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CONTENTS

January 2020

FEATURES 16

A Century-Long Tradition

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Tip of the Iceberg

From Wagons to Pickups Missouri Beef Operation Stands the Test of Time

Parasite Problems May Lurk Larger Under the Surface

MEMBER NEWS 6 22 40

Association Update Beef Checkoff News County News

COLUMNS 8

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Tip of the Iceberg

MCA President’s Perspective The Next Chapter

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

Hay Time

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Cow Disturber

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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Capitol Update

Bad Habits

Early Victories

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 49 - Issue 1 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

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A Century-Long Tradition

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Coby Wilson • Manager of Strategic Solutions - Ext 235 Coby@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2019 MCA Officers (2020 next month)

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

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NCBA News

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Angus News

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USMEF Update

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Advertisers Index

Marvin Dieckman, President-Elect 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, Vice President 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2019 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: Bruce Mershon, 10015 Windsor Drive Lee’s Summit, MO 64086 • 816-525-1954 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Bobby Simpson, President 573-729-6583 • 3556 CR 6150, Salem, MO 65560

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Andrew & Kelly Burkemper, Elsberry, MO David Frye, Frye Farms, Seneca, MO Kyle Fulks, Latham, MO Matt Greathaise, 4G Farms, Novinger, MO Matt & Carmine Heilig, Rebel Dexter Cattle Co, Niangua, MO Collin Heitman, Shallow Creek Farm, Old Monroe, MO Dillon Heitman, Shallow Creek Farm, Old Monroe, MO David Hill, Kirksville, MO Nathanael Hutcheson, Hutcheson Farms, Sedalia, MO Cody Narron, Narron Farms, Higginsville, MO

Nathan Peterson, Bonne Terre, MO Marty Ramsdell, California, MO Garland Sanny, Anderson, MO Tyler Schmidt, Russellville, MO Jeremy Heitman, Shallow Creek Farm, Old Monroe, MO Darrel & Anita Franson, Shiloh Land & Cattle Co., Mt. Vernon, MO Martha Shriver, Elk Creek, MO Danny Thompson, Blue Cross Cattle Company, Eolia, MO Kent Wamsley, The Nature Conservatory, Hatfield, MO Jim Willis, Bevier, MO Lain Woody, Odessa, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 69.

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JANUARY 2020

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America’s Cattle Producers Hail House Passage Of USMCA NCBA Urges Senate to Swiftly Follow House’s Lead WASHINGTON (December 19, 2019) - National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) President Jennifer Houston issued the following statement regarding the U.S. House of Representatives’ approval of the U.S.Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) by a vote of 385-41:

“Today was a crucial win for all U.S. beef producers and a reassurance that U.S. beef will continue to have duty-free access to Canada and Mexico,” said Houston. “A big thank-you goes to the Trump Administration and every lawmaker who voted to approve USMCA. Of course, there is still more work left to do, so I urge the Senate to swiftly pass the USMCA and send it to the President’s desk.”

Governor Parson Applauds Progress on the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement ( JEFFERSON CITY, MO) – Today, Governor Mike Parson issued the following statement regarding the U.S. House of Representatives’ passage of the United StatesMexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA): “President Trump, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny

Perdue, and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer continue to deliver positive news on the trade front,” Governor Parson said. “As a proud farmer, I know that Missouri is a national leader among agriculture states, ranking top ten in the United States for production in nearly every major commodity. Once implemented, USMCA will be the gold standard trade agreement our country uses to measure all other deals moving forward. It not only modernizes agriculture trade but also benefits the American worker. The agreement has the potential to create 176,000 jobs and add $68 billion to our economy. We applaud the House of Representatives for completing the first step and look forward to seeing the Senate follow suit.”

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Agriculture is an $88.4 billion industry in Missouri and remains the state’s number one economic driver. To learn more, visit agriculture.mo.gov.

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Cattlemen Celebrate Finalization of Trade Deal With Japan NCBA Honored to Be Part of Process From Day One to White House Signing Ceremony WASHINGTON (Dec. 4, 2019) - National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) President Jennifer Houston today issued the following statement in response to Japan’s final approval of a trade deal that will lower tariffs for U.S. beef exports to that nation:

NCBA Welcomes First Phase In U.S./ China Trade Deal

“There’s just no other way to say it: this is a tremendous WASHINGTON (Dec. 13, 2019) - National Cattlemen’s victory and a great day for America’s beef producers Beef Association (NCBA) CEO Colin Woodall issued and Japanese consumers. Japan is the number one the following statement regarding today’s announcement export market for U.S. beef, and for many years it has that the U.S. and China have agreed to a phase one been a top priority of NCBA to remove tariff and nontrade deal: tariff trade barriers that have prevented American beef producers from meeting Japanese consumer demand MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62 “The announcement of a phase one deal with China is for safe and high-quality U.S. beef. This agreement welcome news for the U.S. beef industry. While we wait levels the playing field and opens the door for U.S. beef to learn more about the details of the agreement, we are producers to meet consumer demand in Japan. NCBA optimistic that this positive news will bring long lasting has been a strong supporter of President Trump’s relief to farmers and ranchers who have been targeted push for a bilateral trade deal with Japan, and we look with China’s retaliatory tariffs for many months.” said forward to capitalizing on this opportunity in 2020. Woodall. “While tariffs grab most of the headlines, China’s unjustifiable non-tariff barriers and restrictions “Over the past few years, NCBA has met countless on science-based production technologies must be times with our nation’s top trade negotiators and addressed so that Chinese consumers can enjoy the same Japanese trade officials to underscore the importance of high-quality, safe and sustainably-produced U.S. beef market access to Japan to America’s cattle producers. that Americans have enjoyed for decades. We encourage NCBA is honored to have been a part of the process the Trump Administration to keep working with China from Day One right on through to the official signing to establish meaningful market access and rules of trade ceremony with President Trump in the White House. based on market demand and science, most importantly. Because of the Administration’s commitment to this This is an important step forward and something that issue, America’s cattle producers will no longer be at a both countries must build on for our mutual prosperity.” competitive disadvantage in our largest export market. That means our current market of $2 billion a year -nearly $100 per head sold -- is likely to grow in the years to come.” BACKGROUND: Japan’s upper legislative chamber, the Diet, today approved a bilateral trade deal with the United States that will gradually lower the tariff on U.S. beef from 38.5 percent to 9 percent. This will keep U.S. beef on a level playing field with imports from Australia, Canada, Mexico, and other countries. Japan is the largest export market for U.S. beef, accounting for approximately $2 billion in sales per year.

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NCBA Applauds U.S. Senate Introduction of Real MEAT Act NCBA “Leader on this Issue,” Sen. Fischer Says The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) today (December 11) applauded the introduction of the Real MEAT (Marketing Edible Artificials Truthfully) Act of 2019 by U.S. Senator Deb Fischer of Nebraska. The Senate bill is a companion to H.R. 4881, which was introduced by U.S. Representatives Roger Marshall (R 1st Dist., Kansas) and Anthony Brindisi (D - 22nd Dist., N.Y.) in October.

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“It’s clear that fake-meat companies are continuing to mislead consumers about the nutritional merits and actual ingredient composition of their products,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. “We commend the efforts of Senator Fischer on introducing this legislation, which would end deceptive labeling of fake meat products and allow cattle producers to compete on a level playing field.” “Beef is derived from cattle—period,” Senator Fischer said. “Under USDA, beef undergoes a rigorous inspection and labeling process, but plant-based protein products that mimic beef and are sometimes labeled as beef are overseen by the FDA instead. These products are not held to the same food safety and labeling standards as beef. The NCBA has been a leader on this issue, and I am thankful for their strong support of the Real MEAT Act, which will protect consumers from deceptive marketing practices and bring transparency to the grocery store.” Specifically, The Real Meat Act will: 1. Codify the Definition of Beef for Labeling Purposes • Establish a federal definition of beef that applies to food labels; • Preserve the Congressional Intent of the Beef Promotion and Research Act;

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2. Reinforce Existing Misbranding Provisions to Eliminate Consumer Confusion • FDA has misbranding provisions for false or misleading labels; • Prevent further consumer confusion with alternative protein products; • Clarify the imitation nature of these alternative protein products;

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3.Enhance the Federal Government’s Ability to Enforce the Law • FDA will have to notify USDA if an imitation meat product is determined to be misbranded; • If FDA fails to undertake enforcement within 30 days of notifying USDA, the Secretary of Agriculture is granted authority to seek enforcement action.


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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS BEEF MYTH BUSTERS – That’s what your dollar does! By Mark Russell, Executive Director

Many people are often surprised to learn that the bundle of nutrients in lean beef, like high-quality protein, iron, zinc and many B vitamins, comes in such a delicious package with relatively few calories. Let’s bust some common myths that consumers have about our favorite protein, beef. So, what is Lean? A cut of cooked meat is considered “lean” when it contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 mg of cholesterol per 100 grams (3½ oz). SURPRISING FACTS ABOUT LEAN BEEF

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MYTH #1 Beef consumption should be limited because it’s bad for your heart and raises cholesterol. FACT: Research consistently shows that a heart-healthy diet and lifestyle including lean beef, even daily, can reduce risk factors for heart disease. A randomizedcontrolled trial found that participants who consumed lean beef, as part of a dietary pattern that was rich in fruits and vegetables, low in saturated fat, and included low-fat dairy, experienced a 10% decrease in LDL cholesterol and a moderate decrease in blood pressure, both markers of lower heart disease risk.

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Another study found that subjects who followed a healthy, higher-protein, weight-loss dietary pattern, combined with physical activity, and consumed lean beef four or more times a week, saw reductions in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In addition, evidence has shown that lean beef consumed in the context of an overall heart-healthy diet pattern rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy maintains blood lipid levels similar to other lean proteins like poultry and fish.

The current body of evidence provides convincing support that eating lean beef, as part of a healthy dietary pattern and lifestyle, can support a strong heart. MYTH #2: Americans already consume too much protein. FACT: Although the American diet has evolved over time, Americans have not increased their percentage of calories from protein in 30 years. On average, Americans (age 2 years and older) consume 5.7 oz from the Protein Foods group each day (meat, poultry, eggs, fish/seafood, nuts, seeds and soy products), which is at a level consistent with the recommendations of the 20152020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs). Including high-quality protein, like beef, in a healthy dietary pattern can help Americans meet their protein needs, improve satiety and preserve lean muscle mass. MYTH #3: Americans consume too much red meat, especially beef. FACT: On average, Americans consume 1.7 ounces of beef daily, well within the recommended amount of 5.5 ounces from the Protein Foods group per day. The fact is, beef is a natural source of essential nutrients with relatively few calories, which makes it a great lean protein option that Americans can enjoy at any meal. MYTH #4: Beef is the primary source of fat in the diet. FACT: Beef contributes approximately five percent of total calories and 10% or less of saturated fat and total fat to the American diet. Many people are surprised to learn that half of the fatty acids in beef are monounsaturated – the same heart-healthy type of fat found in olive oil. Furthermore, approximately one-third of beef’s total saturated fat is stearic acid, which has been shown to be neutral in its effects on blood cholesterol levels in humans.


MYTH #5: It is difficult to find lean cuts of beef in the grocery store. FACT: Thanks to advancements in cattle breeding and feeding, today’s beef is leaner than ever as approximately 65% of the whole muscle cuts sold through the supermarket meat case are lean when cooked and visible fat is trimmed. In fact, many beef cuts qualify as “lean” including some of the most popular cuts at retail like Top Sirloin, Tenderloin, Strip Steak, Flank Steak and 93% lean ground beef and leaner. The American Heart Association recognizes many beef cuts as “heart healthy” today.

and hay) and other human-inedible plant leftovers (e.g., dried distiller’s grains). In general, all varieties of beef are equally nutritious as all are a natural source of more than 10 essential nutrients, like protein, iron, zinc and many B vitamins. While grass-finished beef tends to be a little leaner, other variables also contribute to leanness, including breed, age, grade and cut. Whether you are an avid beef eater, farmer, rancher or producer, use the facts to help educate consumers about the importance of beef! Contact MBIC or find us on social media for more information. www.mobeef.org

MYTH #6: Beef is difficult and time-consuming to prepare. FACT: Beef is a nutrition powerhouse that can be easy to prepare by using common ingredients and matching the right cooking method to the right cut. By planning ahead, you can also save time in the kitchen when preparing recipes made with beef. Beef pairs well with other healthful foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and many cuts of beef are available in the marketplace. Therefore, you have an endless amount of culinary possibilities to create a delicious, satisfying and healthy meal. Find beef recipes for all meal occasions, cooking tips and nutrition information at BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com.

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Myth #7: Grass-finished beef is more nutritious than grain-finished beef. FACT: The variety of beef choices available to you, including grainfinished and grass-finished, are delicious and nutritious. Most people don’t realize that cattle spend a majority of their lives grazing on pasture. On average, over their lifetime, grain-finished cattle consume less than 11% of their diet as grain and close to 90% of their diet as forage (e.g., grass

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Southwest Missouri Spring Forage Conference to be Held February 25 The 36th annual Southwest Missouri Spring Forage Conference will be held Tuesday, February 25, 2020 at the Oasis Hotel and Convention Center, 2546 N. Glenstone Ave., in Springfield, Missouri. Pre-register early, no day-of registration due to limited seating.

bermudagrass pasture management, sunn hemp, PaddockTrac, managing spring through fall forage growth with cattle numbers, grazing system design considerations, and understanding your forage analysis report.

This year’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Temple Grandin. Dr. Grandin is a professor of animal science at Colorado State University, animal behavior consultant to the livestock industry, and spokesperson for autism. She has been a pioneer in improving the handling and welfare of farm animals. Dr. Grandin is one of the world’s leaders in the design of livestock handling facilities. She has designed livestock facilities throughout the United States and in Canada, Europe, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand and other countries. During the noon luncheon she will speak on Improving Cattle Stockmanship.

A large trade show will also be held in conjunction with the conference. Agricultural businesses and organizations will have exhibits and representatives available to discuss their products and services. If interested in becoming an exhibitor or sponsor, contact Nathan Witt at 417-451-1007 ext.3.

The conference will also feature several breakout sessions. Topics include: improving pasture with grazing management, establishment and management of native grasses, management of orchardgrass and other cool season grasses, incorporation of crabgrass into fescue pasture systems, forage nitrate management,

Conference check-in begins at 8 a.m., with sessions running from 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. A banquet luncheon is included with the registration. The cost is $45 per person if registered by February 14th, 2020. After February 14th, the cost is $55 (if space is available). No walk-in registration allowed. Participants can find more information about the conference and register online at www.springforageconference.com. Contact the Laclede County SWCD office at 417-532-6305, ext.101 for additional questions.

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“W oper e’ve mo ation ved o I-44 to ex across th ur sales i e t 2 hig Co 2, west unty Ro then sou hway” ½ m ad 10 th on ile o n Bla 0 then ckbe rry.

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Good Things Can Happen When Marbling Leads Selection Criteria Source: Steve Suther, Certified Angus Beef What happens to a commercial Angus herd after 23 years of selection led by marbling? No worries, really, just premium opportunities. That’s the nutshell from veteran Iowa State University animal scientist Dan Loy, whose team recently authored a white paper based on data from their quality-selected Angus herd. In November, Loy reminded producers at the Angus Convention in Reno, “Reproduction in the cow herd is very complex. There’s a genetic component—that’s the big box across the top—but it’s impacted by the environment and nutrition at different stages—there are a lot of moving parts.” Noting past studies and literature reviews, he then focused on ISU’s Angus cow herds, first set up in 1996 as a means to use ultrasound-based selection for either high marbling or high yield. In 2002, the latter herd was dispersed when American Angus Association’s statistical tools had improved. The breed’s expected progeny difference (EPD) for marbling (MARB) has guided the 400-cow herd at the fescue-based McNay Farms in southcentral Iowa since then (see sidebar on page 28).

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Loy compared the Angus MARB versus the ISU herd’s EPD over time, simplified with trend lines that currently show the average ISU cows now higher than 1 while the Angus average nears 0.6.

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Looking at interactions with other EPDs, he pointed out the Iowa cows lagged behind on heifer pregnancy early on. “We’ve been improving that through the years so that, currently, we’re about breed average,” he said, adding the same can be said for the milk and weaning weight EPDs. An unusual feature of the Iowa herd is the internally raised crop of breeding bulls. They allow for “a unique dataset,” Loy said, that includes the ability to track the scrotal circumference EPD, slightly above breed average, and within the Angus breed, slightly positive in its correlation to marbling. The ISU herd phenotype in terms of carcass performance can be seen in the finished steers and heifers marketed in the last five years, currently at 93% or more qualified for the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand, including 57% Prime. “I like to say Prime is the new Choice,” Loy remarked, “because working with feedlot nutritionists, and in the research, you always see quality expressed in terms of percent Choice. “With these cattle, that’s a meaningless number, because they’re all Choice,” he said. A guiding principle now is, “We just need to figure out how not to screw that up.” (Continued on page 28)


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Average ribeye area, fat thickness and yield grade within the ISU herd “very typical of the industry,” Loy said, although the carcass weights are a little lighter. The research setting and quality goals open research doors into the timing of marbling deposition as well as how brood cows deplete and build up intramuscular fat during a production year. Serial harvest of steers has found weanling steers that could already grade Choice. “We know marbling starts much earlier in life that was thought, and it’s a slower process,” Loy said. The ISU team has just started monitoring marbling levels in cows

during gestation to see how much it may draw down or increase with body condition scores. Other datasets include calving intervals and reproductive success over time, compared to marbling. Simple correlations found significant, slightly positive relationships with heifer pregnancy, number of calves produced and even numerically favorable in terms of calving interval. “So that’s in the right direction,” Loy noted. “Overall, it’s kind of like a broken record and a little bit boring, but we found very little relationship between marbling and reproduction,” he concluded.

SIDEBAR: Leading up to ISU herd data analysis Genetic improvement in beef cattle means jumping hurdles or “antagonisms” among the traits. When animal scientist Dan Loy signed on with Iowa State University (ISU) as a feedlot specialist 40 years ago, he brought along a commercial Angus background. Best practices for the herds supplying feedlots then were crossbreeding and balanced selection for maternal and growth traits. Stockmen had to use single-trait “heifer bulls,” because there weren’t many bulls with calving ease along with growth. If anybody paid attention to marbling, they probably noticed some bulls above average there had little else to recommend them. Science charted and measured the antagonisms for decades, and the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand sponsored a literature review at Kansas State University in 1999, updated in 2007. That was revisited by researchers at Virginia Tech in 2013. The consensus has always found little or no correlation between marbling and other traits. That lack of correlation says marbling, maternal function and growth should all fit together in the same cow. Before those studies, in 1996, Loy and ISU began gathering data on calves from the University’s two Angus herds, built on either marbling or ribeye emphasis. Early on, results were not much publicized and after six years, the ribeye herd was discontinued when an ultrasound technician moved on.

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It took many years to build up enough volume to achieve significance in data from the McNay Farms herd near Chariton, Iowa. But that time has come with the white paper’s publication, now available online at https://www. cabcattle.com/about/research/relationship-between-carcass-merit-and-maternal-traits-in-beef-cattle/

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Cow Disturber McGraw posed an interesting question. If a cowboy herds a herd of cattle, we call him a herder. If a sheepman herds a flock of sheep, he’s still a herder. Why isn’t he called a flocker? Oley has always referred to himself as a cow disturber. I think that is an accurate description of what cowboys do. The definition of disturb is: to annoy or disrupt. “Where ya goin’, Bill?” “I’m gonna go check the cows.” Which really means, “I’m gonna ride into the bunch, git’em all up, turn’em around and just generally annoy and disrupt them.” I grant there are occasions when we have a certain definite task in mind; i.e. “I’m gonna bring in that cow with the arrow in her side.” Or, “Saddle up, we’re pushin’ 2600 head of Longhorns to the sale barn in Bloomfield.” But most of the time we’re just disturbing them. Like doting parents or cat fanciers, we take any excuse to fuss over the critters in our care. It’s a wonder whitetail deer or jackrabbits aren’t extinct with no one to molest them regularly.

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Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock

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For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

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If we were honest with ourselves, our language would be more forthright. The cattle foreman in the feedlot might give his instructions like this… “Jason, I want you to enter the first pen in the north alley. Unsettle the steers by sitting quietly for a moment. Next upset them by approaching. Confuse them by weaving back and forth, agitating and irritating them constantly. Badger each one until they’ve all gotten up and milled around. Once you’re convinced you’ve stirred them up sufficiently, you may go disturb the next pen.” Or, the cowman might say to his wife, “Darlin’, while I’m at the board meeting I’d like you to torment the heifer in the barn lot every 20 minutes. She’s trying’ to calve. Peek over the fence and bother her. Shine the light in her eyes to break her concentration. Worry her as often as needed, and when I get back I’ll slip in and frighten her into calving.” In fairness, we are doing what all good shepherds do. We watch over our flocks because that is our calling. We stand guard in case any should need our help. But if truth-in-labeling is ever applied to our job descriptions, we will have to be more specific about what we do. So the next time somebody asks what you do, try one of these on for size: herd rearranger, bull nudger, sheep panicker, mule cusser, equine perplexer, steer beautician, hog motivator, Holstein therapist, cow companion, dog shouter or cowboy coddler.


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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Bad Habits It’s common to establish a New Year’s resolution on December 31 as the old calendar is replaced with a new one. This tradition usually consists of someone making a resolution to accomplish a personal goal or to kick a bad habit. Regardless, it is a personal quest to improve your life in some way. This association has a bad habit that we need to kick to the curb, and there is no better time to do so than in 2020.

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One of our worst habits is assuming. We assume our friends and neighbors understand the value of belonging to an association that represents their interests and fights to ensure the opportunities for success aren’t hindered by bureaucracy or misguided laws. We assume they understand that pooling our resources together and standing united against extremists hell-bent on putting us out of business is critical today and even more so for the next generation. You see it, and that’s why you belong, but we too often take for granted that others understand the importance of this association.

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As members, this assumption that the benefits are blatantly obvious tend to allow us to keep the value of membership a secret. Even as the executive vice president, I am as guilty as anyone. I have never pushed my neighbors who aren’t members to join. I just assume they understand the value but choose not to join. In reality, maybe they just haven’t been asked and want someone to explain what MCA does and has done to add real value back to their family’s cattle business. It is time that we no longer settle on assumptions and communicate the value to friends, neighbors and agribusinesses you patronize. We know we should share

Executive Vice President our farm story to our urban friends and those removed from production agriculture. However, we need to also share our MCA story with fellow cattle producers. How did you get involved in MCA? What relationships have you formed that have made your operation more profitable? How many dollars have been returned back to you because of MCA leading the charge to reduce property taxes, eliminate income taxes on disaster payments and so much more? The answer to each of these questions is different for each of us. We all have a unique story to tell. The need for this association’s existence gets more critical with each passing year as our population, including elected leaders, gets further removed from the farm. We can have the best communications plan in the world, but I argue that any organized plan pales in comparison to members contacting non-members to share their story. They will likely join if you ask. They trust you. Let’s stop assuming. It is only when we have the majority of cattle producers as members that we can maximize our effectiveness for this industry and every single member. Let’s make the ask. I will do my part as a proud MCA member. Will you?


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Missouri Tax Commission Stands with Farm and Ranch Families - Agricultural Property Taxes will Not Increase Souce: MCA Prime Cuts Missouri farm and ranch families will not be burdened with higher taxes on their agricultural land in the 20212022 tax cycle. This decision announced on Tuesday, December 17, 2019, by the State Tax Commission was welcomed by the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and other other agricultural organizations. In a joint statement from MCA; Missouri Farm Bureau; Missouri Corn Growers Association; Missouri Soybean Association; and the Missouri Pork Producers, the groups expressed appreciation to the Commission for looking at the realities of production agriculture.

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“We applaud the State Tax Commission’s decision not to propose a tax increase on Missouri farmers. Raising productivity values on agricultural land at a time when farmers are dealing with the combined effects of flooding, weak prices, and trade uncertainty would have taken a tremendous toll on many families and rural communities,” penned the organizations in a joint statement Wednesday, December 18, 2019. “Missouri farmers have shown incredible resiliency in recent years and we are grateful that members of the State Tax Commission recognize the impact an increase in productivity values would have on our state’s number one industry. Their decision is welcome news to farm families who look forward to the beginning of a new year.”

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MCA participated in the State Tax Commission’s hearing on agricultural land productivity values on Tuesday, December 3, 2019, where MCA Treasurer Matt Hardecke spoke on behalf of the organization. “On top of market challenges is the weather. We had a devastating drought in the summer of 2018 followed by historic flooding in 2019. Missouri farmers and ranchers couldn’t catch a break and profitability became a secondary priority to simply surviving and staying in business,” said Hardecke. “What the formula fails to consider is the reality of production agriculture, which is at the mercy of the markets - we are price takers, not price makers - the whims of the weather and consumer demand for the products we produce. Any tax increase on Missouri’s food, fiber and energy producers would be ill-advised.” MCA Executive Vice President Mike Deering said the decision was a good way to end 2019 and prepare for 2020. He said the State Tax Commission listened to farm and ranch families and didn’t cave to pressure from some elected officials. “Despite pressure from several assessors who attended the Commission’s hearing, the Commission stood with farmers and ranchers,” said Deering. “It is always refreshing to see commonsense leadership from elected and appointed leaders in our state.”


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association The Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association held their annual meeting, fish fry and benefit auction on December 7. The location was Kingsway Christian Church, Mt. Vernon. The items on the menu in addition to deep fried fish were calf fries, slaw, potatoes, hush puppies and homemade cake. The bulk of the food preparation was done outside as the sun set. Following supper, the 100-plus attendees did some Christmas shopping at the silent auction and heard from special visitors, Bobby Simpson, president of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and Mike Deering, executive vice-president of MCA. The regular live foundation auction had an abundance of items ranging from pies, cakes, gift certificates, fescue seed, feed, pork, beef, etc. Jackie Moore, Joplin Regional Stockyards served as auctioneer and kept the auction lively. The evening’s total was just over $16,000 for the association’s foundation. Those funds are used for youth scholarships, backpack programs and other worthy occasions. In addition, $5,000 was raised to help the Schnake Family with medical expenses for Scynthia.

Mike Deering has his hands full as he speaks at our meeting.

During the business meeting, the following were elected for the coming year: Jeff Kaal, president, Scynthia Schnake, vice-president; Stephanie Fizette, secretarytreasurer; Lane Hankins, David Sperandio and Nolan Kleiboeker will serve a term as board members. MCA President Bobby Simpson joined our meeting.

Jim and Scott Cape…

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www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840 Sunsets on the food preparation with cattle in the pasture right behind the group.


Mid-Missouri Cattlemen There were over 100 people in attendance for the Mid-Missouri Cattlemen’s meeting at Miller County Regional Stockyards in Eldon, Missouri. The meeting/ dinner was provided by Dr. Cummings from Boerhinger Ingelheim and Glenn Parks of Newport Laboratories. Everyone enjoyed a meal provided by Barbara Zimmerman. The group was led in prayer by Brenton Fowler before the dinner and meeting. This was another eventful and very educational meeting. The main topic of discussion from Dr. Cummins was vaccines and the proper way and time to administer them. There was also a large discussion on proper worming methods. It was open forum with several different discussions/topics.This is very beneficial for both those putting on the demonstration as well as the guests. The presenters get an opportunity to find out just what is on the minds of the producers and the producers get a chance to get all their questions out there and find answers to their situations. Glenn Parks of Newport Laboratories was in the back of the barn to work and examine cattle for different pinkeye symptoms. He demonstrated how to swab eyes and get samples from the calves. The producers were very eager to get their hands dirty and try this for themselves. The samples were then sent to the lab to see if there was any pink-eye present and what type it was. Anytime we get to work cattle at a meeting like this, we have a great response! The producers want to get in there and learn the proper way to handle cattle and love the opportunity to be “hands-on.” We are looking forward to next year and hope everyone has a great holiday season! President – Wendy Cantrell Vice-President – Candy Stockton Sec/Treas – Tanya Gardner Director – Ralph Kliethermes Director – Brenton Fowler

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Douglas / Wright County The Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Monday, December 2, 2019, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove, Missouri at Club 60 Steakhouse for our final meeting of 2019. The group enjoyed a chickenfried steak dinner with sides sponsored by the Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Association. Special thanks to Teresa Clifford for providing cow cookies as dessert for the group! President Ernie Ehlers welcomed the group and gave a treasury report. He proceeded with a blessing before the meal, and 53 members in attendance enjoyed fellowship during dinner. Missouri Cattlemen’s Association President, Bobby Simpson spoke to the group regarding issues that MCA has been working on and those that the leadership will focus on in the coming year. He extended an invitation to the group to the convention in January, and encouraged members to participate by filling out e-mail forms, participating in Cowboys at the Capitol, and shared the importance in speaking out on issues that affect us as cattlemen. Following dinner, the top three essay contestants chosen for the 2019 Douglas / Wright County Cattlemen’s Bred Heifer Project gathered as Ernie announced the winner. Congratulations Landry Golden of Mountain Grove, Missouri, and thank you Marty Lueck and Journagan Ranch for working with us on this year’s bred heifer project!

Essay Contest Winner, Landry Golden, with Journagan Ranch’s Marty Lueck

The Douglas / Wright County group will hold their next meeting on Tuesday, January 14, 2019, at 6 p.m. at Club 60 Steakhouse in Mountain Grove, Missouri. Joplin Regional Stockyards will sponsor our January meeting. cattlemen in the area are always welcome and encouraged to attend.

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Cattlemen visiting after dinner

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MCA President, Bobby Simpson speaking to our group

Cow Cookies by Teresa Clifford


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15th Annual SydGen Influence Sale, April 14, 2020

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Polk County Cattlemen’s Association The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association had their December meeting and Christmas Party at Rockin R Auction House on December 7. Share Your Christmas was later that week, and the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association donated 1,700 pounds of hamburger, distributed to about 400 local families. The meat came

from nine animals that were donated for the cause by members. Saturday December 14, was the Bolivar Christmas Parade, and nine Polk County Cattlemen’s members were in the parade, passing out candy, beef coloring books, and cattlemen’s cookbooks.

Polk County Cattlemen members at the Bolivar Christmas Parade.

Polk County members at Share Your Christmas.

Polk County Cattlemen members at Share Your Christmas.

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St. Clair County St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association is proud to announce that two MJCA members will be awarded $1,000 Missouri Cattlemen’s Foundation Scholarships for the 2020 school year. The recipients were Justin Austin of Appleton City and Kendra Stewart of Lowry City. Justin is a senior at Lakeland High School, and Kendra is currently a freshman at University of Central Missouri. Both individuals have been active members of the St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association and we wish them the best of luck in their agriculture endeavors. St. Clair County Cattlemen also decorated the Appleton City City Hall window for Christmas. We would like to thank Appleton City City Hall for letting us have that opportunity. If you are in the area, take time to drive past and see the window. The St. Clair County Cattlemen would like to wish everyone a happy holiday season!

St. Clair County Cattlemen’s window display in Appleton City.

Barton County

Lafayette County

Barton County Cattlemen’s Association met November 18, 2019, in Lamar, Missouri. A brisket dinner was enjoyed, sponsored by Specialty Risk Insurance.

The Lafayette County Cattlemen held a work day Saturday, November 30 at the home of Bill and Paula Oelrich. Members unloaded, cleaned, organized and reloaded the associaton’s cook trailer following a busy (and wet!) fall grilling season. Supplies were inventoried and labeled to be ready to go next spring. The trailer and grill were both sent to storage for the winter.

Members were asked to assist the Salvation Army with bell ringing for the donation kettle during the Christmas season.

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Dr. Scott Brown, professor of economics at the University of Missouri Department of Agriculture presented a program on the cattle market outlook. The U.S. meat production increased from 85 billion pounds to 99 billion pounds between 2014 and 2019. Many factors affect the supply, demand and the price for producers. He discussed the variances in pork and chicken supply and demand. Other factors affecting the demand for beef include exports, demographics and the economy. Drought in other countries affects exports as well.

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Since 2014, there have been nearly 3 million cows added to the U.S. numbers. He has observed that there is currently a tendency away from keeping heifers, and cow numbers could go down in 2020. Consumers are demanding an increase in quality. This increases the price and, at some point, if the increase in price continues, consumption may decline.

Long-time member Leland Rinne of Higginsville passed away December 10. Leland drove a truck both locally and over the road for many firms, including Farmland Industries and Unitog. In 1990, Leland married Betty Starke and they lived on a farm just south of Higginsville, where he raised Angus cattle after retiring from Unitog in 2000. He was an active member of the Cattlemen’s Association. Over the years, he enjoyed horseback riding, square dancing, motor homing, traveling with the Rinne family, card playing and eating out. He was an active member of Salem United Church of Christ, serving on the Church council, and active in Men’s Fellowship group. Services were held Saturday, December 14 at Salem UCC Church. Memorials are suggested to Children’s Mercy Hospital or Salem UCC Cemetery.


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Cass/Jackson County

Pettis County

The November meeting was attended by 48 members and guests to hear a program presented by the Fort Osage FFA Ag Club, which is composed of four schools; Fort Osage, Blue Springs, Grain Valley, and Oak Grove. Club President, Tess Kinne, Vice President, Julianna Beckley, 2nd V.P. Michael Dieckmann, and, Treasurer Kaleb Lukens presented the club and individual goals and projects. Club activities involved Outreach Day, Farm to Fort (where food to the school was from the hydroponics greenhouse), collection and distribution for Harvesters, and fundraisers at Culvers. Group activities included the FFA National Convention, state and national contests, degree applications, and the “Drive to feed Kids”.

The Pettis County Cattlemen’s Association meeting in November had about 80 people in attendance. We took in $1,500 for the scholarship fund and elected a new officer team. Stay tuned for more information on our next meeting, and we hope to see you at convention!

The members of CJCCA chapter decided to award two $500 scholarships, one to each county. New officers elected were Jason Miller for President, replacing Randy Steckly, and, Trevor Scholljerderges for secretary, replacing Bob Flint, for the 2020-2021 term. They will be joining Billy W. Snyder--V.P, Diana Hartzler-Treasurer, and Bruce Mershon, state director from chapter. It was a great Thanksgiving meal and program. Also working for project goals were the Walcenter 4-H club who helped prepare for the meeting.

Editorial Note:

Please send County News items via email to: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Andy Atzenweiler Deadline for the February 2020 issue is January 15. Thank you!

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The new Pettis County Cattemen officers are pictured above. Bottom row from left to right: James Fairfax secretary, John Shipman Vice President, Robert Gregory treasurer, Alan Ream President, top row left to right Ted Williams northeast director, Mike Carter southwest director, Pat Wood Northwest director, Quinton Fairfax Southeast director, David Elliott Southwest director, Anthony Schwartz Southeast director. Not pictured Jason Sneed Northeast director, Mark Jones Northwest director.

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China Fuels October Pork Exports, Beef Exports Down from Last Year Strong demand from China bolstered U.S. pork exports in October, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Export Federation (USMEF), while October beef exports were below the very high totals posted a year ago. October pork exports increased 8.5% year-over-year to 225,376 metric tons (mt), while export value climbed 10% to $592 million. January-October export volume was 5% ahead of last year’s pace at 2.13 million mt, while value increased 3% to $5.48 billion. Pork export value averaged $48.13 per head slaughtered in October, up 4% from a year ago. For January through October, the per-head average was down 1% to $51.12. October exports accounted for 24% of total U.S. pork production and 20.9% for muscle cuts only, up from 23.6% and 20.7%, respectively, a year ago. JanuaryOctober exports accounted for 26% of total pork production and 22.6% for muscle cuts, both up slightly year-over-year.

October beef exports totaled 108,017 mt, an 8% decline from last year’s large volume, while export value ($649.1 million) was down 11%. Through the first 10 months of 2019, beef exports were down 2.5% in volume (1.1 million mt) and value ($6.75 billion) from last year’s record pace. Beef export value per head of fed slaughter averaged $284.56 in October, down 10% from a year ago, while the January-October average was down 4% to $308.04. October exports accounted for 12.9% of total U.S. beef production and 10.5% for muscle cuts only, down from 14.1% and 11.6%, respectively, last year. For January through October, exports accounted for 14.1% of total beef production and 11.5% for muscle cuts, each down about one-half of a percentage point from 2018, when a record percentage of production was exported. October pork standouts: China, Oceania, Central America Although still saddled by China’s retaliatory duties, October pork exports to the China/Hong region reached 61,062 mt, up 150% year-over-year, while export value (Continued on page 50)

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climbed 127% to $141.3 million. For January through October, exports to China/Hong Kong were up 55% in volume (468,576 mt) and 34% in value ($974.8 million). Exports to the region already exceed the full-year totals of 2018. “China’s efforts to rebuild its domestic swine inventory, which has been hit hard by African swine fever, are gaining traction, but there are still excellent opportunities for pork-supplying countries,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “As U.S.-China trade talks continue, we remain hopeful that access for U.S. red meat in China will return to a level playing field with our competitors.” Pork exports to Mexico fell below year-ago levels in October, with volume down 18.5% to 54,639 mt and value declining 9% to $97.3 million — the lowest since April. January-October exports to Mexico were down 11% from a year ago in volume (584,415 mt) and declined 9% in value ($1.02 billion). “Increased demand in China is pulling some pork cuts and offal away from Mexico as well as other markets, but October shipments to Mexico were nevertheless disappointing,” Halstrom said. “The U.S. industry is still feeling the effect of Mexico’s retaliatory duties on pork, which were in place for about one year, and rebuilding pork demand in Mexico remains a top priority.” The outlook for pork exports to Japan in 2020 and beyond brightened significantly this week as the Japanese Parliament ratified an agreement that will bring tariffs on U.S. pork in line with those imposed on major competitors. The tariff disadvantage was evident in October, as pork export volume to Japan was down 16% from a year ago to 29,622 mt and value fell 17% to $122.3 million. Through October, exports to Japan trailed last year’s pace by 7% in both volume (307,974 mt) and value ($1.27 billion). January-October highlights for U.S. pork include: Fueled by strong growth in both Australia and New Zealand, pork exports to Oceania are on a record pace in both volume (95,218 mt, up 39%) and value ($272.9 million, up 37%). The region is an outstanding destination for U.S. hams and other muscle cuts used in further processing.

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Exports to Central America were 16% above last year’s record pace in volume (76,861 mt) and 19% higher in value ($187 million). Exports to Panama were one-third higher year-overyear and mainstay markets Honduras and Guatemala have both achieved double-digit value growth.

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While October export volume to South America slowed slightly from a year ago (13,934 mt, down 2%), value still increased 12% to $35.9 million. Led by steady growth in Colombia and a strong uptick in demand from Chile and Peru, January-October exports to South America remained on a record-shattering pace at 128,469 mt (up 21% year-over-year), valued at $323.8 million (up 25%). (Continued on page 52)


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October beef exports lower year-over-year in most markets Tariff relief for U.S. beef is also a key component of the new trade agreement with Japan, where competitors currently enjoy a significant tariff rate advantage. The rate for U.S. beef muscle cuts is 38.5% but will drop by nearly one-third when the agreement enters into force, mirroring the 26.6% rate imposed on Australian, Canadian, Mexican and New Zealand beef. Another rate reduction will come April 1, when the Japanese fiscal year begins. October beef exports to Japan were down 21% in volume (21,315 mt) and 19% in value ($135.5 million). Through the first 10 months of the year, export volume fell 6% to 263,054 mt while value was down 7% to $1.64 billion. “Japan’s 38.5% tariff rate is the highest U.S. beef faces in any major market,” Halstrom explained. “It was a burden even when all suppliers were paying it but now it is especially important that both U.S. beef and pork receive tariff relief. Japanese customers are very excited about the new trade agreement, and USMEF and our industry partners are ramping up 2020 promotions and strategies to reclaim red meat market share in Japan.” Beef variety meat exports to Japan (mainly tongues and skirts) have been a bright spot in 2019, increasing 21% in volume (53,432 mt) and 13% in value ($320 million, which is 40% of the worldwide total). Japan’s tariff rate for U.S. beef variety meat is 12.8%, but under the new agreement it will drop to 5.8% for skirts and 5.7% for tongues upon implementation. The rates fall to zero by 2028 for tongues and 2030 for skirts. U.S. beef exports to South Korea slowed in October but remain on a record pace as Korea solidifies its position as the top growth market for U.S. beef in 2019. October volume dipped 3% year-over-year to 19,637 mt, while

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value declined 10% to $138.4 million. But through October, exports to Korea were still up 7% in both volume (215,194 mt) and value ($1.55 billion). Beef exports to Taiwan following a pattern similar to Korea, slowing in October but remaining on a record pace. Through the first 10 months of the year, export volume to Taiwan was up 8% from a year ago to 52,968 mt while value increased 3% to $470.3 million. The U.S. holds nearly 75% of Taiwan’s high-value chilled beef market. January-October highlights for U.S. beef include: In Mexico, the third-largest destination for U.S. beef exports, volume was slightly below last year at 196,431 mt (down 1%), but value increased 4% to $916.4 million. This was largely driven by a sharp increase in the perunit value of beef variety meat exports to Mexico, most notably tripe. Despite being up just 1% from a year ago in volume (80,789 mt), variety meat value to Mexico jumped 17% to $219.1 million. Similar to Mexico, U.S. beef variety meat is commanding stronger prices in Egypt, the leading destination for U.S. beef livers. Through October, variety meat exports to Egypt were up 1% from a year ago at 53,504 mt but climbed 14% in value to $62.3 million. Led by surging demand in Indonesia and solid growth in the Philippines, beef exports to the ASEAN region were 30% above last year’s pace in volume (51,758 mt) and 15% higher in value ($251.5 million). Split fairly evenly between muscle cuts and variety meat, exports to Indonesia soared 72% in volume (19,889 mt) and 43% in value ($71.8 million) from a year ago. Led by strong growth in Panama, beef exports to Central America were 7% above last year’s pace in volume (12,802 mt) and 13% higher in value ($72.7 million). Export value also trended significantly higher to Guatemala, Honduras and Costa Rica. October lamb exports trend higher October exports of U.S. lamb totaled 1,193 mt, up 3% year-over-year, while value increased 17% to $2.3 million. For January through October, exports were 28% above last years pace at 13,254 mt, while value increased 13% to $21.5 million. Lamb muscle cut exports were 11% below last year in volume (1,801 mt), but still increased 4% in value to $11.5 million. Mexico has driven lamb export growth in 2019, but other markets showing promise include Trinidad and Tobago, Panama and Guatemala.


4 Tips to Successfully Wintering Stocker Calves Source: BioZyme, Inc.

sickness.

(SAINT JOSEPH, Mo., Dec. 19, 2019) It’s no doubt, agriculture is a risky business. There are a lot of uncertainties, especially when you add the environment and the ever-changing weather into the mix. But with a good plan and some of these best management practices in place, you can come out in the springtime with healthy, growthy calves that are ready for their next feeding phase, regardless if you are preparing to sell the calves or retain ownership of them through the feed yard.

Perhaps the most important nutrient to your calves’ success is sufficient, clean, fresh water. Water is necessary for adequate digestion, nutrient transportation, enzymatic and chemical reactions, and body temperature regulation.

Have a good health program in place. By now, you likely have had your calves for a while, they are straightened out, and you have worked with your local veterinarian to have a vaccination protocol in place. This is a vital step in any phase of the production cycle, but especially important as these calves go through the stress of weaning, the potential stress of adapting to a new environment and now entering a season of the year where temperatures can fluctuate with great variation within a 24-hour period. A health management program should be a written plan that you and your veterinarian devise on how to best care for your cattle. It can include information like animal identification, a vaccination schedule, diagnosis and treatment procedures and morbidity/mortality targets. Any treatments given should be recorded with this plan. Plan for your nutritional needs. Nutrition and health go hand-in-hand, and it is much more efficient to feed and grow a healthy animal than a sick one. That’s why it is imperative to have a highquality mineral available to your stockers, 24/7. A good mineral program helps vaccines do their job and helps the animal respond to health challenges by boosting the immune response. That’s where a product like VitaFerm® Gain Smart® is useful in the stocker health management plan. VitaFerm Gain Smart is a line of vitamin and mineral supplements for beef cattle with the Amaferm® advantage that promotes economically produced pounds by maximizing the natural energy and protein available in forage.

Manage stress for less shrink. Any time cattle experience stress, they are likely going to encounter shrink, or weight loss, so think about ways to reduce stress as much as possible. Don’t handle them unless needed. When you do need to handle or treat a calf, follow the methods outlined in the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) guidelines. Do provide them with bedding and windbreaks during wet, cold weather. And perhaps the most important time stress becomes a factor is prior to shipping them to sell or to transport to the feedlot. Keep them in their natural environment as long as you can, with access to water. If you are hauling them to a livestock auction market the night prior to the sale, and they are bunk broke, inquire about feeding them at the Auction Market, even if it takes some extra effort. The more of a routine you can keep them on, the better. Caring for stockers through the winter doesn’t have to be a gamble. Though you can’t control the weather, you can control your health and nutrition programs, along with providing bedding and reducing stress. Control what you can to make your stocker operation a positive business venture. To learn more about the Amaferm advantage, visit www.vitaferm.com.

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Amaferm is a precision prebiotic designed to enhance digestibility by amplifying the nutrient supply within for maximum performance. Once that animal is vaccinated, a good health protocol will help the animal stay healthy, helping eliminate the need for further treatments due to

Prepare for inclement weather. Even though you might get cold, you don’t necessarily need to worry about your cattle feeling cold unless extreme cold temperatures strike. If you are in the part of the country where cattle hair up and put on a heavy winter coat, they are already covered. In addition, as their digestive system works, they are warmed from the inside, out. However, any time the temps drop below zero or are accompanied by precipitation or strong winds, you will want to make sure your have some wind break and bedding for your calves. Bedding like straw, hay or stalks help keep the calves warm and off wet, frozen or muddy ground. Windbreaks, man-made or natural like tree rows, help protect the calves from severe winds and wind chills.

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MU Extension Releases Winter Feed Cost Dashboard Source: MU Extension COLUMBIA, Mo. – Beef producers will soon spend a lot on hay and supplement. Just how much can vary and depends on many moving factors, say two University of Missouri Extension specialists. Agricultural business specialist Brent Carpenter and livestock specialist Gene Schmitz looked at how current prices affect winter feeding costs for several different diets. “Winter feeding is a critical time for herd health and production. It’s also the most expensive time on the cow calendar,” Schmitz says. Carpenter says grass hay prices dropped only slightly from last winter following a drought. Although USDA reports strong production in 2019, hay stocks at the start of harvest season were the lowest in 35 years. Heading into the winter feeding season, prices remain 25-30% higher than two years ago. The team compared the cost of hay and supplement for spring- and fall-calving cows. They found that the difference in daily cost with current prices is about a dime per day. Spring-calving cows are in late gestation and dry most of the hay-feeding season. Fall-calving cows are in mid-to-late lactation during winter. Without laboratory testing, grass hay quality is difficult to establish, says Schmitz. No grading system exists for grass hay, so the longtime extension specialists assigned “poor, fair and good” grades based on crude protein and energy content. Similarly, hay prices are quoted by rough quality grade. They considered multiple feed mixes to meet the cow’s nutritional needs. They estimated cost at about 8 cents per pound for delivered feed in central Missouri.

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The cost of raised hay is set to $62 per ton, based on MU Extension production budgets. Carpenter says producers who grow their own hay should strive for high quality. The costs per ton to grow poor-quality and highquality hay are the essentially the same.

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The realized cost of feeding good-quality raised hay is about 59 cents less than comparable purchased hay. Feeding poor-quality raised hay actually cost the

producer about 16 cents more each day than buying comparable hay. This difference is even higher in years of surplus hay supplies, says Carpenter. Using current market prices, producers who buy hay save about 64 cents per cow per day by feeding the lowpriced, low-quality hay even though it requires a higher level of supplementation. Carpenter says he knows the “cheap hay” calculation flies in the face of traditional cattle and forage wisdom. “But that is how the math works,” he says. “The idea is not to feed junk, but to keep hay costs low even if it means spending more on supplement.” Good management practices remain key to profitability. “Hay expense, not supplement, is the main driver of winter feeding costs and potentially the profitability of the enterprise,” says Schmitz. “Management practices can have a large impact on the number of days on hay and overall winter feeding costs.”


USDA Report Affirms Feasibility of Dealer Trust Source: LMA OVERLAND PARK, Ks. – A Dealer Statutory Trust would improve the recovery of livestock sellers in a dealer payment default while also allowing commerce to continue as usual, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) report released December 20. In the 2018 Farm Bill, Congress instructed USDA to examine the feasibility of establishing a livestock Dealer Statutory Trust and provide a report within one year. Based on its analysis of industry data, public input, and experience with the livestock industry, USDA finds that it would be feasible to implement a livestock Dealer Statutory Trust. Under current law, farmers, ranchers, and livestock auctions have been devastated when livestock dealers default on payment. The sellers often do not have the ability to get the livestock back for which they were not paid and recover little from the dealer’s bond. While the Eastern Livestock default, which cost livestock sellers tens of millions of dollars, is the best-known example of this, the USDA report analyzes 82 additional dealer defaults occurring from October 1, 2013 – June 30, 2019. A Dealer Statutory Trust would give unpaid sellers of livestock the legal right to reclaim livestock or, if they have been resold, proceeds from livestock in the unfortunate event of a livestock dealer payment default. The USDA report finds existing statutory trusts in other segments of agriculture (sales of livestock to packers as well as poultry, fruit, and vegetables sales) are effective in improving financial recoveries and similar results could be expected under a livestock Dealer Statutory Trust. “We appreciate the in-depth analysis of USDA on this important issue,” said Livestock Marketing Association President Tom Frey. “These findings will be helpful as we work with Congress in 2020 to get livestock auctions and producers the increased certainty and predictability of payment they deserve.”

Creation of a Dealer Trust is supported by the livestock industry, including the Livestock Marketing Association, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, United States Cattlemen’s Association, American Sheep Industry Association, and American Farm Bureau Federation. Prior to the 2018 Farm Bill calling for the USDA report, the bipartisan Securing All Livestock Equitably (SALE) Act, which would have created a Dealer Statutory Trust, was introduced in the House and Senate. Additional key findings in the USDA report include: A Dealer Statutory Trust could improve sellers’ chances of obtaining full recoveries. Under a Dealer Statutory Trust, livestock purchase payments made to sellers within 90 days before a dealer files bankruptcy would not be considered preferential transfers and could not be reclaimed from sellers. Establishment of a livestock Dealer Statutory Trust would likely have little effect on buyer and seller behavior in livestock markets. In general, commerce would continue as usual. Implementation of a livestock Dealer Statutory Trust would be unlikely to significantly impact credit availability or lender behavior. For more information about Dealer Statutory Trust, contact Livestock Marketing Association Vice President of Government and Industry Affairs Chelsea Good at cgood@lmaweb.com or 816-305-9540.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc. On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road 573-642-7486 Every Monday: Slaughter Cattle Sale 10:00 a.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: David Means

John P. Harrison

573-642-9753

573-386-5150

Jack Harrison

David Bell

573-386-2138

660-327-5633

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6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

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Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame Joins Forces with Cattle Industry Convention for Second Year Both to be held in San Antonio, Texas, in early February CENTENNIAL, CO (Nov. 14, 2019) – Cattle feeders will honor their own Feb. 4, 2020, during their 11th annual banquet, held for the second year in conjunction with the nation’s largest annual cattle industry gathering. The Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame banquet will precede the 2020 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show, to be held in San Antonio, Texas, Feb. 5-7. The Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame was established in 2009. It annually honors leaders who have made lasting contributions to the cattle-feeding industry. Inductees for 2020 will be Carl Stevenson, Red Rock Feeding Company, Red Rock, Ariz., and the late Don Oppliger, Oppliger Land and Cattle, Amarillo, Texas. Dr. Robert Hummel, founder of Animal Health International in Greeley, Colo., will receive the Hall of Fame’s Industry Leadership Award. Attendees of the Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame banquet will find it convenient to stay in San Antonio for the Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show, which starts the next day. That event will feature important industry meetings, motivational speakers, valuable education, music and entertainment, a massive trade show, producer recognition, an NCBA Invitational PBR Bull Riding event and much more.

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All proceeds from ticket sales to, and corporate sponsorships of, the Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame will benefit future Hall of Fame initiatives. As an added incentive, Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame banquet attendees will receive a $50 discount on their Cattle

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

Industry Convention registration, courtesy of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “These cattle feeders have devoted their careers to preserving our mission and improving production practices in the industry,” said Cliff Becker, vice president of publishing for Farm Journal Media and Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame board member. We can’t wait to honor these men and add them to the existing Hall of Fame members and award winners who have made extraordinary contributions to the cattle feeding industry.” Information on the 2020 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show, including tickets to the 2020 Cattle Feeders Hall of Fame banquet, can be found at http://convention.ncba.org. For more information on the Hall of Fame go to www.cattlefeeders.org.


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WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION 68

“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898


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SALE REPORTS Lacy’s Red Angus Bull & Female Sale 10.27.19 – Drexel, Missouri 18 Month Old Bulls...................................... Avg. $6,063 14 Month Old Bulls...................................... Avg. $4,712 Registered Open Heifers............................... Avg. $3,209 Commercial Bred Heifers............................. Avg. $1,950 Commercial Open Heifers............................ Avg. $1,263 GENETRUST at Chimney Rock Cattle Company 11.1.19 – Concord, AR 20 3N1....................................................... Avg. $8,137.5 19 Bred Heifers........................................ Avg. $5,026.32 8 Donors..................................................... Avg. $16,125 63 Open Heifers....................................... Avg. $5,246.03 1 ET Pick Lot.............................................. Avg. $27,000 111 Gross $744,750................................. Avg. $6,709.46 GENETRUST at Chimney Rock Cattle Co 11.2.19 – Concord, AR Registered Brangus and Ultrablack Bull Averages 29 Coming 2’s............................................... Avg. $5,405 91 Yearlings................................................... Avg. $4,101 120 Total Bulls Gross $529,936................... Avg. $4,417. Commercial Brangus and Ultrablack Female Averages 202 Bred Heifers........................................... Avg. $1,650 58 Open Heifers............................................ Avg. $1,357 3 Fall Pairs..................................................... Avg. $2,300 260 Total Commercial Females Gross $418,900................................... $1,593 Southwest Show-Me-Select 11.15.19 – Carthage, MO 108 Tier I A.I................................................ Avg. $1,704 82 Tier I N.S................................................. Avg. $1,630

Sydenstricker Genetics Production Sale 11.23.19 – Mexico, MO 1 Older Bull................................................ Avg. $80,000 89 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $5,387 57 Bull Calves............................................... Avg. $3,911 126 Open Heifers.......................................... Avg. $5,784 54 Bred Heifers............................................. Avg. $3,853 29 Bred Cows................................................ Avg. $2,831 59 Fall Pairs................................................... Avg. $4,230 13 Embryos...................................................... Avg. $311 Dalebanks Angus 11.23.19 – Eureka, KS 72 Older Bulls............................................... Avg. $5,979 69 Yearling Bulls........................................... Avg. $4,706 West Central Show-Me-Select 11.30.19 – Kingsville, MO 18 Tier II A.I................................................. Avg. $1,963 1 Tier II N.S.................................................. Avg. $1,585 149 Tier I A.I................................................ Avg. $1,790 63 Tier I N.S................................................. Avg. $1,663 Southeast Show-Me-Select 12.7.19 – Fruitland, MO 12 Tier II A.I................................................. Avg. $1,689 4 Tier II N.S.................................................. Avg. $2,062 29 Tier I A.I.................................................. Avg. $1,627 19 Tier I N.S................................................. Avg. $1,576 East Central Show-Me-Select 12.13.19 – Farmington, MO 3 Tier II A.I................................................... Avg. $1,583 6 Tier II N.S.................................................. Avg. $1,675 62 Tier I A.I.................................................. Avg. $1,722 41 Tier I N.S................................................. Avg. $1,664 Northeast Show-Me-Select 12.14.19 – Palmyra, MO 17 Tier II A.I................................................. Avg. $2,160 10 Tier II N.S................................................ Avg. $2,020 137 Tier I A.I................................................ Avg. $2,022 65 Tier I N.S................................................. Avg. $1,970

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GENETRUST at Cavender’s Neches River Ranch 11.15-16.19 – Jacksonville, TX Brangus & Ultrablack Bull Averages 95 Coming 2’s .............................................. Avg. $6,855 85 Yearlings................................................... Avg. $5,574 180 Total Brangus and Ultrablack Gross $1,125,000.................... Avg. $6,250 Charolais Averages 24 Coming 2’s Gross $90,000....................... Avg. $3,750 Commercial Brangus Female Averages 83 Fall Pair..................................................... Avg. $2030 43 Bred Cows................................................. Avg. $1903 312 Bred Heifers............................................ Avg. $1819 84 Open Heifers............................................. Avg. $1386 522 Total Commercial Females Gross $934,250.......................................... Avg. $1790

North Central Show-Me-Select 11.22.19 – Kirksville, MO 5 Tier II A.I................................................... Avg. $1,800 5 Tier II N.S.................................................. Avg. $1,770 54 Tier I A.I.................................................. Avg. $1,808 46 Tier I N.S................................................. Avg. $1,821

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SALE CALENDAR January 25 Nichols Farms Sale, Bridgewater, IA January 25 Tweedy Cattle Co. Angus Production Sale, Pocahantas, AR February 1 Loonan Stock Farm Sale, Corning, IA February 4 Hoover Angus Production Sale, Creston, IA February 7 Cow Camp Ranch Annual Spring Bull Sale, Lost Springs, KS February 8 J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS February 8 Crooked Creek Angus Sale, Clarinda, IA February 9-16 Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA February 15 Byergo Angus Sale, Savannah, MO February 17 Ade Polled Herefords Presidents Day Sale, Amsterdam, MO February 21 Galaxy Beef Production Sale, Macon, MO February 22 Seedstock Plus North Missouri Bull Sale, Kingsville, MO February 23 63rd Missouri Angus Breeders Futurity Sale, Columbia, MO February 28 Jamison Hereford Bull Sale, Quinter, KS March 6 Express Ranches Spring Bull Sale, Yukon, OK March 7 Mead Farms Spring Sale, Versailles, MO March 7 Peterson Farms Bull Sale, Mountain Grove, MO

Kingsville Livestock Auction

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Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

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Special Cow/Bull & Cow/Calf Sale Saturday, January 18 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

March 7 March 8 March 13 March 14 March 14 March 14 March 14 March 14 March 15 March 16 March 18 March 20 March 20 March 21 March 21 March 21 March 21 March 21 March 21 March 26

Seedstock Plus Arkansas Bull & Female Sale, Hope, AR Sampson Annual Bull Sale, Kirksville, MO Schlager Angus Production Sale, Palmyra, MO Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney, MO Express Honor Roll Sale, Yukon, OK Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale, West Plains, MO Seedstock Plus Red Reward Bull & Female Sale, Osceola, MO Genetic Power Gelbvieh & Balancer Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Briarwood Angus Annual Production Sale, Butler, MO Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO Valley Oaks Spring Sale, Lone Jack, MO Marshall & Fenner Farms Sale, Marshall, MO THM Land & Cattle Sale, Vienna, MO Circle A Spring Production Sale, Iberia, MO Pinegar Annual Herdbuilder XXVI Sale, Springfield, MO Falling Timber Farm Sale, Marthasville, MO Aschermann Charolais Bull Sale, Carthage, MO Brinkley Angus Ranch Sale, Green City, MO Mississippi Valley Angus Sale, Palmyra, MO Maplewood Acres Sale, Sedalia, MO


March 28 Worthington Angus Sale, Dadeville, MO March 28 Arkansas Bull Sale and Commercial Female Sale, Heber Springs, AR March 28 Seedstock Plus South Missouri Bull Sale, Carthage, MO March 28 Harriman Santa Fe “Top of the Breed” Bull & Bred Heifer Sale, Windsor, MO March 30 Southwest MO Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, MO April 2 Hunter Angus Sale, Fair Grove, MO April 3 Meyer Cattle Co. Sale Curryville, MO April 4 Four State Angus Association Sale Springfield, MO April 4 B/F Cattle Co. Spring Maternal Integrity Gelbvieh & Balancer Bull Sale, Butler, MO April 6 Brockmere Farms Inc. Sale, New Cambria, MO April 10 Howard County Angus Association Sale, Fayette, MO April 11 Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO April 14 Sydenstricker Genetic Influence Sale New Cambria, MO April 18 East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO May 9 Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO

MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164.

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Advertiser Index

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American Angus Association ............................... 27 American Gelbvieh Association.......................35-38 Buffalo Livestock Market...................................... 13 Callaway Livestock Center Inc............................. 63 Central Missouri Sales Co.................................... 48 Circle A Angus Ranch.......................................... 43 Classified............................................................... 73 Clearwater Farm................................................... 43 Cow Camp Sale.................................................... 29 Crystalyx............................................................... 19 Durham Simmental Farms................................... 11 Eastern Missouri Commission Company............. 52 F&T Livestock Market.......................................... 28 FCS of Missouri.................................................... 76 Galaxy Beef LLC.................................................. 43 Gerloff Farms........................................................ 43 Gleonda Farms Angus - Traves Merrick............... 43 Green’s Welding & Sales....................................... 12 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.................................... 43 HydraBed.............................................................. 20 Iowa Beef Expo..................................................... 49 J&N Black Hereford Sale...................................... 31 Jamison Hereford Sale.......................................... 33 Jauer Angus Sale................................................... 58 Jim’s Motors.......................................................... 40 JRS ......................................................................... 3 Kingsville Livestock Auction................................ 72 Loonan Stock Farm.............................................. 45 Lucas Cattle Co.................................................... 11 Marshall & Fenner Farms..................................... 43 MBC Cowboys at the Capitol............................... 21 MBC Top 100 Profitability Challenge.............60-61 MCA Member Benefits......................................... 66 MCA Membership Form...................................... 69 MCA Presidents Council...................................... 67 MCA Proud Member Signs.................................. 70 McBee Cattle Co................................................... 44

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McPherson Concrete Products.............................. 73 Mead Cattle Co..................................................... 56 Mead Farms.......................................................... 43 Merck Animal Health...................................... 50-51 Merry Meadows Simmental................................. 11 Missouri Angus Association.................................. 43 Missouri Angus Breeders...................................... 43 Missouri Beef Industry Council............................ 23 Missouri Simmental Association........................... 11 Missouri Simmental Breeders............................... 11 Missouri Valley Commission Company............... 11 MLS Tubs............................................................... 7 Naught-Naught Agency......................................... 26 Nichols Farms Sale................................................ 75 Oval F Ranch....................................................... 11 Ozarks Farm & Neighbor..................................... 39 Pinegar Limousin.................................................. 15 Richardson Ranch................................................ 43 RLE Simmental.................................................... 11 Seedstock Plus....................................................... 25 Sellers Feedlot....................................................... 48 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle................................... 11 South Central Regional Stockyards...................... 64 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef.............................. 43 Superior Steel Sales............................................... 24 Sutphin Cattle Company...................................... 59 Sydenstricker Genetics.......................................... 43 Tweedy Cattle Co. Sale......................................... 47 Valley Oaks Angus................................................ 43 Valley Oaks Angus Sale.......................................... 9 Weiker Angus Ranch............................................ 43 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate........................... 30 Wheeler Livestock Market.................................... 12 Mike Williams....................................................... 30 Windsor Livestock Auction................................... 68 Y-Tex....................................................................... 2 Zeitlow Distributing.............................................. 14


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Profile for Macey Hurst

January 2020 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

January 2020 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

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