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Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - [ Traduci questa pagina ] The Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” (Op. 95), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 during his ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._9_(Dvořák) - Copia cache - Simili Antonin Dvorak: Symphony No. 9 In E Minor Op.95 ‘From The New ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Sheet Music - £4.99 - A great and lasting favourite in the vast symphonic literature, Dvorak’s New World Symphony is among the composer’s most enduring and ... www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/07147/details. html - Copia cache - Simili Symphony No. 9, Op. 95,”From the New World” – Antonín Dvořák ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Listen free to Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9, Op. 95,”From the New World” (Largo, Allegro con


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Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - [ Traduci questa pagina ] The Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” (Op. 95), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 during his ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._9_(Dvořák) - Copia cache - Simili Antonin Dvorak: Symphony No. 9 In E Minor Op.95 ‘From The New ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Sheet Music - £4.99 - A great and lasting favourite in the vast symphonic literature, Dvorak’s New World Symphony is among the composer’s most enduring and ... www.musicroom.com/se/ID_No/07147/details. html - Copia cache - Simili Symphony No. 9, Op. 95,”From the New World” – Antonín Dvořák ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Listen free to Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9, Op. 95,”From the New World” (Largo, Allegro con fuoco and more). 4 tracks (41:48). Antonín Leopold Dvořák ...


www.last.fm/.../Antonín+Dvořák/Symphony+No. +9,+Op.+95,%22From+the+New+World%22 - Copia cache - Simili Symphony No.9, Op.95 (Dvořák, Antonín) - IMSLP/ Petrucci Music ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] 22 Apr 2009 ... Work Title, Symphony No. 9, Op. 95. Alternative Title, Symfonie č.9, “Z nového světa”, “From the New World”. Composer, Dvořák, Antonín ... imslp.org/.../Symphony_No.9,_Op.95_(Dvořák,_ Antonín) - Copia cache - Simili Music: Dvořák: Symphony No. 8 / Symphony No. 9 “From The New World ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Symphony No. 9 in E minor Op. 95, “From The New World”: Allegro con fuoco. Artist: Sapporo Symphony Orchestra, Antonín Dvořák, Tadaaki Otaka ... www.rhapsody.com/.../dvoraksymphonyno8symphonyno9fromthenewworld?... - Copia cache - Simili Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, From the New World: Antonin ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, From the New World: Antonin Dvorak, Marin Alsop, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra: Amazon.co.uk: Music. www.amazon.co.uk/Symphony-No...Op.../ B0017PE9L8 - Copia cache - Simili


Jan Valach - Antonín Dvorák, Symphony No. 9 In E Minor, Op. 95 ... Scarica e ascolta in streaming l’album Antonín Dvorák, Symphony No. 9 In E Minor, Op. 95 (From The New World) di Jan Valach su Dada: contiene brani famosi ... www.dada.it/.../antonín-dvorák,-symphonyno.-9-in-e-minor,-op.-95-(from-the-new-world)_ 3055984a.html - Copia cache - Simili Dvorák - Symphony no 9 in E minor, Op. 95/B 178 “From the New ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Dvorák - Symphony no 9 in E minor, Op. 95/B 178. ... Dvorak: Symphony No 9 / Leonard Bernstein, New York Po Release Date: 09/07/1999 Label: Sony Classical ... www.arkivmusic.com/classical/listPage.jsp?list_ id... - Copia cache - Simili Antonin dvorak symphony no 9 in e minor op 95 Torrent Downloads ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] If this search for antonin dvorak symphony no 9 in e minor op 95 did not find you the right torrents, try to fine tune your query. At the top you might find ... www.nowtorrents.com/.../antonin-dvorak-symphony-no-9-in-e-minor-op-95.html - Copia cache - Simili


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Antonín Dvořák From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Antonín Leopold Dvořák; September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms and melodies of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. His works include operas, symphonic, choral and chamber music. His best-known works include his New World Symphony (particularly the second and fourth movements), as well as his Slavonic Dances, “American” String Quartet, and Cello Concerto in B minor. Biography Early career Dvořák was born on September 8, 1841 in Nelahozeves, near Prague (then Austrian Empire, today the Czech Republic), where he spent most of his life. His father František Dvořák (1814-1894) was a butcher, innkeeper, and professional player of the zither. Dvořák’s parents recognized his musical talent early, and he received his earliest musical education at the village school which he entered in 1847, age 6. From 1857 to 1859[1] he studied music in Prague’s only Organ School, and gradually developed into an accomplished player of the violin and the viola. Throughout the


1860s he played viola in the Bohemian Provisional Theater Orchestra, which from 1866 was conducted by Bedřich Smetana. The need to supplement his income by teaching left Dvořák with limited free time, and in 1871 he gave up playing in the orchestra in order to compose. During this time, Dvořák fell in love with one of his pupils, Josefína Čermáková, and wrote a song cycle, Cypress Trees, for her.[1] She never returned his love, however, and married another man. In 1873 Dvořák married Josefína’s younger sister, Anna. They had nine children together. Antonín Dvořák with his wife Anna in London, 1886 At about this time Dvořák began to be recognized as a significant composer. He became organist at St. Adalbert’s Church, Prague, and began a period of prolific composition. Dvořák composed his second string quintet in 1875, and in 1877, the critic Eduard Hanslick informed him that his music had attracted the attention of Johannes Brahms, whom he later befriended. Brahms contacted the musical publisher Simrock, who as a result commissioned Dvořák’s first set of Slavonic Dances. Published in 1878, these were an immediate success. Dvořák’s Stabat Mater (1880) was performed abroad, and after a successful performance in London in 1883, Dvořák was invited to visit England where he appeared to great acclaim in 1884. His Symphony No. 7 was written for London; it premiered there in 1885. Dvořák visited England nine times in total,[1] he often conducted his own works there. In 1890, influenced by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, he also visited Russia, and conducted


the orchestras in Moscow and in St. Petersburg.[1] In 1891 Dvořák received an honorary degree from the University of Cambridge, and his Requiem premiered later that year in Birmingham at the Triennial Music Festival. United States (1892–1895) From 1892 to 1895, Dvořák was the director of the National Conservatory of Music in New York City, at a $15,000 annual salary. The Conservatory had been founded by a wealthy and philanthropic socialite, Jeannette Thurber; it was located at 126-128 East 17th Street,[2][3] but was demolished in 1911 and replaced by what is now a high school. Here Dvořák met with Harry Burleigh, one of the earliest African-American composers, his pupil. Burleigh introduced traditional American Spirituals to Dvořák at the latter’s request. In the winter and spring of 1893, while in New York, Dvořák wrote Symphony No.9, “From the New World”. He spent the summer of 1893 with his family in the Czech-speaking community of Spillville, Iowa, to which some of his cousins had earlier immigrated. While there he composed the String Quartet in F (the “American”), and the String Quintet in E flat, as well as a Sonatina for violin and piano. Over the course of three months in 1895, Dvořák wrote his Cello Concerto in B minor. However, problems with Mrs. Thurber about his salary, together with increasing recognition in Europe — he had been made an honorary member of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna — and


homesickness made him decide to return to Bohemia. He left New York before the end of the spring term. Dvořák’s New York home was located at 327 East 17th Street near Perlman Place.[4] It was in this home that the Ninth Symphony was written. Despite protests, from the then Czech President Václav Havel amongst others, who wanted the house preserved as a historical site, it was demolished to make room for a Beth Israel Medical Center residence for people with AIDS.[5] To honor Dvořák, however, a statue of him was erected in Stuyvesant Square. Later career During his final years, Dvořák concentrated on composing opera and chamber music. In 1896 he visited London for the last time to hear the premiere of his Cello Concerto in B minor. In 1897 his daughter married his pupil, the composer Josef Suk. Dvořák succeeded Antonín Bennewitz as director of the Conservatory in Prague from 1901 until his death from heart failure in 1904[7]. His 60th birthday was celebrated as a national event. He is interred in the Vyšehrad cemetery in Prague, under his bust by Czech sculptor Ladislav Šaloun. Dvořák’s tomb in Prague He left many unfinished works, including the early Cello Concerto in A major (see Concerti below). Dvořák’s funeral on 5 May, 1904


Works See List of compositions by Antonín Dvořák by category, List of compositions by Antonín Dvořák by Burghauser number and Category: Compositions by Antonín Dvořák Dvořák wrote in a variety of forms: his nine symphonies generally stick to classical models that Beethoven would have recognised, but he also worked in the newly developed symphonic poem form and the influence of Richard Wagner is apparent in some works. Many of his works also show the influence of Czech folk music, both in terms of rhythms and melodic shapes; perhaps the best known examples are the two sets of Slavonic Dances. Dvořák also wrote operas (of which the best known is Rusalka); serenades for string orchestra and wind ensemble; chamber music (including a number of string quartets, and quintets); songs; choral music; and piano music. Symphonies During Dvořák’s life, only five of his symphonies were widely known. The first published was his sixth, dedicated to Hans Richter. After Dvořák’s death, research uncovered four unpublished symphonies, of which the manuscript of the first had even been lost to the composer himself. This led to an unclear situation in which the New World Symphony has alternately been called the 5th, 8th and 9th. This article uses the modern numbering system, according to the order in which they were written. -Symphony No. 1 in C minor was written when


Dvořák was 24 years old. Later subtitled The Bells of Zlonice after a village in Dvořák’s native Bohemia, it shows inexperience but also genius with its many attractive qualities. It has many formal similarities with Beethoven’s 5th Symphony (for example, the movements follow the same keys: C minor, A flat major, C minor, C major), yet in harmony and instrumentation, Dvořák’s First follows the style of Franz Schubert. (Some material from this symphony was reused in the Silhouettes, Opus 8, for piano solo.) -Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 4, still takes Beethoven as a model, though this time in a brighter, more pastoral light. -Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 10, clearly shows the sudden and profound impact of Dvořák’s recent acquaintance with the music of Richard Wagner and Franz Liszt; there is no scherzo. (A portion of the slow movement was reused in the sixth of the Legends, Opus 59, for piano duet or orchestra.) -Symphony No. 4 in D minor, Op. 13, still shows a strong influence of Wagner, particularly the second movement, which is reminiscent of the overture to Tannhäuser. In contrast, the scherzo is strongly Czech in character. -Symphony No. 5 in F major, Op. 76, and Symphony No. 6 in D major, Op. 60, are largely pastoral in nature, and brush away nearly all the last traces of Wagnerian style. The Sixth shows a very strong resemblance to the Symphony No. 2 of Brahms, particularly in the outer movements, though this similarity is belied by the third-movement furiant,


a vivid Czech dance. -Symphony No. 7 in D minor of 1885, Op. 70, is sometimes reckoned to exhibit more formal tautness and greater intensity than the more famous 9th Symphony. There is emotional torment in the Seventh that may reflect personal troubles: around this time, Dvořák was struggling to have his Czech operas accepted in Vienna, feeling pressure to write operas in German, and arguing with his publisher. His sketches show that the Seventh cost him much hard work and soul-searching. -Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88, is, in contrast with the Seventh, characterized by a warmer and more optimistic tone. Karl Schumann (in booklet notes for a recording of all the symphonies by Rafael Kubelík) compares it to the works of Gustav Mahler. As with the Seventh, some feel the Eighth is the best of the symphonies. That some critics feel it necessary to promote a symphony as “better than the Ninth” shows how the immense popularity of the Ninth has overshadowed the earlier works. -Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, may be better known by its subtitle, From the New World, and is also called the New World Symphony. Dvořák wrote it between January and May 1893, while he was in New York. At the time of its first performance, he claimed that he used elements from American music such as spirituals and Native American music in this work, but he later denied this. The first movement has a solo flute passage reminiscent of “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot”, and one of his students later reported that the sec-


ond movement depicted, programmatically, the sobbing of Hiawatha. The second movement was so reminiscent of a negro spiritual that William Arms Fisher wrote lyrics for it and called it “Goin’ Home”. Dvořák was interested in indigenous American music, but in an article published in the New York Herald on December 15, 1893, he wrote, “[In the 9th symphony] I have simply written original themes embodying the peculiarities of the Indian music.” Neil Armstrong took a recording of the New World Symphony to the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission, the first Moon landing, in 1969.


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Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“New World Symphony” redirects here. For the Miami-based orchestra, see New World Symphony Orchestra. “From the New World” redirects here. For other uses, see From the New World (disambiguation). The title page of the autograph score of Dvořák’s ninth symphony The Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” (Op. 95), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 during his visit to the United States from 1892 to 1895. It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular in the modern repertory. Instrumentation This symphony is scored for an orchestra of the following: 2 flutes (one doubling piccolo), 2 oboes (one doubling on cor anglais), 2 clarinets in A(B flat in movt II), 2 bassoons, 4 horns in E and C, 2 trumpets in E, C and E flat, 2 tenor trombones, bass trombone, tuba (second movement only), timpani, triangle (third movement only), cymbals (fourth movement only), and strings.


Movements The piece has four movements: - I. Adagio — Allegro molto - II. Largo - III. Scherzo: Molto vivace — Poco sostenuto - IV. Allegro con fuoco Influences Dvořák was interested in the Native American music and African-American spirituals he heard in America. Upon his arrival in America, he stated: “I am convinced that the future music of this country must be founded on what are called Negro melodies. These can be the foundation of a serious and original school of composition, to be developed in the United States. These beautiful and varied themes are the product of the soil. They are the folk songs of America and your composers must turn to them.” The symphony was commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, and premiered on December 16, 1893 at Carnegie Hall conducted by Anton Seidl. A day earlier, in an article published in the New York Herald on December 15, 1893, Dvořák further explained how Native American music had been an influence on this symphony: “I have not actually used any of the [Native American] melodies. I have simply written original themes embodying the peculiarities of the Indian music, and, using these themes as sub-


jects, have developed them with all the resources of modern rhythms, counterpoint, and orchestral color.” In the same article, Dvořák stated that he regarded the symphony’s second movement as a “sketch or study for a later work, either a cantata or opera ... which will be based upon Longfellow’s [The Song of] Hiawatha” (Dvořák never actually wrote such a piece). He also wrote that the third movement scherzo was “suggested by the scene at the feast in Hiawatha where the Indians dance”. Curiously enough, passages which modern ears perceive as the musical idiom of African-American spirituals may have been intended by Dvořák to evoke a Native American atmosphere. In 1893, a newspaper interview quoted Dvořák as saying “I found that the music of the negroes and of the Indians was practically identical”, and that “the music of the two races bore a remarkable similarity to the music of Scotland”.[4][5] Most historians agree that Dvořák is referring to the pentatonic scale, which is typical of each of these musical traditions. In a 2008 article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, prominent musicologist Joseph Horowitz asserts that African-american spirituals were a major influence on the 9th symphony, quoting Dvořák from an 1893 interview in the New York Herald as saying, “In the negro melodies of America I discover all that is needed for a great


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yctfXIqugXc&hl=it


and noble school of music.” Despite all this, it is generally considered that, like other Dvořák pieces, the work has more in common with folk music of his native Bohemia than with that of the United States. Leonard Bernstein averred that the work was truly multinational in its foundations. Popular reception At the Ninth Symphony’s premiere at Carnegie Hall the reception was one of perpetual cheering. The end of every movement was met with thunderous clapping and Dvořák felt obliged to stand up and bow. In a letter to his publisher Simrock he stated how there was “no getting out of it, and I had to show myself willy-nilly”. Influence on other composers It has been claimed that the theme from the largo was adapted into a spiritual-like song “Goin’ Home,” by black composer Harry Burleigh, whom Dvořák met during his American sojourn, and lyricist William Arms Fisher,[9] but the song was actually written by Fisher and based on Dvořák’s Largo theme. Original manuscript score The score as published has some differences from Dvořák’s manuscript. The published score is the version almost always heard today. However, the original version as written by Dvořák has been championed by the conductor Denis Vaughan, who


performed it for the first time on 17 May 2005 with the London Philharmonic Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall, London.


Jan Valach - Antonín Dvorák, Symphony No. 9 In E Minor, Op. 95 ... Scarica e ascolta in streaming l’album Antonín Dvorák, Symphony No. 9 In E Minor, Op. 95 (From The New World) di Jan Valach su Dada: contiene brani famosi ... www.dada.it/.../antonín-dvorák,-symphonyno.-9-in-e-minor,-op.-95-(from-the-new-world)_ 3055984a.html - Copia cache - Simili Dvorák - Symphony no 9 in E minor, Op. 95/B 178 “From the New ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] Dvorák - Symphony no 9 in E minor, Op. 95/B 178. ... Dvorak: Symphony No 9 / Leonard Bernstein, New York Po Release Date: 09/07/1999 Label: Sony Classical ... www.arkivmusic.com/classical/listPage.jsp?list_ id... - Copia cache - Simili Antonin dvorak symphony no 9 in e minor op 95 Torrent Downloads ... - [ Traduci questa pagina ] If this search for antonin dvorak symphony no 9 in e minor op 95 did not find you the right torrents, try to fine tune your query. At the top you might find ... www.nowtorrents.com/.../antonin-dvorak-symphony-no-9-in-e-minor-op-95.html - Copia cache - Simili


Sinphony n. 9