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GALLERY OF GRADS

MAY 26, 2017

A Cleveland Jewish News Special Section

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 25


26 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

High School Graduates

May 26, 2017

Gallery of Grads

JEREMY GIMBEL Shaker Heights High School Vanderbilt University

RYAN MARMAROS Beachwood High School University of Wisconsin

JACK SPERO Beachwood High School The Ohio State University

BENJAMIN LEIZMAN Princeton University Computer Science Engineering

JEREMY GLOGER Beachwood High School The Ohio State University

AIDAN MILLER Hawken College Kenyon College

ADEN STERN Beachwood High School University of Colorado Boulder

DAVID LITT University of California, Berkeley Ph.D. Chemistry

REBECCA GOLDFARB Orange High School Brandeis University

JAKE MORRIS Solon High School University of Colorado Boulder

Matthew Stovsky Beachwood High School The Ohio State University (Scholars) Fisher College of Business

BENJAMIN P. LOCKSHIN Presidential Management Fellow U. S. Office of Personnel Management, Public Affairs

KYLE GOODMAN Orange High School University of Colorado Boulder

ALEXANDER ORLOFF Beachwood High School The Ohio State University

ADDISON TISCH Solon High School University of Akron

HANNAH GREENFIELD Lawrence School Lake Erie College

SHERIDAN PATAI Solon High School University of Cincinnati

JORDAN LONGSTRETH Kent State University Summa Cum Laude – Bachelor’s Degree in Communications

Rachel Braun Solon High School Ohio University – College of Education

CASEY GREGORY Laurel School Miami University

LINDSEY PETERSEN Solon High School The Ohio State University

DANIELLE CHISLING Solon High School Indiana University

MAXWELL GUSTAFSON Shaker Heights High School West Virginia University

JAMIE POSNER Orange High School The Ohio State University

CAMERYN COHEN Beachwood High School The Ohio State University

BRANDON INSUL Solon High School Miami University

SAMANTHA RICH Solon High School Purdue University

DANNY COHEN Solon High School University of Pennsylvania

ABBY JACOBSON Aurora High School Bowling Green State University

GRANT RICHMAN Orange High School The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business

EMMA COHEN Solon High School Syracuse University

HANNAH KARL Beachwood High School University of Arizona

GRIFFIN DAVIS Beachwood High School The University of Arizona

SYDNEY KLEIN Solon High School The Ohio State University

JUSTIN DUBIN Beachwood High School The Ohio State University

RACHEL KRANTZ Solon High School Ohio University

A.J. EISENBERG Beachwood High School University of Toledo

ETHAN KULNANE Mayfield High School Lakeland Community College

Samantha Eisner Kenston High School Indiana University

MARGO LACKRITZ Beachwood High School Kent State University

CAMRYN FISH Orange High School Parsons School of Design

MIRIAM LIGHT Solon High School The Ohio State University

ABBIE FLEETER Fuchs Mizrachi School Machone Mayaan-Israel/Stern College For Women

MICHAEL LITT Orange High School Brown University

REAGAN ANTHONY Orange High School Tulane University MATTHEW AXNER Solon High School University of Michigan JORDON BERKOVITZ Solon High School The Ohio State University JOSHUA BIALOSKY Beachwood High School Indiana University- Kelly School of Business

JAMIE FRAYMAN Beachwood High School The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business SARAH FURTH Hathaway Brown Miami University Emily Olbinsky Garforth Solon High School Miami University

JARED MANDELL Solon High School Emory University

JAMES RITOSSA West Geauga High School Gnomon-Hollywood, CA

AMANDA WASSERMAN Beachwood High School University of Rochester MATTHEW WEINTRAUB Shaker Heights High School The Ohio State University MATTHEW WEISMAN Shaker Heights High School University of Wisconsin – Madison ARI WEISS Shaker Heights High School Indiana University JOSHUA WEXLER Solon High School Rochester Institute of TechnologyEngineering DAVID WITTENBERG Hawken School University of Cincinnati

KYLE ROSENTHAL Rocky River High School University of Cincinnati

College Graduates

MALLORY ROSSEN Solon High School The Ohio State University

MELANIE ADELSTEIN The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Science

JULIA SALTZMAN Laurel School University of Miami KYLE SCHARF Beachwood High School Butler University BAILEY SCHLEIFER Orange High School Miami University MIRIAM SCHLOSSBERG Yavne of Beachwood Touro CAMERON SCHWARTZ Twinsburg High School The Ohio State University

Alexandra Mangel Laurel School The Ohio State University, Honors Biomedical Engineering

BRITNEY SILK Solon High School The Ohio State University

RYAN MARKS Beachwood High School Penn State University

ZACK SINGER Solon High School The Ohio State University

ALEX FRANKEL The Ohio State University, Fisher School of Business Bachelor of Science in Business Administration - Finance ALYSSA FURTH Vanderbilt University Bachelor of Science ELANA GLOGER Ohio University Bachelor of Arts Psychology Bachelor of Science Pre-Professional Biological Sciences ADAM ICKOWICZ University of Utah Bachelor’s in Psychology, Minor in Sociology YITTY KOVAL Charter Oak State College Bachelor’s of Liberal Studies JONI LEE KUPPS The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management Minor in Business

BRADLEY MARKS Pennsylvania State University Bachelor of Science in Finance GABRIEL KATZ NAPOLI Northwestern University Bachelor of Music in Performance, Violin ERIC ROSENTHAL American University in Washington, D.C. Bachelor of Arts in International Relations EDEN SALTZMAN Tulane University Bachelor of Science in Public Health Bachelor of Science in International Development AARON SHAFER Indiana University Bachelor of Arts in Film and Media, With a Minor in Music JONATHON SHAPIRO American University, Washington,D.C. Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Economics Jacob Simon Ohio University Bachelor of Arts & Sciences in Communication Studies Minor in Marketing MARISA SIMON The Ohio State University Master of Education SAMANTHA SINGER The Ohio State University, John Glenn College of Public Affairs Bachelor of Arts in Public Management, Leadership & Policy CARLY TOMKO The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Public Health BRANDON WEISMAN The Ohio State University Bachelor of Arts in Political Science Bachelor of Science in Business Magna Cum Laude with Honors LAUREN BIALES WISE The Ohio State University, College of Engineering, Honors Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Magna Cum Laude


GALLERY OF GRADS

MAY 26, 2017

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 27

Take advantage of scholarships, loans to ease financial burdon BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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here are many things to stress over while applying for college, like selecting the school you’ll attend as well as how to pay for your education. However, financial stress can be reduced by taking advantage of loans and scholarships provided by Jewish agencies. Durham Jessica Rosenblitt, manager of College Financial Aid at Jewish Family Service Association in Beachwood, and Bob Durham, director of Financial Aid of College Now in Cleveland, both agreed the sooner Rosenblitt students consider scholarships and begin apply for them, the better. Some options to explore regarding financial aid are from JFSA and the Hebrew Free Loan Association. HFLA can provide interest-free loans up to $5,000 after students receive federal financial aid. The deadline for JSFA aid has passed and the application process will reopen in December. Rosenblitt said if students can’t apply now, they should start taking the time to research scholarships they would like to apply for. “Though we don’t fund online programs and students have to be enrolled full time, they can seek the JSFA at any point,” Rosenblitt said. “You don’t have to be a high school senior. We also have funding for graduate students as well.” The JFSA has about 30 different named scholarships, where donors approach and set up funds in someone’s memory. One scholarship is the Jack W. and Shirley J. Berger Scholars Award, which is worth a maximum of $10,000 per year to a Jewish student with a 3.5 gradepoint average and minimum ACT score of 28.

There is also the Ruth Weltmann Begun Memorial STEM Scholarship. Rosenblitt said this award has similar requirements as the Berger Scholars Award, except it is geared toward female Jewish students exploring STEM majors. Regardless of the award students explore, Rosenblatt said the need for scholarships has increased over the years. “Do something to set you apart,” she said. “Find a volunteer opportunity that you’re passionate about that you can speak about in an essay or interview. A well-rounded student that excels at sports or academics or holds a job will say a lot about the student and the level of their responsibility.” Durham said students should try and apply for as many scholarships as possible. “Start locally because big, national scholarships can have high application pools,” he said. “They should make sure they do an exhaustive search for scholarships. College Now can help do those searches. We’re like a scholarship encyclopedia. Acting as the middle man, we can connect students to other companies.” Students should do research before applying for a scholarship as well, Durham said, because knowing what a selection committee is looking for can help a student tailor and craft the essay. “You should also be really careful about your deadlines,” he said. “Sometimes there are things you may need that you might not be able to get last minute. Apply as early as possible for that extra wiggle room.” Durham agreed students should think about what sets them apart in other applicants. He, on the other hand, said that instead of doing things that are unique already, students could stand out by interpreting prompts or situations differently. “Think about how you can make yourself standout in terms of a different style or interpreting a question in a totally unique way,” he said. “Being creative can go along way.”

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Congratulations MATTHEW WEINTRAUB Shaker Heights High School

MAY 26, 2017

Hillel, Chabad like second homes to incoming freshmen BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

Photo / Moto Photo Shaker Heights

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We are so proud of you! We wish you nothing but happiness and success at The Ohio State University. We love you! Mom, Dad, Josh and Sam

The Ohio State University

GALLERY OF GRADS

or students arriving at college for the first time, they immediately search for a place to belong. Hillel International, the largest Jewish campus organization in the world, is at more than 550 colleges and universities worldwide and many universities have Chabad houses. Adam Hirsh, assistant director who will become executive director of Kent State University’s Hillel program in Kent, Sara Alevsky, who runs Case Western Reserve University Chabad with her husband, Rabbi Mendy Alevsky, and Marcy Miller, executive director of Miami University’s Hillel in Oxford, all said their programs, no matter where you go, is the perfect place to explore spirituality and culture while making friends and important connections. “College is a daunting task and the Jewish community wants to help,” Hirsh said. “Before you even get to campus, most Hillel’s would love to connect you with other students who are like minded.” Hirsh said Hillel could assist students religiously and culturally so they don’t get lost when they enter college. “If you want to observe a level of kashrut, your Hillel can help you find out what can be done,” he said. “If things are important, you should always organize those things prior to arriving.” Hirsh said KSU Hillel and many others like it offer programs in the first week of classes and throughout the year that focus on making friends, and dealing with culture, spirituality and religion. He said students could expect daily programs during the first few weeks of school. “I can’t get over the importance of having a Jewish community in college,” Hirsh said. “About 1,000 students on the Kent State campus are Jewish. It’s important to band together to insure a vibrant and strong presence on campus. We want to make sure students feel supported in their identity.” Kent Hillel also serves the University of Akron. Hirsh said Hillel is meant to be that “home away from home” for students and they should

Hirsh

be encouraged to use it as a support system. “It’s about having that community that you may not think is important, but will be over time,” he said. Alevsky said many Jewish students are looking for lasting friendships and a place they can call “home.” By checking their campus for a Chabad house, they can fulfill

those needs. “You’ll find the kindest rabbi and rebbetzin team ever who open their homes to every Jewish student without any agenda,” she said. “(CWRU)’s Chabad House is a fully functioning Jewish center operating out of our home, with a large array of social, educational, volunteer and religious opportunities.” Alevsky said that students should remember that they have a second family on campus that they can “truly count on 24/7.” She mentioned that her Chabad has tended to sick students and listened to their troubles with open minds and hearts. Miller said when students arrive on campus, it really shouldn’t be his or her first day there. Miami Hillel has opportunities for prospective students to connect with current students and Hillel members to learn more about the campus and other organizations they can join. “We hire students as engagement interns and they actually take the time to connect with students who are coming to the university,” she said. “Our engagement interns reach out to students in the summer time and let them know what’s going on the first week of campus.” She said when students get to campus, the college experience can be overwhelming – even if he or she connects with another student prior to arrival. Hillel is established to provide opportunities for students to come together and connect with others as quickly as possible. “We have barbeques, Shabbat dinners and a breakfast for dinner event that help students mingle,” Miller said. “These help them get acclimated with the campus and its structure.” Miller said Miami Hillel offers at least 25 programs for students to connect in the first few weeks. However, the point she wants to drive across is the same that all of the Hillels around the world work to accomplish the same goal: community is important, no matter how big or small. “We’re about 1,100 Jewish students out of 16,000 undergrads at (Miami University), making us only about 6 percent of the campus,” she said. “Our Hillel is not exactly about building the size of the organization, but it’s about building a strong sense of community. The camaraderie and the opportunities become critical. It’s about helping (students) explore their identities as a Jew and as a student.” Former Clevelander Eric Fingerhut is president and CEO of Hillel International.


GALLERY OF GRADS

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 29

MAY 26, 2017

‘Little moments’ can help students compose better application essays

Mazel Tov AJ EISENBERG Beachwood High School

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hether writing a paper or a fulllength novel and everything in between, writer’s block tends to be unavoidable. When it comes to writing application essays for college and scholarships, there really isn’t time to be unsure where to start. Davida Horowitz Amkraut, a college Amkraut essay and writing coach based in Beachwood, said many times, high school seniors have trouble breaking out of the “formulaic” type of writing that is regularly taught in school. “It’s important to make an essay sound like a conversation,” Amkraut said. “Adapting that tone and voice is what the student really needs to focus on. That’s not the only thing an admissions office is looking for because they want to get to know the applicant. But, the best way to do that is in a conversational essay.” But what Amkraut makes sure her students understand is not every essay needs to be focused on some sort of monumental, life changing moment – because every essay admissions people will read is likely going to be trying to accomplish that.

Mandel JDS students honored

“Actually, the best essay is one that finds meaning and power in such an inconsequential detail,” she said. “You can make the smallest detail in your life explode with meaning and power when you critically think about it. Admissions have heard about everything under the sun. It’s important to find that little moment and breathe power into it.” Amkraut said when she meets with students, she works with them to help them recognize these little moments. One activity she does is make lists. By compiling things you enjoy, you can pinpoint smaller moments within those interests. “I do caution students to not write in a way that shows their entitlement or status in life,” she said. “They don’t want to exactly hear about a student’s time spent abroad but more so about their work ethic and dependability.” Amkraut said every student always should have someone take a look at the essay before sending it. “I think that it’s important to have some sort of coach to give you feedback,” she said. “Usually, an objective reader can pick out errors that you may have missed. Don’t ever send an essay out blind, but don’t let someone rewrite it either, because it can lose it’s conversational tone.”

Tamar Poreh, left, and Allie Dettelbach, eighth-graders at the Joseph and Florence Mandel Jewish Day School in Beachwood, were honored at the NEO Schools Network Celebration May 16, hosted by Facing History and Ourselves, for contributing to a safe, inclusive school culture. They are pictured with Jonathan Lykes, an activist who was the keynote speaker for the program. | Photo / Mandel JDS

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC

BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

We are so proud of you Love, Sammy, Max and Uncle

University of Toledo

Mazel Tov ALEXANDER ORLOFF Beachwood High School

We are thrilled with the person you are and we are excited for the man you will become! Couldn’t be more proud! With Love – Mom, Dad & Maya

The Ohio State University


30 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

Congratulations BRANDON INSUL

MAY 26, 2017

GALLERY OF GRADS

Saltzman Youth Panel allocates $42,500 for community organizations

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC

Solon High School

Jewish teenagers made up the Saltzman Youth Panel to decide on grants for community needs. | Photo / The Jewish Federation of Cleveland

We are extremely proud of you and all of your achievements. We look forward to seeing what you will accomplish in this next chapter of your life. We love you very much, Mom, Dad, Jamie & Lauren

Miami University

Congratulations MARISA SIMON Master of Education

Marisa, we are so proud of you! The kids in Columbus are lucky to have you! Love, Jessica and Alec

The Ohio State University

AMANDA KOEHN | STAFF REPORTER @AmandaKoehnCJN akoehn@cjn.org |

Panelist

School

Reed Abrams

Hawken School

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Reagan Anthony

Orange High School

12

Matthew Axner

Solon High School

12

Sarah Baskin

Fuchs Mizrachi School

11

Jordyn Bauer

Hawken School

12

Nathan Blumenthal

Solon High School

12

Jakob Bolman

Beachwood High School

11

Joshua Caplan

Hawken School

12

Carly Chessin

Solon High School

11

Ryan Covitt

Hawken School

11

Hannah Cutrona

Parma High School

12

Sara Rivka Cweiber

Yavne High School

11

Hannah Froimson

Hathaway Brown

11

Sarah Furth

Hathaway Brown

12

Aidan Geis

Orange High School

12

Andrew Gilmore

University School

12

Jeremy Gimbel

Shaker Heights High School

12

Logan Goldberg

Shaker Heights High School

11

Mason Goldberg

Hawken School

11

Jacob Good

Shaker Heights High School

11

Zoe Grant

Beachwood High School

11

Jamie Guggenheim

Solon High School

11

Jesse Klineman

Fuchs Mizrachi School

12

Natalie Korach

Shaker Heights High School

11

Cameron Kraeger

Orange High School

12

Margo Lackritz

Beachwood High School

12

Sophia Levinson

Laurel School

11

Josie Lowell

Shaker Heights High School

11

Jared Mandell

Solon High School

12

Adam Marcus

Orange High School

11

Simone Marocco

Fuchs Mizrachi School

11

Joshua Robbins

University School

11

Matthew Rosenthal

Orange High School

11

Rachael Roth

Beachwood High School

12

Lilly Rothschild

Hathaway Brown

11

Rachel Rothschild

Solon High School

11

Jessica Schwartz

Twinsburg High School

12

Megan Schwartz

Solon High School

12

Gabriel Shapera

Beachwood High School

12

Zachary Shore

Cleveland Heights High School

12

ewish high school juniors and seniors recommended $42,500 in grants for local community organizations May 4, as part of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland’s Saltzman Youth Panel. The 40 panelists were selected via an application process and funds allocated came from a gift from the late Shirley Saltzman, in memory of her husband, Maurice. The purpose of the panel is to educate youth on Jewish community leadership, engage them in making difficult decisions about philanthropic causes and to fund local community needs. Organizations receiving $6,000 top grants were the Hebrew Shelter Home, to provide transportation assistance to homeless clients; Jewish Family Service Association, to provide services to older adults; and the Mandel Jewish Community Center, to support one-onone aides for children with special needs participating in summer camps. Natalie Korach, a junior at Shaker Heights High School, said participating in the panel helped her learn what causes were important to her. “I learned how to kind of align my personal values with the causes and organizations locally,” she said. The panel process includes seven meetings among the students, where they determine shared values and community needs, meet with agency leaders requesting the grants, review details of proposals and finally, allocate grants. Korach also said that the experience helped her decipher between causes where funds would have a direct impact, versus those where grant proposals are for a less concrete cause or have less potential. She said visiting the Hebrew Shelter Home spoke to her because of the importance of their work – providing housing for homeless community members, some of whom are fleeing an abusive family member – and the potential for the direct impact funds could make on families. “We were seeing specifically where the balance was going,” she said. For the panel, a program that began in 1998, 85 percent of funds are awarded to Jewish community causes while the remaining 15 percent can go to nonprofits serving the general community. Stephanie Kahn, associate director of the panel

SALTZMAN | 38

Grade


GALLERY OF GRADS

MAY 26, 2017

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 31

Herman elected OSU Hillel co-president

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tepping on the grounds of an unfamiliar university with 58,321 other students and a campus spreading across 1,777 acres like The Ohio State University’s main campus in Columbus can make a freshman feel insignificant. For Mitchell Herman, a South Euclid resident and graduate of University School in Hunting Valley, he embraced the experience and dived in, where he found his home away from home at Hillel. “I always wanted a Jewish Herman presence on campus,” he said. “I always had a strong Jewish community backbone through my life.” He began school by rushing Zeta Beta Tau, the world’s first Jewish fraternity. Slowly, he came in contact with more Jewish people, leading him to attend Shabbat dinner hosted by Hillel, which he was elected co-president of at the end of his junior year. During his first two years of school, he said he wasn’t overly involved in the workings of Hillel, but constantly attended the events. In his junior year, he added board responsibilities. “It was really about becoming a leader in the Jewish community, advocating what it’s like to be Jewish and kind of preparing to take bigger roles in the Jewish community in the future,” Herman said. While serving on the board his junior year, he considered putting his name in for the co-president

position. “I talked to the rabbi about it and I just felt like being on the board another year would be great but I wanted more responsibility and more of a voice,” Herman said. “I wanted to see things happen and good ideas to make things happen. I felt that being president of Hillel student board is the best way to see these ideas come to life.” Now that he has the official title, he has a drive to keep Hillel relevant on campus. “I wanted to see things happen,” he said. “I wanted the board to have more impact in Hillel. With Herman’s new plan, when students step onto campus this fall, they’ll notice Hillel. The board will add more positions, such as secretary and treasurer, along with more committees, which will lead to more events. “(We’ll be) getting students to Hillel as much as we can,” Herman said. “Not just with the opening barbecue, but sustaining it throughout the year and making a lasting impact.” As more Hillel events are added, Herman said he hopes the organization will gain and keep more members. “Part of your job is to motivate the people behind you and people coming next to step up,” Herman said. “It’s all about leaving your last imprints so the next president and board can build upon that.” Publisher’s Note: Mitchell Herman is the son of Joel Herman, a member of the Cleveland Jewish News Foundation Board of Directors.

Fuchs Mizrachi School receives $50,000 grant for education innovation BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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uchs Mizrachi School in Beachwood has been awarded the Day School Educators Challenge Grant, a $50,000 grant from the Jewish Education Innovation Challenge. The grant, which will be paid out over two years, was awarded at the JEIC Innovators Retreat in Boston on May 17 and 18. Rabbi Avery Joel, principal of Fuchs Mizrachi’s Stark High School, said the grant will be used to “further deepen the work of (Fuchs Mizrachi’s) professional Joel development program for Judaic studies teachers.” For the last four years, the JEIC, an organization funded by the Mayburg Family Foundation, has been funding two projects a year at the school. Joel said Fuchs Mizrachi worked hard in order to be selected for the award and had to go through an interview, written

proposal and a two-round application process. Joel said that the award is the result of the hard work of Rabbi Yehuda Chanales, Fuchs Mizrachi’s director of curriculum and instruction. He said the school’s Lilmod U’Lilmeid teacher Torah program will “develop the structures and processes by which the Fuchs Mizrachi School” and will “maintain a culture of reflection, growth and innovation for it’s middle and high school Jewish studies faculty.” “The (Lilmod U’Lilmeid) program will serve as the engine for continuous learning and growth for Judaic faculty at Fuchs Mizrachi,” Joel said in a statement to the Cleveland Jewish News. “Instead of focusing on implementing a particular innovative curriculum, new technology or cutting edge pedagogy, we are looking to fundamentally change the way Judaic faculty work – building a cycle of continuous improvement and innovation into our school.” Both Joel and Chanales said the grant would help make these processes possible. The retreat event took place at John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Columbia Pointe in Boston.

Mazel Tov ALEXANDRA MANGEL Laurel School

Mazel tov Alex, we are so proud of you! Looking forward to the next great chapter in your life! Love Mom, Dad, Matt & Zach

The Ohio State University Honors Biomedical Engineering

Mazel Tov CAMERYN COHEN Beachwood High School

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC.

ALYSSA SCHMITT | STAFF REPORTER @AlyssaSchmitCJN aschmitt@cjn.org |

We’re SO proud of everything you’ve accomplished in your past 4 years of high school and can’t wait for the amazing things about to come your way!! We love you so much!! Mom, Dad and Kyle

The Ohio State University


32 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

Mazel Tov MELANIE B. ADELSTEIN

Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Science

MAY 26, 2017

GALLERY OF GRADS

Copley student Hertz makes Styrofoam fashionable ALYSSA SCHMITT | STAFF REPORTER @AlyssaSchmitCJN aschmitt@cjn.org |

W Congratulations on your graduation from The Ohio State University. We are so proud of the knowledge that you painlessly extracted these past four years. You sparkled in every area. We wish you continued success as you take your talents to CWRU’s School of Dental Medicine. We hope that you will have AHH-some days ahead. We couldn’t be more proud of you. Love, Mom, Dad, and Jake

The Ohio State University

hen thinking of wedding dresses, Styrofoam isn’t the first material that comes to mind. But a soonto-be graduate from Copley High School embraced the oddity. Alyssa Hertz, 18, saw her dress in Styrofoam cups, bowls and plates. While forming the pieces of her dress, she incorporated the soft round shapes to form circular patterns and created flowers that lined the halter strap, all held together with hot glue. “I’m really inspired by flowers and soft shapes,” she said. “One of my favorite designers, Pablo Sebastian, does all sort of things with intricate detail. He’s one of my biggest inspirations.” Alyssa will submit the gown in the Cleveland IngenuityFest, which showcases local artists’ creations. Her story also has received national attention on people.com and today.com. She came up with the idea during her independent study, where she was assigned to come up with unusual dress designs. “The first semester was about learning how to draw and learning to draw clothes on the body,” Alyssa said. “The second semester was about unconventional design dresses.” This wasn’t the first time Alyssa dived into fashion. It’s something that’s consumed her life since she was young.

Congratulations

Mazel Tov

MIRIAM LIGHT

EMILY OLBINSKY GARFORTH

Mimi, We are so proud of your accomplishments as a student, cheerleader, yearbook editor, peer mentor and leader. We know you will continue to succeed as a Buckeye.

Solon High School

Photo / DawnKaye Photography

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC

Solon High School

We are so proud of you, the person that you are, and all your accomplishments thus far. We know you will continue to do great things and make us proud. Good luck at Miami! We love you very much!!

Love, Mom, Dad, Simone and Sarah

Mommy, Ray, and Cosmo

The Ohio State University

Miami University

Alyssa Hertz, left, poses with a model wearing her gown made entirely out of Styrofoam for her independent study class.

“I’ve always had an interest in fashion,” Alyssa said. “I started sketching things (at first). Junior year, I was able to take an intro to art class and the skills kind of started from there.” She already created a dress made solely of newspaper and jewelry made from nuts and bolts before taking on the challenge of Styrofoam. It turned out to be good practice for Alyssa, who wants to continue pursuing fashion at Kent State University in the fall, where she’ll major in fashion design. Publisher’s Note: Alyssa Hertz is the daughter of David Hertz, a member of the Cleveland Jewish Publication Company Board of Directors.

It’s never too late to congratulate your high school or college graduate! The CJN will continue to feature paid congratulatory messages in upcoming issues throughout June & July. Call Sherry Tilson at 216-342-5204 or email stilson@cjn.org to assist you.


GALLERY OF GRADS

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 33

MAY 26, 2017

Kfar Silver students travel to U.S. to help raise awareness for school ALYSSA SCHMITT | STAFF REPORTER @AlyssaSchmitCJN aschmitt@cjn.org |

Mazel Tov MATTHEW STOVSKY Beachwood High School

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Way to go Matt! We could not be more proud of you! OHIO Cleveland Cavaliers general counsel Jason Hillman of Solon, center, visits with Azriel Reubens, 15, left, and Noa Cohen Gerber, 17, as they tour Quicken Loans Arena on May 4. |

Mom, Dad, Lexi, and Tyler

Submitted photo

and helping bring support for new facilities like a science building and communication lab. “My little sister (is) suppose to go to Kfar Silver in seventh grade so it means a lot to me that she gets a new science lab or new community center,” Noa said. “I love the school because the environment is great. It is important to me, not only for my little sister, for all the kids.” Azriel said he wants to keep his science knowledge up to date and needs updated equipment to

understand new discoveries. “I love biology so when (I) choose that field … it’s important for me to learn modern science, the new things being discovered” he said. “For that I need there to be a lot of new things in the building.” Noa wants to join the Israeli army and become a combat soldier when she finishes school. Azriel hasn’t decided if he wants to pursue medicine or become a veterinarian, but he said he still has time to decide.

The Ohio State University

(Scholars) Fisher College of Business

Mazel Tov RYAN MARKS Beachwood High School

Photo / Hiliary Benjamin LLC

wo teenagers from Kfar Silver, a boarding school in Israel, traveled to Los Angeles, Cleveland and New York City in the span of eight days to help raise awareness of funding needs for their school. While in Cleveland, Noa Cohen Gerber, 17, and Azriel Reubens, 15, along with Kfar Silver Project liaison coordinator Inna Goncharor and history director Lily Frisch, visited Quicken Loans Arena May 4 and attended an ORT donors and supporters reception at Kertes Homes Lakes of Orange in Orange. Named after the late Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver of Cleveland, the school is located in southern Israel, 44 miles west of Jerusalem and 33 miles south of Tel Aviv, serving students with a will to learn, like Noa. “I switched from five schools in two years,” she said. Noa said she had difficulties at previous schools with teachers unwilling to help her improve her studies, causing her to fall behind. At Kfar Silver, she said for the first time she is happy to attend school. The school has provided opportunities Noa wasn’t able to experience before and with Azriel, she said she hopes to continue the school’s legacy by sharing her story

Ryan we are so proud of your accomplishments and the person you’ve become. Congratulations! We love you so much. Love, Mom, Dad, Allyson, Jonathan & Julia

Scholarship winners

Pepper Pike Civic League chairperson Doug Solomon, from left, with residents Jacquelyn Ellis, a senior at Hathaway Brown School in Shaker Heights, Michelle Moufawad, a senior at Gilmour Academy in Gates Mills, and Mayor Richard Bain upon presentation of $1,000 scholarships for winning the civic league’s 500-word essay contest. | Photo / Pepper Pike Civic League

Penn State University


34 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

MAY 26, 2017

GALLERY OF GRADS

Teen difference makers take center stage at Friendship Circle award reception ALYSSA SCHMITT | STAFF REPORTER @AlyssaSchmitCJN aschmitt@cjn.org |

T

he Friendship Circle of Cleveland’s annual award reception recognized 240 teenage volunteers for their hands-on friendship to children with special needs May 22 at Beachwood High School in Beachwood. The night began with Friendship Circle Executive Director Rabbi Yossi Marozov explaining how youth has been the catalyst of change throughout the decades. “Who was at the heart of so much radical change? It was our youth,” he said. “Repeatedly they were at the forefront demonstrating idealism, energy and a commitment to buck the trend in order to mold a better future.” Among the students honored was Liat Schiowitz, 14, with a video showing her dedication as a volunteer by learning sign language to help her friends with hearing disabilities. “They haven’t had their chance yet to make their big marks on the world,” Marozov said. “But they have already made a big mark on the children that they hands-on support with genuine friendship.” Other volunteers took the stage to tell the crowd what it meant to be a volunteer through a sketch and later, a rap song. Telling his story of how difference makers helped

Mazel Tov

him was Lloyd Bachrach, an inspirational speaker born with a disability. “I was born missing bones in both legs,” Bachrach said. “The doctor who brought me in the world, he told my parents that he didn’t think I would even walk. That due to the size of my legs, he felt I would never do much of anything.” As a baby, Bachrach started using his arms to drag himself across the floor to crawl. He said his parents realized after they saw him crawl up the stairs using only his arms that he needed a way to strengthen his arm muscles. That is when Bachrach said he met his swimming teacher. His first dream maker in a long line of people that believed in Bachrach and helped him achieve feats his first doctor said he never would. “I participated in all different sports (like) baseball, basketball, football, volleyball, swimming,” he said. “I even ran track.” At 13, Bachrach received his first set of legs, allowing him to walk, run and stop on a dime. When he entered high school, he wanted to continue participating in sports and decided he would join the gymnastics team because he could take advantage of his arms. Bachrach proved to the crowd that this was true when he took off his legs and whirled around on his arms on stage. “Now again, I’d like to take credit but there were people in my life along the way that helped me,” he said. “The dream makers. You all know what it takes to be a dream maker. You are dream makers. Don’t forget it. I learned in life that if you help one person, really you help two.”

Lloyd Bachrach sits next to his prosthetic legs during his presentation at the annual Friendship Circle of Cleveland award reception May 22 at Beachwood High School in Beachwood. | CJN Photos / Alyssa Schmitt

CARLY TOMKO

Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Steve Weinberg, from left, with Lee Seidman and Rabbi Yossi Marozov during the annual Friendship Circle award reception.

Ryan Schiowitz, 11, poses with his siblings Ariella, 15, Sara, 17, Liat, 14, and Akiva, 17, during the reception.

Congratulations Carly! We are extremely proud of all you have accomplished. Best wishes to you now and always. Lots of Love, Mom, Dad, Katie and Lexi

The Ohio State University Boys in the Friendship Circle perform a rap about a summary of their volunteer hours during the annual award reception.

Yehudis Frank, 18, left, with Tzipora Saks, 18, Hanna DeWolf, 17, Chani Goldstein, 18, and Leah Wolovitz, 18, during the reception.


Gallery of Grads

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 35

May 26, 2017

Average college debt students incur at private schools 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

School

Marietta College Tiffin University Ursuline College Cleveland Institute of Art Heidelberg University Bluffton University University of Findley University of Dayton Cincinnati Christian University Wittenberg University Ohio Wesleyan University Malone University University of Mount Union Baldwin Wallace University Xavier University Capital University John Carroll University Columbus College of Art & Design Cedarville University Case Western Reserve University

Congratulations

Amount

$40,196

ABBY JACOBSON Aurora High School

38,448 37,900 37,443 37,387 36,797 36,249 35,740 35,167 34,178 33,810 33,067 32,680 32,558 32,131 31,563 31,386 31,006

Photo / Monica Kimes Photography

Rank

Abby, We are so proud of you and all you accomplished at Aurora High. We look forward to your next step in life at Bowling Green State University in Environmental Science. We love you! Bubbie and Poppy, Mom, Dad and Emma

Bowling Green State University

29,454 28,562

Mazel Tov

Source: The Institute For College Access and Success, 2015

Average college debt students incur at public schools 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

School

Amount

Kent State University Bowling Green State University University of Akron Wright State University Youngstown State University Miami University Ohio University University of Cincinnati University of Toledo Cleveland State University The Ohio State University

$33,083

Kenston High School

31,746 31,707 30,790 30,735 30,015 28,083 27,938 27,928 27,563 27,400

Source: The Institute For College Access and Success, 2015

Photo / Noah Blue Photography

Rank

SAMANTHA EISNER

Your hard work and success give us pride; your kind and loving heart gives us joy. We can’t wait to see what amazing things you do in the next four years. Love, Mom, Dad, William and Gramma Karen

Indiana University


36 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

MAY 26, 2017

GALLERY OF GRADS

Cleveland Hillel Summer Internship program meet-and-greet

Participants in the Cleveland Hillel Summer Internship program held a meet-and-greet May 15 at Hillel at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. Interns and their parents heard an overview about the program and got to meet each other. This summer, 44 interns are working at 30 businesses, including the Cleveland Jewish News.

Sydney Lowell, from Shaker Heights and The Ohio State University in Columbus, will intern at Women’s Business Network. She is seen with her parents, Lee and Amy Lowell.

Danielle Scharf, from left, from Beachwood and Washington University in St. Louis, will intern at College Now Greater Cleveland; Emma Kagan, from Shaker Heights and The Ohio State University in Columbus, will intern at Effective Leadership Academy; Abby White, from Shaker Heights and Columbia University in New York City will intern at Global Cleveland; Madison Brown, from University Heights and the College of Wooster will intern at Council Gardens; and Monica Sass, from Pepper Pike and Washington University, will intern at the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland. | Submitted photos

Ben Garnitz, from Shaker Heights and the College of Wooster will intern at COIT Cleaning & Restoration. He is seen with his mother, Amy Garnitz.

Anna Edelman, from Solon and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, will intern at Mean Joe Advertising. She is seen with her mother, Karla Edelman.

Gross Schechter Day School offers ‘Fairy Tales, Shmairy Tales’

For wisdom will enter your heart, and knowledge will be pleasant to your soul. Proverbs 2:10

Sadie Barnholtz and Ari Kiwi act in the Gross Schechter Day School Hebrew-English bilingual production of “Fairy Tales, Shmairy Tales,” written and directed by Sheri Gross, the school’s director of creative programs. | Photo / Gross Schechter Day School

Simon joins CJPC as Wain Advertising Intern

The Park Synagogue expresses appreciation to our entire staff and faculty of Jewish educators Director of Education

B

radley Simon has joined the Cleveland Jewish News as the Nina and Norman Wain Advertising Intern. “Bradley brings great enthusiasm and excitement and is eager to learn the ad sales and marketing business,” Vice President of Sales Adam Mandell said. “He will gain invaluable hands-on experience before he leaves here and heads back to school.” Simon will be a junior in the fall at Ohio

University in Athens, where he is majoring in journalism and strategic communications and minoring in marketing. A graduate of Orange High School in Pepper Pike, he lives in Simon Orange. He enjoys playing sports and writing.


GALLERY OF GRADS

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 37

MAY 26, 2017

Teach for America changing lives

Solon High School

To help celebrate the Greater Cleveland office’s fifth anniversary, Teach for America CEO Elisa Villanueva Beard will speak at two events.

Villanueva Beard will speak June 2 at Music Box Supper Club, 1148 Main Ave. in Cleveland. A buffet breakfast will begin at 7:15 a.m., with the formal event at 8. To attend, register at bit.ly/ TFAGCLEJune2. Villanueva Beard also will speak at noon June 2 at The City Club of Cleveland. For more information, visit bit.ly/CityClubTFA. kind of education that empowers them to build a life of their choosing. “After their corps member experience, our alumni join a broad coalition of people, representing the diverse circles of influence that can make change, working together inside and outside of the education system to translate insights from proof points of possibility into policy and practice,” according to teachforamerica.org. Leavitt was a corps member who decided to stay on past her two-year commitment, and eventually got her masters’ degree in educational leadership. She works with the Breakthrough Charter School Network, and places Teach for America corps members in the school’s network. “I do think Teach for America made me a better educator,” she said. “It really strengthens your practice, (teaching is) not an easy profession, especially when you’re working. Being part of the Teach for America community gave me the strength to keep going.” Kohn didn’t stay on as a teacher past her initial commitment, but she still works for Teach for America. She helped start the Greater Cleveland office and now leads the program team, overseeing the staff that works with incoming corps members. She said being a corps member helped her in her current role to give her the space and credibility to push for things she believed in. “Teaching was the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” Kohn said. “It was the first time I’ve ever experienced failure. My experience teaching helped me be able to coach teachers and gave a strong bar of what’s possible for our kids. It’s particularly meaningful to do the work here in Cleveland. I think the fifth anniversary is a great time for us to reflect on where we’ve been. My hope is we see more kids who are graduating from high school and that we see more kids who have access to opportunities they want and deserve.”

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC

K

atie Kohn thinks her time in Teach for America was a life-changing experience. Kohn was born in Pepper Pike and joined Teach For America as a corps member in 2010. She was assigned to San Antonio, where she taught high school English in a low-income neighborhood. “I heard about Kohn Teach for America in high school,” said Kohn, an Orange High School graduate. “I investigated it and felt compelled by what I was learning about the organization to join.” Teach for America is a nonprofit Leavitt organization which recruits college graduates as teachers, which they call corps members, in one of the 52 low-income communities served by the organization. The corps members commit to teaching for two years and then decide whether to pursue a career in education or follow a different path. The national program was established in 1989, and this year Teach for America celebrates the fifth anniversary of its Greater Cleveland office. “Teach for America was a life- changing experience,” said Kohn, 28 and a resident of Cleveland’s Ohio City neighborhood. “I thought I was going to go to law or business school, and that experience with the children fundamentally changed my outlook and compelled me to think about what my impact could be. I view my role as to help build a force of leaders, helping them cultivate the knowledge and skills to peruse a meaningful journey for themselves.” Morgan Leavitt, a 28-year-old Lyndhurst resident, said her three years teaching in New Jersey were some of the most rewarding experiences of her life. “I learned so much about myself and about my students, it was challenging and rigorous,” Leavitt said. “I loved it, loved getting to know the kids, loved teaching. To me, that was so important, I was continually getting better on behalf of my kids. I just wanted them to succeed.” According to Teach for America’s website, the initial two-year commitment grounds corps members in the challenges facing students and propels them toward careers oriented around long-term impact so that every child has the chance at the

JARED MANDELL

It has been a privilege and an honor to watch you grow up to become such an incredible person. We’re so very proud of you Jared. You deserve the very best that life has to offer. With all our love, Mom, Dad & Chase

Emory University

Congratulations SAMANTHA RICH Solon High School

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC

ED CARROLL | STAFF REPORTER @EdCarrollCJN ecarroll@cjn.org |

Congratulations

Good luck at Purdue University! You make us proud everyday! This is the start of a new chapter - fill it with amazing experiences! All your hard work paid off! Always remain true to yourself! We love you! Mom, Dad, Whitney, Douglas, and Harrison

Purdue University


38 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

May 26, 2017

Gallery of Grads

SALTZMAN | 30 Organizations

Project

Brief Description

Amount Recommended

Independent Montefiore Shelter Home dba Hebrew Shelter Home

Transportation Supports for Clients of Hebrew Shelter Home

Funding will offset the costs associated with providing transportation assistance to clients including bus passes, cab vouchers, and gas cards.

$6,000

Jewish Family Service Association of Cleveland (JFSA)

Older Adult Services

Provide subsidized services and supports for older adults who cannot otherwise afford them including dental care, medical supplies, hearing aids, eyeglasses, transportation or in-home supportive care.

$6,000

Mandel Jewish Community Center

One-on-one aides for two week camp for children with disabilities

Supports one-on-one aides for children with special needs participating in Mandel JCC day-camps, providing safe and meaningful Jewish summer experiences with their peers.

$6,000

American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee Inc. (JDC)

PACT Backpack Subsidies

Subsidizing backpacks and basic school supplies for Ethiopian-Israeli children entering first grade.

$5,259

Jewish Federation of Cleveland (JFC)

Cleveland Chesed Center

Distribution of kosher food to Jewish families experiencing food insecurity.

$4,000

“Menorah Park Foundation”

Capacity Building - Integrative Therapies for Hospice Patients

Supports Menorah Park Hospice in providing more integrative healthcare therapy sessions to Hospice patients and their families.

$4,000

“Menorah Park Foundation”

Jewish Education Resources and Direct Services for Indigent Russian Residents

Safety Net Services for Indigent Russian Long-Term Care Residents and Adult Day Center Russian Participants.

$3,866

Jewish Federation of Cleveland (JFC)

“Shutafim L’Chinuch” University Scholarships for Beit Shean, Israel

Provide university scholarships for Beit Shean area residents to obtain a degree and improve their lives and the local community.

$1,000

Circle Health Services

Teen Clinic & Outreach Education Program

Provides year-round medical and educational services to young people 13-21 years old who lack alternatives to medical care due to fear, stigma and/or being uninsured/underinsured.

$2,125

Rainey Institute

“Commit to Be Fit” Community Workout and Health Resources Program

Provides weekly classes including cooking demonstrations and fitness classes, Flu Shots, health education, blood pressure screenings, and educational information regarding childhood obesity, diabetes, lead poisoning and the Affordable Care Act. Also provides a variety of resources including access to local health providers at the monthly food markets.

Family Promise of Greater Cleveland

Health Forums Relating the Latest Health Care Recommendations for Homeless Families

Provides food for healthy lunches and health care products for clients, and offers enriching childcare activities to supplement the Health Forum programming at Family Promise.

$1,125

Linking Employment, Abilities and Potential (LEAP)

A School to Work Transition Program for Youth with Disabilities

Prepares youth with disabilities in Cleveland Municipal School District schools for post school success. The program is designed to prevent youth from graduating to a life of dependency, entitlement, and limited opportunities.

$1,125

Jewish Agency Grants:

United Way Agency Grants:

TOTAL

Congratulations

Congratulations

REAGAN ANTHONY

DANIELLE CHISLING Solon High School

Photo / Kamron Khan

Photo / Hilliary Photography, LLC

Orange High School

Reagan, We know you want adventure in the great wide somewhere....so just keep swimming. We are so proud of you! Roll wave! Love, Mom, Dad and Josh

Tulane University

We are so proud of you and your accomplishments! We know the future is so bright and nothing is beyond your reach! Love Mom, Dad, Melanie and Samantha

Indiana University

$2,000

$42,500

and community planning and allocations associate at the Federation, said students asked sophisticated questions about allocations, such as considering the depth versus the breadth of impact grants could make on organizations. She also said it’s interesting to hear student perspectives vary from year to year and to see how they take ownership over community needs. “A lot of questions they have are ‘how is this sustainable?’ Which is a very sophisticated question,” she said. Panelists also reflected on the experience for a recognition program May 4 at the Federation in Beachwood, where they presented recommendations to the Federation’s board of trustees. In a written reflection, Lilly Rothschild, a junior at Hathaway Brown School in Shaker Heights, said the experience helped her learn about the “power of discussion.” “Both what we had in common and what we didn’t helped us make meaningful and well thought out decisions that fit our common mission,” she wrote. Jamie Guggenheim, a Solon High School junior, wrote that coming to an agreement on allocations was challenging, but the group rallied around goals to improve the community. “Going through a process like this also helps a person who can be relativity indecisive (like me) learn how to become more decisive, and more importantly, I learned how to express myself and communicate my feelings verbally to others,” Jamie wrote in a reflection.


GALLERY OF GRADS

CJN.ORG | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | 39

MAY 26, 2017

Synagogue replicas a highlight for students at Solon Chabad BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

BENJAMIN P. LOCKSHIN On Your Graduation - Class of 2014

PRESIDENTIAL MANAGEMENT FELLOW United States Office of Personnel Management

O

PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS AND CONGRESSIONAL AFFAIRS Federal Transit Administration U.S. Department of Transportation The Touro Synagogue in Rhode Island, replicated by students in the seventh-grade boys’ class, is the oldest synagogue in the United States. | Photos / Solon Chabad

which is the Touro Synagogue in Rhode Island.” Greenberg said the project took the students about one month to complete. Then, on May 21, the students presented their work to 200 participants and the families in attendance voted on their favorite one. The Altneushul Synagogue won first place. “Our goal was to instill in our children that there are Jews all over the world and wherever they travel, they should seek out the Jewish community and visit,” he said. “This gives them the feeling of being part of a larger, global Jewish community.”

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY M.A. - American Government and Politics

MIAMI UNIVERSITY B.A. with Honors - Political Science; French; Economics

We are so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Zara

Congratulations RACHEL KRANTZ Solon High School

Photo / Darcy Hershey Lifestyle Photography

n the last day of the school year for Solon Chabad’s Hebrew school, students started setting up exhibit tables to show off the work the students put into creating eight replicas of synagogues from around the world. Rabbi Zushe Greenberg said the replica project was another installment of a yearly hands-on Greenberg project series that the school’s older division does at the end of each school year. Last year’s project focused on what Jewish heroes and a “wax museum,” where students dressed as a Jewish hero and presented research on the person. Students learned about Jewish communities all around the world and Greenberg said their studies led them to create the replicas. The project was inspired by the Diaspora Museum in Tel Aviv, which produced something similar. “The students were really excited about it and worked in groups of five to seven students,” he said. “(Each group) voted on a country and then, using their phones, looked for a synagogue that was over 100 years old and still in use. “It was awesome to see which synagogues were chosen, such as the Altneushul in Prague, which is the oldest synagogue in Europe. The oldest synagogue in the U.S. was chosen as well,

Congratulations

Rachel, we are so proud of all that you do and the amazing, kind, energetic, funny person you are. Keep loving what you do and never settle. Your future ahead will be as wonderful as you . We love you!

‘Making a Difference’ at Hebrew Academy

Hebrew Academy of Cleveland fifth-graders Leah Spolter, left, and Dahlia Shtern display their posters about medical professionals at the “Making a Difference” wax museum. Using research skills and creativity, students either depicted people who have made a difference or various types of professionals. In costume, students presented their research to visitors. | Photo / Hebrew Academy of Cleveland

Mom, Dad & Adam

Ohio University


40 | CLEVELAND JEWISH NEWS | CJN.ORG

May 26, 2017

Gallery of Grads

Mazel Tov, Confirmands & Graduates Congratulations to the 2017 confirmands and graduates Shavuot, which occurs this year on May 31, is the holiday that celebrates the revelation of the Torah to the Jewish people on Mount Sinai. Most Conservative and Reform synagogues hold confirmation ceremonies on this holiday.

Confirmands Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple Zachary Carno Harf Harry Carroll Asher Caruso Zachary Chylla Natalie Cohen Joshua Danielpour Delaney Eisen Thom Gisser Paige Gordon Anna Jaffe Zachary Kallmeyer Samuel Kramer Ross Krantz Isabel Levin Eva Levine Sarah Levine Felicia Maryash Hannah Pollack Samuel Spiegle Ryan Vincent Samantha Wittenberg

Beth Israel-The West Temple Carly Chessin Joseph Josselson Evie Krislov Hannah Ross Alex Weissberg

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation Paul Jacobs Jacob Levine Gabriel Perla Yoav Saggi Ronen Zomber

Park Synagogue Leo Abramson Emma Briskin Trudie Doris Effron Alexa Mirielle Freeman Armon Gabriel Frey Elijah Seth Frey Andrew Mark Friedman Hadas Galili Matthew Alexander Grunzweig Emma Tanya Gutarts Iris Taylor Levine

Lincoln Raymond Luzar Noa Miriam Marcus Benjamin Seth Muencz Ryan Harris Muencz Jack Newman Jared Harrison Shapiro Bryan Alfonso Shein Mason Mellitz Shein Mia Paige Shein Noah Harrison Shore Todd Philip Stein Carly Meredith Stewart Irene deChelly Young

Suburban Temple Kol Ami Joseph Berick Alexa Cooper Joshua Silver

Temple B’nai Abraham Tess Kelly Maya Schane

Temple Beth Shalom Maxwell Irvin Asher Samuel Lloyd Chupack Jeremiah Egolf Peyton Fettman Peri Michelle Gretta Avery Brooke Silverman

Temple Emanu El Lauren Blaugrund Ethan Cooper Laila Edelman Melissa Ellin Elena Flores Zachary Lashley Jadon Tinnon

The Temple-Tifereth Israel Greta Bauer Abigail Bendis Jenna Cahn Benjamin Corbin Alexandra Deutchman Ava Edelman Jolie Eitman Ethan Gimbel Ilon Goldberg Virginia Hexter Olivia Kline Claire Ockner Alexa Paull Logan Rock Hannah Roth

Allison Sewell Jonah Shapera Eliana Sosin Rachel Weisman Zoey Zelman

Graduates @akiva @akiva High School Josh Caplan Andrew Feldman Aidan Geis Kayla Giterman Jacob Hoberman Noah Horowitz Zoe Newman Yoni Peleg Samantha Rose Jessica Schwartz Daniel Simon Gabe Sugerman

HaZamir Hannah Cutrona

icnext Cohort 3 Eli Atzenhoffer Lindsay Blashka Emerson Bloomberg Eliana Bortz Sydni Burg Josh Caplan Hannah Caplin Emily Einhorn Aidan Geis Jeremy Gimbel Yoni Peleg Miriam Pincus Rebecca Shankman Gabriel Shapera Daniel Simon Shane Strongosky

icnext Cohort 4 Sarah Borow Allison Cohen Hannah Cutrona David Gold Sam Greene Noa Immerman Erica Kahn Hannah Kornblut Jessica Linden

Rosalind Madorsky Adam Marcus Leah Marek Zachary Nosanchuk Shira Ophir Shai Paz Rachel Podl Samantha Rose Jonah Ross Lillian Rothschild Jonah Rubanenko Caleb Segar Ellie Shafron Dalia Socher Arielle Sternberg Gabrielle Sudilovsky

Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple Jacque Berkson Mikayla Carno Harf Aaron Jacobs

Beth El Congregation Sam Shkolnik

Beth Israel-The West Temple Eli Atzenhoffer Hannah Cutrona Sarah Greenberg Shane Strongosky

Congregation Shaarey Tikvah Gabriel Cohen Emily Einhorn Aidan Geis

Park Synagogue Gabrielle Adelstein Maxwell Adelstein Emma Rose Cohen Rebecca Emily Goldfarb Casey Gregory Nathan Gutarts Sydney Levine Miriam Livia Light Lindsay Morris Zoe Newman Samantha Rich Samantha Arielle Rose Jessica Schwartz Louis Schwartz Joanna M. Sherman

Laura H. Sherman Michael Wayne

Suburban Temple Kol Ami Noah Adamson Jane Arnold Mackenzie Berk Joshua Bialosky Emma Bloomberg Andrea Cohen Sam Cooper Bennett Hilkert Michael Litt Samuel Katz Daniel Passov Leia Rich Andrew Roth Andrew Schechtman Mimi Thompson

Temple Emanu El Brandon Arnold Samantha Eisner Rebecca Ellin Alex Kohn Rachel Krantz Joshua Lashley Emily Olbinsky Garforth Michael Richards Adam Rogers Cameron Schwartz Megan Schwartz Rebecca Shankman Rachael Sullivan

The Temple-Tifereth Israel Madison Dunn Jamie Frayman Sarah Furth Bess Gatanas Jeremy Gimbel Hunter Goldberg Jeremy Klein Sydney Klein Sheridan Patai David Regal Nicole Rumizen Bailey Schleifer Erin Segal

Lists were provided by synagogues/schools. This page is donated by the Cleveland Jewish News.

Cleveland Jewish News Gallery of Grads 2017  

A commemorative keepsake special section celebrating our community's high school and college graduates.

Cleveland Jewish News Gallery of Grads 2017  

A commemorative keepsake special section celebrating our community's high school and college graduates.

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