 2012 hundreds of people had attended civic forums held throughout the x Lackstrengths of transportation options in communities regionally regional and challenges. Combined&with a wide range of factual information, this x used The “New Economy” – post-manufacturing, high tech was to generate the following reasons to care about the future of our region. x x

Abandoned Job Centers –unused mills & shopping centers Capitalizing on Assets –supporting existing small businesses

Reasons to Care about–the Future of options our Region x Healthy Communities transportation & open

1. The New Economy – Nearly 350,000 new jobs will be added to the region by 2040. But they are no space a much more educated workforce. x require Sidewalks & Bike Lanes – mobility and recreation 2.x Transportation Choices – The lack of transportation choices is causing families and businesses econo Access to fresh food sources x Good highways & utilities to support job creation & 3.x Housing – Current housing choices are not keeping up with the demand of a changing economic development Energy Market Conservation – construction, restoration, re-use goods, services and jobs. 4. Demographic Changes – More planning is needed for aging and increasingly diverse po Exhibit 19: Strengths and Challenges Piedmont Triad athe By the spring of 2012 hundreds of people had attended civic forums held throughout in thethe region to generate listarea’s of 5. Scenic, Recreational and Natural Resources – The region’s natural resources, one of its strengths, ar regional strengths and challenges. Combined with a wide range of factual information, this grassroots stakeholder input Farm and Food Systems – The desire and market for local fresh food is on the rise, yet the Triad is l was used to generate the following reasons to care about the6.future of our region. lands at an alarming rate and the local infrastructure for food processing and distribution is lacking. 7. Regional Cooperation – Regional cooperation and coordination is critical to the future economic p

Reasons to Care about the Future of our Region

1. The New Economy – Nearly 350,000 new jobs will be added to the region by 2040. But they are not the jobs of the past; they will


State of the County Health Report, 2013 (Stokes County Health Department)

The Stokes County Health Department’s “State of the County Health Report” (2013) was designed as a quick overview of County health data. The report provided an annual review of the health of the County, tracked the progress of health priorities, and identified emerging health issues of importance to County residents. The report highlighted several community concerns (drug abuse, alcohol abuse, lack of exercise, smoking/tobacco use, and poor eating habits), and focused on the County’s high suicide rate. The report summarized the importance of the County’s Community Transformation Grant Project - which will aid in addressing these and other health concerns – as well as the County’s effort to incorporate public health into its new Comprehensive Plan.

TOP 5 HEALTH CONCERNS IDENTIFIED BY COMMUNITY 1. CANCER 2. DIABETES 3. HEART DISEASE 4. SCHOOL VIOLENCE 5. OBESITY/OVERWEIGHT Exhibit 20: Top 5 Health Concerns Identified by Community

Stokes County, NC

Marketing

2.3.D > ACTION PLAN FOR RECRUITMENT, 2013 (STOKES COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION)

In 2013, the Stokes County Economic Development Commission completed its “Action Plan for Recruitment”. The plan discussed several key challenges to recruiting efforts, including the County’s lack of available buildings and shovel-ready sites. These factors have hindered the EDC’s ability to respond to prospective company inquiries, and may constrain future expansion of existing businesses. The plan identified available buildings and sites, potential funding sources for building improvements, potential industry segments for targeted recruitment initiatives, other economic development initiatives (construction of shell buildings, etc.), and focused on the importance of marketing.

SCED can implement marketing at many different levels. We understand the marketing budget is limited, so we focused on the biggest bang for the buck – electronic marketing, existing business outreach, etc. The current marketing budget is approximately $41,500 with $20,000 committed to tourism marketing and $6,000 committed to the Business Extravaganza Event.

RECOMMENDED MARKETING INITIATIVE WITH ASSOCIATED COSTS

We hope that SCED can grow its marketing budget over time to allow for rebranding, lead generation, and more outreach. Marketing Initiatives Create an Identity E-Marketing & Lead Generation Materials Website Updates Existing Business Marketing Leveraging Partnerships

Cost We recommend using the current brand now but plan for a rebranding in future budget cycles. $15,000 $2,000 to design a template that can be used in electronic marketing; in-house, on-demand printed proposals; and reports. $10 per company contact for e-marketing. $3,000 - $5,000 for electronic brochure with minimal hardcopies Minor design changes $2,000 Staff time plus travel to headquarters $2,000+ depending upon number of trips $1,500 for trips to Raleigh and in-county meetings with Commerce

Exhibit 21: Recommended Marketing Initiative with Associated Costs Organizational Development Stokes County Economic Development is a public agency, a department of county government. As such, there are limits to its economic development activities. For example, it does not have a mechanism to raise private sector funds to supplement public funds. Also, it does not have a Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan 39 high level of confidentiality (often necessary in economic development) given public records laws.


VIRGINIA

5

STOKES COUNTY

Miles

89

N

- OUTDOOR RECREATION DESTINATION

G UR

0

704 - TOURISM - OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS - DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION

772

52

-INDUSTRY LAND RESERVE

-TRAFFIC CALMING

89

-DAN RIVER TERMINUS

PINE HALL

89 NC

-DOWNTOWN EXPANSION

-DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION

MEADOWS 8

N

PINNACLE

- STOKES COUNTY EARLY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL

772 NC

PINNACLE

9

66

- CONCENTRATE SINGLE FAMILY EXTENSION FROM KING

MEADOWS

SAURATOWN & MST TRAIL

&8

CR EE K

311

DAN

E RIV

R

W

NF

CREEK RK

TO

52 US

STOKES COUNTY NC 8 FORSYTH COUNTY

52 US

Hanging Rock State Park

5 &6

65

NC 65

Hanging Rock State Park

Commercial Nodes

Danbury

Private Camps and Lodges

Conservation Region

Map 7: Stokes County Framework

65

LEGEND

Unincorporated King Single Family

311

65 NC

North

O

-MEDICAL CORRIDOR

US 311

Low-Density Residential District

8 89

A NEAT M

- RURAL NODE - CLOSE TO PILOT MTN, SAURATOWN TRAIL, KING, AND HWY. 52

Residential Agricultural

MADISON

- CROSSROADS COMMUNITY

C

8

(GREAT SMOKY MTNS TO OUTER BANKS.)

6

N

-MOUNTAINS TO SEA

NC

6

(PILOT MTN. TO HANGING ROCK)

STOKES COUNTY

-SAURATOWN TRAIL

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

8&

89

68268 NC 2

CONSERVATION REGION

Chapter 1: County Profile

C7

704

NC

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

LY

- 500,000+ VISITORS EACH YEAR

DANBURY

B

CH

CONSERVATION

66

" " " Residential-Medium Density COMMERCIAL NODES- Conditional Use Density " " " Residential - Medium " " " Neighborhood County Framework Residential District

40

770 N

8

-CONSERVATION REGION

The Stokes County Framework Map highlights the High Density Residential District County’s natural andHigh cultural resources, and also Density Mobile Home Residential District PILOT ETJ Mobile Home Residential identifies several commercial growth nodes. These MOUNTAIN Medium Density Residential District nodes occur at the NC Route 704 – NC Route 8 inter" " " Residential - Low Density - Conditional Use " "Stokes, " Residential section in northern along NC Route 704 in the - Multifamily - Apartments Residential - Multifamily - Townhomes Sandy Ridge community, at the NC Route 704 – NC " " " Residential - Multifamily - Townhomes - Conditional Use Route 700 intersection in northeastern Stokes, at the " " " Residential - Mobile Home NC Route 8 – NC Route 89 intersection in the MeadResidential Manufactured single section 0 1.25 Home 2.5- MILES ows community, and Residential at the Highway 311 Home – NC- Multisectional R in Manufactured Residential - Multifamily the Pine Hall Community. These commercial growth Rural Residential District nodes are likely to experience long term growth as the LEGEND " " R-3 due to their proximity to utilCounty develops,"" either " " Rural Residential - Conditional Use Walnut Cove " " their " R-8 location MHE ities or because of at key points along King routes that traverse the County.

SANDY RIDGE

WC RE EK

LAWSONVILLE

EK BIG CRE

SANDY RIDGE

SN O - SCENIC RIVER ROUTE

- CONCENTRATE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT AT NODES

NC 704704

7

FRANCISCO

RIV ER

RAILROADS

R-2

89

DA N

NC

89

704

HANGING ROCK

US_HWY

Framework maps wereRoads developed for Stokes County LEGEND Flood Zones of Danbury, King, and and for its three municipal areas Old Business District Walnut Cove. These maps strive to connect much of WALNUT COVE General Business " " " General the information gleaned from Businessthis Chapter. The purpose Conditional Use KING " " " of the framework" map series is to Business identify the “is” of District " " Neighborhood UNINCORPORATED KING SINGLE FAMILY B-3 Stokes County. Where is the community growing? What DANBURY I are the geographic trends and howHANGING can they inform the ROCK STATE PARK I-1 PRIVATE CAMPS AND LODGES This way we think about the future of Stokes County? Heavy Industrial FLOODZONES Industrial map series was createdLight to help inspire discussion during " " " Light IndustrialLAKES - Conditional AND WATERWAYS Use the public engagement " " " M-1phase of the planning process, SAURATOWN & NCMTS TRAILS which is the focus of the next chapter. The remainder Insitutional HANGING ROCK TRAILS " " Office - to of this chapter is "dedicated a brief description Institutional - Conditionaland Use " " " HIGHWAYS R-1 " "framework " presentation of the map series.

704

NC 8

NC

State_Roads

DAN RIVER

NC_HWY

31 1

2.5

US

0

NC 8

Senior Living

SINGLE FAMILY

College

CROSSROADS - CROSSROADS TO VIRGINIA

KING

School

D

µ

STOKES COUNTY F R A M1 Einch W=O12,000 R Kfeet FRAMEWORK MAPS PLAN ETJ

WALNUT COVE

City Jurisdiction

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N


R DAN RIVE

Y ORK

SEVEN I SLA ND

Danbury Framework The Framework Map for Danbury highlights the importance of the Town’s proximity to Hanging Rock State Park. The asset map indicates two opportunities for trail connections linking the park to downtown. Commercial corridors, anchored by the historic courthouse and the Danbury General Store along NC Route 8 & 89 are also identified as key assets. Other assets include, Moratock Park, Pioneer Community Hospital, and the Stokes County Government office.

STEDMAN LAKE PIONEER COMMUNITY HOSPITAL OF STOKES HIG HW AY

8

&

89

TAYLOR LAKE

SCOTT LAKE

ILL

STOKES COUNTY GOVERNMENT COMPLEX

M

HANGING ROCK PARK RD

PPA RD

TO HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

CORRIDORS

SHE

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN MAIN

MORATOCK PARK

V N RI ER DA

TOWN HALL & HISTORIC COURTHOUSE (STOKES COUNTY SCHOOL)

HANGING ROCK FOREST RD

DANBURY GENERAL STORE HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

SATELLITE COMMERCIAL NTAIN MOU

G HI

ROCKINGHAM

8 AY HW &8 9

GUILFORD

TO WALNUT COVE

LEGEND

LEGEND

Hanging Rock State Park Commercial

Industrial

Office Institutional Parks

Floodzones

ETJ

City Jurisdiction

Commercial Nodes/ Corridors

Points of Interest

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N

Map 8: Danbury Framework

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

41


CHESTNUT GROVE MT. OLIVE MIDDLE ELEMENTARY WEST STOKES HIGH

King Framework

KING FRAMEWORK King’s Framework Map identifies the notable P L AcommerN

PRIDDY MANOR

cial corridors and commercial hubs found throughout the City. One corridor extends southward along LEGEND South Main Street from downtown to the intersection COMMERCIAL with Kirby and Spainhour. A regional commercial INDUSTRIAL hub continues to grow along HighwayOFFICE 52.INSTITUTIONAL Between US Route 52 and Newsome Road, the framework plan MIXED USE PARKS identifies an industrial corridor that continues to be inSENIOR LIVING fringed on by multi-family development. The Moore Road Medical Corridor is shown justSCHOOLS south of the FLOODZONES YMCA and Farmer’s Market. A local commercial hub LAKES AND WATERWAYS is shown at the intersection of MountainGREENWAY View and NC Route 66 & 5, which links the City to CITY Hanging JURISDICTION Rock State Park. Greenway opportunities are highlighted ETJ HIGHWAYS between Fowler Park and Recreation Acres.

TO HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

GOFF

M N

W BRO

VIEW

UNTA IN OA D MO O R E R OR RR ID

SPA INHOUR

REGIONAL COMMERCIAL HUB

OL D

CO MEDICA L

VIRGINIA

CENTRAL PARK

AMERICAN LEGION VILLAGE CARE

YMCA (FARMERS’ MARKET)

US

AY

52

STOKES COUNTY FORSYTH COUNTY

STOKES COUNTY FORSYTH COUNTY

ROCKINGHAM

INDUSTRIAL FORSYTH PARK TECHNICAL

WALNUT COVE

North

GUILFORD

LEGEND

LEGEND

0

0.25

Hanging Rock State Park

0.5 MILES

Commercial

Industrial

Senior Living

Mixed-Use

Office Institutional Schools Parks

City Jurisdiction

TO WINSTON ETJ SALEM

Points of Interest

Commercial Nodes/ Corridors

0

Map 9: King Framework

42

Chapter 1: County Profile

6

S 6-

TRANSITION CORRIDOR

NE WS OME RO A D

VICINITY MAP

KING ELEMENTARY

S MAIN

K OO BR MEADOWBROOK W O SCHOOL ME AD

POINTS OF INTEREST

FORSYTH

CITY HALL

HW

Rose Tara

OFFICE INSTITUTIONAL CORRIDOR

YADKIN

DOWNTOWN

HI G

FOWLER PARK

INDUSTRIAL CORRIDORS

KING

DA LT ON

KING REC. ACRES PUBLIC LIBRARY

COMMERCIAL NODES / CORRIDORS

DANBURY

NG

MO

52

KI

UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE

POPLAR SPRINGS ELEMENTARY

IN

Y IT IN TR

N MA

GH WA Y

KIRB Y

HI

CH UR CH

RAILROADS

STOKES

N AI

N

TO PILOT MOUNTAIN STATE PARK

COLLECTOR ROADS

SURRY

LOCAL COMMERCIAL HUB

HARTG R OV E

0.25

0.5 MILES

N


TT L E TU

MA

NH J OH

89 NC

NN

ILL

SM I

TH

Walnut Cove Framework

TO HANGING ROCK STATE PARKULP

E PIN

F

WALNUT COVE E SCH CO V ELEMENTARY LNUT

YM

RHA M DU

WA

TN

31 1 US

N C 89

VE

OR CH

BRIARWOOD

M ES FA R

D ALE

CAMP C

AR

LIONS P

D AR

CE

R

UU SS 313111

OL

STOKESBURG

MORGAN

JR

EASLEY

ER KIN U TH NL

G

MART I

65 NC

N PI

BA

UX MT N

EAST WALNUT COVE COMMUNITY PARK

65

ER

The Framework Map for Walnut Cove identifies several assets. A commercial corridor is shown around historic downtown on Main Street, and commercial nodes are indicated at the key intersections of NC Route 89 and US Route 311 (Walnut Cove Center), and NC Route 65 and US Route 311. Each corridor/ node is strategically located in areas that can be leveraged to stimulate future growth. The R.J. Reynolds and Hedgecock buildings are shown on the plan map, as are Fowler Park and Walnut Cove Lions Park.

RD FO

NC

BROOKHAVEN

PU LPW OOD

WALNUT COVE N C 65 SHOPPING CENTER

EN SP

TON BUR

65 OLD

TERR Y

ST C RE VIE

RK LEFO MIDD

W

HEDGECOCK BUILDING

HINSDALE

CH

BROOKRIDGE

R FLOEWR LE

FOW

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN

JO N

D

EM CH UR

FAR ER M

FAGG EXT

MILLER OO KW

N

OA

E

L HA

L

FAGG

PAC K

-O -W IL

L

MAN UEL

TUCKER

L

D EL FI

RK LA

OP LT HIL

HO

MAIN / US 311

M I DD N EE GR

NC 65

EW

FOWLER PARK WN LDT O HISTORIC O RESIDENTIAL CITY HALL LAGOON WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTER ST 1

R CH BU

VE K CO BROO

WN TO OLD

STOKES SMALL BUSINESS CENTER

D 3R

VE CO

R.J. REYNOLDS STORAGE

KI G

WVI MEADO

MITCHEL & SON MEAT PROCESSING

ADOW ME

LEAKE M

SOUTHEASTERN STOKES MIDDLE SCHOOL

WALNUT COVE INTERMEDIATE & LONDON ELEMENTARY

K OO BR

CO

WALNUT COVE CENTER

WALNUT RIDGE & WALNUT COVE ASSISTED LIVING

RT HA DE

HIDDE

BOOTH

HA N

E L LIS B ULLINS

LE B R OO K

WATTS

CE M E

TE RY

PARKDALE

11

3 US

CE

D EL

WALNUT COVE ROSENWALD SCHOOL

R

ON J O Y

ROOK EB DL M ID

T EAS

RE EN FI

E AK

R GER

H JO

AR K

WALNUT COVE LIONS PARK

G

F F MAN

H

I

RO SEB UD

LEGEND W HI P

µ

C YTO W N ILE BA

NR DA

NEAL

Hanging Rock State Park

Commercial

Industrial

Senior Living

Mixed-Use

Office Institutional Schools Parks

Historic Residential

ETJ

Points of Interest

City Jurisdiction

Commercial Nodes/

Corridors

0

0.25

FISHERMAN

0.5 MILES

N

Map 10: Walnut Cove Framework

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

43


44

Chapter 1: County Profile


CHAPTER TWO: PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT & VISION Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

45


CHAPTER 2: PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT AND VISION I N

T H I S

C H A P T E R

A. Public Engagement Public Workshops Focus Groups Surveys

A major goal throughout the planning process was to glean ideas and concerns from local citizens to collectively determine a future vision for Stokes County. This chapter pro-

A

vides a comprehensive overview of all public outreach efforts and culminates with an overarching vision statement for Stokes County.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

STOKES 2035 ONLINE SURVEY • MAY 14, 2014 • 100 PARTICIPANTS

STOKES COUNTY

B. Vision

The Stokes F Vision R A Plan M E was W Oinitially R K unveiled to the public P L AonNJanuary 14, 2014 at the Stokes County Business

VIRGINIA STOKES COUNTY

FRANCISCO FOCUS GROUP 704 • MAY 14, 2014 • 18 PARTICIPANTS 89

770

PUBLIC WORKSHOP

EK BIG CRE

• APRIL 1, 2014 704 • +/- 30 PARTICIPANTS

8

66

MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL FOCUS GROUP 704

• MAY 14, 2014 • +/- 20 PARTICIPANTS SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

Public Outreach Tools:

89

772

DANBURY

DANBURY TOWN SURVEY

268

• MARCH 22, 2013 • 9 PARTICIPANTS

RAILROADS

8 89

CONSERVATION REGION COMMERCIAL NODES

HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR SURVEY (3) • APRIL 16, 2014 • 66 +/- 324 PARTICIPANTS

8

A NEAT M

Public Workshops

N

KING 52

2.5 MILES

TO

STOKES COUNTY FORSYTH COUNTY

Map 11: Public Engagement

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision

PUBLIC WORKSHOP

DAN

O 1.25

311

• MARCH 10-11, 2014 • +/- 40 PARTICIPANTS R

CREEK RK

NF

Surveys 0

PUBLIC WORKSHOPS

WALNUT COVE

CR EE K

• MAY 14, 2014 • +/- 40 PARTICIPANTS

HIGH SCHOOLS

46

89

W

North

Focus Groups

STOKES COUNTY

HIGHWAYS

WC RE EK

65

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

311

65

E RIV

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

HANGING ROCK TRAILS

FRANCISCO

RIV ER

County. This event launched a maKING UNINCORPORATED SINGLE FAMILY jor public outreach effortKINGthat subsequently includedDANBURY three (3) charrette HANGING ROCK STATE PARK workshops, three (3) focus groups, PRIVATE CAMPS AND LODGES and three (3) surveys. This section proFLOODZONES LAKES ANDeach WATERWAYSpublic outvides an overview of SAURATOWN & NCMTS TRAILS reach tool.

704

SN O

DA N

Extravaganza: Disco Inferno, where LEGEND many local businesses were on hand to share their ideas for a better Stokes WALNUT COVE


HERE’S WHAT PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT IN STOKES COUNTY LOOKS LIKE:

1 WE CREATED A PROJECT WEBSITE TO KEEP EVERYONE POSTED ON THE EVOLVING PLANNING EFFORT.

THEN, WE KICKED OFF AT THE STOKES COUNTY BUSINESS EXTRAVAGANZA: DISCO INFERNO.

2

Exhibit 22: Public Engagement Process

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

47


3

48

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision

WE LET YOU KNOW WHAT WE WERE UP TO AND ASKED FOR YOUR INPUT.


4 MANY OF YOU SHOWED UP TO THE PUBLIC WORKSHOPS AT WALNUT COVE, DANBURY AND KING.

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

49


YOU HAD LOTS AND LOTS OF IDEAS.

5

50

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


YOU LET US KNOW WHAT YOU LIKE.

6

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

51


WE HAD SUCH A GOOD TIME AT THE CHARRETTES, SOME OF YOU INVITED US TO YOUR COMMUNITY FOR A FOCUS GROUP MEETING.

52

7

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


YOU HAD FUN SHARING YOUR IDEAS...

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

53


AND EVERYONE LEFT Stoked!

54

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


PUBLIC WORKSHOP A charrette is a participatory planning technique in which design professionals work alongside stakeholders to develop ideas for improving the built environment.

W

IMAGE FAVORABILITY SURVEY

is today.. y t . n

tomo

ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION

me

INTERACTIVE MAPS

5

co

3

be

DEMOGRAPHICS & ONLINE SURVEY RESULTS

REAL TIME DESIGN

2

6

WELCOME & SIGN IN

s e k

Co

u

rrow!

Wh a

t

S t o

Three (3) public workshops, or charrettes, were conducted throughout the county from April – June 2014. Each workshop was anchored by a design team that included Landscape Architects and Architects who interacted with the public throughout the day to brainstorm ideas and opportunities for improving community life. The design team developed renderings, site plans, and schematics in “real-time” to reflect the community’s ideas and vision. Charrette workshops were conducted in Walnut Cove, Danbury, and King. Residents of the county were asked to attend the Danbury workshop.

s County w e k o an St ts t a to 4 h

1 PUBLIC WORKSHOP FORMAT

Exhibit 23: Public Workshop Format

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

55


HERE’S WHAT SCOUNTY T O K ERESIDENTS S C O U NHAD T Y TO SAY... 1

FRAMEWORK I T A P L LI A Z N E O N

C A P

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I N D U S T R Y

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704

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66

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COMMUNITY

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision

311

KING

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66

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Exhibit 24: Major Stokes County Themes

65

MAJOR STOKES COUNTY THEMES

311

65

E RIV

R

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

HANGING ROCK TRAILS

772

DANBURY

STOKES COUNTY

FOOD

SAURATOWN & NCMTS TRAILS

V A L U E

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

3


HERE’S WHAT DANBURY HAD TO SAY... THE

NEED A PLACE

M A I N T A I N YOUTH

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1

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Exhibit 25: Major Danbury Themes

MAJOR DANBURY THEMES

6

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HANGING ROCK

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Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

57


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Exhibit 26: Major Walnut Cove Themes

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Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision

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HERE’S WHAT KING HAD TO SAY... IMPROVE APPEARANCE OF

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S T R E E T S

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Exhibit 27: Major King Themes

SALEM MAJOR KING THEMES

R O A D

EXPAND

RURAL

COMMUNITY

ORGANIZATIONS

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

59


Focus Groups At special request, two (2) focus groups were conducted throughout the planning process: a special stakeholder meeting focused on efforts to improve and further develop the Mountains-to-Sea Trail throughout Stokes County; and the Francisco community in northern Stokes County who requested that the consultant team meet with key members of their community to help initiate efforts to organize a community-based planning committee.

The two focus groups were centered on the 01

MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL &

02

FRANCISCO.

01

MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL “Continue to work with landowners along the Sauratown Mountains to maintain the existing Mountains-toSea Trail.”

HERE’S WHAT THE MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL FOCUS GROUP HAD TO SAY...

“Change the official motor route from Highway 89 to roads with less traffic.”

“Create a feasibility analysis for establishing a trail along the Dan River.”

MOUNTAINS-TO-SEA TRAIL MAJOR TAKE-AWAYS Exhibit 28: Mountains-To-Sea Trail Focus Group

60

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


02

FRANCISCO

ON MAY 6, 2014 WE MET AT THE NEWBERRY MANOR IN FRANCISCO, NC TO “LET FRANCISCO COME UP WITH IDEAS FOR FRANCISCO”. Exhibit 29: Francisco Focus Group

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

61


WE ASKED YOU.... Tell us what you consider to be the greatest assets in the community? What are some distinguishing characteristics of this community? What are you excited about in the community? What are concerns in your community? How do you see the next 10 years being different than the last 10 years? What aspects of community development need to be carefully planned for the next 20 years? What are some ideas for meeting these challenges?

62

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


HERE’S WHAT FRANCISCO HAD TO SAY... OUR ASSETS

ARE OUR NATURAL RESOURCES,

COMMUNITY ATTITUDE, TALENT,

FARMS, & ORGANIZATIONS DEER, TROUT & TURKEY and JESSUP R U R A L L A N D S C A P E

DAN RIVER

THE

M I L L DISTINGUISH US

WE ARE CONCERNED ABOUT A LACK OF

INTERNET, CABLE

L O C A L B U S I N E S S E S , & THE COMMUNITY CENTER

R E V I T A L I Z E

SCHOOL GROUNDS

&

I N C U B A T E F A R M E R S

Francisco and surrounding communities will be the most desirable area in Stokes County in which to live, work, and play

Mission Statement:

A LOSS OF COMMUNITY CHARACTER,

WE NEED TO SUPPORT E D U C A T I O N ,

Our purpose is to coordinate a community-driven planning process and to lead a campaign to invest in northwestern Stokes County. The group encourages the involvement of everyone interested in strengthening our communities and creating new economic, social, cultural, and recreational opportunities in our region.

Vision Statement:

YOUNG PEOPLE LEAVING

B R I N G INTERNET

Purpose:

N O C E N T R A L P L A C E TO M E E T,

THE FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE, and

THE

In June of 2014 the Francisco Community Planning Group decided on the following:

& AN UNAPPEALING SCHOOL,

CELL SERVICE,

AFTER THE INITIAL FOCUS GROUP, MEMBERS OF FRANCISCO MET SEVERAL MORE TIMES AND CREATED THE Francisco Community Planning Group.

Francisco is at the heart of scenic northwestern Stokes County where a clean mountain stretch of the Upper Dan River connects family farms, rustic retreats and a rich agricultural heritage. We envision a revitalization of our community and a bright inclusive future for our families and our neighbors. Revitalization will be achieved through an integrated development strategy that draws on a tradition of stewardship and rural innovation. Combining education, farming, outdoor recreation and community building, in new ways, will help us rise to the challenges of agricultural and generational transitions. Community teams will lead the revitalization.

These teams will address a number of priority needs identified by the community and will develop new initiatives:

Five Top Priorities:

1.

Support for education (especially Francisco Elementary School and the early-college academy for grades 6-8 scheduled to open in 2015)

2. Revitalization of the school grounds and the development of new trails 3. Support for the community center 4. Support for local businesses 5. Robust internet connectivity

New initiatives will focus on finding creative solutions to local challenges, such as: a) providing needed services, b) increasing funding and support for community organizations, c) attracting new investments, d) supporting farming, e) enriching community life, and f) promoting the region.

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

63


Surveys Four (4) surveys were conducted throughout the planning process.

01

VISUAL PREFERENCE STUDY

02

ONLINE STOKES 2035 SURVEY

03

HIGH SCHOOL SURVEY

02

DANBURY TOWN SURVEY

01

VISUAL PREFERENCE STUDY The purpose of the visual preference study was to determine preferences within the built environment of Stokes County. Workshop participants were given two dots (one green & one red) per each page of four images. They were then asked to place a green dot on the image they found most appealing and a red dot on the image they found most

unappealing. Two images per page were left without any dots. The following two pages show those images that resonated well and those that were unappealing to participants.

AT EACH PUBLIC WORKSHOP A VISUAL PREFERENCE STUDY HELPED TO DETERMINE CITIZEN PREFERENCES IN STOKES COUNTY’S BUILT ENVIRONMENT. @ Walnut Cove Public Workshop

Exhibit 30: Visual Preference Survey

64

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


STOKES COUNTY CITIZENS FOUND THESE IMAGES APPEALING:

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

65


STOKES COUNTY CITIZENS FOUND THESE IMAGES UNAPPEALING:

66

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


02

ONLINE STOKES 2035 SURVEY

One hundred (100) Stokes County residents participated in the Online Stokes 2035 Survey. The following map illustrates where participants reside within Stokes County.

Which of these ideas, if any, would you suggest the County do to promote Economic Development? (Choose up to 2 items) 80.0% 70.0%

“More unpaved walking/ biking trails”.

ES COUNTY MEWORK PLAN

704

DA N

89

704

SN O

FRANCISCO

RIV ER

60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Create special Establish a small Provide sites for business loan technical industrial fund assistance for development business

Create Concentrate on monetary improving incentives to quality of life locate here

“Quality of life = Economic Development”

VIRGINIA STOKES COUNTY

EGEND

WC RE EK

770

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ING

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8

NINCORPORATED KING SINGLE FAMILY

ANBURY

704

66

ANGING ROCK STATE PARK

704

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AKES AND WATERWAYS

IGHWAYS

11%

DANBURY

268

STOKES COUNTY

ANGING ROCK TRAILS

772

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OMMERCIAL NODES

66

8

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311

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STOKES COUNTY FORSYTH COUNTY

“Good quality of life that hasn’t changed in past 5 years.”

89

WALNUT COVE

CR EE K

38%

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

AURATOWN & NCMTS TRAILS

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

LOODZONES

0

HERE’S WHAT ONLINE PARTICIPANTS HAD TO SAY...

65

16% 311

65

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R

“Excellent place to raise children & retire”.

“Good availability of safe and affordable housing opportunities.”

LOCATION OF ONLINE PARTICIPANTS

*35%

of participants were from the county

Map 10: Locations of Online Survey Participants

Exhibit 31: Online Stokes 2035 Survey

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

67


03

HIGH SCHOOL SURVEY

nearly

Every high school senior in Stokes County was asked to participate in the Stokes 2035 planning process by answering a survey. A total of 322 students responded, and here’s what they said:

“What we like most are the people/community, the outdoors, and the small town feel.”

1 OF HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS PLAN TO LEAVE 2 STOKES CO. PERMANENTLY

SCHOOL SENIORS

PEOPLE & COMMUNITY

DISLIKE L I K E

HIGH

SAY THEY

OUTDOORS & NATURE

SMALL TOWN FEEL LACK OF OPPORTUNITY

NO GOOD PAYING JOBS

NOWHERE TO GO and

NOTHING TO DO

IN ORDER TO KEEP AND ATTRACT YOUNG PEOPLE

STOKES COUNTY NEEDS

A PLACE TO HANG OUT

WELL-PAYING JOBS A GOOD COLLEGE S O M E T H I N G

T O

D O

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Public workshop participants requested we capture the youth’s opinion. We modified our process, developed a survey, and asked every Stoke’s County high school senior for their input.



Exhibit 32: High School Seniors Survey

68

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


04

DANBURY TOWN SURVEY

WE WANT OUR

The Town of Danbury mayor and town council dispersed a questionnaire entitled “Shaping our Future” in 2013. Of the 50 households the questionnaire was sent to there were a total of 9 responses. Here’s what Danbury had to say:

“Tourism is important to our future.”

BUILDINGS & SIGNS T O

C O N F O R M

T O

A COMMON THEME

OUR NATURAL ENVIRONMENT is

INVESTING IN

TO OUR

IMPORTANT QUALITY OF LIFE OUTDOOR RECREATION is

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

PRESERVING SMALL COMMUNITY FEEL

IMPROVING SIDEWALKS and

PROMOTING TOURISM ARE IMPORTANT TO OUR FUTURE Exhibit 33: Danbury Town Survey

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

69


B

VISION

“WHAT’S YOUR VISION” WAS ASKED AT EVERY STEP ALONG THE PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT PROCESS - Starting at the 2014 Stokes County Business Extravaganza.

70

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


Stokes 2035 Vision Statement THe vision for the stokes county 2035 plan is to create a healthy built and natural environment in which:

1

Future growth & development respects the county’s history and rural character;

2

There are explicit efforts to seek, retain and attract the next generation;

3

There are ample and accessible opportunities for active living and a healthy lifestyle;

4

Future growth preserves and protects the County’s unique natural environment;

5

Small businesses and entrepreneurship can flourish; and

6

Connections are made and “community happens” through unique programs and events.

this vision will be achieved by:

1

Encouraging growth and development where infrastructure currently exists;

2

Creating vibrant downtown environments in King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury that support visitation and small business development;

3

Establishing a linear parks and trail system that links commercial areas with neighborhoods and community assets;

4

Creating unique programs and events that celebrate the people and places of Stokes County;

5

Supporting community based organizations and providing them the capacity to improve their communities.

6

Creating opportunities for workplace wellness and fitness. Exhibit 34: Stokes County 2035 Vision Statement

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

71


72

Chapter 2: Public Engagement and Vision


rleacnrde a tisoen u

CHAPTER THREE: LAND USE Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

73


CHAPTER 3: LAND USE This chapter serves as the cornerstone of the Stokes 2035 Vision Plan, providing guidance for Stokes County and its municipal leaders as they make land use development decisions regarding where and how the community should grow.

rleacnrde a tuisoen I N

T H I S

C H A P T E R

A. Methodology B. Land Use Framework Maps C. Land Use Policies

74

Chapter 3: Land Use

This Land Use Chapter is comprised of three major parts, including: A) Methodology; B) Land Use Framework Maps; and C) Land Use Policies.

The Land Use Plan provides the overall structure for orchestrating appropriate patterns of growth and environmental conservation throughout the community.

A

METHODOLOGY

The subsequent maps and policies are supported by the Land Use Transect methodology, which defines a series of zones that transition from rural Stokes County to the more urban downtowns of Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King. This model supports the land use priorities identified throughout the planning process, which include: protecting natural resources; developing vibrant downtowns; encouraging pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use development; facilitating infill/ redevelopment; and providing a broad range of housing opportunities. The Land Use Transect includes six (6) major “sectors” moving from preserved lands to the County’s most urban areas. Each sector is conceptually illustrated and defined on the following page.


Image: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

RURAL I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TRANSECT I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I URBAN

O-1 Preserved Lands

Lands/ O-2 Reserved Conservation

• Conservation • Parks and Greenways • Limited Agriculture and Forestry

• Conservation • Parks and Greenways • Limited Agriculture and Forestry

• Water Access Areas

• Water Access Areas

G-1 Low Density Growth Areas • Primarily Residential/ Low Density • Small Scale Multi-Family • Limited Convenience Retail Uses • Civic Uses

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas • Single and Multi-Family Development • Neighborhood Mixed-Use Centers • Neighborhood Scale Commercial • Civic and Light Industrial

Centers G-3 Mixed-Use and Corridors • Medium to High Density • Regional Centers • Industrial Districts

G-4 Downtowns • Mixed-Use • High Density

Uses

Exhibit 35: Land Use Transect

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

75


B

LAND USE FRAMEWORK MAPS

The following maps provide a land use foundation for the County and its three (3) municipal jurisdictions.

STOKES COUNTY The primary land use classification throughout the County includes very low (greater than 4-acre density average) or low-density (1.5 acre density average) residential growth. In an effort to encourage neighborhood commercial growth toward major intersections throughout the county, the Land Use Framework Map identifies twelve (12) Rural Neighborhood Commercial Nodes. A one-mile buffer around these nodes identifies a target low-density residential growth area. The recent sewer infrastructure expansion to the Meadows community will allow for greater density and is necessary to realize a return on investment; a mixed-use and high-density classification surrounds Meadows. This plan recognizes that growth pressure will likely continue along the Highway 66 corridor that extends north from King. There are two neighborhood commercial nodes identified along this corridor.

(O-1) PRESERVED LANDS Open Space/ Parks

(O-2) RESERVED LANDS/ CONSERVATION

100 Yr. Floodplain/ 100 Ft. Stream Buffer/ Voluntary Ag District

Map 13: Stokes County Land Use Framework Map

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Chapter 3: Land Use

(G-1) LOW DENSITY GROWTH AREAS

Primarily Residential/ Low Density

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas

Urban Neighborhoods/ Medium Density

G-3 Mixed-Use Centers and Corridors

Mixed Use/ Medium to High Density

Industrial

G-4 Downtown

Downtown /

Mixed Use


DANBURY Danbury’s proximity to Hanging Rock State Park, a key driver of visitation to the county, emphasizes the importance of encouraging transitional areas between the Town and the County. To achieve this, the periphery of Danbury (outside of the extraterritorial jurisdiction) is classified as a Low Density Growth Area. Progressing towards the downtown core from the periphery of Danbury there are large areas classified as Controlled Growth Areas (G2) that are appropriate for medium density neighborhoods. Three (3) areas within Danbury are classified for Mixed Use/ Medium to High Density development, including an area at the intersection of NC Route 8/89 and Mountain Rd., an area that includes the Stokes County Governmental Center and an adjacent emerging mixed use development on NC Route 8/89, and a node at the intersection of 8/89 and Hanging Rock Park Road that includes Pioneer Hospital.

(O-1) PRESERVED LANDS Open Space/ Parks

(O-2) RESERVED LANDS/ CONSERVATION

100 Yr. Floodplain/ 100 Ft. Stream Buffer/ Voluntary Ag District

(G-1) LOW DENSITY GROWTH AREAS

Primarily Residential/ Low Density

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas

Urban Neighborhoods/ Medium Density

G-3 Mixed-Use Centers and Corridors

Mixed Use/ Medium to High Density

Industrial

G-4 Downtown

Downtown / Mixed Use

Map 14: Danbury Land Use Framework Map

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

77


WALNUT COVE Walnut Cove is distinguished by its linear downtown district, which is surrounded by established residential neighborhoods. Significant capital infrastructure investments – both private and public – are necessary to foster small business development and to preserve the historic nature of downtown Walnut Cove. The Town is bisected by Town Fork Creek, which divides it into north and south sections. Mixed-use commercial centers exist on both the northern and southern areas of town; both areas provide an opportunity for infill development and surrounding redevelopment. The floodplains of Town Fork Creek, Mills Creek, and their tributaries have been designated as preserved lands (O-1). Though not suitable for more intense development, these areas present opportunities for linear parks/ greenways that would connect important destinations within the town. There are several sections of the Walnut Cove area that have been classified as industrial. Most notably, the R. J. Reynolds tract covers over 450 acres just outside the town’s extra territorial jurisdiction to the west.

(O-1) PRESERVED LANDS

(O-2) RESERVED LANDS/ CONSERVATION

Open Space/ Parks

100 Yr. Floodplain/ 100 Ft. Stream Buffer/ Voluntary Ag District

Map 15: Walnut Cove Land Use Framework Map

78

Chapter 3: Land Use

(G-1) LOW DENSITY GROWTH AREAS

Primarily Residential/ Low Density

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas

Urban Neighborhoods/ Medium Density

G-3 Mixed-Use Centers and Corridors

Mixed Use/ Medium to High Density

Industrial

G-4 Downtown

Downtown / Mixed Use


KING The City of King is located between two significant transportation arteries (US 52 and NC Route 66). Because of its proximity to major transportation corridors, King has the ability to attract major job-generating industry. It is critical for King and Stokes County as a whole that conflicting land uses (ie. residential development) do not encroach upon land projected for future industrial growth. Preserving land for industrial growth is especially important along the Newsome Rd. corridor. King has several important commercial areas that are classified as Mixed-Use Centers and Corridors (G-3). These areas include: •

A regional commercial hub near the interchange of US 52 and King- Tobaccoville Rd/ South Main Street.

• An important transitional corridor along South Main Street between downtown King and the commercial hub at the Highway 52 interchange. • A satellite commercial area in northeast King surrounding the intersection of Hwy 66 and Mountain View Road. • A mixed-use area targeted especially for medical uses along Moore Road. • A large urban residential neighborhood west of the City’s downtown core that has potential for more dense mixed use development.

(O-1) PRESERVED LANDS Open Space/ Parks

(O-2) RESERVED LANDS/ CONSERVATION

100 Yr. Floodplain/ 100 Ft. Stream Buffer/ Voluntary Ag District

Map 16: King Land Use Framework Map

(G-1) LOW DENSITY GROWTH AREAS

Primarily Residential/ Low Density

G-2 Controlled Growth Areas

Urban Neighborhoods/ Medium Density

G-3 Mixed-Use Centers and Corridors

Mixed Use/ Medium to High Density

Industrial

G-4 Downtown

Downtown / Mixed Use

State law restricts the transfer of water across watershed boundaries and thus prevents the extension of sewer lines east of Hwy 66. As a result, the area east of Hwy 66 is designated for low-density growth.

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

79


C

LAND USE POLICIES

This section outlines specific policies associated with the transects found within each jurisdictions’ Land Use Framework Map.

OPEN SPACE 1 POLICIES: 1.0

OPEN SPACE 1 (O-1): PRESERVED LANDS The O-1 Transect Zone is comprised of areas for preservation, conservation, or very limited development. This transect includes existing major public lands, 100 year floodplain, 100 foot stream buffer, and voluntary agricultural districts. Key areas of the O-1 transect zone in Stokes County include Hanging Rock State Park, Camp Hanes, Camp Sertoma, and the floodplains of all rivers and streams. General land use policies for the O-1 transect zone are set forth to the right.

2.0

Encourage similar and supporting land uses, such as campgrounds, camps, lodging facilities, and recreation-oriented businesses, adjacent to existing public lands and camps. Protect water quality and wildlife habitat throughout Stokes County by protecting floodplain and riparian areas from development when possible.

3.0

Utilize floodplain and riparian areas, which are unsuitable for development, for recreation and tourism infrastructure development. 3.1

Utilize floodplain areas to create linear parks and greenways to connect communities and neighborhoods, commercial districts, and recreation resources.

3.2

Allow public river accesses (blueways) along navigable rivers in Stokes County.

(0-1) PRESERVED LANDS

0-2

G-1

G-2

G-3

G-4

photo by others Encourage investment adjacent to recreational resources such as Camp Sertoma that support such assets and capitalize upon the tourism draw that they present. 80

Chapter 3: Land Use

Floodplain & riparian areas are substantial community assets that can be used for outdoor recreation and tourism.


OPEN SPACE 2 (O-2): RURAL COMMUNITY The O-2 Transect Zone is comprised of very low density de-

OPEN SPACE 2 POLICIES:

velopment that includes many of the rural areas in Stokes County. This zone includes areas with very limited or no water or sewer infrastructure. Some areas located within the O-2 Transect Zone could ultimately transition into the

1.0

Support the further development and expansion of agriculture-related operations, including agri-tourism related businesses.

6.0

Commercial land uses might be appropriate where former commercial, but vacant, buildings exist.

2.0

Promote institutional uses in rural areas that are compatible with the rural environment, such as churches, schools, community centers, job training centers, social service agencies, and post offices.

7.0

Appropriately manage or discourage “High-Impact” land uses through detailed guidelines to maintain Stokes County’s natural resources and quality of life.

8.0

Continue to work with North Carolina Parks and Recreation to expand state parks within Stokes County, thereby expanding the O-1 transect zone while preserving environmentally sensitive lands that can be utilized for recreation.

O-1 Transect Zone by expanding public lands and preserving highly sensitive natural resources and riparian areas. The preservation of rural areas accomplishes many planning goals:

• It discourages sprawl by focusing new growth in and around existing developed areas. • It plays an important role in natural resource protection. • It promotes fiscal stewardship by encouraging growth toward municipal areas to create more efficient use of public facilities and existing infrastructure.

3.0

Work to expand the Stokes County Voluntary Agricultural District program to ensure any new residential homeowners are aware of nearby agricultural activities.

4.0

Discourage traditional residential subdivisions (1 acre lots with no preserved open space) within this district, but encourage cluster subdivisions with a greater than 3 acre density average per dwelling unit or minor subdivisions with a greater than 2 acre minimum lot size.

5.0

Discourage commercial land development, particularly along rural road corridors.

• By targeting growth toward municipal areas, the public will have more opportunities to walk or bike daily. (0-2) RURAL COMMUNITY

0-1

G-1

G-2

G-3

G-4

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

81


GROWTH SECTOR 1 (G-1): LOW-DENSITY RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS The G-1 sector, indicated by yellow on the Framework Maps, is intended for low-density residential growth and includes areas with limited access to water and sewer infrastructure. However, these areas are adjacent to target growth areas, such as municipal areas, county areas with water and sewer infrastructure, and existing and planned rural neighborhood commercial nodes. In addition, poor/wet soils that are not typically appropriate for development are included in this sector; soils information should be overlaid and investigated at a detailed level when developing in these areas to avoid the most sensitive soil types. Appropriate development in this sector typically consists of cluster development such as conservation subdivisions, or low-density residential development on relatively large lots. Other land uses appropriate for this sector include civic uses such as parks, schools, government uses, and religious institutions.

(G-1 LOW DENSITY

0-1

0-2

G-2

G-3

GROWTH SECTOR 1 POLICIES: 1.0

Support low density residential development where soils allow. 1.1

Develop standards for allowing and encouraging cluster developments and conservation subdivisions.

1.2

Incentivize the conservation of open space by increasing the dwelling unit density average per acre with the provision of additional open space by the developer.

1.3

Make provisions for density averaging to allow developers to take advantage of soils most suitable for development, while preserving poor soil areas for open space.

2.0

Connect these areas with Growth Areas, Mixed Use Centers, and Downtowns via multi-use greenways, sidewalks, and bike lanes. 2.1

Require all new development to dedicate multiuse greenway easements in accordance with this plan and all other adopted bicycle and pedestrian plans.

G-4

Single-family homes, such as this farmhouse, are the primary land use type found within the low-density growth sector of Stokes County. 82

Chapter 3: Land Use


TRADITIONAL DEVELOPMENT

FLEXIBLE DEVELOPMENT

Successful Flexible Developments: Prairie Crossing - Grayslake, IL Serenbe - Chattahoochee Hills, GA Village Homes - Davis, CA

The Numbers:

Acreage: Lots:

Roads:

52.5 46 Single Family (1 Acre Parcels)

The Numbers:

Acreage: Lots:

+/- 4085 LF

Open Space: -0Trails:

-0-

52.5 42 Single Family (1/4 Acre to 1 Acre Parcels) 4 MultiFamily

Roads:

+/- 3260 LF

Open Space:

+/- 22 Ac.

Trails:

+/- 1 1/3 Mi.

FLEXIBLE SUBDIVISION DEVELOPMENT A flexible development pattern, shown to the right alongside the traditional development pattern, was preferable among public workshop participants. Features such as community open space, interconnecting trails and the ability to preserve Stokes County’s rural character were some of the most well received features found in the flexible development plan.

Exhibit 36: Flexible Subdivision Development

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

83


GROWTH SECTOR 2 (G-2):URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS The G-2 Sector, indicated by orange on the Framework Maps, contains denser, mixed-use development at a scale appropriate for neighborhood commercial centers and walkable residential neighborhoods. Many of these areas have access to water and sewer infrastructure where growth should be directed. A local road network should be well connected and link to larger collector streets. Paths should form pedestrian connections linking internal parks, multi-use greenways, sidewalks, and adjacent preserved open spaces. This pattern of development can provide significant public health benefits by creating safe and accessible opportunities for walking and biking. G-2 areas are appropriate for higher density residential types, including small lot single-family homes, townhomes, apartment or condominium buildings, or mixed-use buildings. This transect should serve as transition between higher intensity commercial uses and existing lower density neighborhoods, and take advantage of proximity to existing centers of commerce, education, or employment centers such as Forsyth Tech, downtowns, and medical facilities. (G-2) URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

0-1

0-2

G-1

G-3

G-4

GROWTH SECTOR 2 POLICIES: 1.0

Encourage a range of housing opportunities including single-family and multi-family that is context sensitive, accounting for the nature of surrounding properties.

3.0

Allow light industrial uses that effectively blend with the surrounding development context and environment.

2.0

Provide for neighborhood-scale commercial uses (retail and office) that appropriately serve nearby residential areas and emphasize pedestrian use.

4.0

Ensure that all commercial development respects and contributes to the community character of Stokes County and its municipal areas.

Twelve (12) Rural Neighborhood Commercial Nodes, like this intersection in Sandy Ridge, have been identified throughout Stokes County as areas to focus rural growth. Measures such as reduced setbacks and locating parking on the sides and rear can help to preserve the character of rural Stokes County.

LEGEND EXISTING BUILDINGS Exhibit 37: Developing Rural Neighborhood Commercial Nodes

84

Chapter 3: Land Use


GROWTH SECTOR 3 (G-3): NEIGHBORHOOD MIXED-USE The G-3 Sector is indicated by red on the Framework Map.

GROWTH SECTOR 3 POLICIES:

Water and sewer infrastructure and major transportation networks and nodes serve these areas. The G-3 Sector also includes major road corridors for which specific attention is required to avoid unwanted strip development. A full-range of land uses are appropriate in the G-3 sec-

1.0

Greater emphasis should be placed on building form, orientation, and architectural character, rather than specific land use type.

2.0

tor, including single-family and multi-family residential, civic uses, neighborhood and regional commercial centers, and light industrial areas.

Ensure that all commercial development contributes to the community character of Stokes County and its municipal areas by meeting minimum architectural and design standards.

INFILL DEVELOPMENT AT A WALNUT COVE COMMERCIAL CENTER Well-designed infill development could help existing commercial centers better contribute to the community character of Stokes County. Several features of the design below should be incorporated into new mixed-use developments as well as considered when retrofitting existing developments.

DESIGN FEATURES • Vehicular parking should generally be placed along the side and rear of structures. • The building edge should extend along a significant percentage of the road fronting lot line.

(G-3) MIXEDUSE

0-1

O-2

G-1

G-2

• Encourage multi-story buildings that provide for mixed-uses.

G-4

• Orient the building front toward the road. • The building architecture should create interest through significant fenestration – approximately 60% of building fronts should incorporate glass. • Enhanced Public Infrastructure

Exhibit 38: Infill Development at a Walnut Cove Commercial Center

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

85


3.0

“Big Box” retail shall incorporate architectural features in alignment with Stokes County character, provide for considerable parking tree islands and perimeter landscaping, and incorporate effective stormwater management systems.

4.0

Reserve lands suitable for industrial growth, preventing the encroachment of residential development.

5.0

Industrial development shall incorporate design features, such as walking trails, appropriate for workplace fitness activities.

6.0

Manage growth along major corridors to create an urban form and effectively control access management.

7.0

Ensure that all commercial development respects and contributes to the community character of Stokes County and its municipal areas.

adhere to adopted greenway plan or sidewalk ordinance reduced setback dark-sky lighting

parking to side & rear landscape requirements

Awnings entrance addresses the street

signage at pedestrian scale

photo by C.R. Crawford Construction

Exhibit 39: Architectural and Design Standards

Whether it’s a local business or chain store, when incorporating basic architectural and design standards new commercial development can contribute positively to Stokes County’s built environment. 86

Chapter 3: Land Use


GROWTH SECTOR 4 (G-4): DOWNTOWN The G-4 transect zone is comprised primarily of existing

GROWTH SECTOR 4 POLICIES:

downtown core areas, with a relatively dense street grid,

PEDESTRIAN TRIANGLE

and is appropriate for redevelopment or additional development. G-4 transect zone areas are shown in pink on the Framework Maps, which include the historic downtowns of

1.0

Danbury, Walnut Cove, and King.

Development must provide special consideration for pedestrians with particular attention to the “pedestrian triangle.”

These areas are appropriate for redevelopment and new infill development and are well served by existing infrastructure. Because this area is already well provided for in

2.0

Maximum setbacks will be required to ensure that buildings front along the street and adjacent to sidewalks.

3.0

Signage must be oriented and sized appropriately for the pedestrian scale.

terms of urban services, it is one of the most efficient, fiscally responsible, and attractive areas for redevelopment or development of underutilized land.

Providing special attention to the “pedestrian triangle”, or area between a building’s awning and curb, is a critical component of a competitive downtown. Several features that should be found in this zone are illustrated below.

on-street parking 60% Fenestration (windows) 15’ preferred/ 10 min. sidewalk awnings

4.0

Parking shall be located to the sides and the rear of structures or on-street.

5.0

Structures shall provide for a minimum of two stories, with office or residential uses located on the second story.

6.0

Locate public buildings, such as Town Hall, etc. within the G-4 District to support redevelopment efforts.

(G-4) Downtown

0-1

O-2

G-1

G-2

G-3

buildings to edge of sidewalk street trees

Exhibit 40: Pedestrian Triangle

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

87


7.0

8.0

Initiate streetscape design and traffic enhancements with NCDOT to realize municipal interests and needs. Ensure that all commercial development contributes to the community character of each municipal area by meeting minimum architectural and design standards.

LEVERAGE MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS: KING’S CIVIC BLOCK The concept illustrated below provides a site plan that utilizes municipal buildings to support redevelopment efforts. A capital infrastructure project of this magnitude would serve as a major catalyst to further private revitalization in King’s downtown.

CONCEPT “A” In King’s Civic Block Concept “A”, public projects would include a City Hall, amphitheater, and municipal parking lot off of Main St. The amphitheater could satisfy the need for a down-

Note: See Economic Development Chapter for an alternative site plan, Concept “B”, for King’s Civic Block.

Exhibit 41: King’s Civic Block Concept “A”

88

Chapter 3: Land Use

legend

town greenspace.


eco

nroemcicr

t n e edaetvieolonp m

CHAPTER FOUR: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

89


CHAPTER 4: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Stokes County, like many rural communities across North Carolina, is working to attract job growth and investment.

rleacnrde a tuisoen I N

T H I S

C H A P T E R

A. Business Recruitment B. Small Business and Main Street Development C. Workforce Development D. Quality of Life and Tourism Development

Also, like much of rural North Carolina, Stokes County must confront its challenges – lagging population growth, high poverty rates, and an aging workforce – to realize economic growth. Fortunately, Stokes County has an abundance of assets and resources to help meet these challenges. Some of these assets include: the major Highway 52 transportation corridor near King; the distinctive, small town Main Street environments of King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury; and a tremendous natural environment that includes the Sauratown Mountains, Hanging Rock State Park, and the Dan River. Accordingly, the Stokes County economic development strategy must be diverse and provide for a range of initiatives that support:

A

business recruitment;

B

small business and Main Street development;

C

workforce development; and

D

quality of life and tourism development.

A

BUSINESS RECRUITMENT

Stokes County must achieve three distinctive goals to attract new business and industry. First, Stokes County must position itself organizationally for success; a public-private, nonprofit corporation structure will provide the necessary flexibility for recruitment negotiations and financial obligations. Second, economic development leaders must be prepared with readily-available land; industry site selection firms will often only consider “shovel-ready” property. Lastly, Stokes County must invest in effective branding and marketing through print and web.

BUSINESS RECRUITMENT GOALS: THE BIG THREE Organizational Structure Readily-Available Land Branding and Marketing The following recommendations outline specific objectives associated with each goal.

90

Chapter 4: Economic Development


Organizational Structure 1.0 Stokes County Economic Development (SCED) is the primary entity with a focus and responsibility for developing the county’s economic potential. As a governmental entity, the organization is limited in several ways that a public –private, nonprofit entity would not be, such as the ability to raise private sector funds.

Create a nonprofit economic development corporation. Stokes County Economic Development must transition into a public-private, nonprofit economic development corporation that would bring together both the public and private sectors. This could also be accomplished by the development of a sister non-profit corporation to compliment the public sector corporation.

Action Steps TO FORM A NON-PROFIT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENTITY INCLUDE:

1•

2•

Host a meeting of key stakeholders to explore the various economic development organizational structure models. Develop a Memorandum of Understanding that outlines the activities of the nonprofit, how it will support Stokes County, and how it will interact with ally agencies.

3•

Survey for private partner interest and gauge funding support.

4•

Launch a fundraising campaign, potentially utilizing the services of a professional fundraising firm.

Exhibit 42: Action Steps to form a Non-Profit Economic Development Entity

Advantages OF UTILIZING A NON-PROFIT CORPORATION AS AN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENTITY INCLUDE:

• A nonprofit corporation is typically more effective at raising private funds and grants, especially foundation grants. • If structured correctly, a nonprofit could absorb unforeseen liabilities and be a buffer for the County. For example, the nonprofit could be used to control property. • A nonprofit provides for a higher level of confidentiality in handling sensitive economic development information. • A nonprofit can help insulate economic development activities from politics, and protect political leaders from negative repercussions of economic development activities. • There are certain expenditures such as marketing and costly travel that may be more palatable to the public if paid for from private-sector funds. • All of the above advantages of this organizational structure are important, but of paramount importance to most counties is the ability to supplement public money. Most public-private partnerships strive to reach a 50-50 model, whereby 50% of funding is public and 50% of funding is private.

Exhibit 43: Advantages of a Non-Profit Economic Development Entity

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

91


Readily-Available Land 2.0

Partner with community organizations throughout Stokes County and develop community-driven strategic plans.

2.1

The Planning Director or its liaison should regularly meet with leaders from each community.

2.2

A community-driven strategic plan should be created that addresses public space, community events, recreation and trails, schools, and other community-specific issues.

2.3

The County should continue to provide staff support to assist with plan implementation to generally improve quality of life throughout the County.

There are many organizations, such as the Francisco Community Group, working throughout Stokes County to improve their communities. Stokes County must partner with these organizations to capitalize on opportunities to improve quality of life.

Stokes County must Identify and Secure Land Suitable for Business and Industry Development. Stokes County and its municipalities must work in concert to preserve the County’s existing buildings and limited land appropriate for manufacturing and industrial uses. Specifically, large tracts near Highway 52 must be preserved since Stokes County’s access to and from Winston-Salem and I-40 creates an opportunity for businesses and enterprises looking to locate or expand in the region.

1.0

Existing Buildings.

The Stokes County EDC will identify and promote an inventory of existing structures to companies inquiring about locating in the Area.

Promote existing vacant buildings such as the Elastometrics Building near Francisco as an available site that could be up-fitted to suit a variety of users.

New Building Sites.

Similarly, the county and its municipalities should promote an inventory of prime locations for potential development.

2.0

2.1

Prepare, pre-certify, and make potential building sites “shovel-ready” in order to increase their attractiveness to businesses looking to locate in the area.

2.2

Take measures to perform “due diligence” on potential sites to investigate potential barriers to development.

DUE DILIGENCE CONSIDERATIONS: 1

Phase 1 environmental study

2

Review for archaeological, historical sig-

3

Geo-technical survey

4

Conceptual master plan and estimates

5

Title search

nificance, and endangered species

of probable development cost

Note: It may be necessary to secure sites with an option or other form of agreement in order to perform some or all of these actions. Exhibit 44: Due Diligence Considerations

92

Chapter 4: Economic Development


2.3

Explore public- private partnerships with construction and development firms to market and promote qualified business sites with shell buildings or virtual spec buildings.

NEWSOME ROAD CORRIDOR INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX CONCEPT

PHASING

ANALYSIS

At the public workshop in King, the design team created a preliminary concept for the Newsome Road Corridor which analyzes how the Newsome Road Corridor could

2.4

Investigate the feasibility of offering incentives in the form of free or reduced price land or buildings to companies looking to locate in the area.

be developed for industrial/ business use. Such preliminary planning efforts are effective at identifying barriers and opportunities to development in advance- and thereby make the sites more appealing to businesses.

BIRDS-EYE PERSPECTIVE

BRANDING

photo: Cadiz-Trigg County, KY EDC

Virtual Spec Buildings are a marketing tool that shows how a building can be developed or expanded on a site. Exhibit 45: Newsome Road Corridor Industrial Complex

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

93


2.5

2.6

Work alongside Rockingham County to explore the possibility of commercial or industrial development in the Pine Hall area from the 772/ 311 intersection to the county line to take advantage of rail and natural gas infrastructure and the availability of water. Follow best practices for site development to promote and market the Holder, Moore, and Newsome Drive properties as prepared, certified, prime locations that are shovel-ready for industrial development.

2.7

Target medical/ health care related development along the Moore-RJR Road corridor to U.S. Highway 52 (I-73).

2.8 Conduct site-specific soils evaluations at targeted commercial areas throughout County where sewer infrastructure is unavailable.

Stokes County’s 2013 “Action Plan for Recruitment” Report identified properties on Moore Rd, a property off of Highway 52 and Newsome Road known as the “Holder Property” and another tract off of Newsome Drive as the most promising building sites in the county. Several tracts for sale along Newsome Rd. in King offer preferable industrial opportunities in Stokes County.

are you shovel ready? To compete for new investment, industry, and jobs, Stokes County must have “shovel-ready” sites. Here are the steps: 1

Secure sites with an option or other form of agreement in order to conduct due diligence.

2

If due diligence proves positive, move forward with longer-term control either through an option, purchase, or partnership with the landowner or developer.

3

Certify the site through the NC Department of Commerce. Much of the certification work will be completed in the due diligence phase. Certified sites are common in most states, so companies and site selection consultants know to ask for certified sites.

4

After due diligence and certification, create detailed plans that visually demonstrate how the site can be developed.

Exhibit 46: Steps for Shovel Ready Projects

94

Chapter 4: Economic Development


Branding and Promotion Stokes County must develop and maintain a strategic marketing plan for attracting new business and industry.

1.0

• Advanced manufacturing

Enticing successful businesses to locate in an area is a function of more than just supplying buildings or sites that meet their physical needs. Marketing and promotion of sites and their benefits are indispensable in bringing those sites to companies’ attention. The County, Danbury, King, and Walnut Cove should seek to effectively market Stokes County to businesses inquiring about locating in the area.

• Medical devices • Distribution and logistics • Professional services • Tourism services (though not identified by the “Action Plan”, there are identified opportunities for providing services such as accommodations and retail to the existing tourism market in Stokes County).

2.0

3.0

Sample Story Graphic: Stokes

County has many economic development success stories, which can be highlighted through “story graphics.”

!

Direct limited marketing funds towards the target sectors identified by Stokes County:

Create partnerships with the NC Department of Commerce and neighboring counties to reach a larger audience and leverage marketing dollars. Create a marketing plan that pursues target audiences through creating basic marketing materials that support recruitment, prioritizing the website, utilizing social media outreach, and reaching out to regional businesses.

ELEMENTS OF A MARKETING PLAN: 1

Create an Identity- “Branding”

2

E-Marketing & Lead Generation. Design a template that can be used in electronic marketing; in-house, on-demand printed proposals and report materials.

3

Create brochures, electronic brochures,

4

Internet and Social Media marketing.

5

Market to existing businesses.

6

Leverage Partnerships with state and local

and other marketing materials.

government entities and nonprofits.

Exhibit 47: Elements of a Marketing Plan

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

95


B

Small Business and Main Street

Stokes County and its municipalities must continue to support efforts to cultivate and foster the creation and success of small businesses. Local government must continue to provide critical infrastructure, such as water and sewer, but must also provide other critical public sector investments necessary to attract private sector development.

Enhance the physical environment within each downtown area within the county.

1.0

1.1

Pursue downtown streetscape improvements in Stokes County’s municipal areas by providing the sidewalks and pedestrian infrastructure necessary to support downtown commerce. Specific initiatives include: • Create pedestrian circulation plans that identify priority sidewalk projects and support local businesses by linking commercial areas to parking and neighborhood centers.

97% of the County’s business establishments have fewer than 50 employees. 96

Chapter 4: Economic Development

• Work with NCDOT and the local MPO/ RPO to get sidewalk projects on the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), North Carolina’s identification and prioritization list for funding transportation projects. • Seek grant funding or use capital improvement funds for priority sidewalk projects that cannot access funding through the STIP. • Require sidewalks when development or redevelopment occurs in downtown areas and commercial centers.

Located at the heart of Walnut Cove, the intersection of Main Street and 3rd Street would be the most visible site for streetscape improvements in Walnut Cove. The exhibit to the right illustrates changes that could expand upon recent NCDOT streetscape improvements. Next steps would include anchoring the intersection with buildings with “zero setbacks” from the sidewalk. Exhibit 48: Enhancing the Heart of Walnut Cove: Main St. and 3rd St. Streetscape Enhancements


• Establish a “fee in lieu of” program in which developers have an option to either construct required sidewalks or contribute funds to municipal capital improvement funds. • Danbury pedestrian path reestablishment project. Re-establish the former pedestrian path along Main Street. • Walnut Cove Town Hall sidewalk connector project. Complete the sidewalk connection from Main St. to Town Hall.

STREETSCAPE OPTIONS IN WALNUT COVE

1.2

Coordinate with NCDOT to secure other improvements to Public Space and downtown streetscapes. Specific initiatives include: • Explore opportunities for public spaces/ gathering areas on the public way such as encroachment agreements that allow outdoor seating and dining areas. • Install street furniture such as benches and waste receptacles that reflect the distinct character and style of each of Stokes County’s municipalities and help to create more functional, inviting public spaces.

• Commission public art that showcase the communities’ history, culture, and values. • Install human-scaled street lighting that aligns with each communities’ distinct character and style. • Danbury traffic calming project. In Danbury, work with NCDOT to implement traffic calming strategies such as road diets and colored/ stamped pavement to slow traffic and create a more pedestrian-friendly downtown environment.

DINING

BIKING

EXPANDED SIDEWALK

MEDIAN

A variety of streetscape improvement options were explored during the Walnut Cove public workshop:

EXISTING

Exhibit 49: Streetscape Options in Walnut Cove

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

97


DOWNTOWN DANBURY STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS Traffic calming measures and a town-wide wayfinding initiative will help to create a safer, pedestrian-friendly downtown environment. The changes are critical as Danbury seeks to expand tourism development and generate private sector investment.

EXISTING Exhibit 50: Downtown Danbury Streetscape Improvements

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Chapter 4: Economic Development

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS


1.3

Walnut Cove Redevelopment District. Create a Redevelopment District (in accordance with NCGS 160A, Article 22) in Walnut Cove that allows the town to acquire and redevelop blighted structures in its downtown. • Create and adopt a Redevelopment Plan in accordance with NCGS 160A-513 that enables the community to engage the redevelopment powers set forth in state law. This plan should clearly set forth the goals, objectives, priorities, and action steps that will be accomplished in the Redevelopment District. • Explore the possibility of passing a bond to fund the improvements as set forth in the plan. • Commission public art that showcases the communities’ history, culture, and values.

WALNUT COVE: RIPE FOR REDEVELOPMENT A Redevelopment District is a geographic area targeted for redevelopment by a local government pursuant to the Urban Redevelopment Law (North Carolina General Statutes (G.S.) Chapter 160A, Article 22). To be eligible for designation as a Redevelopment District, the targeted area must be classified as blighted—meaning the growth of the area is impaired by the presence of dilapidated or obsolete buildings, overcrowding, or other unsafe conditions—or as being in danger of becoming blighted. Once designated as a Redevelopment District, special statutory powers may be exercised by the local government to attract private investment. Other powers include:

1

Acquisition of property, including by power of eminent domain for blighted parcels;

2

Clearance of areas by demolition, removal of existing buildings;

3

Installation or construction of site improvements and other site preparation;

4

Entering into contracts for construction, demolition, moving of structures, and repair work (G.S. 160A-514(b) and Article 8 of G.S. Chapter 143).

5

Sale of real property through competitive bidding procedures (G.S. 160A-514(c));

6

Carrying out programs of compulsory repair and rehabilitation (probably through the use of minimum housing codes), to include “the making of loans therefor”;

7

Engaging in “programs of assistance and financing, including the making of loans,” for rehabilitation, repair, construction, acquisition, or reconditioning of residential units and commercial and industrial facilities in a redevelopment area. G.S. 160A-512, G.S. 160A-503(19).

Exhibit 51: Walnut Cove: Ripe for Redevelopment

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

99


1.4

1.5

Effectively organize and provide for additional public parking in downtown areas to foster the success of local businesses. In Walnut Cove, create a Municipal Services Designation to help finance downtown improvements.

Walnut Cove Municipal Services District Designation: With support from downtown businesses, create a Municipal Services District in accordance with the provisions of NCGS §160A-536 through §160A-544 to finance improvements to the downtown area. Municipal Service Districts are special taxation districts, which are represented by business owners and taxpayers within the District, and provide a mechanism to finance downtown improvements.

Exhibit 52: Walnut Cove: Municipal Services District Designation

100

DOWNTOWN PUBLIC PARKING IMPROVEMENTS

Chapter 4: Economic Development

Danbury.

Create additional public parking adjacent to the Board of Education.

King.

Consider working with landowners to

develop a public parking lot behind Dalton Rd.

PROPOSED

EXISTING Walnut Cove.

A gateway to the Post Office’s parking lot incorporates a seat wall, greenscreen, and wayfinding elements that contribute to the urban form and Walnut Cove’s revitalization.

Exhibit 53: Downtown Public Parking Improvements


1.6

1.7

2.0

Develop voluntary Faรงade Improvement Programs in which businesses are reimbursed for a portion of the costs of improvements to the faรงade of their buildings that meet certain standards set by the municipal jurisdiction.

FACADE IMPROVEMENTS Facade improvement programs are a critical tool for advancing downtown revitalization efforts. Basic and inexpensive facade treatments, such as those developed at the public workshops, can drastically improve the downtown image. General facade guide-

@ Danbury

Utilize the redevelopment and improvement of existing downtown parks to anchor downtown areas and add pedestrian friendly visitor activities adjacent to business and civic spaces.

lines are also listed below. Provide Contrast in Brick Color Cornices or other window treatment help create interest

Bold colors for doors or framing make a lively storefront Create Accessible Curb Ramps & HC Parking

PROPOSED IMROVEMENTS

2.2

Require that new establishments in commercial hubs meet standards for appearance and functionality for Mixed Use Centers as described in the Land Use chapter of this plan. Standards include the allowance of mixed uses and requirements for the design of structures and their sites.

SUGGESTED FACADE GUIDELINES

Add or Replace Awnings

Create functional and aesthetic improvements to commercial hubs and corridors to make them more appealing for commerce. 2.1

EXISTING

Fix broken windows to prevent vandalism & create a positive image

@ Walnut Cove

Planters & benches provide a more pedestrian-oriented public space

EXISTING

Explore opportunities for infill development to capitalize upon existing infrastructure and maximize the potential of existing commercial properties.

Provide Contrast in Brick Color

1.

Strong Corners

2.

Masonry(Brick) Storefronts

3.

Rigid Awning Systems (With Signage)

4.

Storefront Ground & Punch Windows Above

5.

Clear Cornice Line/ Parapet

6.

Bold colors for doors or framing make a lively storefront

Rhythmic Variety

Create Accessible Curb Ramps & HC Parkin

7.

2-3 Story LimitsPlanters & benches provide

8.

Exterior Accent Downlights at Human Scale

9.

Streetscape Texture

Cornices or other window treatment help create interest

Add or Replace Awnings

Fix broken windows to prevent vandalism & create a positive image

10.

a more pedestrian-oriented public space

Sloped Roof = Stepped Facade

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS Exhibit 54: Facade Improvements

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

101


2.3

Capitalize on expected growth at Meadows and create a zoning overlay district to ensure high-quality and dense development that provides a return on recent infrastructure investments.

INFILL DEVELOPMENT AT THE WALNUT COVE INGLES

MEADOWS INTERSECTION

The commercial node at NC HWY 65 and US HWY 311 in Walnut Cove has substantial infill development potential. Several features Proposed should be considered at this location: Greenway

Proposed 2-Story

Proposed Greenway

ds Direction of Bir

Proposed 2-Story Commercial (~7,500 S.F. each)

’ Eye

• Proposed Greenway Trail Connector; and

65

Existing floodway Commercial with upgraded parking lot & landscape

Proposed 2-Story

Commercial • Infill Development.

U.S. 311

Subway

North

n

U.S. 311

102

Chapter 4: Economic Development

NC H

5 WY 6 Proposed 2-Story Commercial (~3,300 S.F.)

U.S. 311

NC HWY 65

Exhibit 55: Meadows Intersection

Ingles Store

Eye

Proposed 2-Story Commercial (~3,300 S.F.)

(~8,800 S.F. each)

rds’ Direction of Bi

Y NC HW

Proposed 2-Story Commercial (~8,800 S.F. each)

Subway

n North

Existing Commercial with upgraded parking lot & landscape

Commercialor rear of build• Parking along side (~7,500 S.F. each) floodwaying (note: NCDOT Right-of-Wqy Ingles Store would need to be determined);

Exhibit 56: Infill Development at the Walnut Cove Ingles

NC HWY 65


Leverage the creation of new public buildings to improve the downtown physical environments and to generate traffic and patronage to local businesses. 3.1

3.2

Danbury Town Hall.

Explore an opportunity to create a new Town Hall building in the downtown along with a larger streetscape and public infrastructure investment.

King Town Hall. With the development of a new Town Hall, consider a creation of “civic block” - to create a vibrant and thriving commercial center. • Explore the potential for new public parking facilities. • Investigate ways of bringing residential units into the downtown area to foster economic activity. • Study the potential for new public spaces such as an amphitheater or civic plaza that could support community events and interaction. • Study the potential for a farmers market that could provide economic activity to the downtown as well as support the community’s desire to retain its rural and agricultural character.

• Explore the potential for creating a “Downtown Mall” through the closure and rerouting of a portion of East Dalton Street. Such a place would energize the pedestrian atmosphere and open doors for new business opportunities in several vacant downtown buildings. • Improve the functionality and appearance of the public space on North Main Street to create an appealing gateway to the commerce and activity in the downtown area.

• Redevelop Town Hall Site and other municipal buildings in a manner that is a catalyst for good development in the downtown area. This is an opportunity for the city to lead the way in quality development by setting an example of best practices in downtown development that reflects King’s character.

Using public sector investment to generate private sector investment. Catalyst Project: A Civic Block for Downtown King King’s Civic Block Concept “B” features a City Hall, Police Department and downtown farmers’ market. A walkway from Dalton St. to the farmers market and civic plaza would encourage downtown visitation on the weekends.

Note: See Land Use Chapter for an alternative site plan, Concept “A”, for King’s Civic Block.

legend

3.0

Exhibit 57: King’s Civic Block Concept “B”

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

103


KING GATEWAY The North Main Street gateway can be significantly improved through basic streetscape enhancements: • Install a signage & wayfinding system. • Extend King’s streetscape with curbs, gutters, and sidewalk paving. • Construct a landscaped median. • Improve building facades with murals.

EXISTING PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS Exhibit 58: King Gateway

104

Chapter 4: Economic Development


4.0

5.0

Develop Capital Improvement Plans that set forth goals for improvements to public space over a five year period. Make a portion of these funds “leverage only,” providing a designated fund for matching grants. Create greenway infrastructure that connects commercial areas, neighborhoods, and other community assets.

KING MALL At the King public workshop a downtown business owner proposes a big idea: “What if we closed off a block of Dalton St. to create a downtown pedestrian mall?” Although bold, the King mall proposal would provide for central community greenspace to attract civic activity and patronage of downtown businesses.

EXISTING

Greenways are highly desirable amenities that attract all ages and help drive economic growth.

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS Exhibit 59: King Mall

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

105


C

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT 2.1

The presence of a quality workforce is one of the most critical factors a company considers when deciding whether to grow or expand in an area.

Support K-12, post-secondary, and workforce training programs offered through county schools and Forsyth Technical Community College to enhance the competitiveness of the County’s resident workforce.

Stokes County must continue to support and attract emerging industries and develop its workforce. The following policies and strategies have been identified as methods to support and foster business development in Stokes County.

1.0

Establish a “business development center” or a “business incubator.” 1.1

2.0

106

A business development center can provide business planning assistance, assistance with identifying business partners, access to financing, exposure to critical business or technical support services.

Partner with Forsyth Technical Community College and other colleges and universities throughout the region to prepare post-secondary students for future careers in target industries and businesses.

Chapter 4: Economic Development

Stokes Early College is preparing students, particularly those without a family tradition of a college education, to obtain an associate’s or bachelor’s degree.

3.0

Develop flexible policies that recognize the broad scope of impacts and economic potential of emerging industries such as agri-tourism, solar farms and cellular communication towers.

3.1

Be proactive in researching and addressing emerging industries, their potential in Stokes County, and their impacts upon their surroundings.

3.2

Ensuring that emerging industries are developed in harmony with the rural character of Stokes County through the installation of vegetative buffers, increased setbacks, viewshed restrictions, façade/architectural requirements, etc.


4.0

Work with Stokes County Schools/ Stokes County Agricultural Extension to strengthen agricultural education.

5.0

Encourage and support efforts to improve broadband internet access for Stokes County residents to capitalize on the trend toward home based occupations and remote workplaces.

ulture port Agric ds Re ent of Awar partm ram | es De Prog d Stat itiatives Unite In d dban Broa

11 ary 20 Janu

ncing Advadband Broa r ion fo undat A Fo

photo: info.nc.agr.com North Stokes High School has an Agricultural Program that has achieved Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) certification- enabling the food created to be used in the school cafeteria.

nities mmu ral Co g Ru Stron

Case Study: Wilkes Telecommunications re-

ceived a grant from the USDA Rural Utilities Service’s Broadband Initiatives Program (BIP). The funds will go toward creating the necessary infrastructure to reach 3,680 households and 3,358 businesses. Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

107


D

TOURISM DEVELOPMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE

Tourism development provides a significant opportunity for economic growth in Stokes County. The county currently experiences over 900,000 annual visitors who predominantly come to experience the County’s natural assets like Hanging Rock State Park, Sauratown Mountains, and the Dan River. 400,000+ visitors a year come to Hanging Rock State Park alone.

Tourism Product Development 1.0

• Promote the Dan River as a destination for paddling, fishing, and camping.

Continue efforts to develop the NC Mountains to Sea Trail in Stokes County.

• Develop a multi-use hiking/ biking trail system along the Dan River, which could serve as part of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail.

1.1

Chapter 4: Economic Development

• Continue to develop and improve river access along the river.

• Extend the Mountains-to-Sea Trail from Hanging Rock State Park to Danbury. • Connect with the statewide trails initiative and the Sauratown Trail Association and amenable landowners on permanent easements.

2.0 Establish and enhance cultural and agricultural

heritage activities aimed at tourists.

2.1

Develop agri-tourism in the county, such as local farmer’s markets, “pick-your-own produce” farms, and other opportunities for visitors to immerse themselves in Stokes County’s agricultural heritage.

2.2

Finalize the Danbury Art Market to showcase the visual arts and attract visitors.

• Work with NC Division of Parks and Recreation for technical, administrative, and financial support for local efforts to establish the MST trail in Stokes County.

The development of tourism assets not only brings visitors to the county, but it also improves and creates amenities that locals enjoy. Improved quality of life can attract new business, drive real estate investment, or entice people to relocate, retire, or buy second homes in the County.

108

Foster nature- based “eco” tourism on the Dan River.

Invest in outdoor recreation infrastructure to attract additional visitors to Stokes County.

However, a lack of services and accommodations prevent the county from capturing significant economic benefits of these visitors. The County must develop a network of tourism services and infrastructure to provide visitors with opportunities to stay longer and spend more money. There is also an opportunity to refine the tourism entities themselves to help them draw an even larger tourism market.

The following strategies and recommendations highlight opportunities for (1) Tourism Product Development and (2) Marketing.

1.4

• Create a detailed trail plan for the Dan River corridor.

1.2

Support efforts to create a destination-quality mountain biking trail system at Moore’s Springs.

1.3

Implement improvements at Moratock Park in accordance with the Moratock Park Master Plan. This public sector investment will create excitement and attract visitation that can help generate new business opportunities.

3.0 Capitalize upon Scenic Byways in Stokes Coun-

ty on Highways 89, 66, and 8 as an opportunity to develop tourism-related assets and capture tourism expenditures.


3.1

Improve scenic byway signage.

3.2

When opportunities become available, work with NCDOT to designate cycling lanes to promote cycling as a tourist attraction as well as promote safety for cyclists.

3.3

WALNUT COVE FARMERS MARKET Downtown farmers markets, such as the proposed design in Walnut Cove shown below, are weekend destinations for local citizens and tourists alike.

Pursue federal Scenic Byway grant funding to enhance tourism infrastructure along these corridors.

photo: Stokes County EDC

Stokes County should take advantage of their scenic byways and work with NCDOT to develop cycling lanes or wide shoulders along destination-quality cycling routes.

Exhibit 60: Walnut Cove Farmers Market

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

109


Marketing 1.0

Establish a Stokes County brand for tourism-related marketing initiatives. This branding effort should be developed in concert with business recruitment promotional material. 1.1

Develop “strap-lines� that use a single phrase to connect a variety of tourism opportunities found throughout the County.

WAYFINDING PROGRAMS Throughout the public workshop series, a variety of wayfinding and signage options were developed. A unified signage plan should be developed that will provide continuity while recognizing the unique character of each

1.2

Develop an extensive wayfinding signage plan throughout Stokes County that effectively brands the County and directs visitors to its many natural and cultural resources.

municipality.

WALNUT COVE Exhibit 61: Wayfinding Programs

110

Chapter 4: Economic Development

DANBURY

KING


rec r e a t i o n

CHAPTER FIVE: RECREATION Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

111


CHAPTER 5: RECREATION

rec r e a t i o n I N

T H I S

There is overwhelming consensus among citizens and community leaders that recreation serves as a key element of the new economy for Stokes County. As a rural county striving to attract investment, tourism, young families, and retirees, Stokes County will need to continue creating safe and accessible trails and greenways, inviting parks and open spaces, and connectivity to its public lands and rivers. Recreation is not merely a “want,” but a critical component of Stokes County’s economic development strategy.

C H A P T E R

A. RECREATION GOALS B. RECOMMENDATIONS

As a rural county striving to attract investment, tourism, young families, and retirees, Stokes County will need to continue creating safe and accessible trails and greenways, inviting parks and open spaces, and connectivity to its public lands and rivers

A

RECREATION GOALS RECREATION GOALS: THE BIG THREE

1 Encourage the development of trails and other recreation amenities that are part of larger regional and statewide efforts. 2 Focus on the creation of new linear parks, trails, and greenways, and improving (rather than creating new) existing park facilities. 3 Strengthen relationships and support civic organizations that maintain park facilities and manage programming efforts throughout the county and municipal areas.

B

RECOMMENDATIONS

The following recommendations are not only targeted at allowing Stokes County citizens to fully utlize the County’s environment for recreation, but also are in-line with on-going economic development and health intiatives.

1.0

112

Chapter 5: Recreation

Support the development of the Mountains-toSea Trail (MST) through Stokes County


1 inch = 12,000 feet 2.5

VIRGINIA

5

STOKES COUNTY

Partner with theNC_HWY NC Division of Parks and RecState_Roads reation for technical and financial support to US_HWY further establish the MST trail in Stokes CounRoads Flood Zones ty. Miles

JESSUP MILL RIVER ACCESS

89

89

FRANCISCO

RIV ER

Old Business District General Business

" " " General BusinessSupport Community Organizations such as Conditional Use " " " Neighborhood Business District " " " Trails Association, Friends of the Sauratown the Sauratown B-3 Mountains and the Friends of I the Mountains-to-Sea Trail that work alongI-1 Heavy Industrial side state, county, and municipal leaders to Light Industrial improve trail and recreational oppor" " access " Light Industrial - Conditional Use " " " M-1 tunities throughout Stokes County. AssisInsitutional tance can "include: " " Office - Institutional - Conditional Use

770 N

C7

0

8

704

66 704

G

UR SAURATOWN CH & MST* L Y N

HANGING ROCK RIVER ACCESS

B

NC BIKE ROUTE 4

NC

772

MOROTOCK PARK RIVER ACCESS

STOKES COUNTY

SNOW RIVER ACCESS

6

6

HANGING ROCK STATE PARK

N

C

8

FMST EXISTING ROAD ROUTE

&8

9

8 89

CAMP HANES MEADOWS 66

High Density Mobile Home Residential District

ETJ Mobilefunds Home Residential • Providing matching for trail grants

N

Medium Density Residential District

PINNACLE

" " " Residential - Low Density - Conditional Use with" amenable to explore " " Residentiallandowners - Multifamily - Apartments

Work - Multifamily - Townhomes the possibility Residential of permanent easements that " " " Residential - Multifamily - Townhomes - Conditional Use would secure " " " the future of the trails.

89

PINE HALL

89 NC

A NEAT M

• Holding trail easements High Density Residential District

8

772 NC

HEMLOCK RIVER ACCESS

CR EE K

311

52

DAN

WALNUT COVE KING NF TO

52 US 52 US

STOKES COUNTY FORSYTH COUNTY

8 NC

5 &6

R PINA HALL ACCESS AREA

CREEK RK

W

Residential Manufactured single section 0 1.25 Home 2.5- MILES

E RIV

65

NC 65

311

65 NC

North

O

Residential - Mobile Home

65

MAJOR RECREATION INFRASTRUCTURE

LEGEND

NC BIKE ROUTE

EXISTING FMST ROAD ROUTE

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY

8&

NC

FMST* PROPOSED ROAD ROUTE

DANBURY

89

CAMP SERTOMA

68268 NC 2

Low-Density Residential District

Conduct a trailResidential master Manufactured plan for theHome Dan Riv- Multisectional Residential - Multifamily er corridor with the goal of creating a certiRural Residential District fied section ofR-3the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. " " " Rural Residential " " "process The planning should- Conditional include aUsemajor " " " R-8 MHE landowner outreach effort and recommendations for improving river access.

SANDY RIDGE

WC RE EK

89

Density " " human " Residential-Medium • Providing resource capacity for - Medium Density - Conditional Use " " " Residential " " " Neighborhood grant writing, maps, serving on boards, Residential Districtand trail maintenance Residential Agricultural

1.4

SN O

EK BIG CRE

" " " " " " R-1 • Acting as a fiscal organization for grants R-2

1.3

NC 704704

LAWSONVILLE

SURRY COUNTY STOKES COUNTY

1.2

704

DAN RIVER PADDLE TRAIL

DA N

NC

HART’S RIVER C 704 N ACCESS

7

0

31 1

Senior Living

US

College

1.1

µ

US 311

School

NC 8

ETJ

NC 8

City Jurisdiction

PROPOSED FMST ROAD ROUTE

*MST - Mountains-to-Sea Trail *FMST - Friends of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail

SAURATOWN & MST

0

1.25

2.5 MILES

N

Map 17: Major Recreation Infrastructure

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

113


Conduct a town-wide greenway master plan for Walnut Cove that includes a landowner outreach effort. The plan should capitalize on the Town’s network of floodplain areas.

3.2

• Formalize and improve public river access at 7-Island. • Re-stablish a public river entry point at Whit‘s Access. ILL

SM I

CHOOL

89 NC

NN

Conduct a trail master plan for the Dan River corridor with the goal of creating a certified section of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. The planning process should include a major landowner outreach effort and recommendations for improving river access.

TH

TO HANGING ROCK STATE PARKULP

E PIN

F

YM

RHA M DU

TN

CH VE S

WA

O WALNUTLCOVE NUT C ELEMENTARY

31 1 AR K

BROOKRIDGE

M ES FA R

MILLER

BRIARWOOD

LIONS P

R FLOEWR LE

FOW

M I DD

MAIN / US 311

JO N

D ALE

OL

STOKESBURG

CAMP C

LAKES AND WATERWAYS

FAGG EXT

R

US313111 US

OR CH

MORGAN

BROOKHAVEN

EASLEY

CITY JURISDICTION ETJ

N PI

E

L HA

L

HIGHWAYS COLLECTOR ROADS RAILROADS

FISHERMAN

TUCKER

0.5 MILES

L

0.25

W HI P

0

-O -W IL

TERR Y

UX MT N

North

HO

• Danbury Town Hall to Moratock Park.

SCHOOLS

FLOODZONES

CE

BA

F F MAN

TW

µ

• Danbury Town Hall to Stokes County Government Campus

A R PARKS

SENIOR LIVING

D AR

FAGG

PAC K

MAN UEL

JR

ER

BA RE D NK

EN SP

HER KIN LU T

G

65

RD FO

&

N MART I

LEGEND

65 NC

8

OD

65

NC

EAST WALNUT COVE COMMUNITY PARK

NC

LEAKE MEM CH URCH

• Hanging Rock State Park to Downtown Danbury

TON BUR

65 OLD

NC 65

KI G

RK

W

PU LPWO

M

R

ST C RE VIE

N C 65 HINSDALE

FAR

US

N C 89

BOOTH

HA N

E L LIS B ULLINS LE BR OO K

WATTS

D

HIDDE N

OO KW

RK LA

SHORT

OA

L

D EL FI

Chapter 5: Recreation

ER WD BRO

OP LT HIL

114

RI

N EE GR

IN

FAR ER M

WN OLDT O

LEFO MIDD

8

• Work with HRSP to establish additional river access and overnight camping facilities between the intersection of Highways 268 and 89 and Moratock Park.

COVE

WN TO OLD

LAGOON WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTER

HEDGECOCK BUILDING

R CH BU

Conduct a targeted greenway feasibility analysis for the Town of Danbury that includes a landowner outreach effort. The plan should target the following connections: RS

Create improvements for paddle/canoe/camping/fishing access sites to support safe and accessible use of the river.

K OO BR

FOWLER PARK

ST 1

D 3R

VE CO

NC

3.1

WALNUT COVE INTERMEDIATE & LONDON ELEMENTARY

ADOW ME

K BROO

CO

SOUTHEASTERN STOKES VIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL MEADOW

WALNUT RIDGE & WALNUT COVE ASSISTED LIVING

RT HA DE

IEW OKV BRO

E AK

US

R

1 31

CE

D EL

Create linear parks, trails, and greenways to connect commercial areas, neighborhoods, civic buildings, and other community assets.

CED A

2.1

CE M E

3.0

K EE CR

ties along the Dan River

M

2.0 Foster the development of recreation opportuni-

TE RY

PT ON

VE

ON J O Y

ROOK EB DL M ID

G

RE EN FI

HA

The MST spans for 26 miles across Stokes County’s Sauratown Mountains and Hanging Rock State Park (shown above) before following a road route through the remainder of the County. Creating a master plan to replace the road sections with trail along the Dan River corridor is a major recreation recommendation of this plan.

R GER

H JO

T EAS

EY

CH YTO W N

WALNUT COVE LIONS PARK

ANKLIN

IL

ILE BA

N DA

NEAL

RO SEB UD

BA

TTL E TU

MA

NH J OH

2.2

WALNUT COVE GREENWAY CORRIDORS AND ASSET OPPORTUNITIES Map 18: Walnut Cove Greenway Corridors and Asset Opportunities

Walnut Cove has schools, parks, and numerous other assets worthy of greenway connection. The most valuable resource for greenway developement is the expansive floodway corridors located throughout the Town.


• Fowler Park to Recreational Acres along the existing trail easement (note: with easements secured, this project is likely ready for construction documents and permitting)

3.3 Conduct a targeted greenway feasibility

analysis for the City of King that includes a landowner outreach effort. The plan should K I N G G R E E N WAY connections: C Otarget N N E C the T I Ofollowing NS

• Fowler Park to the Stokes Family YMCA via Recreational N KIN G

BU DAN

EXPLORE GREENWAY CONNECTION TO NW KING SCHOOLS ALONG DANBURY CREEK

C RY

RE

E

MAN

S

PULL

PROPOSED TRAILHEAD AT FOWLER PARK

TOWN HALL FELTS

FELTS FELTS

IEW

UTILIZE CITY OF KING EASEMENT ALONG MAPLE STREET

E E DAL TO XI N ST IN GS IDE WA LK PROPOSED TRAILHEAD/ DOWNTOWN PARKING

ER

EA

W

STV

KING ELEMENTARY

BY

KIR

G HI

CENTRAL PARK

AY HW

PREFFERRED TRAIL CROSSING

52

YMCA (FARMERS’ MARKET)

REEK UN C OK DR RO KE B O AMERICAN CRO OW LEGION AD

LEGEND

• Danbury Creek Greenway:

POLICE DEPT. & PUBLIC WORKS

MAPLE

PIL OT V

TE HI

WE

T

EN

M SE

G

KING PUBLIC U LIBRARY TIL IZ

EW

FOWLER PARK

IEW

KIN

REC. ACRES

• Crooked Run Greenway: Connect Central Park to the American Legion Park

EXPLORE BICYCLE LANE CONNECTION TO SATELLITE COMMERCIAL & RECOMMENDED NORTHERN KING POCKET PARK

K

FIRE DEPT.

Acres, Town Hall, King Elementary, and Central Park.

ME

PREFFERRED TRAIL CROSSING

TRAILHEAD

S MAIN

PREFERRED TRAIL ROUTE PREFERRED TRAIL CORRIDOR POTENTIAL TRAIL ROUTE POTENTIAL BICYCLE ROUTE

SENIOR LIVING

52

SCHOOLS

AY HW

PARKS

G HI

POTENTIAL SIDEWALK ROUTE

VILLAGE CARE

SPAINHOUR

North

FLOODZONES LAKES AND WATERWAYS

0

1/8

1/4 Mile

KING GREENWAY CONNECTIONS Map 19: King Greenway Connections

Greenway connections were explored during the City of King’s public workshop. A detailed greenway feasibility analysis, however, is needed to furhter this planning goal.

Connecting Fowler Park, shown above, to Recreation Acres could be a greenway catalyst project for the City of King. This section of trail may be easeier than others due to the existing sewer easement. Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

115


3.4

Provide support to community organizations with an interest in developing local trail systems.

Provide for a network of well-maintained parks throughout Stokes County and its municipal areas.

4.0

4.1

Implement the Moratock Park Master Plan completed in 2009. The County should explore a relationship with the Town of Danbury regarding the maintenance and improvement of Moratock Park.

4.2

4.2

Moratock Plan Exhibit: “Moratock Park is located in the heart of Stokes County along the Dan River. This facility would compete well for a Parks and Recreation Trust Fund Grant.” Enhance parks and public spaces located in downtown to encourage visitation and activity near commerce areas. Specific park plans should be developed and implemented for: • Town of Walnut Cove: Fowler Park

Work with Duke Energy to improve and expand recreational amenities at Belews Lake.

5.0

5.1

6.0

Work with Duke Energy officials to develop a recreation master plan for their Belews Lake property. Continue and expand unique programs and events that use recreation facilities throughout Stokes County.

• Town of Danbury: Town Hall Park

5

+ 4

+ 3

+ 2

Financial Assistance

Dedicate Level of Local Government Staff Time/ Human Resource Capacity

Willingness to Hold Easement or Fee Simple Property for Public Trail Officially Accept Segment Management Responsibility or Delegate such Authority

+ 1

Endorsement of Trail Initiative

Exhibit 62: The Trail Support Spectrum

The Trail Support Spectrum illustrates the varying roles local governments can take in supporting trail development.

116

Chapter 5: Recreation

Moratock Park is located in the heart of Stokes County along the Dan River. This facility would compete well for a Parks and Recreation Trust Fund Grant.”


rtreacnrsepaorttiaotnion

CHAPTER SIX: TRANSPORTATION Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

117


CHAPTER 6: TRANSPORTATION

rtreacnrsepaorttiaotnion I N

T H I S

This chapter provides general transportation policy guidance as Stokes County leaders continue to work with NCDOT to improve the state’s road system throughout the County. King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury also maintain a network of municipal roads; this chapter outlines policies and objectives that impact the planning and improvement of these systems as well. Accordingly, this chapter includes three parts: 1) Existing Transportation Infrastructure Overview; 2) Previous Plan; and 3) Transportation Policies.

A

EXISTING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE OVERVIEW

Stokes County’s transportation system is comprised of its roads, rail, bike, pedestrian, and transit networks. While Stokes County relies on its road network for the majority of its transportation needs, it is also important to consider how other modes contribute to the overall transportation system. The characteristics of Stokes County’s existing transportation system are discussed below.

C H A P T E R Roads

A. EXISTING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE OVERVIEW B. PREVIOUS TRANSPORTATION PLANS C. TRANSPORTATION POLICIES

US Highway 52 (Interstate I-73) is the largest major highway within Stokes County. It provides an important connection for commerce and transportation between Winston-Salem, King, and Mount Airy. This corridor connects three interstate highways (I-77, I-40 and I-85), and links northwest North Carolina and Virginia to North Carolina’s industrial heartland. Other major highways in Stokes County include US Hwy 311, NC Hwy 8, NC Hwy 65, NC Hwy 66, NC Hwy 89, NC Hwy 704, NC Hwy 772, and NC Hwy 268. The regional and local connectivity of Stokes County is largely dictated by these arteries. Both King and Walnut Cove enjoy relatively easy access to Interstate 40, North Carolina’s main east-west interstate highway, via US 52 and US 311, respectively. Danbury’s access to a major interstate is less convenient, accessing I-40

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Chapter 6: Transportation


via NC 89. Access to Winston Salem, Interstate 40, and Greensboro is much more difficult from northern sections of Stokes County, where it is often easier to reach Mt. Airy or Stuart, Virginia.

Commuter Infrastructure A park and ride lot is located in King at the corner of South Main Street and Newsome Road directly off of U.S. 52. This lot is serviced by the Surry County Express Route, part of the Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART), which brings commuters to and from popular locations in Winston-Salem.

Rail Infrastructure Norfolk Southern Railways operates two rail lines in Stokes County, one in the southeast between Walnut Cove and Belews Lake and one in the southwest through King. The rail line in the southeastern corner is leased by the Yadkin Valley Railroad and is referred to as the CF-line. Freight is hauled over this line between Rural Hall and Mt. Airy with typically two to three trains per day. Eleven miles of this line run through Stokes County.

Existing Transportation Providers Railways operate in the southeast and southwest corners of Stokes County.

Bicycle Infrastructure

The rail line in the southwestern corner is known as Norfolk Southern’s R-line and runs from Winston Salem to Roanoke, Virginia. Freight and coal are typically hauled over this line with up to eight trains per day. Twelve miles of this line run through Stokes County.

Stokes County currently only offers on-road bike routes for its bicyclists. These designated routes extend to all corners of the county and link each municipality. NC Bike Route 4 bisects the county.

There are currently no passenger train services on either rail line in the county.

Pedestrian Infrastructure Stokes County’s pedestrian infrastructure includes sidewalks in Walnut Cove, King, and Danbury, several parks that provide walking trails, and hiking opportunities on public land.

A park and ride lot is located in King at the corner of South Main Street and Newsome Road directly off of U.S. 52. This lot is serviced by the Surry County Express Route, part of the Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART), which brings commuters to and from popular locations in Winston-Salem. Yadkin Valley Economic Development District Inc. (YVEDDI) is a regional nonprofit organization that administers transportation, human services, and community development programs. YVEDDI serves as the primary transportation provider in Stokes County for older adults, those with disabilities, and low-income individuals. These services are part of the Coordinated Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Plan for Stokes County, which was mandated by the federal government to ensure that transportation opportunities are available for the elderly and undeserved.

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) works with two regional organizations to identify, coordinate, and prioritize transportation infrastructure improvements in Stokes County: the Winston-Salem Urban Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and the Northwest Piedmont Rural Planning Organization (RPO). Both organizations are heavily involved in transportation planning in Stokes, but each is responsible for different geographic areas of the County.

Stokes County’s Comprehensive Transportation Plan or CTP (adopted in 2008 by Stokes County, Danbury, and Walnut Cove) evaluates current transportation conditions and makes recommendations for future transportation improvements. The plan, developed in conjunction with local governments, the North Carolina Department of Transportation and NWPRPO, makes several recommendations for road improvements throughout the County. Major improvements recommended in the CTP are discussed below.

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US 311: Recommended improvements on US 311 (widening the existing three-lane road to a four-lane road with a median) would extend from NC 89 to NC 65. Improving US 311 would enable the roadway to accommodate existing and projected traffic vol-

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US 52 (Future I-74): The

CTP recommends US 52 be widened from four to six-lanes and upgraded to interstate standards from Winston Salem to the Surry County Line. Improving US 52 would enable the roadway to accommodate existing and projected traffic volumes.

Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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The project begins at U.S. 158 southwest of Winston-Salem and ends at U.S. 311 southeast of the city. The total length of the project is 34.2 miles. Environmental studies for the project are complete, and design work, right of way acquisition and construction on some portions of

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Proposed Southern Connector:

Previous plans and comments from the Stokes 2035 public workshop series highlight the need for improved and direct connectivity between Walnut Cove and King. The Stokes CTP recommends a two lane minor thoroughfare with 12-foot lanes and paved shoulder be constructed starting at the US 311 and NC 89 intersection and extending west 5.6 miles to connect with SR 1974 (Mountain View Rd). This roadway would connect Walnut Cove to King. However, according to the 2014 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), the project is not funded.

NC 772: Widen NC 772 from the existing 10-foot

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The Stokes County CTP also set forth various recommendations of lower priority or magnitude than the four primary recommendations discussed above. These recommendations include:

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rerouted onto the new road.

Winston Salem Northern Beltway: The Winston-Salem Northern Beltway is currently in development and will create a multi-lane freeway to serve the northern part of Winston-Salem. The road is designed to help alleviate congestion and enhance safety along heavily traveled routes such as U.S. 421/Business 40 and U.S. 52 in Forsyth County.

6.0

2008 Stokes County Comprehensive Transportation Plan Minor Improvement Recommendations:

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Recommended improvements for NC 65 (from US 311 to the Winston Salem area) include widening (from two-lanes to a four-lane divided major thoroughfare) from Winston Salem to US 311. In Walnut Cove, a new two-lane road is proposed from SR 1921 (Martin Luther King Jr Rd) to NC 65. The existing section of NC 65 from SR 1921 (Martin Luther King Jr Rd) to US 311 would then be

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Winston Salem Northern Beltway: Stokes County Perspectives: The proposed Winston Salem

2.0

A main issue identified with Stokes County’s transportation network can be attributed to its physiographic conditions: the Sauratown Mountains, running generally east-west through the center of the county, limit the connectivity between the northern and southern portions of the county.

Northern Beltway may reduce transit times for Stokes County residents traveling to Greensboro, Piedmont Trial International Airport, and the communities around Winston Salem (Clemmons, Lewisville, Walkertown, and Kernersville). The beltway’s proposed northwestern alignment through Tobaccoville and Rural Hall could provide an additional option for truck traffic traveling to and from King’s US 52/Newsome Road industrial corridor. For example, truck traffic from King would be able to avoid congested areas of US 52 leading into downtown Winston Salem. Increased truck fuel efficiency associated with improved traffic flow on the Northern Beltway may improve King’s competitive position in securing new businesses in the City’s industrial corridor. Overall accessibility to the County’s tourism destinations and municipalities from the south may also improve, as the proposed beltway would provide direct connections from Interstate 40 to US 311 and US 52 without requiring more time consuming travel through congested areas of Winston Salem.

C

Increase the safety and functionality of major arteries without adding additional lanes. 2.1

3.0

Work with NCDOT to create pedestrian-oriented transportation and streetscape improvements at targeted downtown areas and small business growth nodes. Targeted areas include:

TRANSPORTATION POLICIES

• Downtown Danbury

Given the existing transportation network in Stokes County and the groundwork laid by previous planning efforts, the following sets forth recommendations for the improvement of Stokes County’s transportation network:

Improve transportation infrastructure to support the creation of targeted industrial growth areas.

1.0

1.1

Advocate for an interchange at the intersection of Trinity Church Road and U.S. Highway 52 (I-74) to enhance access to potential development areas currently served by water.

In accordance with existing transportation plans, widen existing lanes and improve shoulders on Highways 311, 772, 704, 268, 66, 8, and 65.

• Downtown Walnut Cove • Downtown King • Meadows

4.0

Pursue transportation initiatives that support efficient use of infrastructure, promote environmental health, and provide affordable transportation options for Stokes County residents. 4.1

Work with NCDOT and area transportation agencies to further encourage the use of mass transit between Stokes County and Winston Salem. Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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5.0

6.0

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Actively participate within the regional transportation process to help facilitate transportation projects in alignment with this plan. 5.1

Actively participate in the MPO/RPO planning process to ensure transportation projects are included in the STIP.

5.2

Work closely with NCDOT on transportation projects and on identifying funding opportunities for transportation related initiatives.

5.3

Explore partnerships with transportation agencies such as PART and private providers to meet transit needs.

Establish community-based organizations that can focus on bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. 6.1

Elected officials should make a call for those with an interest in trail development throughout their respective jurisdiction.

6.2

A formal committee should be established to facilitate the planning and implementation of multi-use greenways and other bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

Chapter 6: Transportation


in f r a

str u cture

CHAPTER SEVEN: INFRASTRUCTURE Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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CHAPTER 7: INFRASTRUCTURE

in f r a I N

str u cture

T H I S

The availability of water and sewer is a major determinant of where growth can occur. This is especially true in Stokes County where soils in many locations have characteristics that preclude individual septic systems. This weakness (poor soils) provides an opportunity for Stokes County to target infrastructure development in accordance with this plan. The chapter includes an overview of existing systems throughout Stokes County and recommendations for improving this system in the future.

A

WATER INFRASTRUCTURE

With the Dan River and its tributaries, the nearby Yadkin River, and the groundwater supply, Stokes County has an adequate water supply to meet its needs into the future.

C H A P T E R

A. WATER INFRASTRUCTURE B.MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER C. INFRASTRUCTURE POLICIES The Dan River serves as a major source for public water in Stokes County. There are four municipal water distribution facilities in Stokes County. There are municipal systems in King, Walnut Cove, and Danbury. The Stokes Water and Sewer Authority also operate a water distribution system, purchasing its water from the City of Winston Salem. Each system has adequate excess capacity to meet anticipated growth.

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Chapter 7: Infrastructure


In addition to the distribution systems within the county, the City of Winston Salem directly provides water service to a small percentage of Stokes County residents. In addition to their own water supplies, the City of King has interconnection with the City of Winston Salem that enables it to purchase water to meet its needs in emergencies. Likewise, the City of Walnut Cove has the ability to purchase water from the Stokes Water and Sewer Authority to supplement its supply.

The Town of Walnut Cove currently operates a wastewater treatment facility that discharges into Town Fork Creek. This system cleans water by filtra-

Stokes County operates a wastewater treatment facility that discharges to the Dan River. The County has recently extended sewer the Meadows community where Forsyth Technical Community College will expand its campus. The availability of sewer in Meadows will provide for significant new growth in coming years.

MUNICIPAL WASTE WATER Source: Town of Walnut Cove

B

Due to the continual increase of sewer rates by the City of Winston Salem, the City of King must consider the development of its own waste water treatment facility.

tion through wetlands, in which gravity and nature work to filter out unwanted contaminants.

The existing municipal wastewater infrastructure in Stokes County also has the capacity to meet the county’s needs for the foreseeable future. There are currently three municipal waste water operations in Stokes County, located in King, Danbury, and Walnut Cove. The City of King operates a 1,000,000 gallon per day system with an excess capacity of 750,000 gallons per day. King does not own or operate a wastewater treatment facility, but pumps waste through a force main to Tobaccoville, where the City of Winston Salem is responsible for its treatment. Due to the continual increase of sewer rates by the Winston Salem, the City of King must consider the development of its own waste water treatment facility.

Exhibit 63: Walnut Cove’s Waste Water Treatment Facility

Walnut Cove’s innovative sewer treatment facility was built for less than half the price of a conventional facility and has fewer maintenance costs. Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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C

from South Main Street and Mountain View Road

INFRASTRUCTURE POLICIES 1.5

1.0 Prioritize infrastructure investments that maxi-

mize and improve existing infrastructure, targeting planned growth areas. 1.1

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In Walnut Cove, combine necessary water and sewer infrastructure updates with the redevelopment of the downtown main street.

1.2

Conduct an engineering study to determine the feasibility of providing a county waste water treatment facility located on Little Yadkin River, south of I-73 to serve areas from Pinnacle to Trinity Church Road.

1.3

Strategically extend King’s water system to “fill in” areas between existing water lines, create loops whenever practical to increase the circulation of the system.

1.4

Extend water along Volunteer Road and Chestnut Grove Road to complete a “loop” to the Pinnacle community.

1.5

Concentrate future extension of residential services to a projected growth area west of Mountain View Road, west of NC66, and north of Old U.S. Highway 52 to encourage residential development with access to U.S. Highway 52/I-73

Chapter 7: Infrastructure

Extend sewer infrastructure to reach the Timberline subdivision in Northern King that has failing septic systems. • Explore the possibility of CDBG to fund this extension

2.0

Create an independent wastewater treatment facility to serve the City of King.

3.0

Conduct an engineering report and cost-benefit analysis to effectively plan for a City-owned sewer treatment plan.


Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan

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Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan: Moving Together  

The Stokes County 2035 Vision Plan provides a unified vision for Stokes County and its three municipal jurisdictions, including the Town of...