Coastal View News • May 26, 2022

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SHIRLEY KIMBERLIN

oastal C

Everything I list turns to SOLD! 805-886-0228 skimberlin@aol.com

This week’s listings on the back page

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CARPINTERIA

Vol. 28, No. 36

May 26 - June 1, 2022

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View News

Workability program at work

11

5th graders tackle “Battle of the Books”

20

Rock, Paper, Scissors champ defends title

22

Shamblin invited to USA Trials

30

Farmyard fun with FFA

Eager pygmy goats attempt to crawl out of the arms of David Flores, left, and Kevin Lujano, right. Flores and Lujano led a combination kindergarten and first-grade class from Carpinteria Family School on a field trip through the Carpinteria High School barn last week, showing off the school’s Future Farmers of America program’s goats, pigs, cows and lambs – including the 500 pound Miss Pig. See more on pgs. 16 and 17. KARLSSON

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2  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

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Carpinteria named one of “20 Best Beach Towns in America”

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hello@dirtbotanicals.com The Carpinteria Lions Club

is proud to announce this year’s

Memorial Day Observance Monday May 30 -- 10 AM

We will honor our Veterans this year with our traditional Ceremony at the Carpinteria Cemetery. Chairs will be provided; you are welcome to bring your own.

Once again, Carpinteria is making a splash in dreamy, beachy destinations! The online magazine, Trips to Discover, has named Carpinteria one of 20 best beach towns in America. Each year, the publication seeks out idyllic stretches of sand, charming seaside towns and laid-back getaways to spotlight. “Santa Barbara’s southernmost town offers quintessential Southern California beaches, a relaxed pace, year-round mild weather, and a wide sandy beach with beginner-size waves, perfect for learning to bodyboard,” Trips to Discover author K.C. Dermody writes. “While mornings can be foggy, that can make for a perfect time to enjoy the pleasures of Linden Avenue, shaded by palm trees and lined with cafes, galleries, and clothing stores.” The travel piece gives shout-outs to downtown favorites like Esau’s Café and The Spot, stating, “This eclectic, artsy town is one of California’s few remaining beach communities that hasn’t lost its original flavor.” To read the article, visit tripstodiscover.com/americas-best-beach-towns.

SB Bicycle Coalition to hold summer bike camp in Carpinteria

Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition will hold a Bike Summer Camp from June 13 to 17 at Carpinteria Children’s Project. Participants will learn handling skills, traffic laws, a little bike maintenance and take daily rides to fun destinations based on the ability of the group. The week-long camp will increase children’s confidence and skill to get to their destination safely. The certified bicycling instructors will share their love of riding and teach the responsibility that comes with it. The camp is open to children 10-14 years old. Campers must be able to ride a straight line, turn and start and stop competently. Sessions are 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday, with 12 participants maximum. Participants must bring a bike and helmet. The cost is $150 per participant. Scholarships and earn-a-bike opportunities are available. For more information contact Kim Stanley-Zimmerman, kim@coast-santabarbara.org.

High Fire Season begins

The Santa Barbara County Fire Department, in conjunction with all local fire jurisdictions including Montecito, have declared May 20 as the start of the 2022 High Fire Season for all areas of Santa Barbara County. During High Fire Season, Montecito Fire Department increases staffing ahead of critical fire weather conditions and dispatches additional resources to wildland fire incidents. Additionally, all burn permits in Santa Barbara County are suspended during High Fire Season. As firefighters prepare for a busy and challenging fire season, the community is asked to join in preparing for wildfire by reviewing evacuation plans and building an emergency supply kit. The “Ready! Set! Go!” guide thoroughly outlines how to prepare one’s home and family for wildfire. To access the “Ready! Set! Go!” guide and other wildfire preparedness information, visit montecitofire.com.

Amtrak offers new pet carry-on program

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Amtrak and the Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN) Rail Corridor Agency, which manages the Amtrak Pacific Surfliner service, has introduced a pet program for the Southern California train route. Amtrak Pacific Surfliner passengers can now bring their dogs and cats weighing up to 20 pounds onboard the Pacific Surfliner trains for $26. The Pacific Surfliner travels along a 351-mile route through San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties, with portions of the route hugging the Southern California coastline. In alignment with Amtrak’s national pet policy, a limited number of pet reservations are available per train and each customer is limited to one pet reservation per trip. Pets will be allowed in all cars, except for Business Class and the Café car. Pets must remain in a carrier at all times and carriers should remain under the seat. Amtrak continues to welcome service animals on board at no charge. To confirm pet eligibility, all customers must read and sign a Pet Release and Indemnification Agreement for each travel segment. For more information about Amtrak’s Pet Policy, visit amtrak.com/pets.

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Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Submit online at coastalview.com

online. community. news. Trash, Recyclables and Yard/Organic Waste Pick Up Delay Due to the Memorial Day Holiday Due to the Memorial Day holiday on Monday, May 30, trash, recyclables and yard/organic waste will be collected one day later than usual, on Friday, June 3 in the City of Carpinteria. Thank you and Happy Holiday E. J. Harrison & Sons

805-647-1414

To order services & pay bills online go to www.ejharrison.com Connect with us! @ejharrisoninc


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  3

Supervisors unanimously deny appeals against two local cannabis grows Concerned Carpinterians’ appeals shut down; cannabis grows will move forward

BY EVELYN SPENCE Following similar opinions as their colleagues at the County Planning Commission, the County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously denied appeals that sought to stop operation of two local cannabis grows, both Van Wingerden family owned. Supervisors were strong in their support for the grows, located at 4701 Foothill Road and 3508 Via Real – particularly the former. They praised the work the Van Wingerden family has done on cannabis odor control in the area; Supervisor Bob Nelson called the Van Wingerden family, “the one that is spending all the money to do it right.” “I’m deeply concerned about the impacts of cannabis on our youth,” Supervisor Steve Lavagnino said. “The proximity to the high school is troubling. Then I went and toured it (…) the most impactful was this odor mitigation. I sat inside the greenhouse, and I couldn’t smell cannabis when it was all around me.” Ed Van Wingerden owns the Foothill Road operation, while his son Ivan runs the Via Real project.

Ever-Bloom Project: 4701 Foothill Road

The cannabis grow at 4701 Foothill Road was unanimously approved by the Santa Barbara South County Planning Commission in early February, although concerns the project is too close to Carpinteria High School have followed it since its infancy. Carla Singer and Concerned Carpinterians – a vocal group in the area – filed an appeal against the Foothill Road grow on Feb. 11, shortly after it was approved by the planning commission.

The project is located on two parcels, spoke Wednesday. Commenter Tina Fawith 18.49 and 10.74 acres. Inside the nucchi-Frontado dismissed suggestions greenhouse on site, a line drawn inside that a Carpinterian majority would be keeps mature cannabis cultivation 750 passive if they opposed a project such as feet away and nursery cultivation 600 feet the Foothill cannabis grow. “With history as our touchstone, if any away from the high school property line. No cannabis processing happens onsite. (Carpinteria parents) had or have ever felt In their appeal, Singer and Concerned that our students and our children were Carpinterians said the grow is not far in harm’s way, well let’s just say, Hell has away enough from the high school, seen no fury like a Carpinteria parent,” and violates district conflict of interest Fanucchi-Frontado said. “(Supervirules and federal sors’) telephones, laws. Singer also inboxes and mailargued that it viboxes would all olates the Civil be inundated by Rights Act and well-crafted and the 14 th amendaggressive correment by unfairspondence from ly impacting the these groups, letmajority-Latino –Santa Barbara County ting you all know high school. without a doubt Planner Gwen Supervisor Steve Lavagnino loud and clear, Beyeler said the their opinions county’s planning and development department does and feelings about this project. Carpinnot take federal law or district conflict teria is not a quiet, Podunk community. of interest policies into consideration And the promise of money and or riches when reviewing cannabis projects, and has never held any leverage here.” Supervisors agreed, noting the largely that the buffers are measured per state requirements. The project does not violate empty room. the 14th amendment or the Civil Rights Act, and it is in “full compliance” with Creekside: 3508 Via Real zoning laws and regulations, and odor The second appeal the supervisors requirements, she said. heard Wednesday focused on the cannaAnn Louise Bardach, who spoke on Singer’s behalf on Wednesday, said she was commenting for future historians. “Would this be happening at Montecito Union School, or any majority white school? We all know the answer,” she said. Public commenters were largely in favor; several commenters from the February planning commission meeting also

“...I sat inside the greenhouse, and I couldn’t smell cannabis when it was all around me.”

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bis grow at 3508 Via Real, owned and run by Ivan Van Wingerden. The 9.68-acre project was approved by the South County Planning Commission in March; an appeal was filed shortly after by Jill Stassinos, Concerned Carpinterians and the Save Arroyo Paredon Creek group. The appellants’ issue largely lied with the grow’s proximity to Arroyo Paredon Creek and how the operation could affect the sensitive habitat. Stassinos argued the operation’s odors would have adverse effects on endangered species in the area and would be a public nuisance, and that modifications to the bank would affect fish and bird habitats. She also shared several pictures of misplaced or blank public notice signs attached to the properties. Planner Gwen Beyeler said several groups have determined odors will not affect fish and birds in the habitat, and that the grow’s odor abatement plan, public notices and bank modifications meet all requirements. While supervisors did ultimately vote to deny the appeal, they praised Stassinos’ approach to the appeal, noting that she did have “salient points.” “It was a legitimate appeal, it was time well spent,” Supervisor Lavagnino said. “But I think the questions you asked were answered in detail by either the staff or the applicant.”

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Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

Advance Care Planning series coming to Carpinteria Woman’s Club CVN REPORT

A free Advance Care Planning series will be given at the Carpinteria Woman’ Club next month, to help Carpinterians make decisions about their health care wishes. The program is organized by Compassionate Care of Carpinteria, an initiative of Hospice of Santa Barbara (HSB) and will be led by HSB Community Engagement Manager Jeanne West. On June 9 at 4 p.m., West will lead a seminar on how to choose a health care agent, a person who can manage a person’s health care in the event they are unable to. West will instruct participants in how to complete the legal document required. West will also hold follow up appointments on June 16 to help get participant’s health directives notarized for free. “As we have seen over the past several years with the rapid spread of Covid, individuals, young and old alike, have become seriously ill with this virulent virus. For many, there were no formal plans in place indicating their health care wishes prior to the crisis,” a representative from Compassionate Care of Carpinteria stated. “This has spurned an increased desire locally, as well as nationally, to help individuals aged 18 and over, to have meaningful discussions about the care they want – or don’t want – in the event of a serious or life-threatening medical emergency.”

Jeanne West, will lead an Advance Care Planning class at the Carpinteria Woman’s Club next month. Copies of the completed documents will be made and delivered to Cottage Hospital. “Beyond the conversation, we need to help individuals actually get the document completed,” West said. Sign up by contacting jwest@hospiceofsb.org or at (805) 866-4234. Registration is required. Learn more at getitdonesb.org. The Carpinteria Woman’s Club is located at 1059 Vallecito Road.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING OF THE CARPINTERIA PLANNING COMMISSION

MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2022 AT 5:30 p.m.

Notice is hereby given that the City of Carpinteria Planning Commission will hold a regular meeting at 5:30 P.M. on Monday, June 6, 2022 to consider the following item: Housing Element Update 2023-2031 The City of Carpinteria Planning Commission will conduct a public meeting to discuss the 2023-2031 update to the Housing Element of the Carpinteria General Plan. The Housing Element is a component of the City’s General Plan and includes analysis of the community’s housing needs, opportunities and constraints, impediments to fair housing, as well as policies and programs to facilitate the construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of housing for all economic segments of the community and persons with special needs. All jurisdictions in Santa Barbara County are required by State law to prepare an updated Housing Element for the 2023-2031 planning period. The full agenda and associated staff reports will be available on Thursday, June 2, 2022 on the City’s Website here: carpinteriaca.gov/city-hall/agendas-meetings/. Details and procedures on how to provide public comment are available on the posted agenda at carpinteriaca.gov/city-hall/agendas-meetings/. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact Community Development by email at lorenae@ci.carpinteria.ca.us or by phone at 755-4410, or the California Relay Service at (866) 735-2929. Notification two business days prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements for accessibility to this meeting. PUBLISH: MAY 26, 2022

Looking for related stories? Search the archives at

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Santa Barbara County Health report as of May 20.

First booster recommended for everyone 5+

The Centers for Disease Control recommended last week everyone older than five should receive a Covid-19 booster shot, and that children between 5 and 11 receive their booster shot five months after their initial vaccination series. Prior to last week, only those older than 11 were eligible for a first booster shot. “Vaccination with a primary series among this age group has lagged behind other age groups leaving them vulnerable to serious illness,” the CDC said in an announcement. According to the CDC, 4.8 million children in that age group have had Covid-19 since the beginning of the pandemic, 180 have died and 15,000 were hospitalized. “Today, I endorsed ACIP’s vote to expand eligibility for Covid-19 vaccine booster doses. Children 5 through 11 should receive a booster dose at least 5 months after their primary series. Vaccination with a primary series among this age group has lagged behind other age groups leaving them vulnerable to serious illness,” CDC Director Rochelle P. Walensky said. “With over 18 million doses administered in this age group,

we know that these vaccines are safe, and we must continue to increase the number of children who are protected. I encourage parents to keep their children up to date with CDC’s Covid-19 vaccine recommendations.” “With cases increasing, it is important that all people have the protection they need.” Only the immunocompromised older than 12, or everyone older than 50, are currently eligible for a second booster shot. The Santa Barbara County Public Health Department will now only report Covid-19 statistics on Tuesdays and Fridays, the department announced. To learn where to get vaccinated for Covid-19, visit publichealthsbc.org/ vaccine. To get tested for Covid-19, visit publichealthsbc.org/testing. For more information from the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department, call 211 and press #4 or email the county at PHDDOC. PIOCommunitySupport@sbcphd.org. Order free Covid-19 test kits through the U.S. Postal Service at covidtest.gov. Call (800) 232-0233 for help with ordering.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  5

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commitment to quality, Cottages Carpinteria offers 1 - anddesign 2-story, 3-bedroom ample storage throughout, with The built-in cabinets and thoughtful finishes. to quality, The Cottages Carpinteria offers 1 - The and 2-story, 3-bedroom 805.570.4965 Yolanda Van Wingerden Thecommitment Cottages range from 2,048 to 2,525 square feet. first two of five homes, homes, all with desirable features such as an optional fourth bedroom or office, homes, all with desirable features such as an optional fourth bedroom or office, Yolanda@BHHSCAL.com at full 5130 andfrom 5140 Ogan Road, will be available and sale beginning 805.570.4965 The Cottages range 2,048 2,525 square feet.solar Thefor firstviewing two five homes, laundry room, mud to room, soaring ceilings, panels, airof conditioning, and full laundry room, mud room, soaring ceilings, solar panels, air conditioning, and 25, 2022. DRE # 01308141 Yolanda@BHHSCAL.com at 5130 May and 5140 Oganthroughout, Road, will with be built-in available for viewing and sale beginning ample storage cabinets and thoughtful design finishes. ample storage throughout, with built-in cabinets and thoughtful design finishes.

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805.570.4965 © 2022 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. anda@BHHSCAL.com BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verifyis the accuracyofofthethat information. are anLLC. artist’s conception and are not intended to be exact replica homes orInsurance landscaping. a member franchise systemRenderings of BHH Affiliates BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marksofoftheColumbia Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. DRE # 01308141© 2022 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. Renderings are an artist’s conception and are not intended to be exact replica of the homes or landscaping. © 2022 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. © Berkshire HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC.Information BHHS and the BHHS symbol registered marks Insurance a Berkshire affiliate. BHH2022 Affiliates LLC Hathaway and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. is obtained fromare various sourcesservice and will notofbeColumbia verified by broker orCompany, MLS. Buyer is advisedHathaway to independently BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy all accuracy data including conditions,areand of property.and Information is obtained and willornot be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verifyofthe of thatmeasurements, information. Renderings anfeatures artist’s conception are not intended to befrom exactvarious replicasources of the homes landscaping. verify the accuracy of that information. Renderings are an artist’s conception and are not intended to be exact replica of the homes or landscaping.


CITY BEAT

6  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

City will accommodate majority of Jr. Lifeguards waitlist after frustrated parents complain More than 100+ children had been stuck on waitlist for popular summer program

BY EVELYN SPENCE After more than a dozen frustrated parents and their children packed Monday night’s Carpinteria City Council meeting, complaining the city’s popular Jr. Lifeguards program was excluding 100 plus children, city staff told CVN Tuesday that they will pull 95 children off the waitlist. Originally, the city program had closed registration at 65 members, putting 100 children – including many who had attended the program in prior years – on the waitlist due to a staffing shortage, city staff told the council on Monday. However, due to recent staffing changes, Aquatics Superintendent Amber Workman told CVN the city will now remove 95 children from the waitlist and enroll them in the program. “We were able to hire more staff and make some adjustments to our program to accommodate more participants, we will start calling people from the waitlist this afternoon,” Workman said Tuesday. The popular seven-week program is a Carpinteria staple, parents argued to the council on Monday during public comment, saying that many plan their summers around the program. They urged the council to up the staff pay rate to $20 per hour from $15, to meet the competitive Santa Barbara city rates. Workman did not confirm to CVN how many more staff it had hired. She later confirmed city staff had submitted a request for pay increases, pending council approval. She had originally told the council on Monday that the city would need at least 10 more instructors to meet the need, “without compromising national safety standards.” Commenter Alena Ballat, 13, told the council Monday that when the Jr. Life-

KARLSSON FILE PHOTO

Frustrated parents swarmed the Carpinteria City Council’s meeting on Monday, complaining that 100 children were stuck on the waitlist for the city’s popular Jr. Lifeguards program, pictured above last year, due to a staffing shortage. City staff later told CVN they will be able to pull most of the children off the waitlist. guards program registration opened at 9 a.m. last week, her mother received a message at 9:04 a.m. “that it was already filled.” “I look forward to becoming a Carpinteria lifeguard one day,” she said. Her brother Michael, who later stood beside her, also told the council he wanted to be in the Jr. Lifeguards program. Parent and Santa Barbara City College teacher Osiris Castaneda also told the council to prioritize Latino representation in the program. He pointed out while 70% of the children in Carpinteria are Latino,

the majority of parents and children present at Monday’s meeting were white. “Forty-five percent to 60% of our Latino children cannot swim properly,” he said. We need to find an avenue for those children, as well as their parents, to get involved in this.” To be a staff member working in the Jr. Lifeguards program, individuals must be older than 18 and pass a swim test. The Jr. Lifeguards program runs June 20 through Aug. 5 on Mondays through Fridays, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. at Carpinteria City Beach.

Chain moratorium vote pushed due councilmembers’ absence

The Carpinteria City Council could not vote Monday on the urgency ordinance temporarily banning chain businesses within the city limits due to a lack of quorum. Because the matter is on the council’s table as an urgency ordinance, it requires that a minimum of four of the five councilmembers vote in favor for it to pass. Councilmember Natalia Alarcon was absent during Monday’s meeting, and Councilmember Roy Lee recused himself from the item, citing a potential conflict of interest; his family owns a small business in town, Uncle Chen Restaurant. The council first discussed an urgency ordinance temporarily banning chain businesses at its last meeting in early May, stating a need to protect small businesses. But while support for the ordinance had been seemingly strong at the last meeting, several commenters at Monday night’s meeting warned the council against passing the ordinance. Commenter Matt LaBrie and his team, who are currently renovating a large commercial property on the 700 block of Linden – formerly the Austin Hardware building – said the ordinance could affect the project’s future construction loans.

The council has not yet decided where it would apply within the city or who it would affect; it does have the authority to make exceptions for certain types of businesses. “We do have a problem with an urgency ordinance,” LaBrie said. “Case law around this section of the government code stipulates that you really need an eminent threat.” City legal staff Jena Shoaf Acos said the council does have the power to introduce an urgency ordinance that affects public health, safety and welfare. For example, if a chain business immediately coming to town could “lead to a lack of diversity within city limits,” that could create health and safety issues, she said. Other commenters, such as lawyer Mark Carney and Little Dom’s Seafood owner Warner Ebbink, asked that the council limit the ordinance to specific locations. Carney, speaking on behalf of the owners of the Casitas Plaza Mall, asked

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the council to exclude the mall from its ordinance. “(The ordinance) really is not necessary,” he said. Ebbink, who gave his full support at last meeting, said he is “pro-development – sensitive, thoughtful development” and asked the council to limit the ordinance to the downtown-T area. “There’s more direct benefit in protecting areas like the T-zone,” he said. If the urgency ordinance passes, it would be in effect for 45 days. The council has not yet decided where it would apply within the city or who it would affect; it does have the authority to make exceptions for certain types of businesses, such as grocery stores or banks, or limit it to certain areas, such as the city’s downtown-T.

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  7

Obituaries

Marilyn Bjork 8/13/1927 – 5/9/2022

Marilyn Bjork was born in Belleview, Illinois, on Aug. 13, 1927. She graduated Cathedral High School in Belleville with honors at 16 years old and then graduated Le Clerc College with a degree in language. She was married to the late Lt. Col. Richard Bjork for 46 years until he passed away. She re-married Anthony Zamarripa, and they enjoyed nine years together. She was a teacher in Ventura County for 34 years before retiring at age 78. She lived in Carpinteria for 13 years, serving the community through St. Joseph’s Church and St. Joseph’s thrift store. She moved to Fort Mohave, Arizona, in 2017, where she spent her last days. Marilyn had four children. She is survived by one son, six grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. A memorial for Marilyn will held at St. Joseph Church in Carpinteria on Tuesday, June 7, at 3 p.m. A graveside memorial will be held at Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City, California on Wednesday, June 8, at 1 p.m.

Billie F. Wilding 10/29/1926 – 5/15/2022

Billie Frances Wilding, 95, of Carpinteria, passed away on May 15 after a short illness. Billie was born in Oklahoma in 1926. She and her family moved to the Los Angeles area when she was 13. She met Robert Wilding and married him in

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1947. They moved to Carpinteria in 1993 from the San Fernando Valley. Prior to her marriage, Billie worked as a hostess at the Brown Derby in Hollywood and was voted Miss Lockheed, where she packed parachutes during WWII. She retired from the LA School District as a cafeteria regional supervisor and trainer. Billie served several terms as president of the Carpinteria Seniors Club, volunteered at the Senior Lunch Program at the Veterans’ Memorial Hall, and was active for many years at the Family Baptist Church. Billie is predeceased by Robert (2010) and son Jeffrey (2022). She is survived by her three children: Robin, Mike and Kim (Baron), as well as eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held 11 a.m. on Friday, May 27, at Carpinteria Cemetery. A reception will follow in the cemetery pavilion.

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8  Thursday, May 26, 2022

In the face of tragedy

School staff is equiped to help

BY JAMIE PERSOON, PRINCIPAL, CANALINO ELEMENTARY AND CARPINTERIA FAMILY SCHOOLS I want to acknowledge the tragedy in Uvalde, Texas, in which a young man shot multiple people, mostly students, in an elementary school on Tuesday, May 24. When incidents like this occur (all too often), we re-examine our own safety plans on our campus. I have heard from some families asking questions about our training for such an event. Our staff members are required to do safety trainings each month through a program called Hour Zero. One of the modules we are trained on is active shooter training. This is unfortunately a scenario we talk about as a staff, and the School Site Council also reviews, edits and approves the Comprehensive Safety Plan in the fall. While we have lengthy safety plans and mandated training for staff, the discussion as a staff is about the current knowledge, and unfortunately the many incidents of violence on school campuses over the years. Previously, we held active shooter trainings in which we would practice a “lockdown” with locked doors, shades drawn and students hiding with their teacher. The data has shown that the lockdown is not the most effective; rather, we discuss and run through the more updated strategy of getting the students and staff away from the violence. Given the size of the campus, there are many exits from the campus, and every staff member has access to open one of the 12 exits from the campus. We also have updated communication systems, as well as 50 staff members who carry radios all day long. As the principal, I would operate as incident command until law enforcement arrived, which would be quite quickly, given the small size of our town. In addition, our gates are locked as of 8 a.m., and there is one way into the campus during the school day, which is the front office. None of us wants to envision any-

“None of us wants to envision anything like this happening in our town ... one of our strongest strategies to address these types of issues is the provision of mental health support for our students and families.” thing like this happening in our town. Nevertheless, the staff is provided training, and the CUSD leadership team discusses safety during our weekly leadership meetings at the district office. One of our strongest strategies to address these types of issues is the provision of mental health support for our students and families. This has been an intentional investment by our leadership team and our governing board, who have invested at Canalino and Carpinteria Family schools with two full-time school-based counselors, a Marriage Family Therapist (MFT) on site, and a full-time psychologist. All of our sites in CUSD have similar and comparable mental health resources as well. Our teachers understand the delicacy of these discussions in class, especially given the young age of our students. We want to create a safe space for questions and also for reassurance. If you have any questions or concerns or comments, please email me directly, jpersoon@cusd. net. For help on how to talk to your kids about violence, please visit nasponline. org, which our counselor Patricia Humbles has provided as a resource. Take good care.

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

VIEWPOINT

In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month, this year celebrated in May, CVN presents a four-week series in which mental health professionals from Carpinteria discuss different aspects of mental health and the resources available to residents in Carpinteria and Santa Barbara.

Addressing loneliness and connection through integrated health care BY ELSPETH MILLS, PSYD

Last year, the American Academy of Pediatrics, along with several other pediatric organizations, declared a National Emergency in Child and Adolescent Mental Health. This year, the World Health Organization reported that the global prevalence of anxiety and depression increased by 25%, citing one major explanation: the social isolation resulting from the pandemic. But even before the pandemic, the United States Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy identified loneliness as a public health “epidemic,” associated with a 26% increase in the risk of premature death. So, if we recognize loneliness and isolation as contributing factors in our national distress, then we can also identify connection as the intervention. The Carpinteria Health Care Center is located at 931 Walnut Avenue and is one of the five clinics in the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department system. The clinics are Federally Qualified Health Centers, whose mission is to serve the uninsured and under-insured. The Carpinteria Health Care Center has provided high-quality and culturally sensitive primary, OB and pediatric care to our community for many years. In the past couple years, the clinic has also begun offering behavioral health services. Clinic patients identified by their health care provider as benefitting from mental health care are referred to me, Dr. Elspeth Mills, a Clinical Psychologist and receive an assessment and treatment plan within weeks of their referral. During their initial appointment, I evaluate current symptoms and severity, and create a treatment plan that may include brief

“If we recognize loneliness and isolation as contributing factors in our national distress, then we can also identify connection as the intervention.” psychological interventions as well as referrals to community resources and specialty mental health care. In addition to working individually with patients, I am also a member of the Carp Connect Collaborative, and have been working with local organizations to facilitate more local opportunities for support and connection. Currently, I am working with New Beginnings Counseling Center to create a weekly “Women’s Circle” that we hope can counteract the loneliness and isolation many of us feel. By integrating behavioral health and primary care, the Carpinteria Health Care Center is able to offer medical interventions that account for the contextual aspects of each unique patient. In doing so, we hope to address both the physical and psychological health of our Carpinteria community. Elspeth Mills, PsyD, is a behavioral health specialist with Santa Barbara Public Health Department.

Upcoming wellness program targeted at teens will be offered by local professionals and agencies.

CVN

Appreciation

SUPERINTENDENT’S DESK DIANA RIGBY CUSD SUPERINTENDENT

The Carpinteria Unified School District is collaborating with the city of Carpinteria, County Public Health, Santa Barbara County Behavioral Wellness, HopeNet, the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Family Service Agency, Carpinteria Children’s Project, Pacific Pride and YouthWell to provide ongoing mental health services to Carpinteria Middle School and Carpinteria High School students during the summer. A variety of classes that focus on cooking, hiking, multimedia, art, drama, journal writing and podcast development

I would like to recognize this year’s retirees and thank them for their dedicated service to the students, families, and colleagues in the district: Darcie Campbell, CHS Counselor; Mary Keane Gruener, CHS Culinary Arts; Debra Leiter, CMS Science; Kathleen Tomscha, Canalino; and Teresa Koontz, GATE. I would also like to recognize and thank Trustee Jayme Bray for her dedicated service and leadership to CUSD for the past four years. She will be relocating to Oregon, and we wish her and her family the very best in their new home and schools.

Congratulations

Shanna Hargett, Canalino School Counselor, was selected to receive this year’s SBCOE Bill Cirone Heart of Education Award for her work as an outstanding educator who demonstrates passion for her profession, creativity, and compassion for students. Nico Lopez, Canalino Instructional Assistant, received the SBCEO Crystal

Apple Award, and the following teachers received SBCEO Teacher’s Network Grants: Crystal Marshall, Canalino; Lucy Carleton, Christine Gilbert and Janelle Jovanni Manrique, CHS; Jessica Gala and Christina Eckert, CMS; and Maria Espitia, SPED Preschool. Five CMS seventh grade students – Avery and Addisyn Galvez, Julie Maya, Ashley Abarca and Mitzy Lagunas – were selected to attend the one-week summer camp, Tech Trek, at UC Santa Barbara, which focuses on STEM education. CHS art student Nansy Camacho won an Award of Excellence in Drawing during this year’s Student Art fund online art show. CHS Boys’ Volleyball made their debut in CIF finals in the Division 5 Championship at Long Beach City College last Saturday.

Governor’s Budget Proposals defy projections

The state revenues continue to defy projections. Schools and community colleges will receive a record $128 billion in funding in 2022–23 under Governor Gavin Newsom’s revised state budget at $300.7 billion, which he presented on Friday.

The TK-12 budget includes a 10% increase in general funding under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF). While CUSD does not receive LCFF funding, allocation increases in one-time discretionary dollars, special education, universal TK, universal meals programs, expanded learning opportunities program and categoricals will assist us in meeting significant cost increases.

Renewal for After School Education and Safety Program

The CDE has reviewed and approved CUSD’s ASES program grant request for renewal for July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2025.

First 5 Grant

The First 5 Commission approved our Early Learning Implementation grant in the amount of $252,907 for the next three years. CUSD partnered with Carpinteria Children’s Project to develop Carpinteria’s Early Learning Plan to improve early childhood education and to strengthen family support structures. Diana Rigby is the superintendent at the Carpinteria Unified School District. She can


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

A heart wrenching protest

It was with a heavy heart that I saw the cover photo and center spread of this publication last week. Other than one brave young couple quietly reading their bibles in protest, the photos of all of those smiling people demanding the right to kill the unborn was truly heart wrenching. Roe v. Wade was enacted in an era before ultrasound and science gave us a better idea of fetal development. I was a teenager in the ‘70s and bought into the whole “blob of tissue” lie. To this day I have family and friends who regret and mourn for the decisions they made, and the babies lost because we all were fed that lie. Do those out protesting realize that overturning Roe v. Wade will simply return the decision to individual states and the voters? Unfortunately, abortion will still be legal in California and many other states. In this great democracy, I would think the protesters would be celebrating taking the decision that was made by an all-male Supreme Court and putting it back into the hands of the people. In the end, any loss of innocent life is nothing to celebrate. It is just heart breaking.

Leanne Rose Carpinteria

We’re not going back there

Thank you for giving such prominent coverage to the pro-choice demonstration (CVN, Vol. 28, No. 35). The front page says I am holding the sign, “I will not go quietly back to the 1950s.” That woman, in a black and white top, is not me. You identified me correctly on pg. 16, where a photo shows me carrying a sign saying “In the ‘60s, I marched for me. In my 60s, I march for you.” There will be many more events to come, and I urge young women and men to join the cause. The majority of protestors seemed to me to be past their child-bearing years. To paraphrase Senator Elizabeth Warren, we’ve seen the world where abortion was illegal and unsafe, and we’re not going back there!

Deborah Dentler Carpinteria

I can’t do this anymore

The second amendment to the constitution was written 230 years ago by men who wore white wigs, had wooden teeth and held slaves. They thought muskets were vital to defending a new country that had some catching up to do in terms of defense against adversaries like England. We don’t live in that time or place, thankfully. We live in today, and cry every day from the massacre of our fellow people, young and old – who are all defenseless against gun culture. People kill a lot of people with guns. There’s nothing sacred about protecting their rights or the rights of so many other backward thinkers. Children have rights to not be shot by American guns. How can we claim to be helpless to fix it because of George Washington? We need to elect people who understand time is not stuck in 1791 and to teach people to think for themselves on important issues with the gravest consequences. We can’t do this anymore.

Peter Dugré Carpinteria

CoastalView.com CoastalView.com

Thursday, May 26, 2022  9

CVN

LETTERS

“Other than one brave young couple quietly reading their bibles in protest, the photos of all of those smiling people demanding the right to kill the unborn was truly heart wrenching.”

–Leanne Rose

An attempt to fasttrack development

Carpinteria’s Architectural Review Board (ARB) is scheduled to decide whether to give their preliminary approval to an interim trail spur that would inappropriately fast-track the development of our Open Space between Dorrance and south of the railroad tracks, prior to the November 2022 election when Carpinteria voters will decide for themselves how this public land should be used. This slight-of-hand rush-job proposal is for an interim trail spur clearly designed to accommodate a future parking lot on our open space parcel. In addition, it includes building a storage area for heavy equipment and a tool shed. Also included in the proposal is a 40-foot-wide opening at the dead end of Elm Avenue. This is both dangerous for children playing in the neighborhood and as reported by the city planner in the staff report, “The parking, in addition to the pedestrian traffic creates a hazardous situation for drivers and pedestrians alike.” This proposal can and should be put on hold, just as the Surfliner Inn’s proposed development is on hold. This proposal needs to wait to go to the ARB, Planning Commission and City Council until after the November election. It is inappropriate for city staff to pursue this proposal before the election, besides being a waste of time and money. Decency and respect for the voices of Carpinterians is called for.

Amrita M. Salm Carpinteria

Out of control: another perspective

In response to the letter “Out of control” (CVN, Vol. 28, No. 34), I am a Non-MAGA (America is Already Great), pro-choice American. I believe women have the right to choose whether or not to have an abortion. I am outraged and disgusted by the Right, Donald Trump, the remnants of the Republican Party and the many feckless and disingenuous politicians and media organizations that condone disseminating disinformation. They do not care about finding solutions to real problems, only espousing their personal beliefs and imposing them on other individuals. Yes, a Supreme Court draft opinion was leaked. I have not yet read that it was a crime to do so, although certainly a breach of protocol. The only crime here is if the Supreme Court’s final ruling reflects the leaked draft. Roe v. Wade has been settled law for 50 years, giving women control and choices over their own bodies – choices that should always be an individual woman’s right to decide, not for individual states to legislate. Individual states have no more rights than the federal government to dictate a woman’s right to choose. No, the Left, the Democrats and the

media did not misrepresent what happened, nor did the peaceful protesters physically threaten the justices, destroy property or cause mayhem everywhere. That was already done on Jan. 6 by the misguided ideologues on the Right who tried to overturn a free and fair election because their “man” didn’t prevail. Going forward, as a pro-choice American, I am done with the Republican Nationalist Party, those who choose lies over facts, and Donald Trump and his sycophants. If those sycophants now in elected offices are not voted out of office in the next election, America as a democratic republic will deteriorate and decay into an autocracy in the control of a minority.

Elaine Dietsch Santa Barbara

Salcido for superintendent

Since day one of kindergarten, Susan Salcido has been committed to and focused on education. Her love of learning and later teaching led her to UC Santa Barbara, where she received a master’s degree in education and later a doctorate from University of Southern California. Dr. Salcido’s vision, foresight and leadership tool bag has and continues to see our school districts through the worst disasters our county has ever endured, beginning with the Thomas Fire to the debris flow to our current state of the Covid-19 pandemic. Public education is the most complicated institution of our public service system and rightly so! Being in charge of our children’s education is not easy, will never be easy and should never be easy. Having a competent, forward thinking, highly educated, work-with, non-party driven superintendent that can keep all the parts moving while employing the skill set to course-correct and plan for future successes is not a skill most of us possess.

I’m forever grateful to Dr. Susan Salcido’s continued and steadfast dedication to our county schools and know, without a doubt, that she’s the best person for this incredibly important, intense and complicated position.

Tina Fanucchi-Frontado Carpinteria

Poor leadership in DC

I have sincere respect for those who disagree with me. I continue to believe that Joe Biden is, by far, the worst president who has held that office during my 84-year lifetime. It would take far more than the allowable number of words to detail all of the economic and decision-making blunders he has made in less than two years and how quickly he places blame on others for the multitude of problems he created. But there is opportunity ahead: this is the United States, the greatest country ever created. We have never been perfect and never will be perfect. However, unlike Russia, China and many other countries, we can speak out and we have the opportunity to replace ineffective leaders. We should also continuously honor those who came before us, imperfect as they were, for building a country that people want to enter. Those who want to leave are free to do so. Granted, we should definitely learn to be a bit kinder to, and more understanding of, those who disagree with our thoughts and beliefs. Our present leaders in Washington D.C. in both major political parties set very poor examples for us. My genuine feeling is that we should replace Biden/Harris in 2024. Legislators such as Schumer, Pelosi, McConnell and a few others should be removed at the first opportunity. I especially abhor those politicians who use the word “racist” to describe those who disagree with them. Biden surfaces here: on July 22, 2020 he called Donald Trump “the country’s first racist president.” We’ll survive what I see as a real leadership crisis. I suggest that we use the wonderful rights we have to clean the swamp in Washington D.C. sooner rather than later. For those who disagree with me, we are all Americans. I love you all.

Sanderson Smith Carpinteria

For the record...

On the cover of last week’s edition, the woman standing in the forefront holding a sign was misidentified. The correct name is Carlena McKnerney.

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Submit online at coastalview.com

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Providing local news and information for the Carpinteria Valley

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Coastal View News is locally owned and operated by RMG Ventures, LLC, 4180 Via Real Suite F, Carpinteria, CA 93013, and is published every Thursday. Coastal View News has been adjudged a newspaper of general circulation by the Superior Court of Santa Barbara County, Case No. 210046. Coastal View News assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material.

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10  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

The 1/9 debris flow was not so rare

Montecito and Carpinteria have been hit by four other debris-charged events during the past 200 years – and they were worse, researchers say.

BY MELINDA BURNS

The bulldozers are back at Randall and East Valley roads this month, working on the final phase of Montecito’s newest debris basin – a giant bowl designed to trap boulders and fallen trees and help protect the downstream homeowners on San Ysidro Creek from catastrophic debris flows. When it is finished in late August, the $10 million Randall Road basin will be the fifth on Montecito’s deadly creeks. The older basins on Cold Springs, San Ysidro and Romero creeks were quickly overwhelmed after the pre-dawn deluge of Jan. 9, 2018 and could not prevent the worst impacts of the raging rivers of mud, boulders and fallen trees that engulfed whole neighborhoods: 23 fatalities, 500 structures damaged or destroyed, 1,000 rescues in the first 24 hours, the closure of Highway 101 for 13 days and $1 billion in economic losses. Montecito will be somewhat better protected next time. To help get ready, the county has spent $800,000 expanding the Cold Springs basin by 50%. Next year, work will begin on a sixth debris basin on Buena Vista Creek, for $3 million. Even against the backdrop of these and other public works, though, much of Montecito remains exposed to dangerous debris-charged flows and floods. According to a $600,000, 168-page study of the historical record (which can be read at tprcsb.org) entitled “Fire, Flood and Landslide Dam History: Community of Montecito and Vicinity” and released this spring by the Project for Resilient Communities, these events are far from rare. “This was such a rough experience that trying to learn more about it is sometimes the only way you’re going to get better,” Pat McElroy, Project for Resilient Community’s executive director and a former city of Santa Barbara fire chief, said of the 1/9 catastrophe. The Project’s study shows that Montecito and Carpinteria have been hit with four other debris-charged events during the past 200 years that were larger than the 1/9 debris flow – the debris flows of 1825, 1861-62 and 1914, and the debris-laden floods of 1995. That’s an average “return interval” of 48 years between massive debris-charged events here. In all, the study shows, the South Coast from Gaviota to Carpinteria has experienced 36 debris flows and debris-laden floods since 1825. Twenty-two of them engulfed large portions of Montecito and

COUNTY FLOOD CONTROL

The original outlet at the Gobernador debris basin in Carpinteria, shown in the top photo in the basin embankment, has been modified to allow mud to pass through and capture more boulders and trees. In the bottom photo, the basin lies upstream behind the modified outlet. The county plans to similarly upgrade the outlets at the Cold Springs, San Ysidro and Romero debris basins, beginning this spring. Carpinteria – and that tally is likely on the low side because the 19th-century record is sparse, researchers say. “This was astonishing news to me,” said Larry Gurrola, the Project’s lead scientist and a consulting geologist with 27 years of experience in the tri-counties. “The news reports didn’t call them debris flows, but they referred to them as tidal waves of boulders, trees and water coming down the creeks and banks as a huge wave, destroying everything.” Two-thirds of the time, Gurrola found, debris-charged events in these communities occurred in post-wildfire conditions – the critical five-year period after a fire has devastated the mountainside and heavy rains are most likely to trigger an avalanche of mud. On 1/9, the massive Thomas Fire was still smoldering as the boulders and burned vegetation surged downhill. “The recent past is key to understanding the near future,” Gurrola said. Gurrola scoured newspaper archives; property records; geological survey, topographic and aerial maps; and county, state and federal flood reports to determine the size and frequency of debris flows and debris-laden floods in Montecito, and he mapped the paths they took on Montecito Creek and its tributaries, Cold Springs and Hot Springs creeks. “It seems like every time I came across a Montecito event, Carpinteria was part

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of it as well,” Gurrola said. “The two watersheds are similar in terrain and geology.” The Project, a non-profit group, now hopes to raise $2 million to map the debris flow paths for the rest of Montecito’s creeks. The goal is to help the county draw up a master plan for protecting Montecito, McElroy said. “We’re trying to illuminate the problem and keep it in the public mind,” he said. “I think it makes some people nervous, but there’s no pretending it won’t happen again soon.” The Project is best known for installing two steel “ring” nets each across Cold Springs, San Ysidro and Buena Vista creeks to catch debris above the existing basins – a $5 million project that was funded with private donations and completed in 2019.

The 1914 catastrophe

After 1/9, UCSB geologists identified what they said was the previous debris flow of that magnitude in Montecito, an event at least 1,000 years old. But Gurrola contends that the 1914 debris flow was the “penultimate” event. In both 1914 and 2018, boulders and trees came surging out of the canyons during extreme rains, riding walls of mud 20 to 30 feet high, permanently altering the topography of Montecito and Carpinteria. In 1914 accounts, there is mention of hundreds of trees washing out to sea from all the creeks in Carpinteria. In the course of his review of the historical record, Gurrola found that after wildfires, the creeks sometimes produced multiple debris flows within just a few years or even months – a consequence of heavy rains, steep slopes, soft rock and vast amounts of vegetation on the mountainside. These findings contradicted a 2020 UCSB study that said it would probably take “hundreds to thousands of years” to build up enough material in the canyons to produce another large debris flow. “That’s just not true, and it does give people the wrong impression,” Gurrola said. “The watersheds of Montecito and Carpinteria are capable of quickly regenerating ample boulder and vegetation debris.” The Coyote Fire of 1964, for example, was followed by a debris flow in Montecito within two months, a debris-laden flood in Santa Barbara in 1967 and debris

flows in Montecito and Carpinteria in early 1969, Gurrola said. Ed Keller, a chief author of the UCSB studies and Gurrola’s former Ph.D. geology advisor, declined to comment. Gurrola’s work was reviewed by his mentor and co-author, J. David Rogers, a geological engineer at the Missouri University of Science and Technology and an expert in landslide hazards and levee failures. In newspaper accounts of the 1914 debris flow, one eyewitness, Jose Graviel Hernandez of the Fithian Ranch in Carpinteria, compared it to the events of 1825 and 1862. He recommended adopting the practices of the indigenous people and settlers who kept the lower canyons clear of trees in the early 1800s and let the flood waters radiate out onto the coastal plain. One of Gurrola’s more startling findings was his discovery of 10 debris flows and debris-laden floods that were caused by the collapse of landslide dams from Santa Barbara to Carpinteria during the past 200 years. A landslide would block a creek after heavy rains, forming a temporary lake. Then, within 24 hours, the dam would break, triggering a potentially deadly debris flow. The first landslide dam outbreak that appears in the historical record took place on Santa Monica Creek in Carpinteria in December 1861, Gurrola said. An account from the Heath Ranch describes how, on a clear night after rains, a sudden flood rushed through, swamping the house and leaving the entire plain covered in water 18 inches deep.

“Hero” of 1/9

There are no easy answers for how or even whether to try to “build out of” the fire-flood cycle in Montecito, even as it becomes more dire under climate change. Carpinteria is another story: the vast debris basin that was built by the federal government in 1977 above the town on Santa Monica Creek is twice as big as the Randall Road project. On Jan. 9, 2018, the Santa Monica basin filled once with debris and saved the city, prompting county officials to call it “the hero” of the day. During the debris-laden floods of 1995, the Santa Monica basin filled twice. But a basin that size is not under consideration in Montecito; there are too many homes in the foothills. In the wake of the multiple debris flows that followed the Coyote and Romero fires of 1964 and 1971, respectively, the county Flood Control director concluded that land near the mouths of creeks and along creek banks in Montecito “should probably not be built on at all.” Melinda Burns is an investigative journalist with 40 years of experience covering immigration, water, science and the environment. As a community service, she offers her report to multiple publications in Santa Barbara County, at the same time, for free.

online. community. news. 05/24/2022 1:28:17 PM


Thursday, May 26, 2022  11

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Working hard at Workability Program BY DEBRA HERRICK

Q & A with CMS Education Specialist Kelli Flores

would not receive otherwise.

Special Education programs provide much needed support to students with different learning abilities and at different developmental stages. Carpinteria Middle School education specialist Kelli Flores, M.Ed., teaches students with moderate to severe disabilities and case manages students with IEPs who are mainstreamed into general education. CVN invited Flores for an interview to learn more about her background in Special Education and the school’s program, including the Workability program, which takes kids to local businesses to learn more about future career choices.

What is your favorite part of teaching in the special education program at CMS? My absolute favorite class to teach is Workability. I learned a lot from one of our former instructional assistants, Anya Ibarra, who was running most of the program before I was hired. Special thanks to her for going above and beyond her normal duties to get this program started.

CVN: How long have you worked at Carpinteria Middle School? Kelli Flores: This is my fourth year at CMS. I started at Canalino Elementary School mid-year in 2017 as the resource specialist but was transferred at the end of the year due to the need at CMS to start a moderate/severe program, as the number of students with moderate to severe disabilities was growing. I never would have envisioned myself as a middle school moderate/severe teacher but to my surprise, I’ve really enjoyed it and feel that it was a blessing in disguise to create this much-needed program here and serve a variety of students who really benefit from it. What inspired you to become an education specialist? My original inspiration to go into this field started in high school with a family friend who had a disability. I taught her basic life skills and how to swim one summer as a swim instructor/lifeguard. Teaching her to swim was one of the most incredible and rewarding experiences of my life at that time. She was extremely fearful of water because she had a breathing trach in her throat most of her life. She was eventually able to remove it and the hole closed which is when her mom asked me if I would try to teach her to swim. At the start of summer, she was so fearful that she wouldn’t even get in the water and by the end of the summer, I was able to get her to jump in, swim across the pool

KARLSSON

From left, Carpinteria Middle School Workability program instructional aide Marisa Hallinan is with education specialist Kelli Flores, who leads the Workability program. and dive for rings at the bottom. I’ll never forget that magical summer. I went to California State Long Beach on a soccer scholarship and majored in Psychology. I have a mild/mod and a mod/sev education specialist credential as well as a Masters in Special Education from University of the Pacific. I started my teaching career as an instructional aide in a resource elementary classroom in Long Beach and fell in love with working with students with special needs and making a difference. What classes do you teach at CMS? I have my own classroom designed for students with mod-sev disabilities. The classes that I teach are English, Math, Science, Academic support and Workability. My classroom also serves as a safe space on campus for a variety of other children with and without disabilities to come and get a snack, water, rest or take a break when they need it. I love how the space I have created has served as such an amazing resource for many other students as well.

Describe the Workability program. The objective of the Workability program is to teach students about a variety of career/job opportunities as well as acquire simple job skills that we practice in our classroom (answering phones, cooking, cleaning, making coffee, gardening, etc.) At the beginning of the year, I always ask students what they want to be when they grow up and I do my best to tailor our field trips around their interests so they can get an idea of what kinds of jobs they could possibly have in the future. For example, if a student loves animals, we may go to the zoo or the veterinary clinic. I always try to make sure that each student really looks forward to at least one of the trips we plan but really, they all learn so much from all the trips and enjoy them all. So much more is gained from these experiences that I never even realized such as practicing how to order at a restaurant, social communication skills with asking questions and waiting your turn, and just exposure to all these opportunities in the community that they

Any pitfalls to implementing the program that you can share? In the past, transportation and money have been an issue. Big thanks to our special ed director, Karla Curry, who has helped us navigate the transportation costs and supported the purchases of our coffee business and funds for cooking. The vans even when approved are also sometimes not available or they are broken down and we used to have to pay for each van usage prior to the current special ed director. Some field trips like the zoo, MOXI Museum, etc. require an admission fee of some sort. Sometimes we are able to pay with money from a grant, but the amount is not very much. Time, as a special education teacher and mother of two young children, can always be a pitfall as well, but I have been very fortunate to have amazing instructional aides to assist me with this program. Without them this would not be possible. Marissa Hallinan has taken over after Anya Ibarra took an office job at CMS mid-year and has done an amazing job helping me plan, set up field trips, and more. I am so grateful for their support. What is your greatest hope for all CMS students? My greatest hope for all CMS students is for them to be able to learn in an environment where they feel loved and safe. I’ve done my best to create a very welcoming environment in my classroom where all students are welcome, and I know our administration, counselors and CMS teachers have also worked really hard to create that culture on our campus as well. I’m so blessed to be working among so many caring adults across the CMS campus.

After 21 years, district counselor welcomes retirement BY EVELYN SPENCE

Over the past 21 years, Darcie Campbell has worked several roles in the Carpinteria Unified School District: playground supervisor, elementary school aide, middle school counselor and finally as a counselor at Carpinteria High School. Campbell, who is set to retire at the end of this school year in two short weeks, told CVN that of all her time on campus, it is the people she worked with and helped she will remember the most. “It’s been an awful lot of fun,” she said. Campbell grew up in the Santa Barbara area and moved to Carpinteria in the late 70s after she got married and bought her first h ome. S he h ad h er children in Carpinteria, who went through Carpinteria schools. But after taking a few classes in psychology and childhood development, she decided to go back to college at 35 after she “had my family situation set up.” Campbell has an undergraduate degree from Cal State Northridge, and a masters from Azusa Pacific University. She first worked in the district as a playground supervisor – “That was my first job,” she said. “That set the career in motion.” From there, she worked as an elemen-

tary school aide before working at the county education office in special education. She then returned to the middle school as a counselor, before taking a job as a high school counselor. When asked if one student or memory stood out, Campbell recalled a student from early in her career who had attended Harvard. “(The student) had actually completed two AA degrees from the community college before they even graduated high school. That’s a rare thing,” she said. “Writing a letter of recommendation for a student like that was very challenging, but very rewarding.” Campbell, who has a granddaughter at the middle school, said she hopes to travel, but mainly wants to focus on her hobbies: painting, gardening and exercising. She described her profession as rewarding, and said it was an honor to work at the district over the past two decades. “It’s a really rewarding profession for people that are interested in working with our next generation of students, and it’s really an honor to be able to support our parents and students in the community,” she said. “I’m very blessed.”

KARLSSON

After 21 years with the Carpinteria Unified School District, counselor Darcie Campbell will retire at the end of the school year.


12  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

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Thursday, May 26, 2022  13

CVN

ARTCETRA

A show of Carpinteria artist Ben O’Hara’s landscape paintings is now on view at Zookers Restaurant.

Ben O’Hara landscapes exhibited at Zookers

On May 24, the art show “California Gold” opened at Zookers Restaurant featuring landscape paintings by Ben O’Hara. “It showcases my latest paintings and will take you on a visual journey through our local backcountry, to Jelly Bowl, and beyond to the Channel Islands,” O’Hara said. O’Hara said he planned to donate 20% of proceeds from the show toward student scholarships at the Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center. “California Gold” will run from May 24 through Aug. 21. Zookers Restaurant is located at 5404 Carpinteria Ave.

Carpinteria artist Robert Abbott’s oil painting, “From Alma Rosa,” is now on display along with several of his other works at the Marcia Burtt Gallery in Santa Barbara.

Robert Abbott featured in SB gallery

A new show at Marcia Burtt Gallery in Santa Barbara features works from Carpinteria artist Robert Abbott. The show, “Cultivated,” features paintings and photographs of agricultural aspects of Central Coast and Southern California. Abbot’s oil paintings depict landscapes inspired by his work as a farmer, focusing on vehicles, buildings and crops that decorate the area’s farmland. “Abbott does not just observe the landscape; he transforms it. As a farmer, he creates practical land art that results in rows of ochre sprouting into greens and yellows. As an artist, he deconstructs the parts and rebuilds them into paint, emphasizing patterns and shapes that form the farmland seen from a particular viewpoint,” the exhibition text states. Marcia Burtt Gallery is located at 517 Laguna St.

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The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center is looking for volunteer aides to help with its summer camp. Pictured, from left, are prior years’ aides, Emma Lapidus, Jillian Stineman, Adele Kulingara and Eduardo Vences.

Teen volunteer opportunities open at Carpinteria Arts Center

The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center is looking for teen program aides to work at its annual Sea Summer Camp, according to outreach director Joyce Donaldson. The summer camp runs from June 20 through Aug. 5. Program aide volunteers can receive up to 35 community service hours a week for assisting summer camp program leaders. All aides must participate in an orientation session, held this year on June 18, prior to the beginning of camp. Six positions are available. Applications are due by May 31. Learn more at carpinteriaartscenter.org/ summercamp.

Women’s communications group announces summer, art-themed mixer

The Association for Women in Communications – Santa Barbara Chapter will hold its next networking event, an art-themed happy hour at Sullivan Goss Gallery in Santa Barbara on June 8 at 5:30 p.m. Registration is required; tickets are $20 for non-members, free for members. Learn more at awcsb.org. Sullivan Goss Gallery is located at 11 E. Anapamu St.

Submit your art news at

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14  Thursday, May 26, 2022 20  Thursday, May 28, 2020

“The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent”

COMMANDER’S DUNCAN’S RECAP REEL CVN

Reports from the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office

COASTAL BUREAU OPERATIONS

DEAL

MAY 17 – 23, 2020

M AT T D U N C A N Sunday, May 17

was recovered and booked into Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Office property.

9:54 a.m. / Unregistered Firearm / Everyone who grew up in the 1990s 1400 block Sterling Avenue vividly remembers movies like “The

Deputies responded a call about a Rock,” “Con Air” andto“Face/Off.” fi rearm and contacted a man who reportThey were full of explosions and car edly had an unregistered Kimber 1911 chases, international intrigue and soarfirearm in his possession. The firearm was ing scores. And they all starred Nicolas taken Who from didn’t the man andhim? secured into the Cage. love Santa Sheriff’s ceyounger property CageBarbara is not the star toOffi the department for generations thatsafekeeping. he was to mine, and his movies may not have aged that well, 11:44 / Misdemeanor Hit and but, to a.m. be fair, with a little distance, it’s Run to / 6500 block Rincon Road(“The hard deny it: Stanly Goodspeed Deputies responded to a misdemeanor Rock”), Castor Troy (“Face/Off ”), and hit and run call, but thearemale subject Cameron Poe (“Con Air”) ridiculous. fled the Unbearable scene traveling southbound on “The Weight of Massive Rincon Road. man continued southTalent” is for The everyone. It’s a Nicolas bound on the northbound off-ramp Cage movie about Nicolas Cage writingof at movie Rincon about Road. Nicolas Deputies aHighway Nicolas 101 Cage checked the area and Cage. were unable to Cage – starring Nicolas locate the subject. It starts off, at present day, with Nick Cage past his prime and hustling, trying to get p.m. back to the days of/superstardom. 2:12 / Narcotics 4600 block He’s not a great family man either. EvCarpinteria Avenue eryDeputies interaction he has with his daughter, responded to narcotic activity Addy (Lily MoaSheen), about and contacted womanis who hadhim, two his outinterests his career. standingand warrants: one out of Hermosa Nickbut alsowas hasnon-extraditable, a lot of debt, even taking Beach and the jobs payofit Santa off as the entertainment at othertoout Barbara. The woman the wealthy’s parties. At warrant one of wasmega arrested for the outstanding these Nick flies to Mallorca, Spain, out ofjobs, Santa Barbara County. to be the entertainment at Javi Gutierrez’s (Pedro Pascal) birthday party.and 3 p.m. / 015F / Linden Avenue It turns out Javi is a super fan who Malibu Drive thinks “Face/Off ” is the best movie of A black purse was found at Linden and all time. Nick can get for on board with that, Malibu, then booked safe keeping. The and they quickly become fast friends. owner was not contacted. Javi sparks a renewed love of acting in Nick. Javi shows Nick his movie script. Sunday, May 17 After reading Javi’s script, Nick begins 8 p.m. Trespassing / 3200 block to work/with him on developing it. Via Real Meanwhile, there’s a Nicolas Cage A caller is renting home on the twist. Whilewho in Spain, the aCIA contacts Polo Field reported that several people Nick. They need his help. They say Javi, forcedand their intoasher home sweet funway loving he rental may seem, and starteda yelling and insulting her is actually brutal arms dealer who family. Deputies arrived and contacted six people, who admitted entering the home after they were directed to come look at the damaged caused by the caller. The caller showed cell phone video of the suspects entering the home without permission and were heard and seen yelling at the caller and her family. The husband-suspect fled across the Polo Field and did not return to the scene. A complaint will be forwarded to the DA’s office for review.

6:15 p.m. / Theft / 3200 block Via Real

A caller reported that she believes her laptop and credit cards were stolen by a female neighbor who lives at the Polo Field apartments. Follow up by deputies.

Tuesday, May 19

6 p.m. / Towed Abandoned Vehicle / 2200 block Lillie Avenue

Deputies received complaints about recently kidnapped a politician’s daughan abandoned vehicle parked near Sandter. The CIA wants Nick’s help finding piper Liquor. The vehicle was tagged and the girl. on Nick must decide who tovehicle trust. marked Thursday, May 14. The The chemistry and Nick was checked andbetween was notJavi moved. The is delightful. Almost from the get-go, vehicle was towed. you want them to be friends. It’s also set in a picturesque Spanish seaside village. Wednesday, May 20 Cage and Pascal play off each other’s 8:28 p.m. masterfully. / Meth Possession / 1100 chemistry block Casitas Pass of “The UnbearPart of the genius A Weight man drove into a parking lotthat not able of Massive Talent” is wearing histoseatbelt. A trafficand stoppoke was it manages both celebrate initiated, and he admitted tomovie being in posfun at Nicolas Cage and the genre session of a meth pipe. During a search he’s so well known for. The movie is a of the vehicle, his meth pipe was located, ridiculous action movie. Nicolas Cage, but also a baggie with 3.7 grams of meth. the man himself, is ridiculous. Almost The subject that wastakes cited place for the everything inviolations. the movie is absurdly silly.

10:12 p.m.fun, / Weapon Dope It’s also a blast ofand a movie. Violations / Hales Lane and Via “The Unbearable Weight of Massive Real Talent” is rated R for language through-

A woman and man were contacted as out, some sexual references, drug use their vehicle was getting dropped off by a and violence. tow truck. The woman is on active probation a searchaofformer her property Mattand Duncan, Coastalshowed View she hadeditor, meth,has a meth pipe and a container News taken physical but not of pepper spray. She Carpinteria is a convicted emotional leave from to felon be a and prohibited from owning pepper philosophy professor at Rhode Island Colspray. baggie of meth found in the lege. InAhis free time fromwas philosophizing, center console and since no onearound, wanted Duncan enjoys chasing his kids to claim it,movies the man given ownership watching andwas updating his movie since was duncansreeldeal.blogspot.com. his vehicle. reviewitblog,

3:38 a.m. / Dope Violations / 4100 block Via Real

A woman and man were in a vehicle with a stolen license plate, reported to Santa Barbara Police Department. A traffic stop was initiated, and it was determined the vehicle was not stolen, but was rented a few weeks ago by the woman. She thought the “PERM” on the Arizona license plate meant it was only a “permit” for the vehicle and not an actual license plate. So, to avoid getting pulled over, they placed a stolen plate on the car, she said. After a search of nearby motel rooms associated with the subjects, they, and the woman’s sister, were cited for possession of stolen property, meth and paraphernalia. Further investigation will be done for the fraudulently obtained EBT cards.

GOLDEN

ANNIVERSARY?

5 p.m. / Open Beer Violation / Linden Avenue and 9th Street

A man was cited and released for possession of an open container.

5 a.m. / Welfare Check / 2100 block Ortega Hill Road

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A caller reported that his girlfriend’s 27-year-old son had a bad dream and ran out of the house naked and was last seen Thursday, May 21 running towards Summerland. Deputies 8:47 a.m. / Driving with False responded and located a man walking Registration / Carpinteria and Palm nude on North Jameson near Sheffield. The man claimed he smoked marijuana avenues A man was driving with a false regiswith friends and wanted to go to the tration tab. He was cited for the violation hospital His mother Tell to usdetox. about your pet and drove send ushim a picture, too. and allowed to park the vehicle at his to the hospital. Favorite snacks, special tricks, nicknames,mechanic let all ofshop located nearby.

Car • PET • teria

CarpinteriaMay know18 about your furry, feathered or scaly Monday, 10:06 p.m. / Suspended License / 10:41 a.m. / Tossed Mail member. / Via Real family Via Real and Vallecito Road and Carpinteria Creek

A man was stopped for not displayEmail scattered news @coastalview.com Mail was found off a county ing license plates on his truck. A records access road by a Caltrans site. The mail check showed his driver’s license was

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

20  Thursday, August 31, 2017

Halos Pitchforks

&

A reader sends a halo Rockwell Printing. “HerLumbergraphic A reader sends a halototoKaitlyn Burleneatfor making the Carpinteria artsyard genius is only matched by her stunning personality and willingA reader sends a halo to the generous person for paying for the Nursery area a joy to visit. “Her outgoing personality (Southern ness to gofriendly above and beyond for customer service. She hasstation. our reader’s gas when she forgot her ATM card at the gas “I’m style), conversation and plant knowledge make ithelped a pleasure business Iand chose the most expensive oil, I’d love to reimburse you, and tosorry visitimmensely.” shop.” thank you. I’m deeply moved by your generosity.” halo to Lance at thewonderful Carpinteria Sanitaryand District for A reader sendsAareader halo tosends Sean aand Dayna for being neighbors helping all the knowledge and time he and his crew gave the reader in getting their plumbing A reader sends a halo to the 93013 Fund, Uncle Chen Restaurant the reader through another frazzled mom situation. straightened out. and Marybeth Carty for the surprise delivery of a delicious dinner complete with a fortune painted rock.person “Wonderful kindness quite a in thrill!” A readercookie, sends candy a halobar to and the anonymous who left a $100and donation the A reader a halo offi to Hugh Lee “who to myyou ‘Sweetie’ onekindness.” year ago.” HELP of sends Carpinteria ce mail slot thisintroduced past week. me “Thank for your A reader sends a halo to the staff of Jack’s Bistro for staying open during CoA reader“Always sendsaahalo Larry Nimmer. “I hope he has a wonderful vid-19. ahalo smile noDaykas matter how busy. A great way startwith thebirthday.” day.” A reader sends totothe for always being there totohelp anything and never complaining. “Many thanks to the best neighbors ever. We love you all dearly.” A twoWade boys who rescued baby ducks that were separated A reader reader sends sends aa halo halo to to the Mayor Nomura for the city’s beautiful flower wreath from their wounded mother and took them all the way to Goleta to the Wildlife at the Carpinteria Cemetery for the Memorial Day program. A reader sends a halo to Tami and John at Robitaille’s for their constant smilesCare and Network. “Bless you good young men with big hearts. Young men admired.” over-the-top customer service. “The wedding favors were loved by to allbe and brought reader sends a halo to Seattle those who acknowledge people with disabilities. “When aAbit of Carpinteria to the wedding!” A reader sends aa halo to the of theoracreage bywith the intersection of the roadand to you encounter person in aowner wheelchair walking a walker, please smile Ojai, Hwy 150 and Via Real. “Your stunning, picturesque, yellow mustard plants say hello sends to thataperson.” A reader halo to Lance Lawhon at the Carpinteria Sanitation District for are a treat to the eyes. It is always great to watch your variety of plants grow. Your helping Kim’s Market. hardworking crew areto a real asset for you.” A reader sends a halo the Carpinteria Beautiful lady picking up trash in a neighborhood near the beach. “Thank you! We needatallThe theSpot. help we can get A reader sends a halo to Kassandra Quintero “When the keeping roof-toptrash flag A reader halo to in City for helping the reader, homeowner, picked upsends inand thea lodged neighborhoods onemployees the beach-side of the tracks.” was twisted theHall rain gutter, Quintero jumped into actiona and climbed obtain permits needed to complete project. “Ifreely. want Way to especially thank Jason up to the roof and untangled it so thattheir it could wave to show patriotism!” and Mariasends for their help. to City Hall A reader a halo to Kudos Carpinterians whoemployees!” put out boxes in front of their homes full of surplus avocados, from“It their “Thankwedding, you for sharing your A reader sends oranges, a halo to Emma andetc. Justin. wastrees. a wonderful great food, A reader sends a halo to great the members the moving Church and of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day abundance.” spectacular location and people! Itofwas wonderful.” Saints for providing an outstanding meal for the homeless in the community. A reader reader sends sends aa halo halo to to Nikki all the at beach community residents. “Thank you for A HEAT Culinary. “I went to my first class thisparking weekA sends ahome halo towith Andrew, the young man working at time! Goodwill, whoget helped inreader front your end withof my sister, who hasyour been permit.” to four so far. I had the best Someone this the find school things theirFood grandchildren. “He stayed with me until we girl reader a TV show, she should be for on the Network already.” found all we needed… without I would probably still beSenior there trying evA reader sends a halo to Diana,him a caregiver at Carpinteria Lodgeto forfind nearly erything. Whomever hired him got one young man that was the equal of two people.” three years. A reader sends a halo to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and the local vet for working diligently to save the Rincon Beach bear. “It’s a terrible shame A sends areader halo tosends Dave the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network forAvenue rescuaofhalo to Tom Sweeney for going out on toreader lose one ofAthese magnifi cent creatures; however, I wouldn’t want it toElm suffer to a ing a young red tail beach hawk stranded onplastic the sidewalk Arbol Verde Street. by the to clean up bottles,on bags, dirty gloves and“Another masks. miserable death.” halo to the kind folks who walked out of their way to avoid startling the hawk.” A reader pitchfork toSwing the new zones. the “no parkA reader sends a halo sends to Billaand Rosana forparking spending their“All Saturday taking photos for Junior Warriors appreciate all you doneighborhood. for our families, playing/two hour”Football. signs just“We made people park in my Seventh ers and program. Youneighboring rock!” and the streets are a packed parking lot.”

Editor’s note: There were no pitchforks submitted this week that were suitable fortheir publication. A reader sends a pitchfork to tho se who lied on FAFSA and took scholarships

A reader sends a halo to DJ Hecktic for coming out early Saturday morning to support away fromWarriors. kids who“It need it. the kids so happy to hear you say their names—you’re the Junior made a local celebrity to them!”

Submit Halos & Pitchforks coastalview.com. Submit Halos & Pitchforks online online atat coastalview.com. Alla halo submissions subjecttoto editing. A reader sends to Diana Rigby,are Superintendent of schools, and Debra HerAll submissions are subject editing.

rick, director of Boys & Girls Club, for removing the toxic Euphorbia fire sticks from the pots and landscape. suspended. The man was cited, and his he found a small baggie containing a vehicle was released to a licensed driver. white powdery substance underneath the driver’s seat of his recently purchased RECORDS • POSTERS • VINYL ART • THEMED APPAREL & MORE!the The man stated he purchased 2:37 a.m. / Public Intoxication / WALL vehicle. vehicle three weeks ago but didn’t find Bailard Avenue small Two men were contacted in a parked DEADLINE Ethe XT ENbaggie DEDuntil he’d removed the truck and both were extremely intoxi- driver’s seat to fix the reclining mechadocumented, and cated with open containers of alcohol nism. The incident E bwas i-lingual P Individual/Family Plans RE was booked into Santa Barbara observed in the vehicle. One man was the baggie F Concfor ierdestruction. ge edmost icarecooperative, Supplem5285 enbut ts Carpinteria PM Offi•ce805-318-55O6 property not being the once Sheriff’s Avenue Covered Ctoalexit ifornthe ia vehicle, Cust10am-4pm omer Service he wasPconvinced Mon-Sat:a 10am-8pm • Sun: pat down search of his person was con- Saturday, May 23 ducted. Deputies located a collapsible www.stevensinsurance.com 5:49 a.m. / Domestic Violence / Call baton in Today: the man’s 805-683-3636 front waistband. He 3412 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 4100 block Via Real was cited and both were released to a Deputies responded to a motel on Via sober friend. Real for a report of a domestic violence incident. Upon arrival, a deputy conFriday, May 22 tacted a man and woman in the parking lot. After contacting both subjects, there 7:41 a.m. / Theft / 5500 block Calle were visible injuries on both parties. Due Arena Deputies responded after a woman re- to conflicting statements regarding their Min-pin, pit bullwas mixburglarized Jolene is the mutual altercation and obvious injuries, ported her residence a peppy puppy from Paw Works prior night. The woman stated a cartoon both parties were arrested for corporal Ventura. While still catching up onfrom injury on a spouse. of almond milk and tools were taken hergarage. vaccinations, enjoys beher She toldJolene the reporting deputy ing carried around in a baby wrap 10:36 a.m. / Hit and Run / Cameo that the tools belonged to her daughter’s by human companions Amanda boyfriend. The deputy attempted to con- and Casitas Pass roads Schumacher Marcus Tracy.times tact the man viaand telephone multiple Deputies responded to a report a of a Jolene visits Carpinteria once a her black sedan crashing into a parked water with no response. The woman stated monthdoor with was Schumacher who is a the truck. While en route, it was also reported garage unlocked during biologist for Forde Biological Connight and is in the process of getting a the male subject driving the sedan fled sultants, new lock. monitoring She did notwater haveresourcany suspect the scene on foot. Upon arrival, deputies es at Carpinteria Creek. Her favor- was observed the sedan abandoned in the information at the time. The incident ite food is frozen blueberries which 4850 A CARPINTERIA AVE. middle Cameo Road with major damdocumented, and patrol will follow-up soothe her teething gums. Super Behind Rockwell Cleaners for further details of the stolen items. age to the front right passenger wheel friendly and energetic, Jolene loves to be pet and play fetch.

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See RECAP

continued on page 22

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428 xx  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Thursday, May 26, 2022  15 Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CARP MAG

The Summer Issue Has Arrived! Sneak Peek inside…

COASTING BACKWARDS: CARPINTERIA BEACH LIFE IN BLACK AND WHITE

The joy of summer beach days never ages, and we’ve got new (old) proof. Take a look at this stunning collection of Carpinteria Beach photos from the 1920s-1940s and see if you don’t recognize the same smiles and silliness of today.

IT’S OUR JAM! THE CROUSE FAMILY SQUEEZES EVERY DROP FROM ITS BACKYARD BOUNTY Water, sunshine, hard work and lots of love go into the Crouse family’s backyard garden. What comes out are fruits, veggies and jams, pickles and preserves in every color of the rainbow.

#BLESSED: DISHING WITH THE DISCIPLES OF ST. JOE’S RESALE

Churches provide community, and Saint Joe’s Resale Shop proves that churches’ thrift shops do too. Devoted patrons and volunteers have their own unique history with this second-hand treasure trove.

OUT OF THE BLUE: ART, SURFING AND AIRSTREAM DWELLING

There’s more to the friendly park host at Rincon County Beach than the sacred responsibility of opening and closing the parking lot gate each day. Artist, professor and surfer Pecos Pryor channels emotion into art while savoring each day in his house on wheels.

PLUG IN AND PLAY: THE E-BIKE REVOLUTION COMES TO CARPINTERIA

What has two wheels and electricity and just zoomed by you with a happy rider aboard? An e-bike, of course. New e-bike fans are created daily, and Carpinteria is home to many.

PI C K U P Y OU R C O P Y AT B USINESSES T H R O UGH OU T T H E VALLEY OR AT OUR OFFICE, 4180 VIA REAL, SUITE F


16  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News •

Carpinteria, California

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  17

Kids & kids get down in the dirt on farm field trip PHOTOS BY ROBIN KARLSSON

A combined kindergarten and first grade class from Carpinteria Family School had some one-on-one time with the animals at Carpinteria High School, courtesy of Carpinteria’s Future Farmers of America chapter. The Carpinteria High School group – which raises pygmy goats, cows, lambs, pigs and other farm animals – gave elementary students a tour around the barnyard, providing a close look at how the animals are brought up. Carpinteria’s FFA chapter is well known for its rearing tactics; it earned Chapter of the Year in 2021.

Quinn Knabke, right, pets a white pygmy goat with the help of David Flores, left.

From left, Bodhi Swigart, Brooklyn Allison and Sylvia Mohr draw pictures of the farm animals they observed in the barn. ABOVE, Gabriel Castillo pets 500 pound Miss Pig while she sleeps.

A curious kid checks out Ella Cagle.

LEFT, Quinn Knabke BOTTOM LEFT, Gabriel Flores moves animal manure.

Coastal View News Carpinteria

Celebrate your Graduate!

Celebrate your grad in our Special 2020 Grad Is

Erin Kane and her son Sean

Publishing Thurs. June 9

CHS, CMS, Elementary Schools, Cate & Bishop welcome!

Submit materials to Kris@CoastalView.com

ACTUAL AD SIZE

Deadline June 2 at 5pm

Congrats FFA member Kevin Lujano, left, shows off a black pygmy goat to Carpinteria Family School students, from left, Kai Cagle, Suzette Clay and Ella Cagle.

Issac, Isaiah, & Iyanna!

12th, 8th, & 6th

GRADE GRADUATES!

Publishing T June

available for rela

To our 3 IAC’s which we are beyond proud of. Another one bites the dust.

full co free De

Love, Mom & Dad

only $

Carpinteria High School, Middle School & elementary Insert at Graduation & in CVN scho Color • Free Design DeadlineFull Monday June 1st at 5pm ONLY $125

Submit materials to kris@coastalview.co


16  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News •

Carpinteria, California

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  17

Kids & kids get down in the dirt on farm field trip PHOTOS BY ROBIN KARLSSON

A combined kindergarten and first grade class from Carpinteria Family School had some one-on-one time with the animals at Carpinteria High School, courtesy of Carpinteria’s Future Farmers of America chapter. The Carpinteria High School group – which raises pygmy goats, cows, lambs, pigs and other farm animals – gave elementary students a tour around the barnyard, providing a close look at how the animals are brought up. Carpinteria’s FFA chapter is well known for its rearing tactics; it earned Chapter of the Year in 2021.

Quinn Knabke, right, pets a white pygmy goat with the help of David Flores, left.

From left, Bodhi Swigart, Brooklyn Allison and Sylvia Mohr draw pictures of the farm animals they observed in the barn. ABOVE, Gabriel Castillo pets 500 pound Miss Pig while she sleeps.

A curious kid checks out Ella Cagle.

LEFT, Quinn Knabke BOTTOM LEFT, Gabriel Flores moves animal manure.

Coastal View News Carpinteria

Celebrate your Graduate!

Celebrate your grad in our Special 2020 Grad Is

Erin Kane and her son Sean

Publishing Thurs. June 9

CHS, CMS, Elementary Schools, Cate & Bishop welcome!

Submit materials to Kris@CoastalView.com

ACTUAL AD SIZE

Deadline June 2 at 5pm

Congrats FFA member Kevin Lujano, left, shows off a black pygmy goat to Carpinteria Family School students, from left, Kai Cagle, Suzette Clay and Ella Cagle.

Issac, Isaiah, & Iyanna!

12th, 8th, & 6th

GRADE GRADUATES!

Publishing T June

available for rela

To our 3 IAC’s which we are beyond proud of. Another one bites the dust.

full co free De

Love, Mom & Dad

only $

Carpinteria High School, Middle School & elementary Insert at Graduation & in CVN scho Color • Free Design DeadlineFull Monday June 1st at 5pm ONLY $125

Submit materials to kris@coastalview.co


18  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News •

Seniors Spotlight

PHOTOS BY ROBIN KARLSSON

With graduation less than a month away, CVN is catching up with Carpinteria High School’s Class of 2022. In this weekly series, soon-to-be Warriors grads give us a sneak peak to what’s ahead for them.

NATALIA PEREZ

be EXT: I will WHAT’S N gh BCC throu going to S hen, T . e program the promis r o g to UCSB transferrin ology tudy psych UCLA to s ience or neurosc OOL HIGH SCH FAVORITE IF for Going to C MEMORY: and tennis water polo TO: FORWARD y LOOKING lf e g mys b Challengin e g d le my know advancing tion and educa

Carpinteria, California

VALERIE OJEDA

WHAT’S NEXT: I’m gonna be hon est, I have no idea

FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MEMO RY: Playing tennis with my friends . This year we had a great team and we all really bonded, especially with Henry, our toy pig that we passed around LOOKING FORWARD TO: Not wak ing up at 6 a.m.

EMMA JEAN HOLMSTROM

WHAT’S NEXT: Attending OTIS College of Art & Design FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MEMORY: Meetin g new friends, learning more about myself LOOKING FORW ARD TO: Finding my pass ion in college by expl oring my artistic abilities

IAN THOMAS

WHAT’S NEXT? I will be attending Cal Lutheran in the fall

FAVORITE HIGH SCHO OL MEMORY: Winning CIF for water polo and traveling with my tea m LOOKING FORWARD TO: I’m looking forward to starting thi s new stage in my life

ALONDRA BADILLO

WHAT’S NEXT: SBCC

FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MEMORY: School dances LOOKING FORWARD TO: Graduating

BRIANA RODRIGUEZ

ly SLO WHAT’S NEXT: Cal Po g OL MEMORY: Playin FAVORITE HIGH SCHO r ou in ez Yn nta ng Sa water polo and beati first round of CIF TO: Learning about LOOKING FORWARD ring bio-medical enginee

QWETZEM ARCE RIV ANY ERA

WHAT’S N EXT: Cal S tate Unive at Long B rsity each FAVORITE HIGH SCH OOL The Spirit Week rally MEMORY: first seme during the ster of my senior yea r LOOKING FORWAR D TO: Tra and findin veling g a career me happy that make s


Thursday, May 26, 2022  19

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

PIPER CLAY TON

EXT: WHAT’S N LO, Cal Poly S olitical p majoring in science HIGH FAVORITE EMORY: SCHOOL M Mr. De La Talking to period Cruz in 7th FORWARD LOOKING g TO: Meetin o e new p ple

EGA EMILY ORT sferring

n tran SBCC, the : T X E N ’S WHAT sno to CSU Fre ORY: HOOL MEM C S H IG H FAVORITE rm ut at the fa Hanging o TO: New FORWARD LOOKING s experience

ALEA DAHLQUIST WHAT’S NEXT: Majoring in elementary education at California Lutheran University FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MEMORY: Cheering at the halftime show and going on our Virtual Enterprise class trip to New York

CHARLES SANTIZO

WHAT’S NEXT: SBCC, then transferring to C al Poly FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MEMO RY: Senior rally durin g the first semeste r LOOKING FORW ARD TO: Going to Cal Poly

LOOKING FORWARD TO: Meeting new people and discovering what I am passionate about

EVANNY NAVARRO

uation, and attending WHAT’S NEXT: Grad ty Cal Lutheran Universi OL MEMORY: FAVORITE HIGH SCHO d cheering at New York City trip an s Friday football game TO: Meeting new LOOKING FORWARD mories at friends and making me college

BRIAN GARCIA WHAT’S NEXT: Going to SBCC FAVORITE HIGH SCHOOL MEMORY: Playing soccer LOOKING FORWARD TO: My next adventure

2022 GRADUATES… WE CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS!

#WSND


20  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Paula Evans Consulting QuickBooks Payroll & Bookkeeping Can’t get out? Need help writing checks? In-home services for Seniors 65+

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

SCHOOL NOTES

Pay Caregivers, Bills, Bank Local Errands & Post Office Insured, local, personal service since 1996

Call for a Free Consultation!

pc.paula4u@gmail.com 805-895-0549

CARPINTERIA

SENIORS

Getting together for Fun • Friendship & Fellowship

FIRST FRIDAY EVERY MONTH Special events and Local Travel Trips scheduled frequently

The fun starts at age 55! Join us at our next event:

FRIDAY, JUNE 3• 1pm

Cannabis Education for Seniors

GUEST SPEAKER: TINA FANUCCHI

We meet at Carpinteria Community Church! Carpinteria Senior Citizens Inc. Call (805) 368-5644 for information

“How do you know that this land is sacred?” Three reservation Navajos were on their way to a Pow Wow They stopped by my place to visit my Native American foster daughter, Renae Geneeha. My daughter was at a young peoples AA dance. But I welcomed them. While I was preparing food, I overheard one of them say that this land was Sacred. I can out of the kitchen and asked, “How do you know that this land is Sacred?” Yellow Hand and Blue Cloud were Shy. They seemed unready to talk about it with someone they probably felt might not understand. But Leeroy, who I had gotten friendly with on previous visits, slowly began to explain. “Whenever you have the mountains on one side protecting you from your enemies and the ocean on the other side, that is a sign. There is food for The People, gifts from both the mountain and the ocean. The ocean offers up drift wood for shelters, for fires, for building boats that take The People to the Islands, Islands that protect them from tidal waves. And the mild climate means the gardens will grow food year round. He hesitated, And there are other ways, he continued, the way of the Spirit…but The People will talk about that only among themselves.” There are those that believe that it is Sacred benevolence that is playing a role in Carpinteria’s small town survival PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Developing stories

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From left, fifth grade students Alanni Navarro, Alia Matthews, Jade Ornelas, Carson Weber, Jane Mayer, Amaya Kuryliw and Luella Runhaar tackled this year’s Battle of the Books competition.

Read-y, set, go!

Canalino Elementary and Carpinteria Family schools’ fifth grade students jumped right into this year’s, Battle of the Books, an annual countywide competition that encourages reading across the county and identifies top-notch readers. Each student had to read between 15 and 28 books to qualify before they were placed with other students in the county. Students answered several questions about the books on the reading list, competing against 20 teams of five or six students. “Our Carpinteria students had a fantastic time meeting other readers from across the county and flexing their reading prowess. Congratulations, readers!” Canalino transitional kindergarten teacher Katrina Kuryliw said.

to the Carpinteria Children’s Project last week, thanking their teacher, Ms. Horrigan, the Carpinteria Library, the Friends of the Carpinteria Library Used Bookstore and their parents.

“I learned that I love helping kids and that we are capable of doing things to help out the community,” Boles said. “I cherished the time that I spent with Isabella while being able to do lots of work.”

Tweens donate books and skateboards to Children’s Project

Local tweens Isabella Stovall and Naomi Boles have found their newest venture: a skateboard and books initiative, aptly named Books & Boards. Last year, Stovall helped raise $23,000 for the Carpinteria Skatepark. For this initiative, Stovall and Boles reached out to local businesses for sponsors. Over the past few months, they were able to collect skateboards, helmets and books for children under 12 years old. “They were inspired by the community’s support for the skate park and want all kids to be able to enjoy it, regardless of socioeconomics. So, they raised money to purchase skateboards and helmets. And books too, because reading is important,” Stovall’s mother, Jessica, said. The pair handed over their donations

Do you have a photo from Carpinteria’s past? Contact news@coastalview.com to share it with other readers!

Isabella Stovall, left, and Naomi Boles, right, met with Carpinteria Children’s Project Executive Director Teresa Alvarez, center, to deliver skateboards and books from the girls’ new charitable initiative, Books & Boards.

Coastal View News welcomes your letters

Letters must include your name, address, phone number and signature. Letters are subject to editing. Letters over 300 words will be edited in length. Submit online at coastalview.com


Thursday, May 26, 2022  21

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Still searching for Tom Curren

CVN

IT’S ALL SURFING CHRISTIAN BEAMISH First released 25 years ago, the film “Searching for Tom Curren” was screened in Ventura the weekend before last, and I bailed-out on family movie night at home in hopes of seeing TC’s timeless surfing once again. Unfortunately (despite Curren’s surfing looking as fresh as ever) the film quality was so bad that I left half-way through. The first indication of trouble was the film-operator’s personal computer desktop projected on the theater screen. People in the crowd called out, “Fit-to-screen!” as the film started because it needed to be formatted from the home computer set up. Tickets online came to about 18 bucks with additional fees, and I was feeling kind of ripped off with the funky set up and murky picture as I headed back to my car, navigating the Saturday night downtown Ventura party scene, grateful to have my family to get home to. But Tommy’s Q&A on stage beforehand salvaged the event. Still fit in his late 50s, with a trim haircut salted grey on the sides, Curren walked on to raucous applause from an appreciative audience. As is his way, he was at once seemingly bemused, self-conscious and, ultimately, self-possessed. The host first gave away a Channel Islands Twin Fin, which was amusing as the winner (determined by a large Rip Curl Wetsuits sticker placed randomly under his seat by staff before the start of the event) was a rowdy young dude who immediately announced that he was giving the board to his deserving friend. Not impressed with the man on the mic’s attempts at hype, the board winner turned and gave the crowd a deadpan, perplexed look in lieu of answering inane questions. As for Curren, the hype-man on stage was asked about his surfing experiences in Ventura. One could almost see the collective mental images developing from the older surfers in the room – the epic Jimmy Metyko photos of a once-ina-century sandbar at Santa Clara Rivermouth in the 80s, with TC and the late and beloved Willy Morris going tube-ride for tube-ride in those brisk winds blowing straight offshore from the Oxnard Plain. “Well, being from Santa Barbara,” Curren explained, “we have to come to Ventura for waves.” This brought knowing laughs from the crowd, both for the essential truth of the statement and for Tom’s sardonic delivery. “So, thank you, Ventura, for having us.” “You’re welcome!” a surfer barked-out from the crowd, the exchange at once humorous and suggestive of earlier, edgier days on the beaches of Ventura and Oxnard. Us Santa Barbara County surfers do make the run down to Ventura and Oxnard, especially in summer, as only South-East swells (they’re rare but they do come, originating from hurricanes just off Cabo San Lucas) make these shores work, June through September (evening wind-swell notwithstanding). We also head down there in winter because the curve of the coast, and the deep water just offshore makes the Northern Hemisphere surf hit the beach with undiluted power,

Nobody does it like Tom. and that hard-offshore Oxnard wind makes world-class waves. How to say this delicately? Ventura County, after-all, is distinct from Santa Barbara County with many neighborhoods having what my wife and I call a “high RV quotient,” and, perhaps an even higher per-capita rate of full-body tattoos. Then again, jostling for parking with the Maserati set in Montecito and estate surveillance on the public thoroughfare at Padero Lane make for their own forms of social alienation. I like Ventura for the same reason I like Carpinteria, which is that both cities have their roots in the natural resources that define them: agriculture here, and (complicated and freighted as it is) oil there, along with a solid fishing and manufacturing base as well. People who make and do things in the physical world – who Walt Whitman celebrates in “Leaves of Grass” referencing the working man’s “barbaric yawp” – have a refreshing “realness” to them. It is said that a surfer’s style is reflective of the kind of person they are: aggressive, harmonious, non-committal, etc. I also think that surfing offers another reveal that has nothing to do with personality, only one’s level of achievement in the very specific skill set of wave riding. In other words, surfing cannot be faked. It can be emulated and is often overdone, but bottom line, a surfer can only do what he or she has the ability to do on a wave – that’s the beauty of our sport. Tom Curren, three-time world champion, is unique among all surfers for the physical poetry he brings to wave riding. At once poised and radical, there are elements from every era of surfing in his performance. And if surfing does telegraph some aspect of personality, then his wave riding suggests the ability to adapt and incorporate the full gamut of experience – from a Hawaiian Style “Bully Boy” stance in big waves, to lithe whips and snaps on the clean point surf of home. Whether in the far West of Ireland, or on the gritty shores of Oxnard, or even on a movie screen with poor quality, watching Curren surf is an education. Christian Beamish took leave of his position at Coastal View News in October 2020, to pursue his surfboard business, “Surfboards California,” full time. He continues his monthly column. The former Associate Editor of The Surfer’s Journal, Beamish is also the author of “Voyage of the Cormorant” (Patagonia Books, 2012) about his single-handed expedition down the coast of Baja California by sail and oar in his self-built Shetland Isle beach boat. He lives with his wife and two children in Carpinteria.

Surfing cannot be faked. It can be emulated and is often overdone, but bottom line, a surfer can only do what he or she has the ability to do on a wave – that’s the beauty of our sport.

THURS.

FRI.

HIGH: 64 LOW: 57

HIGH: 64 LOW: 57

SAT.

SUN.

MON.

HIGH: 71 LOW: 58

HIGH: 75 LOW: 55

HIGH: 71 LOW: 56

SURF & TIDES SURF DIRECTION WIND

TUES.

WED.

HIGH: 70 HIGH: 74 LOW: 59 LOW: 59

SUNDAY Sunrise: 5:47am • Sunset: 8:03pm

THURS FRI SAT SUN MON TUES 1 ft 1 ft 1 ft 2-3 ft 2-3 ft 1-2 ft W SW W W W W 9mph/SSE 6mph/W 5mph/SSW 9mph/WSW 11mph/WSW 10mph/WSW


22  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CVN

SNAPSHOTS PHOTOS BY ROBIN KARLSSON

Arts Center celebrates volunteers The Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center celebrated its volunteers on Sunday under the sunshine. At top, left: Christy Schofield was named Volunteer of the Year and received a special gift for her support of the arts community. Schofield is a regular gallery host who said she enjoys greeting visitors from around the world as they take a tour of the Charles LoBue Gallery. Above, right: Marilyn “Missy” DeYoung, left, was also celebrated at the annual appreciation gathering. Lynda Fairly, right, art center board member and namesake, took home a signed copy of DeYoung’s latest book. Everyone attending also received a signed book, “Remarkable Women of California.” At right: Lena Childers and Jacob Smith delight in mimosas and cupcakes.

Procore employees get carnival as company thank you

Last week, Carpinteria-based software giant, Procore, showed its appreciation for employees with a carnival including a Ferris wheel, games and food delights. Above, Procore employee Sydney Campbell channeled her carnival vibes to tame a snake.

Rock, Paper, Scissors champion triumphs again

Santa Monica Creek gets a makeover

At the community workday cleaning up the Santa Monica Creek last weekend, volunteers helped pull weeds and nurture native plants. From back left: Ivan Van Wingerden, Peter Dugre, Ray Kolbe, Das Williams and Tina Culver; from front left: Reinier Van Wingerden, Delilah Culver and Kaya Williams.

Submit your “snapshots” at

CoastalView.com

At the Island Brewing Company’s annual Rock, Paper, Scissors contest held on Friday, May 20, Byanca Carrillo (pictured above), the reigning champion, took home the first-place award for the third year in a row. At right, brothers Isaac and Josue Zick made it to the semi-finals, with Josue, left, moving onto the final match where he succumbed to first-place winner Carrillo.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Gluten-Free Strawberry Shortcakes with Mascarpone Whipped Cream

Strawberry Filling:

2 cups strawberries, sliced ½ lemon, juiced ½ orange, juiced 1/3 cup of sugar a pinch of salt

extra dough, re-roll the dough and cut until you have no more left.

Whipped Cream:

1 ¼ cup heavy cream ¼ cup powdered sugar 1 t vanilla extract ½ cup room temp mascarpone Shortcakes: Preheat oven to 350F. Lightly spray or butter a baking sheet. Mix all the dry ingredients in a stand mixer or bowl. Then add the butter and mix for a couple of minutes to disperse everything. Mix heavy cream and vanilla in a separate bowl then add to the dry mixture. Press the mixture together.

FOOD COURT

Strawberry Filling: In a bowl, mix sliced strawberries, lemon juice, orange juice, sugar, and salt then set aside. Stir every few minutes until the sugar dissolves leaving you nice syrup. Mascarpone Whipped Cream: Using a mixer or whisk, whip the cream, sugar, and vanilla until medium stiff peaks form. Add your softened mascarpone and mix until fully incorporated. Assembly: Carefully cut your (cooled) shortcakes in half horizontally. Divide and place macerated sliced strawberries on the bottom of your shortcakes. D r i z z l e s t r a w b e r r y s y ru p o n t h e

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FRI: THE SONS OF JOE SATTERLY 6-9 PM aLL6-9 daY SAT: CHILLPOINT PM spaghetti W/Meat SUN: MICHAEL “WITT” GUITAR 1-4 PM

Chef Heather grew up in upstate New York. She followed her dream of living in Southern California and received her certificate in Culinary Arts at SBCC. She has worked at many places coast to coast, including Eleven Madison Park in New York City, and earned the Executive Pastry Chef title at San Ysidro Ranch in Montecito. She currently is head of the pastry program at The Food Liaison in Carpinteria and has gained a loyal following from near and far. She is passionate about bringing people joy with her delicious desserts.

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Prepare a lightly gluten-free floured surface, like a large cutting board or counter, and place your shortcake mixture on it. Roll out the shortcake dough to approximately ½ inch thick. Cut out round pieces with a 3-inch ring cutter or cookie cutter. You should get about six cakes. If you don’t have a ring cutter, you can cut it into squares with a knife. If you have

Place shortcakes on a prepared baking pan 1 or 2 inches apart. Lightly brush egg-wash on top of shortcakes and sprinkle with raw sugar. Bake 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Set aside to cool.

bottom of your top halves. Spoon or pipe on your whipped cream, then place the top of the shortcake on the whipped cream.

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Can you believe it’s almost June and summer is right around the corner? What better way to bring in the season than to share my strawberry shortcake recipe? There are many versions of this dessert, calling for anything from angel food cake to almond shortbread cookies, but in my opinion the original recipe is best. Made with a flaky biscuit-like shortcake, fresh citrus macerated berries, and a dollop of whipped cream, these shortcakes are sure to impress. I couldn’t have had better timing in sharing this recipe because we are in peak strawberry season, and it happens to be National Strawberry Shortcake Day on June 14. Many states around the country hold strawberry festivals around this date, including the Mattituck Strawberry Festival, which I have attended many times during summer vacation with my family on Long Island. There is also the California Strawberry Festival held just down the road in Oxnard. California produces roughly 90% of strawberries grown in the United States, so take advantage of our local farmers market and buy some of these ultra-fresh and sweet berries. If strawberries aren’t your favorite fruit, feel free to substitute another berry or stone fruit. Enjoy! Recipe yields about 6 cakes

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H E AT H E R G I A C O N E

2 cups gluten-free flour (I prefer Cup4Cup brand) 1/3 cup +1 T sugar 1 T + 1 ½ baking powder 1 t salt 4 oz cold butter, cut into pea-sized pieces 1 cup heavy cream 1 t vanilla extract 1 egg beaten for egg wash 1/8 cup raw sugar

ER

PASTRIES IN PARADISE

Shortcakes:

GRAB

CVN

Thursday, May 26, 2022  23

6/30/22 ONLY AT 4610 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA. OFFER VALID THROUGH 6/30/21 Coupon not available with 3rd party vendors or delivery (or delivery partners). Delivery prices may be higher than in restaurant. Tax not included. One coupon per customer per visit. Limit one discount per coupon. Original coupon must be presented and surrendered at time of order. Not valid with any other offer, discount, or combo. Price may vary. Cash value 1/100 of 1 cent. Not for resale. © 2021 Carl’s Jr. Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved.

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24  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

20  Thursday, July 17, 2014

CVN

ON THE ROAD World’s Fastest CVN

Brian Rochlitzer took his copy of CVN with the Carpinteria Skatepark groundbreaking on the cover to El Mirage, California, to race his custom-built motorcycle – aiming to beat a new class record. “The officials didn’t let me shove it inside my leathers to actually make it the world’s fastest Coastal View because it was a potential fire hazard, but I tried,” Rochlitzer said.

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The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Invitation letters 5 Historic periods 9 Silents star Mary 14 Palace resident 15 Soft rock? 16 Waste metal 17 Neck part 18 Shots, for short 19 Glide along 20 Lock of hair 22 Like many wallpapers 24 Bacon portions 26 Dollar divisions 27 Like some garages 30 Faux ___ 33 Biological stages 36 Window ledge 37 "Reversal of Fortune" Oscar winner 38 Playground game 39 Power glitch 40 Urban unrest 41 Airplane measure 43 CT time zone 44 Bibliophile's destination 45 Reject rudely 47 Corrections list 51 Take turns 55 Pillow filler 56 Cowboy gear 57 Fail miserably 59 Clothing line? 60 WWII German sub 61 Margarita fruit 62 Alternatively 63 Blabs 64 "Lane" anagram 65 Farmer's purchase

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Answers to Previous Crossword: T H I S A N T I T E S L A

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9 10 11 12 ACROSS 1 Flow stopper 15 16 13 14 5 Heroin, slangily 18 19 17 Reports from the 9 Tylenol target Santa Barbara County 13 Pandemonium 22 20 21 Sheriff’s Office 15 Bridge fee 23 24 16 Toot one's horn COASTAL BUREAU OPERATIONS • MAY 15 – 21 17 Simple organism 25 26 27 28 18 Cut time, in was at fault for the collision because 30 31 32 33 34she Sunday, 15 29 music May Thursday, March 14 was not paying attention. Deputies de1406 hrs / Theft / 5500 block 20 Mathematical 36 37 38 39 40 35 Library preschooler Carpinteria library, 5141not Carpinteria the subject was under the Carpinteria Avenuestory time, 10:30 a.m.,termined curve Ave., 684-4314 infl uence. The reporting party and the 43 44 45 41 42 staff reported that two individ22Motel Window Rotary Club of Carpinteria meeting, 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., lions Park Community subject exchanged information. uals treatments used a room without paying. The 46 47 48 Building, 6197 signed CasitasaPass road, non-members rSVP to49566-1906 motel’s manager citizen’s arrest, garment 23 Monk's Bingo, 1witness p.m., Veterans Walnut Ave.hrs / 53 50 Building, 51 identify 52 941 the 1510 Theft / Casitas Pass but refused to 24 the Sensible Farmers Market and Arts & Crafts Fair, 3-6:30 p.m., linden Ave. downtown, Craft Road 25 Woebegone suspects. The male suspect was found in 54 55 56 57 58 fair: 684-2770 A resident reported the theft of a cat29 Goodbye, possession of to a meth pipe with residue Free Stress Relief Veteran’s Acupuncture Clinic, 6-7 p.m. drop in, 4690 Carpinteria 61 59 ts card that did 60 converter at some alytic point between and Guillermo a California benefi Ave. Ste. A, 684-5012 May 12 and May 16. 30 Curly-tailed not belong to him. 63 64 62 Karaoke, 8 p.m., Carpinteria & linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria linden Ave. canine Dusty Jugz Country Night, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden Ave., 684-3811 66 31 Type of May race 16 65 Thursday, May 1967 Monday, 35 Huge amount 1156 hrs /Copyright Stolen2014 Vehicle / ViaSyndicate Real 1647 hrs March / Traffic 15 Collision / 4600 by The Puzzle Friday, 36 All together The reporting party said his vehicle block Carpinteria Avenue 40 Traveler's stop Stablep.m., Curious 39 Spring (from) 51 between Give the slip CVCC Lunch & Learn,5noon-1 Cup, 929 linden Ave., 684-5479 x10. 15 was stolen sometime May Deputies responded to a non-injury 41 Pond Refuse The Peacegrowth Vigil, 5-6 p.m.,compartments corner of linden42 & Carpinteria Ave. 52 Weighty books and May 19. traffic collision involving four vehicles. drink choice receptacles Island east road, of 43 Sculler's 6 Soft Concert, Music in ourneed Schools Month 7:30 p.m., CHS cafeteria, 55 4810 foothill Sobriety field tests were conducted on one 44684-4701 Ocean ray 7 The whole 45 Paint remover Java of the involved parties. He did not show 1451 hrs / Incident / Shepard Mesa 46 Blazer shebang 47 Fishing spot 56 Coastal flier Back Track, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden Ave., 684-3811 any sign of impairment from alcohol and Road 50 Recollect 8 Fancy duds 48 Picturesque 57 Biblical king The reporting party said his computer his results came back at 0% blood alcohol 53 Fountain fare 9 Wore away 49 Write down 58 With-ring link Saturday, March 16 content. Police decided he showed signs was hacked and money was stolen from 54 Bent-billed bird 10 Paris pancake hastily 60 Water source account. Carpinteria Saltthe Marsh docent tours, his 10 a.m., free walks start from the park of55being under infl11 uence of aled stimuSoftware trial Safe place 50 Metabolism type sign, lant. He684-8077 was booked into Santa Barbara 59 Do-gooder 12 Discharge Magicarp Pokemon League, 11 a.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden County Jail. Friday, May 20Ave., (619) 972-3467 61 Bar mitzvah 14 Freight-train Energy Balancing, 2-4 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., free 1208 hrs / Drug Violations / Via reading finish “The Quiet Man,” 8 p.m., Plaza Playhouse theater, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., $5 Wednesday, May Answer to Last Week's Crossword: Real 62 Yemen's capital 1918 Old Spice rival The Groovie Line, 9 p.m., the Palms, 701 linden Ave., 684-3811 1413 hrs / Possession / Carpinteria he of title to 63 Neighbor 21 Hold C A A man M P wasAcontacted T T I after C A was F Rseen O smoking in EfrontDofR aAlocal 24 Good thing Niger Creek Bike Path S H A R G O B O E a cigarette Monday, March 64Three Ho-hum feeling 25 Research motel. was possession subjects were18 found in the sensi- P L E M found O N in V E I L U R The R man Comparative results 65 habitat ofGirls aT used pipe Women of Inspiration, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.,S tive area of the Carpinteria Creek. E inc. P methamphetamine PofACarpinteria, R E N T 5315 I foothill S with L Ea 26 Objectofofa glass usable amount word road, 684-6364 One was$70, found in possession L O N in E the bowl. R AHeSwas H cited. 66 Grand worship Basic Bridge, 1 p.m.,amount Sandpiper Mobile Village 684-5921 A Sclubhouse, C E N T 3950 P Via R real, I C E W A R pipe with atale usable of methamBe areleased. fink 67 Snakelike 27 and Mah Jongg,he 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile Village clubhouse, 3950 Via real, 729-1310 E P O X Y F R U S T R A T E phetamine; was cited Saturday, May 21 Eye-popping swimmers D E I S T G U M Bingo, 1 p.m., Veterans28Building, 941 Walnut Ave. 1208 hrs / False RegistrationT/ O P prints S W E L5026 I M P 6Ap.m., T I first E NBaptist T Celebrate Recovery Hangups, Addictions), Church, 1927 hours / Traffi(Hurts, c Collision / Carpinteria and Linden avenues L Gretzky's milieu S E A C O A S T DOWN F A I R L Y foothill rd., 684-3353 Linden Avenue and32 Sandyland Deputies stopped a vehicle that had 1 Crack, as lips 33 Initial E N T S I G room, N CVCC’s Cuba Trip Meeting, 6-8stake p.m., Carpinteria Slibrary Multi-Purpose 5141 Road a torn registration tab on its rear license 2Carpinteria Revered Tibetan 34 Bitty biter L A S T R O P E L A D D E R Ave., 684-5479 x10 The reporting party said a nearby plate. The vehicle had a partial 2022 regI N with E R Understanding, T B O R E O L I O Person CBer's word 12:00 PM 3 37 A Community Toolbox: How to Serve the Depressed subject was under the influence and had istration tab, but a records check showed N O Vallecito O N B U L684-2509 G E A L G A 47-8:30 Caldwell's 38 Question or Club, quo- 1059 Carpinteria Woman’s road, caused a p.m., vehicle collision. The reporting the vehicle expired in July 2021. The E S T E R G L O P G E N E "_____ Road" tation follower part said the subject had used controlled

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driver was cited, and the vehicle’s license plate was removed. and determined that thea.m., reporting party 4945 Carpinteria Ave., 684-5405 x437 Coffee with Cops, 9-11 Crushcakes, Carpinteria Writers’ Group, 10 a.m.-noon, Carpinteria library multipurpose room, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., 684-7838 Sandpiper Duplicate Bridge Club, 1 p.m., Sandpiper Mobile Clubhouse, Sudoku Puzzle by Village websudoku.com 3950 Via real, 684-5522 Battle of the Books club, Easy 3:30 p.m., Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., 220-6608 Level: Beginner Meditation Workshop, 6:30 p.m., Curious Cup back meeting room, 929 linden Ave., 705-4703 Al-Anon Meeting, 7-8 p.m., faith lutheran Church, 1335 Vallecito Place, 331-4817 ESL Class, 7 p.m., first Baptist Church, 5026 foothill road, free, 684-3353

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Tuesday, 19Deputies arrived substances atMarch the beach.

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h calendar h COMMANDER’S RECAP

Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

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Morning E a c h SRotary u d o k umeeting h a s a with Cyndi Macias, The Gym Next Door, 7-8 a.m., Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito rd., $10 unique solution that can Meditation, Carpinteria Woman’s club, 1059 Vallecito rd., 847-208-6520 be reached10:30-noon, logically without guessing. digitsVeterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnut Ave., free, 684-8077 Knitting Group,Enter 1-4 p.m., from 1 Back to 9 into the blank Fighting Parent Program, 5:30-7 p.m., Canalino School, 1480 Carpinteria Ave., spaces. row must 963-1433Every x125 or x132 contain one of each digit. Kiwanis Club Meeting, 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 941 Walnut Ave., 368-5644 So must every column, Coastal View Book Clubasmeeting, 7:30 p.m., Carpinteria Branch library, 684-4428 must every 3x3 square. 8 Ball Tournament, 7:30 p.m., Carpinteria & linden Pub, 4954 Carpinteria linden Ave.

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Puzzle by websudoku.com

Last week’s answers:

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th Lani Garfield photography show, island Brewing Co., 5049 9 4 5 1 6 745-8272 3 7St., 8 2 6 Michael Fisher Fish art show, Corktree Cellars, 910 linden 3 7 2 8 9 5 4684-1400 6 1 Ave., 1 3 2 4 7 8 6 9 5 Liz Brady art show, Porch, 3823 Santa Claus lane, 684-0300 1 8 3 7 2 5 Carpinteria 4 9 6 5103 Arturo Tello art show, friends of the library used Bookstore, Ave., 5 8 7 3 9 6 2 1 4 566-0033 3 6 1 9 8 7 5 4 2 “SPACE” exhibit, 855 At the Arts Gallery, 855 linden Ave., 684-7789 2 4 8 1 3 5 9 7 6 Carpinteria Plein Air Painters art show, lucky llama, 5100 8 3 684-8811 5 6 2 4 1Ave., 9 7Carpinteria Imagination & Inspiration show, Curious Cup, 929 linden Ave., 220-6608

Puzzle by websudoku.com

Puzzle by websudoku.com

5 8 7 1 6 2 9 3 4

2 4 9 3 7 5 8 6 1

1 6 3 8 4 9 2 7 5

4 2 1 9 8 7 3 5 6

6 9 8 5 3 4 1 2 7

3 7 5 2 1 6 4 9 8

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Puzzle by websudoku.com

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Thursday, May 26, 2022  25

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What’s stupid?

CVN

MAN ON THE STREET LARRY NIMMER Larry’s comment: Racism.

That women might be denied control of their bodies. - Laura, Season & Lark

Speeding motorists in construction zones. - Donna Liotta

What the Russians are doing in Ukraine. - Buckwheat

That I’ll never again be able to have dinner at The Palms. - George Martinez


26  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Public Notices CITY OF CARPINTERIA 5775 CARPINTERIA AVENUE CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 (805)684-5405/www.carpinteria.ca.us NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING OF THE CARPINTERIA PLANNING COMMISSION MONDAY, JUNE 6, 2022 AT 5:30 P.M. Notice is hereby given that the City of Carpinteria Planning Commission will hold a regular meeting at 5:30 P.M. on Monday, June 6, 2022 to consider the following item: Housing Element Update 2023-2031 Planner: Steve Goggia Applicant: City of Carpinteria Project: 22-2157-GP The City of Carpinteria Planning Commission will conduct a public meeting to discuss the 2023-2031 update to the Housing Element of the Carpinteria General Plan. The Housing Element is a component of the City’s General Plan and includes analysis of the community’s housing needs, opportunities and constraints, impediments to fair housing, as well as policies and programs to facilitate the construction, rehabilitation, and preservation of housing for all economic segments of the community and persons with special needs. All jurisdictions in Santa Barbara County are required by State law to prepare an updated Housing Element for the 2023-2031 planning period. The full agenda and associated staff reports will be available on Thursday, June 2, 2022 on the City’s Website here: https:// carpinteriaca.gov/city-hall/agendas-meetings/. Details and procedures on how to provide public comment are available on the posted agenda at https://carpinteriaca. gov/city-hall/agendas-meetings/. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact Community Development by email at lorenae@ci.carpinteria. ca.us or by phone at 755-4410, or the California Relay Service at (866) 7352929. Notification two business days prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements for accessibility to this meeting. Steve Goggia, Community Development Director Publish: May 26, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as 805 MERCHANT SERVICIES at 4860 SANDYLAND RD, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. Mailing address: PO BOX 130, CARPINTERIA, CA 93014. Full name of registrant(s): JULIA E PREDMORE at 4860 SANDYLAND RD, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 4/29/2022. The registrant began transacting business on MAR 23, 2022. Signed: JULIA PREDMORE. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001163. Publish: May 5, 12, 19, 26, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as SOUL CARE STUDIO AND SAUNA at 810 PUENTE DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110. Full name of registrant(s): TWO MOONS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION at SAME ADDRESS AS LISTED ABOVE. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 4/29/2022. The registrant began transacting business on APRIL 27, 2022. Signed: BENJAMIN REDEN, CEO. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001168. Publish: May 19, 26, June, 2, 9, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as STEWART’S &

SELZER PLUMBING at 415 E MONTECITO ST., SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): COUNTY SANITATION COMPANY, INC. at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a Corporation. This statement was filed with the County 5/12/2022. The registrant began transacting business on JUNE 01, 2017. Signed: JENNIFER HODGINS, SEC/TREAS. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001254. Publish: May 19, 26, June, 2, 9, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as CHARCUTERITA at 152 AERO CAMINO, GOLETA, CA 93117. Mailing address: 3725 PORTOFINO WAY, UNIT A, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105 Full name of registrant(s): CHARCUTERITA at 3725 PORTOFINO WAY, UNIT A, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. This statement was filed with the County 5/13/2022. The registrant began transacting business on MAY 08, 2022. Signed: RITA PITTTS, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001280 Publish: May 19, 26, June, 2, 9, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/ are doing business as SANTA BARBARA PONDS UNLIMITED at 1215 DE LA VINA STREET, SUITE E, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): MICHAEL J CAVALLETTO at 5700 VIA REAL #142, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 5/13/2022. The registrant began transacting business on MAY 01, 1983. Signed: MICHAEL CAVALLETTO. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001282. Publish: May 19, 26, June, 2, 9, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as DOCUTRUST at 5676 ENCINA ROAD, GOLETA, CA 93117. Full name of registrant(s): ALLYSON T CHAVEZ at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual . This statement was filed with the County 5/16/2022. The registrant began transacting business on JUNE 01, 2017. Signed: ALLYSON T CHAVEZ. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001291. Publish: May 26, June, 2, 9, 16, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as (1) MONTECITO MED SPA (2) SKJN MED SPA at 1280

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

CLASSIFIED

COAST VILLAGE CIRCLE, SUITE B, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108. Mailing address: 630 STATE ST, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. Full name of registrant(s): KJN AESTHETICS, LLC at 630 STATE STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. This statement was filed with the County 5/19/2022. The registrant began transacting business on N/A. Signed: MARK LAWRENCE, MANAGING MEMBER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001254. Publish: May 26, June, 2, 9, 16, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as EVALUZ DESIGN at 120 N. LA CUMBRE RD. UNIT 47 SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110. Full name of registrant(s): CUNEYT OZTURK. at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by an Individual. This statement was filed with the County 5/12/2022. The registrant began transacting business on APRIL 30, 2021. Signed: CUNEYT OZTURK, OWNER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001215. Publish: May 26, June, 2, 9, 16, 2022 _________________________________ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT. The following Entity(ies) is/are doing business as ZAHARA DATA at 1021 TREMONTO ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. Full name of registrant(s): AVRICK CONSULTING LLC at SAME ADDRESS AS ABOVE. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. This statement was filed with the County 5/12/2022. The registrant began transacting business on MAR 22, 2022. Signed: JEAN AVRICK, MANAGER. In accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (see section 1441 Et Seq., Business and Professions code). I hereby certify this copy is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk-Recorder (SEAL) FBN2022-0001258. Publish: May 26, June, 2, 9, 16, 2022 _________________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF AARON SORIANO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NO. 22CV01262 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ARIANA CATALAN HERNANDEZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: AARON SORIANO Proposed name: AARON HERNANDEZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 8, 2022 at 10:00 am, Dept: 3, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121-1107. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Carpinteria-Summerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated 4/28/2022 by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court.

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FILED BY the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 4/29/2022. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzralli, Deputy Clerk. Publish: May 5, 12, 19, 26, 2022 _________________________________ IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MATTEO FISHER CONANT AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NO. 22CV00540 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: P e t i t i o n e r : H I L A RY A N D B RYA N CONANT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MATTEO FISHER CONANT Proposed name: MATTEO THOMAS FISHER CONANT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that include the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING June 24, 2022 at 10:00 am, Dept: 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121-1107. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Carpinteria-Summerland Coastal View a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for the hearing on the petition. Dated 5/17/2022 by Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. FILED BY the Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara on 5/19/2022. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Chavez, Terri, Deputy Clerk. Publish: May 26, June, 2, 9, 16, 2022 ________________________________ SUMMONS (Family Law) CASE NUMBER 22FL00124 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: OMAR PANTALEON CARDOSO You have been sued. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. Petitioner’s name is: ELVIRA CONTRERAS ESTRADA You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE: The restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them.

FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, pr changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or any other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in the manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of supervisorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. You must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. SANTA BARBARA COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney are: ELVIRA CONTRERAS ESTRADA 1000 CONCHA DR #N CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 Date: 1/27/2022 Filed by J. Rostami, Deputy Clerk, for Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer. Publish: May 26, June, 2, 9, 16, 2022

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME PUBLICATION $40 for 2 NAMES COASTAL VIEW NEWS DOES NOT KNOWINGLY ACCEPT advertising which is deceptive, fraudulent, or which might otherwise violate the law or accepted standards of taste. However, this publication does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of any advertisement, nor the quality of the goods and services advertised. Readers are cautioned to thoroughly investigate all claims made in any advertisements, and to use good judgment and reasonable care, particularly when dealing with the persons unknown to you who ask for money in advance of delivery of the goods or services advertised.

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Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  27

Condor Gulch

CVN

UNPREDICTABLE WILDERNESS CHUCK GRAHAM Nothing screams Pleistocene Epoch like an endangered California condor. Thermal updrafts were already swirling upward within the Condor Gulch Trail at Pinnacles National Park, the weathered volcanic crags, and spires ideal habitat for North America’s largest flying land bird. From the moment we reached the trailhead there were squadrons of opportunistic scavengers dotting cloudless skies. The cleaners of the forest were circling and soaring way overhead, those raptor’s superhero-like vision seeking carrion concealed in the dense, parched chaparral surrounding this unique landscape that became a national park in 2013. At first it was a little difficult to decipher which vultures were which, but as my girlfriend Holly Lohuis and I walked the well-maintained route, it became increasingly clear what was what as we traversed into the high peaks. For one, the wingspan of a turkey vulture doesn’t measure up to the nearly 10-foot-wide wingspan of the California condor. And when turkey vultures fly/soar they tip back and forth. A condor never does. After a few flaps of its massive wings, condors hold steady as they soar like a hang glider.

High Peaks Biome

Once Holly and I plateaued the narrow ridge and rounded behind the high peaks, we crossed paths with a biologist using telemetry to monitor the condors within the region. Each condor is fitted with a numbered wing tag and Global Positioning System (GPS). We saw eight to 10 condors throughout the day, but she said there were more throughout the national park. “Many of the birds fly back and forth between Pinnacles and the Big Sur Coast,” she said, as she gradually waved the antennae, picking up beeps, some strong, others faint. “There are some birds that visit the refuges south at Bitter Creek and Hopper Mountain.” We also learned there were at least three active nests hidden throughout Pinnacles. The craggy spires standout in

Holly looks for condors above the high peaks in Pinnacles.

“Amongst the deep blue sky and those incredible crags, a condor soared high above, a mere black dot against the blue.“ the chaparral choked Gabilan Mountains. The range is located on the eastern fringe of Central California’s Salinas Valley. The volcanic uplift is a remnant of an ancient volcanic field. It’s one of the many geological features of the San Andreas Fault Zone. All the forces of nature have been in place for millions of years affecting the unique topography of Pinnacles National Park. Heat, wind, frost and water have all played their part in its creation. Water is the most active ingredient today continuing to carve out its cracks, gorges, caves, and spires, prime habitat for the California condor, which were first released here at Pinnacles in 2011.

Turkey vultures soar in Pinnacles National Park.

Thermal Rise

After gazing across several overlooks, hiking portions of the shaded ridge and exposed crags, Holly found a lichen-covered lookout with epic views of the High Peaks Trail down to Bear Gulch and its shimmering reservoir. A cool breeze wafted skyward, and taking advantage of its updraft was a mature, green-tagged condor known as #26, its pumpkin-colored head distinct against the brushy chaparral backdrop below. I scrambled out with my camera onto a narrow precipice as the condor circled below me several times. Another physical characteristic I love about condors is as they are flying, their wingspan is wide open, and their wingtips appear as long, dark fingers. The velvety feathers of #26 stood out like no other condor in the vicinity, a glistening sheen reflecting off its wings as the sun beat down overhead. Condors weigh around 20 pounds, and when utilizing those thermal updrafts, can reach speeds of 55 mph. Even more impressive is their ability to reach altitudes of 15,000 feet. On an average day condors can fly for 150 miles. They soar

so high for so long it’s kind of a “now you see them, now you don’t” scenario. They can be soaring right overhead, and within a few seconds simply vanish.

Chaparral Descent

Once Holly and I were below the high peaks, descending back to the trailhead, other birds became active in the shaded oak groves. Acorn woodpeckers worked hard on their impressive granaries. A pair of stellar jays hopped from limb to limb above a seasonal arroyo. However, when I glanced back over my shoulder gazing skyward toward the tallest pinnacles, a condor caught my eye. Amongst the deep blue sky and those incredible crags, a condor soared high above, a mere black dot against the blue. Nevertheless, that high-flying speck demanded all my attention. Adventure and travel writer Chuck Graham lives in Carpinteria and contributes his writing and photography to publications far and wide. For more wildlife photos, visit chuckgrahamphoto. com or follow Graham on Instagram at @chuckgrahamphoto.

Read more by Chuck Graham at A biologist uses telemetry to locate condors in the park.

CoastalView.com


28  Thursday, May 26, 2022

CVN

THROWBACK

Bring on summer

Memorial Day weekend officially kicks off tourist season in Carpinteria, and a packed State Beach Park can be counted on between now and Labor Day. As pictured back in 1925, a portion of today’s state park was the Fish Auto Camp, and much like today, campers from the hot interior of the state flocked to the campground in search of cooler temperatures and, of course, the World’s Safest Beach. The summer edition of Carpinteria Magazine hits the streets this week. Featured are a collection of never-before published images of Carpinteria State Beach Park‘s yesteryears. Pick up a copy of the magazine at most CVN distribution locations. To learn more about Carpinteria history, visit the Carpinteria Valley Museum of History’s website carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org to access more articles on local history. To support the preservation of local history, consider becoming a member of the Carpinteria Historical Society.

CVN

CLUB SCENE

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

THURSDAY

CARPINTERIA VALLEY MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Do you have a photo from Carpinteria’s past? Contact news@ coastalview.com to share it with other readers!

Girls Inc. honors Title IX anniversary

This year’s Girls Inc. Week celebrated the 50th anniversary of Title IX, a federal law established in 1972 prohibiting sex discrimination in any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. On June 23, 2022, the law which sought to establish gender equality will turn 50. Girls Inc. of Carpinteria continues to put an importance on sports in girls’ lives, and to “break down stereotypes and inspire girls to pursue these historically male-dominated roles,” Jamie Collins, executive director of Girls Inc. of Carpinteria, said.

Mavericks founder talks basketball team success

The Rotary Club of Carpinteria Noon recently welcomed guest speaker Ryan Reed, founder of Carpinteria Mavericks Athletics, a youth basketball club. Reed discussed the team’s expansion over the years and stressed a need for donations. Reed, who is also the owner of Coast Supply Co. which has a showroom on Padaro Lane, said more than 100 kids are enrolled in the non-profit Mavericks teams. Mavericks offers programs for third through 12th grade boys and girls. “Ryan’s message was that they use basketball to teach character through athletics,” Rotarian Cheryl Wright said.

Assistant city manager visits Rotary Morning, mentoring program reopens

Camila Herrera plays with a soccer ball at Girls Inc. of Carpinteria. The organization celebrated the 50th anniversary of Title IX this month.

Assistant City Manager Michael Ramirez dropped by the Rotary Club of Carpinteria Morning earlier this month to introduce himself and discuss his background with city management. Ramirez, who was hired with the city of Carpinteria in December 2021, discussed his background working in Moorpark and Oxnard, and his 23 years of public service. “I am very enthusiastic about working with the Carpinteria management team and the (residents) of Carpinteria to develop projects together. (Resident) input is critical in getting the best projects possible,” he told the group. The club also recently launched a mentoring program for high school students in the area, offering students interviews with Rotarians who give advice from their respective fields. “Student participants gain rare access to professionals that are considered experts in their fields – from CEOs of global corporations to small-business owners and startup entrepreneurs,” Club member Art Fisher said. The mentoring program is coordinated by Rotary members Mary Layman and Steve Gerteis. Learn more at mentorscarpamrotary@gmail.com or by calling (805) 941-0624.


Coastal View News • Tel: (805) 684-4428

Thursday, May 26, 2022  29

CVN

THIS WEEK

IN CARPINTERIA MAY 26 - JUNE 1

Submit Your Weekly Event News Online at CoastalView.com

NEW BUNDLE OF JOY?

FRIDAY, MAY 27 PEACE VIGIL RETURNS

After a pause due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the peace vigil returns to Carpinteria on Friday, May 27. A group of local anti-war activists created the vigil in the early 2000s, and protested every Friday afternoon until last year. Locals Robert Lehmann and Toni Stuart said they are resurrecting the tradition and will continue “for as long as we can or until the carnage of senseless war is silenced.” Corner of Carpinteria and Linden avenues. 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

VISIT COASTALVIEW.COM TO SEND IN YOUR SUBMISSION

SATURDAY, MAY 28 LIVE MUSIC: RICK & JENNY

Flower-power duo Rick & Jenny will perform at to Sunburst Wine on Saturday, May 28, showing off tunes from the ‘60s. Limited to 21+. 5080 Carpinteria Ave. 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.

COASTAL VIEW NEWS

Wedding Guide

MUSEUM MARKETPLACE

The Carpinteria Valley Museum of History will hold its outdoor flea market on Saturday. Browse and buy antiques, collectibles, furniture, jewelry, clothing, books and more. 956 Maple Ave. 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.

MONDAY, MAY 30

2022

2022 WEDDING GUIDE

Coastal View News CARPINTERIA

J I AN L U E N AN D VAN LA THAM, MAK EN Z IE PHOTOGRAPHY

VIEW ONLINE AT COASTALVIEW.COM Submit your event information to news@coastalview.com CONNECTING CARPINTERIA

MEMORIAL DAY OBSERVANCE

The Carpinteria Lions Club will honor veterans on Memorial Day on May 30 at the Carpinteria Cemetery. Chairs will be provided. 1501 Cravens Lane. 10 a.m.

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ONLY $150 FOR 3 MONTHS! Contact Kris at 805.684.4428 or kris@coastalview.com


CVN

SPORTS May 26, 2022

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We Are Proud Supporters of Warrior Athletics Locally Owned. Lic. # 375514

At only 16 years old, Shamblin has made a splash in girls basketball.

Brooklyn Shamblin is one of 40 girls in the country to be invited to the USA trials.

Local hooper Brooklyn Shamblin invited to USA Trials

The slashing playmaker had a standout freshman season at Oaks Christian.

BY RYAN P. CRUZ

After a monster freshman season at Oaks Christian – earning Miramonte League and allstate honors along with a CIF-SS Division 3A Girls Basketball Championship – Carpinteria local Brooklyn Shamblin was one of 40 student athletes to get the exclusive invite to the USA Basketball U17 Team Trials. “It’s definitely a dream come true, and an honor,” Brooklyn said. “I feel like I’ve been preparing for this my whole life.” A year ago, Brooklyn made waves by committing to play college basketball at USC as just an eighth grader. Her mother Julie Shamblin, a teacher and cheerleading coach at Carpinteria High School, said they were nervous about heading into her first season at Oaks Christian, but that she was prepared to play at a higher level. “She’s worked really hard,” Julie said. “It’s been a crazy freshman year.” Brooklyn helped lead the Lions to a 25-4 season, winning the Miramonte League title and going on to claim the Girls CIF-SS 3A championship with a 54-33 win over Shadow Hills on February 26. “It was really surreal. You kind of dream of these situations,” Julie said. A couple weeks ago, the family got the news that Brooklyn had been one of only seven girls from the class of 2025 to be invited to the USA team trials in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

“I was really excited, just to be on the list with some of these other girls,” Brooklyn said. Playing at Oaks Christian – where the team beat six Division 1 schools – and competing with the top athletes for the USA trials, she said, gave her the opportunity to measure herself against the best in the game. Julie and Brooklyn both gave thanks for the coaches that helped along the way, from her youth basketball days in Carpinteria to this year at Oaks Christian, where coach Kristy Hopkins came out of retirement to coach one more season. “We’re so indebted to her,” Julie said. “Not only did she allow (Brooklyn) to play as a freshman, she taught her it’s about more than just baskets.” Brooklyn said that she was able to earn the trust of her new teammates by establishing a connection and showing her work ethic during practice. “Our team had really good chemistry from the beginning,” she said, adding that “it’s not about being the best scorer, but being the best hustler and getting everyone involved.” Brooklyn’s Team USA tryouts begin Thursday, and she will spend two weeks training in Colorado, where each athlete will be decked out in official USA gear: “clothes, shoes, equipment, everything they would need,” Julie said. After trials, she will find out if she will com-

pete on the final roster, but both Brooklyn and Julie will always remember their small-town California roots. She plans to give back to the community, whether it be through coaching or other outreach programs like the ones that helped her develop her skills years ago at the Carpinteria Boys & Girls Club. “That’s where these seeds were planted so long ago,” Julie said.

ABOVE, Carpinteria native Brooklyn Shamblin earned a spot at the USA Basketball U17 Trials.


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Thursday, May 26, 2022  31

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Carpinteria’s 2022 Boys Volleyball team in the CIF-SS Championship Game.

Looking back on the Warriors’ volleyball success

“It’s been a great year!” wrote Carpinteria head coach Mickey Caughey in his final boys volleyball recap of the year. Despite two losses at the end of the year, the Warriors finished as Co-Citrus Coast League champions, Runners-Up in the CIF-SS Division 5 Championships, and earned a chance to compete in the CIF State Regional Volleyball Championships for the first time in school history. Caughey, in his last year after 40 years of coaching, described the boys’ last road trip of the season to compete against Division 2 Champion Madison High School in San Diego. “For us, it was yet another very long road trip all the way down to San Diego,” he said. “We didn’t mind because it was the chance to play at the next level.” It was that “no big deal” attitude that the Warriors carried with them all season, showing up week after week and proving themselves against teams in higher divisions with much larger student populations. Several times this season, Carpinteria played up to the challenge in big-name local tournaments at Dos Pueblos, Bishop Diego and Santa Barbara. Against Madison, the boys came out swinging, winning the first set 25-23. In the second set, both teams were locked at 25 before Madison came out on top 27-25 to even the match at one set apiece. In the third set, Carpinteria trailed 2-9 before roaring back to a 25-22 set win, before Madison came out on top of a back-and-forth battle once again to claim the fourth set, 25-23. In the final tiebreaking set, Madison jumped out ahead 8-14, needing just one more point to claim the win, but Carpinteria clawed back with four straight points to force a timeout with the score 12-14. Madison was able to get one more point to take the win, with the Warriors walking away with their heads held high. “It was a great match for us and we were really having some fun,” Caughey said. “It was a good feeling to take a Division 2 team all the way to five sets.” Following the match, Madison Athletic Director Rick Jackson sent a message to Carpinteria staff applauding the Warriors’ effort and sportsmanship: “It was a joy to watch your team tonight,” Jackson wrote. “They genuinely looked like they were just having a great time playing and competing. It was a very refreshing evening. You have a great group of young men.” Caughey replied: “I’ve been involved with coaching most of our varsity players since they were freshmen and they truly do have a great time playing and competing. I feel lucky to be their head coach in this my last year of coaching. They are a great group of young men!”

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Carpinteria athletes earn Citrus Coast League honors

Five Carpinteria baseball players were included in the 2022 Citrus Coast League All-Star Team following the end of their season. Junior outfielder Erich Goebel was named first team all Citrus Coast League, while junior infielder Matt Muñoz earned second team honors. Junior catcher Diego Nieves earned an honorable mention, along with sophomore infielder Oscar Velasquez and sophomore outfielder Talon Trumble. The Warriors finished 4-10-1 in Citrus Coast League play this year, including a big 17-1 win over Villanova Prep for the final game of the season.

Sign Up for Carpinteria Co-ed Softball!

Batter up! Another season of Carpinteria Co-ed Softball is fast approaching. The season opener is on May 31, and play will take place on Tuesday and Thursday evenings at Viola Fields throughout late spring and early summer. To learn more, contact Reynaldo Cardenas at reynaldo_cardenas@yahoo.com.

Carpinteria AYSO All-Star Teams Celebrate Wins at Strawberry Cup By Dan Runhaar & Brett Labistour

This past weekend, three Carpinteria AYSO All-Stars Girls teams competed in Camarillo’s 27th Annual California Strawberry Cup. The U10 girls’ team showed vast improvement from their early-season performances but could not earn a spot in the championship round. However, Ailene Wheatley, Eva Arroyo and Layla Foster were presented with good sportsmanship awards. The U12 girls ended the weekend with three wins and a loss, edging out the North Valley Black Mambas for third place in their highly competitive pool. In addition, good sportsmanship awards were presented to Caroline Cooney and Penny Rowe. The 14U Girls placed first in pool play with two wins and a draw, edging out a competitive Culver City All-Star team and advancing to the Championship final on Sunday afternoon against Diamond Bar. After Diamond Bar scored early in the second half, Charlotte Cooney leveled up the score off a corner taken by Kaydance Gardner, ending regulation time tied at 1-1. An exciting extra time remained scoreless with multiple opportunities for both teams, ending the match at a draw and forcing a tie-breaker penalty shoot-out. Evelyn Lara, Kaydance Gardner and Logan Labistour found the back of the net with their shots, while Diamond Bar managed one score thanks to standout goalkeeping by Ava Miller for a Carpinteria victory. Good sportsmanship awards were presented to Lindsay Doyle and Ava Miller.

BELOW, 27th Annual California Strawberry Cup U14 Girls Champions; from left to right: Ellie Roberts, Lindsay Doyle, Salma Balogun, Elsabet Schlobohm, Logan Labistour, Evelyn Lara, Ava Miller, Lacey Zimmerman, Lexi Wheatley, Charlotte Cooney, Vivian Huskins, Kaydance Gardner and Yeret Cervantes. ASHLEY LABISTOUR


32  Thursday, May 26, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

C-DOG sets sights on making Carpinteria “a dog-friendly destination”

28  Thursday, May 5, 2022

Coastal View News • Carpinteria, California

BY DANIELLE DE LA MONT

The Carpinteria Dog Owner’s Group (C-DOG), is spearheading a new initiative in collaboration with local businesses to put Carpinteria on the map as a dog friendly destination. C-DOG is creating a comprehensive map of shops, restaurants and other places where dogs are welcome in town. Some businesses are restricted by various regulations and cannot allow dogs inside, however many offer permitted options such as patio seating. Others have committed to providing treats behind the counter or a bowl filled with water outside to keep dogs on the move happy. Nearly 40% of American families own a dog and the demand for pet friendly destinations is on the rise. Research has shown people are often willing to spend more on travel expenses if it means their furry friend can come along too. People who live locally are also more inclined to patronize establishments if they know they can bring their dog along. Other regions have recognized this lucrative market and have been taking steps to attract dog owners with targeted advertising. Wisconsin recently created a campaign to target dog owners with the slogan, “Dogs are welcome in Wisconsin, and they can bring their people, too.” A non-profit organization, C-DOG is looking for sponsors to support the production of materials such as

Tony and Leilani Ibarra, owners of The Thrifty Flea – along with Lola, Murphy Brown and Lambie – support C-DOG and welcome furry friends to help their human companions shop for finds in their store. brochures, water bowls and other amenities. This is one of a number of projects in the works by C-DOG in addition to

its already busy event calendar, which usually includes the Independence Day parade, the annual Howl-O-Ween costume competition, and the annual winter

Holiday Parade. To sponsor, volunteer or ask a question, email woof@c-dog.org, visit c-dog.org or call (805) 668-3366.

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