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SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN Everything I list turns to SOLD! 805-886-0228 skimberlin@aol.com

Ex pi r e s 4/30/20

oastal C

This week’s listings on the back page

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CARPINTERIA

Vol. 27, No. 29

April 8 - 14, 2021

coastalview.com

View News

Bob Kingston: Mentor of the Year

7

Made in Carpinteria: Rincon Mountain Winery

12

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

16

Warriors baseball scores first win

25

t’s ll n t e et ls

After several successful Community Paint Day events, artists from the Muralism team are putting the finishing touches on the Ash Avenue Boathouse mural honoring the late Carpinteria artist Ray Cole. Local artist Joanna Norstedt lent her precise pointillism skills to the project, filling in the mural with small, distinct dots of color to add dimension to the vibrant marinethemed piece. Once the remaining detail work is complete, the mural will be formally unveiled with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. KARLSSON

NancyHussey.com Summer’s Coming! This Great Beach House Will Be Gone Act Now! Seeing is Believing! Only $1,847,000 • 4740 4th St. Carpinteria

View at www.47404th.com

5182 Concord Place $985,000 • Charming Seacoast Village BRE#01383773

Just SOLD!


2  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

STIMULATE SMALL BUSINESSES Consider donating government stimulus funding to help local small businesses and nonprofits RECOVER AND REBUILD

Thank you, Carpinteria!

We have made it through a year like none before. We’ve been tested and proven to be resilient. Yet, the 93013 Fund continues to receive applications for Small Business Grants from businesses that have sacrificed so much. Let’s finish the job and bring normal back.

$1400

GOVERNMENT STIMULUS

SHOP LOCAL

DONATE TO 93013 FUND

& INVEST IN OUR FUTURE

SMALL BUSINESS GRANTS

Goal $20,000

IT’S A SIMPLE C L I C K AWAY !

DONATE AT WWW.93013FUND.ORG OR MAIL A CHECK TO PO BOX 1211, CARPINTERIA, CA 93014 NO FUNDS ARE SPENT ON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS

In the past year, the 93013 Fund has COLLECTED AND DISTRIBUTED OVER $200,000 toward food insecurity, youth centers, community serving nonprofits, school safety and supplies, senior care and small business grants. AD COURTESY OF B & H FLOWERS

93013 Fund is a program of Rotary Club of Carpinteria Sunset Charitable Foundation

With support from

Coastal View News CARPINTERIA


Thursday, April 8, 2021  3

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

CVN

BRIEFLY

Public Health Vaccination sites open to ages 16 and over

This week, Santa Barbara County residents ages 16 years and older are able to make an appointment for the Covid-19 vaccine at Public Health Community Vaccination Clinics in Santa Maria happening this week using the Pfi er vaccine. Those years of age and older can now make an appointment for Santa Barbara vaccination clinics happening Thursday, April since Moderna and ohnson ohnson will be used at this site. Additionally, Lompoc Valley Medical Center will expand eligibility to all who qualify based on vaccines available. ective April , people years of age and older will also be eligible to schedule appointments at any of the participating pharmacies, hospitals or health care providers as supply is available. These locations may be able to begin sooner, depending on availability of vaccines. All eligible community members can sign up for a vaccine appointment by registering online at publichealthsbc.org community-vaccination-clinics or by calling 2- - and pressing option for assistance. Anyone who is having di culty accessing 2- - can dial 2.

Household Goods and Hazardous Waste Day is this Saturday

The city invites the community to its Annual Household Goods and Ha ardous aste ay on Saturday, April , from a.m. to p.m. at City Hall, Carpinteria Ave. At the free event, Carpinteria residents can dispose of almost anything household ha ardous waste, household goods such as furniture, used appliances, mattresses, clothing, uorescent light bulbs, pesticides, herbicides, mercury thermometers, aerosol cans, cleaning products and e-waste anything with a plug or a battery . ot accepted at the event are the following tires, explosives, bioha ards and radioactive materials. Modifications have been made to the event to reduce the risk of spreading Covid- . Participants must remain in their vehicles and wear a mask. tems for disposal must be kept in the trunk or truck bed where sta can easily access them. Sta will not enter the vehicle cabin. For more information, contact rin Maker, Carpinteria’s environmental coordinator, at or erinm ci.carpinteria.ca.us.

Rotary Club of Carpinteria presents

2021

FREE ONLINE EVENT www.theAlcazar.org

SAT. APRIL 17 at 7pm JOHN PAL MI NTERI A S EMC EE PLUS 2 0 G R E AT VARI ETY A C TS I NC LUDI NG: JASON LOVE

IS CLEAN COMEDY

Performing is one of our rising stars Jason Love. He has appeared on HBO, Comedy Central, America’s Got Talent, the Laugh Factory in Hollywood, and Carolines on Broadway. He performs overseas for the troops and on the seas for cruise ships. His clips are played daily on Sirius XM radio. Says LA Weekly, “Jason Love is comedy that brings people together”. Laughter is great!

D O N AT E O N L IN E AT C A R P I N T E R I A R O TA RY. O R G Proceeds benefit the STUDENTS at CUSD’s Music Program

online. community. news.

Carpinteria Household Goods & Hazardous Waste Day WITH THE FOLLOWING MODIFICATIONS

Remain in your vehicles. • Wear a mask. Bring ONLY accepted items & keep them together in your trunk where staff can easily access them. Staff will NOT enter the vehicle cabin.

SATURDAY APRIL 10, 2O21 9am–1pm

5775 Carpinteria Ave., City Hall Parking Lot Sponsored by the City of Carpinteria and E.J. Harrison & Sons, Inc. Used oil disposal is funded in part by CalRecycle

ACCEPTING HOUSEHOLD GOODS:

including furniture, mattresses, appliances, electronic waste, yard waste and assorted junk.

HAZARDOUS WASTE: Pesticides, paint, automotive fluids, fluorescent bulbs, cleaning products, medications, other chemical wastes.

ATTENTION CARPINTERIA BUSINESSES! Small quantity hazardous waste generators may dispose of items by appointment. To make an appointment contact 805.880.3415, erinm@ci.carpinteria.ca.us

*PLEASE LIMIT 15 GALLONS TOTAL LIQUID QUANTITY PER CAR. NOT ACCEPTING: Tires, explosives, biohazards, radioactive materials,

OPEN TO CARPINTERIA RESIDENTS ONLY!


4  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Locals team with Lompoc dispensary to secure cannabis retail storefront Santa Claus Lane location secures top spot in county’s preliminary rankings

BY DEBRA HERRICK The contest for a single permit to sell cannabis in a retail shop in the unincorporated county areas of Carpinteria and Summerland has neared completion of its penultimate round. Local Padaro Beach Village storefront owners, Patrick and Maire Radis, along with The Roots dispensary, have come out on top, and are now one step closer to achieving their goal to open a pot dispensary in the former Porch retail location. As a result of the third of four phases in the merit-based selection process, Santa Barbara County’s Cannabis Program has released preliminary rankings for applicants by Community Plan Area (CPA). In the Toro Canyon/Summerland CPA, which includes Santa Claus Lane, two applicants were ranked. Ranked number one is The Roots Carpinteria, LLC for a store at 3823 Santa Claus Lane. Ranked number two is Haven XV, LLC for a store just across the way at 3825 Santa Claus Lane, Unit B. Only the applicant seated in the number one ranking on the final list will be allowed to move forward with their permit application. Countywide, rankings for 15 applicants have been released across five CPAs Toro Canyon/Summerland; Eastern Goleta Valley; Isla Vista/Goleta; Santa Ynez; and Los Alamos. Rankings for the Orcutt CPA were withheld, as the CPA is undergoing a legal challenge and the county is complying with a stay order issued by the court on March 12. Determination of the Phase 3 rankings consisted of an on-site visit to the proposed retail location and a review, score and ranking of the Neighborhood Compatibility Plan that each applicant submitted. After the release of the rankings on April , applicants have five business days to file a written protest to the scoring. Scoring protests will be considered by the County xecutive O ce which will issue a final decision. “We anticipate a large number of protests,” said Brittany Heaton, principal

The Roots Carpinteria, LLC has ranked number one in the county’s merit-based selection process to open a cannabis retail location. If successful, The Roots will open a store at 3823 Santa Claus Lane.

Last summer, when the Radises’ biggest tenant, Porch, gave notice on their lease, the Radises decided to apply for the cannabis retail permit. The decision came after years of cannabis edibles providing Patrick with relief from his Parkinson’s. analyst, Cannabis Program, County Executive O ce. “There may be legal action it’s hard to tell at this point how long it will take but I’m hopeful that by the end of this month we’ll be releasing the final scores.” The final decision on scoring protests will be made by e Frapwell, assistant county executive o cer.

CEF merges science enrichment for all CUSD students

The Carpinteria ducation Foundation C F has facilitated a , gift from Chevron to provide the Merge Cube to augment science education at Carpinteria nified School istrict. According to its website, the Merge Cube helps students learn science and ST M e ectively with objects and simulations they can touch, hold and interact with. Students can hold a three-dimensional object while interacting digitally, allowing for hands-on learning such as dissecting a virtual frog or holding fossils. Middle school science curriculum lessons include genetics and evolution for eighth graders, yeast respiration (chemical reactions) for seventh graders, and a lesson on homeostasis and negative feedback for sixth graders. The , gift came from Chevron’s Santa Barbara County Social Investment program and was given on Nov. 8, 2020, according to Sara Dearman, public a airs representative for Chevron. “Chevron takes a comprehensive approach to investments in education by getting students excited about STEM

and encouraging them to pursue STEM courses and, ultimately, STEM careers. The Merge Cube program is a great way to keep kids engaged and doing handson activities,” Dearman said. “Science education at the secondary level is especially challenging in a virtual learning environment,” said Diana Rigby, CUSD superintendent. “Chevron has been so generous in donating funds for the purchase of the Merge Cube to keep students engaged and doing hands-on experiments and projects – a lifesaver!” The Merge Cube’s tactile learning is particularly important as time in the lab has been curtailed due to the pandemic. “The Merge Cube allows students to really see and feel science that kids are sure to engage with and will hopefully lead to a lifelong interest in science and technology to better prepare all CUSD students for jobs in the 21st century,” said Casey Balch, C F president. “The Merge Cube is one more way to bring the classroom into the home and continue to ensure that our kids have access to cutting edge learning.”

The Radises

Patrick and Maire Radis have lived in a barn house in the hinterlands of Toro Canyon since 1995. Their three adult children attended local schools and now live nearby. The couple dreamed of owning and fixing up the abandoned obster Town USA building on Santa Claus Lane for years. The property had been abandoned for over three decades when they finally purchased it in 2009 and began a full-scale restoration project. Patrick was an electrical contractor with an o ce on Carpinteria Avenue before retiring in 2015 because of his Parkinson’s Disease and joining Maire fulltime in their real estate investment business, specializing in buying and rehabilitating distressed properties. Maire has also run her own property management company since 1987. Last summer, when the Radises’ biggest tenant, Porch, gave notice on their lease, the Radises decided to apply for the cannabis retail permit. The decision came after years of cannabis edibles providing Patrick with relief from his Parkinson’s. “Patrick has what is known as an ‘atypical’ form of Parkinson’s,” said Maire. “The traditional drugs used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s, such as Dopamine agonists and others , have no e ect on him and in fact make him really sick.” There is no cure for Parkinson’s Disease, but in 2017 a friend recommended Patrick try a cannabis-infused chocolate. “It allowed him to get through the day with no meds,” Maire said. “Today he takes no medications and is still surfing.”

The Roots

Entering the retail cannabis sector though is not easy, so the Radises sought a partner that was already a leader in the

industry. After receiving several o ers from non-local firms to buy the building or rent the space, they decided to team up with Victor Sanchez, who operates a retail cannabis store, The Roots, in Lompoc. “While we were entertaining those offers, we discovered that our friend Victor Sanchez, who we have known since he was a little kid and whose family we have known for many years, has a successful retail cannabis store,” said Maire. “Victor has put together a stellar team to run The Roots Carpinteria including Luis Castaneda who is in charge of compliance and operations, Marcus and Beth Thuna who manage the business side of things and David Garcia who oversees product procurement … Retail cannabis is a highly regulated and complicated business, and we are excited to be working with such a successful and capable team.” The Roots opened in Lompoc two years ago as the only locally owned dispensary in town. “We are focused on giving back to the community,” said Luis Castaneda, co-owner of The Roots. “We’re on the sidelines at Little League games in Lompoc and we want to keep that same community relationship in Carpinteria.” The Roots focuses on owers grown locally in Santa Barbara County, while also introducing new brands from across the state. “We like to spread the love and educate customers,” said Castaneda. “We have a large emphasis on locally grown cannabis, health and well-being. We put a lot of energy into educating our bud tenders and having a solid team.”

Next phase

After the County Executive Office releases the final rankings, the top applicants will move on to seek the licenses and permits required to open a cannabis retail shop. If the top candidate falls out for any reason, the applicant with the next highest ranking will be invited to seek permits and licensing. The county’s Planning and Development Department will follow the standard process of public noticing for each associated permit. Inquiries related to the land use entitlement permitting process and noticing per CPA can be directed to Petra Leyva, supervising planner, Cannabis Program, (805) 568-2071, Petra@co.santa-barbara. ca.us. For all other inquiries, residents can call (805) 568-2777 or email cannabisinfo@ countyofsb.org.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, April 8, 2021  5

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6  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Fully vaccinated in Santa Barbara County is at 18% As of April 7, Santa Barbara County has vaccinated 17.7% of its population, according to the county’s Public Health Department. Doses administered as of April 5 totaled 223,087, including vaccinations given by the county, CVS, Walgreens and RiteAid. New cases by the two-week average metric are now down by 35%, with active cases also down by 6%. The adjusted case rate for the county per 100,000 residents is now at 6.8 and there is currently 30.3% adult ICU availability. The county reported , confirmed cases of Covid-19 to date on April 6, indicating 247 new infections countywide in the past seven days. There have now been confirmed deaths from the novel coronavirus, 20 in the South County communities of Carpinteria, Montecito and Summerland where there have been , confirmed Covid-19 infections. For more information, visit publichealthsbc.org.

Looking for related stories? Search the archives at

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Thursday, April 8, 2021  7

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

CADA names Kingston as 2021 Mentor of the Year The Council on Alcoholism and rug Abuse CA A will hold its annual Gratitude uncheon celebrating its mentor program on Tuesday, April 2 from 2 to p.m. Among the honorees at the event is Carpinterian Bob ingston, who has earned the title of 2 2 Mentor of the ear and will be awarded the Penny enkins Mentor Champion Award. ingston has been a member of CAA’s Mentor Task Force and a mentor for the past five years. He and his mentee came to CA A’s Mentor Program in 2 2 from Family Service Agency’s former Big Brothers Big Sisters. ith a self-proclaimed “attitude of gratitude” for his own life, ingston has always been passionate about making time to help kids validate who they are and discover what they can achieve. Today, he and his -year-old mentee Manny are exploring life’s many possibilities with stops along the way for Taco Bell fare and lots of hours of fishing. hen asked why being a mentor is such an important part of his life, ingston is quick to reply, “That’s easy. t’s the smile on Manny’s face every time pull in the driveway to pick him up That’s what

Bob Kingston and his mentee, Manny, have made many memories together in ingston’s time as a mentor. this is all about.” ith a degree from San iego State, ingston’s career spanned local business and industry, including the opening of Santa Barbara’s famous Chart House

Restaurant. He also founded and operated All Around andscape Supply in Carpinteria for over 2 years. ingston married his high school sweetheart inda in , and the couple have two adopt-

ed sons, Blake and Todd, and grandson evi. A native of Brooklyn, ew ork, ingston is a natural athlete and avid sports enthusiast, having originally come to California as a young boy when his father followed the Brooklyn odgers to os Angeles in . ow in its th year, the Mentor Program matches Santa Barbara County youth enrolled in third through eighth grade with caring adult mentors. Mentees are referred to CA A by school counselors and psychologists who have identified at-risk behaviors that can result in poor academic studies, social di culties and association with negative in uences. espite the constraints of the pandemic, the program is approaching current mentor-mentee matches, many of which will continue beyond high school graduation and become lifelong friendships. Free event registration, sponsorship and donation information for the April 2 virtual event can be found at cadagratitude.org. Attendees can also donate in honor of a mentor in their life, whose name and photo can be shared on the event website and during the event.

School board meeting prompts stakeholder concern over elimination of Zoom learning option BY ODESSA STORK

On Tuesday, March 30, the Carpinteria nified School istrict Board of Trustees voted to return all students in-person five days per week for elementary schools, and four days per week for Carpinteria High School and Carpinteria Middle School beginning Monday, April . Attendees expressed varying opinions about the amended reopening plan, but the aspect of the plan that was discussed in most detail was the elimination of the oom learning option at the elementary and middle school levels. As part of the plan, Cohort C, the subgroup of students that had previously been studying remotely over oom, will be discontinued at the elementary and middle school levels. nstead, elementary and middle school students must choose between returning to school in person fulltime, or enrolling in a remote, independent study program called dmentum, which is provided by the district. Students on dmentum learn fully independently except for meetings once a week with a district administrator who has been designated as the dmentum coordinator for their school, according to Superintendent iana Rigby. At Carpinteria High School, Cohort C or oom learning will remain available for all students and courses, a decision that was made largely because many students are enrolled in Advanced Placement AP and ual nrollment courses at CHS that are not supported by dmentum. Additionally, special education students districtwide will be able to amend and individuali e their learning plans to best suit their needs. Holly Minear, a parent of a student at Summerland lementary, spoke in support of the move to fully in-person

instruction. “ hile our son’s teacher has done her best to teach students through a camera and a keyboard, this is not the format we know best suits our son’s learning and social-emotional needs,” she said. Ryane Alexander, a parent of a student at Carpinteria Middle School, shared a di erent view. “My youngest daughter is at the middle school and she’s doing great on oom,” Alexander said. “She’s ourishing, she has all As, she is an ama ing student, and feel like giving us the choice for oom and then taking it away doesn’t feel right for our family there’s still a pandemic going on.” “ just feel like we should have the choice,” Alexander continued. “ t’s the end of the school year, there’s a couple months left. think it’s great if kids want to go back, but some kids don’t, and some kids also have anxiety of going back. So, pushing parents to put their kids in class or go on independent study isn’t really a great choice for us t’s not really a choice. She’s doing so well in school right now, so to put her in independent study would be kind of a shame.” Sarah Rochlit er, a teacher at Carpinteria High School, echoed Alexander’s concerns. “ f the whole purpose of this is to make the most e ective teaching and learning for students, then forcing kids to choose between a sub-par online system and returning with anxiety t’s just not an option, it feels forced,” she said. “ t doesn’t feel like a choice, it feels like you’re just being forced.” ay Hotchner, president of CA S , the union representing teachers in C S schools, expressed the need for more community input on the topic. “Simply looking at the attendance at this meeting does much to clarify how hard C S worked to minimi e input and participation and collaboration,” he said. “ magine

“My youngest daughter is at the middle school and she’s doing great on Zoom. She’s flourishing, she has all As, she is an amazing student, and I feel like giving us the choice for Zoom and then taking it away doesn’t feel right for our family; there’s still a pandemic going on.”

–– Ryane Alexander

a decision of this importance being made with so little community input.” aime iamond, the sole board member who would go on to vote against the amended reopening plan, expressed concern that students’ learning would get disrupted by switching between the various learning options. “ ’m concerned that students who are essentially forced into the independent study will get lost in their academics at this point,” she said. Rigby acknowledged the challenge and said that the district is “weighing the benefits of doing in-person instruction and the challenge for teachers to do simultaneous teaching with what we call roomies’ and oomies.’ t’s extremely difficult to teach students who are in person and students who are on oom without having everybody on oom.” Board members Aaron Smith, Sally Green, ayme Bray and Andy Shea er voted in support of the plan. Citing the strain that virtual learning has placed

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on the mental health of many students throughout the pandemic, Shea er said that being back in school is the best thing for students. hen asked how the district reached its conclusion that simultaneous learning with some students on oom was not working e ectively and should be discontinued, Rigby stated that “students perform much better with live teachers and peers in their classrooms” and cited an overall increase in s and Fs at Carpinteria Middle School in Fall 2 2 . hen asked about the success of such learning at Carpinteria High School, Rigby cited the similar drop in grades. Starting Monday, April , all C S students began the remainder of their semester in one of the designated learning options outlined in the amended reopening plan. Rigby said the district will not know the exact total number of students who have chosen to enroll in ndependent Study until the end of this week.

Managing Editor Debra Herrick Graphic Designer Kristyn Whittenton Photographer Robin Karlsson Reporter Odessa Stork Advertising Manager Karina Villarreal Publishers Gary L. Dobbins, Michael VanStry

Coastal View News is locally owned and operated by RMG Ventures, LLC, 4180 Via Real Suite F, Carpinteria, CA 93013, and is published every Thursday. Coastal View News has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of Santa Barbara County, Case No. 210046. Coastal View News assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material.

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8  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Obituaries

Harry Boone Powell 6/24/1928 – 3/1/2021

Harry Boone Powell was born June 24, 1928 in Lake Wales, Florida to Charles Grady Powell and Nora Elizabeth Wingfield. However, he always said he was born in Frostproof, an even smaller town miles south, where his father owned a pharmacy, a men’s clothing store, and orange groves. Harry worked in all three through high school while lettering in three sports and graduating as class aledictorian. His mother gave him bridge lessons at the age of , while his father started him on golf at . Harry always credited his skill at golf and bridge to the early start he got from his parents. His other great parental gift was an abiding respect and love for family history in the Georgia and Florida panhandle, dating back to aniel Boone. He attended anderbilt niversity for two years in pre-med, but in , Florida had no medical school, so Harry, never one to waste time, enrolled in pharmacy at niversity of Florida. He joked that his family produced doctors, pharmacists and preachers and preaching and medicine were out hile at . of Florida he formed a local chapter of appa Psi, the national pharmacy fraternity. He was elected to Florida Blue ey, and won the F duplicate bridge Championship with a Chinese architecture professor, anny, but couldn’t compete in ationals because anny wasn’t a student. Before his last year of pharmacy school, he met on a blind date and followed to California the woman who became his wife of years, oyce Humphrey. Married in , they raised five children in the beach town of Carpinteria, where oyce’s family had a long history. Financed by the Humphreys in buying their first drugstore, alley Rexall rugs, and working -hour weeks, Harry still managed to play golf at Ojai alley nn, where an out-of-town membership cost six dollars a month. Ojai became the site of the third store, followed quickly by three more. n the s, Harry and the Powell family became the face of Rexall Association Clubs. An organi ation which represented , national and international independent retail druggists. Harry organi ed disaster relief and did PR, but his favorite project was an award-winning ational Teen Forum. Rexall sponsored a national patriotic essay contest in each state, the winners of which received a trip to ashington C for a week of sight-seeing, patriotic and business presentations. The outstanding boy and girl, chosen by Rev. Billy Gra-

ham, joined a Rexall People-to-People Pharmaceutical Tour, meeting political and business leaders from the Middle ast and Russia, Poland and C echoslovakia. Such a project would be inconceivable today, but the expectation in was for unending prosperity, co-operation and world peace. Harry served on the Carpinteria lementary School Board and the Santa Barbara County Grand Jury, before he joined Carpinteria business leaders and ranchers in the formation of Casitas ational Bank. The banking business became his first priority as Casitas grew into County Bank with branches and eventually sold to Barclays . Retirement was not in the cards with five children to educate or help finance in their own businesses. ith oyce’s help, he partnered with ack and Rene endinger for years at the sla ista Rexall, where junior Powells and endingers worked behind the cash register with the biggest candy counter in town. Buying candy during exams became known locally as “having a Rexall fit.” All the while Harry found the time to read widely, keep his handicap below , fire up his old charcoal barbecue, and take care of his avocado trees. A chance meeting with a visiting Scottish couple, at and Moira Thomson, led to a lifelong friendship and the purchase of a Flat in St. Andrews with Southern California friends who enjoyed history, gardens, golf, tennis, birding, architecture, single malt Scotch and craft beers. hen Harry served on the Board of Birnam ood, the Powells brought acorns from the famous Birnam ood Oak in Scotland and planted them around the golf course in Montecito. Harry closed out his golfing and banking careers with spots on the Board of a Cumbre Country Club, Santa Barbara Bank and Trust, and partnering with buddy Don Anderson on golf outings, usually with a fair amount of success. He shot his age so many times in later years that he stopped recording it, but could still recount most shots, maintaining that smooth down-the-middle swing into his s. He leaves his beloved wife oyce his sons Larry Powell and Andy Powell (Denise his daughters ebby Bernal Rich , ennifer eSandre and Carolyn Horwald Gary grandchildren, ric Bernal (Alison), Jessie Bernal, Tyler Powell jersti , Garrett Powell, icole Powell, atie Horwald McClenathen Matt , ara Horwald, Jenna Horwald, Grady Powell, es Powell, Haley Powell, endra eSandre Alfredo Soto-Mariscal , and aniel eSandre and six great-grandchildren, Hannah, innea and Ben Bernal, and Ryan, Brooks and Parker ane Powell. He also leaves sisters-in-law Carolyn incaid Henderson and Peggy Hudgens Humphrey a cousin leanor Hamilton acobs his brother im Powell Georgia sister Anne ilson and many beloved nieces and nephews. Although never a student of genealogy, his abiding pride in his family will be his legacy. A private burial will be held at the Carpinteria Memorial Cemetery. Remembrances may be directed to the Carpinteria ducation Foundation, the Carpinteria Historical Society or the charity of your choice.

Pacific Village

Peter Richards 9/19/1957 – 3/25/2021

Peter . Richards, born on Sept. , in afayette, California passed away on March 2 , 2 2 at his home in Carpinteria, where he was cared for by his loving family. Pete was diagnosed in October 2 with squamous-cell carcinoma, and throughout his courageous battle with an aggressive cancer, he remained true to himself- unwaveringly optimistic and unbelievably stoic. Pete’s life story reaches far and wide his light and love have touched so many, the ripple e ect of his embrace for every human he encountered shifting the world for the better. Music, typically as loud as was socially acceptable, existed in every corner of his life. The ocean was and is his spirit’s home. And his family we were it. e were his everything, his purpose, and he made sure we felt it every day. There was nothing he loved more than sharing stories, making others laugh, and turning every occasion possible into a celebration. “ ou only live once,” he would say, and he made his one shot count, big time. Peter was a beloved husband, father, brother and grandfather. He is survived by his wife, aurie, his daughter, Rio, his son, Tanner, and his granddaughter, Opal, as well as his four older brothers, Mike, Chris, oe and Gyani. His incredible humor, love and playfulness will be deeply missed by so many. A local memorial and celebration of his life will be planned at a later date. More information about his memorial can be found at peterdrichards.com.

Michael William Scheck 10/10/1944 – 3/22/2021

t is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Michael illiam Scheck, , of a Conchita, on March 22, 2 2 . He was a beloved husband, brother, uncle and friend. Michael was born at Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital to ictoria and oe Scheck on Oct. , . He spent years in the cosmetology industry, working in notable salons in Beverly Hills and on Montana Avenue in Santa Monica, before moving to a Conchita in . Michael was a founding member of the Gold Coast Card Players Club, now in its th year, where he made many friendships that endure to this day. n addition to gaming, Michael enjoyed gardening, crossword pu les, hiking and his cats. Michael is survived by Ron Oehler of a Conchita, his husband of years brother ohn Scheck of Camarillo and myriad cousins, nieces, nephews and friends. A small graveside family service was held on Monday, April at Conejo Mountain Memorial Park. He will be terribly missed by both family and friends.

Previously published obituaries may be read online at coastalview.com

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Thursday, April 8, 2021  9

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

KARLSSON PHOTOS

Walnut Avenue bungalows are “Looking Good” April is designated as Carpinteria Beautiful Month and the organization has named two bungalows on Walnut Avenue as the month’s recipients of the Looking Good Award. The homes, 539 and 519 Walnut Ave., are owned by Ranell Hansen and date back to 1939. Hansen moved into the house at 539 Walnut Ave. in 1979. “I always had a garden in the back yard, and one year I even had a small chicken coop with three chickens,” she said. “Over the years, because of the drought, we stopped watering our front lawn. I would always plant wild owers in the planters, which would grow if it rained, some years better, some years not so great. But by summer, everything looked pretty bleak.” In 2020, Hansen decided to tear out the lawn and plant drought resistant landscaping. Gardener Janie Ableson had done the drought tolerant landscaping at 519 Walnut a few years earlier “with fabulous results.” She and her crew did the planting and Ableson recommended drought tolerant plants that would bloom most of the year. “The mix of succulents and perennials turned out to be magnificent,” Hansen said. “We are very happy with our makeover, and love to sit on the front porch and enjoy the variety of blooms, the birds it attracts, the lizards, the bees and the comments of people passing by.” Hansen’s family, the Barbers, moved to Carpinteria in 1939. They left Gresham, Nebraska during the Great Depression because there was promise of work in California. Hansen’s aunt, Florence Fine, had moved to Carpinteria previously and sent word to her family to come on out. “My grandfather, Frank Barber, was a carpenter,” Hansen said. “He came to Carpinteria earlier, got work and wrote to my grandmother to sell everything and move here. My mom was 16; she is now 98!” The first house the family lived in upon arriving in Carpinteria was at 539 Walnut Ave. “My mom says that the house was pretty new at the time,” Hansen said. “The cottages in the back had not yet been built, and my Uncle Ike Fine’s step-father, Henry Wilson, built at least one of them.” Back then, living in this little two bedroom, one-bath house, there were eight adults and a baby. As time went

Ranell Hansen s Walnut Avenue bungalows have been in her family since 1939. In recent years, she has replaced the lawn with colorful drought resistant landscaping designed by gardener Janie Ableson. on, family members moved to their own separate homes. Hansen’s grandfather built two houses on 8th Street, one for her grandmother and one for her aunt. “Over the years he also helped other family members build homes on Vallecito Road, Vallecito Place and Calle Ocho,” Hansen said. By 1965, Ranell Hansen’s father, George Hansen had been working for Carpinteria Plumbing for roughly 20 years. When his boss, Buzz Gann, retired, he bought the business. “At that time the plumbing shop was located behind Ralph’s Market, (now Guicho’s Eatery) and Ralph Walsh owned the building with Rollie Mac Intyre,” Hansen said. “Nadine Walsh wanted to open a ower shop behind the store, so my dad needed to relocate his business. He purchased the property at 539 Walnut and converted the garages in the back into o ces and storage for Carpinteria Plumbing which still occupies the space today and is owned by Oscar Loretto.”

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Carpinteria has a new onor ry re ter

Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Protection District recognized longtime supporter, DJ Mora, at a special ceremony at Fire Station 61 on April 1. DJ was given honorary firefighter status and CSFP Firefighters presented him with a helmet at the small event attended to by his close friends and family. DJ is moving to Plano, Texas with his mother. He has been visiting Carpinteria’s fire stations since he was a toddler, checking out the fire engines and talking with the firefighters. “We wish he and his mom much luck with their move and new home. will definitely be missed!” said Rob Rappaport, CSFP fire marshal.

DJ Mora was recognized at a special ceremony at the fire station.


10  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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The Alcazar Theatre is holding a contest to gather some of Carpinteria’s funniest videos, and community members are invited to send in video submissions of themselves, friends, family or pets that will make Carpinteria laugh out loud. Submissions should be sent to carpsfunniest thealca ar.org. ideos must be seconds or less and will be posted on the Alca ar Theatre’s Facebook page. The video with the most likes wins the contest. isit thealca ar.org for o cial rules.

Carpinteria Library announces Storywalk event, expands Grab N Go hours

The Santa Barbara Public ibrary will hold a Storywalk at the Carpinteria Children’s Project on April from to p.m. The featured children’s book is Senorita Mariposa by author Ben Gundersheimer, and pages of the book and corresponding activities will be printed on large standing signs that children can follow along a path. All participants will take home a free activity kit when they are finished. o registration is required for the Storywalk families can drop in. Participants must follow social distancing guidelines and remain feet apart from other groups. Masks are required for everyone at all times except children under two. Additionally, the Carpinteria ibrary announced that they will expand Grab Go hours starting Tuesday, April . Moving forward, the hours will be Tuesday and Thursday from 2 to p.m. and Saturday from a.m. to p.m. Call to learn more.

#CarpCares BY INGRID BOSTROM

For many, this past year has been a reminder that Carpinteria has a deeply rooted culture of caring. In week six of her 10-week series, photographer Ingrid Bostrom captures portraits of some of Carpinteria’s most compassionate citizens. Becki orton and anielle Bordenave were nominated by Terri Simber “for starting a community adventure of positivity, kindness, joy and new friendships during a di cult time.”

BECKI NORTON was visiting Homer, Alaska when she found a beautifully painted rock with a note on the bottom about carrying on the kindness rock project (by painting one’s own rocks and leaving them outside for others to find . She was inspired to begin painting rocks to leave around Carpinteria, which became a project and Facebook page known as “CARP ROC S ” orton has been grateful for the many connections built through the project, along with “a creative outlet it brings that is literally grounding. t brings joy and excitement to my inner child when hide or find rocks,” orton said. orton has been delighted to hear about kids begging their parents to take them out for walks to hunt for painted rocks.

DANIELLE BORDENAVE found her first painted rock on Feb. , 2 2 on inden Avenue and learned that it was placed there by orton. ithin a day, Bordenave was at orton’s house learning how to join along with the project. Since that day, she has painted and hid over 2, rocks around Carpinteria. The project “is about spreading joy and kindness. love when people find a rock and it brings a smile to their face. ith all that is going on in the world, love that simply a sweet rock can make someone’s day,” Bordenave said. The growing CARP ROC S “caterpillar” lining the sidewalk of inden Avenue has been a hit with my -year-old son and provides us with an easy outing while keeping close to home. hen the past year has kept many caught between a rock and a hard place, colorful rocks with encouraging messages are a welcome diversion Know someone who is giving back in a powerful way or bringing joy to others? Send nominations to ingrid@ingridbostromphotography.com.

Sierra Mayoral crowned champion of Poetry Out Loud contest

S i e r r a Mayoral of Carpinteria High School was selected to represent Santa Barbara County at the statewide Poetry Out oud competition after she was crowned the champion at the Santa Barbara County competition, presented by Cora n del Pueblo. “Sharing stories through the arts, such as poetry, gives us the ability to connect with people. uring this time where a lot of us are missing human connection, Poetry Out oud has given me the opportunity to connect with other people that love storytelling as much as do,” Mayoral said. An initiative of the ational ndowment for the Arts, administered statewide by the California Arts Council and locally by the County O ce of Arts and Culture, Poetry Out oud encourages high school students to learn about poetry through memorization, performance and competition. Participants master public speaking skills, build self-confidence and learn about literary history and contemporary life.

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Thursday, April 8, 2021  11

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

THIS WEEK:

What we offer:

Gallery host volunteers Chris Fredericks and Ed Ransford purchase the new photography book “Carrizo Plain” from nature photojournalist Chuck Graham.

Arts Center concludes Through the Lens exhibit; calls for gallery host volunteers

The last days of the “Through the Lens” photography exhibit in the Charles Lo Bue gallery at the Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center are on April 10 and 11 this weekend. On Friday, April 9, three artists will be present for Feature Artist Fridays. Jewelry artist Susan Steindler will be at the event from 10 a.m. to noon, Marcia McNally will be there from noon to 2 p.m. and photographer Christina Gessler will be there from 2 to 4 p.m. The Arts Center is also looking for more gallery host volunteers to join the team. There will be a new host training session on April 9 from 1 to 2 p.m., and another training opportunity on April 16 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more information, contact operations manager Kristina Calkins at kristina@carpinteriaartscenter.org or call (805) 684-7789.

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Artist Lauren Graf featured in upcoming Cal Lutheran University exhibition

Carpinterian and Cal Lutheran University senior Lauren Graf will show several of her mixed-media artworks in the upcoming virtual show “Escapism,” which explores the outlets that Cal Lutheran’s graduating art majors sought to escape their isolation under the pandemic. “I found myself turning to movies, books and tabletop games to transport to other worlds during a time where I hardly even left my house,” Graf said. “I realized just how much these stories were sustaining me and helping me cope with everything going on. I then started making art to dive deeper into these stories I cherished, drawing my favorite characters from Shakespeare or creating imaginary book covers to use my art as a tool of escapism.” The virtual exhibit opens April 12 Lauren Graf drew inspiration from and will run through September 30. movies, books and tabletop games The featured students will discuss to create pieces for the upcoming and answer questions about their “Escapism” exhibition. This mixed-media work during a webinar on Friday, book cover combines acrylic paint and April 23 at 2 p.m. Cal Lutheran’s art digital art. department and Rolland Gallery are sponsoring the free exhibit, which can be found at RollandGallery.CalLutheran.edu. To attend the April 23 Artist Talks, go to RollandGallery.CalLutheran.edu/events.

Girls Inc. hosts Yoga and Gardening Workshop Girls Inc. of Carpinteria is holding a Yoga and Gardening Workshop in partnership with instructor Kylie Wagner, and welcomes girls from the community to join in on the six-session workshop. Sessions take place Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 to 5 p.m. and the workshop will run from April 13 to April 29. To register, email erica@girlsinc-carp.org or call (805) 684-6364. The workshop fee is $100 and the membership fee is $35.

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12  Thursday, April 8, 2021

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Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Rincon Mountain Winery matures to tasting room and wine club

MADE IN CARPINTERIA B R E N D A TA N Opening a wine tasting room in Carpinteria was no quick endeavor for the folks behind Rincon Mountain Winery, located in the west end business district of Carpinteria Avenue. Owned by Jill and Edward Darren Siple, Rincon Mountain Winery’s grapes take three years to mature from the time they are planted. The Siples planted their grapes in 2012 and harvested them in 2015. After harvesting, the grapes were stored in barrels for two additional years. By 2018, the wine was ready for sale and in 2020, the Siples opened their tasting room. Jill runs the business and Edward is in charge of the winemaking process. The vision for the business started when Edward’s father planted a vineyard at Rincon Mountain 30 years ago. His father encouraged him to study winemaking in college before returning to open the winery. After graduating, Edward completed a harvest internship at L’Aventure Winery in Paso Robles. “When my dad started the winery, I didn’t know anything and got a very rough crash course early on,” Edward said. “I was initially drawn in by the fermentation process – the microscopic organisms that turn sugar into alcohol. I loved the science behind it and trying to understand it more got me excited to make wine. As I learned more, I came to appreciate the artistic side of winemaking, the taste and the craft that goes into it. I learned about how where your fruits come from and how they are grown changes its composition. I learned about all the details that go into making wine.”

Jill Siple runs the business side of Rincon Mountain Winery and her husband Edward leads the winemaking process. It was in college where Edward would meet his future wife, Jill, who at the time wanted to be a teacher. “My father-inlaw decided that I could do the business side of the winery and I thought I would give it a try,” Jill said. “I come from a city background, so I didn’t understand how to run a business or do agriculture, but it was exciting to see it happen, and I wanted to be a part of it. As I was thrown into the business, I realized that I enjoyed it.” When Rincon Mountain Winery opened in 2018, it was more of a wordof-mouth a air. Customers could opt for di erent club tiers, the most basic tier being the three-bottle club. Each member is invited up to Rincon Mountain to pick up their wine at private events, and to

eat wood-fire pi a, sample unreleased or rare wines and enjoy the view. Guests at the events are allowed to bring their friends and meet the winemaking team. “When people come here, it’s like they are part of the family,” Jill said. “My husband pours the wines at these events so people

can ask him their questions about how he makes it.” The Siples opened the tasting room to allow more people to taste their wine, and they also wanted to get to know their customers better. “To be interested, people need to know who is making the wine or why it is special,” Jill said. “If people come to the tasting room, they can pick my brain about the wine and I can ask about them and their family. I love being around people drinking wine, relaxing and chatting about life and wine, I get to develop friendships with people when they come in ... Since opening, so many people have come in and expressed their gratitude to have a winery in Carpinteria. I’m glad we chose to open our wine tasting room here.” With the impressive achievement of opening a wine tasting room during a pandemic under their belt, the Siples now have ambitious plans for the future. Edward wants to replant the vineyard his father planted 30 years ago. Additionally, the Siples make their own beer with ingredients from their Rincon ranch such as edible owers, citrus fruits and macadamia nuts. They also own a farm in Paso Robles where they grow grapes, hops and grains that they hope to use in craft beers in the near future. They plan on opening a bottle shop for beer next to their wine tasting room. To learn more about Rincon Mountain Winery, visit rinconmtn.com or stop by the tasting room at 4187 Carpinteria Ave., Suite 1 and 2. Brenda Tan is a columnist and a freelance writer. She is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in English, Writing and Literature, and Art History with an emphasis in Museum Studies at UCSB. She can be reached at brendatan321@gmail.com.

Edward Siple carries on a tradition of winemaking that his father started with a vineyard on Rincon Mountain 30 years ago.

Rincon Mountain Winery’s Carpinteria tasting room has outdoor seating that allows for fresh air and social distancing.


Thursday, April 8, 2021  13

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Crews continue major highway repair and renovation

Over the next several weeks, crews will be finishing up work on southbound Highway in Carpinteria and then shift lanes onto the new median and southbound areas. The work comes as part of the ongoing Highway Carpinteria to Santa Barbara project, undertaken by Caltrans and the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments SBCAG to add a new carpool lane in each direction between Carpinteria and Santa Barbara. The current repairs will prepare for the next stage of construction on the mountainside of the freeway. Through April , residents can expect alternating closures of southbound and northbound freeway ramps in Carpinteria at night. On the orthbound Highway , stretches from Bailard Avenue to Santa Claus ane and from orth Padaro ane to She eld rive will be reduced to one lane from p.m. to a.m. on Sunday nights. Additionally, those same stretches will be reduced to one lane Monday through Thursday nights from p.m. to a.m. On the Southbound Highway , stretches from She eld rive to orth Padaro ane and from Santa Claus ane to Bailard Avenue will be reduced to one lane from p.m. to a.m. These same stretches will also be reduced to one lane Monday through Thursday from p.m. to a.m. n both directions, alternating on-and o -ramps will be closed while the nightly construction takes place. These ramps include Carpinteria Avenue, Reynolds Avenue, inden Avenue, Casitas Pass Road and Bailard Avenue. n both directions, consecutive on- and o -ramps in the same direction will not be closed at the same time. rivers are instructed to use the ramp before or after each closure. n Carpinteria, crews are finishing up work on the southbound side in preparation for shifting lanes. On the northbound side, once tra c is switched, crews will begin breaking up old pavement to prepare for upcoming work on new freeway lanes. On the Santa Monica Road ramps, crews will construct temporary ramp improvements to prepare for the next stage of work where freeway lanes are shifted

Crews at the Sheffield Drive interchange are working on the retaining walls, temporary supports and bridge span. toward the southbound side. At Franklin and Santa Monica Creek Bridges, crews are working on finishing the safety barriers. Along inden Avenue and Casitas Pass Road, the landscaping contractor is planting and mulching. n the Summerland segment between She eld rive and orth Padaro ane, crews are working on upcoming median and lane improvements, installing underground storm drains and paving the asphalt base layer for upcoming Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement later this spring. At the She eld rive interchange, they will continue working on the retaining walls, temporary supports and bridge span. To view a complete list of closures including detour maps, visit SBROA S. com and select the project segment.

The current repairs are part of the ongoing project to add a new carpool lane in each direction between Carpinteria and Santa Barbara.

Highway renovation project leaders work to protect double crested cormorants

DAVID LEVASHEFF

Double crested cormorants have seasonally nested along southbound Highway 101 near Sheffield Drive since 2013.

The Highway Carpinteria to Santa Barbara project is primarily intended to address tra c congestion and safety on Highway , but project sta have also had to make a unique environmental consideration as they begin construction. The project has employed measures to balance e ective freeway construction with environmental protections specifically related to double crested cormorants, a protected bird species that has seasonally nested along southbound Highway near She eld rive since 2 . The project leaders recently increased the frequency of air blasts due to the increased nesting activity of the cormorants with the goal to encourage nesting outside the construction area. nfortunately, the increased frequency has had an unintended negative impact on the surrounding neighbors. n working with the project team biologists, and in collaboration with project partners, the project will be taking several steps. First, they are shifting the focus of the habitat protection and nesting deterrence plan to rely more heavily on visual deterrents and human presence in the area. This is to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of air blasts to the benefit of project neighbors, while still being e ective in encouraging cormorants to nest outside

the construction one. People can expect to see biologists monitoring the area daily, and see tree crews rotating visual deterrents. Climbers will also be switching out the use of Mylar ash tape for other visual deterrents, including owl silhouettes. Project biologists will be on-site daily through April conducting monitoring activities and maintaining visual deterrents. Additional monitoring will continue throughout the nesting season, likely into September. “Our priorities are to build this important project, protect the environment and be a good neighbor. This is a challenging situation with many variables to consider. e are refocusing our e orts to be a better neighbor and will continue to make sure we are e ective. t is also important to keep in mind that if this plan doesn’t work, we could be looking at an additional year of construction and cost to taxpayers up to million,” said oe rwin, Highway Corridor Manager at Caltrans istrict . Biologists have been monitoring the cormorants and their nest counts since 2 . As part of the highway improve-

ments, a bird deterrent and protection plan was created by state and independent biologists focused on the cormorants. Avoidance and minimi ation measures were created as part of the 2 nvironmental mpact Report, supplemented with a atural nvironment Study in 2 , and approved by the California epartment of Fish and ildlife. The multi-tiered plan began with monitoring, then removal of old nests outside of nesting season when birds were not present, visual deterrents such as predator balloons , and auditory deterrents prior to and during nesting season. The goal is to protect the habitat area in the long-term, but temporarily encourage birds to find suitable nesting areas outside of the construction one. This will reduce the potential for construction to impact nesting birds and their young. The Highway Carpinteria to Santa Barbara improvements represent a significant component of the overall solution to address tra c congestion by adding new peak-period carpool lanes and enhancements to improve freeway operations. For more information, visit SBROA S.com.


14  Thursday, April 8, 2021 Spotlight on Carpinteria photographers In this weekly series, local photographers share their recent work and inspiration with CVN readers.

Moments in time PHOTOS BY MIGUEL BERNAL

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California Palm trees abound in Carpinteria. I like to think of them as giants with a mission to guard and beautify our precious city.

I spe nt my ch i ldh ood i nt er act i ng wi t h nat ur e. M y lov e fo r t h e lands cap e and all t h i ngs t h at li v e i n i t led me t o p h ot ogr aph y. I enjo y cap t ur i ng i mage s t h at p or t r ay t h e nat u r al b eau t y ar ou nd m e and I lov e h ow t h ey p r es er v e wh at wou ld ot h er wi s e b e los t i n t i me : mo me nt s t h at f r om t h e t i me of capt ur e woul d no longe r ex i s t a f r act i on of a s econd lat er . Fo r t h e ar t i st at h ear t , C ar p i nt er i a of f er s coun t les s op po r t un i t i es t o f eed our cr eat i v i t y r egar dles s of t h e ch os en subje ct or wh i ch ar t f or m w e p r ef er .

Beautiful soft light is cast over one of the most iconic rock formations in Carpinteria at twilight. ABOVE, One of the most iconic trees in Carpinteria serves as a rest stop to a falcon and a companion. BELOW, A long exposure gives the moving surf a foglike appearance, emphasizing the main subject.

A bee is hard at work collecting hone in redients at a ower ed near the railroad tracks.

BELOW, I found this wood log at the beach while photographing with my friend Glenn Dubock and wasted no time to capture this image.

Sycamore trees

ro in the world s sa est beach is in Carpinteria.


Thursday, April 8, 2021  15

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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Coastal View News 2021

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High surf and clouds add drama to a different take o these ma nificent rocks

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16  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Open for Business BY ODESSA STORK

The heart of Carpinteria is in its local and family-owned businesses, but it’s also in the strength and giving spirit of the community. One year into the Covid-19 pandemic, local businesses are still in need of community support. In this special edition of Open for Business, we spotlight some of Carpinteria’s local farmers and the work that they do in bringing fresh produce, goods and more to the community, county and beyond.

Sweet Mountaintop Farm

Alex Frecker owns Frecker Farms, where this year’s crop of strawberries is just starting to grow.

Frecker Farms

Frecker Farms is a certified organic farm growing over 40 varieties of produce on 35 acres of land year-round, from lettuce, kale, chard and cabbage to watermelon, strawberries, avocados and much more. When Alex Frecker founded Frecker Farms in 2013, it took up just three acres. Since then, the farm has grown tremendously both in scale and community impact. Today, Frecker Farms plays a fundamental role in bringing fresh, local organic fruits and vegetables to Santa Barbara and Los Angeles counties, supplying local distribution chains with quality produce. Every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Frecker Farms hosts a Farm Stand event where the public can visit the farm and take home fresh produce. You can also find them at the Carpinteria Farmers’ Market every Thursday from 3 to 6 p.m. Frecker Farms is located at 6701 Casitas Pass Road. Call (805) 455-2033 and visit freckerfarms.com to learn more about how and where you can find Frecker Farms products.

Owner, farmer and creator Mary Gonzales leads Sweet Mountaintop Farm.

Situated between Rincon Mountain’s many avocado orchards, Sweet Mountaintop Farm grows 100% of their own herbs and flowers which are then used to create herbal tinctures, tea blends, skin toners, herbal infused body oil and salve, flower garlands and more. Led by owner, farmer and creator Mary Gonzalez, Sweet Mountaintop Farm is a non-certified organic farm with a commitment to beyond-organic practices that are kind to both customers and the earth. Working alongside Gonzales are production manager Katie Bloom and farm hand Sarah Plath. Visit sweetmountaintop.com to shop a selection of herbal remedies, skincare items and more. Aside from the online store, Sweet Mountaintop Farm also sells their products at the Santa Barbara Farmers’ Market on Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. each week, and their tinctures can be found at Pacific Health Foods in Carpinteria.

Red Hen Cannery

NELLIE ENGLE

Maureen Foley Claffey owns Red Hen Cannery.

Award-winning, farm-to-jar fruit preserves company Red Hen Cannery uses family recipes and local fruits and herbs from Foley Farm and Bailard Ranch to produce delicious jams and marmalades. Led by Maureen Foley Claffey, Red Hen Cannery is the latest offshoot of a family farm operation that has run in Carpinteria since the 1860s. Their marmalades have won gold, silver and bronze roundels at the international Dalemain Marmalade Awards, and in 2017 their Heirloom Tomato and Spice Jam won a national Good Food Award. Red Hen Cannery preserves are sold at the Santa Barbara Downtown Farmers’ Market every other Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Claffey is hopeful that Montecito Farmers’ Market appearances are soon to come every other Friday. Online orders are temporarily paused due to a national canning jar shortage, but customers can visit redhencannery.com to learn more about the business.


Thursday, April 8, 2021  17

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Rancho Santa Cecilia specializes in exotic fruits, including a variety of avocados.

Rancho Santa Cecilia

Rancho Santa Cecilia is a local, family-owned and operated farm specializing in growing varieties of avocados, sweet tangerines, limes, lemons and other various citruses. They also pride themselves on growing quality exotic fruits and flowers including passion fruit, cherimoyas, persimmons, guavas and more. Among the varieties of avocados grown at Rancho Santa Cecilia are Hass, Fuerte, Reed, Zutano and many more. Led by the Marquez Family since 1999, Rancho Santa Cecilia fruits can be found at Farmers’ Markets across the state including the Santa Barbara Farmers’ Market. Customers can shop exotic fruits at ranchosantaceciliafruits.com and call (805) 566-1086 for more information. Rancho Santa Cecilia also posts updates to their Facebook page @RSCfarm and on Instagram @ranchosantacecilia.

Canzelle Alpacas is home to over 40 award-winning alpacas.

Canzelle Alpacas

Canzelle Alpacas is home to a high-achieving herd of over 40 award-winning alpacas who live a life of luxury in the foothills above Carpinteria. These adorable, intelligent creatures are sheared once a year or so for their fur, which can be used to create many different products while also making sure the alpacas stay cool and shed their heavy winter coat for the summer – a win-win for everybody involved. Canzelle Alpacas is owned and operated by the Lonson family, who began growing their business in Carpinteria in 2002. In addition to an on-site store with an array of alpaca-themed goods and souvenirs, Canzelle Alpacas is currently offering private tours where visitors can get up close and personal with the herd and get a taste of life on the farm. Canzelle Alpacas is located at 4036 Foothill Rd., and visitors must book their tour ahead of time at canzelle.com.

Pete’s

Pete Overgaag is the executive VP of strategy and innovation at Pete’s.

Pete’s produces high-quality, great-tasting sustainable greens out of their Carpinteria greenhouse. The farm is employee-owned and operated with a passion for people and the planet – Their hydroponic greenhouse uses 90% less land and water than field-grown greens, and Pete’s has donated 25,000 pounds of lettuce and counting to local food banks, according to their website. Pete’s living lettuce and cress are still connected to their roots when packaged and sold, ensuring maximum freshness. Executive VP of Strategy and Innovation Pete Overgaag comes from a long line of greenhouse growers. His father and the rest of the Overgaag family immigrated to Santa Barbara County from Holland in 1968 and have since established themselves as some of the finest cut flower and produce growers in the area. Pete’s products can be found in local grocery stores and markets. Visit eatpetes.com to learn more.

THURS.

FRI.

SAT.

HIGH: 71 LOW: 51

HIGH: 71 LOW: 54

HIGH: 72 LOW: 54

SUN.

MON.

TUES.

HIGH: 70 LOW: 53

HIGH: 68 LOW: 51

HIGH: 67 HIGH: 68 LOW: 51 LOW: 52

SURF & TIDES SURF DIRECTION WIND

SUNDAY Sunrise: 6:32 am • Sunset: 7:24 pm

THURS

FRI

SAT

SUN

MON

2-3 ft WSW 10mph/W

2-3 ft

2-3 ft

2 ft

1-2 ft

W 4mph/SW

W

WED.

W

W

3mph/WSW 9mph/WSW 6mph/W

TUES 1-2 ft

W

4mph/SSW


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A reader sends a halo to Mike Wondolowski for creating a most A r eader s ends a h alo t o article Bu r l e n in e f or m ak i ng t h e C ar p i nt er i a Lu m b er amusing April Fool’s Day CVN. alot ot ov i t s h i t e . “ genr H er ouo u t g s oip nger s p o ern s f onali or p ayi yarA dr eader N u r s ers ends y ar eaaah j oy t y ( ngS ou f ort h ert h ne r yle) eader ’ endly s gas wh eners h s ate f i or g and ot h erp lant A T M k nowledg car d at t eh m e gak ase si t t ata p i on. s t , f r i conv on leas “I u ’ r m e A reader sends a halo to Cathy and Mark for a beautiful day. “You’ve sov r i sr y I and ch oss h eopt h e.” mo s t ex p ens i v e oi l, I ’ d lov e t o r ei mb u r s e you , and t o i t done it again, thank you.” t h ank yo u . I ’ m de ep ly mo v ed b y you r g ener os i t y.” A reader r eader sends s ends aa h halo alo t to o SeBart a n Dickens a n d Da y n Innovations a f or b ei ng wonder f u lprofessional nei g h b or s and h elp i ng A for their work. r eader a h m alo t h e r eader t h r ou g h A anot h er s f ends r az z led om t os t i h t u e at9301 i on. F u n d , Un c l e C h en Res t au r an t and Mar ybeth C ar ty fo r t h e s ur p r i s e deli v er y of a deli ci ou s di nner comp let e wi t h a A reader sends a halo to Abel at Beach Motors for helping her after his shop was fo r t eader un e cook i e, candy b t aro and ntn y ed l lef k i ndnes and qu i t on e a i t nh r t i h ll!e” Aclosed s ends a h alo t h e a p n aio “I m or ock u ins . ap “W e desperate r s onder o n wh f u oplace t aand $ 1 0 s 0he donat when her car overheated. was took i the time P of Carpinteria offi ce mail slot this past week. “Thank you for your kindness.” to help me even though his shop had already closed. Sometimes angels look like A r eader s ends a h alo t o t h e s t a f f o f J a c k ’s Bi s t r o f or s t ayi ng op en du r i ng C omechanics!” 19. “Al waysa ah alo smi t olet h no mat y k t era s h f orowalways b us y. A b eigr ngeatt h way t t h t h e anyt day.” h i ng and A v i r d-eader s ends e Da er e t ot oh s elpt ar wi nev er com p lai ni ng . “ M any t h ank s t o t h e b es t nei g h b or s ev er . W e lov e you all dear ly.” A reader sends a halo to all CUSD teachers and staff who showed up for their stuA r eader se nds a h alo t o Mayor Wad e No m u r a for the city’s beautiful flower wreath dents for the return to in-person school. “ ou make the di erence in our children h e Car s pi ends nt er ai ah Cealomet o t Taer y p r s ogf orr am.t h ei r cons t ant s m i les and A at r t eader m f i ora n t d h eJ o M h emn oat r R i al ob D i t ay ai lle’ we need more of you!” over-the-top customer service. “The wedding favors were loved by all and brought o s t e lew weddi h o ac ng know ! ” l edg p eop le wi t h di s ab i li t i es . “Wh en aA bi r eader t of C ars ends p i nt erai ah alo t o t h t oe St h eat A reader sends a halo to Jaime Diamond for being “the voice of students and families.” you encoun t er a pe r so n i n a wh eelch ai r or walki ng wi t h a walk er , p leas e s m i le and ello st oends t h at ape h r alo so n.”t o La n c e La w h o n at t h e C ar p i nt er i a S ani t at i on D i s t r i ct f or A sayr h eader A reader sends a halo to Mark at the Carpinteria Cemetery district for all his help h elp i ng K i m ’ s M ar k et . and kindness at the reader’s mother’s burial and grave site. A r eader se nds a h alo t o t h e C ar pi nt er i a Beau t i f u l l ad y p i ck i ng u p t r as h i n a nei g h h ood snear eacht o. K“T a h s ank t h eSpot. h elp we can g the et k roof-top eep i ng t fl r asagh A bo r r eader ends t h aeh b alo s a n d you r a ! Q W u i en tneed e r o atallThe “When A reader sends a pitchfork to the people who leave dog poop all over pi cke t wi d up s i t ednand t h e lodg nei gh edb ori nh t oods t r ack was h e r ai on n g t u h t et erb , each Q u i - nts i erdeoofj u m t h p eed i nt s o.” act i on and cli m b ed the sidewalks and planters on Linden Avenue. “Gross.” up t o t h e r oof and u nt ang led i t s o t h at i t cou ld wav e f r eely. W ay t o s h ow p at r i ot i s m ! ” A r eader se nds a h alo t o C ar p i nt er i ans wh o -p ut out b ox es i n f r ont of t h ei r h ome s A reader sends a pitchfork to people who leaf blow their yards into l of su s r ends p lus ora h ang e t s, o Em av ocados ei r t raees . “T h ank you f orng s , h g arr eat i ng f ood, you r A ful r eader alo m a a n ,d etJ u c.s ft ri n om . “ I t t h was wonder f u l weddi other yards or the street and don’t clean up. dance.” s abp unect acu lar locat i on and g r eat p eop le! I t was m ov i ng and wonder f u l.” eader s s ends ends aa h h alo alo t t oo Ni allk t h k e i at beac h AT c om Culinary. m uni t y “I r es went i d en to t s .my “T h fiank you f this or p weekar k i ng A A r r eader rst class i n fr wi ontt h Submit ofm you om, ewh wi r p t oer f mi ou t r .” s o Pitchforks online at t coastalview.com. end y s r i s t h erHalos o h t& ash you b een f ar . I h ad h e b es t t i m e! S om eone g et t h i s girl a T show, she should be on the Food etwork already.” All submissions are subject to editing. A r eader s ends a h alo t o Di an , a car egi v er at C ar p i nt er i a S eni or Lodg e f or near ly years s ends . A t h r ee eader a h alo t o t h e C a l i f o r n i a De p a r t m e n t o f F i s h a n d Wi l d l i f e and t h e l o c a l v e t f or wor k i ng di li g ent ly t o s av e t h e R i ncon B each b ear . “ I t ’ s a t er r i b le s h am e by Margie E. Burke The Weekly Crossword r eader s endscent a h creatures alo t o Tom however, Sw eny f or g oi ng want ou t on A v enu to lose one ofA these magnifi I wouldn’t it toE lmsuffer to ae 3 4 up 5p las t i c b 6ot t les7 , b ag 8 s ,d 9 i r t y g lov10 es 11 and 12 m as 13 k s . m ACROSS i s er abl e deatby h t .” h e be1 ach 2 t o clean 1 Not quite right 14 15 16 A r aeader i n g ngzo n t h es ei. r “A S atllu t h r day e “n o A 6r eader s ends h alo st oends Bi l l aa p n i d t chRof ors a k n t a oSwt h e i new g f orpar s p k endi t akp ari ngk Fencing sword photos for Junior Warriors Football. “We appreciate all you do for our families, i ng / t wo h ou r ” s i g ns j u s t m ade p eop le p ar k i n m y nei g h b or h ood. S evplayent h 18 19 17 10 Burglar's take er14s and r og r and ama . t Y h oue nei r ockgh ! b ” or i ng s t r eet s ar e a p acke d p ar k i ng lot .” Two p make 20 21 22 diameter eader ends i t cht of or sc e f orw hocom l i i ed ng ou ont t ear h ei ly r 24 F S A at F u S r A day and Wartime partner A A 15r r eader s s ends aah palo DJ k H t oe c t k h t o i 23 m ort ook ni ngs cht oolar s u p s p h ori p t s away r f om i k ds w h o need i t . 16 Gawk at t h e J u ni or W ar r i or s . “ 25I t m 26 ade 27 t h e k i ds s o h ap p y t o h 28ear you s ay t h ei r nam es — you ’ r e Market a17local celebindicator r i t y t o t h em ! ” 18 Here Submit or there Halos & Pitchforks online at coastalview.com. 29 30 31 32 33 34 20 Theater back-a h alo t o Di a n a Ri g b y , S u p er i nt endent of s ch ools , and De b r a H e r A r eader s ends All35submissions are subject to editing. 38 36 37 r i c k drop , director of oys irls Club, for removing the toxic uphorbia fire sticks from 44 40 41 42 43 t 22 h e One p ot s taking and lands cap 39e. h e f ou nd a s m all b ag g i e cont ai ni ng a supe orders nded. T h e man was ci t ed, and h i s 47 to rest y s u b s t ance u nder neat h v 23 eh ____ i cle was r elease d t o a li cens ed45dr i v er . wh i t e p owder 46 24 Suede outfit? t h e dr i v er ’ s 51s eat of h i s r ecent ly p u r ch as ed 48 49 50 25RECORDS Joshua • POSTERS • VINYL • THEMED eh i cle. T h e m an s APPAREL t at ed h e p u &r chMORE! as ed t h e 2:37 a.m. tree / Public Intoxication / WALL v ART 52 53three weeks ago but 54 didn’t 55 56 habitat vehicle find Bailard Avenue 28T Old West t h e s a m l l b ag g i e u nt i l h e’ d r em ov ed th e wo me n wer e cont 59 57 act ed i n a p ar ke d 58 driver’s seat to fix the reclining mechat r u ckchasers and b ot h wer e ex t r em ely i nt ox i 29 ed Caribou 62 60 ai ner s of alcoh ol 61 ni s m . T h e i nci dent was docu m ent ed, and cat wi t h kin op en cont 30 Branch ob s er v ed i of n t h e v eh 63 i cle. One m an was 64 t h e b ag g i e was b ook 65ed i nt o S ant a B ar b ar a property for destruction. not philosophy be i ng t h e mo s t coop er at i v 5285 e, b ut Carpinteria once Sheriff’s Avenueffi•ce805-318-55O6 Animal house? 2021 by The Puzzle Syndicate h 35 e was conv i nced t o ex i t t h e v Mon-Sat: eh i cle, a 10am-8pm Copyright • Sun: 10am-4pm pa37 t Polished down se off ar ch of h i s p er s on was conSaturday, May 23 38 ct"Star Place to trade 50 Comedian's job du ed. Wars" D ep u t i es locat2ed a collap s i b le 36 Answer 5:49 a.m. / Domestic captain 3 Anagram for 40 Excavation find 51 Violence Smelling of /suds bat on i n t h e man ’ s f r ont wai s t b and. H e 4100 block 39 Scatter among aide 41 Like OR Via Real 53 Like bachelor was ci t ed and b ot h wer e r eleas ed t o a D instruments ep ut i es r es p onded t parties o a mo t el on V i a 44 It paves the way 4 Unattached so be r fr i end. Re42al"Quit f or it!" a r ep or t of a54domWord e s t after i c v i olence 45 Arrive, as dark5 One way to gray i 43 nci Printing dent . U error p on ar r i v al,oraplay dep u t y conness pitch Friday, May 22 6 Lightened (up) t 47 act Still ed atoo mangreen and wom55 an It may i n t h be e p pitched ar k i ng 46 School-skipper 48 Desk accessory 7 Story element 48. Refine, as ore lot A f t er cont act i ng 56 b ot Circular h s u b j ectcurrent s , t h er e 7:41 a.m. / Theft / 5500 block Calle 51 Word in a Lady 8 Colonnade tree 49 Bocelli, fori njone 58 b Lend wer e v i s i b le u r i es on ot h p aarhand t i es . D u e Arena to conflicting statements regarding their D Gaga ep u t i film es r estitle p onded 9 af t Optical er a womsolution an r e10 bPart u al alt er cat i on and ob v i ou s i nj u r i es , p 52 or Elie t ed h Wiesel's er r es i dence was u r g of lar ai z pope's ed t h e mut "Night" is one title h p ar t i es wer e ar r es t ed f or cor p or al pr i or ni gh t . T h e woman s t at ed a car t oon b ot Answers to Last Week's Crossword: upm i lk and t ools 11 wer Playing i nj ur y on a s p ou s e. of53almSplit ond e t ak marble en f r om S M O G G E E S E S P A N worry h 57 er Pronounce g ar ag e. S h e t old t h 12 e r epWorrier's or t i ng dep u ty H A U L E L V E S P A N E 10:36 a.m. / Hit and Run / Cameo t h at distinctly t h e t ools b elonge d13t oSuspicious h er daugh t er ’ s A N T E C E D E N T O N T O bo59yfTuckered r i end. T h out e dep ut y19 at t O'Keeffe emp t ed t subject o conand Casitas Pass roads R O G E R E N T E R T A I N 60 End of a winning 21 Place to build t act t h e m an v i a t elep h one m u lt i p le t i m es D ep ut i es r es p onded t o a r ep or t a of a P R O C E S S R O O M wi t h streak no r es p ons e. T h e24 womHard an drinker s t at ed h er b lack s edan cr as h i ng i nt o a p ar k ed wat er L A T T E R S N A C K 61 Tall tale teller 25 Supermarket g ar ag e door was u nlock ed du r i ng t h e t r u ck . W h i le en r ou t e, i t was als o r ep or t ed A S S U M E D A L E H U E overi s i n t h e p r ocessection ni62gh Flip t and s of ge t t i ng a the male subject driving the sedan fled B L O B E L E G Y P A T E 63 Genealogy new lock. Sh e di d not 26 h avSparkle e any s us p ect t h e s cene on f oot . U p on ar r i v al, dep u t i es L O P T R I M M A R T E N diagram 27 Comedy routine i nf or m at i on at t h e t i m e. T h e i nci dent was ob s er v ed t h e s edan ab andoned i n t h e D A P P L E E T H O S 64 On pins and plate A and CARPINTERIA AVE. docu m 4850 ent ed, p at 28 r ol Communion wi ll f ollowu p m i ddle C am eo R oad wi t h m aj or dam O P A L S H I N G L E needles 31 Snouted critter Behind Rockwell Cleaners fo r fur t h er det ai ls of t h e s t olen i t ems . ag e t o t h e f r ont r i g h t p as s eng er wh eel C A M E R A S H Y B A R O N 65 Substantial 32 Teensy bit A N O N S T I C K I T O U T 33 Reunion bunch 2:07 p.m. / Found Drugs / 6000 S E R E S U S H I A P S E DOWN ROCKPRINT.COM 34 Database block Jacaranda Way E W E R O N S E T L E E R 1 Cultural pursuits command A man was cont act ed af t er r ep or t i ng

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California 24  Thursday, June 13, 2013 Coastal View News and how to find inspiration in everyday CVN A r eader s ends a h alo t o Ry a n Mo o r e f or b r i ng i ng di r t b ack t o C ar p i nt er i a. things. I would hand this book to any by Margie Burke The Weekly Crossword child or teen having a toughE. time fitting A r eader s ends a h alo t o e v e r y o n e wh o s u p p or t ed t h e P laya D el S u r 4 - H t h i s year . in. You can place a request for 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 the 12 book 13 ACROSS “The members are looking forward to another successful year.” with your library card. 1 Cloth measure 14 15 —Blanca Ramirez,16librarian, Carpinteria Buck or bull a h alo t o V a l e r i e , the new volunteer A 5r eader s ends at the Friends of the ibrary Branch Library 18 9 Talk B ook s t or big e, f or cleani ng17 and r eor g ani z i ng t h e s elf - h elp s ect i on. 19 14 Field of 20 21 22 expertise Friends of the Carpinteria A 15r eader s ends a h alo t o De s i r e e , the new masseuse at The ym ext26Door. 23 24 25 27 “She 28 In the know Library recommends Carpinteria Library cou ld h av e coas t ed t h r ou g h i t , b u t s h e wor k ed r eally h ar d t o r eli ev e m y b ack p ai n. I about 29 30 31 32 33 34 nev ex p er recommends i enced 16 erSundance entry,s u ch a g r eat m as s ag e.” usually 35 36 37 38 A 17r eader ends to a h life alo t o w h o e v e r lef t a s i g n t elli ng p eop le t o p i ck u p t h ei r dog - was t e Brings back 41 b 19 ag s Bell andinvention s t op leav i ng 39t h em on C as i t as P as 40 s R oad. 20 Inning half 42 43 44 21 Word on a A r eader s ends a p i t ch f or k t o w h o e v e r h a s b e e n l e a v i n g b a g s o f d o g 45 t h e g r ou nd 46along C as i t as P as47s R oad.48 “ Y es , i t ’ s f r u s t r at i ng t h at nametag w a s t e on t h e t r as 49h cans ar e g one, b u t i s t h 50at r eally you r b es t way of h andli ng 23 Type of reaction 51 t h etos i t u at i on? ” 25 One with lots 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 offer A r eader s ends a p i t ch f or k t o t h e p e r s o n wh o h i t t h e r eader ’ s p i ck u p 29 Throaty 59 60 61 62 63 f r ont of t h e r eader ’ s h ou s e and di dn’ t s t op . “ S h am e on you , and I h op e 34 Put upi n with 65 66 you h avtoe k ar m 64a i ns u r ance.” 35 Accustom 36 Filthy money 67 68 69 A 38r eader Games ends piecea p i t ch f or k t o t h e b i c y c l e e v e n t s on Foothill oad. “Purposely hostCopyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate ing rides There are countless bike 39 huge Part of VHFthat take up the whole road is irresponsible. lanes t h at wer e p u t i n wi t h ou r t ax dollar s t o av oi d t h i s p r ob lem .” 40 Classic board 4 Stretched tight 37 Fisherman's 55 Pessimist's game “The Silent Patient” A 41r eader s endsconduit a p i t ch f or k t o t h problem e l i f e g u a r d s b basket r ai di ng By h ai Alex r wh i le s wicontraction m m er s ar e i n t h e 5 Heart Furnace Michaelides Rus” 6 ” Mimic 40 Take 56 Kind p 42 ool.Otologist's “ N ot p r of“Jo es s & i onal! of skia lift “Theeffect Silent Patient” needs reader 7 Scottish lake 41beware 57not concern Dull-colored Hodgepodge By Audra Winslow sticker: “Do begin this book 8or Computer 58 Trust, Wish key fide with A 43r Jo eader s granter ends a p i t ch f Winslow k t o t h e ise m about p l o y e 43 e unless s ofBona t h eyou newer b u s nothing i nes s es on t h to e C "on" ar p uni n& Rus by Audra have else do 44unlikely 9 Many 44tilSnouted 59 50 Tutu fabric cropanimal Cent piece? teria luffs. “ earn to between share thea bike walking pathfinish with locals There will bestory four an friendship the titular you the last page.” The 45five 60 Web duster Stubby piece Candle to of forums' you walking together and not a 46 single onearound will scoot over just acount tadAlicia, to let characters forged by their outcast status centers popular artist, 61 ancestor Listening Stalactite site Prohibit a local p asofs cats. t h r ou Rus, g h ? ” 10 and love whose familytoruns 4833, who is married to established phoWine server Muzak, maybe Cast member Island garland a47 junk yard, is in high school, plays in a 50tographer, Gabriel63Berenson, 44. They Porky's further A 49 r eader a p i t ch 11 f ortok Without t o t h e Li n d how e n p l 53 a n are t Lifted e r s a. “ loving, A an ll t anchor h e m healthy u s h r oom and s g r owi ng t h er e band, ands ends isgal struggling figure out prosperous 51will Spot tot i ndi cat epay t for oo mafor u chcollege. wat er .___... N i is ce in weed f ar m .” English couple. he Jo middle 52 Banana 12 Sermon school and isbuy being bullied by hersubject, peers. From page three, we know who shot 54r eader One who gets sometimes AShe s ends a p i t ch f or k t a r e s grandt a u r a n t o the w n Answer e victim r f or to p in arLast k i ngWeek's h i s but v Crossword eh the i clebig i n t question h e s p ot s lives in a trailer withoher the face, 13 spoils item r i g h the t ou and t f r ont of h i to s esherself t ab Golf li s h since m bag ent no . “ S one h ou ldn’ t h e leav e t h os e p ar k i ng s p ot s av ai Ilab Ple mother keeps A remains: M P S Why? R ASixI years S E after S the K head59 f or h Synagogue i s p ayi ngin cubecoming s t om 18 er s Renegade ? her ” friend. The S lines, is interested theNshooter A R TV I coverage O L D and E Ntrial, U D O 22 A little two cleric meet while Jo is skipping school and P isLincarcerated O D S for K ElifeTinCa shoddy H B O mental O K Fairlyout A 62r eader s good endsin athe p i t chjunk f or suspicious k yard t o t h with e C i t y the o f C a ward, r p i n t e The r i a f Grove, or let t i ng t h e b remains lu f f s t u r n i nt o hanging S I D E W A Y Sbut he R U S T silent. L E 64 24 From the top Hawk'slot. hook an ever-increasing dirt aparking not what the bluffs were purchasedTheo for. stray cats. Rus becomes mentor to Jo“That and isCuriosity causes psychotherapist W A R D T O T E Uproar P 65 os t CBer's N her o P the ar term k confidence i ng s i g ns 26i m to m make edi at ely! ” gives friends Faber to transfer to The Grove to study D R E A R Y P R A C T I C E Do perfectly Delphi prophet in66school and take up27new hobbies. He R the murderer toB learn E P L Y E E why. C H M A X 67 28 Tubular pastaa p of A bullied r eader s because ends i t ch his f orApartment k Puerto t o t h eRican s h e r i f f ’s d Alex e p u t y Michaelides’ u s i ng h i s r adarfirst g u nnovel t h e ot h er is A M O K H A R S H D A T isE a 68 Tack room item dweller m or ni ng i n f r and ont ofhisci t family’s y h all. “ W business, h y don’ t youknowledgeable g o b y one of tale t h e s ch the oolsarts and cat ch and all background M I X B A S I of S T I world G E R city in the t h 69 e he’s s "Iliad" p eeder s t h ertoeovercome i n m 29or Throw ni nghis, and k eep ou mental r ch i ldr en s af e wh i le walk i (or ng t non-treato s ch ool.” but learned obstacles illness treatment A S S E R T towel that bring A T Y P I C A L and look forward to the things ment) Rgiftedly written. I read this book O I L B R A T DOWN 30 Apprehension him joy. until 3:30 a.m. in anticipation of learning A online T H O M V A G R A N C Y 1The 31 and Fishhook's end Castle feature Submit Halos Pitchforks at Ecoastalview.com friendship between the two is the solution to this “Why done it.” So, P R O P E N S I T Y S E R A 2 32 Sandwich Take to court wholesome as Rus Jo as a little don’t say you haven’t been warned. Alltreats submissions are S subject O L E toDediting. E V I L T E A L 33 Like tabloid cookie sister, showing her the ropes on how to —Megan Shannon, volunteer, Friends of E W E R A W A K E E D G E 3 In the event that headlines handle the tough world of middle school the Library

THE BOOK NOOK

Sudoku

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Lev el: E as y

MURPHY’S

VINYL SHACK

CARPINTERIA’S ONLY PRINT SHOP

JUST DOWN THE DRIVEWAY!

805.684.0013

On time as promised!

Each Sudoku has a unique solution that can be reached logically without guessing. Enter digits from 1 to 9 into the blank spaces. Every row must contain one of each digit. So must every column, as must every 3x3 square.

Lev el: H ar d

7 1 8 4

9 6 4 5 1 6 5 3 6 9 3 7 1 5 8 8 1 2 9 8 6 2 9 6 1 5 2

3 2 4 9

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Br e n Am b Da v i K e v i A v F re e


Thursday, April 8, 2021  19

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

60th anniversary Joseph and Yvonne Velasquez will celebrate 60 years of marriage on April 8. Joseph and Yvonne have three children, Joe, Dina and Denise and six grandsons (one deceased), three granddaughters, five great-grandsons and three great-granddaughters. The family plans to have a reunion to celebrate next year.

Fruit Punch (nonalcoholic) CVN

CHEF RANDY RANDY GRAHAM Here’s an old school fruit cooler that is sure to wet your whistle on a hot day. I’ve been making it and serving it to kids of all ages for over 30 years, and it’s a good addition to your traditional beverages at your next barbecue.

Ingredients:

6 ounce can frozen orange juice concentrate (thawed) 6 ounce can frozen lemonade (thawed) 1 quart chilled apple juice (or cider)

CVN

2 quarts chilled ginger ale 1 pint orange sherbet (optional)

Directions:

Combine the first four ingredients in a large punch bowl with a capacity of approximately 128 ounces. Spoon orange sherbet on top of punch (if using) and serve immediately.

NEWLY NEWLY ENGAGED? ENGAGED?

Randy Graham is a noted chef and writer and has been a lacto-ovo vegetarian for over 38 years. Chef Randy has written and published a series of seven cookbooks with original recipes developed over the period 1975 through 2020. He writes for the Ojai Quarterly, the Ojai Discover Monthly, and the California 101 Travelers Guide. His vegetarian recipes are published in newspapers throughout Central California under the header, Chef Randy. He and his wife, Robin, live in Ojai, California, with their dog Cooper. Robin and Cooper are not vegetarians.

VISIT VISIT COASTALVIEW.COM COASTALVIEW.COM TOTOSEND ININ YOUR SEND YOUR SUBMISSION SUBMISSION

FOOD COURT FOOD COURT CVN

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The Palms misses each and everyone of you. While we have To our lifelong patrons, not reopened, due to our unique operation, we are still alive and family: and well. We will continue our tradition, friends offering quality food for value, as soon as it is safe for you and our employThe Palms misses each and everyone of you. While we have ees. Hope you are all well. ~Stay safe, Bill & Tod Bennett not reopened, due to our unique operation, we are still alive

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OFFER VALID THROUGH 6/30/21 ONLY AT 4610 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA. Coupon not available with 3rd party vendors or delivery (or delivery partners). Delivery prices may be higher than in restaurant. Tax not included. One coupon per customer per visit. Limit one discount per coupon. Original coupon must be presented and surrendered at time of order. Not valid with any other offer, discount, or combo. Price may vary. Cash value 1/100 of 1 cent. Not for resale. © 2021 Carl’s Jr. Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved.

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FIND DELIVERY AVAILABLE NEAR YOU ON CARLSJR.COM OFFER VALID THROUGH 6/30/21 ONLY AT 4610 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA. Coupon not available with 3rd party vendors or delivery (or delivery partners). Delivery prices may be higher than in restaurant. Tax not included. One coupon per customer per visit. Limit one discount per coupon. Original coupon must be presented and surrendered at time of order. Not valid with any other offer, discount, or combo. Price may vary. Cash value 1/100 of 1 cent. Not for resale. © 2021 Carl’s Jr. Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved.

C

6


20  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

THROWBACK

A 1942 Carpinteria Murder Mystery: Who killed Margaret Senteney? Part 2 of 2

It stands as Carpinteria’s greatest murder mystery, an infamous story in the classic sense of “true crime,” shaking the community at large like a tidal wave, appearing and disappearing, only to reappear again and then vanish amidst years of rumor and speculation. This feature was written by former CVN editor Paul Sisolak and originally published in Carpinteria Magazine, Summer 2007. Part 1 of this story may be read at coastalview.com.

Silence broken

Longtime Carpinteria farmer George Bliss had been interviewed by authorities in 1942 shortly after the murder. He asked if anything suspicious had come within his sights. “They asked me if I had seen the car ... and I saw nothing at all,” Bliss recently recalled as his answer to police. (Bliss was interviewed in 2007 for this story. At the time, he was 87.) Bliss’ property, near the former Beckstead land, was not in close proximity to where the body was reported found on the border of neighboring Summerland. Leonard Kirkes’ wife’s maiden name was Beckstead and police were investigating all leads. But authorities most likely began canvassing rural areas, questioning anyone they could for information. Other Carpinterians had seen something—plenty—in the days surrounding the homicide. But if Kirkes was the guilty party, his actions, and witness accounts, wouldn’t come to light until nearly a decade later. It wasn’t until after returning to Carpinteria in 1945 from serving during World War II that Ross’ suspicions against Kirkes—commended for an exceptional Alaskan stint with the Red Cross—came closer to prosecution. Apparently, when Kirkes found himself under arrest on an unrelated moral charge of child molestation in September 1950, Ross, having been promoted to sheri of Santa Barbara County, saw it as his opportunity to pin the Senteney murder on him. Now that he was in custody, a remarkable in ux of once-silent witnesses began pouring in, swearing that Kirkes was the killer. One witness, Charles Boverson, told authorities that he was the man Kirkes asked to hastily repaint his car, despite Boverson’s response that the car didn’t need it.

CARPINTERIA HERALD ARCHIVE IMAGES

On Aug. 29, 1942, the body of 20-year-old Margaret Senteney was discovered in Toro Canyon.

Another, Amilcaero Fogliadini, an elderly Italian farmer, claimed that he spotted irkes’ Ford in a field near the crime scene the day of Senteney’s death. Murder charges were pressed; the case came to trial, and Boverson and Fogliadini provided solid testimony. But evidence of Kirkes’ smoking gun came from key witness Dorothy Egan. The Carpinteria woman said she saw Margaret Senteney get into Kirkes’ car that fateful August day in 1942, eight long years prior. In 1951 a jury convicted Leonard Kirkes of second degree murder and sentenced him to five years to life in prison.

Retrial approved

While in San Quentin prison, the ex-patrolman maintained his innocence. According to an anonymous source, Kirkes disclosed his story to an inmate. An interview with Daniel Corral Sr., Kirkes’ supposed cellmate, was declined to Carpinteria Magazine. Kirkes did not spend his time idling in jail and quickly appealed his case. The ex-patrolman in 1952 was approved a retrial first denied to him when the deputy district attorney at Kirkes’ original trial was accused of misconduct during his closing argument. The bias he displayed might negatively have influenced the guilty verdict placed on the patrolman. Specifically, .A. eldon’s courtroom behavior was assessed after he intimated to members of the jury that he was assured of Kirkes’ guilt prior to the beginning of legal proceedings, before any formal evidence had ever been presented. Trial transcripts quoted Weldon as saying, “I knew prior to the time that I became associated in this particular pros-

THURSDAY ecution in the month of October, that this particular defendant was guilty of this particular o ense.” Weldon’s arguments were duly improper, according to the transcripts, because they embellished elements of the crime, partially justifying Kirkes’ guilt by painting him as a “wolf at bay” who in uenced key witnesses’ years of silence in fear he might retaliate against them. Dorothy Egan’s “unexplained eightyear silence,” as quoted by the transcripts, was justified by the .A. as one stemming from fear, though it was unsubstantiated. On Weldon’s remarks, “They appealed to the sympathy of the jury for the unfortunate victim of the crime; they characterized the defendant as a ‘wolf at bay’; they drew imaginary and fanciful inferences as to the circumstances of the crime not justified by any evidence in the record.” There were other testimonial inconsistencies, chalked up largely to the amount of time passed between the crime and the retrial. Truck farmer Fogliadini later claimed on a witness stand that the Ford he spotted was indeed a di erent color than Kirkes’ car. The clincher was when the prosecution determined that Dorothy Egan’s testimony was inadmissible, having learned that the woman, now a mother, had spent a four-month confinement to a Connecticut state mental hospital for symptoms related to postpartum depression. Finally, how thorough was the original investigation into Kirkes’ whereabouts the day of the crime? Laselle Thornburgh, an attorney involved in the early stages of the case, according to the transcripts, testified “that he had been informed that a sailor was known to have driven to Carpinteria on Aug. 28 and stated that he was going out that evening with a ‘churchy girl.’” It was noted that Senteney was a church choir singer and taught Sunday School. Kirkes also was not a sailor. Thornburgh told the court that when he followed up with Ross on the matter, the undersheri did nothing to check the information. It wasn’t until two and a half weeks later that Ross finally checked it out and nothing turned up. Still, it seemed suspicious that he had stalled on such an important matter. It also smacked of a setup. In 1953 Leonard Kirkes was acquitted of Margaret Senteney’s murder and returned home to Carpinteria a free man.

Who killed Margaret Senteney?

Leonard Kirkes was remembered as a friendly man about town, no more suspicious than the average stranger. “Nobody seemed to be afraid of him,” said resident Bonnie Milne. (Milne was interviewed in 2007. She was 81 at the

time.) “He was really a nice guy. I remember saying to my mother, ‘Gee, he’s a nice guy,’ and she would say, ‘Would you get in a car with him?’ I guess not.” Milne said Kirkes was a hunter and would have stored fresh game in his trunk, a valid explanation why the patrolman, before the age of DNA testing, may have scrambled to clean out his car. The consequence: pig’s blood mistaken for that of a human’s. That was only one argument out of several, and given as testimony by a man named Maddox, who confirmed that in the summer of 2 Kirkes carried two pigs in his trunk en route to a barbecue. “There were 10 million rumors, and most of them went away,” Milne noted. But for many years the rumor mill grinded away and became the equivalent of a Carpinteria urban legend. One popular theory suggested that Kirkes was, in fact, put up to the task. Rumor had it that a roadhouse or bordello-type destination existed on Carpinteria’s eastern end near the former “Thunderbowl” drag racing strip, where the elite attended secret parties filled with sex, gambling and assorted illicit behavior. Stories circulated that some noted public o cials were known to show their faces there and would have done—or paid—anything to make their presence unknown should something criminal happen. Senteney, according to sources, was easily trusting of others and was even said to be developmentally impaired, suggesting that she was lured to one such party and killed, or maybe died accidentally by a fall. Notable citizens seeking an escape plan, according to rumor, paid o Kirkes handsomely to take the blame and go to prison, swearing to silence. Altering the scenario a bit, there was implication that Kirkes was wrongfully accused, his car stolen and then used as storage for cargo in the murder, another reasonable answer to why the top cop, under duress, would bungle his e orts in a panicked attempt to avoid being framed. This could also explain the possibility that Senteney’s body was moved to a di erent location after she was killed. Still, more theories hinted that a local bus driver with a sordid way around children was the culprit. Though the murder remains technically unsolved, no cold case file exists, according to Sergeant Erik Raney of the Santa Barbara County Sheri ’s epartment. Kirkes died in 1988 of complications resulting from a stroke and is interred in Santa Barbara Cemetery. To the grave with him went perhaps the answer to one of Carpinteria’s biggest questions: Who killed Margaret Senteney? Nobody may ever know, though recollections from that August day in 1942 will remain. To learn more about Carpinteria history during Covid-19 closure, visit the Carpinteria Valley Museum of History’s website carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org to access more articles on local history. To support the preservation of local history, consider becoming a member of the Carpinteria Historical Society.

Read more Throwbacks at CoastalView.com

CoastalView.com


Thursday, April 8, 2021  21

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

ONLINE REPORTS

COMMANDER’S RECAP

3/24 at 0843 hrs / Catalytic converter theft

A reporting party reported the theft of his catalytic converter between March 19 and March 21.

Reports from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office

3/25 at 1547 hrs / Theft / 5800 block Carpinteria Avenue

A reporting party reported unknown suspect(s) accessed the trunk of his unlocked car and stole his professional camera equipment. He had parked the car at a parking lot on March 25 between 1:30 and 2:30 p.m.

Sunday, March 28

1043 hrs / Found item / Dorrance Way

A reporting party called to report she found a bicycle. It is unknown who the bicycle belongs to. The bicycle was taken and booked for safekeeping.

1506 hrs / Open container / 5100 block Carpinteria Avenue

A man was contacted while drinking a beer in front of the library. He was cited for the open container.

2242 hrs / Drugs / 5500 block Carpinteria Avenue

Deputies contacted a man at his vehicle in the Motel 6 parking lot. A probation search of his vehicle yielded five used syringes with residue and account information and a signed check for someone else. A probation search of his motel room yielded a Xanax pill in a female subject’s purse. Deputies also found drug paraphernalia and pepper spray in another male subject’s bag. The second male subject is on probation for injuring someone in an act of domestic violence. The woman was issued a citation. The two men were arrested and taken to jail.

0157 hrs / DUI turnover / Highway 101 Southbound near N. Padaro Lane

A tra c stop was conducted on an SUV for vehicle code violations. California Highway Patrol was requested for a DUI turnover. The driver was arrested for DUI with a BAC of .13 and .14.

Monday, March 29

1000 hrs / Burglary / 5300 block Carpinteria Avenue

COASTAL BUREAU OPERATIONS MARCH 28 - APRIL 3, 2021

property, deputies located a meth pipe. He was cited and released.

1700 hrs / Burglary / El Carro Lane

Between 5 p.m. on March 28 and 6:30 a.m. on March 29, an unknown suspect(s) forced entry to a vehicle through the locked driver’s door. Landscaping tools were stolen from a toolbox.

1633 hrs / Vandalism / Carpinteria Avenue

A man was arrested for vandalizing a victim’s vehicle and for possessing a used meth pipe. The victim signed a citizen’s arrest for the vandalism. The subject was booked into jail.

1856 hrs / Theft / 1000 block Casitas Pass Road

A reporting party called to report money stolen from his residence.

1549 hrs / Drugs / Via Real

While on patrol, a known drug user’s car was seen parked at the gas station and no one was pumping gas. Since the registered owner was on probation, deputies conducted a vehicle investigation. Three subjects were discovered in the vehicle, all of whom were arrested the night prior. During a probation search of the vehicle, drug paraphernalia was located, along with two Xanax bars and heroin, which one of the subjects attempted to ditch under the car, but another subject admitted ownership for it. All three subjects were displaying symptoms of being under the in uence of opiates. All three were arrested and booked at Santa Barbara County Jail.

Tuesday, March 30

1230 hrs / Grand theft / 900 block Linden Avenue

An employee at the Law Office of Crowder reported that an unknown suspect(s) broke out a small window and entered the building. According to the reporting party, an undisclosed amount in cash and gold coins were taken from a desk. Deputies investigated the incident.

The owner of MiraMed Salon reported that she paid a company to come pick up her hair laser machine for repair and they never returned it. She has since learned that this was a fraudulent company. During the deputies’ investigation, a suspect was identified and there is a warrant pending an arrest.

1521 hrs / Shoplifting / 900 block Elm Avenue

Wednesday, March 31

A reporting party reported that a male stole a torch lighter from Carpinteria Valley Lumber and left the area. A store employee followed the suspect, who was eventually detained by deputies. He was contacted and during a search of his

1227 hrs / Vehicle damage / Concha Loma Drive

An unknown suspect(s) scratched the hood and rear bumper of a reporting party’s parked vehicle. The reporting party has suspect information.

1338 hrs / Public disturbance / Rincon Brewery

A reporting party reported that a white male parked in his vehicle began yelling at patrons. The driver ed prior to deputies’ arrival.

2117 hrs / Catalytic converter theft / Jacaranda Way

An unknown suspect stole the catalytic converter from a victim’s vehicle.

2315 hrs / Illegal fire, littering, underage drinking / Carpinteria City Beach

While conducting a premise check for beach fires, a large group of approximately 20-30 juveniles were seen on the beach. Once deputies were noticed, the juveniles ed the scene. One juvenile female party goer walking o the beach was detained and issued a citation for the violations. She was released to a guardian.

Thursday, April 1

1433 hrs / Drug paraphernalia / 5th Street and Linden Avenue

A man was contacted and found in possession of a used syringe.

1557 hrs / Drugs / Motel 6 North

A woman was contacted sitting in a parked vehicle in the Motel 6 parking lot. She admitted to possessing a methamphetamine pipe in her vehicle. The pipe was located and she was issued a citation.

1631 hrs / Drugs / 7-Eleven

Two men were contacted at the 7-Eleven gas pumps. Their vehicle had 2021 tabs but came back expired as of August 2020. One of the men later admitted that he bought the tab from an unknown subject in an attempt to defraud the DMV and not pay for his registration or get pulled over for expired tabs. The other man was found in possession of approximately 16 grams of methamphetamine and a methamphetamine pipe. The first man was also in possession of several methamphetamine bongs and pipes. Both were arrested and booked at Santa Barbara County Jail. The vehicle was towed and the plate was booked into evidence with the false tab.

1900 hrs / DUI / 900 block Linden Avenue

A reporting party called to report an intoxicated male entering a vehicle parked in the area. While in the vehicle, he was observed drinking a beer. The reporting party gave deputies the subject’s direction of travel, and deputies located the vehicle on Carpinteria Avenue. The driver performed poorly on his field tests and provided a breath sample; his results were 0.13/0.14 BAC. He was arrested and transported to Santa Barbara County Jail.

CoastalView.com

CASITAS PLAZA DISTRIBUTION

Albertson’s CoastalView.com Carpinteria Laundry Sandcastle Time Tyler’s Donuts The UPS Store

CoastalView .com

2015 hrs / Domestic dispute / Carpinteria-Summerland Fire Station #2

Fire personnel heard a verbal argument outside their station and when they went to investigate, they discovered a male and female in a verbal domestic dispute. Due to the female being extremely agitated, they requested that an emergency vehicle respond to the con ict.

2107 hrs / Public disturbance / 4500 block Carpinteria Avenue

A reporting party called to report four subjects, one with a bat, fighting in the area. Upon arrival, deputies observed several subjects in the intersection but they ed north on Cramer Road.

2201 hrs / Suspicious subject / 1300 block Limu Drive

A deputy was agged down regarding a suspicious subject in the area. The male was contacted and known to be on summary probation. He was advised to not return to a residence in the 700 block of Holly Avenue where he has been seen entering the backyard without permission.

2310 hrs / Carpinteria City Beach

The city beach was checked for bonfires and none were located. xtra patrol was conducted of the condos where numerous juveniles were believed to be staying who were an issue the previous night.

2340 hrs / Marijuana possession / Linden Avenue and Sandyland Road

A reporting party stated there were several subjects in a parked vehicle playing loud music and urinating in the parking lot. Three subjects were contacted and found in possession of marijuana and alcohol. They were all cited and released to a sober driver or parent.

0216 hrs / Warrant / 5500 block Carpinteria Avenue

A man was seen in front of Casa Del Sol, and was known to have an active Ramey warrant. He was arrested and after being read his rights, he did not wish to speak to deputies regarding the warrant. A probation search was conducted on his room, which was registered to a male on probation. Meth and multiple pipes were located and seized as evidence.

Friday, April 2

1102 hrs / Catalytic converter theft / Catlin Circle

A reporting party reported the theft of her catalytic converter between April 1 at 8:30 p.m. and April 2 at 9:30 a.m.

1142 hrs / Catalytic converter theft / Via Real

A reporting party reported the theft of her catalytic converter between the late afternoon of April 1 and 11:30 a.m. on April 2.

Saturday, April 3

1627 hrs / Warrant / Post Avenue

A reporting party called to report that a man was driving without a valid driver’s license. Deputies responded to a residence and saw the man’s vehicle parked in the driveway. He had a non-bookable WANDA warrant, which he was issued a citation on.

Car • PET • teria T ell us about your pet and send us a picture, too. Favorite snacks, special tricks, nicknames, let all of Carpinteria know about your f urry, f eathered or scaly f amily member. Email news @coastalview.com


22  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Pu b l i c No t i c e s ________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as W AV ES M O B IL E ACV IM at 1624 GARDEN ST, 3, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): SO CAL M O B IL E SAIM at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a Co r p o r a t i o n . This statement was filed with the County 2/25/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Feb. 12, 2021. Signed: KAREN EILER, PRESIDENT. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 52 6 . Publish: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2021 ________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SAV O RY T YM E CAT ERING at 4945 CARPINTERIA AVENUE, STE A, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013-2625. Full name of registrant(s): CARP K IT CH EN AND G RO CERY at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a L i m i t e d L i a b i l i t y Co m p a n y . This statement was filed with the County 3/10/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Dec 22, 2017. Signed: DEBRA GOLDMAN, MANAGING MEMBER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 6 6 3 . Publish: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2021 ________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as CAEL L A W INES at 33 WEST HALEY, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101, mailing address to 11224 CARLOS ST, VENTURA, CA 93004. Full name of registrant(s): AD AM G CAM ARD EL L A at 11224 CARLOS ST, VENTURA, CA 93004. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/12/2021. The registrant began transacting business on March 1, 2021. Signed: ADAM G CAMARDELLA, OWNER/OPERATOR. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 6 9 1. Publish: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2021 ________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as CL ARIT YW ISE W IND O W CL EANING at 2492 LILLIE AVE, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067, mailing address to PO BOX 20162, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93120. Full name of registrant(s): CH RIST O PH ER W CAST IL L O at 2492 LILLIE AVE, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 2/24/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Feb 17, 2021. Signed: CHRISTOPHER CASTILLO, OWNER/OPERATOR. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E.

Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 513 . Publish: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2021 ________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as L IND EN ST RAND S at 954 LINDEN AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013, mailing address to 784 MAPLE ST, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): B RAND EE D CARRASCO at 784 MAPLE ST, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 2/19/2021. The registrant began transacting business on February 8, 2021. Signed: BRANDEE CARRASCO, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 4 53 . Publish: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2021 ________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as PO INT CO NCEPT IO N W INERY at 6 HARBOR WAY #160, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93109. Full name of registrant(s): ET IENNE C T ERIL IND EN at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/04/2021. The registrant began transacting business on February 23, 2021. Signed: ETIENNE C TERILINDEN, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 59 7 . Publish: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as D P M O V ER at 23 N SALINAS ST, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. Full name of registrant(s): F RANCISCO P M EJ IA at (mailing address) PO BOX 41803, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/08/2021. The registrant began transacting business on March 14, 2016. Signed: FRANCISCO P MEJIA, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 6 2 4 . Publish: March 25, April 1, 8, 15, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as O U T PO ST S M ED IA at 5666 CARPINTERIA STREET, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 (mailing address) PO BOX 14, SUMMERLAND, CA 93067. Full name of registrant(s): B ENJ AM IN W EINER at 429 LAMBERT ROAD, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/19/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: BENJAMIN WEINER, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 8 0 9 . Publish: March 25, April 1, 8, 15, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as M IRI M ARA CERAM ICS at 5292 CARPINTERIA AVENUE, SUITE B, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 (mailing address) 1482 EAST VALLEY ROAD, SUITE 323, CARPINTERIA, CA 93108. Full name of registrant(s): F AT M IR M ARA CERAM ICS, L L C. at 1482 EAST VALLEY ROAD SUITE 323, CARPINTERIA, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a L i m i t e d L i a b i l i t y Co m p a n y . This statement was filed with the County 3/16/2021. The registrant began transacting business on January 1, 2012. Signed: FATMIR MARA, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 7 4 1. Publish: March 25, April 1, 8, 15, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as D O G H O U SE REPAIRS & W O O D CRAF T at 4991 FOOTHILL RD, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): RYAN L L O PEZ at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/18/2021. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: RYAN LOPEZ. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 7 9 2 . Publish: March 25, April 1, 8, 15, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as Q T ECH at 1482 THERESA ST, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): D AV ID Q U ENZ ER at SAME ADDRESS. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/30/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Jan. 1, 2000. Signed: DAVID QUENZER, OWNER/OPERATOR. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 9 10 . Publish: April 1, 8, 15, 22, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as D ANIEL L E RENEE ART at 296 NORTH HOPE AVE, UNIT 67, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110. Full name of registrant(s): D ANIEL L E R M ET H M ANN at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d i u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/17/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Jan 15, 2019. Signed: DANIELLE METHMANN. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 7 57 . Publish: April 1, 8, 15, 22, 2021

_________________________________ Ad v e r t i s e m e n t o f L i e n Sa l e Notice is given that pursuant to Sections 21701-21715 of the business and professions code, section 2328 of the commercial code, and section 535 of penal code, McCann Mini Storage, 1222 Cravens Lane, Carpinteria, CA 93013, will sell by competitive bidding April 23, 2021 at 10:00 AM Auction to be held online at: www.storagetreasures.com, property to be sold is as follows: Miscellaneous household goods, personal property, clothing, furniture, and business items. Name: Adam Cordero

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Storage Treasures www.storagetreasures.com Phone: 480-397-6503 Publish: April 8, 15, 2021 _________________________________ IN T H E M AT T ER O F T H E APPL ICAT IO N O F J O H AN EM M ANU EL Z AM U D IO D O M ING U EZ O RD ER T O SH O W CAU SE F O R CH ANG E O F NAM E: CASE NO . 2 1CV 0 0 9 3 2 T O AL L INT EREST ED PERSO NS: Petitioner: J O H AN EM M ANU EL Z AM U D IO D O M ING U EZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: J O H AN EM M ANU EL Z AM U D IO D O M ING U EZ Proposed name: J O H AN EM M ANU EL D O M ING U EZ T H E CO U RT O RD ERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NO T ICE O F H EARING May 11, 2021 at 10:00 am, Dept: 3, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the CarpinteriaSummerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated March 22, 2021 by Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. F IL ED B Y the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 03/01/2021. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Spann, Elizabeth, Deputy Clerk. Publish: April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2021 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ SU M M O NS ( F a m i l y L a w ) CASE NU M B ER 2 1F L 0 0 3 0 8 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: B ERAL D O CAT AL AN You have been sued. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. Petitioner’s name is: D EL IA EL IZ AB ET H J IM ENEZ CAT AL AN You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE: The restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, pr changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or any other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and

4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in the manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of supervisorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. You must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA 93121-1107 The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney are: DELIA ELIZABETH JIMENEZ CATALAN 1210 CACIQUE ST SPACE 42 SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 Date: 3/15/2021

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Filed by Vega, Jessica, Deputy Clerk, for Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer. Publish: April 1, 8, 15, 22, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as ERIN M O RIAH D ESIG NS at 1445 CARNATION PL, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): ERIN M CAL L AW AY at SAME ADDRESS. This business is conducted by a n In d i v i d u a l . This statement was filed with the County 3/10/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Feb. 1, 2021. Signed: ERIN CALLAWAY. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 6 56 . Publish: April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2021 _________________________________ F ICT IT IO U S B U SINESS NAM E ST AT EM ENT . The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as CH ANNEL ISL AND SU RF B O ARD S at 1160 MARK AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Full name of registrant(s): CI SU RF B O ARD S L L C at SAME ADDRESS. This business is conducted by a L i m i t e d L i a b i l i t y Co m p a n y This statement was filed with the County 3/16/2021. The registrant began transacting business on Jan. 1, 2021. Signed: SCOTT ANDERSON,GENERAL MANAGER/PRESIDENT. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) F B N2 0 2 1- 0 0 0 0 7 3 3 . Publish: April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME PUBLICATION $40 for 2 NAMES

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24  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Crossing the line CVN

IT’S ALL SURFING CHRISTIAN BEAMISH A buddy of mine who spent his youth as a deckhand on his father’s commercial fishing boat out of Santa Barbara, and as a member of the Channel Islands surf team in the early 80s along with the great Tom Curren, once said that some of the surf crew in that era divided Rincon, roughly, by county a liation entura surfers got the Cove, east of the Rivermouth, and Santa Barbara County surfers got Indicator. Depending on the conditions of course, one group or the other would have a raw deal in such an arrangement and I doubt the division was strictly adhered to – although surfing was a much rougher pursuit in those days and frequently entailed fisticu s. Fun, huh Since October, most days I’m driving

The author with a 1950s-inspired surfboard recently completed at Jeff Hull Custom Boats in Ventura. the 25 minutes down to Ventura to shape surfboards out of a converted shipping container at Jeff Hull Custom Boats, where Hull and his crew build Radons – the military-looking fishing boats that urchin divers use in Santa Barbara and Ventura. They’re all surfers at the boatyard, and the similarities between the boats and the surfboard designs are seemingly endless. The factors of rocker (bottom curve), and plan shape (outline) serve the same function in a boat or

Lucy Dane volunteers for Sealwatch on Saturday mornings.

KARLSSON

t’s ne tt e harbor seal rookery?

The pandemic has reduced the number of volunteers at the overlook. Sealwatch reminds visitors to protect others by wearing a mask, staying distanced and limiting time at the viewing area when it is crowded. This report covers March 22 - 28.

High Adult Count

137

Pup Count

Natural History Notes

56

Some are too large to distinguish.

Harbor seals choose limited specific haulouts and rookeries. As their name implies, haulouts are often in sheltered locations such as harbors and river mouths, but beyond shelter from surf it is di cult to assess why sites are so few. Some studies have suggested prey abundance, but since seals swim miles to forage, the relationship is questionable. One study in Canada, using predator models, suggests a major reason for choosing particular places may be the ability to see land predators, such as bears, wolves and coyotes, at all directions and at su cient distance to ee to the ocean.

Visitors

Many beachgoers are not aware of the seals and are surprised to meet the closure signs. Sealwatchers report people are stopped at least once daily from entering when they fail to see or heed the signs. Most people are happy to learn the seals can be seen from the blu s above.

Info

The Carpinteria harbor seal rookery is located immediately east of Casitas Pier, between the Carpinteria Blu s ature Preserve and Carpinteria State Beach. Please remember not to bring dogs, bicycles or loud voices to view the seals. Harbor seals, when disturbed, may ee and become separated from their pups. Volunteers ask that dogs remain outside the rope area at all times. olunteers needed. Call -22 or email carpsealwatch gmail.com. To find out more, visit carpinteriasealwatch.org.

surfboard, and a successful builder of either craft must have the ability to see the utility in a particular curve, or combination of curves. This ability is what Herrescho , the much-lauded American yacht designer, called “boatsense.” I like the crew who work in the yard, I like their straightforwardness and the way they seem to enjoy their labor in the same way I do mine. And they all have “boatsense,” too. Standing 20 feet back from a vessel under construction, they’ll sometimes appear to just stare at the work for a time before moving back into it. It’s a matter of proportion they’re seeking, simply what “looks right.” The two main guys (I don’t want to embarrass them by calling them out by name , besides e Hull, the owner, have been building and doing major repairs and renovations on boats in Hueneme, Ventura and Santa Barbara since their teens. Between them, there is about 70 years of boatbuilding knowledge, and there will likely be more than a century before they’re done. With time logged surfing in Hawaii and across the Pacific – Polynesian designs inked up their forearms – they remind me that our coastline here is part of the Pacific Rim, and that we participate in the culture of this endlessly intriguing ocean before us each time we paddle out, swim or make a crossing. I may have mentioned before the strong sense I get on the backside of the Channel Islands, with its shimmering greens and blues, of the ocean there feeling like the orthern-most boundary of the South Pacific. The poet Gary Snyder (I believe I’ve mentioned this before as well) has a notion of the land being divided by watersheds, and that there is a way that people of European descent can become “new natives”– that is, come to see the land and

Feliz 88th Birthday Julia Saragoza-Requejo

interact with it as an indigenous person does. While I appreciate the sentiment, I trust that Snyder being more of a scholar and more erudite than me, has worked out the implications of such a statement. Because, of course, the first thing think of when I hear of white people calling themselves “new natives” (besides okopelli lawn figures, Birkenstocks and crystal collections) is gross appropriation to top o a gruesome inheritance of genocide. Although a brutal history underpins our “kinder and gentler” society (notwithstanding the reckoning with injustice that remains incomplete across the nation, and everyday instances of horrific gun violence), our more serene present day indicates the truth in Dr. King’s statement that the “arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” Like a lot of things in 21st-century life, I recognize a general cultural evolution from the days of my youth. Thinking back on what it was like to cruise through Ventura even in the early 1990s, with its sometimes-heavy vibe of Hell’s Angels and gangbangers, compared to the boutique and brewery scene there now, is the stu of realtor’s dreams, what with the median price of a single-family home. My dad took me to the long defunct “Pike” amusement zone in Long Beach as a little boy in the mid-1970s, and I remember being amazed and a little afraid of the rough crowd of carnies and tattooed sailors. Huntington Beach was another coastal town with a persistent feeling of illicit activity – The Surf Theater a bacchanalian venue of discarded beer bottles clinking down the incline beneath the seats and pot smoke filling the air as Gerry ope and Rory Russell went barrel-for-barrel at the Pipeline on-screen. I’m not sure what I’m getting at here, frankly. The nostalgia of a man in his s for the wildness of an earlier time It can’t be that, because despite a streak of the wild man in me, I tend to make fairly conservative life choices, like avoiding fist fights and anything criminal, completing my avy service with an honorable discharge, earning college degrees, etc. … I suppose what I’m wrestling with after all is the feeling of the past – colonial, racial, cultural – being so present in the social structures of today. And these structures are solidly built, seemingly impossible to reconfigure in more equitable ways. Every day I think of my ancestors and the historical factors that led them from West County Cork, reland, to Taranaki, ew ealand Aotearoa, where they fought gati-Ruanui Maori for land acquisition. I think of ways I might connect with the tribe, then realize the best thing is to let it rest until can o er something of true cross-Pacific reciprocation. In the meantime, I still marvel at the ocean arts that have come to us in boats and surfboards from the people of the Pacific diaspora. Christian Beamish took leave of his position at Coastal View News in October 2020 to pursue his surfboard business, “Surfboards California,” full time. He continues his monthly column. The former Associate Editor of The Surfer’s Journal, Beamish is also the author of “Voyage of the Cormorant” (Patagonia Books, 2012) about his single-handed expedition down the coast of Baja California by sail and oar in his self-built Shetland Isle beach boat. He lives with his wife and two children in Carpinteria.

CoastalView.com Read past CoastalView.com Beamish columns

CoastalView .com

CoastalView


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Senior Miles Souza blasts a double in the arriors ret rn to action at Calderwood Field.

Boys baseball earns first win of the season

PHOTOS BY ROSANA SWING T h e W ar r i or b oys b as eb all t eam g r ab b ed their first win of this year’s adjusted baseball season, outlasting the ordhoff angers 1 -5 on Thursday, April 1. Senior ace iles Souza toed the rubber and limited the early anger attack to single runs in the first and third innings. This gave the Warriors the change to explode for 10 runs in the bottom of the third. The attack included a double and a single by uke ounsbury as the Warriors batted around the order. Also pacing the Warrior attack, iles Souza had two doubles, three Is and scored two. rich oebel walked twice, picked up an I and scored three runs. “There were definitely some moments that looked like it was our first time on the field,” coach Pat Cooney said. “At the same time, we relied on some experience on the mound and leadership at the plate from the players that have some games under their belts. It took contributions from the entire roster to keep the Warriors in front.” ooking ahead, the Warriors will host ishop Diego on Thursday, April at John Calderwood Field at 3 30 p.m.

Submit your Sports Photos to news@coastal view.com

Freshman Talon Tr m le slides across the late in the r n arrior o t rst in the third innin

enior ace iles o a relies on fine t ned techni e and o r ears o e erience to hold down the an er attack

L ke Lo ns

r as he smashes a do

le


26  Thursday, April 8, 2021

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

SHORT STOPS Girls soccer falls to Nordhoff

T h e CH S gi r ls s occer t eam dr op p ed a 2- 0 deci s i on t o No r dh of f H i g h S ch ool on W ednes day, M ar ch 3 1 . “ Ou r g i r ls di d ex t r em ely well cons i der i ng h ow you ng m os t of t h em ar e, ” s ai d coach Lu cy C ar let on. “ I was s t r u ck b y t h e f act t h at N or dh of f h ad only t h r ee un der clas s me n on t h ei r ent i r e s quad, w h i le we h av e 15! ” Car let on s ai d t h at i n s p i t e of t h e age and s i ze di f f er ence b et ween t h e t wo t eams , t h e W ar r i or s wer e ab le t o h old No r dh of f s cor eles s un t i l well i nt o t h e s econd h alf , and only t h en conceded a go al on a f r ee ki ck. M any p layer s wer e f or ced t o p lay di f fe r ent po si t i ons t h an t h ey wer e us ed t o, and di d s o wi t h g r ace and p oi s e. S eni or capt ai n Z ah ea H ammadi h ad t o s wi t ch f r om s t r i ke r t o def ens e b ecau s e t h e W ar r i or s wer e mi si ng pl ayer s du e t o i llnes s . Sh e me s h ed well wi t h h er co- cap t ai n Cl ar i sa R ami r ez, as well as f r es h me n out s i de def ender s Lu na G alv an and E ma Mi ller . K eep er Ar i ana Lou ns b ur y h ad f our s av es , and I s ela Z amo r a and S op h i a Mo r a ba t t led on t h e wi ngs wh i le K ar en G ame z s t oke d t h e of f ens e wi t h h er h u s t le and wor ke d well wi t h h er t eammat e A s h ley V er duzc o, wh os e dazzl i ng f oot wor k ke pt t h e No r dof f pl ayer s on t h ei r h eels . Un fo r t un at ely, CH S cou ldn’ t come up wi t h a go al, and t h en t h ey wer e ab le t o put anot h er bal l i n lat e i n t h e game . “W e wer e b uo yed b y t h e r et u r n of B ar b ar a Contreras and Shania Jimenez, both 10th graders playing their first match this year , an d look t o se e mo r e f r om t h em,” C ar let on s ai d.

Boys tennis defeats St. Bonaventure

Apr

T h e C H S b oys t enni s t eam h os t ed t h e St . Bo nav ent u r e S er ap h s on T h u r s day, i l 1 i n a non- league mat ch , def eat i ng t h e v i s i t i ng t eam 13- 5. “I t was act u ally a m u ch clos er m at ch t h an t h e s cor e, ” s ai d coach C h ar les B r yant . “ W e h ad s om e v er y t i gh t se t s i n doub les t h at we ended up p ul li ng out . I gi v e ou r b oys s ome cr edi t as t h ey h ad t o di g de ep and s t ay me nt ally f ocus ed t o ear n t h os e wi ns .” T h e doubl es t eam of T r oy Z i me r man and M at h ew E ndow went 3- 0 on t h e day. T h e t eam of I an T h om as and Z ai den J u ar ez went 2 - 1 , as di d C onnor G r alews k i and G av i n P ender gas t . Bo t h t eams h ad t o wor k h ar d f or t h ei r wi ns . I n s i ng les , A u s t i n S t one and M ax S t one cont i nu ed t h ei r dom i nat i ng p er f or m ances, each wi nni ng b ot h of t h ei r mat ch es b ef or e b ei ng s ub b ed ou t . R yan S ou za went 1on t h e day and i s looki ng b et t er and b et t er , Br yant not ed. S t ev en B eng r y won his first attempt in singles, and Asher Pampel came up just short in a hard-fought tiebreaker in his first-ever singles match. “It’s nice to have some crossover players wh o can se aml essl y sw i t ch f r om s i ngl es t o doub les and v i ce v er s a,” B r yant s ai d. “It definitely gives us more flexibility.” Carpinteria is now 1-1 overall.

Track and field takes on Foothill Tech at weekend dual meet

The Warrior track and field team competed in a dual meet against the Foothill Tech Dragons on Saturday, April 3 at home. Foothill Tech’s depth in the distance r aces coun t er act ed C ar p i nt er i a’ s s p r i nt er s , as t h e D r ag ons edg ed t h e W ar r i or s 68 to 56 in the boys’ competition. The Foothill girls won eight out of nine races to come out on t op of t h e W ar r i or s 71 t o 42. T h e W ar r i or b oys ar e now 1- 1 on t h e se aso n wh i le t h e gi r ls ar e 0- 2. C ar p i nt er i a h ad m any h i g h li g h t s t h r ou g h ou t t h e day. V i ncent R i naldi cont i nu es t o i mpr ess i n t h e s p r i nt s . T h e s eni or gav e up s occer t o f ocu s on t r ai ni ng and i t h as pai d di v i dends, coach V an Lat h am not ed. Ri naldi s et me et r ecor ds i n b ot h t h e 10 and 20 me t er s wi t h t i me s of 1 1.1 1 an d 2.25, r es p ect i v ely. Mat eo H andall h as als o f ocus ed on t r ack t h i s s eas on. H e h as r u n t wo cons ecu t i v e st r ong 40 me t er r aces t o op en t h e s eas on. H e won t h e 40 0- me t er ev ent wi t h a t i me of 53.39 o n Sat ur day. E s ai V eg a was a dou b le wi nner f or C ar p i nt er i a, s weep i ng t h e s h ot p u t and di s cu s . H e was wi t h i n an i nch of h i s p er s onal r ecor d i n t h e s h ot p u t wi t h a t os s of 38- 7 ¾. Co nv er s ely, h e i ncr eas ed h i s p er s onal r ecor d i n t h e di s cu s b y t h r owi ng 1 25- 9. Al ex andr a Z ap at a op ened h er s eas on on a p r omi s i ng not e wi t h a 6.14 s econd victory in the 400 meters. She finished volleyball last week and is in the process of ge t t i ng h er s p r i nt i ng l egs b ack . Ainslee Alexander was a double winner in the jumps. The sophomore set a personal record of 15-3 ¼ in the long jump and won the triple jump with a hop, step and jump of 31-11. Fatima Cervantes equaled her seasonal best in the high jump with a clearance 4-10.

CVN

ON DECK

Thursday, April 8

*Carpinteria Baseball vs. Bishop, 3:30 p.m.

Friday, April 9

*Carpinteria Baseball vs. Hueneme, 3:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 10

Carpinteria Football vs. Santa Paula, 11 a.m. *Carpinteria Track and Field vs. San Marcos, 11 a.m. *Denotes home game

S WI

NG

P H OT OS

ABOVE, Fatima Cervantes equaled her seasonal best in the high jump with a clearance of 4-10. LEFT, A masked Matthew Endow puts the slice on a drop volley. BELOW, Alex Zapata clears the hurdle with ease as Fatima Cervantes aims to catch her.


Thursday, April 8, 2021  27

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

From left to right, Warriors Ruby Cluderay, Isa Alarcon and Belen Herrera compete in the 100-meter dash.

Mateo Handall won the 400-meter event.

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April 8,8, 2021 28  Thursday, Thursday, April 2021

Coastal View News Coastal View News• •Carpinteria, Carpinteria, California California

SBCC horticulture students get hands-on cannabis farming education

Santa Barbara City College horticulture students headed into the field on April 2 to learn about greenhouse cannabis farming in Carpinteria. Students toured Headwaters farm on Foothill Road as part of the hemp cultivation portion of their curriculum. Cannabis and hemp are closely related. Students learned about production management for cultivation and farming techniques used at each stage of the plant’s life. They were able to clip clones from “mother plants” and get new plants started by dipping the clone in a rooting hormone and placing it into a moist growing medium. “Our tour gave the class direct, in-person exposure to what a greenhouse growing operation is like, and even gave them some hands-on experience in methods involved in cannabis cultivation,” said SBCC Professor Michael Gonella. “They were all very appreciative of the tour and are excited to learn more about job opportunities in the industry now.” CARP Growers, the local cannabis farmers group, has worked to provide academic opportunities and internships for college students at SBCC and Allan Hancock College in Santa Maria, which both have incorporated hemp into their curriculums. Colleges and universities face less barriers in studying hemp as cannabis remains a federally illegal plant.

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