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Barbarella (1968) Directed by Roger Vadim. With Jane Fonda, John Phillip Law, Anita Pallenberg. In the far future, a highly sexual woman is tasked with finding and stopping ... Photo gallery - Trailers - Plot summary www.imdb.com/title/tt0062711/ - Cached - Similar Barbarella - 1968 3 min - 29 Jan 2006 Rated 4.7 out of 5.0 Barbarella 1968 trailer www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uwNEnh9uaM Barbarella Trailer 3 min 16 sec - 9 May 2008 Rated 4.9 out of 5.0 Trailer www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsPkQt2H4YQ Barbarella (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Barbarella is a 1968 erotic science fiction film directed by Roger Vadim and based on the French


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Barbarella (1968) Directed by Roger Vadim. With Jane Fonda, John Phillip Law, Anita Pallenberg. In the far future, a highly sexual woman is tasked with finding and stopping ... Photo gallery - Trailers - Plot summary www.imdb.com/title/tt0062711/ - Cached - Similar Barbarella - 1968 3 min - 29 Jan 2006 Rated 4.7 out of 5.0 Barbarella 1968 trailer www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uwNEnh9uaM Barbarella Trailer 3 min 16 sec - 9 May 2008 Rated 4.9 out of 5.0 Trailer www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsPkQt2H4YQ Barbarella (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Barbarella is a 1968 erotic science fiction film directed by Roger Vadim and based on the French Barbarella comics from Jean-Claude Forest. ... Plot - Style - Cast - Reception and influence


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarella_(film) - Cached - Similar Barbarella - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 9 Feb 2009 ... Barbarella is a female given name, variant of Barbara. It may also refer to: Barbarella (comics) by Jean-Claude Forest; the origin of the ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbarella - Cached - Similar Show more results from en.wikipedia.org Barbarella ♥ Male Juice 1 min 55 sec - 22 Jan 2007 ♥ Jane Fonda is “ Barbarella “ • 1968 Jus de mâle ... Male Juice www.cyberium.net www.dailymotion.com/video/x11lo3_barbarellamale-juice_fun Barbarella B-Movie Review 9 posts - Last post: 2 Feb 2002 Movie review, sound clips, video clip, and pictures. www.badmovies.org/movies/barbarella/ - Cached - Similar Barbarella Space wanderer Barbarella has various adventures on the planet Lythion. In the second volume, she explores a slow-time planet. In the subsequent volumes, ... www.coolfrenchcomics.com/barbarella.htm


- Cached - Similar Barbarella Headquarter 1968 Science Fiction Movie Barbarella Queen of the Galaxy. membres.lycos.fr/angel/Barbarella/ - Cached - Similar Amazon.com: Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy: Jane Fonda, John ... Amazon.com: Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy: Jane Fonda, John Phillip Law, Anita Pallenberg, Milo Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea, Marcel Marceau, Claude Dauphin, VĂŠronique Vendell, ... www.amazon.com/Barbarella-Queen-Galaxy.../ B00000IREA - Cached - Similar Barbarella Jean-Claude Forest created the character of Barbarella for V-Magazine in 1962, at the request of its editor, Georges H. Gallet, who was already familiar ... www.hollywoodcomics.com/forestbbd.html - Cached - Similar Barbarella images Barbarella on Spectra, the planet where time stands still. Barbarella helps Mado, the female android. Barbarella becomes a mother in the third graphic novel ... www.hollywoodcomics.com/forestbarbgallery. Barbarella opening title sequence | The Art of the Title Sequence


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Barbarella (film) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Barbarella is a 1968 erotic science fiction film directed by Roger Vadim and based on the French Barbarella comics from Jean-Claude Forest. Plot Set in the 40th century, Barbarella follows the adventures of its title character played by Jane Fonda. In the film, Barbarella is assigned by the President of Earth to retrieve Doctor Durand Durand from the planet SoGo in order to save the earth. Beyond this premise, the plot is very loose, serving mostly as an excuse for Barbarella to end up in erotic situations. On her quest to find Durand Durand, Barbarella is seduced by a human resident of SoGo, who introduces her to penetrative intercourse (civilized people of Barbarellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s society find sexual release through pharmaceuticals), seduces an angel named Pygar, and overloads a torture device (called the Excessive Machine) which kills through sexual pleasure. Style Barbarella is famous for a sequence in which the


title character, played by Jane Fonda, undresses in zero gravity during the opening credits. The whole film is played in a tongue-in-cheek manner; especially when it comes to the frequent (but not explicit) sex scenes. The most controversial of those scenes involves Barbarella being tortured by the use of a piano-like instrument that delivers sexual pleasure in doses that can be lethal, although Barbarella survives the ordeal and is visibly disappointed when it is discovered she has overloaded the machine. The film was simultaneously shot in French and English. Some charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lines were performed by the same actors in both languages; others were not: - In the French version, Fonda performs her own lines in French. - Marcel Marceauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lines are dubbed into English. De Laurentiis returned to camp science fiction (but with far less erotica) with 1980s Flash Gordon. Cast - Jane Fonda as Barbarella - John Phillip Law as Pygar, the angel - Anita Pallenberg as The Great Tyrant, Black


Queen of Sogo (voiced dubbed by Joan Greenwood) - Milo O’Shea as Durand-Durand - Marcel Marceau as Professor Ping - David Hemmings as Dildano - Claude Dauphin as President Dianthus of Earth - Ugo Tognazzi as Mark Hand Reception and influence The film was both a box office and critical failure on its release. Variety’s review stated that “Despite a certain amount of production dash and polish and a few silly-funny lines of dialogue, Barbarella isn’t very much of a film. Based on what has been called an adult comic strip, the Dino De Laurentiis production is flawed with a cast that is not particularly adept at comedy, a flat script, and direction which can’t get this beached whale afloat.” Another major critic[who?] at the time claimed the film was a “mix of poor special effects and the Marquis de Sade.”[citation needed]However, it has gained a cult following since its re-release in 1977 on home video, and has had considerable influence on pop and film culture in the decades following its original release.[citation needed] Jane Fonda has subsequently lamented the fact that she turned down starring roles in two major hit films, Bonnie and Clyde and Rosemary’s Baby to stay in France and star in Barbarella, which was being directed by


her then husband Roger Vadim. Music Soundtrack The filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s score was also popular and obtained a cult following. The music was composed by Bob Crewe and Charles Fox. During his first European tour in 1967 Frank Zappa flew from Copenhagen to Italy to meet Vadim and Fonda in order to discuss the possibility of him composing the music for the film. It never happened, but Frank Zappa remained faithful to his love for sci-fi, and composed several tributes to the genre. Influence In the world of comics, the manga artists collectively known as CLAMP parodied Barbarella in one chapter of their Miyuki-chan in Wonderland, the chapter titled TV no Kuni no Miyuki-chan (Miyukichan in TV Land) shows several of the characters (including some female versions) trying to seduce the main character. The manga contains heavy lesbian overtones. In 2008 the indie pop singer Lights made a Barbarella-themed music video for her song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drive My Soulâ&#x20AC;?. From 1988 to 2002, a nightclub in downtown Orlando, Florida was called Barbarella, inspired


by the film. Although the club is still open, it has changed its name to Independent Bar. In episode 1 of the anime F3: Frantic, Frustrated & Female, Hiroe finds herself strapped to a chair by a mad scientist in order to test out a sex machine, parodying Barbarella’s situation with Durand Durand. 1980s - Duran Duran, one of the most influential British music bands of the 1980s, took their name from Barbarella character Durand Durand. They have frequently referenced the movie and character - When the 1980s girl group Fuzzbox could not get permission to use the Thunderbirds of the British TV series for their song International Rescue. They spoofed Barbarella with Adrian Edmondson playing the Durand Durand character. They also featured their faithful cover version of the theme song on the single’s B-side. - The American pop band The Bongos recorded a song called “Barbarella” on their RCA EP “Numbers With Wings”. It became a college radio favorite and dancefloor hit in 1983.[citation needed] 1990s Another famous singer to use the iconography of Barbarella in a pop video was Kylie Minogue who recreated the infamous zero-gravity strip-tease in


her award winning 1994 video for “Put Yourself in My Place”. It was again recreated in the European video for Jem’s 2005 single “They”. In 1998, front man Scott Weiland of the bands Stone Temple Pilots and Velvet Revolver released a solo album entitled 12 Bar Blues. The hit song from that album which spawned a music video was titled “Barbarella”. The lyrics of the song pay homage to several science fiction television shows and movies. The band Matmos takes its name from the underground fluid creature in the film. The Finnish rock band The 69 Eyes also recorded a song called “Barbarella” released in Bump ‘n’ Grind album in 1992. The song’s intro starts with Barbarella speaking; that was taken from the original movie. Duran Duran The band Duran Duran takes its name from the mad scientist Dr. Durand Durand. O’Shea repaid the compliment by appearing (as an older version of Durand Durand) in Arena, the band’s 1985 concert film. (Though the Arena DVD subtitles spell the villain’s name as “Duran Duran”.) Some of the band’s early appearances were at a


nightclub called Barbarella’s, in their home town of Birmingham, England. The band has continually used sound clips from the film in their songs, most notably 1989’s “Burning The Ground” and the remixes for 1990’s “Violence Of Summer”. The band continued the homage to its roots with their 1997 US single, “Electric Barbarella” (released in the UK in 1998). Stephen Duffy, an original member of Duran Duran, released a solo song titled “Barbarellas” on his 1998 I Love My Friends album. Special effects The psychedelic “blob” patterns that form much of the special effects in the film are created using an oil wheel projector, a popular visual effects device also used in many other ‘60s movies, as well as in many anti-drug educational films. Remake A remake of Barbarella is planned. It will be penned by current James Bond writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, and produced by Dino and Martha De Laurentiis. It was recently announced that Sin City director Robert Rodriguez is slated to direct the remake for Universal Studios.The remake of Barbarella was originally planned in the 1990s with Roger Vadim as director, and actresses Sherilyn Fenn and Drew Barrymore were considered for


the title role. As of May 2007, it was announced that actress Erica Durance of the WB’s Smallville was a front-runner for a 2008 remake. However, subsequent reports have identified British actress Sienna Miller as the favorite to take the role, along with Rodriguez’s Grindhouse star Rose McGowan. According to Elle magazine, McGowan has been cast in the title role. According to the New York Observer, Universal Studios has backed out of funding the movie because of Rodriguez’s insistence to cast McGowan in the title role. Executives reportedly do not think that she can carry a movie with a budget close to $100 million. Once Universal learned of Rodriguez’s decision to cast McGowan they slashed the budget significantly. Rodriguez denies this, saying, “Universal had initially signed on for $60 million, but then when we were done with the script it wound up at closer to $82 million.” The filmmaker is currently shopping the project around to other studios in the hopes of getting more money. He has cited the fact that most of the movie takes place in outer space as the reason for the rise in budget, and that “we don’t want the movie to look like the original.” Rodriguez backed out of the project, and in June 2009, Entertainment Weekly reported that Robert Luketic will be directing the remake with a different studio.


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Barbarella (comics) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Barbarella is a fictional heroine in the French science fiction comic book created by JeanClaude Forest. He created the character for serialisation in the French magazine V-Magazine in spring 1962, and in 1964 Eric Losfeld later published these strips as a stand-alone book, under the title Barbarella. The stand-alone version caused a scandal and became known as the first “adult” comic-book, despite its eroticism being slight and the existence of the Tijuana bibles well before this date. Its traditional editor, however, contrasted with its subject matter, anticipating as it did the sexual revolution. Barbarella is a young woman who travels from planet to planet and has numerous adventures, often involving sex (the aliens she meets often seduce her, and she also experiments with a “machine excessive” or “orgasmotron”). The original comic book version of Barbarella was probably modeled on Brigitte Bardot, who was once married to the director of the 1968 film, Roger Vadim; Jane Fonda appeared in the film’s title role. For her creator, the character embodied the mod-


ern woman in the era of sexual liberation.later switched to philosophy. The 2009 biopic Little Ashes gives an account of the relationship of Dalí, Lorca, and Buñuel at this time. film glorifying Hitler, Triumph of the Will (1934). In his autobiography, The Secret Life of Salvador Dalí (1942), Dalí suggested that he had split with Buñuel because the latter was a Communist and an atheist. Buñuel was fired (or resigned) from MOMA, supposedly after Cardinal Spellman of New York went to see Iris Barry, head of the film department at MOMA. Buñuel then went back to Hollywood where he worked in the dubbing department of Warner Brothers from 1942 to 1946. In his 1982 autobiography Mon Dernier soupir (English translation My Last Sigh published 1983), Buñuel wrote that he submitted a treatment to Warners about a disembodied hand which was later adapted (without his consent and without paying him royalties) into The Beast with Five Fingers (1946) with Peter Lorre. Buñuel also wrote that, over the years, he rejected Dalí’s attempts at reconciliation. In 1972, Buñuel, along with his screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière and producer Serge Silberman, was invited by George Cukor to his house. This gathering was particularly memorable and


other invitees included Alfred Hitchcock, Rouben Mamoulian, Robert Mulligan, George Stevens, Billy Wilder, Robert Wise and William Wyler. Other characters - Duran : A one-eyed old man who helps Barbarella. - Pygar, A blind ‘angel’ guided by Barbarella, he is the last of the ornithanthropes (bird-men). - La Reine noire (The black queen) : A villainess who reigns in the town of Sogo, surrounded by a maze, on the planet Lythion. - Lio : A brown-haired teenage girl saved by Barbarella who must save the town governed by her father in Les Colères du mange-minutes. (The chanteuse Lio drew her stage name from this character.) - Mado : Male gigolo robot (gynoïde), whose “breakdown” Barbarella repairs. - Narval, an “aiguiote” (aquatic man) who comes from Citerne IV to complete his scientific research in Les Colères du mange-minutes. - “L’artiste”, a self-portrait of Jean-Claude Forest. In Semble Lune he and Barbarella have a child together. Bibliography - Barbarella (originally serialized in “V-Magazine”, 1962; book by Eric Losfeld, 1964) - Les Colères du Mange-Minutes [The Wrath Of The


Minute Eater] (Kesselring, 1974) - Le Semble-Lune [The False Moon] (Horay, 1977) - Le Miroir aux Tempêtes [The Storm Mirror] (Albin Michel, 1982) (art by Daniel Billon) Barbarella also guest-stars in Mystérieuse, Matin, Midi et Soir [Mysterious, Morning, Noon And Evening] (originally serialized in “Pif”, 1971; book: Serg, 1972) Barbarella was translated into English and published in the Evergreen Review (nos. 37-39 (19651966)) and Heavy Metal (v.1 no. 11 through v.2 no. 3 (1978)).


- Cached - Similar Barbarella Headquarter 1968 Science Fiction Movie Barbarella Queen of the Galaxy. membres.lycos.fr/angel/Barbarella/ - Cached - Similar Amazon.com: Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy: Jane Fonda, John ... Amazon.com: Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy: Jane Fonda, John Phillip Law, Anita Pallenberg, Milo Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea, Marcel Marceau, Claude Dauphin, VĂŠronique Vendell, ... www.amazon.com/Barbarella-Queen-Galaxy.../ B00000IREA - Cached - Similar Barbarella Jean-Claude Forest created the character of Barbarella for V-Magazine in 1962, at the request of its editor, Georges H. Gallet, who was already familiar ... www.hollywoodcomics.com/forestbbd.html - Cached - Similar Barbarella images Barbarella on Spectra, the planet where time stands still. Barbarella helps Mado, the female android. Barbarella becomes a mother in the third graphic novel ... www.hollywoodcomics.com/forestbarbgallery. Barbarella opening title sequence | The Art of the Title Sequence


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